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Shipwrecked ivory a treasure trove for understanding elephants and 16th century trading
An international collaboration of researchers in Namibia, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States reporting in the journal Current Biology on December 17 have found that the cargo of a 16th century shipwreck known as the Bom Jesu included more than 100 elephant tusks, which paleogenomic and isotopic analyses trace to many distinct herds that once roamed West Africa.
6h
Astronomers detect possible radio emission from exoplanet
By monitoring the cosmos with a radio telescope array, a Cornell University-led international team of scientists has detected radio bursts emanating from the constellation Boötes. The signal could be the first radio emission collected from a planet beyond our solar system.
1d
Studie: Pas på ulfrafine partikler fra 3D-printere i hjemmet
ABS-plast udleder så mange ultrafine partikler, når den opvarmes i en 3D-printer, at det udgør en sundhedsmæssig risiko for mennesker, især børn. Problemet opstår især med de mange billige 3D-printere.
11h
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LATEST

A Week of Record Deaths. Again.
This week, American health-care workers started receiving their first doses of a new COVID-19 vaccine. Early data have shown that the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine is safe and highly effective , reaching 95 percent efficacy about a week after the second of two doses. The second COVID-19 vaccine under evaluation for use in the United States is expected to receive an FDA emergency use authorization as so
24min
Scientists set a path for field trials of gene drive organisms
Setting a course for responsible testing of powerful gene drive technology, a multidisciplinary coalition of gene drive organism developers, ecologists and conservation biologists has joined experts in social science, ethics and policy in a policy article published in Science. The group describes core commitments that ensure that gene drive organism field trials are safely implemented, transparent
27min
Polariton interactions: Light matters
Why do 2D exciton-polaritons interact? This intriguing quasiparticle, which is part light (photon), and part matter (exciton), doesn't behave as predicted: continuing to interact with other particles when confined to two dimensions in extremely cold conditions. A new study finds the answer lies in the 'light-like' characteristics of these quasiparticles, with importance for future applications suc
27min
Ultra-thin designer materials unlock quantum phenomena
New research has measured highly sought-after Majorana quantum states.
27min
States Complain of Smaller Vaccine Shipments Than Expected
The smaller number of expected doses, which appeared to be the result of a scheduling hiccup, reignited tensions between the federal government and Pfizer over vaccine supply.
27min
Scientists set a path for field trials of gene drive organisms
Setting a course for responsible testing of powerful gene drive technology, a multidisciplinary coalition of gene drive organism developers, ecologists and conservation biologists has joined experts in social science, ethics and policy in a policy article published in Science. The group describes core commitments that ensure that gene drive organism field trials are safely implemented, transparent
30min
Taking greenhouse gas analysis on the road, er, rails
Since 2014, there have been research-grade suites of air quality instruments installed and maintained on light rail trains that move throughout the Salt Lake Valley every day. These mobile sensors, researchers estimate in a new study, cover the same area as 30 stationary sensors, providing the Salt Lake Valley with a highly cost-effective way to monitor its greenhouse emissions and fill in gaps in
30min
Can water saving traits help wine survive climate change?
Climate change is expected to make many grape-growing regions too hot and dry to produce high-quality wine from traditional varieties. But scientists have found that wine grape varieties from regions that are more prone to stress have traits that could help them cope with climate change.
30min
Ultra-thin designer materials unlock quantum phenomena
New research has measured highly sought-after Majorana quantum states.
30min
Seeking to avoid 'full lockdown,' cells monitor ribosome collisions
New research shows that cells monitor for ribosome collisions to determine the severity of the problem and how best to respond when things start to go awry.
30min
Cataract surgery in infancy increases glaucoma risk
Children who undergo cataract surgery as infants have a 22% risk of glaucoma 10 years later, whether or not they receive an intraocular lens implant.
30min
Former CIA Director Says UFO Videos Are "Quite Eyebrow-Raising"
Eyebrow-Raising In a new interview, former CIA director John Brennan, who served under Obama for four years, grappled with the Pentagon UFO videos that surfaced publicly in a New York Times investigative report back in 2017. "I've seen some of those videos from Navy pilots, and I must tell you that they are quite eyebrow-raising when you look at them," Brennan said in the interview , which was co
32min
33min
US needs clear vaccine distribution strategy to defeat coronavirus
An opinion piece published today online calls for a national vaccine strategy now that COVID-19 vaccines are available. The author writes that a lack of clarity on a distribution plan sets unrealistic expectations among the public and could undermine public trust. But even with a clearly defined strategy in place, vaccinating hundreds of millions of Americans will not be easy.
40min
Northern Ireland imposes 6-week lockdown from Boxing Day
Republic of Ireland also likely to tighten restrictions between Christmas Day and new year
48min
The First Major Anti-MLM Platform
This week, when TikTok announced an updated version of its community guidelines, one small addition was more surprising than the others. Under a section of policy prohibiting various types of "Frauds and Scams"—which used to focus on outright Ponzi schemes, get-rich-quick hoaxes, and phishing attempts—the company became the first major social-media platform to declare that multilevel marketing wa
52min
F.D.A. Panel Endorses Moderna's Coronavirus Vaccine
An advisory group's recommendation will mean millions more Americans can be inoculated, extending protection against Covid beyond major urban areas into rural and suburban regions.
57min
Will Ghost Sharks Vanish Before Scientists Can Study Them?
Much remains to be learned about the cartilaginous, little understood fishes that inhabit the deep-sea.
57min
Believe in learners. Education that empowers people, empowers society.
Education should fuel lifelong learning that encourages every individual to discover, develop, and deploy their unique aptitudes to improve their life and society. To improve education, we need more approaches that are individualized — based on a student's aptitudes and interests. We can make a difference by empowering people to create bottom-up solutions that help individuals unlock their potent
58min
How climate change is disrupting ecosystems
When it gets warmer, organisms rise higher from the lowlands. Researchers investigated what could happen to plant communities on alpine grasslands if grasshoppers from lower elevations settled there.
59min
Oceans without oxygen
With no dissolved oxygen to sustain animals or plants, ocean anoxic zones are areas where only microbes suited to the environment can live.
59min
Polariton interactions: Light matters
Why do 2D exciton-polaritons interact? This intriguing quasiparticle, which is part light (photon), and part matter (exciton), doesn't behave as predicted: continuing to interact with other particles when confined to two dimensions in extremely cold conditions. A new study finds the answer lies in the 'light-like' characteristics of these quasiparticles, with importance for future applications suc
59min
Study tracks elephant tusks from 16th century shipwreck
In 1533, the Bom Jesus – a Portuguese trading vessel carrying 40 tons of cargo including gold, silver, copper and more than 100 elephant tusks – sank off the coast of Africa near present-day Namibia. The wreck was found in 2008, and scientists say they now have determined the source of much of the ivory recovered from the ship.
59min
Change in global precipitation patterns as a result of climate change
Earth's climate system is largely determined by the differences in temperature between the tropics and the poles. Global warming is likely to cause global atmospheric circulation to change and progressively revert to a situation similar to that of 5,000 to 10,000 years ago.
59min
SARS-CoV-2-like particles very sensitive to temperature
A new study found that moderate temperature increases on glass surfaces broke down SARS-CoV-2 virus-like particles structure, while humidity had very little impact. The findings suggest that as temperatures begin to drop, particles on surfaces will remain infectious longer. This is the first study to analyze the mechanics of the virus on an individual particle level, but the findings agree with la
1h
Biden's EPA Pick Seems to Actually Care About the Environment
Picking Teams U.S. President-elect Joe Biden reportedly plans to nominate Michael Regan as head of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). And in a breath of fresh air after the Trump administration's years of environmentally-destructive decisions , it seems that Regan actually believes in protecting the environment and acting against climate change, The New York Times reports . Based on Regan
1h
IBM, Fujifilm Set New Areal Density Record With 580TB Tape Cartridge
Fujifilm and IBM have announced a world record in new tape storage density. According to the two companies, breakthroughs like this are necessary if the world's storage capacity is going to keep up with the demands of future systems. The global "datasphere" — the total amount of information created, captured, copied, and consumed in a given year — is expected to rise from an estimated 33ZB (zetta
1h
Improving hospital nurse staffing is associated with fewer deaths from sepsis
According to a new study published in American Journal of Infection Control, improving nurse staffing as proposed in pending legislation in New York state would likely save lives of sepsis patients and save money by reducing the length of hospital stays.
1h
Giant iceberg A68a has 'fender bender' moment
The huge iceberg bumps into shallow seafloor off South Georgia island and knocks off a corner.
1h
13 books everyone should read and why—as voted by you
We asked BigThink's readers and staff for their recommendations on books everyone should read. A collection of fiction and non-fiction works from around the world spanning millennia, these books will expand your horizons. Many of these books are long out of copyright, and can be read for free. Do you ever want to read more but find yourself unsure of what to read? Lots of people have the same pro
1h
Best Streaming Devices: Watch anything your heart desires
No matter what content you want to watch, these streaming devices have got you covered. (Nicolas J Leclercq via Unsplash/) In the past few years, streaming has gone from an alternate to television to the new definition of television. The concept of "network" TV is becoming more and more obsolete as binge-watching and subscriptions have replaced channel surfing and rigid program scheduling. Using
1h
COVID-19 virus enters the brain, research strongly suggests
The SARS-CoV-2 virus, like many viruses before it, is bad news for the brain. In a new study, researchers found that the spike protein, often depicted as the red arms of the virus, can cross the blood-brain barrier in mice. The spike proteins alone can cause brain fog. Since the spike protein enters the brain, the virus also is likely to cross into the brain.
1h
Study in mice shows genes may be altered through drug repurposing
Researchers screened drugs that can enhance the PAX6 gene and found MEK inhibitors can stimulate PAX6 expression in the eye. They tested this drug in newborn PAX6 deficient mice and found that either topical or oral administration of the drug enhanced PAX6 and partially normalized their eye development. Mice treated with topical MEK inhibitor had clearer corneas (less scarring) and could see bette
1h
Build Your Own Transforming Robot With The Robosen T9
Sure, we can pretend to soberly assess articles informing us that there are more and more robots that turn into vehicles , and vice versa. But if we're really being honest, who among us doesn't want a robot friend who can change into a car on command? The Robosen T9 Programmable Robot is the mechanical buddy you've wished for, and it's also a good way to learn about robotics and programming. Curr
1h
Biden To Pick North Carolina Regulator Michael Regan To Lead EPA
Regan is the top environmental regulator for North Carolina. He would be first African American man to run the EPA, and he would oversee much of the federal government's response to climate change. (Image credit: North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality)
1h
A Supermassive Black Hole Is Missing, NASA Says
Astronomers have spotted a distant galaxy cluster without the expected supermassive black hole at its center — despite the fact that its mass should be somewhere between three and 100 billion times that of the Sun. The black hole was theorized to be in the galaxy cluster Abell 2261, about 2.7 billion light years from Earth, according to observations made between 1999 and 2004, according to a NASA
1h
Method transforms plastic bags into useful adhesive
A new chemical process converts polyethylene plastic into a strong adhesive, researchers report. While many cities and eight states have banned single-use plastics, bags and other polyethylene packaging still clog landfills and pollute rivers and oceans. One major problem with recycling polyethylene, which makes up one-third of all plastic production worldwide, is economic: Recycled bags end up i
1h
How long's too long? Effects of crosslinker length on anion-exchange membrane fuel cells
Anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells (AEMFCs), which produce electricity using hydrogen, are considered an alternative to currently used proton exchange membrane fuel cells. However, AEMs have problems with stability in alkaline conditions, which can be overcome by crosslinking–but effects of crosslinker length on AEMFC performance are not well understood. Now, scientists from Korea have eluc
1h
Insects Pass Antiviral Immunity to Offspring
In both Drosophila and mosquitoes, protection lasts for generations following a single maternal exposure to positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses.
1h
How climate change is disrupting ecosystems
The world is getting warmer and warmer—and many organisms native to lower latitudes or elevations are moving higher.
1h
Researchers dive into the biogeochemistry of ocean anoxic zones
With no dissolved oxygen to sustain animals or plants, ocean anoxic zones are areas where only microbes suited to the environment can live.
1h
New study measures neighborhood inequality and violence based on everyday mobility
A new study looking at the patterns of movement from 400,000 people offers fresh insights into how a neighborhood's economic conditions mixed with the mobility patterns of its residents and visitors relates to the well-being of the neighborhood and can serve as a predictor of violence.
1h
How climate change is disrupting ecosystems
The world is getting warmer and warmer—and many organisms native to lower latitudes or elevations are moving higher.
1h
The shadow pandemic of domestic violence during COVID-19 | Kemi DaSilva-Ibru
Mandatory lockdowns, quarantines and shelter-in-place orders meant to contain COVID-19 have created a shadow pandemic of domestic abuse, says physician Kemi DaSilva-Ibru. Sharing alarming statistics on the rise of gender-based violence worldwide, she describes how Nigeria quickly retrained a squadron of basic health care providers to respond to the crisis — and shares lesson other countries can a
1h
A new means of neuronal communication discovered in the human brain
An international research group has discovered in the human brain a new functional coupling mechanism between neurons, which may serve as a communication channel between brain regions.
1h
Fertilizer runoff in streams and rivers can have cascading effects, analysis shows
Fertilizer pollution can have significant ripple effects in the food webs of streams and rivers, according to a new analysis of global data.
1h
Weddell sea: Whale song reveals behavioral patterns
Scientists have now used permanently installed underwater microphones, which have been recording for the past nine years, to successfully gather and analyze whale observation data from the Weddell Sea. The AWI's underwater recordings confirm: Minke whales prefer the shelter of sea ice, while humpback whales avoid it.
1h
AI could mine the past for faster, better weather forecasts
Artificial intelligence can analyze past weather patterns to predict future events, much more efficiently and potentially someday more accurately than today's technology, researchers say. Today's weather forecasts come from some of the most powerful computers on Earth. The huge machines churn through millions of calculations to solve equations to predict temperature, wind, rainfall, and other wea
1h
UMD paves the way for growing human organs for transplantation with new proof-of-concept
With the number of people who suffer from organ failures and the growing need for available organs for transplant, finding a new way to provide organs and therapeutic options to transplant patients is a critical need. In a new paper, University of Maryland researchers show for the first time that newly established stem cells from pigs could provide a solution, laying the groundwork for growing tra
1h
Fibrous protein finding may lead to improved bioprinting, tissue engineering
Fibrous proteins such as collagen and fibrinogen form a thin solid layer on the surface of an aqueous solution similar to the 'skin' that forms on warm milk, according to a team of Penn State Researchers, who believe this finding could lead to more efficient bioprinting and tissue engineering.
1h
New Protocol Advances Toward Lab-Made Universal Red Blood Cells
Researchers report a new way of generating the cells from induced pluripotent stem cells in hopes they will one day be used in blood transfusions.
2h
How to get a true 4K experience on Netflix
Sit back, relax, and enjoy the best Netflix experience possible. (Mollie Sivaram/Unsplash/) Netflix continues to be one of the go-to streaming services for on-demand entertainment, and a big part of its appeal is the multiple ways you can access it—from virtual reality headsets, smartphones, and the Amazon Echo Show smart displays to name a few. But not all of these devices give you the very best
2h
Science's Breakthrough of the Year 2020: shots of hope in a pandemic-ravaged world
Swiftly developed vaccines may curb COVID-19, even as second pandemic of misinformation rages
2h
Cross-species recognition of SARS-CoV-2 to bat ACE2 [Microbiology]
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has emerged as a major threat to global health. Although varied SARS-CoV-2–related coronaviruses have been isolated from bats and SARS-CoV-2 may infect bat, the structural basis for SARS-CoV-2 to utilize the human receptor counterpart bat…
2h
Profile of Raul Padron [Profiles]
Over the past four decades, structural biologist Raúl Padrón has elucidated muscle contraction at the molecular and atomic level using a model system that he and his colleague Roger Craig developed: tarantula skeletal muscle. Padrón's research on how skeletal muscle thick filaments relax and become activated is helping to inform…
2h
Opinion: Being Scientists Doesn't Make Us Science Communicators
Effectively relating science to the public is a science in itself, and expertise on a topic doesn't guarantee expertise in explaining it.
2h
To put focus on inequality, talk disadvantages
Information about economic inequality that focuses on the disadvantages facing people from the lower-socioeconomic class leads Americans to engage more with the issue, research finds. This strategy also leads Americans to express greater support for action to mitigate inequality. Researchers find that information about economic inequality focusing on the disadvantages facing people from the lower
2h
New study measures neighborhood inequality and violence based on everyday mobility
A new study looking at the patterns of movement from 400,000 people offers fresh insights into how a neighborhood's economic conditions mixed with the mobility patterns of its residents and visitors relates to the well-being of the neighborhood and can serve as a predictor of violence. The theory argues that a neighborhood's well-being depends not only on its own socioeconomic conditions but on th
2h
Protein linked to progressive lung scarring in scleroderma patients
Osteopontin is discovered as the culprit behind systemic sclerosis patients' main cause of death: lung fibrosis. However, a repurposed immunosuppressive drug may combat the pro-inflammatory protein.
2h
Mission to MAARS: Long non-coding RNA may play a key role in cardiovascular disease
Through utilization of genetically modified high-risk atherosclerotic mice, a research team from Brigham and Women's Hospital identified and characterized Macrophage-Associated Atherosclerosis lncRNA Sequence (MAARS), which is expressed specifically in macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques and contributes to the progression of the disease.
2h
Video: Will it kombucha?
Kombucha is a bubbly, fermented tea that has gained popularity in the health and wellness scene over the last decade—but what is it exactly?
2h
Smart fabric collects space dust on International Space Station
An Army-funded smart fiber being tested on the International Space Station could be used to develop space dust telescopes and allow astronauts to feel through their pressurized suits.
2h
Researcher boosts vegetable oil production in plant leaves
Since antiquity, cultures around the world have been extracting vegetable oil from plants to use as food and fuel. Some vegetable oils have important health benefits, including lowering cholesterol levels and decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease.
2h
Researchers create entangled photons 100 times more efficiently than previously possible
Super-fast quantum computers and communication devices could revolutionize countless aspects of our lives—but first, researchers need a fast, efficient source of the entangled pairs of photons such systems use to transmit and manipulate information. Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have done just that, not only creating a chip-based photon source 100 times more efficient that previou
2h
Territorial red squirrels live longer when they're friendly with their neighbors
Researchers found that red squirrels in the Yukon have a greater chance of survival when living near neighbors. These fitness benefits depended on familiarity, or how long the same squirrels lived next to each other. These benefits were more pronounced in older squirrels, whom the data suggested could sharply offset the effects of aging by maintaining all of their neighbors from one year to the ne
2h
Researchers discover brain area crucial for recognizing visual events
Researchers report that a brain region in the superior temporal sulcus (fSTS) is crucial for processing and making decisions about visual information.
2h
Researchers discover brain pattern that could improve mental health disorder diagnosis
A pattern in how the brain breaks down tryptophan, a common amino acid consumed through food, was discovered.
2h
What's up, Skip? Kangaroos really can 'talk' to us, study finds
Animals that have never been domesticated, such as kangaroos, can intentionally communicate with humans, challenging the notion that this behavior is usually restricted to domesticated animals like dogs, horses or goats, a new study has found.
2h
Talking to kids about weight: What the internet says and why researchers are wary
Researchers systematically reviewed numerous independently published guidelines for having conversations with children about weight status to analyze their content, consistency, actionability and scientific support. They recommend future guidelines unify their messages and be better supported by scholarly data.
2h
Crops near Chernobyl still contaminated
Crops grown near Chernobyl are still contaminated due to the 1986 nuclear accident, new research shows.
2h
Computational model reveals how the brain manages short-term memories
Scientists have developed a new computational model showing how the brain maintains information short-term using specific types of neurons. Their findings could help shed light on why working memory is impaired in a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, as well as in normal aging.
2h
Antifungal drug improves key cystic fibrosis biomarkers in clinical study
A drug widely used to treat fungal infections improved key biomarkers in lung tissue cultures as well as in the noses of patients with cystic fibrosis, a clinical study found.
2h
Transforming clean energy technology
A team of researchers has developed a new method of harnessing solar energy, moving us closer to a clean energy future.
2h
More West Nile virus-infected mosquitoes in lower-income areas of Baltimore
Researchers found higher rates of West Nile virus-infected mosquitoes in lower-income neighborhoods in urban areas of Baltimore, Maryland. This preliminary data provides another piece of the puzzle pointing to higher risk of mosquito-transmitted diseases in these neighborhoods already struggling with environmental injustices and poorer health outcomes.
2h
Researcher boosts vegetable oil production in plant leaves
Since antiquity, cultures around the world have been extracting vegetable oil from plants to use as food and fuel. Some vegetable oils have important health benefits, including lowering cholesterol levels and decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease.
2h
NHS hospitals running out of beds as Covid cases continue to surge
Hospitals in England had to divert patients 44 times last week – the highest number for four years Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Growing numbers of hospitals in England are running short of beds and having to divert patients elsewhere and cancel operations as the NHS struggles to cope with the resurgence of coronavirus, a Guardian analysis shows. According to the N
2h
10 Best LLC Services – Top LLC Formation Services 2021
Looking for the best LLC service on the market? Look no further since we have a list of the best LLC formation services in 2021.
2h
Research takes the chill off icy build-up on planes and wind turbines
New UBC Okanagan research is changing the way aircraft and wind turbine operators are addressing the risks related to ice build-up.
2h
Machine learning boosts the search for 'superhard' materials
Superhard materials are in high demand in industry, from energy production to aerospace, but finding suitable new materials has largely been a matter of trial and error based on classical materials such as diamonds. Until now.
2h
Can water saving traits help wine survive climate change?
Climate change is expected to make many grape-growing regions too hot and dry to produce high-quality wine from traditional varieties. But scientists at the University of California, Davis, have found that wine grape varieties from regions that are more prone to stress have traits that could help them cope with climate change.
2h
The Big Sleep: How We Hibernate
As December deepens, we rapidly find ourselves coming up on the first day of winter. Though winter officially begins on the 21st, many animals began their preparations for the season far earlier this year. Any birdwatcher could easily tell you that most birds migrated south a long while ago, and any hiker could tell you […]
2h
Space Force Claims That Russia Just Tested an Anti-Satellite Missile
Anti-Satellite Missiles According to US Space Command (USSC) officials, Russia has launched a new anti-satellite missile test, Space.com reports . The test involved a direct-ascent anti-satellite (DA-ASAT) missile that is designed to destroy small satellites in low Earth orbit. It's Russia's third anti-satellite test this year alone. Weaponizing Space American officials are irate. "Russia publicl
2h
Oceans without oxygen
With no dissolved oxygen to sustain animals or plants, ocean anoxic zones are areas where only microbes suited to the environment can live.
2h
Research strongly suggests COVID-19 virus enters the brain
The SARS-CoV-2 virus, like many viruses before it, is bad news for the brain. In a study published Dec. 16, 2020 in Nature Neuroscience, researchers found that the spike protein, often depicted as the red arms of the virus, can cross the blood-brain barrier in mice. The spike proteins alone can cause brain fog. Since the spike protein enters the brain, the virus also is likely to cross into the br
2h
How climate change is disrupting ecosystems
When it gets warmer, organisms rise higher from the lowlands. Swiss Researchers investigated what could happen to plant communities on alpine grasslands if grasshoppers from lower elevations settled there.
2h
Infant circumcision may lead to social challenges as an adult undergoing circumcision as an infant
Undergoing circumcision as an infant has delayed psychological complications. This is shown by an international study led by researchers from Aarhus University.
2h
Developing new classification criteria for improving antiphospholipid syndrome research
An international team of more than 80 collaborators led by Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) investigators is developing new classification criteria for clinical research of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), a life-threatening autoimmune clotting disorder. In a paper published online in Arthritis Care & Research, the investigators reported on the first two of four phases of criteria development.
2h
Taking greenhouse gas analysis on the road, er, rails
Research-grade air quality sensors are costly—around $40,000. For cities trying to monitor their greenhouse gas emissions, the cost may limit the number of sensors they can install and the data they can collect.
2h
Can water saving traits help wine survive climate change?
Climate change is expected to make many grape-growing regions too hot and dry to produce high-quality wine from traditional varieties. But scientists at the University of California, Davis, have found that wine grape varieties from regions that are more prone to stress have traits that could help them cope with climate change.
2h
40 more states have targeted Google with its third antitrust lawsuit in two months
Forty attorneys general representing both Republican- and Democratic-led states and territories have filed a new antitrust lawsuit against Google claiming that the company has "virtually untrammeled power over internet search traffic" as a result of its "overwhelming and durable monopoly in general internet searches." The move comes one day after another complaint filed by Texas and nine other st
2h
You Can't Stop Aging. But Thanks To Advanced Science, You Can Age Better.
Despite the nonsensical claims of many anti aging products, there's nothing we can do to "stop" or "reverse" or "defy" the aging process. We're all going to get old, so obsessing over the superficial signs of aging is just a waste of time and money. What we should be doing is trying to find a way to age better . And thanks to the team of scientists and Nobel Prize winners at Elysium Health , now
2h
Gifts to turn any coffee-lover's kitchen into a cafe
Some say coffee tastes even better if you make it yourself. (Jeremy Ricketts/Unsplash/) It's hard not to love local coffee shops. They're often run by members of your community, and they're a great place to hang out, catch up, or get work done (in non-pandemic times, at least). Each one also has a unique menu and drinks you probably won't find elsewhere. But COVID means it's not always responsibl
2h
Is lightning striking the Arctic more than ever before?
Nature, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03561-1 Team detects a huge increase and says it could be due to climate change, but others can't confirm the findings.
2h
Investigating the carbon intensity of ferries
Climate change mitigation requires curbing emissions from all sectors, including shipping. The European Union has set ambitious targets to achieve this goal. The European regulation number 757 on Monitoring, Reporting, and Verification of CO2 emissions (EU-MRV) contributes to it by collecting CO2 emission data from all vessels above 5,000 GT calling at ports within the European Economic Area.
2h
Boosting vegetable oil production in plant leaves
A professor has found a way to boost the production of triacylglycerol — the main component of vegetable oil — in plant leaves, a technique that could allow producers to harvest oil from large, leafy plants that also have other uses. Sorghum, for example — a global source of grain prized for its drought-resistant qualities — could serve a dual role as a source of vegetable oil, creating a more
3h
Financial woes grow worse during pandemic for American families
The economic challenges caused by the coronavirus pandemic have grown worse since the spring for many American families, with an increasing number reporting that they have trouble paying bills, according to a new RAND Corporation study.
3h
Childhood intervention can prevent 'deaths of despair'
Mortality rates among young adults are rising in the US due in part to 'deaths of despair' — preventable deaths from suicide, drug overdoses and alcohol-related liver disease. An intensive childhood intervention program called Fast Track could help reduce these deaths by reducing risky behaviors in adolescence and young adulthood, finds new research from Duke University and the Conduct Problems P
3h
New catalytic process turns plastic bags into adhesives
While many cities and eight states have banned single-use plastics, bags and other polyethylene packaging still clog landfills and pollute rivers and oceans.
3h
Russia's Hack Wasn't Cyberwar. That Complicates US Strategy
To evaluate whether cyber security tactics are working, you need to first establish what the SolarWinds hack really was.
3h
Northern Ireland set to enter six-week lockdown from Boxing Day
Plan also approved to reinforce the ambulance service with units from Republic of Ireland Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Northern Ireland is preparing for a sweeping lockdown and the deployment of paramedics from the Republic of Ireland in an effort to control Covid-19. Health officials on Thursday proposed a six-week lockdown and approved a plan to reinforce the am
3h
Improved macaque genome enhances biomedical utility
Using advanced sequencing technology, researchers present a new, improved and far more complete reference genome for the rhesus macaque – one of the most important animal models in biomedical research.
3h
One ethics lesson can curb your meat consumption, study finds
Vegetarians often point to animal suffering and environmental concerns as reasons to stop eating meat. Despite these arguments, meat consumption has only slightly decreased in recent decades. In a recent study, the researchers were surprised when a relatively small intervention produced a noticeable reduction in meat consumption. What would it take for you to eat less meat? The answer might be as
3h
Biden Will Pick Deb Haaland to Lead Interior Department
The historic choice would elevate a Native American to a cabinet secretary position for the first time, and do so at an agency that played a central role in the nation's long-running abuse of native peoples.
3h
Upcycling: New catalytic process turns plastic bags into adhesives
Only a small percentage of plastic bags and other polyethylene packaging is recycled because only low-value products can be made from this waste. Chemists have created a catalytic process that preserves the desirable properties of polyethylene while adding another attribute – stickiness – that increases the value of the recycled product. The adhesive polyethylene could be used to coat wires and me
3h
Ian McKellen Says He Feels "Euphoric" After Taking COVID Vaccine
Sir Ian McKellen, the 81-year-old actor best known for playing Gandalf, Magneto, and a horrifying cat monster , got his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Wednesday, according to CNN . When it was over, McKellen said he felt "euphoric" and urged everyone who's medically able to get vaccinated as well. "I feel very lucky to have had the vaccine," McKellen tweeted Thursday. "I would have no hesi
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Fluorine may replace lithium for rechargeable batteries
Fluorine, a relatively abundant and light element, may serve as an alternative to lithium in rechargeable batteries, a new study shows. With increased use of rechargeable batteries to power modern technology, particularly electric vehicles, researchers have been looking for alternative materials for lithium-ion in rechargeable batteries. Modern batteries use lithium and cobalt, but these have a v
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The Guardian view on England's Covid-19 tiers: a licence to divide | Editorial
Boris Johnson is privatising responsibility for the problems caused by his Christmas plan to lift restrictions while cases are rising From Saturday, two-thirds of England will be in tier 3 , the most severe category of the UK government's Covid restrictions. This change, announced by the health secretary, Matt Hancock , on Thursday, is the product of two contradictory things. The first is that co
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U Maryland virus researcher up to 13 retractions
A veterinary researcher at the University of Maryland has lost seven papers for problematic images and other issues, bringing his retraction total to 13. Siba Samal, who studies viruses and vaccines, lost four of his articles in March after journals determined that figures in the papers were unreliable. And he was a co-author on papers … Continue reading
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UBCO research takes the chill off icy build-up on planes and wind turbines
New UBC Okanagan research is changing the way aircraft and wind turbine operators are addressing the risks related to ice build-up. In a follow-up study from one released previously this year, Assistant Professor Mohammad Zarifi and his team at UBCO's Okanagan MicroElectronics and Gigahertz Applications (OMEGA) Lab, have broadened the scope and functionality of their ice sensors.
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Study in mice shows genes may be altered through drug repurposing
Researchers screened drugs that can enhance the PAX6 gene and found MEK inhibitors can stimulate PAX6 expression in the eye. They tested this drug in newborn PAX6 deficient mice and found that either topical or oral administration of the drug enhanced PAX6 and partially normalized their eye development. Mice treated with topical MEK inhibitor had clearer corneas (less scarring) and could see bette
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Machine learning boosts the search for 'superhard' materials
Superhard materials are in high demand in industry, from energy production to aerospace, but finding suitable new materials has largely been a matter of trial and error based on classical materials such as diamonds. Now researchers have reported a machine learning model that can accurately predict the hardness of new materials, allowing scientists to more readily find compounds suitable for use in
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Scientists create a new phototoxic protein, SuperNova2
Scientists have developed an enhanced version of SuperNova, a genetically encoded phototoxic synthesizer, that helps control intracellular processes by light exposure. 'We expect that the genetically encoded photosensitizer SuperNova2 will find use in a wide range of experimental models,' Konstantin Lukyanov, a professor at the Skoltech Center of Life Sciences (CLS), comments.
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Green revolution saved over 100 million infant lives in developing world
New research from the University of California San Diego shows that since modern crop varieties were introduced in the developing world starting in 1961, they have substantially reduced infant mortality, especially for male babies and among poor households.
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Fish oil supplements don't raise bad cholesterol
The Fatty Acid Research Institute (FARI) has published a new research paper in conjunction with The Cooper Institute on the omega-3s EPA and DHA in fish oil and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).
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Multi-messenger astronomy offers new estimates of neutron star size and universe expansion
Multi-messenger astronomy allows researchers to put new constraints on the radius of a typical neutron star and provide a novel calculation of the Hubble constant.
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Scientists set a path for field trials of gene drive organisms
Setting a course for responsible testing of powerful gene drive technology, a multidisciplinary coalition of gene drive organism developers, ecologists and conservation biologists has joined experts in social science, ethics and policy in a policy article published in Science. The group describes core commitments that ensure that gene drive organism field trials are safely implemented, transparent
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Can white dwarfs help solve the cosmological lithium problem?
For the first time, lithium has been identified and measured in the atmosphere of a white dwarf. The finding, reported by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, provides clues for what's become of the lithium expected from the Big Bang.
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COVID-19 pandemic had big impact on commercial fishing in Northeast
With restaurants and supply chains disrupted due to the global coronavirus pandemic, two-fifths of commercial fishermen surveyed from Maine through North Carolina did not go fishing earlier this year, according to a Rutgers study that also documented their resilience and adaptation. Of those who kept fishing, nearly all reported a decline in income compared with previous years, according to the su
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Combined observations of neutron stars constrain their equation of state and the Hubble constant
Combining signals from multiple observations of neutron stars has allowed researchers to better understand the properties of ultra-dense matter and constrain the Hubble constant, which describes how fast the Universe is expanding, according to a new study.
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Upcycling: New catalytic process turns plastic bags into adhesives
Only a small percentage of plastic bags and other polyethylene packaging is recycled because only low-value products can be made from this waste. Chemists have created a catalytic process that preserves the desirable properties of polyethylene while adding another attribute – stickiness – that increases the value of the recycled product. The adhesive polyethylene could be used to coat wires and me
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Response to Comment on "Meta-analysis reveals declines in terrestrial but increases in freshwater insect abundances"
Desquilbet et al . take issue with our data inclusion criteria and make several other dubious claims regarding data processing, analysis, and interpretation. Most of their concerns stem from disagreement on data inclusion criteria and analysis, misunderstanding of our goals, and unrealistic expectations. We maintain that our synthesis provides a state-of-the-art analysis of patterns of trends in
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A breakthrough for us all
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News at a glance
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Shots of hope
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A divisive disease
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Ones we've lost
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Runners-up
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A gatekeeper for learning
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Celebrating Marie Tharp
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Best books of 2020
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Form, fit, and function
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Cerebellar evolution
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Learning to feel better
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Changing with the times
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An anti-arthritis signal
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Accepting imperfection
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Relativistic kinematics of a magnetic soliton
A tenet of special relativity is that no particle can exceed the speed of light. In certain magnetic materials, the maximum magnon group velocity serves as an analogous relativistic limit for the speed of magnetic solitons. Here, we drive domain walls to this limit in a low-dissipation magnetic insulator using pure spin currents from the spin Hall effect. We achieve record current-driven velociti
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How directed evolution reshapes the energy landscape in an enzyme to boost catalysis
The advent of biocatalysts designed computationally and optimized by laboratory evolution provides an opportunity to explore molecular strategies for augmenting catalytic function. Applying a suite of nuclear magnetic resonance, crystallography, and stopped-flow techniques to an enzyme designed for an elementary proton transfer reaction, we show how directed evolution gradually altered the confor
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Direct observation of Klein tunneling in phononic crystals
Tunneling plays an essential role in many branches of physics and has found important applications. It is theoretically proposed that Klein tunneling occurs when, under normal incidence, quasiparticles exhibit unimpeded penetration through potential barriers independent of their height and width. We created a phononic heterojunction by sandwiching two types of artificial phononic crystals with di
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Multimessenger constraints on the neutron-star equation of state and the Hubble constant
Observations of neutron-star mergers with distinct messengers, including gravitational waves and electromagnetic signals, can be used to study the behavior of matter denser than an atomic nucleus and to measure the expansion rate of the Universe as quantified by the Hubble constant. We performed a joint analysis of the gravitational-wave event GW170817 with its electromagnetic counterparts AT2017
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Tailored quinones support high-turnover Pd catalysts for oxidative C-H arylation with O2
Palladium(II)-catalyzed carbon-hydrogen (C–H) oxidation reactions could streamline the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and other complex organic molecules. Existing methods, however, commonly exhibit poor catalyst performance with high palladium (Pd) loading (e.g., 10 mole %) and a need for (super)stoichiometric quantities of undesirable oxidants, such as benzoquinone and silver(I) s
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Quantum computational advantage using photons
Quantum computers promise to perform certain tasks that are believed to be intractable to classical computers. Boson sampling is such a task and is considered a strong candidate to demonstrate the quantum computational advantage. We performed Gaussian boson sampling by sending 50 indistinguishable single-mode squeezed states into a 100-mode ultralow-loss interferometer with full connectivity and
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SARS-CoV-2 D614G variant exhibits efficient replication ex vivo and transmission in vivo
The spike aspartic acid–614 to glycine (D614G) substitution is prevalent in global severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) strains, but its effects on viral pathogenesis and transmissibility remain unclear. We engineered a SARS-CoV-2 variant containing this substitution. The variant exhibits more efficient infection, replication, and competitive fitness in primary human airwa
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Novel trophic interactions under climate change promote alpine plant coexistence
Herbivory and plant defenses exhibit a coupled decline along elevation gradients. However, the current ecological equilibrium could be disrupted under climate change, with a faster upward range shift of animals than plants. Here, we experimentally simulated this upward herbivore range shift by translocating low-elevation herbivore insects to alpine grasslands. We report that the introduction of n
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An ultrapotent synthetic nanobody neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 by stabilizing inactive Spike
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus enters host cells via an interaction between its Spike protein and the host cell receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). By screening a yeast surface-displayed library of synthetic nanobody sequences, we developed nanobodies that disrupt the interaction between Spike and ACE2. Cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reveal
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Versatile and multivalent nanobodies efficiently neutralize SARS-CoV-2
Cost-effective, efficacious therapeutics are urgently needed to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we used camelid immunization and proteomics to identify a large repertoire of highly potent neutralizing nanobodies (Nbs) to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike protein receptor binding domain (RBD). We discovered Nbs with picomolar to femtomolar affiniti
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A bearer of good news
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Neuron class-specific responses govern adaptive myelin remodeling in the neocortex
Myelin plasticity is critical for neurological function, including learning and memory. However, it is unknown whether this plasticity reflects uniform changes across all neuronal subtypes, or whether myelin dynamics vary between neuronal classes to enable fine-tuning of adaptive circuit responses. We performed in vivo two-photon imaging of myelin sheaths along single axons of excitatory callosal
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Perirhinal input to neocortical layer 1 controls learning
Hippocampal output influences memory formation in the neocortex, but this process is poorly understood because the precise anatomical location and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that perirhinal input, predominantly to sensory cortical layer 1 (L1), controls hippocampal-dependent associative learning in rodents. This process was marked by the emergence of distinct
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Mechanism of protein-guided folding of the active site U2/U6 RNA during spliceosome activation
Spliceosome activation involves extensive protein and RNA rearrangements that lead to formation of a catalytically active U2/U6 RNA structure. At present, little is known about the assembly pathway of the latter and the mechanism whereby proteins aid its proper folding. Here, we report the cryo–electron microscopy structures of two human, activated spliceosome precursors (that is, pre-B act compl
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Cerebellar nuclei evolved by repeatedly duplicating a conserved cell-type set
How have complex brains evolved from simple circuits? Here we investigated brain region evolution at cell-type resolution in the cerebellar nuclei, the output structures of the cerebellum. Using single-nucleus RNA sequencing in mice, chickens, and humans, as well as STARmap spatial transcriptomic analysis and whole–central nervous system projection tracing, we identified a conserved cell-type set
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Sequence diversity analyses of an improved rhesus macaque genome enhance its biomedical utility
The rhesus macaque ( Macaca mulatta ) is the most widely studied nonhuman primate (NHP) in biomedical research. We present an updated reference genome assembly (Mmul_10, contig N50 = 46 Mbp) that increases the sequence contiguity 120-fold and annotate it using 6.5 million full-length transcripts, thus improving our understanding of gene content, isoform diversity, and repeat organization. With th
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Comment on "Meta-analysis reveals declines in terrestrial but increases in freshwater insect abundances"
Van Klink et al . (Reports, 24 April 2020, p. 417) argue for a more nuanced view of insect decline, and of human responsibility for this decline, than previously suggested. However, shortcomings in data selection and methodology raise questions about their conclusions on trends and drivers. We call for more rigorous methodology to be applied in meta-analyses of ecological data.
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The ZSWIM8 ubiquitin ligase mediates target-directed microRNA degradation
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) associate with Argonaute (AGO) proteins to direct widespread posttranscriptional gene repression. Although association with AGO typically protects miRNAs from nucleases, extensive pairing to some unusual target RNAs can trigger miRNA degradation. We found that this target-directed miRNA degradation (TDMD) required the ZSWIM8 Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase. This and other findi
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A ubiquitin ligase mediates target-directed microRNA decay independently of tailing and trimming
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act in concert with Argonaute (AGO) proteins to repress target messenger RNAs. After AGO loading, miRNAs generally exhibit slow turnover. An important exception occurs when miRNAs encounter highly complementary targets, which can trigger a process called target-directed miRNA degradation (TDMD). During TDMD, miRNAs undergo tailing and trimming, suggesting that this is an import
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Form, fit, and function
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Cerebellar evolution
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Learning to feel better
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Changing with the times
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Best Android tablet: Find the right device for you
Depending on what you need it for, there are things to consider when you're looking at your next Android tablet. (Muhannad Ajjan via Unsplash/) While far from the essential devices many predicted they would become, tablets have evolved into more than just slightly larger smartphones. With varying sizes, capabilities, and content focuses, shopping for a tablet involves careful consideration of you
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A Breakthrough (of the Year) crossword puzzle
Test your knowledge of general science facts and Science's current and past top 10 annual advances
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In fiction, we remember the deaths that make us sad
People may cheer the demise of evil villains in fiction, but the deaths we most remember are the meaningful and sad endings of the characters we loved, research suggests. In a new study, researchers found that when people were asked to recall the death of a fictional character, they were more likely to mention deaths perceived as 'meaningful' than those seen as 'pleasurable.'
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Scientists unlock promising key to preventing cancer relapse after immunotherapy
The researchers discovered that cancer immunotherapies that make use of immune system cells such as T cells and CAR-T cells kill not only tumor cells that express the drugs' target, but also adjacent tumor cells that lack the targets, because of the presence of fas. This process, known as bystander killing, can be made more effective by adding therapeutics that turn off the regulation of fas prote
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Three-dimensional view of catalysts in action
For understanding the structure and function of catalysts in action, researchers have developed a new diagnostic tool. Operando X-ray spectroscopy visualizes the structure and gradients of complex technical catalysts in three dimensions, thus allowing us to look into functioning chemical reactors.
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Wildfire Smoke Is Loaded With Microbes. Is That Dangerous?
Researchers are putting out a call to study the potential effects of bacteria- and fungi-filled haze on human health.
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Gravitational Waves Probe Exotic Matter inside Neutron Stars
A new analysis of light and gravitational waves from colliding neutron stars helps reveal what's inside these ultradense objects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Will it kombucha? (video)
Kombucha is a bubbly, fermented tea that has gained popularity in the health and wellness scene over the last decade — but what is it exactly? This week, the Reactions team breaks down kombucha's chemistry and investigates which ordinary beverages they can turn into kombucha.
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Taking greenhouse gas analysis on the road, er, rails
Since 2014, the University of Utah has maintained research-grade suites of air quality instruments installed on light rail trains that move throughout the Salt Lake Valley every day. These mobile sensors, researchers estimate in a new study, cover the same area as 30 stationary sensors, providing the Salt Lake Valley with a highly cost-effective way to monitor its greenhouse emissions and fill in
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Can water saving traits help wine survive climate change?
Climate change is expected to make many grape-growing regions too hot and dry to produce high-quality wine from traditional varieties. But scientists at the University of California, Davis, have found that wine grape varieties from regions that are more prone to stress have traits that could help them cope with climate change.
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UCI researchers create model to calculate COVID-19 health outcomes
University of California, Irvine health sciences researchers have created a machine-learning model to predict the probability that a COVID-19 patient will need a ventilator or ICU care. The tool is free and available online for any healthcare organization to use.
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Stevens creates entangled photons 100 times more efficiently than previously possible
Super-fast quantum computers and communication devices could revolutionize countless aspects of our lives — but first, researchers need a fast, efficient source of the entangled pairs of photons such systems use to transmit and manipulate information. Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have done just that, not only creating a chip-based photon source 100 times more efficient that prev
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Multi-messenger astronomy offers new estimates of neutron star size and universe expansion
A combination of astrophysical measurements has allowed researchers to put new constraints on the radius of a typical neutron star and provide a novel calculation of the Hubble constant that indicates the rate at which the universe is expanding.
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Can white dwarfs help solve the cosmological lithium problem?
For the first time, hard-to-find lithium has been identified and measured in the atmosphere of burned out stars called white dwarfs, according to a study led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill published online in the journal Science.
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COVID-19 pandemic had big impact on commercial fishing in Northeast
With restaurants and supply chains disrupted due to the global coronavirus pandemic, two-fifths of commercial fishermen surveyed from Maine through North Carolina did not go fishing earlier this year, according to a Rutgers study that also documented their resilience and adaptation.
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Scientists set a path for field trials of gene drive organisms
The modern rise of gene drive research, accelerated by CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology, has led to transformational waves rippling across science.
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COVID-19 pandemic had big impact on commercial fishing in Northeast
With restaurants and supply chains disrupted due to the global coronavirus pandemic, two-fifths of commercial fishermen surveyed from Maine through North Carolina did not go fishing earlier this year, according to a Rutgers study that also documented their resilience and adaptation.
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Scientists set a path for field trials of gene drive organisms
The modern rise of gene drive research, accelerated by CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology, has led to transformational waves rippling across science.
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Gravitational Waves Probe Exotic Matter inside Neutron Stars
A new analysis of light and gravitational waves from colliding neutron stars helps reveal what's inside these ultradense objects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How Insurtech Can Help Make Car Insurance Less of a Burden
Auto insurance is an unfortunate reality of owning a car. That means finding the best deal, and staying in control of your auto policy, is a reality for most of us. Fortunately, it's not all bad news as it once was with traditional insurers. New-school insurers like Clearcover , currently available in nine states, put technology first to make the insurance process entirely digital, helping put dr
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Report: Electric Cars Could Be Cheaper Than Gas Ones in Just 2 Years
Driving Competition In a matter of just two to three years, electric cars are on track to become cheaper than their gasoline-powered alternatives, according to a new report by energy research firm BloombergNEF. According to the report, the market average for batteries will hit just $101 per kWh by 2023. Analysts have long predicted that for electric vehicles to match the price of gas ones, the co
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First reviews can set products up for success or failure
A product's first review can have an outsized effect on the item's future and can even cause the product to fail, researchers report. Researchers looked at the influence of the first review after noticing the exact same products getting positive reviews on one retailer's website but negative reviews on others, says Sungsik Park, who studied the phenomenon as a doctoral student at the University o
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Synthetic biology and machine learning speed the creation of lab-grown livers
Researchers have combined synthetic biology with a machine learning algorithm to create human liver organoids with blood and bile handling systems. When implanted into mice with failing livers, the lab-grown replacement livers extended life.
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Pandemic Leads Geoengineering Experiment to Move from U.S. to Sweden
The project aims to use a balloon to release particles into the atmosphere to tamp down warming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Two new studies offer ways to avert accidents and workplace injuries for American workers
Human error is a causal factor in up to 80 percent of workplace accidents. A new study measuring the eye movements and cognitive processes for at-risk workers, sheds new light on the potential to avert accidents and possibly prevent workplace injuries. The study 'Measuring attention, working memory, and visual perception to reduce risk of injuries in the construction industry,' by Behzad Esmaeili,
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A Smile at a Wedding, a Cheer at a Soccer Game Are Alike the World Over
A survey of 6 million videos from 144 countries suggests facial expressions are near universal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A Smile at a Wedding, a Cheer at a Soccer Game Are Alike the World Over
A survey of 6 million videos from 144 countries suggests facial expressions are near universal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Daily briefing: The biggest retractions of the year
Nature, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03616-3 The Surgisphere scandal and a spate of spider-paper retractions top the list. Plus, how Biden can rebuild the ravaged EPA and a photo that took eight years to snap.
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NASA Says It Will Fly a Canadian to the Moon
Collab? NASA just struck a historic deal with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) that will entail, for the first time in history, a non-US astronaut orbiting the Moon. The agreement says that the CSA will help NASA with its upcoming Artemis Moon missions in exchange for a seat on some of the flights, according to Space.com . Not only is the CSA's support good news for the Artemis missions specifical
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A Smile at a Wedding, a Cheer at a Soccer Game Are Alike the World Over
A survey of 6 million videos from 144 countries suggests facial expressions are near universal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Researcher boosts vegetable oil production in plant leaves
Jay Thelen, a professor of biochemistry at the University of Missouri, has found a way to boost the production of triacylglycerol — the main component of vegetable oil — in plant leaves, a technique that could allow producers to harvest oil from large, leafy plants that also have other uses. Sorghum, for example — a global source of grain prized for its drought-resistant qualities — could serv
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Big brains and white matter: New clues about autism subtypes
Researchers found that a long-accepted theory about brain size in some children with autism may not be true. In a separate study, they linked development of white matter with changes in autism symptom severity.
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The Year of Ambitious TV Watching
My biggest accomplishment of the year was a bloody mess. The project started simply enough, but within weeks, I found myself regularly staring at contorted limbs and gaping wounds. Soon few things marked the end of my workday more clearly than a grisly episode of Dexter , the mid-aughts Showtime series about a forensic analyst who moonlights as a serial killer. Tearing through all eight seasons o
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How We Lifted Flight From Bird Evolution
The path to flight in modern birds was full of forks, twists and dead ends
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Best portable air conditioner: Cool off where you need it most
Portable air conditioners that you can move from room to room. (Paige Cody via Unsplash/) When the broiling heat of the summer kicks in, there is no escaping the need for an air conditioner. Currently, the cooling market is packed with a wide variety of options to choose from when you absolutely need to make your living or workspace comfortable. Our modern living spaces don't always have the spec
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Catalyst research: Molecular probes require highly precise calculations
Catalysts are indispensable for many technologies. To further improve heterogeneous catalysts, it is required to analyze the complex processes on their surfaces, where the active sites are located. Scientists have now reached decisive progress: They use calculation methods with so-called hybrid functionals for the reliable interpretation of experimental data.
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Longest intergalactic gas filament discovered
Astrophysicists have for the first time observed a gas filament with a length of 50 million light years. Its structure is strikingly similar to the predictions of computer simulations. The observation therefore also confirms our ideas about the origin and evolution of our universe.
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Cholera outbreaks predicted using climate data and AI
Climate data taken from Earth orbiting satellites, combined with machine learning techniques, are helping to better predict outbreaks of cholera and potentially save lives.
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Wildfire smoke changes dramatically as it ages, and that matters for downwind air quality
The year 2020 will be remembered for many reasons, including its record-breaking wildfires that turned San Francisco's skies an apocalyptic shade of red and blanketed large parts of the West in smoke for weeks on end.
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Chatbot launched in battle against COVID-19 misinformation
Experts in computational communication at the Universities of Liverpool and Dundee launched a chatbot enabled website, based on the work of some of philosophy's greatest critical thinkers, to help improve people's ability to spot semi-fake news.
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Optogenetic method can reveal how gut microbes affect longevity
Research has shown that gut microbes can influence several aspects of the host's life, including aging. Given the complexity and heterogeneity of the human gut environment, elucidating how a specific microbial species contributes to longevity has been challenging. To explore the influence of bacterial products on the aging process, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Rice University deve
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Improving multi-sectoral ocean management to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals
Researchers from IRD, the CNRS and Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada) have assessed the capacity of the principal ocean management tools to achieve the "Conserve and sustainably use the oceans' sustainable development goal (SDG). They have shown that certain multi-sectoral mechanisms, such as marine protected areas, are the most effective in reconciling the ecological, economic and socia
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A phantom training program may help acclimate heifers to an automatic milking system
A new study appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science indicates that heifers that participated in a training program using a phantom before introduction to an automated milking system (AMS) visited the actual AMS more frequently, thereby potentially increasing milk yield. Acclimating the herd to an unfamiliar milking robot in advance is a potential solution to decrease stress for animals and farm
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Upcycling: new catalytic process turns plastic bags into adhesives
Only a small percentage of plastic bags and other polyethylene packaging is recycled because only low-value products can be made from this waste. UC Berkeley chemists have created a catalytic process that preserves the desirable properties of polyethylene while adding another attribute – stickiness – that increases the value of the recycled product. The adhesive polyethylene could be used to coat
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Financial woes grow worse during pandemic for American families
Many Americans have lost their jobs or are working less because of the shutdowns caused by the coronavirus pandemic. A survey that has been tracking a representative sample of Americans over the course of the pandemic finds that the financial struggles of many families are growing worse.
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Researchers discover brain pattern that could improve mental health disorder diagnosis
A pattern in how the brain breaks down tryptophan, a common amino acid consumed through food, was discovered by researchers at UTHealth.
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UMD finds more West Nile virus-infected mosquitoes in lower-income areas of Baltimore
Researchers at the University of Maryland found higher rates of West Nile virus-infected mosquitoes in lower-income neighborhoods in urban areas of Baltimore, Maryland. Continuing a collaboration with the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, this preliminary data provides another piece of the puzzle pointing to higher risk of mosquito-transmitted diseases in these neighborhoods already struggling
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Errant DNA boosts immunotherapy effectiveness
DALLAS – Dec. 17, 2020 – DNA that ends up where it doesn't belong in cancer cells can unleash an immune response that makes tumors more susceptible to immunotherapy, the results of two UT Southwestern studies indicate. The findings, published online today in Cancer Cell , suggest that delivering radiation – which triggers DNA release from cells – before immunotherapy could be an effective way to f
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New toolkit aims to improve quality of thrombosis data in COVID-19 trials
The ASH Research Collaborative (ASH RC) and the International Society of Haemostasis and Thrombosis (ISTH), two organizations with multidisciplinary expertise in blood clotting and bleeding disorders, have developed a toolkit to help clinical researchers from across medical disciplines design clinical trials that further the understanding of blood clotting events associated with COVID-19.
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Without Resources, Vaccine Rollout Could 'Fall At The Last Hurdle,' Journalist Warns
Atlantic writer Ed Yong says the COVID-19 vaccination program will be the most complicated the U.S. has ever attempted: "It's going to be a slow process, and there are a lot of possible roadblocks." (Image credit: Nathan Howard/Getty Images)
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Research breakthrough could transform clean energy technology
By some estimates, the amount of solar energy reaching the surface of the earth in one year is greater than the sum of all the energy we could ever produce using non-renewable resources. The technology necessary to convert sunlight into electricity has developed rapidly, but inefficiencies in the storage and distribution of that power have remained a significant problem, making solar energy imprac
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Optogenetic method can reveal how gut microbes affect longevity
Research has shown that gut microbes can influence several aspects of the host's life, including aging. Given the complexity and heterogeneity of the human gut environment, elucidating how a specific microbial species contributes to longevity has been challenging. To explore the influence of bacterial products on the aging process, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Rice University deve
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Crops near Chernobyl still contaminated
Crops grown near Chernobyl are still contaminated due to the 1986 nuclear accident, new research shows.
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Improving multi-sectoral ocean management to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals
Researchers from IRD, the CNRS and Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada) have assessed the capacity of the principal ocean management tools to achieve the "Conserve and sustainably use the oceans' sustainable development goal (SDG). They have shown that certain multi-sectoral mechanisms, such as marine protected areas, are the most effective in reconciling the ecological, economic and socia
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A phantom training program may help acclimate heifers to an automatic milking system
A new study appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science indicates that heifers that participated in a training program using a phantom before introduction to an automated milking system (AMS) visited the actual AMS more frequently, thereby potentially increasing milk yield. Acclimating the herd to an unfamiliar milking robot in advance is a potential solution to decrease stress for animals and farm
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Scientist tests new technology for removing, destroying 'forever chemicals'
University of Rhode Island hydrogeologist Thomas Boving and colleagues at EnChem Engineering Inc. are testing a proprietary new technology for quickly removing and destroying hazardous chemical compounds from soil and groundwater. If proven effective, the technology could soon be applied to cleaning up the abundant per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, collectively referred to as PFAS and 'forever
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Fertilizer runoff in streams and rivers can have cascading effects, analysis shows
Fertilizer pollution can have significant ripple effects in the food webs of streams and rivers, according to a new analysis of global data. The researchers also found some detection methods could miss pollution in certain types of streams.
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New discovery opens novel pathway for high-titer production of drop-in biofuels
A special light-dependent enzyme, which was first discovered about three years ago, is the focal point in a new scientific discovery that enables high-yield production of drop-in biofuels from biomass.
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New discovery opens novel pathway for high-titer production of drop-in biofuels
A special light-dependent enzyme, which was first discovered about three years ago, is the focal point in a new scientific discovery that enables high-yield production of drop-in biofuels from biomass.
5h
Biden to Pick Michael Regan, North Carolina Environment Chief, to Head E.P.A.
Mr. Regan, if confirmed, will take over an agency central to achieving the new administration's climate agenda.
5h
Biden To Nominate Brenda Mallory To Run Council On Environmental Quality
Mallory, an Obama veteran, would take the helm at a White House office where she worked as former general counsel. The CEQ is seen as critical to address climate change and environmental equity. (Image credit: Stephanie Gross for Southern Environmental Law Center)
5h
Is rap music destigmatizing mental health disorders?
The most popular rap songs in the U.S. are more frequently making references to mental health problems, particularly suicide and depression. A research team analyzed lyrics from the top 25 most popular rap songs released in the years 1998, 2003, 2008, 2013, and 2018, examining the lyrics of artists such as Eminem, Drake, Post Malone, Lil' Wayne, Juice WRLD, Kanye West, and Jay-Z. References to su
5h
What's up Skip? Kangaroos really can 'talk' to us
Animals that have never been domesticated, such as kangaroos, can intentionally communicate with humans, challenging the notion that this behaviour is usually restricted to domesticated animals like dogs, horses or goats, a first of its kind study from the University of Roehampton and the University of Sydney has found.
5h
NIH researchers discover brain area crucial for recognizing visual events
Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) report that a brain region in the superior temporal sulcus (fSTS) is crucial for processing and making decisions about visual information.
5h
Hearing loss and high blood sugar linked to poorer learning and memory among older Latinos
Researchers report that hearing loss and high blood sugar are associated with poor cognitive performance among middle-aged and older Latinos.
5h
Nurse practitioners bring big savings to long-term care facilities in Quebec
Countries worldwide face challenges meeting the growing needs for long-term care services because of high costs. A study led by researchers from McGill University and Université du Québec en Outaouais shows that introducing nurse practitioners can significantly reduce costs and improve patient safety.
5h
Healthcare workers have increased insomnia, risk of severe mental health problems: COVID-19 study
University of Ottawa global meta-analysis finds significant mental-health consequences for population, but especially healthcare workers.
5h
ACE2 protein protects against severe COVID-19: Study
Female COVID-19 patients face less severe disease complications and a lower risk of dying than male patients thanks to hormones and chromosomes that contribute to a stronger immune response, according to new research from a University of Alberta-led team.
5h
Palliative care improves quality of life for patients with advanced blood cancer
A first-of-its-kind intervention integrating palliative care early in the course of cancer therapy for patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a highly aggressive cancer of the blood and bone marrow, resulted in substantial improvements in patients' quality of life, mood and end-of-life care, a team of investigators has found.
5h
Artificial intelligence classifies supernova explosions with unprecedented accuracy
Scientists from the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian have trained machine learning software to classify supernovae without the traditional use of spectra. The project–the first to use real supernovae data to inform its artificial intelligence–is 82% accurate. Currently, scientists take spectra of 10-percent of the ~10,000 supernovae discovered each year. When the Rubin Observatory
5h
Research breakthrough could transform clean energy technology
A team of researchers has developed a new method of harnessing solar energy, moving us closer to a clean energy future.
5h
'No such thing as a little bit of pain:' More cancer patients could benefit from rehabilitation
West Virginia University researchers identified the rehabilitation recommendations included in cancer-treatment guidelines from around the world. But the researchers discovered a disconnect between what the guidelines suggested and what many doctors do.
5h
Optogenetic method can reveal how gut microbes affect longevity
Optogenetics offers a direct way to manipulate gut bacterial metabolism in a temporally, quantitatively and spatially controlled manner and enhance host fitness.
5h
Antifungal drug improves key cystic fibrosis biomarkers in clinical study
A drug widely used to treat fungal infections improved key biomarkers in lung tissue cultures as well as in the noses of patients with cystic fibrosis, a clinical study by researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and the University of Iowa found.
5h
Talking to kids about weight: What the internet says and why researchers are wary
Researchers from the Center for Weight, Eating and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center) in the College of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University systematically reviewed numerous independently published guidelines for having conversations with children about weight status to analyze their content, consistency, actionability and scientific support. They recommend future guidelines unify their messages an
5h
Crops near Chernobyl still contaminated
Crops grown near Chernobyl are still contaminated due to the 1986 nuclear accident, new research shows.
5h
Computational model reveals how the brain manages short-term memories
Salk scientists have developed a new computational model showing how the brain maintains information short-term using specific types of neurons. Their findings, published in Nature Neuroscience on December 7, 2020, could help shed light on why working memory is impaired in a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, as well as in normal aging.
5h
Investigating the carbon intensity of ferries
Ferry emissions are over-proportional with respect to the number of these ships. Half of the European ferry emissions stem from the Mediterranean, this largely reflecting a greater number of ships operating in this sea. Which factors affects ferry carbon intensity and energy efficiency? New insights and perspective from a study realized by the CMCC Foundation in the framework of GUTTA project acti
5h
Biden To Nominate Brenda Mallory To Run Council On Environmental Quality
Mallory, an Obama veteran, would take the helm at a White House office where she worked as former general counsel. The CEQ is seen as critical to address climate change and environmental equity. (Image credit: Stephanie Gross for Southern Environmental Law Center)
5h
Researchers use neural networks to study DNA
HSE scientists have proposed a way to improve the accuracy of finding Z-DNA, or DNA regions that are twisted to the left instead of to the right. To do this, they used neural networks and a dataset of more than 30,000 experiments conducted by different laboratories around the world. Details of the study are published in Scientific Reports.
5h
COVID-19 fear is driving up gun sales
COVID-19 pandemic stress and uncertainty about what the future holds are motivating people to buy guns, according to a new study. The trend may be more prevalent in those who already own firearms, the researchers report. The study in the Journal of Psychiatric Research shows that people intending to acquire a firearm in the next 12 months have less tolerance for uncertainty, have exaggerated thre
5h
Awareness vs. fatigue battle affects COVID's spread
The battle between awareness of the COVID-19's severe consequences and fatigue from nine months of pandemic precautions shows up in the oddly shaped case, hospitalization, and fatality-count graphs, a new study suggests. The tension between awareness and fatigue can lead to case-count plateaus, shoulder-like dynamics, and oscillations as rising numbers of deaths cause people to become more cautio
5h
Researchers use neural networks to study DNA
HSE scientists have proposed a way to improve the accuracy of finding Z-DNA, or DNA regions that are twisted to the left instead of to the right. To do this, they used neural networks and a dataset of more than 30,000 experiments conducted by different laboratories around the world. Details of the study are published in Scientific Reports.
5h
Research team identifies second-harmonics generation interference in 2-D heterobilayers
Since the invention of world's first laser—the ruby laser—in 1960, the human desire to control light has spread to various industries, including telecommunications, medicine, GPS, optical sensors and optical computers. Recently, a POSTECH research team has taken a step closer to its goal of controlling light by identifying nonlinear optical phenomena occurring in heterobilayers composed of two-dim
5h
How does immersive reality affect implicit racial bias?
Implicit racial bias refers to automatic, non-conscious behaviors, even if one's explicit attitude is not biased at all. Several studies have shown these prejudices are reduced in white people after being in the body of a black person in virtual reality. Now, a study carried out by researchers of the University of Barcelona shows that when the virtual scenario is affectively negative, implicit bia
5h
On the hunt for a missing giant black hole
The mystery surrounding the whereabouts of a supermassive black hole has deepened.
5h
How scientists are using declassified military photographs to analyse historical ecological change
Researchers are using Cold War spy satellite images to explore changes in the environment, including deforestation in Romania, marmot decline in Kazakhstan and ecological damage from bombs in Vietnam.
5h
Especially neurotic people feel worse emotionally during the coronavirus crisis
New research finds that during the coronavirus crisis, neurotic people experience more negative emotions in their everyday lives, are more unstable emotionally and worry more about their health.
5h
How scientists are using declassified military photographs to analyse historical ecological change
Researchers are using Cold War spy satellite images to explore changes in the environment, including deforestation in Romania, marmot decline in Kazakhstan and ecological damage from bombs in Vietnam.
5h
The most consumed species of mussels contain microplastics all around the world
"If you eat mussels, you eat microplastics." This was already known to a limited extent about mussels from individual ocean regions. A new study reveals that this claim apparently holds true globally. The team investigated the microplastic load of four mussel species which are particularly often sold as food in supermarkets from twelve countries around the world.
5h
Greenland 'knickpoints' could stall spread of glacial thinning
The jagged terrain of Greenland's mountains is protecting some of the island's outlet glaciers from warm coastal waters, according to a team of researchers. However, in regions where the flat bedrock offers no such protection, runaway thinning can reach far into the ice sheet and eat away at previously unaffected ice and contribute to sea level rise.
5h
Electron-producing microbes power sustainable wastewater treatment
Researchers have developed a sustainable wastewater treatment system that relies on electron-producing microbial communities to clean the water. The work could someday lead to reduced reliance on the energy-intensive processes that are used to move and treat wastewater, which accounts for as much as two percent of the total electrical energy consumption in the United States.
5h
Artificial intelligence classifies supernova explosions with unprecedented accuracy
Artificial intelligence is classifying real supernova explosions without the traditional use of spectra, thanks to a team of astronomers at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian. The complete data sets and resulting classifications are publicly available for open use.
5h
Satellite tracking supports whale survival
Extensive satellite tracking has revealed important new knowledge about the little known pygmy blue whale population of Southern Australia.
5h
Weddell Sea: Whale song reveals behavioral patterns
Until recently, what we knew about the lives of baleen whales in the Southern Ocean was chiefly based on research conducted during the Antarctic summer. The reason: in the winter, there were virtually no biologists on site to watch for the animals. Experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have now used permanently installed underwater micropho
5h
NASA Suggests Sending Boston Dynamics Robodog to Mars
Good Boy NASA scientists have an unusual idea for exploring the surface of Mars: sending a four-legged robot dog. Specifically, researchers suggested that a modified version of Boston Dynamics' dog-like Spot robot would make for a great alternative to the classic Mars rover, Live Science reports . The idea is that they're better suited to cover long distances and rough terrain — and could even he
5h
Satellite tracking supports whale survival
Extensive satellite tracking has revealed important new knowledge about the little known pygmy blue whale population of Southern Australia.
5h
Weddell Sea: Whale song reveals behavioral patterns
Until recently, what we knew about the lives of baleen whales in the Southern Ocean was chiefly based on research conducted during the Antarctic summer. The reason: in the winter, there were virtually no biologists on site to watch for the animals. Experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have now used permanently installed underwater micropho
5h
Coronapod: The big COVID research papers of 2020
Nature, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03609-2 We look back at a year of coronavirus discoveries.
5h
Improving multi-sectoral ocean management to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals
Researchers from IRD, the CNRS and Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada) have assessed the capacity of the principal ocean management tools to achieve the "Conserve and sustainably use the oceans" sustainable development goal (SDG).
5h
Interventional radiology associated with an increased risk for preventable adverse events
In a review article in the journal Radiology, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), suggest there is a critical need to renew understanding of adverse events and complications within interventional radiology. They also call for a robust recommitment to patient safety and quality assurance in clinical practice, continuing medical education and graduate medical education.
5h
Fertilizer runoff in streams and rivers can have cascading effects, analysis shows
Fertilizer pollution can have significant ripple effects in the food webs of streams and rivers, according to a new analysis of global data.
5h
A phantom training program may help acclimate heifers to an automatic milking system
A new study appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science indicates that heifers that participated in a training program using a phantom before introduction to an automated milking system (AMS) visited the actual AMS more frequently, thereby potentially increasing milk yield. Acclimating the herd to an unfamiliar milking robot in advance is a potential solution to decrease stress for animals and farm
5h
Change in global precipitation patterns as a result of climate change
The Earth's climate system is largely determined by the differences in temperature between the tropics and the poles. Global warming is likely to cause global atmospheric circulation to change and progressively revert to a situation similar to that of 5,000 to 10,000 years ago. This is the conclusion of a study published in Nature Communications .
5h
Neuroendovascular procedures linked to patient back pain
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care performed a prospective study of neuroendovascular patients and found more than 40% suffered back pain during the procedure, signaling a need for clinicians to be more proactive in addressing this complaint.
5h
Skinnier but resilient geese thriving in the high Arctic
Barnacle geese in the Arctic have been on a diet. So many now migrate to northern breeding grounds that in some places there's less food to go around. The good news is that it doesn't seem to restrict their population growth — yet.
5h
New recipe for antibiotic could prevent deafness
Stanford Medicine scientists have discovered a simple method of reformulating gentamicin, a commonly used and highly effective antibiotic, that could prevent its toxic side effect of hearing loss.
5h
"None of us were ready" to manufacture genetic vaccines for a billion people
The first covid-19 vaccine developed as part of Operation Warp Speed is likely to be authorized for emergency use this week in the US following an all-day meeting of federal medical advisors today, December 17. The shot, called mRNA-1273, was developed by the biotech company Moderna, and the US is relying heavily on it to meet the US government's timeline of vaccinating most of the population by
5h
The latest magnesium studies pave the way for new biomedical materials
Materials used in biomedicine must be characterized by controlled biodegradability, sufficient strength and total absence of toxicity to the human body. The search for such materials is, therefore, not a simple task. In this context, scientists have been interested in magnesium for a long time. Recently, using such techniques as positron annihilation spectroscopy, the researchers were able to demo
5h
The Terrible Déjà Vu of COVID-19's Winter Surge
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Back in the spring, before the first surge of the coronavirus had fully diminished, public-health experts were already warning of a second surge. Shutdowns were ending and public spaces reopening, but as the months turned cold, they said , cases could spike again—more drama
5h
Space Force Airman Disciplined for Playing Hooky to Buy PlayStation
Reprimanded An unidentified member of the U.S. Space Force was desperate to get his hands on a Sony PlayStation 5. In fact, he was 30 minutes late for a fitness lesson because he was scoping at deals at nearby Target stores to snag one, Task & Purpose reports . The airman showed no sign of regret for his actions. His response when he was reprimanded by his superior officer: "YOLO [You only live o
5h
Loneliness is wired into the human brain. Here's what it looks like.
A study of 40,000 participants shows specific signatures in the brain scans of lonely people. Loneliness is linked to variations in grey matter volume and connections in the brain default network. This area of the brain is connected to the use of imagination, memory, future planning, and daydreaming. COVID-19 has exacerbated the worldwide spread of loneliness that had been alarming researchers pr
5h
How the Belief in American Exceptionalism Has Shaped the Pandemic Response
A political scientist discusses how national identity influences how the country has dealt with the Covid-19 crisis
5h
What Two Late-Night Shows Learned From Covering Trump
Kristen Bartlett's entire TV comedy-writing career has revolved around Donald Trump's presidency. She became a writer on Saturday Night Live in 2016, before joining the staff of the late-night series Full Frontal With Samantha Bee in 2018. And between the two shows, she's spent four years telling Trump-related jokes, parsing his press conferences, and trying to cover his actions without serving a
5h
Weddell sea: Whale song reveals behavioral patterns
Experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have now used permanently installed underwater microphones, which have been recording for the past nine years, to successfully gather and analyse whale observation data from the Weddell Sea.
6h
The latest magnesium studies pave the way for new biomedical materials
Materials used in biomedicine must be characterized by controlled biodegradability, sufficient strength and total absence of toxicity to the human body. The search for such materials is, therefore, not a simple task. In this context, scientists have been interested in magnesium for a long time. Recently, using such techniques as positron annihilation spectroscopy, the researchers were able to demo
6h
A new means of neuronal communication discovered in the human brain
An international research group has discovered in the human brain a new functional coupling mechanism between neurons, which may serve as a communication channel between brain regions.
6h
Study reports drop in lung cancer screening, rise in malignancy during COVID-19 surge
Reporting on how deferred care worsened outcomes for lung cancer patients when the COVID-19 pandemic first surged in the spring of 2020, researchers explained that they have identified a framework that could help people with serious health conditions keep up their appointments during the current surge.
6h
COVID-19 escalated armed conflicts in several war-torn countries
A new study finds that armed conflict activities increased in five countries during the first wave of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.
6h
Biden Should Restore the Role of Science in the U.S. Government
Four ways the new administration can elevate evidence and build up the science ranks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Chemist Nancy Goroff eyes national stage despite losing race for Congress
Stony Brook University professor is leaving academia for bigger role as science advocate
6h
Omskæring: Politikerne bør sikre danske drenge og mænd retten til intakte kønsdele
Nyligt fremlagte tal fra Landspatientregisteret undervurderer i alvorlig grad omfanget af komplikationer efter rituel drengeomskæring. Det skal medlemmerne af Folketinget vide, når de få uger inde i det nye år skal tage stilling til, om der skal indføres en aldersgrænse på 18 år for omskæring af raske drenge, skriver overlæge Morten Frisch.
6h
Congress wants answers from Google about Timnit Gebru's firing
Nine members of the US Congress have sent a letter to Google asking it to clarify the circumstances around its former ethical AI co-lead Timnit Gebru's forced departure. Led by Representative Yvette Clarke and Senator Ron Wyden, and co-signed by Senators Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker, the letter sends an important signal about how Congress is scrutinizing tech giants and thinking about forthco
6h
HSE researchers use neural networks to study DNA
HSE scientists have proposed a way to improve the accuracy of finding Z-DNA, or DNA regions that are twisted to the left instead of to the right. To do this, they used neural networks and a dataset of more than 30,000 experiments conducted by different laboratories around the world. Details of the study are published in Scientific Reports .
6h
LSU health research suggests new mechanism to balance emotional behavior
Research led by Si-Qiong June Liu, MD, PhD, Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, discovered a surprising reciprocal interaction between chemicals in the brain resulting in accelerated loss of molecules that regulate brain cell communication.
6h
In fiction, we remember the deaths that make us sad
People may cheer the demise of evil villains in fiction, but the deaths we most remember are the meaningful and sad endings of the characters we loved, research suggests.In a new study, researchers found that when people were asked to recall the death of a fictional character, they were more likely to mention deaths perceived as "meaningful" than those seen as "pleasurable."
6h
Big data will analyze the mystery of Beethoven's metronome
Data science and physics research at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and UNED has analysed a centuries-old controversy over Beethoven's annotations about the tempo (the playing speed) of his works, which is considered to be too fast based on these marks. In this study, published in the PLOS ONE journal, it is noted that this deviation could be explained by the composer reading the metronome i
6h
Lithuanian researchers propose combination of methods to improve anticancer drug delivery
Application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in combination with microbubbles might enhance the delivery of chemotherapy medication used for treating cancers. In their study, a team of Lithuanian researchers from three universities – KTU, LSMU and VMU – claim that the rate of microbubble survival time is the best indicator for determining the efficiency of sonoporation, i.e. ultrasound-induced l
6h
UBC study highlights need for more effective staffing in care homes
Even the best-managed long-term care homes will need to step up to get through the second wave of the pandemic.
6h
Drinking water significant source of microplastics in human diet
In an effort to understand the potential risks associated with exposure to micro/nanoplastics, the?Emerging Risks of Micro/nanoplastics: Perspectives From Diverse Sectors symposia at the 2020 Society for Risk Analysis virtual Annual Meeting, December 13-17, 2020,?aims to highlight the current state of knowledge associated with physical and chemical transformation, hazard characterization, environm
6h
Air pollution death ruling: What comes next?
A girl who died in 2013 has had air pollution listed as a cause of death; what are the implications?
6h
Brain-Eating Amoeba Is Spreading in United States, Scientists Say
According to a new study by researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Naegleria fowleri , better known as the "brain-eating amoeba," is slowly making its way northwards from the southern United States — and we've got climate change to blame. The news isn't quite as gloomy as it sounds, Live Science reports . The actual number of yearly cases isn't increasing; it's jus
6h
Reliable COVID-19 test could reduce virus spread
A unique test that targets three viral genes to increase reliability could cut COVID-19 detection time to 20 minutes, according to a new study.
6h
New discovery opens novel pathway for high-titer production of drop-in biofuels
Using an unusual, light-dependent enzyme and a newly discovered enzymatic mechanism, researchers from Aarhus University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have enabled the biological synthesis of high-yield industry relevant production of climate neutral drop-in fuels from biowaste. The study along with the new discovery has been published in Nature Communications.
6h
2D material controls light twice stronger
POSTECH research team identifies second-harmonics generation interference in 2D heterobilayers.
6h
How does immersive reality affect implicit racial bias?
A University of Barcelona study shows that when the virtual scenario is affectively negative, implicit bias increases, and even the illusion of owning a virtual body is lessened. Researchers argue that negative affect prevents the formation of new positive associations with black, and distress leads to disownership of the virtual body. Results challenge virtual reality as an empathy machine and ma
6h
The most consumed species of mussels contain microplastics all around the world
"If you eat mussels, you eat microplastics." This was already known to a limited extent about mussels from individual ocean regions. A new study by the University of Bayreuth reveals that this claim holds true globally.
6h
How scientists are using declassified military photographs to analyse historical ecological change
Researchers are using?Cold?War spy satellite images to explore changes in the environment, including deforestation in Romania, marmot decline in Kazakhstan and ecological damage from bombs in Vietnam.?
6h
Researchers discover protein function that could improve chemotherapy in the future
A protein responsible for orchestrating DNA key signaling and repair pathways could play a role in future chemotherapy treatment for cancer patients. The protein's function has been described by researchers at University of Copenhagen.
6h
COVID-19 as leading cause of death in US
This Viewpoint uses Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data to compare the COVID-19 mortality rate in 2020 with prior leading causes of death (heart disease, cancer, lung disease and injury) to put into context the cost of the infection in loss of life in the United States.
6h
Researchers determine how often cancer patients develop osteonecrosis of the jaw
A landmark study by researchers from the SWOG Cancer Research Network, a cancer clinical trials group funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has found that 2.8 percent of patients on average develop osteonecrosis of the jaw, or ONJ, within three years of starting a common treatment for cancer that has spread to the bone.
6h
intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor use in France during COVID-19 pandemic
This study quantified changes in the use of intravitreal (IVT) anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (anti-VEGF), the main treatment for retinal vascular abnormalities, since the COVID-19 pandemic started in France.
6h
COVID-19-associated ocular neuropathy with panuveitis
A case of COVID-19 with severe ocular neuropathy and panuveitis (inflammation) is reported in this article.
6h
Outcomes of early tracheostomy for patients with COVID-19
A retrospective medical record review was done of 148 patients to assess outcomes from early tracheostomy in the airway management of patients with COVID-19 who required mechanical ventilation.
6h
SARS-CoV-2 infection among patients with cancer undergoing antitumor treatment
The rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection among patients in Italy receiving antitumor treatment was evaluated in this study.
6h
COVID-19 social distancing efforts: implications for cancer control
The consequences of COVID-19-related social distancing on health behaviors that may result in better or worse outcomes for patients with cancer are explored in this Viewpoint.
6h
Cataract surgery in infancy increases glaucoma risk
Children who undergo cataract surgery as infants have a 22% risk of glaucoma 10 years later, whether or not they receive an intraocular lens implant. The findings come from the National Eye Institute (NEI)-funded Infant Aphakic Treatment Study, which today published 10-year follow-up results in JAMA Ophthalmology. NEI is part of the National Institutes of Health.
6h
Squirrels need good neighbours
Living beside familiar neighbours boosts a squirrel's chances of survival and successful breeding, new research shows.
6h
Seeking to avoid 'full lockdown,' cells monitor ribosome collisions
New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that cells monitor for ribosome collisions to determine the severity of the problem and how best to respond when things start to go awry.
6h
Geology: Alpine summits may have been ice-free during life of Tyrolean Iceman
Alpine summits at 3,000 to 4,000 m may have been ice free until about 5,900 years ago, just before the lifetime of the Tyrolean Iceman (Oetzi), when new glaciers started to form, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.
6h
Ultra-thin designer materials unlock quantum phenomena
New research, published in Nature , has measured highly sought-after Majorana quantum states
6h
Study tracks elephant tusks from 16th century shipwreck
In 1533, the Bom Jesus – a Portuguese trading vessel carrying 40 tons of cargo including gold, silver, copper and more than 100 elephant tusks – sank off the coast of Africa near present-day Namibia. The wreck was found in 2008, and scientists say they now have determined the source of much of the ivory recovered from the ship.
6h
Territorial red squirrels live longer when they're friendly with their neighbors
Researchers publishing December 17, 2020 in the journal Current Biology found that red squirrels in the Yukon have a greater chance of survival when living near neighbors. These fitness benefits depended on familiarity, or how long the same squirrels lived next to each other. These benefits were more pronounced in older squirrels, whom the data suggested could sharply offset the effects of aging b
6h
Ivory: Elephant decline revealed by shipwreck cargo
A forensic examination of the cargo reveals the devastation of populations caused by the trade.
6h
Targeted wetland restoration could greatly reduce nitrogen pollution
Nature, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03515-7 Wetlands remove nitrate pollution from water effectively. An analysis shows that this effect is constrained in the United States by the distribution of wetlands, and could be increased by targeting wetland restoration to nitrate sources.
6h
FDA advisory panel backs Moderna's Covid-19 vaccine
US regulator expected to grant emergency authorisation for inoculation by end of week
6h
Trump Signs Directive Calling for Nuclear Reactors in Space
Space Nukes On Wednesday, U.S. President Donald Trump signed Space Policy Directive-6 (SPD-6) , which lays out a plan to explore the cosmos using nuclear fission. Basically, SPD-6 is a call to develop and promote nuclear reactors to power bases on other worlds, according to Space.com 's breakdown, as well as nuclear propulsion systems for the rockets that will get us there. NASA is by no means a
6h
Ivory From Shipwreck Reveals Elephant Slaughter During Spice Trade
A trove from a Portuguese trading ship that sank in 1533 preserved genetic traces of whole lineages that have vanished from West Africa.
6h
Protein in cerebrospinal fluid signals Alzheimer's stage
A new form of an Alzheimer's disease protein in the fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord indicates what stage of the disease a person is in, and tracks with tangles of tau protein in the brain, according to a new study. Tau tangles are thought to be toxic to neurons, and their spread through the brain foretells the death of brain tissue and cognitive decline. Tangles appear as the early
6h
The Weirdest Objects in the Universe
With a new encyclopedia, seekers for intelligent life ask astronomers to reexamine the sky
6h
Author Correction: Recent evolution of a TET-controlled and DPPA3/STELLA-driven pathway of passive DNA demethylation in mammals
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20453-0
6h
Alzheimer's disease: regulating copper in the brain stops memory loss among mice
Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques1 in the patient's brain. These plaques sequester copper, and contain approximately five times as much as a healthy brain. Two CNRS scientists from the Coordination Chemistry Laboratory recently developed, with their colleagues from the Guangdong University of Technology and Shenzhen University (China), a molecule that regulate
6h
Longest intergalactic gas filament discovered
Astrophysicists led by the University of Bonn (Germany) have for the first time observed a gas filament with a length of 50 million light years. Its structure is strikingly similar to the predictions of computer simulations. The observation therefore also confirms our ideas about the origin and evolution of our universe. The results are published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics .
6h
Catalyst research: molecular probes require highly precise calculations
Catalysts are indispensable for many technologies. To further improve heterogeneous catalysts, it is required to analyze the complex processes on their surfaces, where the active sites are located. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), together with colleagues from Spain and Argentina, have now reached decisive progress: As reported in Physical Review Letters, they use calculation
6h
COVID-19 escalated armed conflicts in several war-torn countries
Nine countries were studied – four were found to have reduced conflict but five saw escalations
6h
Three-dimensional view of catalysts in action
For understanding the structure and function of catalysts in action, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), in cooperation with colleagues from the Swiss Light Source SLS of Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, have developed a new diagnostic tool. Operando X-ray spec-troscopy visualizes the structure and gr
6h
New nanobiomaterial from the silk of a mite with 'promising biomedical properties'
An international team of researchers has developed a new nanomaterial from the silk produced by the Tetranychus lintearius mite. This nanomaterial has the ability to penetrate human cells without damaging them and, therefore, has "promising biomedical properties".
6h
Scientists unlock promising key to preventing cancer relapse after immunotherapy
The researchers discovered that cancer immunotherapies that make use of immune system cells such as T cells and CAR-T cells kill not only tumor cells that express the drugs' target, but also adjacent tumor cells that lack the targets, because of the presence of fas. This process, known as bystander killing, can be made more effective by adding therapeutics that turn off the regulation of fas prote
6h
Josef Aschbacher to be new European Space Agency boss
One task for the Austrian will be managing the interests of EU and non-EU states, such as the UK.
6h
Alpine summits may have been ice-free during life of Tyrolean Iceman
Alpine summits at 3,000 to 4,000 m may have been ice free until about 5,900 years ago, just before the lifetime of the Tyrolean Iceman (Oetzi), when new glaciers started to form, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. The findings suggest that only the highest Alpine summits (4000 m and above) remained covered in ice for all of the current geological epoch, the Holocene, which began
7h
Seeking to avoid 'full lockdown,' cells monitor ribosome collisions
Ribosomes are the machines in the cell that use instructions from mRNA to synthesize functional proteins. There are hundreds of thousands of ribosomes in each cell, and they mostly process their instructions faithfully. But sometimes ribosomes get stuck or stall on roadblocks along defective mRNA molecules.
7h
Territorial red squirrels live longer when they're friendly with their neighbors
Though red squirrels are a solitary and territorial species, a 22-year study of these squirrels in the Yukon suggests that they have a higher chance of survival and a greater number of offspring when living near the same neighbors year after year. Surprisingly, the findings—appearing December 17 in the journal Current Biology—show that it didn't matter whether the squirrels' neighbors were related
7h
Study tracks elephant tusks from 16th century shipwreck
In 1533, the Bom Jesus—a Portuguese trading vessel carrying 40 tons of cargo including gold, silver, copper and more than 100 elephant tusks—sank off the coast of Africa near present-day Namibia. The wreck was found in 2008, and scientists say they now have determined the source of much of the ivory recovered from the ship.
7h
How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected measles vaccination rates?
Researchers evaluated changes in measles vaccination rates from before the pandemic to this summer, when return for clinical care was encouraged. Finding a steep and lasting decline, the researchers are making efforts to improve timely vaccination and provide safe catch-up opportunities to children in their pediatric primary care network.
7h
Coronavirus spread during dental procedures could be reduced with slower drill rotation
Researchers have found that careful selection and operation of dental drills can minimize the spread of COVID-19 through aerosols.
7h
Seeking to avoid 'full lockdown,' cells monitor ribosome collisions
Ribosomes are the machines in the cell that use instructions from mRNA to synthesize functional proteins. There are hundreds of thousands of ribosomes in each cell, and they mostly process their instructions faithfully. But sometimes ribosomes get stuck or stall on roadblocks along defective mRNA molecules.
7h
Territorial red squirrels live longer when they're friendly with their neighbors
Though red squirrels are a solitary and territorial species, a 22-year study of these squirrels in the Yukon suggests that they have a higher chance of survival and a greater number of offspring when living near the same neighbors year after year. Surprisingly, the findings—appearing December 17 in the journal Current Biology—show that it didn't matter whether the squirrels' neighbors were related
7h
Study tracks elephant tusks from 16th century shipwreck
In 1533, the Bom Jesus—a Portuguese trading vessel carrying 40 tons of cargo including gold, silver, copper and more than 100 elephant tusks—sank off the coast of Africa near present-day Namibia. The wreck was found in 2008, and scientists say they now have determined the source of much of the ivory recovered from the ship.
7h
New 3-D structure of RNA polymerase III could lead to new treatments
Scientists have created a three-dimensional map of a complex of molecules that plays a fundamental role in life—and which when it goes wrong is linked to increased sensitivity to viral infections and neurodegenerative diseases.
7h
Financial inclusion, the digital divide and other thoughts on the future of money | Ajay Banga
Roughly two billion people worldwide don't have access to banks or financial services like credit, insurance and investment — or even a way to formally prove their identity. How do we bridge this divide? Mastercard CEO Ajay Banga sits down with TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers to discuss how innovative public-private partnerships can help bring everyone into the digital econ
7h
Molecular probes require highly precise calculations
Catalysts are indispensable for many technologies. To further improve heterogeneous catalysts, it is required to analyze the complex processes on their surfaces, where the active sites are located. Scientists at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), together with colleagues from Spain and Argentina, have now reached decisive progress: As reported in Physical Review Letters, they use calculation
7h
The most consumed species of mussels contain microplastics all around the world
"If you eat mussels, you eat microplastics." This was already known to a limited extent about mussels from individual ocean regions. A new study by the University of Bayreuth, led by Prof. Dr. Christian Laforsch, reveals that this claim holds true globally. The Bayreuth team investigated the microplastic load of four mussel species which are particularly often sold as food in supermarkets from twe
7h
Change in global precipitation patterns as a result of climate change
The Earth's climate system is largely determined by the differences in temperature between the tropics and the poles. Global warming is likely to cause global atmospheric circulation to change and progressively revert to a situation similar to that of 5,000 to 10,000 years ago. This is the conclusion of a study undertaken by a research team led by Dr. Michael Deininger, the results of which have b
7h
New 3-D structure of RNA polymerase III could lead to new treatments
Scientists have created a three-dimensional map of a complex of molecules that plays a fundamental role in life—and which when it goes wrong is linked to increased sensitivity to viral infections and neurodegenerative diseases.
7h
Demand for meat is driving deforestation in Brazil—changing the soy industry could stop it
Soy may have a pretty innocuous reputation thanks to its association with vegan food and meat alternatives. But don't be fooled—crops of this pale legume are behind much of Brazil's epidemic of deforestation. Since 2000, Brazil has doubled its total area of soy plantation to 36 million hectares and become the world's largest producer. This expansion has erased vast swathes of forest and other habi
7h
Why snow days are becoming increasingly rare in the UK
Winter frost fairs were common on the frozen River Thames between the 17th and 19th centuries, but they've become unimaginable in our lifetime. Over decades and centuries, natural variability in the climate has plunged the UK into sub-zero temperatures from time to time. But global warming is tipping the odds away from the weather we once knew.
7h
Physicists quantum simulate a system in which fermions with multiple flavors behave like bosons
In the text book of quantum mechanics, it's stated that bosons and fermions, two types of elementary particles that build the universe, behave in a drastically different way. For example, bosons can share the same quantum state while fermions of the same kind cannot but fill available quantum states one by one.
7h
New nanobiomaterial from the silk of a mite with 'promising biomedical properties'
An international team of researchers has developed a new nanomaterial from the silk produced by the Tetranychus lintearius mite. This nanomaterial has the ability to penetrate human cells without damaging them and, therefore, has "promising biomedical properties".
7h
Scientists first to simulate a large-scale virus, M13
Atomistic simulations are a powerful tool to study the movement and interactions of atoms and molecules. In many biological processes, large-scale effects, for example, assembly of large viruses to nanoparticles are important. The assembly processes of these large viruses are of fundamental importance to the design of many devices and viral protein-targeted therapeutics. However, the time and leng
7h
Does Joe Biden Understand the Modern GOP?
The dissonance between the first and second halves of Joe Biden's landmark speech this week encapsulates a central strategic challenge he'll face as president. During his victory speech on Monday, following the Electoral College vote, Biden denounced more forcefully than ever before the Republican Party's legal maneuvers to overturn his win, arguing that they constituted an effort "to wipe out th
7h
The balkanization of the cloud is bad for everyone
Cloud computing is at a critical juncture. Millions of companies now use it to store data and run applications and services remotely. This has reduced costs and sped operations. But a new trend threatens the benefits that cloud computing has unlocked. "Digital sovereignty" describes the many ways governments try to assert more control over the computing environments on which their nations rely. I
7h
Satellite tracking supports whale survival
Extensive satellite tracking has revealed important new knowledge about the little known pygmy blue whale population of Southern Australia. Marine biologists have extensively tracked the movements of foraging and migrating blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) along the Australian continental shelf on a journey towards breeding grounds in Indonesia as part of conservation efforts for the
7h
Neurotic people feel worse emotionally during the corona crisis
During the corona crisis, neurotic people experience more negative emotions in their everyday lives, are more unstable emotionally and worry more about their health. These are the results of a study carried out by psychologists from the Universities of Münster and Bielefeld. The study has been published in the "Journal of Research in Personality".
7h
Finding a personalized approach to treating chronic rejection after lung transplantation
By studying the roles of an inflammatory protein and antibodies in chronic rejection after lung transplantation, researchers discover possibilities for new treatments.
7h
Physicists quantum simulate a system in which fermions with multiple flavors behave like bosons
Quantum simulations show that boson-like behaviours, so-called bosonization, emerge from an ensemble of fermions in three-dimensional systems, despite that bosons and fermions are governed by distinct quantum statistics
7h
Regeringen: Krav til parkeringspladser ved nybyggeri bør lempes
PLUS. Kravet om udlægning af parkeringsarealer kan indebære væsentlige udfordringer i tætte byområder, lyder det fra regeringen, som lægger op til at lempe reglerne i nyt udspil.
7h
The US Seems to Have Way More Vaccine Doses Than It Thought
The world is gearing up for the biggest vaccination campaign in history. As the first frontline workers and senior citizens are getting their COVID-19 shots, there's more good news: the US might have far more doses of Pfizer and BioNTech's vaccine than initially thought. Health officials found that vials of the vaccine technically had enough of the precious liquid for not just five, but a sixth o
7h
Shrine of decapitated heads suggests violence against foreigners in ancient Mexico
Victims may have been sacrificed because they were outsiders
7h
Genes could be key to new COVID-19 treatments, study finds
Genes involved in two molecular processes — antiviral immunity and lung inflammation — were pinpointed in new research. The breakthrough will help doctors understand how COVID-19 damages lungs at a molecular level.
7h
Training methods based on punishment compromise dog welfare, study finds
After aversive training, dogs had a lower behavioral state (higher stress and anxiety), a new study has found. If aversive methods were used in high proportions, that persisted even in other contexts.
7h
Eastern Australia has hundreds of enigmatic volcanoes. New research shows how they formed
The landscape of eastern Australia is dotted with hundreds of extinct volcanoes. They gave rise to an environment to which Aboriginal people have been connected for tens of thousands of years, and the rich soils upon which modern Australia has grown in the last few hundred years.
7h
Pulp succeeded in diet? Determining the slenderization of wood pulp
Osaka University scientists devise a system for measuring the quality of nanofibrillation for wood pulp using its natural optical birefringence. This work may lead to clear definition and sophisticated utilization of wooden cellulose nanofibers.
7h
Study reports drop in lung cancer screening, rise in malignancy during COVID-19 surge
Reporting on how deferred care worsened outcomes for lung cancer patients when the COVID-19 pandemic first surged in the spring of 2020, researchers from the University of Cincinnati explained that they have identified a framework that could help people with serious health conditions keep up their appointments during the current surge. The study has been selected for the 2020 Southern Surgical Ass
7h
Greenland 'knickpoints' could stall spread of glacial thinning
The jagged terrain of Greenland's mountains is protecting some of the island's outlet glaciers from warm coastal waters, according to a team of researchers that included scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and NASA. However, in regions where the flat bedrock offers no such protection, runaway thinning can reach far into the ice sheet and eat away at previously unaffected ice and cont
7h
Study: the pandemic's impact on lung cancer
A recent study led by University of Cincinnati Cancer Center researchers shows the impact the pandemic had on lung cancer screening, which experts say could be bad for both screening programs in general and for the overall well-being of patients. The article appears on the website of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print.
7h
Can mammogram screening be more effective?
MIT economists have identified an important challenge in designing age-related guidelines for when to start breast cancer screenings: Women who start getting mammograms at age 40 may be healthier than the population of 40-year-old women as a whole, with a lower incidence of breast cancer at that age.
7h
Neuroregenerative gene therapy
Spinal cord injury (SCI) often causes disability and seriously compromises quality of life. The major reasons for the difficulty of treatment for SCI might be due to the fact that many neurons are lost during the injury, leading to permanent loss of neural functions. An innovative gene therapy approach regenerated functional new neurons using local glial cells in the injured spinal cord, bringing
7h
Method finds hidden warning signals in measurements collected over time
MIT researchers have developed a deep learning-based algorithm to detect anomalies in time series data. The technology could provide advance warning of potential failures in systems ranging from satellites to computer data centers.
7h
SUTD and MIT scientists first to simulate a large-scale virus, M13
Scientists from the Singapore University of Technology and Design and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a procedure that combines various resolution levels in a computer simulation of a biological virus. Their procedure maps a large-scale model that includes features, such as a virus structure, nanoparticles, etc, to its corresponding coarse-grained molecular model. This approac
7h
Fibrous protein finding may lead to improved bioprinting, tissue engineering
Fibrous proteins such as collagen and fibrinogen form a thin solid layer on the surface of an aqueous solution similar to the "skin" that forms on warm milk, according to a team of Penn State Researchers, who believe this finding could lead to more efficient bioprinting and tissue engineering.
7h
Exploring links between lethal police violence and neighborhood health
As a series of police shootings sparked protests and a national reckoning on race this summer, Emory sociologist Alyasah Ali Sewell published a paper on the consequences that police violence has on the health of residents in neighborhoods where it occurs.
7h
Sond med mångrus tillbaka på jorden
Den kinesiska rymdsonden Chang'e-5 har landat på jorden med en samling sten och grus från månen, enligt Kinas statliga medier. Det är det första uppdraget av sitt slag som genomförs på fyra årtionden.
7h
Researchers solve a Colorado River mystery
A team led by University of Oregon geologist Rebecca Dorsey has published two papers that provide new insights into the origins of the Colorado River, using data from ancient sedimentary deposits located east of the San Andreas fault near the Salton Sea in Southern California.
7h
Billeddiagnostikken på Sygehus Lillebælt får ny fælles ledelse
Pica Ann Blackburn Andersen og Jakob Møller udgør den ny fælles afdelingsledelse for røntgenafdelingerne på Sygehus Lillebælt.
7h
The war on drugs didn't work. Oregon's plan might.
Criminalizing drugs didn't work the way we thought it would—or did it? (PopSci/) A tall white man wearing a denim shirt stands in front of a stove. The camera follows his hand as it reaches into a carton of eggs, and then pans out to reveal a cast-iron skillet. Making eye contact with the camera, he points to the egg: "This is your brain." He points to the skillet. "This is drugs." With one muscu
7h
The Great Tomato Debate: Should You Refrigerate or Not For Best Taste?
You might have heard that refrigeration is sacrilege for tomato storage. Is this true?
7h
Air pollution in eastern Europe adds to pandemic health woes
With the arrival of cold and foggy winter weather amid the pandemic, eastern Europe is facing an extra respiratory health hazard—air pollution.
8h
New report: Who is most impacted by inequality in Australia?
UNSW Social Policy Research Centre (SPRC) and Australian Council of Social Services (ACOSS) have released the second part of their analysis of inequality in Australia pre-COVID. Using Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data (2017–18), the report—Inequality in Australia 2020: Part 2, Who is Affected and Why—sets a baseline of data against which to assess COVID-19's impact on inequality in Austra
8h
Greenland 'knickpoints' could stall spread of glacial thinning
The jagged terrain of Greenland's mountains is protecting some of the island's outlet glaciers from warm coastal waters, according to a team of researchers that included scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and NASA.
8h
Sygehus Lillebælt og SDU udnævner professor i rygkirurgi
Mikkel Østerheden Andersen skiftede overlægetitlen ud, da han 1. november blev udnævnt til professor i rygkirurgi ved Sygehus Lillebælt og Institut for Regional Sundhedsforskning på Syddansk Universitet.
8h
Electron-producing microbes power sustainable wastewater treatment
WSU researchers have developed a sustainable wastewater treatment system that relies on electron-producing microbial communities to clean the water. The work could someday lead to reduced reliance on the energy-intensive processes that are used to move and treat wastewater, which accounts for as much as two percent of the total electrical energy consumption in the United States.
8h
Exercise for low back pain beneficial but no one agrees on why
A new UNSW evidence review has found there is still no consensus between researchers about why exercise works for low back pain patients – despite decades of studies on the topic.
8h
New therapeutic target pinpointed for stomach cancer
WEHI researchers have identified a key molecular regulator, TNF, which is involved in the progression and spread of stomach cancer, suggesting a potential new approach to treat this devastating disease.
8h
Polariton interactions: Light matters
Why do 2D exciton-polaritons interact? This intriguing quasiparticle, which is part light (photon), and part matter (exciton), doesn't behave as predicted: continuing to interact with other particles when confined to two dimensions in extremely cold conditions. A new FLEET/Monash study finds the answer lies in the 'light-like' characteristics of these quasiparticles, with importance for future app
8h
SU2C research leads to FDA approval of new first-line treatment for colorectal cancer
The FDA recently approved the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab as a first-line treatment for patients with certain types of advanced colorectal cancer. This is the 9th FDA approval supported by Stand Up To Cancer® (SU2C) research. Patients newly diagnosed with advanced or metastatic microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) colorectal cancer previously would have
8h
SpaceX Starship Prototype Exploded, but It's Still a Giant Leap Towards Mars
Private company SpaceX launched SN8, a prototype of its Starship spacecraft , designed to go to the moon and Mars, on December 10. Its short flight attracted a great deal of attention for its final few seconds before landing —when it exploded. But consider the near perfect totality of its six-and-a-half-minute flight. Look at the groundbreaking technology and maneuvers involved. It is reasonable
8h
The Lifesaving Potential of Less-Than-Perfect Donor Kidneys
Demand for healthy kidneys has long outstripped supply. But better testing and treatment is expanding the donor pool. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Researchers chart the potential risks of free-floating DNA
Loose strands of DNA end up in nature via our wastewater. As of yet, it is unclear how much this free-floating DNA impacts environmental and public health. Researchers at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) have now found a way to determine just how much potentially harmful DNA ends up in our wastewater. They have developed a method that can isolate such free-floating DNA from wastewater to
8h
Vanligt med andningsbesvär bland unga skidåkare
Två av tre unga skidåkare får besvär med andningen vid träning i kyla. Majoriteten av skidåkarna är positiva till andningsmask. Men maskerna har inte enbart positiva effekter, visar en studie med elitidrottande ungdomar inom längdåkning och skidskytte. – Den höga förekomsten av astma hos längdskidåkare kan bero på upprepad och långvarig inandning av kall torr luft. Med andningsmask återanvänds dä
8h
Snow blankets Northeast, breaking records in some areas
The first major snowstorm of the season left the Northeast blanketed in snow, setting records in some areas.
8h
European Space Agency appoints Austrian scientist new chief
Austrian scientist Josef Aschbacher has been appointed to head the European Space Agency as the organization grapples with the fallout from Brexit and the rise of commercial rivals outside of Europe.
8h
Researchers chart the potential risks of free-floating DNA
Loose strands of DNA end up in nature via our wastewater. As of yet, it is unclear how much this free-floating DNA impacts environmental and public health. Researchers at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) have now found a way to determine just how much potentially harmful DNA ends up in our wastewater. They have developed a method that can isolate such free-floating DNA from wastewater to
8h
The science of political polarization and social media
To better understand how politics play out online, W&M News spoke with Jaime Settle, the David and Carolyn Wakefield Term Associate Professor of Government at William & Mary. She is the director of the Social Networks and Political Psychology Lab and co-director of the Social Science Research Methods Center. She also serves as the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Data Science Program. Her
8h
Skinnier but resilient geese thriving in the high Arctic
The world is changing in dramatic ways, especially in the High Arctic. Climate change has meant that spring arrives earlier, but winters have become far more treacherous for Arctic animals that overwinter there, with more rain and ice.
8h
How the Wolves Change the Forest
New research tracked the canines in northern Minnesota for years to see just how they reshape their ecosystems. Audio of wolves inside Voyageurs National Park, courtesy of Jacob Job .
8h
Skinnier but resilient geese thriving in the high Arctic
The world is changing in dramatic ways, especially in the High Arctic. Climate change has meant that spring arrives earlier, but winters have become far more treacherous for Arctic animals that overwinter there, with more rain and ice.
8h
New understanding about ancient branch of life on Earth
Aberdeen scientists have made an important discovery about a branch of ancient life which plays an important—if perhaps not fully understood role—in our world's ecosystem.
8h
Immune and circulatory systems are integrated in insects
Biologists have found solid proof that among the insect tree of life, the relationship between the immune and circulatory systems is consistent. The discovery will help researchers understand how insects—including the relatively few that spread disease to animals or agricultural crops—fight, succumb to or transmit infections.
8h
Jawless lamprey takes a bite out of cancer gene evolution
Mice, fruit flies and dogs are common creatures of laboratories across the country, valuable to researchers for their genetic proximity to humans. But what about lampreys?
8h
Evolution is the reason you want to watch internet cat videos
How many times have you sat down in front of a screen to work or focus on something important, but ended up looking at a new meme of Donald Trump, a homemade YouTube video of a cockatoo going amok, or a series of photos showing what the biggest celebrities from the 90s look like today?
8h
Coronavirus escalated armed conflicts in several war-torn countries
Armed conflict activities increased in five countries during the first wave of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic says new research from the University of Melbourne.
8h
New understanding about ancient branch of life on Earth
Aberdeen scientists have made an important discovery about a branch of ancient life which plays an important—if perhaps not fully understood role—in our world's ecosystem.
8h
Immune and circulatory systems are integrated in insects
Biologists have found solid proof that among the insect tree of life, the relationship between the immune and circulatory systems is consistent. The discovery will help researchers understand how insects—including the relatively few that spread disease to animals or agricultural crops—fight, succumb to or transmit infections.
8h
Jawless lamprey takes a bite out of cancer gene evolution
Mice, fruit flies and dogs are common creatures of laboratories across the country, valuable to researchers for their genetic proximity to humans. But what about lampreys?
8h
Evolution is the reason you want to watch internet cat videos
How many times have you sat down in front of a screen to work or focus on something important, but ended up looking at a new meme of Donald Trump, a homemade YouTube video of a cockatoo going amok, or a series of photos showing what the biggest celebrities from the 90s look like today?
8h
Kommercielle aktører vil have nettilsluttede batterier fritaget for tariffer
PLUS. Et konsortium bestående af fem virksomheder mener, at kommerciel ellagring i stor skala lige nu bremses af dobbelt tarifering, da batterier i visse tilfælde betragtes både som en produktions- og en forbrugsenhed.
8h
The savanna isn't the same after Mozambique's civil war
Animals have returned to Gorongosa National Park after Mozambique's civil war, but the savanna community doesn't quite look like it used to, researchers report. When civil war broke out more than 40 years ago, it largely spelled doom for animals in the park, a 1,500-square-mile reserve on the floor of the southern end of the Great African Rift Valley, in the heart of the country. As the decades-l
8h
Best headphones: Get good-quality audio equipment at your budget
Here are some of the best headphones to suit any style of listener. (Dan Farrell via Unsplash/) Any way you slice it, headphones and other personal audio equipment are an essential part of our lives, at home and at work. Music and podcasts can be summoned at will during our routine workouts or while studying at the library, and conversations can be held over the phone while keeping our hands free
8h
The Data on Coronavirus and Public Holidays
With the festive season ahead, Nature examines what is known about the risks of COVID spread, and how researchers will spend their time off — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Men over 50 have same success with vasectomy reversal outcomes as younger men
In good news for older men, a new study shows that men over 50 who undergo a vasectomy reversal had the same rate of pregnancy with their partners as their younger counterparts.
8h
Shark fishing bans partially effective
Bans on shark fishing are only partially effective in protecting sharks, new research suggests.
8h
Oral contraceptive pills protect against ovarian and endometrial cancer
A comprehensive study involving more than 250,000 women, shows that oral contraceptive use protects against ovarian and endometrial cancer. The protective effect remains for several decades after discontinuing the use.
8h
Beech forests responded quickly to 2018 Swiss drought
How do Swiss beeches respond to extreme drought? To answer this question, researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) studied 75 National Forest Inventory (NFI) sample plots during and after the dry summer of 2018. Reduced growth and an abundance of prematurely discolored leaves and thinned crowns provided clear evidence of a loss of vitality in many of
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Men over 50 have same success with vasectomy reversal outcomes as younger men
In good news for older men, a new study from Keck Medicine of USC published in Urology shows that men over 50 who undergo a vasectomy reversal had the same rate of pregnancy with their partners as their younger counterparts.
8h
University of Oregon researchers solve a Colorado River mystery
University of Oregon researchers have published two papers that provide new evidence that today's desert landscape of the Colorado River's lower valley was submerged roughly 5 million to 6 million years ago under shallow seas with strong, fluctuating tidal currents.
8h
Calm Yourself
Tactics that everyone can easily use to control their response to intense life circumstances — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Beech forests responded quickly to 2018 Swiss drought
How do Swiss beeches respond to extreme drought? To answer this question, researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) studied 75 National Forest Inventory (NFI) sample plots during and after the dry summer of 2018. Reduced growth and an abundance of prematurely discolored leaves and thinned crowns provided clear evidence of a loss of vitality in many of
8h
'I want to generate opportunities for Black scientists'
Nature, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03559-9 UK geoscientist Christopher Jackson will be the first Black researcher to deliver a Christmas lecture at the Royal Institution of Great Britain.
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Calm Yourself
Tactics that everyone can easily use to control their response to intense life circumstances — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
New data-driven index could help countries reopen successfully during the pandemic
When is it safe to reopen countries amidst pandemic lockdowns? It's a big question in the age of coronavirus—and one looming large on many minds across the globe. People need an open economy—and jobs—to put food on the table. But they also need safety and health to survive.
8h
Uber Faces a Fine for Refusing to Give Details on Assaults
The California Public Utility Commission demanded details on sexual assault cases involving drivers. But Uber says complying would compromise victims' identities.
8h
Forskningsbudgeten: Stor satsning för att förebygga kriminalitet
Regeringen lanserar nya forskningsprogram för att minska brottslighet och segregation. Och det satsas extra mycket på klimat i forskningsbudgeten som regeringen presenterade i dag.
8h
The Top Ten Ocean Stories of 2020
From the discovery of a giant coral reef pinnacle to a shocking estimate of plastics on the seafloor, these were the biggest marine moments of the year
8h
Is cadmium a factor in flu, pneumonia, COVID death rates?
High levels of cadmium, a chemical found in cigarettes and in contaminated vegetables, are associated with higher death rates in patients with influenza or pneumonia, research finds. High cadmium levels may also increase the severity of COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses, according to the study. "Our study suggests the public in general, both smokers and nonsmokers, could benefit from reduced
8h
P-piller minskar risken för cancer
P-piller skyddar mot både äggstocks- och endometriecancer, visar en studie där man undersökt över 250 000 kvinnor. Den skyddande effekten består flera decennier efter att man slutat med p-piller. Äggstocks- och endometriecancer tillhör de vanligaste typerna av gynekologisk cancer. Ungefär 2 procent av alla kvinnor drabbas av någon av dessa cancersjukdomar under sin livstid. Endometriecancer, den
9h
Canada finally has a climate plan that will let it meet its carbon targets by 2030
I've studied Canadian climate policy debates for three decades. Over that time, by my count, there has been seven national climate targets and nine climate plans. None has been credible—with the exception of the plan released last week by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government.
9h
For college students, skin cancer risk remains high in winter months
New research finds college students could be just as at risk for developing skin cancer in the dead of winter as they are in the middle of summer.
9h
New diagnostic isotope to enhance targeted alpha therapy for cancer
Researchers in the DOE Isotope Program have developed an effective radionuclide, cerium-134, as a paired analogue of actinium and thorium that can be imaged using positron emission tomography (PET).
9h
How the Wolves Change the Forest
New research tracked the canines in northern Minnesota for years to see just how they reshape their ecosystems. Audio of wolves inside Voyageurs National Park, courtesy of Jacob Job. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Researchers study different strains of Listeria in pigs
Researchers from the CEU Cardenal Herrera University (CEU UCH) of Valencia, the University of Cordoba and the Pasteur Institute of Paris have conducted a study to determine the virulent potential of strains of the listeria monocytogenes bacteria in pigs in Spain. These animals are asymptomatic reservoirs for this bacteria, which both in humans as well as animals causes the disease known as listeri
9h
Astronomers Get Their Wish, and a Cosmic Crisis Gets Worse
On December 3, humanity suddenly had information at its fingertips that people have wanted for, well, forever: the precise distances to the stars. "You type in the name of a star or its position, and in less than a second you will have the answer," Barry Madore , a cosmologist at the University of Chicago and Carnegie Observatories, said on a Zoom call last week. "I mean …" He trailed off. "We're
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How the Wolves Change the Forest
New research tracked the canines in northern Minnesota for years to see just how they reshape their ecosystems. Audio of wolves inside Voyageurs National Park, courtesy of Jacob Job. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Researchers study different strains of Listeria in pigs
Researchers from the CEU Cardenal Herrera University (CEU UCH) of Valencia, the University of Cordoba and the Pasteur Institute of Paris have conducted a study to determine the virulent potential of strains of the listeria monocytogenes bacteria in pigs in Spain. These animals are asymptomatic reservoirs for this bacteria, which both in humans as well as animals causes the disease known as listeri
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First measurement of single-proton interactions with the MicroBooNE detector
Neutrinos are as mysterious as they are ubiquitous. One of the most abundant particles in the universe, they pass through most matter unnoticed. Their masses are so tiny that so far no experiment has succeeded in measuring them, while they travel at nearly the speed of light.
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How the size and shape of dried leaves can turn small flames into colossal bushfires
The 2020-21 fire season is well underway, and we've watched in horror as places like K'gari (Fraser Island) burn uncontrollably, threatening people and their homes and devastating the environment.
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Promising test in Peru: Tackling climate change while reducing poverty
What if we start taxing carbon-intensive products such as electricity and gasoline, and at the same time compensate low-income households? Hauke Ward and colleagues did just that in a computer simulation for Peru, with a remarkable outcome. Not only does the approach tackle climate change, but it could also lead to a significant reduction in the poverty headcount.
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Baby mice 'shut down' to survive extreme cold on the highest mountain tops
It's early 2019, and biologist Jay Storz is struggling to breathe. He has just made it to the top of Llullaillaco, a Chilean volcano about three-quarters the height of Mount Everest, in search of a rumor.
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It Took Two Days to Develop Moderna's Vaccine
As the first crop of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are being rolled out, we can start to see the light at the end of this pandemic tunnel. Still, in the US alone there will probably be another 200,000 deaths before we reach herd immunity. Further, as fast as this vaccine development and deployment was, it's not clear how much faster it will bring an end to the pandemic. We will likely be 18 months into the
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Big Data will analyse the mystery of Beethoven's metronome
Data science and physics research at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and UNED has analyzed a centuries-old controversy over Beethoven's annotations about the tempo (the playing speed) of his works, which is considered to be too fast based on these marks. In this study, published in the PLOS ONE journal, it is noted that this deviation could be explained by the composer reading the metronome i
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Baby mice 'shut down' to survive extreme cold on the highest mountain tops
It's early 2019, and biologist Jay Storz is struggling to breathe. He has just made it to the top of Llullaillaco, a Chilean volcano about three-quarters the height of Mount Everest, in search of a rumor.
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5 evidence-based ways teachers can help struggling students
New South Wales recently introduced a draft Student Behavior Strategy. This was released on the heels of a report suggesting Indigenous students and students with disabilities are more likely to experience exclusionary practices, such as suspension from school, in response to challenging classroom behavior.
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Three-dimensional view of catalysts in action
For understanding the structure and function of catalysts in action, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), in cooperation with colleagues from the Swiss Light Source SLS of Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, have developed a new diagnostic tool. Operando X-ray spectroscopy visualizes the structure and gra
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New SARS-CoV-2 Variant Spreading Rapidly in UK
The significance of the variant remains unclear, but experts remain confident that it will not evade the protection offered by a COVID-19 vaccine.
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Determining the slenderization of wood pulp
Researchers from the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research at Osaka University have devised a new method to determine the degree of fibrillation in wood pulp. By taking advantage of the intrinsic optical birefringence of cellulose, they were able to measure the morphology change through optical retardation distribution. This work may lead to clear grading and smart utilization of renewab
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Cells resistant to treatment already present before diagnosis of adult leukaemia
This work is a collaboration between Núria López-Bigas' lab at IRB Barcelona and the groups headed by Anna Bigas (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute) and Josep Maria Ribera (Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute).The results have been published in Genome Biology.
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A drop of honey in a pandemic: Modeling the social and economic effects of COVID
The COVID-19 pandemic has changed our lives in 2020. Measures that were adopted to preserve lives and protect health services have been more successful in some parts of the world than others. Nevertheless, millions of people have been infected and a large proportion of those have suffered terrible symptoms of this viral disease. Hundreds of thousands of people so far have died. Medical science con
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Learning about quantum vacuum by studying atoms
The Unruh-effect connects quantum theory and relativity. Until now, it could not be measured. A new idea could change this.
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Bornholm skal være testmiljø for cirkulær økonomi
PLUS. »Vi har været en del af problemet. Nu vil vi også være en del af løsningen,« siger Nestlé-direktør om et nyt samarbejde mellem virksomheden, affaldsselskabet BOFA og Danmarks Naturfredningsforening.
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UK government expands strictest Covid restrictions in England
Parts of east and south-east will move into tier 3 from Saturday as virus cases rise
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Finding new uses for waste tires
Tires catapult our cars and trucks down the highway at speeds greater than 70 miles per hour, typically for at least 50,000 miles. They must grip the road even in wet and icy conditions. No wonder tires are difficult to recycle.
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Some Vials Of COVID-19 Vaccine Contain Extra Doses, Expanding Supply, FDA Says
The Food and Drug Administration says is advising health workers to use "every full dose obtainable" to help speed up the nationwide immunization campaign. (Image credit: Rogelio V. Solis/AP)
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Julkalendervinnare 2020
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The WHO's chief scientist on a year of loss and learning
Nature, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03556-y The head of scientific work at the World Health Organization reflects on the agency's challenges and achievements as it navigates the COVID pandemic.
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What's the great conjunction or 'Christmas Star'?
An astrological event called a great conjunction, or "Christmas Star," will occur on December 21. The once-in-a-lifetime occurrence may brighten the unusual season. Shannon Schmoll , director of the Abrams Planetarium at Michigan State University, offers her insight on the rare view of Jupiter and Saturn: The post appeared first on Futurity .
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Scientists create a new phototoxic protein, SuperNova2
Scientists from Skoltech, the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of RAS and the London Institute of Medical Sciences (LMS) have developed an enhanced version of SuperNova, a genetically encoded phototoxic synthesizer, that helps control intracellular processes by light exposure. The research was published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences.
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Scientists create a new phototoxic protein, SuperNova2
Scientists from Skoltech, the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of RAS and the London Institute of Medical Sciences (LMS) have developed an enhanced version of SuperNova, a genetically encoded phototoxic synthesizer, that helps control intracellular processes by light exposure. The research was published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences.
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A Clever Strategy to Distribute Covid Aid—With Satellite Data
The small nation of Togo used image analysis algorithms to target economic support for its most vulnerable residents.
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LncExpDB: Expression database of human long non-coding RNAs
Recently, the researchers from the Beijing Institute of Genomics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have constructed an expression database of human long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), LncExpDB. This study was published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research.
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Your guide to cooking a sustainable holiday meal
Eating local, seasonal produce is an easy way to make your holiday feast more sustainable. (Rosie De La Cruz/Unsplash/) This story was originally featured on Saveur . The holidays are a wonderful time to partake in our most beloved food-centric celebrations—many of us spend more time cooking this time of year than any other. And when we sit down with our families to share a holiday meal, we're al
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Longest intergalactic gas filament discovered
More than half of the matter in our universe has so far remained hidden from us. However, astrophysicists had a hunch where it might be: In so-called filaments, unfathomably large thread-like structures of hot gas that surround and connect galaxies and galaxy clusters. A team led by the University of Bonn has now for the first time observed a gas filament with a length of 50 million light years. I
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LncExpDB: Expression database of human long non-coding RNAs
Recently, the researchers from the Beijing Institute of Genomics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have constructed an expression database of human long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), LncExpDB. This study was published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research.
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Enhanced interactions through strong light-matter coupling
Why do two-dimensional exciton-polaritons interact? The exciton-polariton quasiparticle is part light (photon), and part matter (exciton). Their excitonic (matter) part confers them the ability to interact with other particles, a property lacking to bare photons.
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Abandoned termite mounds are 'islands of fertility'
Termites are considered to be ecosystem engineers. Fungus-growing termites could play an important role in soil nutrient availability and dynamics in humid and subhumid tropical ecosystems, by building numerous mounds with differing properties compared to adjacent soils. However, far less is known about the nutrient variability within the mounds and the nutrient stocks in whole mounds.
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Tiny quantum computer solves real optimization problem
Quantum computers have already managed to surpass ordinary computers in solving certain tasks—unfortunately, totally useless ones. The next milestone is to get them to do useful things. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have now shown that they can solve a small part of a real logistics problem with their small, but well-functioning quantum computer.
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Abandoned termite mounds are 'islands of fertility'
Termites are considered to be ecosystem engineers. Fungus-growing termites could play an important role in soil nutrient availability and dynamics in humid and subhumid tropical ecosystems, by building numerous mounds with differing properties compared to adjacent soils. However, far less is known about the nutrient variability within the mounds and the nutrient stocks in whole mounds.
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Detailing the formation of distant solar systems with NASA's Webb Telescope
We live in a mature solar system—eight planets and several dwarf planets (like Pluto) have formed, the latter within the rock- and debris-filled region known as the Kuiper Belt. If we could turn back time, what would we see as our solar system formed? While we can't answer this question directly, researchers can study other systems that are actively forming—along with the mix of gas and dust that
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Scientists discover a new type of molecular knot using X-ray diffraction techniques
Scientists have developed a way of braiding three molecular strands enabling tighter and more complex knots to be made than has previously been possible.
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Scientists discover insulator-to-semiconductor transition in fluorescent carbon quantum dots
Recently, researchers led by Prof. XU Wen from the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS), along with their collaborators from the Southwest University in Chongqing, applied the Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz TDS) to study the optoelectronic properties of fluorescent carbon quantum dots (FQCDs).
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A no-meat diet everywhere will not solve the climate crisis
People in industrialized regions like the United States of America or Europe are generally urged to eat less meat and animal-source foods as part of a healthier and lower-emissions diet. But such recommendations are not universal solutions in low- or middle-income countries, where livestock are critical to incomes and diets, argue scientists in recently published research in Environmental Research
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Longest known exposure photograph ever captured using a beer can
A photograph thought to be the longest exposure image ever taken has been discovered inside a beer can at the University of Hertfordshire's Bayfordbury Observatory.
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Nyhämtat rymdgrus berättar solsystemets historia
Den kinesiska sonden Chang'e 5 har hämtat prover från månens yta och skickat dem till jorden. Kapseln landade den 16 december, och hämtades upp där den tog mark i Mongoliet. Det är första gången sedan 1970-talet som prover från månen hämtas till jorden. Tio dagar tidigare landade en annan kapsel i Australien, med material från asteroiden Ryugu som hämtats av den japanska farkosten Hayabusa 2.
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Restoring wetlands near farms would dramatically reduce water pollution
Runoff from fertilizer and manure application in agricultural regions has led to high levels of nitrate in groundwater, rivers, and coastal areas. These high nitrate levels can threaten drinking water safety and also lead to problems with algal blooms and degradation of aquatic ecosystems.
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Ultra-thin designer materials unlock quantum phenomena
A team of theoretical and experimental physicists have designed a new ultra-thin material that they have used to create elusive quantum states. Called one-dimensional Majorana zero energy modes, these quantum states could have a huge impact for quantum computing.
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Daily briefing: Mars's crust has layers like a cake
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03603-8 The first peek inside Mars reveals a layered crust. Plus, ten remarkable discoveries of 2020 and what the data say about holiday COVID risks.
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The Best TikToks of 2020
The social media platform, which gained enormous popularity this year, served as a mirror of these often dystopian times.
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Vaccines Are Here. We Have to Talk About Side Effects
Disinformation could thwart distribution before government messages have a chance to push back. Debunking might turn out to be everyone's job.
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How Restaurants Retooled for Takeout—and Survival
Chefs tinkered with food chemistry, while dining apps reengineered logistics. Those changes will endure even after the pandemic is over.
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Usikkert hjemmearbejde: Hver tredje bruger uautoriserede tjenester til erhverv
En ny analyse fra Digitaliseringsstyrelsen viser, at sikkerheden på landets arbejdspladser bliver udfordret, når kontoret rykker hjem i privaten.
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Boligminister: Nye huse skal kunne beskattes efter klimapåvirkning
PLUS. Fra 2023 skal bygherrer beregne klimapåvirkningen fra nye bygninger. Beregningsmodellen skal ifølge boligministeren være så præcis, at den kan danne grundlag for beskatning
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How to Expand Access to COVID Vaccines without Compromising the Science
Emergency use authorizations by the FDA are not ideal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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We Must Find Ways to Detect Cancer Much Earlier
The job of the oncologist of the future will be to prevent and treat the emergence of disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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AI ger gamla porträttfoton liv
Tänk dig att du har bilder av släktingar i ett gammalt fotoalbum, som matas in i ett system för ansiktsigenkänning. Ut kommer inte bara namn utan även länkar till persondata från folkbokföringen och en karta som visar var personerna bodde. Din släkthistoria får liv. Det är en del av visionen för ett tvärvetenskapligt AI-projekt som drar igång vid årsskiftet.
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Fascinating science stories overlooked this year
The discoveries, advances and curious research findings that were missed amid covid-19 coverage
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Jupiter and Saturn's Great Conjunction Is the Best in 800 Years–Here's How to See It
The giant planets will appear spectacularly close together in Earth's sky during the solstice on December 21 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Jupiter and Saturn's Great Conjunction Is the Best in 800 Years–Here's How to See It
The giant planets will appear spectacularly close together in Earth's sky during the solstice on December 21 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Author Correction: Factors influencing riverine utilization patterns in two sympatric macaques
Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79259-1
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Hålrum i vården av äldre med psykisk sjukdom och funktionshinder
Övermedicinering, fler oplanerade vårdbesök och fler besök inom slutenvården. Flerfaldig sårbarhet med ökad risk för samsjuklighet. Vården fyller inte behoven för äldre med funktionshinder och psykisk ohälsa, visar en studie från Lunds universitet. I en unik studie från Lunds universitet har hälsan hos äldre personer med intellektuell funktionsnedsättning och psykisk ohälsa kartlagts. Fokus har v
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How Covid-19 vaccines will get from the factory to millions of Americans | Bahar Aliakbarian
Pfizer and Moderna will need special supply chains to ensure vaccines get to patients fast and without spoiling. Here's how The two major US developers of the early Covid-19 vaccines are Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. They both developed mRNA vaccines, a relatively new type of vaccine . A major supply chain issue is the temperature requirement for these vaccines. The Pfizer vaccine needs to be stor
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En dna-profil säger mycket om potentialen som mjölkko
Det är numera billigt att ta fram dna-profiler på enskilda kor, och ger de ger en bättre bild av vilka kvigkalvar som bör bli avelsdjur än dagens härstamningsindex, visar forskning från SLU. Dessutom kan dna-information användas för att hålla kontroll på genetiska defekter och inavel i besättningen. Intresset för genomiska test, det vill säga analyser av djurs hela arvsmassa, har ökat snabbt inom
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Marknära vindar minskar trots varmare klimat
Ett varmare klimat bör leda till starkare vindar, men en ny avhandling vid Göteborgs universitet visar att de marknära vindarna i Sverige tvärtom minskat. Anledningen tros delvis vara ökad mängd skog kring väderstationerna. När klimatförändringarna gör jordens yta varmare, påverkar det också olika väderfenomen som vind och nederbörd. Ytvindar, alltså vindar på upp till 10 meters höjd, är kanske e
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Hang On for Three More Months
H unkering down to wait out the coronavirus isn't easy. The costs of isolation are steep. Quarantine fatigue is real. The chance to gather with extended family and friends this holiday season is particularly alluring to those of us battling loneliness. Ritual is the bedrock of human society, and forsaking it feels even more destabilizing in a year that has already thrown us all off-kilter. Even s
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Don't Isolate Yourself This Holiday Season
" How to Build a Life " is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. The polls before the 2020 election were an inaccurate predictor of the vote—some wildly so. Many polls badly underestimated the number of people intending to vote for Donald Trump. One explanation is the "shy voter" hypothesis: People were reluctant to tell pollsters their true voting inten
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He Won a Super Bowl. Now for the Real Challenge.
Lauren Tamaki This article was published online on December 17, 2020. M artellus Bennett was in Japan when Bill Belichick called. The legendary New England Patriots head coach wasn't surprised to find Bennett in such a far-flung locale. "You're always somewhere," Bennett recalls a bemused Belichick telling him. It was February 2018, and the veteran tight end had just reached his second straight S
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Moon rocks in hand, China prepares for future moon missions
Following the successful return of moon rocks by its Chang'e 5 robotic probe, China is preparing for future missions that could set the stage for an eventual lunar base to host human explorers, a top space program official said Thursday.
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This alien world could help us find Planet Nine in our own solar system
This 11-Jupiter-mass exoplanet called HD106906 b occupies an unlikely orbit around a double star 336 light-years away and it may be offering clues to something that might be much closer to home: a hypothesized distant member of our Solar System dubbed "Planet Nine." This is the first time that astronomers have been able to measure the motion of a massive Jupiter-like planet that is orbiting very
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Alteration of serum amino acid profiles by dietary adenine supplementation inhibits fatty liver development in rats
Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79234-w
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Two high-rate pentose-phosphate pathways in cancer cells
Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79185-2
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Development of β-Ga2O3 layers growth on sapphire substrates employing modeling of precursors ratio in halide vapor phase epitaxy reactor
Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79154-9 Development of β-Ga 2 O 3 layers growth on sapphire substrates employing modeling of precursors ratio in halide vapor phase epitaxy reactor
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Thin films of formamidinium lead iodide (FAPI) deposited using aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD)
Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79291-1
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Myosteatosis as a novel prognostic biomarker after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer
Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79340-9
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pH-controlled stacking direction of the β-strands in peptide fibrils
Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79001-x
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Effects of activation of the LINE-1 antisense promoter on the growth of cultured cells
Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79197-y
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Readout and control of an endofullerene electronic spin
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20202-3 Encasing a single atom within a fullerene (C60) cage can create a robustly packaged single atomic spin system. Here, the authors perform electron paramagnetic resonance on a single encased spin using a diamond NV-center, demonstrating the first steps in controlling single spins in fullerene cages.
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Zero-bias mid-infrared graphene photodetectors with bulk photoresponse and calibration-free polarization detection
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20115-1 Here, graphene-based plasmonic metamaterials are used to generate an artificial bulk photovoltaic effect, enabling the realization of mid-infrared photodetectors with enhanced responsivity and calibration-free polarization detection at room temperature.
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Single cell analysis reveals distinct immune landscapes in transplant and primary sarcomas that determine response or resistance to immunotherapy
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19917-0 Promising results of cancer therapies in transplant tumor models often fail to predict efficacy in clinical trials. Here the authors show that, while transplant tumors are cured by radiotherapy and PD-1 blockade, autochthonous sarcomas are resistant to the identical treatment, recapitulating the immune lands
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Organism body size structures the soil microbial and nematode community assembly at a continental and global scale
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20271-4 It is unclear whether body size affects community assembly mechanisms of soil biota. Here, the authors analyse soil microbial and nematode communities sampled along a 4000-km transect in China and global soil microbiome data to show that bacterial assembly is governed by high dispersal, whereas larger taxa a
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Metavinculin modulates force transduction in cell adhesion sites
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20125-z Muscle cells express an adhesion molecule called metavinculin, which has been associated with cardiomyopathies. Here, the authors employed molecular tension sensors to reveal that metavinculin expression modulates cell adhesion mechanics and they develop a mouse model to demonstrate that the presence of meta
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Structure of human RNA polymerase III
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20262-5 The eukaryotic RNA Polymerase III transcribes tRNAs, some ribosomal and spliceosomal RNAs. Here, the authors resolve a cryo-EM structure of human RNA Polymerase III in its apo form and complemented it with crystal structures and SAXS analysis of RPC5, revealing insights into the molecular mechanisms of Pol I
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Inhibitory neurotransmission drives endocannabinoid degradation to promote memory consolidation
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20121-3 Endocannabinoid levels are controlled by the fine balance between their synthesis and degradation. Here, the authors show that memory formation through fear conditioning selectively accelerates the degradation of endocannabinoids in the cerebellum via a lasting increase in GABA release.
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Reliable COVID-19 test could reduce virus spread
Results of a unique test developed by a world-renowned expert, which targets three viral genes to increase reliability and could cut COVID-19 detection time to 20 minutes, have been peer reviewed and published in the journal Scientific Reports.
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Impaired blood vessel and kidney function underlie heart disease risk in people with HIV
People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have impaired blood vessel function, which increases risk of heart and blood vessel-disease.The increased heart disease risk is especially pronounced in people with HIV who also have kidney disease.The increased heart disease risk remains regardless of HIV severity or use of antiretroviral therapy.
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What are COVID archivists keeping for tomorrow's historians?
Nature, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03554-0 Records of past pandemics are patchy. This one has seen a global frenzy of collecting.
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Forbindelsen ryger ved grænsen: IoT-netværk bøvler med roaming
PLUS. Det halter med roaming på nye IoT-netværk som NB-IoT og LTM-E, der er særligt udviklet til at forbinde maskiner, sensorer og containere med skyen. Markedet modnes stille og roligt, men komplekse netværksopsætninger og langsom udrulning af eSIM forsinker processen.
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Why people still starve in an age of abundance
Nobel Prizes are rarely awarded without controversy. The prestige usually hatches a viperous nest of critics who deride the credentials of the winner, complain about the unmentioned collaborators who'll be sidelined by history, or point to the more deserving recipients who've been unfairly snubbed. So when the Norwegian committee decided to award the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize to the World Food Progr
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How I embrace diversity in my lab
Nature, Published online: 17 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03606-5 Noam Shomron looks beyond science to recruit students from a range of religions and with compatible personalities.
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WHO team set to visit Wuhan in January to probe Covid origins
US has criticised scope and transparency of agency's planned investigation in China
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Google expands languages push in India to serve non-English speakers
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Circus Roncalli In Germany Uses Holograms Instead Of Live Animals
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Is it possible in the far far future humans or any advanced lifeforms will be able to prevent the end of the universe?
So this goes under the assumption that humans don't just survive but thrive and propagate thought out the solar system and out of it. I am talking about very vast timescales and it's near impossible to think what technology would be like in the next 3 million years considering just how much has changed in the past 300 years. Also how would humans even look like given such vast timescales? Conside
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Scientists make a sodium-ion battery density breakthrough
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The Explosion of Wearable Sensors in Healthcare
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Biomarker of Alzheimer's found to be regulated by sleep cycles
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Uber is Planning Sale of Their Flying Car Division
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Battery Costs Down So Much, EVs Could Soon Cost Same as Gas Cars
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First 3D-Printed House to pass building code in Germany
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Algorithms for Love: Japan Will Soon Launch an AI Dating Service
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China prepares for return of lunar probe with moon samples
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Here Is What The Air Force's New Robot Dogs Are Actually Capable Of
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1st Patients To Get CRISPR Gene-Editing Treatment Continue To Thrive
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The Lifesaving Potential of Less-Than-Perfect Donor Kidneys
The arrival of better HIV and hepatitis C tests, along with a new generation of antiviral medications that cure upwards of 95 percent of infections, now has doctors and patients considering donor kidneys that, only a few short years ago, would have never been on the table. But it remains a weighty decision.
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Emmanuel Macron tests positive for coronavirus
France's president, prime minister, Spanish PM and EU Council president to self-isolate for seven days
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UK coronavirus live: DfE chief refuses to deny return to class for pupils in England in January could be delayed
Latest updates: week-on-week UK cases rise 36% ahead of relaxation of Covid rules over Christmas; IT anomaly misses 11,000 positive cases in Wales Millions in England's tier 3 areas await ruling on Christmas Covid rules 11,000 positive Covid tests missing from Wales data after IT problem Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage 11.22am GMT Labour has published its plan (pdf)
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A shock to the PPE system
A researcher at The University of Tokyo has shown that the N95 masks used by health care workers to prevent the spread of COVID can be sterilized and recharged using a van de Graaff generator. This work may lead to a much larger supply of personal protective equipment for those most likely to be exposed to the virus.
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Two smuggled Indonesian orangutans fly home from Thailand
Eating fruit and drinking from plastic bottles, two Sumatran orangutans stared from their cages at Bangkok airport on Thursday before flying home to Indonesia, years after being smuggled into Thailand.
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Two smuggled Indonesian orangutans fly home from Thailand
Eating fruit and drinking from plastic bottles, two Sumatran orangutans stared from their cages at Bangkok airport on Thursday before flying home to Indonesia, years after being smuggled into Thailand.
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Super cyclone hits Fiji bringing floods, landslides
Super cyclone Yasa slammed into Fiji's second-largest island Thursday, tearing roofs off buildings as it triggered flash floods and landslides in the Pacific island nation.
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Chinese capsule returns to Earth carrying moon rocks
A Chinese lunar capsule returned to Earth on Thursday with the first fresh rock samples from the moon in more than 40 years, offering the possibility of new insights into the history of the solar system and marking a new landmark for China's rapidly advancing space program.
13h
Scientists use NASA data to predict appearance of December 14, 2020 eclipse
On Dec. 14, 2020, the Moon's shadow raced across Chile and Argentina, casting a thin ribbon of land into brief, mid-day darkness.
13h
When genetic data meets marketing
Researchers from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that assesses the implications of the growth of private genetic testing for the field of marketing and evaluates ethical challenges that arise. The researchers review past research in the field of behavioral genetics and use these findings to incorporate genetic influences into e
14h
Organic molecules on a metal surface… a machinist's best friend
How can you improve the cutting of "gummy" metals? Purdue University innovators have come up with an answer—and their findings may help in manufacturing products and reducing component failures.
14h
New path to rare earth mineral formation has implications for green energy and smart tech
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have shed new light on the formation mechanisms of a rare earth-bearing mineral that is in increasingly high demand across the globe for its use in the green energy and tech industries.
14h
Existentiell ensamhet – äldre personers upplevelse
Förr eller senare drabbas de flesta människor av existentiell ensamhet. Särskilt vanligt är det bland sköra äldre personer – kanske förlorar man sina vänner och sin livspartner, kanske börjar den egna kroppen ge vika. Men hur beskrivs detta av de äldre själva?
14h
Shark fishing bans partially effective: study
Bans on shark fishing are only partially effective in protecting sharks, new research suggests.
14h
Shark fishing bans partially effective: study
Bans on shark fishing are only partially effective in protecting sharks, new research suggests.
14h
'World's ugliest orchid' tops list of new discoveries
Scientists find 156 new plants and fungi, including six new species of toadstool in British woodlands.
14h
Kontakteksem eller irritation? Genetiska markörer säkrare än lapptest
Med hjälp av algoritmer har forskare vid Karolinska Institutet identifierat markörer som kan särskilja mellan irritationseksem och kontaktallergi, två hudreaktioner som ser snarlika ut men kräver olika medicinisk handläggning. Ungefär 20 procent av befolkningen i höginkomstländer besväras av kontakteksem, en sjukdom som ofta är kopplad till kemikalieexponering i arbetsmiljön. Kontakteksem förekom
14h
Oral contraceptive pills protect against ovarian and endometrial cancer
A comprehensive study from Uppsala University, involving more than 250,000 women, shows that oral contraceptive use protects against ovarian and endometrial cancer. The protective effect remains for several decades after discontinuing the use. The study is published in the journal Cancer Research.
14h
Mikroskop målte 30 procent forkert i knap et år: Patienter med modermærkekræft måtte udredes igen
Otte patienter på Regionshospitalet Randers måtte gennem en ny udredning, efter at hospitalet ved et tilfælde opdagede en fejl på et mikroskop, der målte modermærker med kræft 30 procent forkert. Lægelig direktør er chokeret over fejlen, der blev opdaget i oktober.
14h
Osteoporosemedicin afprøves på patienter med diabetesrelateret fodlidelse
Et danskledet projekt skal undersøge, om patienter med den sjældne, men ofte invaliderende diabetes­komplikation akut Charcotfod, kan hjælpes ved ­behandling med osteoporoselægemidlet Prolia.
14h
Microsofts danske datacentre vil sende data til USA
Amerikanske medarbejdere vil kunne tilgå danske data i klartekst på Microsofts kommende datacentre, men det kan man forhindre med en særlig løsning. Dansk data sendes allerede til usikre tredjelande.
14h
Coronavirus spread during dental procedures could be reduced with slower drill rotation
Researchers from Imperial College London and King's College London have found that careful selection and operation of dental drills can minimise the spread of COVID-19 through aerosols.