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Global study on bird song frequency
An analysis of the songs of most of the world's passerine birds reveals that the frequency at which birds sing mostly depends on body size, but is also influenced by sexual selection. The new study from researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology and colleagues suggests that habitat characteristics do not affect song frequency, thereby refuting a long-standing theory.
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How a large protein complex assembles in a cell
A team of ETH researchers led by Karsten Weis has developed a method that allows them to study the assembly process for large protein complexes in detail for the first time. As their case study, the biologists chose one of the largest cellular complexes: the nuclear pore complex in yeast cells.
17d
Global study on bird song frequency
An analysis of the songs of most of the world's passerine birds reveals that the frequency at which birds sing mostly depends on body size, but is also influenced by sexual selection. The new study from researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology and colleagues suggests that habitat characteristics do not affect song frequency, thereby refuting a long-standing theory.
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New report reveals human, economic toll of air pollution in India
Air pollution has devastating consequences for India, accounting for 1.67 million deaths in 2019 and economic losses of $36.8 billion (US), according to a new report by an international group of scientists led by researchers from Boston College's Global Observatory on Pollution and Health, the Indian Council of Medical Research, and the Public Health Foundation of India.
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Artificial intelligence predicts gestational diabetes in Chinese women
Machine learning, a form of artificial intelligence, can predict which women are at high risk of developing gestational diabetes and lead to earlier intervention, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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An updated way to calculate the likelihood of the existence of extraterrestrial civilizations
A small team of researchers from California Institute of Technology, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Santiago High School has developed an updated version of an old equation to calculate the likely existence of extraterrestrial civilizations. The team has uploaded their paper to the arXiv preprint server.
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Research explores hallmarks of effective conversations
What makes people good at having conversations? In a recent paper, Cornell researchers explored conversations on a crisis text service in order to figure out how to answer that question.
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Three flavors are better than one—in ice cream and supernova research
Any Neapolitan ice cream lover knows three flavors are better than one. New research from Northwestern University has found that by studying all three "flavors" involved in a supernova, they've unlocked more clues as to how and why stars die.
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The Top Ten Dinosaur Discoveries of 2020
Paleontologists uncovered a great deal about the "terrible lizards" this year
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Long-term study of bonded steel reinforcements on a concrete beam enters 50th year
For half a century now, a long-term experiment has been running in Empa's largest testing laboratory at the Dübendorf site. This involves a reinforced concrete beam manufactured in 1970 which was strengthened with a steel plate bonded to its underside and has since been subjected to a permanent load of just over six tons. "After 50 years under 87 percent of the average breaking load, the epoxy res
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Meet the Heather crab, a newly discovered hermit crab species
Heather Bracken-Grissom is having a crabalicious holiday season.
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Water strategist addresses questions on managing our precious water resources
Many questions surround how to best solve the numerous problems involving efficient management of our precious water resources. We asked a few questions regarding water science and engineering of Junhong Chen, lead water strategist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and a professor of molecular engineering at the University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Molecula
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Antibiotics for C-sections effective after umbilical cord clamped
Antibiotics for cesarean section births are just as effective when they're given after the umbilical cord is clamped as before clamping – the current practice – and could benefit newborns' developing microbiomes, according to new research. The study, by far the largest of its kind, challenges current recommendations for antibiotic use. Administering antibiotics after clamping does not increase the
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Hormone metabolites found in feces give researchers new insight into whale stress
Fecal samples are an effective, non-invasive tool for monitoring gray whale reproduction, stress and other physiological responses.
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Meet the Heather crab, a newly discovered hermit crab species
Heather Bracken-Grissom is having a crabalicious holiday season.
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Seals are chirping under Antarctic ice but we can't hear it
Weddell seals are chirping, whistling, and trilling under Antarctica's ice at sound frequencies that humans can't hear, report researchers. Two years of recordings at a live-streaming underwater observatory in McMurdo Sound have captured nine types of tonal ultrasonic seal vocalizations that reach to 50 kilohertz. Humans hear in the sonic range of 20 to 20,000 hertz, or 20 kilohertz. "It really s
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Author Correction: Molecular dissection of amyloid disaggregation by human HSP70
Nature, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03090-x
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Cases of new Covid variant are 'all around the UK', say scientists
Monitoring shows new B117 strain has clearly spread beyond tier 4 areas Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Thousands of cases of the more infectious variant of coronavirus have been detected across the UK, according to scientists, who said it had clearly spread beyond areas under the most severe tier 4 restrictions. The latest genetic surveillance suggests the new strai
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Multiparty entanglement: When everything is connected
Entanglement is a ubiquitous concept in modern physics research: it occurs in subjects ranging from quantum gravity to quantum computing. In a publication that appeared in Physical Review Letters last week, UvA-IoP physicist Michael Walter and his collaborator Sepehr Nezami shed new light on the properties of quantum entanglement—in particular when many particles are involved.
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Marginalized groups experience higher cumulative air pollution in urban Canada
Marginalized groups are exposed to higher cumulative air pollution in Vancouver, Montreal and Toronto, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.
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Study sheds more light on the complex morphology of supernova remnant IC 443
Italian astronomers have developed a 3-D model for the supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443 in order to investigate the morphology of this source. The model allowed the researchers to gain more insights into the complex morphology of SNR IC 443 and provided crucial information about X-ray emission from this object. The study was detailed in a paper published December 15 on arXiv.org.
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Optimize Your Home Workout With This AI-Powered VR Fitness Studio
It hasn't been a very good year for gyms . As if you needed yet another excuse not to go, the COVID-19 virus is particularly prone to spread in places where people breathe heavily in close proximity to one another. That means that optimizing your home workout has become more important for physical health and fitness than ever. And the best way to do that is with the Tempo Studio . The Tempo Studi
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An automated tool for assessing virus data quality
Through advances in sequencing technologies and computational approaches, more and more virus sequences are being recovered and identified from environmental samples (metagenomes). However, the quality and completeness of metagenome-assembled virus sequences vary widely. In a previous effort, an international consortium recommended specific guidelines and best practices for characterizing uncultiv
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My Year Watching Submarine Movies
To cope with Covid-19 lockdowns, many folks watched older films at home. Some tackled the AFI 100 or picked a favorite director. I picked a theme.
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How Much Will Data Caps Hurt Game Streaming?
Spoiler: Not too much, but watch your wallet before signing up for anyone's "unlimited" plan.
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An automated tool for assessing virus data quality
Through advances in sequencing technologies and computational approaches, more and more virus sequences are being recovered and identified from environmental samples (metagenomes). However, the quality and completeness of metagenome-assembled virus sequences vary widely. In a previous effort, an international consortium recommended specific guidelines and best practices for characterizing uncultiv
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Chemists describe a new form of ice
Scientists from the United States, China and Russia have described the structure and properties of a novel hydrogen clathrate hydrate that forms at room temperature and relatively low pressure. Hydrogen hydrates are a potential solution for storage and transportation of hydrogen, the most environmentally friendly fuel. The research was published in the journal Physical Review Letters.
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Newly discovered receptor helps to sneak a peek at evolution
Together with lipids, membrane proteins are a central component of all biological membranes and fulfill important functions in transport and information transfer within and between cells. The majority of membrane proteins are recognized by a signal recognition particle on the basis of signal sequences at the front end of the protein and are incorporated into the membrane of the endoplasmic reticul
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The world's oldest story? Astronomers say global myths about 'seven sisters' stars may reach back 100,000 years
In the northern sky in December is a beautiful cluster of stars known as the Pleiades, or the "seven sisters." Look carefully and you will probably count six stars. So why do we say there are seven of them?
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Newly discovered receptor helps to sneak a peek at evolution
Together with lipids, membrane proteins are a central component of all biological membranes and fulfill important functions in transport and information transfer within and between cells. The majority of membrane proteins are recognized by a signal recognition particle on the basis of signal sequences at the front end of the protein and are incorporated into the membrane of the endoplasmic reticul
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Primate orphans have it tough even before mother dies
It's no surprise that losing your mother is bad for you. What is surprising is that the troubles start even before she dies, according to a new study comparing life histories of several species of primates.
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College roommates found to have influence on first year students' political ideology
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions of higher learning in the U.S. has found that the political ideology of a college roommate may exert more influence on first-year students than their instructors. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their analysis of surveys they conducted back in 2009 and 2010 and what they lear
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Thousands of ocean fishing boats could be using forced labor – we used AI and satellite data to find them
Fishing on the high seas is a bit of a mystery, economically speaking. These areas of open ocean beyond the territorial jurisdiction of any nation are generally considered high-effort, low-payoff fishing grounds, yet fishers continue to work in them anyway.
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A one-stop shop for analyzing algal genomes
Interested in the genomes of algae? You now have one place where you can browse the genetic blueprints of these photosynthetic organisms. PhycoCosm is one of the largest data repositories of its kind, with an interactive browser that allows algal scientists and enthusiasts to look deep into more than 100 algal genomes, compare them, and visualize supporting experimental data.
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Almost 90% of the world's animal species will lose some habitat to agriculture by 2050
Scientists know that biodiversity is declining across much of the world although less universally and dramatically than we feared. We also know that things are likely to get worse in the future, with a combination of habitat loss, climate change and overexploitation set to drive species and habitats ever closer to extinction.
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Primate orphans have it tough even before mother dies
It's no surprise that losing your mother is bad for you. What is surprising is that the troubles start even before she dies, according to a new study comparing life histories of several species of primates.
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A one-stop shop for analyzing algal genomes
Interested in the genomes of algae? You now have one place where you can browse the genetic blueprints of these photosynthetic organisms. PhycoCosm is one of the largest data repositories of its kind, with an interactive browser that allows algal scientists and enthusiasts to look deep into more than 100 algal genomes, compare them, and visualize supporting experimental data.
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Almost 90% of the world's animal species will lose some habitat to agriculture by 2050
Scientists know that biodiversity is declining across much of the world although less universally and dramatically than we feared. We also know that things are likely to get worse in the future, with a combination of habitat loss, climate change and overexploitation set to drive species and habitats ever closer to extinction.
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Glass frogs, ghost shrimp and clearwing butterflies use transparency to evade predators
What would you do if you could be invisible? Would you use your power for good? For evil? Or just to avoid awkward conversations?
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Here's what we know about the new variant of coronavirus | Sharon Peacock
My team at the Genomics UK consortium sequenced the new Sars-CoV-2 variant, but we'll need more evidence to understand how it might change the pandemic It was always predictable that the genome of Sars-CoV-2 would mutate. After all, that's what viruses and other micro-organisms do. The Sars-CoV-2 genome accumulates around one or two mutations every month as it circulates. In fact, its rate of cha
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Grasshopper cages reveal trouble with shifting habitats
New research uses grasshoppers to investigate how insects from lower elevations could affect plants on higher ones, such as alpine grasslands. Novel organisms moving into a new habitat could disturb the ecological balance that has established over a long period. Plants and the herbivores that eat them have evolved together over the long-term, a process that shaped where they live and the characte
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Glass frogs, ghost shrimp and clearwing butterflies use transparency to evade predators
What would you do if you could be invisible? Would you use your power for good? For evil? Or just to avoid awkward conversations?
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The psychology of fairness: Why some Americans don't believe the election results
The electoral votes have confirmed Joe Biden won the 2020 United States presidential election. The presidential electors gave Biden 306 electoral votes to President Donald Trump's 232 votes. Biden also recorded a solid lead of over 7 million in the popular vote.
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Even in a 'water-rich' country like New Zealand, some cities could face water shortages this summer
After eight months of drought rules, Auckland finally relaxed water restrictions last week, but as New Zealand heads into another La Niña summer, other cities can expect serious water shortages both now and in the future.
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New engine capability accelerates advanced vehicle research
In the quest for advanced vehicles with higher energy efficiency and ultra-low emissions, researchers are accelerating a research engine that gives scientists and engineers an unprecedented view inside the atomic-level workings of combustion engines in real time.
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Muddying the waters: Weathering might remove less atmospheric carbon dioxide than thought
The decay of rocks at the Earth's surface may play a lesser role in regulating our climate than previously thought, says new research.
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Localized magnetic moments induced by atomic vacancies in transition metal dichalcogenide flakes
The emergence of two-dimensional (2-D) materials provides an excellent platform for exploring and modulating exotic physical properties in the 2-D limit, and has driven the development of modern condensed matter physics and nanoelectronic devices. Among various exotic physical properties, 2-D magnetism is one of the most important topics, which shows potential application in spintronics. In recent
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Diamonds are not just for jewelry anymore
When it comes to the semiconductor industry, silicon has reigned as king in the electronics field, but it is coming to the end of its physical limits.
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Researchers simulate car emissions dynamic using gold nanoparticles for catalysis
By examining tiny particles of gold with powerful X-ray beams, scientists hope they can learn how to cut down on harmful carbon monoxide emissions from motor vehicles.
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Researcher investigates how to make the global food supply more resilient
As the world grows increasingly globalized, one of the ways that countries have come to rely on one another is through a more intricate and interconnected food supply chain. Food produced in one country is often consumed in another country—with technological advances allowing food to be shipped between countries that are increasingly distant from one another.
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Researchers find hydrogen-supported life beneath glaciers
Using years of data collected from ice-covered habitats all over the world, a Montana State University team has discovered new insights into the processes that support microbial life underneath ice sheets and glaciers, and the role those organisms play in perpetuating life through ice ages and, perhaps, in seemingly inhospitable environments on other planets.
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Image: Instruments installed on Euclid spacecraft
The optical and infrared instruments of Euclid, ESA's mission to study dark energy and dark matter, have passed the qualification and acceptance review and are now fully integrated into the spacecraft's payload module. This marks an important step forward in the assembly of the Euclid space telescope, which is scheduled for launch in 2022.
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Frozen: Cutting-edge technology reveals structures within cells
Temperatures of -196 degrees Celsius enable high-resolution imaging of the cell's interior. Researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria are thus able to show for the first time how the active form of a protein complex plays critical roles in cell motility and other important biological functions look like. This study is published in the journal Nature Communications.
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High-five or thumbs-up? New device detects which hand gesture you want to make
A new device developed by engineers can recognize hand gestures based on electrical signals detected in the forearm. The system, which couples wearable biosensors with artificial intelligence (AI), could one day be used to control prosthetics or to interact with almost any type of electronic device.
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Frozen: Cutting-edge technology reveals structures within cells
Temperatures of -196 degrees Celsius enable high-resolution imaging of the cell's interior. Researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria are thus able to show for the first time how the active form of a protein complex plays critical roles in cell motility and other important biological functions look like. This study is published in the journal Nature Communications.
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Transforming self-assembled architectures into functional materials
Imagine if a material would arrange itself into a shape suited for its application, for instance, a catalyst that maximizes its own surface area for improved efficiency or a micro-actuator that forms appendages to grab nearby objects. This is the promise of self-assembly: making complex, functional materials by letting matter shape itself. Yet, not all matter that self-assembles into interesting f
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Silkworm's brain determines diapause by thermal information
Diapause is a seasonal adaptation strategy of insects and animals in which biological functions are put on hold, such as insect eggs that remain dormant until conditions are more favorable to hatch. This is not a passive response of dormancy to adverse situations but an actively induced state that takes place well in advance in anticipation of natural conditions. Although it has been hypothesized
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NASA Begins Planning Mars Sample Return Mission
NASA has sent numerous robotic explorers to Mars over the years, examining samples and surveying the fascinating geology of the red planet. Still, we could learn much more with Mars samples to examine in detail here on Earth. The recently launched Perseverance rover will lay the groundwork by collecting samples for return to our planet. NASA has now announced it will work with the European Space
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Author Correction: Improving the thermal conductivity of epoxy composites using a combustion-synthesized aggregated β-Si3N4 filler with randomly oriented grains
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80009-6 Author Correction: Improving the thermal conductivity of epoxy composites using a combustion-synthesized aggregated β-Si 3 N 4 filler with randomly oriented grains
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Lektor Meyrowitschs manipulationer
Læserne må vurdere, hvem de har mest fidus til. Er det til en omskæringskulturelt biased biolog, der aldrig har forsket i omskæring, og som anklager danske læger for at være ramt af 'kognitiv bias'? Eller har de mere fidus til speciallægeselskaber og forskere, der i årevis har oplyst om de helbredsmæssige og seksuelle konsekvenser af drengeomskæring, skriver Morten Frisch i et svar til Dan Meyrowi
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Silkworm's brain determines diapause by thermal information
Diapause is a seasonal adaptation strategy of insects and animals in which biological functions are put on hold, such as insect eggs that remain dormant until conditions are more favorable to hatch. This is not a passive response of dormancy to adverse situations but an actively induced state that takes place well in advance in anticipation of natural conditions. Although it has been hypothesized
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Deep, slow-slip action may direct largest earthquakes and their tsunamis
Megathrust earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis that originate in subduction zones like Cascadia — Vancouver Island, Canada, to northern California — are some of the most severe natural disasters in the world. Now a team of geoscientists thinks the key to understanding some of these destructive events may lie in the deep, gradual slow-slip behaviors beneath the subduction zones. This information
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Brain tissue yields clues to causes of PTSD
A post-mortem analysis of brain tissue from people who had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may help explain enduring mysteries about the disorder, such as why women are more susceptible to it and whether a dampened immune system response plays a role in dealing with stress, a team has found.
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High-five or thumbs-up? New device detects which hand gesture you want to make
A new device developed by engineers can recognize hand gestures based on electrical signals detected in the forearm. The system, which couples wearable biosensors with artificial intelligence (AI), could one day be used to control prosthetics or to interact with almost any type of electronic device.
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How to be happier in 2021
'If you want to make a New Year's resolution that really makes you happy, think about the ways in which you can contribute to the world, because the research shows it's not just good for the world but also really good for you,' says an international expert on motivational research.
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Invasive in the U.S., lifesaver Down Under
New research reveals monitor lizards should be regarded as 'ecosystem engineers' as they provide food and shelter to other reptiles, insects and mammals, helping prevent extinction.
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Potential new drug target to treat cutaneous T cell lymphoma
In order to improve their understanding of how CTCL develops in hopes of developing new therapies, a team of scientists conducted a series of studies. They demonstrate that decreased expression of the protein SATB1 contributes to CTCL development and that drugs that cause SATB1 to become re-expressed may be potential treatment options for this disease.
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Variety: Spice of life for bumble bees
The yield and quality of many crops benefit from pollination, but it isn't just honey bees that do this work: bumble bees also have a role. A team has used innovative molecular biological methods and traditional microscopy to investigate the pollen collecting behavior of honey bees and bumble bees in agricultural landscapes. It turns out bumble bees take much more pollen from different plant speci
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How nearby galaxies form their stars
How stars form in galaxies remains a major open question in astrophysics. A new study sheds new light on this topic with the help of a data-driven re-analysis of observational measurements. The star-formation activity of typical, nearby galaxies is found to scale proportionally with the amount of gas present in these galaxies. This points to the net gas supply from cosmic distances as the main dri
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New optical fiber brings significant improvements to light-based gyroscopes
Researchers have taken an important new step in advancing the performance of resonator fiber optic gyroscopes, a type of fiber optic sensor that senses rotation using only light. Because gyroscopes are the basis of most navigation systems, the new work could one day bring important improvements to these systems.
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Sex-specific Alzheimer's treatment could benefit males over females
A new study found a specific Alzheimer's treatment is effective in male and not female mice, providing a window into the biology of the disease and the effectiveness of targeted treatments.
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Diseased cell fragments burst from pockets in immune cells to activate response
Researchers have uncovered an important process in how our immune system detects signs of disease and activates a protective response. This understanding could improve efforts to find new and effective immunotherapy treatments for diseases like cancer.
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The science events to watch for in 2021
Nature, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03651-0 Climate change and COVID-19 vaccines are among the themes set to shape research.
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Miljøaktivister taber principiel klimasag i Norge
Retssagen kan få betydning for klimasager herhjemme, vurderer ekspert.
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Test Positivity Is a Bad Way to Measure Covid's Spread
So why do policymakers keep using it?
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Uber and Lyft's Gig Work Law Could Expand Beyond California
The companies are backing proposals in other states that would give workers the ability to form unions—but still consider them contractors, not employees.
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Video Game Hell Isn't Nearly Agonizing Enough
Games like Hades take place, largely, in hell. What does that say about the players who happily retreat into the underworld?
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BioNTech says it can produce new vaccine for Covid variant in 6 weeks
Chief Ugur Sahin expects existing shot to be effective but it can be tweaked if needed
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The Top Five Climate Stories of 2020
From raging wildfires to a pending shift on U.S. climate action, the year was a notable one for climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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In Mexico, Midwives Step in as Covid Overshadows Childbirth
Midwives and doctors struggle to help women give birth safely during the grim days of the pandemic.
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The Top Five Climate Stories of 2020
From raging wildfires to a pending shift on U.S. climate action, the year was a notable one for climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Horizon 2020 by the numbers: how €60 billion was divided up among Europe's scientists
Nature, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03598-2 Figures reveal stark regional differences in the distribution of funding as the European Union's 2014–20 research programme draws to a close.
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Year in a word: R number
Epidemiological jargon has surged exponentially (R>1) in usage this year
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The Newest Weapon Against Covid-19: AI That Speed-Reads Faxes
Local health departments rely on the old-fangled tech to track cases. A hastily developed machine-learning program gives it an assist.
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Some of Our Favorite Longreads of 2020
It was a brutal year. Take a breath and enjoy some of our favorite in-depth stories.
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Apple Fitness+ Is Either Right on Time or Much Too Late
Apple invites users to sweat along with prerecorded classes on its new streaming workout platform—but the experience lags behind the competition.
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Let's Search for Alien Probes, Not Just Alien Signals
"Multimessenger" SETI would broaden the quest to find celestial companions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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DNA Finds Pollutants in Green-Glowing Water Test
Bacteria inspire a new pollution-monitoring setup — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor bruger man ikke fleksible autoværn i myldretiden?
PLUS. En læser har noteret sig, at Storebæltsforbindelsen skal have fleksible autoværn, så trafikken kan ledes væk fra biluheld og vejarbejde. Men hvorfor ikke generelt flytte rundt på banerne i myldretiden?
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Renseanlæg udleder mere end dobbelt så meget lattergas som tidligere antaget
PLUS. Lattergas er omkring 300 gange så kraftig en drivhusgas som CO2. Med de nye målinger vil det blive sværere for affaldssektoren at blive klimaneutral.
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DNA Finds Pollutants in Green-Glowing Water Test
Bacteria inspire a new pollution-monitoring setup — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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South Korea May Move to Level 3 if Covid Cases Aren't Controlled
Officials are racing to secure more I.C.U. beds after an explosion of infections caused a bottleneck of patients. If cases aren't brought under control, the government may impose Level 3 restrictions for the first time in South Korea.
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How To Be An Elite Athlete, According To The Data
A new book digs into the social science of athletic greatness and reveals patterns leading to glory. (Image credit: Steve Schaefer/AFP via Getty Images)
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Terraforming: life on Mars
The investment moral is to buy glass makers before gas makers
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China's new Long March-8 rocket makes first flight
China's new carrier rocket, the Long March-8, made its maiden flight on Tuesday, the country's space agency said, the first phase of a strategy to deploy launch vehicles that can be reused.
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Flokimmunitet mod særligt smitsom britisk covid-19 kræver langt flere vaccinerede
PLUS. Bliver den nye variant dominerende herhjemme, vil 80% af befolkningen skulle immuniseres mod de nuværende 60-70%. Det kan blive svært at nå, anerkender SSI.
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Scientists discover mutations associated with early onset dementia
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin today announced a significant advance in our understanding of an early onset form of dementia that may also progress our understanding of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. Adult onset Leukoencephalopathy with axonal Spheroids and Pigmented glia (ALSP) is an ultra-rare condition that manifests initially with psychiatric and behavioural changes in patients
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A least microenvironmental uncertainty principle (LEUP) as a generative model of collective cell migration mechanisms
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79119-y
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New statistical RI index allow to better track the dynamics of COVID-19 outbreak in Italy
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79039-x
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Phylogenetic supertree reveals detailed evolution of SARS-CoV-2
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79484-8
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Altered cortical bone strength and lean mass in young women with long-duration (19 years) type 1 diabetes
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78853-7 Altered cortical bone strength and lean mass in young women with long-duration (19 years) type 1 diabetes
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High affinity nanobodies block SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor binding domain interaction with human angiotensin converting enzyme
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79036-0
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NMR microsystem for label-free characterization of 3D nanoliter microtissues
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75480-0
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GaInP nanowire arrays for color conversion applications
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79498-2
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With two COVID-19 vaccines available, the CDC updates its guidance on who gets them first
Airports are, unfortunately, not this empty anymore. (Pexels/) The first wave of COVID-19 vaccines are rolling out across the country, quite possibly the best holiday gift those folks will receive this year. More than 500,000 people have already been vaccinated , most of them health care workers and nursing home residents and staff, which were the two groups first in line to get the vaccine. Mode
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Kognitiv bias på forhudsfronten
I et debatindlæg, der argumenterer for en kriminalisering af non-terapeutisk drengeomskæring, gentager Morten Frisch flere påstande og fremstiller disse som videnskabelige fakta. Alle disse påstande er blevet afvist af Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed og er desuden i konflikt med bedste viden på området, skriver Dan Meyrowitsch, epidemiolog og forskningsleder på KU, i et svar til overlæge Morten Fri
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Covid vaccine 'highly likely' to work on UK variant, BioNTech says
Chief executive Uğur Şahin says team will know within two weeks if vaccine works or needs adaption Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The chief executive of the German pharmaceutical company BioNTech has said he is confident its coronavirus vaccine works against the new UK variant, but that further studies are needed to be certain. Uğur Şahin told a press conference his
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Variables in the effect of land use on soil extrapore enzymatic activity and carbon stabilization
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19900-9
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Reply to: "Variables in the effect of land use on soil extrapore enzymatic activity and carbon stabilization" by Glenn (2020)
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19901-8
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Anti-selective [3+2] (Hetero)annulation of non-conjugated alkenes via directed nucleopalladation
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20182-4 Dihydrobenzofurans and indolines are common substructures in medicines and natural products. Herein, the authors report a palladium-catalyzed [3 + 2] (hetero)annulation proceeding in an anti-selective fashion and enabling direct access to these valuable heterocycles with broad reaction scope.
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The role of dissociation in ketamine's antidepressant effects
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20190-4 Ketamine is associated with rapid antidepressant effects and temporary dissociative experiences, and this review examines whether these dissociative symptoms are necessary for antidepressant efficacy. Although the current literature does not support this relationship, further work is needed to explore possib
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Bivalent antibody pliers inhibit β-tryptase by an allosteric mechanism dependent on the IgG hinge
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20143-x β-tryptases are responsible for most of the proteolytic activity during mast cell activation. Here, the authors develop β-tryptase-inhibiting antibodies and provide structural and biochemical evidence that the bivalency of the antibodies is a prerequisite for their inhibitory activity.
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In vivo diversification of target genomic sites using processive base deaminase fusions blocked by dCas9
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20230-z In vivo mutagenesis systems can often show restricted capabilities and deleterious off-site mutations. Here the authors fuse base deaminases to T7 RNA polymerase to mutate a target sequence and use dCas9 to define the boundaries of the diversified DNA.
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Structure of the dopamine D2 receptor in complex with the antipsychotic drug spiperone
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20221-0 The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) is a GPCR and an important drug target for schizophrenia treatment. Here, the authors present the crystal structure of human D2R in complex with the antipsychotic drug spiperone, which is of interest for designing antipsychotics with improved receptor selectivity.
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MaTAR25 lncRNA regulates the Tensin1 gene to impact breast cancer progression
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20207-y A group of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), Mammary Tumor Associated RNAs 1-30 (MaTARs 1-30), are differentially expressed between mammary tumor cells and normal mammary epithelial cells. Here the authors report that MaTAR25 plays a role in breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion by regulatin
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The Risk of John Kerry Following His Own China Policy
Competition with China will likely be the most difficult foreign-policy issue that President-elect Joe Biden will face. What he decides to lead with and the precise mix of areas in which he engages and confronts Beijing are critically important. This is why Biden's choice of John Kerry as a special presidential envoy on climate change might create a problem for the incoming president on China pol
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The Unconscious Rebellion of August Wilson
It's a glorious moment for devotees of the late, great playwright August Wilson, even with many theaters closed. Netflix has two new Wilson films on offer: a swift, sumptuous version of Ma Rainey's Black Bottom and the heartening documentary Giving Voice , about high-school students who discover the thrill and resonance of Wilson's characters while preparing for a national monologue competition.
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US companies warned against mandatory vaccine for staff
Corporate America's desire for mandate conflicts with deep suspicion among workers
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Covid: Wuhan scientist would 'welcome' visit probing lab leak theory
A top Chinese scientist addresses claims the coronavirus leaked from her lab in the city of Wuhan.
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Coronavirus variants and mutations: The science explained
Scientists are racing to find out more about variants of the coronavirus that are spreading fast.
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One in four women with ADHD has attempted suicide
Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) can have negative consequences on mental health into adulthood. A nationally representative Canadian study reported that the lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts was much higher for women who had ADHD (24%) compared to women who had not (3%). Men with ADHD were also more likely to have attempted suicide compared to men without ADHD (9% vs. 2%).
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NIH neuroscientists isolate promising mini antibodies against COVID-19 from a llama
National Institutes of Health researchers have isolated a set of promising, tiny antibodies, or "nanobodies," against SARS-CoV-2 that were produced by a llama named Cormac. Preliminary results suggest that at least one of these nanobodies, called NIH-CoVnb-112, could prevent infections and detect virus particles by grabbing hold of SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins. In addition, the nanobody appeared to w
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Frozen: Cutting-edge technology reveals structures within cells
Temperatures of minus 196 degrees Celsius enable high-resolution imaging of the cell's interior. Researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria are thus able to show for the first time how the active form of a protein complex plays critical roles in cell motility and other important biological functions look like. This study is published in the journal Nature Communications.
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Regulatory RNAs promote breast cancer metastasis
A gene-regulating snippet of RNA may contribute to the spread of many breast cancers. A molecule designed to destroy that RNA prevented metastases in animal models. The same strategy could be used to develop a new breast cancer drug.
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Neptune's Weird Dark Spot Just Got Weirder
While observing the planet's large inky storm, astronomers spotted a smaller vortex they named Dark Spot Jr.
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The Democrats Trying to Overturn an Election
A subversion of democracy. A brazen attempt to overturn the will of voters. Modern-day voter suppression. An 11th-hour bid to cling to power. These are all charges Democrats have leveled against President Donald Trump as he's challenged the results of the election that will force him from office. They're all also accusations Democrats have hurled at one another in New York City over the past few
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When Should Kids Be Part of Covid-19 Vaccine Trials?
As the window for having an FDA-authorized Covid-19 vaccine available to children before the next school year narrows, some pediatricians are urging vaccine makers to expand their clinical trials. But others think early trials could backfire — they want to wait until millions of adults have been vaccinated.
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Tørke, virus og flere veje: Her er tendenserne, der vil påvirke verdens skove
En række eksperter sætter i nyt KU-studie fokus på de største tendenser, der vil…
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Britain and France race to negotiate reopening of borders
Trucks remain stuck after UK travel restrictions due to fears over its new strain of coronavirus
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A groggy climate giant: subsea permafrost is still waking up after 12,000 years
After the Last Glacial Maximum some 14,000 years ago, rising temperature melted glaciers and ice caps worldwide. Over thousands of years, sea levels rose by more than 400 feet (130 meters).
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UK public sector borrowing hits record high
Pandemic continues to weaken public finances with falling revenues and soaring spending in November
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A groggy climate giant: subsea permafrost is still waking up after 12,000 years
In the far north, the swelling Arctic Ocean inundated vast swaths of coastal tundra and steppe ecosystems. Though the ocean water was only a few degrees above freezing, it started to thaw the permafrost beneath it, exposing billions of tons of organic matter to microbial breakdown. The decomposing organic matter began producing CO2 and CH4, two of the most important greenhouse gases.
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Poland eyes hard split with coal
Coal-dependent EU member Poland aims to shut its last mine by the bloc's 2050 target, but experts warn the move to go green comes late and faces many hurdles.
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Climate change ravages Kashmir's 'red gold' saffron crop
On sweeping fields once blanketed in lush purple, a thin and bedraggled crop of flowers is all farmers in Indian-administered Kashmir's saffron-growing region Pampore have to show for this year's harvest.
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Climate change ravages Kashmir's 'red gold' saffron crop
On sweeping fields once blanketed in lush purple, a thin and bedraggled crop of flowers is all farmers in Indian-administered Kashmir's saffron-growing region Pampore have to show for this year's harvest.
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Light signal emitted during photosynthesis used to quickly screen crops
An international effort called Realizing Increased Photosynthetic Efficiency (RIPE) aims to transform crops' ability to turn sunlight and carbon dioxide into higher yields. To achieve this, scientists are analyzing thousands of plants to find out what tweaks to the plant's structure or its cellular machinery could increase production. University of Illinois researchers have revealed a new approach
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Hormone metabolites found in poop give researchers new insight into whale stress
Poop samples are an effective, non-invasive tool for monitoring gray whale reproduction, stress and other physiological responses, a new study from Oregon State University shows.
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Revealed: all 27 monkeys held at Nasa research center killed on single day in 2019
27 primates euthanized at California facility Outcry over revelation that animals were not sent to sanctuary Every monkey held by Nasa was put to death on a single day last year, documents obtained by the Guardian show, in a move that has enraged animal welfare campaigners. Continue reading…
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Light signal emitted during photosynthesis used to quickly screen crops
An international effort called Realizing Increased Photosynthetic Efficiency (RIPE) aims to transform crops' ability to turn sunlight and carbon dioxide into higher yields. To achieve this, scientists are analyzing thousands of plants to find out what tweaks to the plant's structure or its cellular machinery could increase production. University of Illinois researchers have revealed a new approach
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Hormone metabolites found in poop give researchers new insight into whale stress
Poop samples are an effective, non-invasive tool for monitoring gray whale reproduction, stress and other physiological responses, a new study from Oregon State University shows.
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In Mexico, Midwives Step in as Covid Overshadows Childbirth
Midwives and doctors struggle to help women give birth safely during the grim days of the pandemic.
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Salonpas
is an over-the-counter topical NSAID used to treat pain. It's probably safe and might be worth trying for minor pain, but the effect is small and the advertising is more hype than substance. The post Salonpas first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Tecknade serier speglar samhällets förändring
Tecknade serier dokumenterar sin samtid i bild och text. I sin avhandling i konstvetenskap har Kristina Arnerud Mejhammar närstuderat fyra svenska serietecknare. Dessutom tecknar avhandlingen en övergripande svensk seriehistoria av åren 1965–2015. 1 | Varför har du undersökt serieskapares självsyn och världsbild?
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ESA signs deals for its first reusable transport spaceplane
Space Rider expected to carry medical and biological experiments on maiden voyage The European Space Agency (ESA) has signed contracts for its first reusable space transportation system. Known as Space Rider, it is a robotic laboratory about the size of a couple of eight-seater minivans. ESA has signed two contracts. The first is for delivery of the spacecraft by co-prime contractors: Thales Alen
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How a string of failures by the British government helped Covid-19 to mutate | Anthony Costello
Ministers did not suppress the virus, and now a new variant is surging in the south-east of England Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage During the first wave of Covid-19 in Britain, many scientists – myself included – said the government should be pursuing a "maximum suppression" or "zero Covid" strategy. One of the many reasons for this was to stop natural selection doi
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Government 'operated illegal buy British policy' over Covid contracts
Other firms better placed to supply antibody tests, argues case against health secretary Matt Hancock Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government was operating an illegal "buy British" policy when it signed contracts with a small UK firm to supply Covid antibody tests, claim lawyers who have filed a case against the health secretary. The Good Law Project said ther
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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 22. december
Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2020. Hver dag med nye præmier!
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Covid-19 vaccines: why are some people hesitant? (part one)
Less than a year since Covid-19 was genetically sequenced, vaccinations against it have begun. Despite being a cause for celebration, the vaccines have been met with some public hesitancy. In the first of a two-part exploration into Covid-19 vaccine scepticism, Nicola Davis speaks to Dr Samantha Vanderslott and Dr Caitjan Gainty about why some people are apprehensive, and how much of a problem vac
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Covid-19 vaccines: why are some people hesitant? (part one) – podcast
Less than a year since Covid-19 was genetically sequenced, vaccinations against it have begun. Despite being a cause for celebration, the vaccines have been met with some public hesitancy. In the first of a two-part exploration into Covid-19 vaccine scepticism, Nicola Davis speaks to Dr Samantha Vanderslott and Dr Caitjan Gainty about why some people are apprehensive, and how much of a problem va
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After legal threats from Herbalife, Elsevier journal retracts — and then removes — a paper
Bowing to legal pressure from the supplement maker Herbalife, Elsevier earlier this year retracted — and then removed — a paper which claimed that a young woman in India died of liver failure after using the company's products. The move has led to more legal threats. In August 2018, a group of researchers in India … Continue reading
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UAE rolls out free Chinese vaccines to all citizens and residents
Emirati government wants to inoculate all adults in population of 9m against Covid-19
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'Bemærkelsesværdig dårlig': Fem problemer, der svækker Smittestop
Selvom teknologien bag Smittestop er imponerende, har appen lille effekt.
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Jupiter and Saturn's great conjunction – in pictures
Jupiter and Saturn have come closer than at any time in 400 years in the event dubbed the great conjunction , prompting people around the world to turn out and try for a glimpse. The orbital paths of the two huge planets ensure great conjunctions every 20 years, but many are impossible to see with the naked eye because they happen during the daytime. Great conjunctions happen when Jupiter, which
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Kommuner kræver bredbåndsstøtte: Men få gør det lettere at grave fiberkabler ned
PLUS. Flere af de kommuner der højlydt har krævet bredbåndspuljen forlænget, har efter 2½ år endnu ikke benyttet sig af nye regler for gravearbejde, som gør det lettere og hurtigere at udrulle fiberkabler
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Covid testing capacity expected to fall short as UK cases surge
Government document warns of scarcity in kits when schools and universities return in January
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Staten samler al whistleblowing i ét centralt system
Regeringen har besluttet at Whistleblowerordningen skal it-understøttes med et fælles system for statslige myndigheder. Lige er ministeriernes ordninger for forskellige og usikre.
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Melody of an Alpine summit falling apart
The summit of the 2592 meters high Hochvogel is sliced by dangerous fracture which continues to open. It is difficult to judge when the summit might crack. Researchers are developing a new monitoring method. Seismic sensors measure the summit's natural vibration. The pitch of the mountain changes depending on the tension in the rock allowing unique conclusions about the development of a landslide.
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Scientists complete yearlong pulsar timing study after reviving dormant radio telescopes
While the scientific community grapples with the loss of the Arecibo radio telescope, astronomers who revived a long-dormant radio telescope array in Argentina hope it can help compensate for the work Arecibo did in pulsar timing. Last year, scientists began a pulsar timing study using two upgraded radio telescopes in Argentina.
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Ecosystem dynamics: Topological phases in biological systems
Physicists have shown that topological phases could exist in biology, and in so doing they have identified a link between solid-state physics and biophysics.
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Ecosystem dynamics: Topological phases in biological systems
Physicists have shown that topological phases could exist in biology, and in so doing they have identified a link between solid-state physics and biophysics.
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CRISPR helps researchers uncover how corals adjust to warming oceans
The CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system can help scientists understand, and possibly improve, how corals respond to the environmental stresses of climate change. New work details how the revolutionary, Nobel Prize-winning technology can be deployed to guide conservation efforts for fragile reef ecosystems.
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Citizens versus the internet: Confronting digital challenges with cognitive tools
Researchers recommend ways that psychological and behavioral sciences can help decrease the negative consequences of Internet use. These recommendations emphasize helping people gain greater control over their digital environments.
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New phase for synthetic aperture microscopy
Although SAM is undoubtedly a promising approach, current implementations lack in both spatial resolution and frame rate to be useful for emerging applications.
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Gene pathway linked to schizophrenia identified through stem cell engineering
Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells engineered from a single family's blood samples, a gene signaling pathway linked to a higher risk for developing schizophrenia was discovered.
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New model reveals previously unrecognized complexity of oceanic earthquake zones
Researchers constructed a state-of-the-art model based on seismic data from the January 2020 Caribbean earthquake. The model revealed considerable complexity in rupture speed and direction, related to a bend in the fault that triggered several rupture episodes. The analysis revealed previously unrecognized complexity of rupture processes and fault geometry in ocean faults that had been assumed to
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Fungal RNA viruses: Unexpected complexity affecting more than your breakfast omelet
Traditional approaches for studying fungal RNA viruses have relied upon sequence similarity, resulting in an underestimation of RNA viral genome diversity. Researchers have now used an advanced technological approach called Fragmented and Primer Ligated Double Stranded RNA sequencing, or FLDS, to identify viral sequences that were previously overlooked. They identified novel viruses and viral geno
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New phase for synthetic aperture microscopy
Although SAM is undoubtedly a promising approach, current implementations lack in both spatial resolution and frame rate to be useful for emerging applications.
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Baby Bees Deprive Caregivers of Sleep
Bee larvae and pupae appear to secrete a chemical that does the work of a late-night cup of coffee for their nurses.
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Light signal emitted during photosynthesis used to quickly screen crops
Researchers have revealed a new approach to estimate the photosynthetic capacity of crops to pinpoint their top-performing traits and speed up the plant screening process, according to a new study.
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Antigen tests — are self-collected nasal swabs a reliable option?
Under certain conditions, antigen testing using self-collected swabs from the anterior nose may constitute a reliable alternative to antigen testing using nasopharyngeal swabs collected by health professionals.
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New energy conversion layer for biosolar cells
A research team has produced a semi-artificial electrode that could convert light energy into other forms of energy in biosolar cells. The technique is based on the photosynthesis protein Photosystem I from cyanobacteria. The group showed that they could couple their system with an enzyme that used the converted light energy to produce hydrogen.
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Crikey! Massive prehistoric croc emerges from South East Queensland
A prehistoric croc measuring more than five meters long — dubbed the 'swamp king' — ruled south eastern Queensland waterways only a few million years ago. Researchers identified the new species of prehistoric croc — which they named Paludirex vincenti — from fossils first unearthed in the 1980s.
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The Atlantic Daily: The Danger in Trump's Efforts
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . DOMINICK REUTER / GETTY With the pandemic at a deadly peak , Americans learned that the president, still set on overturning the 2020 election results, went so far as to discuss martial law. His r
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Baby Bees Deprive Caregivers of Sleep
Bee larvae and pupae appear to secrete a chemical that does the work of a late-night cup of coffee for their nurses. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Baby Bees Deprive Caregivers of Sleep
Bee larvae and pupae appear to secrete a chemical that does the work of a late-night cup of coffee for their nurses. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Baby Bees Deprive Caregivers of Sleep
Bee larvae and pupae appear to secrete a chemical that does the work of a late-night cup of coffee for their nurses. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New energy conversion layer for biosolar cells
A research team has produced a semi-artificial electrode that could convert light energy into other forms of energy in biosolar cells. The technique is based on the photosynthesis protein Photosystem I from cyanobacteria. The group showed that they could couple their system with an enzyme that used the converted light energy to produce hydrogen.
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Vatican says getting Covid vaccine 'morally acceptable'
Catholic church says researchers' use of cell material derived from foetuses does not amount to cooperating with abortion The Vatican has urged Catholics to get vaccinated against coronavirus and said it is "morally acceptable" to take vaccines that use cell lines from aborted foetuses. Cells derived from foetuses aborted decades ago have been used by some researchers working on vaccines against
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Biotech cotton key to eliminating devastating pest from US and Mexico
A collaboration between the University of Arizona, cotton growers, and government and industry partners eradicated the pink bollworm — one of the world's most damaging crop pests — from the United States and Mexico.
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The New Covid Variant in the UK: Questions and Answers
A newly identified variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus appears to be more contagious than established ones. Here's what scientists know.
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Coronavirus live news: Biden receives vaccine as global death toll passes 1.7m
UK warned to expect further restrictions; intensive care beds full in southern California; Denmark bans mink farms for a year European states ban travel from UK as new Covid strain takes hold What do we know about the fast-spreading Covid variant in UK? Pfizer/BioNTech Covid vaccine approved by European regulator 'I'm ready': Joe Biden receives coronavirus vaccine live on TV 12.56am GMT And back
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Study finds surprising link between the Moon and methane leaks in the Arctic
Sensitive instruments reveal methane beneath the Arctic Ocean for the first time. The gas is released in cycles that correspond to the tides. Rising warming oceans may help to contain the greenhouse gas. It's a rhythm that preceded our presence on Earth: The moon's inexorable push and pull on our planet's oceans. According to researchers at University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, i
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When light and atoms share a common vibe
Scientists demonstrate a state of vibration that exists simultaneously at two different times. They evidence this quantum superposition by measuring the strongest class of quantum correlations between light beams that interact with the vibration.
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The U.K. Coronavirus Variant: What We Know
A newly identified variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus appears to be more contagious than established ones. Here's what scientists know.
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How one pain suppresses the other
When two painful stimuli act on us at the same time, we perceive one of them as less painful. This phenomenon is part of the body's own pain control system. A dysfunction of this inhibition is associated with chronic pain disorders.
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Brain stem cells divide over months
Scientists have been able to observe the way stem cells in the adult brains of mice divide over the course of months to create new nerve cells. Their study shows that brain stem cells are active over a long period, and thus provides new insights that will feed into stem cell research.
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Study resolves the position of fleas on the tree of life
A study of more than 1,400 protein-coding genes of fleas has resolved one of the longest standing mysteries in the evolution of insects, reordering their placement in the tree of life and pinpointing who their closest relatives are.
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Even as young adults, male chimps are 'mama's boys'
Close mother-son ties remain as chimps age, researchers find
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Community-based COVID-19 testing: The importance of understanding the virus' unique impact on children
Results from community-based COVID-19 testing site found that one in four kids tested positive, with minorities impacted at a higher rate.
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How the Maya Created Their Extraordinarily Accurate Calendar Thousands of Years Ago
The ancient Maya created a system of timekeeping based on astronomy that's still used today.
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COVID Stimulus Package Would Make Illegal Streaming a Felony
Illegal Streaming If you're out of a job because of COVID and you can't afford Netflix, the pandemic might be set to get even worse. Lawmakers have squeezed controversial legislation into the draft of its COVID-19 stimulus bill, The Hollywood Reporter noticed : according to draft text of the legislation, illegal streaming for commercial profit could become a felony. The proposal has had limited t
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California Has Lost Control
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . California is on the verge of breaking a pandemic record from the darkest days of the spring: With 17,750 COVID-19 patients hospitalized yesterday, the state is closing in on New York's single-day high of 18,825, set on April 13. It's a shocking turn of events for Californi
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Light signal emitted during photosynthesis used to quickly screen crops
University of Illinois researchers have revealed a new approach to estimate the photosynthetic capacity of crops to pinpoint their top-performing traits and speed up the plant screening process, according to a new study in the Journal of Experimental Botany .
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Suspicions grow that nanoparticles in Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine trigger rare allergic reactions
Life-threatening responses seen in at least eight people could be linked to polyethylene glycol, known to trigger reactions to some drugs
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Six things you may have missed in the US stimulus bill
$900bn package includes money for renewable energy and a tax break for the 'three-martini lunch'
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Does Acupuncture Really Work?
Here's what science does (and doesn't say) about how the ancient technique works to alleviate pain and other ailments.
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A Plan by Eastern States to Cap Tailpipe Emissions Gets Off to a Slow Start
Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Washington, D.C., all announced they would join a cap-and-trade program for cars and trucks. But many bigger states have yet to join.
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Hormone metabolites found in poop give researchers new insight into whale stress
Poop samples are an effective, non-invasive tool for monitoring gray whale reproduction, stress and other physiological responses.
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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
1. Modeling Study Suggests That Mitigation Efforts Can Prevent Most COVID-19 Cases on College Campuses ; 2. Patient-physician race concordance may modestly increase COVID-19 knowledge and information seeking ; 3. ACP, Annals of Internal Medicine host virtual COVID-19 Vaccine Forum II for physicians
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Joe Biden Gets COVID Vaccine
On Monday, President-elect Joe Biden got the first of two injections of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer. Like other public figures have already done or vowed to do , Biden was vaccinated on camera in order to boost the public's trust in the vaccine and encourage as many people a possible to get inoculated themselves, according to CBS News producer Sara Cook . "There's nothing to worry ab
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Climate change: Threshold for dangerous warming will likely be crossed between 2027-2042
The threshold for dangerous global warming will likely be crossed between 2027 and 2042 — a much narrower window than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimate of between now and 2052. Researchers introduce a new and more precise way to project the Earth's temperature. Based on historical data, it considerably reduces uncertainties compared to previous approaches.
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Volcanic eruptions directly triggered ocean acidification during Early Cretaceous
A new study supports the hypothesis that the Ontong Java Plateau large igneous province eruptions led to oceanic anoxic event 1a, 127 to 100 million years ago.
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New population of blue whales discovered in the western Indian ocean
An international team of researchers has discovered what it believes to be a new population of blue whales in the western Indian Ocean.
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Apple Is Reportedly Releasing a Self-Driving Car in 2024
Project Titan According to a Reuters exclusive , tech giant Apple is planning to produce a self-driving passenger car to be released as soon as 2024 — despite several layoffs hitting the company's automobile efforts over the last couple of years. The project, known as Project Titan, was reportedly first approved by CEO Tim Cook six years ago. Rumors surrounding Apple's efforts to built a car star
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Deep, slow-slip action may direct largest earthquakes and their tsunamis
Megathrust earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis that originate in subduction zones like Cascadia—Vancouver Island, Canada, to northern California—are some of the most severe natural disasters in the world. Now a team of geoscientists thinks the key to understanding some of these destructive events may lie in the deep, gradual slow-slip behaviors beneath the subduction zones. This information might
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New method for imaging exhaled breath could provide insights into COVID-19 transmission
A new method for visualizing breath that is exhaled while someone is speaking or singing could provide important new insights into how diseases such as COVID-19 spread and the effectiveness of face masks.
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Reston ebolavirus spreads efficiently in pigs
Reston ebolavirus (RESTV) should be considered a livestock pathogen with potential to affect other mammals, including people, according to National Institutes of Health scientists. The caution comes from a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in which the scientists found that experimental piglets infected with RESTV developed severe respiratory disease and shed the v
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Deep, slow-slip action may direct largest earthquakes and their tsunamis
Megathrust earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis that originate in subduction zones like Cascadia — Vancouver Island, Canada, to northern California — are some of the most severe natural disasters in the world. Now a team of geoscientists thinks the key to understanding some of these destructive events may lie in the deep, gradual slow-slip behaviors beneath the subduction zones. This information
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Reston ebolavirus spreads efficiently in pigs
Reston ebolavirus (RESTV) should be considered a livestock pathogen with potential to affect other mammals, including people, according to National Institutes of Health scientists. The caution comes from a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in which the scientists found that experimental piglets infected with RESTV developed severe respiratory disease and shed the v
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Social media use by young people in conflict-ridden Myanmar
Myanmar youth rely heavily on Facebook for news and information. This can be a platform for disseminating fake news and hate speech. With poor digital literacy skills, these youths may be susceptible to disinformation campaigns and other online dangers, according to the peer-reviewed journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.
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Melody of an Alpine summit falling apart
The entire summit of the 2592 meters high Hochvogel is sliced by a five meters wide and thirty meters long fracture. It continues to open up by up to half a centimeter per month. Throughout the years, the southern side of the mountain has already subsided by several meters; and at some point it will fail, releasing up to 260,000 cubic meters of limestone debris down into the Hornbach Valley in Aus
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Study published on the well-being of small business workers during COVID-19
As the pandemic was starting to take hold, researchers from the Center for Health, Work & Environment (CHWE) at the Colorado School of Public Health (ColoradoSPH) performed a study to better understand the impact of COVID-19 on the well-being of workers in Colorado. The team evaluated changes to employees' work and home life resulting from COVID-19 and individual perceptions of workplace safety an
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Monitor lizard should be regarded as 'ecosystem engineer,' researchers say
Ten years of research led by the University of South Florida has revealed that a monitor lizard should be regarded as an "ecosystem engineer," a rarity for reptiles. Tortoises and sea turtles are the only reptiles considered to be ecosystem engineers, a term used to describe organisms that have a great impact on their environment based on their ability to create, modify, maintain or destroy a habi
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Monitor lizard should be regarded as 'ecosystem engineer,' researchers say
Ten years of research led by the University of South Florida has revealed that a monitor lizard should be regarded as an "ecosystem engineer," a rarity for reptiles. Tortoises and sea turtles are the only reptiles considered to be ecosystem engineers, a term used to describe organisms that have a great impact on their environment based on their ability to create, modify, maintain or destroy a habi
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Under Antarctica's ice, Weddell seals produce ultrasonic vocalizations
Weddell seals are chirping, whistling and trilling under Antarctica's ice at sound frequencies that are inaudible to humans, according to a research team led by University of Oregon biologists.
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CRISPR helps researchers uncover how corals adjust to warming oceans
The CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system can help scientists understand, and possibly improve, how corals respond to the environmental stresses of climate change. Work led by Phillip Cleves—who joined Carnegie's Department of Embryology this fall—details how the revolutionary, Nobel Prize-winning technology can be deployed to guide conservation efforts for fragile reef ecosystems.
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Chemical composition of wild potato relative contributes to its resistance to pathogen
Potato is the most consumed vegetable crop worldwide. However, despite its importance, potato production is severely affected by high susceptibility to a wide range of microbial pathogens, such as bacteria from the genus Pectobacterium, which cause various devastating diseases in potato and produce important economic losses.
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CRISPR-Based COVID-19 Tests Could Work in Just 5 Minutes
Ultrasensitive COVID-19 tests based on the popular gene-editing technique CRISPR could be just around the corner, IEEE Spectrum reports . While other rapid antigen tests can be completed in less than hour, they come with sensitivity issues. CRISPR-based tests, however, could take as little as five minutes — but still provide highly reliable results. The tests can be carried out simply using a sma
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Under Antarctica's ice, Weddell seals produce ultrasonic vocalizations
Weddell seals are chirping, whistling and trilling under Antarctica's ice at sound frequencies that are inaudible to humans, according to a research team led by University of Oregon biologists.
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CRISPR helps researchers uncover how corals adjust to warming oceans
The CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system can help scientists understand, and possibly improve, how corals respond to the environmental stresses of climate change. Work led by Phillip Cleves—who joined Carnegie's Department of Embryology this fall—details how the revolutionary, Nobel Prize-winning technology can be deployed to guide conservation efforts for fragile reef ecosystems.
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Chemical composition of wild potato relative contributes to its resistance to pathogen
Potato is the most consumed vegetable crop worldwide. However, despite its importance, potato production is severely affected by high susceptibility to a wide range of microbial pathogens, such as bacteria from the genus Pectobacterium, which cause various devastating diseases in potato and produce important economic losses.
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Ancient wolf pup mummy in Yukon permafrost from 57,000 years ago
While water blasting at a wall of frozen mud in Yukon, Canada, a gold miner made an extraordinary discovery: a perfectly preserved wolf pup that had been locked in permafrost for 57,000 years. The remarkable condition of the pup, named Zhùr by the local Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in people, gave researchers a wealth of insights about her age, lifestyle, and relationship to modern wolves.
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New 3D maps reveal inner workings of immune cell gene expression
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted how our small genetic differences can have a tremendous effect on how our bodies respond to disease. Researchers have created 3D maps of how enhancer sequences and genes interact in several types of immune cells. Their new study opens the door to understanding individual risk for diseases from asthma to cancer.
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Prostate cancer regulator plays role in COVID-19, providing a promising treatment lead
Clinical trials underway are testing whether drugs that target the androgen receptor — successful in controlling prostate cancer — could also work against the coronavirus.
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California lockdown suppressed excess pandemic deaths
Nearly 20,000 more Californians died in the first six months of the pandemic than would have been expected to die in a normal year, with a disproportionate number of those deaths occurring among older adults, black or Latino residents, or those who had not completed high school, according to a new analysis.
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Peering into the Cell
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Researchers explore why some MS patients experience seizures
A research team at the UC Riverside School of Medicine has identified a pathway involving astrocytes, a class of central nervous system support cells, that could shed light on why seizures happen in a subset of multiple sclerosis, or MS, patients. The finding improves scientific understanding of how seizures arise in MS and could provide the foundation for better therapies to manage treatment-resi
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Breathing rate predicts therapeutic benefits for heart patients
Conditions causing arrhythmia are among the most common cardiac conditions. A study headed by Prof. Georg Schmidt of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has demonstrated for the first time that the nocturnal respiratory rate can help with an important prediction: It is an indicator of whether a defibrillator will help to extend the life of patients with arrhythmia.
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SLS: Crucial test for Nasa's 'mega-rocket'
Part of a giant rocket that will send humans back to the Moon has undergone a critical test.
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World's Tiniest "Christmas Tree" Is Barely Thicker Than a DNA Strand
Enhance! Making use of the sophisticated scientific equipment at her disposal, Delft University of Technology physics Master's student Maura Willems decided to give herself a challenge this holiday season: Building the world's tiniest Christmas tree. Willems used a scanning tunneling microscope to chip away individual atoms away from a crystal lattice, according to a Delft press release . The end
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Learning from three centuries of smallpox epidemics in London, UK
The current COVID-19 pandemic has caused a surge of interest in the study of infectious disease transmission, and how control measures could change the course of the pandemic. New research examines the history of recorded smallpox epidemics in London.
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Traditional model for disease spread may not work in COVID-19
A mathematical model that can help project the contagiousness and spread of infectious diseases like the seasonal flu may not be the best way to predict the continuing spread of the novel coronavirus, especially during lockdowns that alter the normal mix of the population.
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The far-reaching effects of mutagens on human health
Mutagenic threats to a cell's subtle machinery may be far more widespread than previously appreciated. In a new study, Michael Lynch and his colleagues demonstrate that DNA mutation itself may represent only a fraction the health-related havoc caused by mutagens.The study highlights the ability of mutagenic compounds to also affect the process of transcription, during which a DNA sequence is conve
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Social media use by young people in conflict-ridden Myanmar
Myanmar youth rely heavily on Facebook for news and information. This can be a platform for disseminating fake news and hate speech. With poor digital literacy skills, these youths may be susceptible to disinformation campaigns and other online dangers
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Liver Dysfunction: Causes and Mechanisms
Learn about the underlying causes and mechanisms behind liver pathophysiology.
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Nobel Prize reflects perseverance in scientific research
New Rochelle, NY, December 21, 2020–The 2020 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine went to three researchers for their discovery of hepatitis C virus (HCV). The undying perseverance that it took to find and cure this elusive virus
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ACP, Annals of Internal Medicine host virtual COVID-19 Vaccine Forum II for physicians
As COVID-19 vaccines are becoming available, physicians and other health care professionals must do the hard work of making sure sufficient numbers of people are vaccinated to end the pandemic.
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Modeling study suggests mitigation efforts can prevent most college campus COVID cases
As colleges and universities consider strategies for the spring semester to keep COVID-19 cases down, a study in epidemic modeling, led by a team of Brigham and Women's Hospital investigators, may help shed light on what mitigation strategies may be most effective, both in terms of infections prevented and cost.
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Trump Signs Directive to Bolster Nuclear Power in Space Exploration
One goal laid out in the new policy is the testing of a fission power system on the moon by the mid- to late 2020s — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Brain on COVID-19
Connecting the dots between COVID-19 and neurological disorders
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A Tesla Investor Is Pouring Money Into Jetpack Technology
Jetpack Future Famed venture capitalist Tim Draper just made major investments in jetpack suit companies JetPack Aviation and Gravity Industries, as CNBC reports . Draper was an early investor for both Tesla and SpaceX. Gravity Industries has repeatedly made headlines for its "Iron Man"-like jetpack suit , which allows its wearer to careen through the air at breakneck speeds. Speeder Jetpack Avia
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Child care facilities can be safe and are essential: new Case Western Reserve study
Child care programs can be safe within the context of low community transmission of COVID-19, according to research from Case Western Reserve University, based on data from child care programs throughout Ohio.The study took place from Aug. 15 to Nov. 20, during a timeframe of relatively low community transmission of COVID-19. The team found COVID-19 infection rates at child care programs have been
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Reston ebolavirus spreads efficiently in pigs
Reston ebolavirus (RESTV) should be considered a livestock pathogen with potential to affect other mammals, including people. The caution comes from a study in PNAS in which scientists found that experimental piglets infected with RESTV developed severe respiratory disease and shed the virus from the upper respiratory tract. RESTV can infect humans but isn't known to cause disease. Now the scienti
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Study identifies amenities parents want in public parks
While parents from diverse backgrounds most often value parks that offer amenities like playgrounds, sports fields and green spaces, they also want parks to feel safe, according to a survey by North Carolina State University researchers.
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Silkworm's brain determines diapause by thermal information
Silkworms (Bombyx mori) were found to lay diapause eggs at 25°C and non-diapause eggs at 15°C. Females were observed to determine whether to lay diapause eggs or not according to thermal information received by the embryonic Bombyx TRPA1 ortholog (BmTRPA1). In this study scientists at Shinshu University et al. have elucidated that the neuropeptide corazonin regulates the release of the diapause ho
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Loss of anti-tumor protein may cause resistance to certain cancer therapies
The absence of a protein that works to prevent tumor formation may explain why some patients are resistant to a common cancer therapy, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They said that testing cancers for the presence of this protein may help clinicians identify patients who may be resistant to or relapse when treated with the therapy.
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Female athletes in WNBA don't return to elite performance for at least 2 years after ACL surgery
Study findings of ACL injuries in WNBA athletes sets return to sport expectations for all female athletes
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Scientists and philosopher team up, propose a new way to categorize minerals
Minerals are the most durable, information-rich objects we can study to understand our planet's origin and evolution. However, the current classification system leaves unanswered questions for planetary scientists, geobiologists, paleontologists and others who strive to understand minerals' historical context. A new evolutionary approach to classifying minerals complements the existing protocols a
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Beyond changing DNA itself, mutagens also cause errors in gene transcription
The discovery that toxic stressors can cause errors in gene transcription opens new avenues of research on diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's and sheds light on the potential role of the "transcriptome" in aging.
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Pacify the protein and win over a disease
Will it be enough to pacify the activity of certain proteins in order to hold back the development of many dangerous diseases including Alzheimer's disease? An article on a breaking through discovery has just been published in PNAS, a prestigious magazine of American Academy of Sciences. Its first author is Karolina Mikulska-Ruminska, Dr., a biophysicist from Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toru
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What if clean air benefits during COVID-19 shutdown continued post-pandemic?
A new study by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers poses a hypothetical question: What if air quality improvements in New York City during the spring 2020 COVID-19 shutdown were sustained for five years without the economic and health costs of the pandemic? They estimate cumulative benefits of clean air during this period would amount to thousands of avoided cases of il
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Volcanic eruptions directly triggered ocean acidification during Early Cretaceous
Around 120 million years ago, the earth experienced an extreme environmental disruption that choked oxygen from its oceans.
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Scientists and philosopher team up, propose a new way to categorize minerals
A diamond lasts forever, but that doesn't mean all diamonds have a common history.
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Food trade with South Asia revealed by Near East food remains
Exotic Asian spices such as turmeric and fruits like the banana had already reached the Mediterranean more than 3000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought. A team of researchers working alongside archaeologist Philipp Stockhammer at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich (LMU) has shown that even in the Bronze Age, long-distance trade in food was already connecting distant societies.
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Satellites can reveal risk of forced labor in the world's fishing fleet
Vessels known to have crew that are subject to forced labor behave in systematically different ways to the rest of the global fishing fleet, reveals a new paper published today in the scientific journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The discovery was used to build a first-of-its-kind model to identify and predict vessels at high risk of engaging in these abuses.
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Muddying the waters: Weathering might remove less atmospheric carbon dioxide than thought
The weathering of rocks at the Earth's surface may remove less greenhouse gases from the atmosphere than previous estimates, says new research from the University of Cambridge.
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Synergy between biotech and classical control tactics rid US of invasive pest
Genetically engineered cotton and classical pest control tactics combined to rid the United States and Northern Mexico of a devastating pest, according to a new study by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and University of Arizona (UofA) scientists published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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New method for imaging exhaled breath could provide insights into COVID-19 transmission
A new method for visualizing breath that is exhaled while someone is speaking or singing could provide important new insights into how diseases such as COVID-19 spread and the effectiveness of face masks.
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Potential preventative treatment demonstrated for Crohn's disease
A potential preventive treatment for Crohn's disease, a form of inflammatory bowel disease, has been demonstrated in a mouse model and using immune-reactive T cells from patients with Crohn's disease.
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Scientists uncover mechanisms that wire the brain's cerebral cortex
A research team at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC has identified the type of brain cell that produces a protein that is crucial for the formation of inhibitory circuits in the brain. This insight could one day help scientists establish the basis for developing new drugs that mature or repair cellular networks.
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Melody of an Alpine summit falling apart
The summit of the 2592 metres high Hochvogel is sliced by dangerous fracture which continues to open. It is difficult to judge when the summit might crack. Researchers at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and the TU Munich are developing a new monitoring method. Seismic sensors measure the summit's natural vibration. The pitch of the mountain changes depending on the tension in the ro
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Study published on the well-being of small business workers during COVID-19
This study, published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine , examined whether safety and health climates were related to employee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic in a sample of small businesses.
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Invasive in the U.S., lifesaver Down Under
New research reveals monitor lizards should be regarded as "ecosystem engineers" as they provide food and shelter to other reptiles, insects and mammals, helping prevent extinction.
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How to be happier in 2021
"If you want to make a New Year's resolution that really makes you happy, think about the ways in which you can contribute to the world, because the research shows it's not just good for the world but also really good for you," says Richard Ryan, an international expert on motivational research and a professor emeritus of psychology at the University of Rochester.
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Længere mellem frost og sne: De danske vintre bliver varmere endnu
I Nationalpark Thy spreder en sydeuropæisk plante sig på den sarte klithede. Dens eneste fjende er frosten, som ifølge nye tal fra DMI vil komme sjældent.
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Russia's Space Chief Just Took Yet Another Swing at SpaceX
Got Em On Friday, Russia's space agency Roscosmos recovered the stages of a Soyuz rocket that carried several dozen satellites into orbit after they dropped in the country's inhospitable Yakutia region. As he shared the news of the mission's success, Roscosmos director general Dmitry Rogozin couldn't help but poke fun at SpaceX, implying that the U.S.-based space company wouldn't have been up to
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Synergy between biotech and classical control tactics rid US of invasive pest
Genetically engineered cotton and classical pest control tactics combined to rid the United States and Northern Mexico of a devastating pest, according to a new study by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and University of Arizona (UofA) scientists published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Beyond changing DNA itself, mutagens also cause errors in gene transcription
Exposure to mutagens, or mutation-causing agents, can not only bring about changes in DNA but also appear to induce errors when genes are transcribed to make proteins, which may be an important factor in age-related diseases.
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Beyond changing DNA itself, mutagens also cause errors in gene transcription
Exposure to mutagens, or mutation-causing agents, can not only bring about changes in DNA but also appear to induce errors when genes are transcribed to make proteins, which may be an important factor in age-related diseases.
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Texas bone researcher faked data in Nature paper, says federal watchdog, as university rescinds professorships
A pharmacologist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center who lost a highly cited 2014 paper in Nature for questions about the integrity of her data has been sanctioned by the U.S. Office of Research Integrity (ORI) — and UT Southwestern has rescinded two professorships she previously held. According to ORI, Yihong Wan, an … Continue reading
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More areas of England set to enter tier 4 in race to curb new strain
Government's chief scientific adviser says it is 'likely' tighter measures will be needed
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New phase for synthetic aperture microscopy
Microscopy is an essential tool in multiple research fields and industries, such as biology, medicine, materials science, and quality control, to name a few. Although many microscopy techniques exist, each has pros and cons, mostly in terms of spatial resolution, speed (images per second), and applicability. For example, scanning electron microscopy can capture images with nanometric resolution, b
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Nanoplastics alter intestinal microbiome and threaten human health
We live in a world invaded by plastic. Its role as a chemically stable, versatile and multi-purpose fostered its massive use, which has finally translated into our current situation of planetary pollution. Moreover, when plastic degrades it breaks into smaller micro and nanoparticles, becoming present in the water we drink, the air we breathe and almost everything we touch. That is how nanoplastic
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Consumers challenged by high status peers make a 'status pivot,' new study finds
When confronted with comparisons to high status friends and colleagues, consumers prefer to make a "status pivot" into another area where they can shine brighter than their successful peers, according to new research into how consumers respond to status competition, according to a new report in the Journal of Consumer Research.
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New population of blue whales discovered in the western Indian ocean
An international team of researchers has discovered what it believes to be a new population of blue whales in the western Indian Ocean.
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The latest on Biden's science team: veteran regulator to be EPA head
Nature, Published online: 21 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03485-w As the US president-elect announces his advisers and agency heads, Nature's guide tracks the appointees who matter most to science.
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The Ultimate Guide to Flow Imaging Microscopy
Rapidly image and analyze heterogeneous particle mixtures.
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New population of blue whales discovered in the western Indian ocean
An international team of researchers has discovered what it believes to be a new population of blue whales in the western Indian Ocean.
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Threshold for dangerous climate warming will likely be crossed between 2027–2042
The threshold for dangerous global warming will likely be crossed between 2027 and 2042—a much narrower window than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimate of between now and 2052. In a study published in Climate Dynamics, researchers from McGill University introduce a new and more precise way to project the Earth's temperature. Based on historical data, it considerably reduces un
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High-five or thumbs-up? New device detects which hand gesture you want to make
A new device developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can recognize hand gestures based on electrical signals detected in the forearm. The system, which couples wearable biosensors with artificial intelligence (AI), could one day be used to control prosthetics or to interact with almost any type of electronic device.
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New research shows masks change the way we process faces
New study finds that our ability to recognize faces is severely impaired by masks, and this decreased face perception is impacting our social interactions with others.
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What if clean air benefits during COVID-19 shutdown continued post-pandemic?
A new study poses a hypothetical question: What if air quality improvements in New York City during the spring COVID-19 shutdown were sustained for five years without the economic and health costs of the pandemic? Cumulative benefits during this period would amount to thousands of avoided cases of illness and death in children and adults, as well as associated economic benefits between $32 to $77
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Using wearable activity trackers to distinguish COVID-19 from flu
By analyzing Fitbit data and self-reported symptoms, researchers distinguished trends in heart rate, step count, and symptom duration between patients with flu and those with COVID-19. While both showed similar-looking spikes in resting heart rate and decreases in average step count, COVID-19 symptoms lasted longer and peaked later. The results appear December 12 in the journal Patterns .
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Volcanic eruptions directly triggered ocean acidification during Early Cretaceous
New study supports hypothesis that Ontong Java Plateau large igneous province eruptions led to oceanic anoxic event 1a, 127 to 100 million years ago.
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Digging deep for differences in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
A UT Southwestern research team has catalogued gene activity in the skeletal muscle of mice, comparing healthy animals to those carrying a genetic mutation that causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in humans. The findings, published online recently in PNAS, could lead to new treatments for this devastating degenerative disease and insights into factors that affect muscle development.
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Podcast: Attention, shoppers–you're being tracked
In some stores, sophisticated systems are tracking customers in almost every imaginable way, from recognizing their faces to gauging their age, their mood, and virtually gussying them up with makeup. The systems rarely ask for people's permission, and for the most part they don't have to. In our season 1 finale, we look at the explosion of AI and face recognition technologies in retail spaces, an
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Podcast: When your face is your ticket
In part-three of this latest series, Jennifer Strong and the team at MIT Technology Review jump on the court to unpack just how much things are changing. We meet : Donnie Scott, senior vice president of public security, IDEMIA Michael D'Auria, vice president of business development, Second Spectrum Jason Gay, sports columnist, The Wall Street Journal Rachel Goodger, director of business developme
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Community-based COVID-19 testing site highlight importance of understanding the virus'
Results from community-based COVID-19 testing site found that one in four kids tested positive, with minorities impacted at higher rate
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Chemical composition of wild potato relative contributes to its resistance to pathogen
Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is the most consumed vegetable crop worldwide. However, despite its importance, potato production is severely affected by high susceptibility to a wide range of microbial pathogens, such as bacteria from the genus Pectobacterium, which cause various devastating diseases in potato and produce important economic losses.
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Nanoplastics alter intestinal microbiome and threaten human health
A review study led by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), the CREAF and the University of Aveiro concludes that nanoplastics change the composition and diversity of gut microbiome in vertebrates and invertebrates. The effects of a widespread and prolonged exposure to nanoplastics observed in animal models could be applied to humans.
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Enhanced scorpion venom molecules can be used to treat Chagas disease
Brazilian researchers tested the antichagasic properties of VmCT1, obtained from the venom of Vaejovis mexicanus, a scorpion harmless to humans, and synthesized novel analogs to redesign the native molecule
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New 3D maps reveal inner workings of immune cell gene expression
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted how our small genetic differences can have a tremendous effect on how our bodies respond to disease. Researchers have created 3D maps of how enhancer sequences and genes interact in several types of immune cells. Their new study in Nature Genetics opens the door to understanding individual risk for diseases from asthma to cancer.
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Consumers challenged by high status peers make a 'status pivot,' new study finds
When outshone by peers in one area of life, such as financial success, consumers will embrace making a 'status pivot' to show prowess in another aspect of life, such as personal relationships, social life, parenting, physical and mental health, and fitness, according to a new report by researchers from Boston College, Boston University and London Business School.
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Scientists discover a new type of brain cell that could help detect distance
A new kind of brain cell has been discovered which will help to understand how we remember where we left objects, such as car keys and mobile phones.
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New population of blue whales discovered in the western Indian ocean
An international team of researchers has discovered what it believes to be a new population of blue whales in the western Indian Ocean.
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Climate change: threshold for dangerous warming will likely be crossed between 2027-2042
The threshold for dangerous global warming will likely be crossed between 2027 and 2042 – a much narrower window than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimate of between now and 2052. In a study published in Climate Dynamics , researchers from McGill University introduce a new and more precise way to project the Earth's temperature. Based on historical data, it considerably reduces
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Pneumolysis: High altitude specialists explain lung destruction caused by COVID-19
According to the scientific paper, COVID-19's hypoxemia (low oxygen tension in the blood) can hardly be handled by ventilators and should not be considered as pneumonia or treated as a SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome).
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Pregnant women whose exercise routines disrupted by COVID-19 show higher depression scores
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted daily life, including many people's ability to exercise, which can boost mood, reduce stress and benefit one's physical and mental health. A Dartmouth study finds that pregnant women whose exercise routines were impacted by the pandemic have higher depression scores than those who have continued to exercise as usual. The study, whose findings are published in PL
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Researchers track and analyze smallpox epidemics over three centuries
Researchers from McMaster University have studied and analyzed thousands of weekly records documenting the deaths of smallpox victims in London, England over the span of nearly 300 years. The analysis provides new and rare insights into the ecology of infectious disease, establishing that the time between epidemics, the size of the outbreaks, and even the season when the epidemics occurred, change
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Learning from three centuries of smallpox epidemics in London, UK
The current COVID-19 pandemic has caused a surge of interest in the study of infectious disease transmission, and how control measures could change the course of the pandemic. New research published on 21st December 2020, in the open access journal PLOS Biology, authored by Olga Krylova of the Canadian Institute for Health Information and David Earn of McMaster University, examines the history of
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Clouds spoil UK's view of Saturn and Jupiter's 'great conjunction'
Two planets appeared closest to each other in the night sky for almost 400 years Stargazers' attempts to observe a once-in-a-lifetime sight were hindered in the UK by a far more everyday occurrence – bad weather. Many hoping to see the "great conjunction" of Jupiter and Saturn on Monday evening, where the two planets appeared closer together in the night sky than they have for almost 400 years ,
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Why Scientists Find Snowflakes Cool
Mineralogists study snowflakes to learn more about how water in its solid phase behaves
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For the First Time, a Restaurant Is Serving Actual Lab-Grown Meat
Meat Cells A restaurant in Singapore just became the first in the world to serve entrees made of lab-grown meat, as Agence France-Presse reports . The meat, created by US-based startup Eat Just from chicken cells, was approved for sale in the Southeast Asian city-state earlier this month. Just announced the first sale of its lab-grown chicken product to 1880, a swank restaurant in Singapore's ent
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Llamas are hotter than ever. Here's why.
The llama's ability to move up and down canyons and mountains makes it an ideal work animal in Peru. (Jessica Kowlden/Unsplash/) Emily Wakild is a professor of History and Director, Environmental Studies Program, Boise State University. This story originally featured on The Conversation . With their long eyelashes, banana-shaped ears, upturned mouths and stocky bodies covered with curly wool, lla
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Current food production systems could mean far-reaching habitat loss
The global food system could drive rapid and widespread biodiversity loss if not changed, new research has found.
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Meteoric evidence for a previously unknown asteroid
A team of scientists has identified a potentially new meteorite parent asteroid by studying a small shard of a meteorite that arrived on Earth a dozen years ago. The composition of a piece of the meteorite Almahata Sitta (AhS) indicates that its parent body was an asteroid roughly the size of Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt, and formed in the presence of water under intermediat
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Looking for dark matter near neutron stars with radio telescopes
In 1983, theoretical physicist Pierre Sikivie found that axions have another remarkable property: In the presence of an electromagnetic field, they should sometimes spontaneously convert to easily detectable photons. What was once thought to be completely undetectable, turned out to be potentially detectable as long as there is high enough concentration of axions and strong magnetic fields.
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Big step with small whirls
Skyrmions are small magnetic objects that could revolutionize the data storage industry and also enable new computer architectures. However, there are a number of challenges that need to be overcome. A team of researchers has succeeded for the first time in producing a tunable multilayer system in which two different types of skyrmions – the future bits for '0' and '1' – can exist at room temperat
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Climate Change Legislation Included in Coronavirus Stimulus Deal
The legislation calls for cutting the use of powerful planet-warming chemicals common in air-conditioners and refrigerators.
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Big step with small whirls
Skyrmions are small magnetic objects that could revolutionize the data storage industry and also enable new computer architectures. However, there are a number of challenges that need to be overcome. A team of researchers has succeeded for the first time in producing a tunable multilayer system in which two different types of skyrmions – the future bits for '0' and '1' – can exist at room temperat
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Virus variant takes pandemic into a new phase
The UK needs strategic plan to support business and keep trade flowing
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US stimulus falls short of what is needed
The public health and economic emergency has got worse since the first relief package
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The mechanics of the immune system
Not only chemistry plays a role in the docking of antigens to the T-cell; micromechanical effects are important too. Submicrometer structures on the cell surface act like microscopic tension springs. Tiny forces that occur as a result are likely to be of great importance for the recognition of antigens. It has now become possible to observe these forces directly using highly developed microscopy m
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How Colorado potato beetles beat pesticides
New research shows that pesticides alter how Colorado potato beetles manage their DNA. These epigenetic changes were passed down two generations suggesting that rapid resistance to pesticides may not require beetles to evolve their genetic code. Instead they may simply use existing genes to tolerate toxins already found in potatoes. The scientists were surprised that these epigenetic changes, trig
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How cancers hurt themselves to hurt immune cells more
A study of melanoma cells explains a puzzling response they exhibit to ward off T cell attacks.
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Goldilocks and the three quantum dots: Just right for peak solar panel performance
Maximizing the efficiency of renewable energy technology is dependent on creating nanoparticles with ideal dimensions and density, new simulations have shown.
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Difference in blood pressure between arms linked to greater early death risk
Robust evidence from a large international study confirms that a difference in blood pressure readings between arms is linked to greater risk of heart attack, stroke and death.
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Exposure to metals can impact pregnancy
Exposure to metals such as nickel, arsenic, cobalt and lead may disrupt a woman's hormones during pregnancy, according to a new study.
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Water and genes flow between the two largest Baltic salmon rivers
Salmon from upstream reaches of the two northernmost Baltic rivers are different from downstream salmon. A recent study found that upstream salmon from the large Tornio and Kalix Rivers in Finland and Sweden are genetically distinct and migrate at different times and ages than their downstream counterparts. However, there seems to be no such distinction between salmon from these two neighboring ri
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Targeting the deadly coils of Ebola
Computer simulations of the Ebola virus structure are helping to crack its defenses. Ebola virus nucleocapsid stability conferred by RNA electrostatic interactions.
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Drinking milk while breastfeeding may reduce the child's food allergy risk
Children of mothers who drink relatively more cow's milk during breastfeeding are at reduced risk of developing food allergies.
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Goldilocks and the three quantum dots: Just right for peak solar panel performance
Maximizing the efficiency of renewable energy technology is dependent on creating nanoparticles with ideal dimensions and density, new simulations have shown.
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Arthritis drug may treat immunotherapy-related heart complication
A drug typically prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis may also be effective in treating a rare but potentially deadly heart complication some cancer patients experience after taking immunotherapies, according to a study published in Cancer Discovery and co-led by investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC).
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New phase for synthetic aperture microscopy
Although SAM is undoubtedly a promising approach, current implementations lack in both spatial resolution and frame rate to be useful for emerging applications. To address these issues, a team of researchers led by Renjie Zhou from The Chinese University of Hong Kong recently developed a novel SAM method.
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Recommendations for the overdose epidemic in the COVID-19 pandemic
A new report from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health offers recommendations aimed at federal, state, and local policymakers to address the opioid epidemic during the pandemic.
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Targeted brain stimulation dulls social pain
Pairing brain stimulation with an emotion management technique blunts negative emotions, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. The combination may improve emotional regulation in people with psychiatric disorders.
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Daily briefing: Explore the world with Leif Penguinson
Nature, Published online: 21 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03610-9 Can you spot the penguin?
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What's your risk of catching COVID? These tools help you to find out
Nature, Published online: 21 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03637-y A look at apps that predict the chance of infection and illness depending on what you're doing and where you are.
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Identifying PrognosticBiomarkers in COVID-19
Single-cell proteomics provides novel insights to COVID-19 disease progression
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Study examines attitudes toward non-native birds
A new study from scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology examines public attitudes toward non-native bird species and whether people are willing to manage them to protect native cavity-nesting birds, such as Eastern Bluebirds and the American Kestrel. The findings are published in the Journal of Environmental Management.
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January issue of SLAS Discovery "Cryo-EM: The Resolution Revolution and Drug Discovery"
The January edition of SLAS Discovery features the cover article, "Cryo-EM: The Resolution Revolution and Drug Discovery" by Taiana Maia de Oliveira, Ph.D., Lotte van Beek, Ph.D., Fiona Shilliday, Ph.D., Judit E. Debreczeni, Ph.D., and Chris Phillips, Ph.D., from AstraZeneca.
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Citizens versus the internet: Confronting digital challenges with cognitive tools
In the latest issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a team of researchers recommend ways that psychological and behavioral sciences can help decrease the negative consequences of Internet use. These recommendations emphasize helping people gain greater control over their digital environments.
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Gene pathway linked to schizophrenia identified through stem cell engineering
Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells engineered from a single family's blood samples, a gene signaling pathway linked to a higher risk for developing schizophrenia was discovered by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The research was published in a recent issue of Neuropsychopharmacology.
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Under Antarctica's ice, Weddell seals produce ultrasonic vocalizations
Weddell seals are chirping, whistling and trilling under Antarctica's ice at sound frequencies that are inaudible to humans, according to a research team led by University of Oregon biologists. Two years of recordings have captured nine types of tonal ultrasonic seal vocalizations that reach to 50 kilohertz.
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Sex-specific Alzheimer's treatment could benefit males over females
A University of Ottawa study found a specific Alzheimer's treatment is effective in male and not female mice, providing a window into the biology of the disease and the effectiveness of targeted treatments.
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CRISPR helps researchers uncover how corals adjust to warming oceans
The CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system can help scientists understand, and possibly improve, how corals respond to the environmental stresses of climate change. Work led by Phillip Cleves–who joined Carnegie's Department of Embryology this fall–details how the revolutionary, Nobel Prize-winning technology can be deployed to guide conservation efforts for fragile reef ecosystems.
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Ecosystem dynamics: Topological phases in biological systems
Physicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that topological phases could exist in biology, and in so doing they have identified a link between solid-state physics and biophysics.
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Study examines attitudes toward non-native birds
A new study from scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology examines public attitudes toward non-native bird species and whether people are willing to manage them to protect native cavity-nesting birds, such as Eastern Bluebirds and the American Kestrel. The findings are published in the Journal of Environmental Management.
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Autonomous Ravn X Drone to Launch Satellites From Airport Runways
Huntsville Alabama's Lowe Mill arts and entertainment center offers studios to artists of all kinds—sculptors, bookbinders, woodworkers. It's the kind of place where, in more normal times, visitors might wander open studios and take ceramics classes. It's also, evidently, the kind of place where one designs autonomous drones to launch rockets. Lowe Mill, you see, is owned by angel investor, Jim H
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Medical oddity reveals unheard-of 'immunity gene' mutations and new way to screen them
Researchers baffled by an infant's rare encephalitis case unusual in children found unheard-of mutations and a new way to examine the 'immunity gene.'
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New topological properties found in 'old' material of Cobalt disulfide
Researchers have discovered the presence of Weyl nodes in bulk CoS2 that allow them to make predictions about its surface properties. The material hosts Weyl-fermions and Fermi-arc surface states within its band structure, which may enable it to serve as a platform for exotic phenomena.
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New energy conversion layer for biosolar cells
A research team from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), together with colleagues from Lisbon, has produced a semi-artificial electrode that could convert light energy into other forms of energy in biosolar cells. The technique is based on the photosynthesis protein Photosystem I from cyanobacteria. The group showed that they could couple their system with an enzyme that used the converted light en
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Artificial intelligence solves Schrödinger's equation
A team of scientists at Freie Universität Berlin has developed an artificial intelligence (AI) method for calculating the ground state of the Schrödinger equation in quantum chemistry. The goal of quantum chemistry is to predict chemical and physical properties of molecules based solely on the arrangement of their atoms in space, avoiding the need for resource-intensive and time-consuming laborato
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Skyrmions proposed as the basis for a completely new computer architecture
The magnetic interactions between atoms at minute scales can create unique states such as skyrmions. Skyrmions have special properties and can exist in certain material systems, such as a 'stack' of different sub-nanometer-thick metal layers. Modern computer technology based on skyrmions—which are only a few nanometers in size—promises to enable an extremely compact and ultrafast way of storing an
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How the coronavirus interacts with cells
Scientists from Würzburg and the US have charted the first global atlas of direct interactions between SARS-CoV-2 RNA and human host cells. This may provide a starting point for novel treatments.
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Orangutans yawn contagiously when they see others yawn
For the first time, contagious yawning has now also been found in a species that roams its territory mostly in solitude and is less frequently engaged in social interactions: the orangutan. Publication in Nature Scientific Reports by an international group of scientists with lead-author Evy van Berlo, psychologist at Leiden University.
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Cooperation is key to addressing climate change
Climate change is our most complicated global pollution challenge, and cooperation is the key to solving it, according to a new book from a Binghamton University economist.
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Using NASA tech to activate citizen scientists
Dr. Brad Norman, Research Fellow at the Harry Butler Institute, is using whale shark identification technology adapted from NASA's Hubble Telescope scientists to inspire and activate the next generation of citizen scientists.
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How nearby galaxies form their stars
Stars are born in dense clouds of molecular hydrogen gas that permeates interstellar space of most galaxies. While the physics of star formation is complex, recent years have seen substantial progress towards understanding how stars form in a galactic environment. What ultimately determines the level of star formation in galaxies, however, remains an open question.
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New optical fiber brings significant improvements to light-based gyroscopes
Researchers have taken an important new step in advancing the performance of resonator fiber optic gyroscopes, a type of fiber optic sensor that senses rotation using only light. Because gyroscopes are the basis of most navigation systems, the new work could one day bring important improvements to these systems.
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Variety: Spice of life for bumble bees
The yield and quality of many crops benefit from pollination, but it isn't just honey bees that do this work: bumble bees also have a role. However, placing honey bee or bumble bee colonies next to the field does not guarantee that they will visit the desired plants since there may be other plant species flowering at the same time that prove more attractive. A team from the University of Göttingen
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Device refines analysis of materials for fuel cells and batteries
A new device designed to help scientists study in detail what happens during electrochemical reactions has been developed by researchers at the Center for Innovation in New Energies (CINE) in collaboration with researchers at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), a unit of the Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM). CINE is an Engineering Research Center (ERC) e
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Scientists complete yearlong pulsar timing study after reviving dormant radio telescopes
While the scientific community grapples with the loss of the Arecibo radio telescope, astronomers who recently revived a long-dormant radio telescope array in Argentina hope it can help modestly compensate for the work Arecibo did in pulsar timing. Last year, scientists at Rochester Institute of Technology and the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR) began a pulsar timing study using two u
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Cyberpunk 2077 and the Meaning of Its Deadly Dildos
In lots of video games, sex toys are repurposed for violence. What's the deal?
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How the coronavirus interacts with cells
Scientists from Würzburg and the US have charted the first global atlas of direct interactions between SARS-CoV-2 RNA and human host cells. This may provide a starting point for novel treatments.
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Orangutans yawn contagiously when they see others yawn
For the first time, contagious yawning has now also been found in a species that roams its territory mostly in solitude and is less frequently engaged in social interactions: the orangutan. Publication in Nature Scientific Reports by an international group of scientists with lead-author Evy van Berlo, psychologist at Leiden University.
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Using NASA tech to activate citizen scientists
Dr. Brad Norman, Research Fellow at the Harry Butler Institute, is using whale shark identification technology adapted from NASA's Hubble Telescope scientists to inspire and activate the next generation of citizen scientists.
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Variety: Spice of life for bumble bees
The yield and quality of many crops benefit from pollination, but it isn't just honey bees that do this work: bumble bees also have a role. However, placing honey bee or bumble bee colonies next to the field does not guarantee that they will visit the desired plants since there may be other plant species flowering at the same time that prove more attractive. A team from the University of Göttingen
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Scientists: Genetically Modified Trees Could Fight Climate Change
Accelerated Growth In order to fight the growing threat of global climate change, scientists are now suggesting that we genetically modify trees so that they can quickly suck more carbon out of the atmosphere. The idea, CBC reports , is based on the basic idea that more trees means less atmospheric carbon dioxide and a healthier planet. But that requires massive, old forests that could take centu
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Researcher experiments with electron-plasma interactions
A paper on research conducted by Meirielen Caetano de Sousa, postdoctoral fellow at the University of São Paulo's Physics Institute (IF-USP) in Brazil, is highlighted as Editor's Pick in the September issue of Physics of Plasmas, published by the American Institute of Physics with the cooperation of The American Physical Society. The paper, entitled "Wave-particle interactions in a long traveling
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Discovery: How Colorado potato beetles beat pesticides
The Colorado potato beetle is a notorious pest—and a kind of unstoppable genius.
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Discovery of 66 new Roman Army sites shows more clues about one of the empire's most infamous conflicts
The discovery of dozens of new Roman Army sites thanks to remote sensing technology has revealed more about one of the empire's most infamous conflicts.
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Looking for dark matter near neutron stars with radio telescopes
In the 1970s, physicists uncovered a problem with the Standard Model of particle physics—the theory that describes three of the four fundamental forces of nature (electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions; the fourth is gravity). They found that, while the theory predicts that a symmetry between particles and forces in our Universe and a mirror version should be broken, the experiments say ot
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Will you have to carry a vaccine passport on your phone?
What seemed so impossible at the beginning of the pandemic is now real: vaccines are here, in record time. They bring much-needed hope to a holiday season shadowed by death and fear. While authorities work out details for this mass vaccination campaign, though, the public is still waiting for answers to fundamental questions. Who gets the vaccine ? Who will know if we've gotten it? Will workplace
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Discovery: How Colorado potato beetles beat pesticides
The Colorado potato beetle is a notorious pest—and a kind of unstoppable genius.
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Who should be first in line for the Covid vaccine? | Letters
An NHS doctor writes of their concerns about the decision to vaccinate health workers at a later time, while Martin Lippitt and Tony Green wonder why Rupert Murdoch has been among the first to receive the jab Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage I wonder whether the government's decision to prioritise vaccinating the elderly in care homes has been the best strategy for ma
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Scientists assemble the gamma-tubulin ring complex in vitro for the first time
Researchers from the Microtubule Organization lab, headed by Jens Lüders at IRB Barcelona, and the Macromolecular Complexes in DNA Damage Response Group, led by Oscar Llorca at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), have achieved the first in vitro reconstitution of the human -tubulin ring complex (γTuRC), responsible for initiating microtubule formation. In addition, they revealed it
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New nanomaterial helps obtain hydrogen from a liquid energy carrier, in a key step toward a stable and clean fuel source
Hydrogen is a sustainable source of clean energy that avoids toxic emissions and can add value to multiple sectors in the economy including transportation, power generation, metals manufacturing, among others. Technologies for storing and transporting hydrogen bridge the gap between sustainable energy production and fuel use, and therefore are an essential component of a viable hydrogen economy. B
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Research analyzes academic abstracts written by students
Abstracts are summaries that introduce scientific articles. Their purpose is to inform as to the content of the text so that in a short time potential readers can get a general idea of the contents and decide whether they are interested in reading the entire document. Formally, it is a basically informative summary that synthesizes the most important contributions of the article: the topic of stud
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Incoming EPA Chief Vows 'Sense of Urgency on Climate'
Michael Regan has said the agency will work quickly on addressing climate change, water pollution and environmental inequities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists assemble the gamma-tubulin ring complex in vitro for the first time
Researchers from the Microtubule Organization lab, headed by Jens Lüders at IRB Barcelona, and the Macromolecular Complexes in DNA Damage Response Group, led by Oscar Llorca at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), have achieved the first in vitro reconstitution of the human -tubulin ring complex (γTuRC), responsible for initiating microtubule formation. In addition, they revealed it
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California lockdown suppressed excess pandemic deaths
Nearly 20,000 more Californians died in the first six months of the pandemic than would have been expected to die in a normal year, with a disproportionate number of those deaths occurring among older adults, black or Latino residents, or those who had not completed high school, according to an analysis by researchers at UC San Francisco.
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How nearby galaxies form their stars
How stars form in galaxies remains a major open question in astrophysics. A new UZH study sheds new light on this topic with the help of a data-driven re-analysis of observational measurements. The star-formation activity of typical, nearby galaxies is found to scale proportionally with the amount of gas present in these galaxies. This points to the net gas supply from cosmic distances as the main
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Sixfold increase in risk
A research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has quantified the effects of an infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) on the development of cervical cancer. Their results show that the risk of developing cervical cancer is six times higher in women who are infected with HIV. Southern and Eastern Africa are particularly affected.
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Young people regarded COVID-19 as a threat to the older generation but not to themselves
During the early stages of the COVID-19 outbreak, young Singaporeans understood the infectious disease to be risky for their parents and older relatives, but not themselves, an NTU Singapore study has found. Young Singaporeans were also more concerned about the dangers of fake news surrounding COVID-19 rather than the health threat posed by the disease and believed misinformation about the pandemi
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Scientists complete yearlong pulsar timing study after reviving dormant radio telescopes
While the scientific community grapples with the loss of the Arecibo radio telescope, astronomers who revived a long-dormant radio telescope array in Argentina hope it can help compensate for the work Arecibo did in pulsar timing. Last year, scientists at Rochester Institute of Technology and the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronom­ia (IAR) began a pulsar timing study using two upgraded radio tel
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New optical fiber brings significant improvements to light-based gyroscopes
Researchers have taken an important new step in advancing the performance of resonator fiber optic gyroscopes, a type of fiber optic sensor that senses rotation using only light. Because gyroscopes are the basis of most navigation systems, the new work could one day bring important improvements to these systems.
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Stanford University study: 12 Tel Aviv University researchers among top 50 in the world
A new study from Stanford University identified 12 Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers among the world's top 50 researchers in their fields. 333 TAU faculty members were also ranked among the top 2% of researchers in their respective disciplines based on publications, citations, and impact. 155 of them are included in the top 1%, and 74 in the top 0.5%.
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Variety: Spice of life for bumble bees
The yield and quality of many crops benefit from pollination, but it isn't just honey bees that do this work: bumble bees also have a role. A team led by University of Göttingen used innovative molecular biological methods and traditional microscopy to investigate the pollen collecting behaviour of honey bees and bum-ble bees in agricultural landscapes. It turns out bumble bees take much more poll
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Diseased cell fragments burst from pockets in immune cells to activate response
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have uncovered an important process in how our immune system detects signs of disease and activates a protective response. This understanding could improve efforts to find new and effective immunotherapy treatments for diseases like cancer.
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Prostate cancer regulator plays role in COVID-19, providing a promising treatment lead
By taking a lesson from prostate cancer, researchers now have a promising lead on a treatment for COVID-19. They found that, just like in prostate cancer, TMPRSS2 is regulated by the androgen receptor in the lungs. And notably, blocking the androgen receptor led to lower expression of TMPRSS2, which led to decreased coronavirus infection in mice and cellular models.
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Traditional model for disease spread may not work in COVID-19
A mathematical model that can help project the contagiousness and spread of infectious diseases like the seasonal flu may not be the best way to predict the continuing spread of the novel coronavirus, especially during lockdowns that alter the normal mix of the population.
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Device refines analysis of materials for fuel cells and batteries
Developed at an Engineering Research Center supported by FAPESP, the novel spectroelectrochemical cell can be used to study the behavior of electrolytes and catalysts by means of X-rays and infrared or even visible light.
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Study examines attitudes toward non-native birds
A new study from scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology examines public attitudes toward non-native bird species and whether people are willing to manage them to protect native cavity-nesting birds, such as Eastern Bluebirds and the American Kestrel. The findings are published in the Journal of Environmental Management.
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Moffitt researchers discover potential new drug target to treat cutaneous T cell lymphoma
In order to improve their understanding of how CTCL develops in hopes of developing new therapies, a team of Moffitt scientists conducted a series of studies. In an article published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, they demonstrate that decreased expression of the protein SATB1 contributes to CTCL development and that drugs that cause SATB1 to become re-expressed may be potential treatme
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Sixteen facial expressions appear in every culture
A new study reviewed YouTube videos in search of commonly used expressions and the conditions that prompted them. The researchers suggest the commonality of our expressions is evidence that some emotional reactions are universal. This study is hardly the first to take on that question. Despite the often extreme differences between individuals, many elements of our existence are shared by almost e
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Scientists develop an efficient way to produce low-cost heatsinks
NUST MISIS scientists found a way to reduce the cost of industrial and electronics heatsinks production up to 10 times. Consequently, the product itself would also cost less. The proposed methods presume the use of rubber and silicon carbide as components, i.e. these components are mixed, pressed and sintered. The article on the research is published in Polymers.
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The United States Space Force Turns One
The newest branch of the U.S. armed services pitches its tent on a vast battlefield
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Exposure to these metals may alter pregnancy hormones
Exposure to metals such as nickel, arsenic, cobalt, and lead may disrupt hormones during pregnancy, according to new research. Exposure to metals has been associated with problems at birth such as preterm birth and low birth weight in babies, and preeclampsia in women. However, little is known about how metals exposure can lead to such problems. The new research shows that some metals may disrupt
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Advice needed for a solo Christmas meal | Brief letters
EU border closures | Festive dining | Bearded men | Brian Sykes obituary You report that EU member state France has temporarily closed its border with the UK ( Covid chaos disrupts Kent ports as France bans UK freigh t, 21 December). You also report that its fellow EU member states Germany, the Netherlands, Ireland and others have done likewise. One could almost be forgiven for thinking these wer
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Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Erupts with Dramatic Lava Fountains
This is some of the most dramatic activity since the floor of one of the volcano's craters collapsed in 2018 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Top 10 parental worries for kids during COVID
A new national poll offers a glimpse into parents' greatest concerns about their kids in the pandemic-era. Many children are in virtual school, less physically connected to friends and activities like sports, and may have experienced major lifestyle changes from spending more time at home during quarantine. High on the top 10 list of parents worries: overuse of social media and screen time, inter
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Tweak gets chameleon material to mimic brain cells
Adding small quantities of the element boron to vanadium dioxide makes the material function like a synapse, researchers report. Each waking moment, our brain processes a massive amount of data to make sense of the outside world. Thus, by imitating the way the human brain solves everyday problems, neuromorphic systems have tremendous potential to revolutionize big data analysis and pattern recogn
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A full blood count of COVID-19 patients can predict disease severity
International research led by the Radboud university medical center shows that a full blood count of COVID-19 patients predicts fairly accurately whether the infection will have a complicated course or not. This makes it easier for healthcare providers to estimate the expected clinical picture. This study, conducted in eleven hospitals, has now been published in the scientific journal eLife.
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Concerns over infecting others matter more for vaccination in sparsely populated areas
Concerns over infecting others play a greater role in people's willingness to be vaccinated in sparsely populated areas than in dense urban ones, according to new research. The findings have implications for public health communications regarding the COVID-19 and flu vaccines and others, and could help in reducing the rural-urban disparity in vaccination.
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Discovery: How Colorado potato beetles beat pesticides
New research shows that pesticides alter how Colorado potato beetles manage their DNA. These epigenetic changes were passed down two generations suggesting that rapid resistance to pesticides may not require beetles to evolve their genetic code. Instead they may simply use existing genes to tolerate toxins already found in potatoes. The scientists were surprised that these epigenetic changes, trig
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Publisher Correction: Galactosaminogalactan activates the inflammasome to provide host protection
Nature, Published online: 21 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03088-5
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Har Danmark købt omstridt teknologi til overvågning? Ja, sagde Forsvaret, men trak så i land
Undersøgelse viser, at Forsvaret har software, som kan spore dig alene ved hjælp af dit mobilnummer.
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The Oldest Crewed Deep Sea Submarine Just Got a Big Makeover
The 60-year-old sub is preparing to take its deepest plunge yet. But in the age of autonomous machines, why are humans exploring the ocean floor at all?
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In 1988, Bernie Sanders outlined the key problem with news media today
Over his four-decade political career, Senator Bernie Sanders has been an outspoken critic of mass news media. In a 1988 speech, Sanders described how it's virtually impossible to meaningfully discuss substantial political issues in 30-second sound bites, and how the consolidation of news outlets makes it harder for alternative views to reach the public. Surveys show that America's trust in mass
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Social status påverkar vårdinsatser vid hjärtstopp
En ny studie från Linnéuniversitetet visar att patienter med lägre socioekonomisk bakgrund löper högre risk att dö vid hjärtstopp. Det visar en undersökning av det nationella patientregistret från 24 217 patienter.
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Brazilian researcher experiments with electron-plasma interactions
The study could help upgrade satellite communications equipment.
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Doctors should change the way that they ask patients about self-harm and suicide
Doctors can better help patients with mental health concerns by adopting a different questioning style around self-harm and suicide, experts have said.
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Discovery of 66 new Roman Army sites shows more clues about one of the empire
The discovery of dozens of new Roman Army sites thanks to remote sensing technology has revealed more about one of the empire's most infamous conflicts.
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The Achilles' heel of cancer stem cells
Colon cancer stem cells have one weak spot: the enzyme Mll1. An MDC team led by Walter Birchmeier has now shown in Nature Communications that blocking this protein prevents the development of new tumors in the body.
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Corona: How the virus interacts with cells
Scientists from Würzburg and the US have charted the first global atlas of direct interactions between SARS-CoV-2 RNA and human host cells. This may provide a starting point for novel treatments.
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Researchers illuminate neurotransmitter transport using X-ray crystallography and molecular simulations
Scientists from the MIPT Research Center for Molecular Mechanisms of Aging and Age-Related Diseases have joined forces with their colleagues from Jülich Research Center, Germany, and uncovered how sodium ions drive glutamate transport in the central nervous system. Glutamate is the most important excitatory neurotransmitter and is actively removed from the synaptic cleft between neurons by special
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Researchers identify a rare genetic bone disorder through massive sequencing methods
Researchers of the Cell Biology and Physiology-LABRET group of the University of Malaga (UMA), together with the Networking Biomedical Research Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), have described a new genetic skeletal disorder based on a precision medicine strategy.
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The mechanics of the immune system
Not only chemistry plays a role in the docking of antigens to the T-cell; micromechanical effects are important too. Submicrometer structures on the cell surface act like microscopic tension springs. Tiny forces that occur as a result are likely to be of great importance for the recognition of antigens. At TU Wien, it has now been possible to observe these forces directly using highly developed mi
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Brain stem cells divide over months
For the first time, scientists at the University of Zurich have been able to observe the way stem cells in the adult brains of mice divide over the course of months to create new nerve cells. Their study shows that brain stem cells are active over a long period, and thus provides new insights that will feed into stem cell research.
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Researchers retract controversial female mentorship paper
Study had drawn scalding criticism
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How to have a constructive conversation with vaccine skeptics
In his book, "Anti-vaxxers," science educator Jonathan Berman aims to foster better conversations about vaccines. While the anti-vax movement in America has grown, more Americans now say they'll get a COVID-19 vaccine. In this Big Think interview, Berman explains why he's offering an ear to the anti-vax movement. As two COVID-19 vaccines roll out in America, Pew Research reported a rare glimmer o
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The Mysterious Link Between COVID-19 and Sleep
The newly discovered coronavirus had killed only a few dozen people when Feixiong Cheng started looking for a treatment. He knew time was of the essence: Cheng, a data analyst at the Cleveland Clinic, had seen similar coronaviruses tear through China and Saudi Arabia before, sickening thousands and shaking the global economy. So, in January, his lab used artificial intelligence to search for hidd
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Research uses a video game to identify attention deficit symptoms
Adapting a traditional endless runner video game and using a raccoon as the protagonist, researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM, in its Spanish acronym), among other institutions, have developed a platform that allows the identification and evaluation of the degree of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and
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Research analyzes academic abstracts written by students
A recent study by Maria Dolors Cañada and Carme Bach of the Gr@el research group at the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, which analyses the abstracts of final year projects by students on the bachelor's degree in Applied Languages, with the aim of helping them achieve discourse competence.
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Big step with small whirls
Skyrmions are small magnetic objects that could revolutionize the data storage industry and also enable new computer architectures. However, there are a number of challenges that need to be overcome. A team of Empa researchers has succeeded for the first time in producing a tunable multilayer system in which two different types of skyrmions – the future bits for "0" and "1" – can exist at room tem
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Cellular exclusion of mitochondria protects cells from damage
Researchers from Osaka University identified mitochondrial release out of cells as a novel mechanism by which cells turn over mitochondria and maintain cell health. The researchers found that cells deficient in the protein parkin, which is responsible for the hereditary form of Parkinson's disease (PD), showed markedly increased mitochondrial release. Further, cerebrospinal fluids of PD patients w
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Optoelectronic devices that emit warm and cool white light
A single semiconducting material can produce white light by emitting light across the visible spectrum.
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Hardly any sports — but more physical activity during lockdown
In spring, when sports clubs closed due to the Corona pandemic, children looked for alternative physical activities. According to a study covering more than 1,700 children and adolescents as part of the Motorik-Modul Study (MoMo) conducted by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Karlsruhe University of Education (PHKA), the children were active about 36 minutes longer every day, but also sp
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Looking for dark matter near neutron stars with radio telescopes
In 1983, theoretical physicist Pierre Sikivie found that axions have another remarkable property: In the presence of an electromagnetic field, they should sometimes spontaneously convert to easily detectable photons. What was once thought to be completely undetectable, turned out to be potentially detectable as long as there is high enough concentration of axions and strong magnetic fields.
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Fungal RNA viruses: Unexpected complexity affecting more than your breakfast omelet
Traditional approaches for studying fungal RNA viruses have relied upon sequence similarity, resulting in an underestimation of RNA viral genome diversity. Researchers from the University of Tsukuba used an advanced technological approach called Fragmented and Primer Ligated Double Stranded RNA sequencing, or FLDS, to identify viral sequences that were previously overlooked. They identified novel
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Plan to map oil in Alaska's Arctic refuge ignores environmental risks, critics say
Scientists argue federal environmental studies are flawed
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Mealworms vs. grasshoppers: Which food fails the 'yuck' test?
Insects, like mealworms and grasshoppers, are a sustainable, climate-friendly food source. But what will it take for us to begin eating them? To find out, researchers had 188 Danish 11- and 12-year-old children roll and eat their own mealworm and grasshopper fortified oatmeal balls. The finding? Some insects have a greater "yuck factor" for kids than others—and mealworms might be the best bet for
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Despite same treatment, obese women face more risks for postpartum hemorrhage complications
As part of an academic medical center initiative to improve maternal health, researchers at the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) and Tampa General Hospital (TGH) examined how obesity affected the management and outcomes of postpartum hemorrhage at a tertiary care center. The findings highlight that certain groups of high-risk obstetric patients, such as obese women, may need a diffe
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How one pain suppresses the other
When two painful stimuli act on us at the same time, we perceive the one of them as less painful. This phenomenon is part of the body's own pain control system. A disfunction of this inhibition is associated with chronic pain disorders. Researchers at Berufsgenossenschaftliches Universitätsklinikum Bergmannsheil, clinic of Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), have developed a method for this. They were
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New energy conversion layer for biosolar cells
A research team from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, together with colleagues from Lisbon, has produced a semi-artificial electrode that could convert light energy into other forms of energy in biosolar cells. The technique is based on the photosynthesis protein Photosystem I from cyanobacteria. The group showed that they could couple their system with an enzyme that used the converted light energy t
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CNIO and IRB Barcelona assemble the gamma-tubulin ring complex in vitro for the first time
This work paves the way for the in vitro study of the nucleation process that is essential for assembly and organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton.The paper is a collaboration between Jens Lüders' group at IRB Barcelona and Oscar Llorca's at CNIO.The results have been published in Science Advances.
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New model reveals previously unrecognized complexity of oceanic earthquake zones
University of Tsukuba researchers constructed a state-of-the-art model based on seismic data from the January 2020 Caribbean earthquake. The model revealed considerable complexity in rupture speed and direction, related to a bend in the fault that triggered several rupture episodes. The analysis revealed previously unrecognized complexity of rupture processes and fault geometry in ocean faults tha
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Antigen tests — are self-collected nasal swabs a reliable option?
Under certain conditions, antigen testing using self-collected swabs from the anterior nose may constitute a reliable alternative to antigen testing using nasopharyngeal swabs collected by health professionals. This is the conclusion drawn by a team of researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and Heidelberg University Hospital. Results from their study have been published in the Europ
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Blood alcohol levels much lower than the legal limit impair hand-eye coordination
In previous studies, eye movements and vision were only affected at blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) approaching the legal limit for driving (0.08% BAC), in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
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Coastal ecosystems 'bright spots'
CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, has identified coastal 'bright spots' to repair marine ecosystems globally, paving the way to boost biodiversity, local economies and human wellbeing.
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SwRI-led team finds meteoric evidence for a previously unknown asteroid
A Southwest Research Institute-led team of scientists has identified a potentially new meteorite parent asteroid by studying a small shard of a meteorite that arrived on Earth a dozen years ago. The composition of a piece of the meteorite Almahata Sitta (AhS) indicates that its parent body was an asteroid roughly the size of Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt, and formed in the pr
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Evolution of a killer: How African Salmonella made the leap from gut to bloodstream
University of Liverpool scientists have exploited the combined power of genomics and epidemiology to understand how a type of Salmonella bacteria evolved to kill hundreds of thousands of immunocompromised people in Africa.
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New catalytic approach to accessing key intermediate carbocation
This study revealed the development of a novel iridium based catalyst. The catalyst is capable of accessing the carbocation intermediates of the reaction to achieve an unprecedented level of regioselectivity (>95%) and enantioselectivity (98%). This technology will have far-reaching implications in synthetic, organic, and pharmaceutical chemistry.
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Brain tissue yields clues to causes of PTSD
A post-mortem analysis of brain tissue from people who had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may help explain enduring mysteries about the disorder, such as why women are more susceptible to it and whether a dampened immune system response plays a role in dealing with stress, a team headed by Yale University researchers has found.
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Current food production systems could mean far-reaching habitat loss
The global food system could drive rapid and widespread biodiversity loss if not changed, new research has found.
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The upside of volatile space weather
Although stellar flares are typically viewed as a detriment to habitability, study shows "life might still have a fighting chance." Researchers find that flares drive a planets atmospheric composition to a new chemical equilibrium.
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'Race norming' blamed for denying payouts to ex-NFL players with dementia
A UCSF clinical psychologist has taken aim at the National Football League (NFL) for "race norming" black players diagnosed with dementia, a practice that is depriving them of the monetary awards allocated to former footballers with neurodegenerative disorders.
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Filled buprenorphine prescriptions for opioid use disorder during COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted health care delivery in the United State, and researchers in this study examined changes in total US retail pharmacy sales and sales of buprenorphine products with a US Food and Drug Administration-approved indication for treatment of opioid use disorder.
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Excess mortality in California during COVID-19 pandemic
Researchers estimated excess deaths in California between March and August during the COVID-19 pandemic by age, sex, race/ethnicity and educational level. California has a population of more than 39 million, which is about 12% of the US population of 328 million.
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Remote monitoring leads to 4x decline in returns to hospital after joint surgery
The rate of hospital readmissions for hip and knee replacement patients declined from roughly 12 percent to 3 percent when they were enrolled in a "hovering" program
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Ancient wolf pup mummy uncovered in Yukon permafrost
While water blasting at a wall of frozen mud in Yukon, Canada, a gold miner made an extraordinary discovery: a perfectly preserved wolf pup that had been locked in permafrost for 57,000 years. The remarkable condition of the pup, named Zhùr by the local Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in people, gave researchers a wealth of insights about her age, lifestyle, and relationship to modern wolves. The findings appear D
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New Singapore obstetrics and gynaecology research network established
Singapore's three public hospitals offering maternity services — KK Women's and Children's Hospital (KKH), Singapore General Hospital (SGH) and the National University Hospital (NUH), have established a collaborative research network.
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Jupiter and Saturn Are Just Showing Off Now
The Atlantic Tonight, if it's not cloudy, look for two points of light huddled together in the night sky—one as bright as a star, the other slightly dimmer. Step outside an hour after sunset, stick a hand out, and cover them with your thumb. There, in the space of a fingertip, you'll hold Jupiter, Saturn, and the many moons around them both. Jupiter and Saturn come together like this in Earth's n
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The US Has Already Given a Half Million COVID Shots
According to US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data, Bloomberg reports , US health workers have already administered more than half a million COVID-19 vaccine doses in the first week of the largest inoculation campaign in history. The doses were mostly distributed to healthcare personnel and long-term care facility residents. In total, 556,208 doses have already been administere
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Pfizer/BioNTech Covid vaccine approved by European regulator
EMA's move paves way for inoculations to begin across Europe within next few days Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Europe's medicines regulator has approved the use of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine against coronavirus, paving the way for inoculations to get under way across Europe within the next few days. A number of EU countries including Germany, France, Austria and
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Astronomers have detected the first radio emissions from an exoplanet
An international team of scientists have picked up the first radio waves emitted by an exoplanet. The planet is a "Hot Jupiter" orbiting a star system 40 light years from Earth. The findings must be confirmed, but if they are, it will be a first in radio astronomy. When people think about radio waves from space, the first thought is probably about aliens. However, lots of things can produce radio
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New method for the development of choline acetyltransferase inhibitors
The enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) catalyzes the synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and could be a target molecule for pharmaceuticals. A Swedish research team has now determined the mechanism by which arylvinylpyridinium (AVP), a known class of ChAT inhibitors, functions. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, ChAT manufactures the actual agent itself by attaching
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Physics student makes world's smallest Christmas tree
Every year, people all over the world try to make the biggest artificial Christmas tree, like the Gubbio Christmas Tree, formed by thousands of lights on the slopes of Mount Ingino, or the illumination of the 372-meter high transmission mast at Lopik in The Netherlands. Maura Willems, a student of Applied Physics at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), decided to do the opposite. She created
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New method for the development of choline acetyltransferase inhibitors
The enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) catalyzes the synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and could be a target molecule for pharmaceuticals. A Swedish research team has now determined the mechanism by which arylvinylpyridinium (AVP), a known class of ChAT inhibitors, functions. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, ChAT manufactures the actual agent itself by attaching
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A Winter Solstice, a Meteor Shower, Jupiter and Saturn Walk Into Your Night Sky
One day that has room for three distinct astronomical events.
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The Nation's Most Ambitious Police Reform Launches Today
T he nation's most ambitious police reform starts today. Few states made concrete and comprehensive changes in response to the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis—in part because the politics of doing so are usually difficult. But Gurbir Grewal, the 47-year-old Democrat who was appointed New Jersey's attorney general in 2017, doesn't have to worry about persuading recalcitrant legislators or w
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What we know about the new coronavirus strain
Scientists are racing to discover how infectious the variant is and if vaccines can beat it
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World's shortest wavelength for a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser demonstrated
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, with collaborators at Technische Universität Berlin, have demonstrated the shortest wavelength ever reported of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). This can pave the way for future use in, for example, disinfection and medical treatment. The results were recently published in the scientific journal ACS Photonics.
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New catalytic approach to accessing key intermediate carbocation
Human civilization in the 21st century is largely sustained by modern chemical technologies. The raw materials used in the manufacturing of a wide range of products, from clothing to plastics and pharmaceuticals, are mainly produced through efficient catalytic conversion of cheap feedstock chemicals into value-added organic commodities. In many cases, the chemical reactions involving organic compo
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New Leak May Force Russia to Ship Oxygen to Space Station
Gas Leak The International Space Station is still, after all this time, leaking air. Russia's space agency, Roscosmos, says that the situation is under control, Deutsche Welle reports . But at the same time, they still don't know where the leak actually is. Meanwhile, oxygen reserves and air pressure continue to drop, so Roscosmos has prepared to ship additional oxygen in February, the latest ins
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A Wolf Pup Mummy From the Ancient Arctic
Melting permafrost yields secrets of how a 6-week-old wolf puppy lived and died.
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Ancient wolf pup mummy uncovered in Yukon permafrost
While water blasting at a wall of frozen mud in Yukon, Canada, a gold miner made an extraordinary discovery: a perfectly preserved wolf pup that had been locked in permafrost for 57,000 years. The remarkable condition of the pup, named Zhùr by the local Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in people, gave researchers a wealth of insights about her age, lifestyle, and relationship to modern wolves. The findings appear D
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Coastal ecosystems 'bright spots'
CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, has identified coastal 'bright spots' to repair marine ecosystems globally, paving the way to boost biodiversity, local economies and human wellbeing.
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Robust stellar flares might not prevent life on exoplanets, could facilitate its detection
Although violent and unpredictable, stellar flares emitted by a planet's host star do not necessarily prevent life from forming, according to a new Northwestern University study.
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Evolution of a killer: How African Salmonella made the leap from gut to bloodstream
University of Liverpool scientists have exploited the combined power of genomics and epidemiology to understand how a type of Salmonella bacteria evolved to kill hundreds of thousands of immunocompromised people in Africa.
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Current food production systems could mean far-reaching habitat loss
The global food system could drive rapid and widespread biodiversity loss if not changed, new research has found.
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Study finds meteoric evidence for a previously unknown asteroid
A Southwest Research Institute-led team of scientists has identified a potentially new meteorite parent asteroid by studying a small shard of a meteorite that arrived on Earth a dozen years ago. The composition of a piece of the meteorite Almahata Sitta (AhS) indicates that its parent body was an asteroid roughly the size of Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt, and formed in the pr
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New fishway technology to get fish up and over those dam walls
Engineers and scientists at UNSW Sydney have come up with an ingenious way to get fish past dam walls, weirs and other barriers blocking their migration in Australian rivers.
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Survey highlights strain among high school seniors in pandemic uncertainty
As COVID-19 continues to disrupt educational experiences of students across the nation, newly analyzed survey research by the California Education Lab at the University of California, Davis, details the high level of uncertainty and financial stress experienced by California high school seniors as they weighed their college plans amid an unfolding pandemic.
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Overlægeforeningen efter krænkelsessag: Man advarer ikke, man rådgiver
En fagforening bør aldrig advare sine medlemmer mod at stå frem. Det siger Lisbeth Lintz, formand for Overlægeforeningen, efter at Yngre Læger i en krænkelsessag advarede en ung læge mod at konfrontere sin nærmeste leder og hospitalsledelsen af hensyn til hans videre karriere.
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SARS-CoV-2 spike protein can get into the brain
The coronavirus' spike protein, often depicted as the red arms of the virus, can cross the blood-brain barrier in mice, researchers have found. More and more evidence is coming out that people with COVID-19 are suffering from cognitive effects, such as brain fog and fatigue. The new finding strongly suggests that SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19, can enter the brain. The spike protein , often ca
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Development of plaques in Alzheimer's disease resolved
In Alzheimer's disease patients, the protein amyloid-beta (Aβ) clumps up in the brain to form so-called fibrils. This has a toxic effect on the surrounding nerve cells. It is believed that immune cells compact the Aβ fibrils into what are known as plaques. It is now possible to track the development of these microscopically small structures in human using infrared microscopy.
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Speeding toward improved hydrogen fuel production
A new material developed by a team led by Berkeley Lab will help to make hydrogen a viable energy source for a wide range of applications.
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Ancient wolf pup mummy uncovered in Yukon permafrost
While water blasting at a wall of frozen mud in Yukon, Canada, a gold miner made an extraordinary discovery: a perfectly preserved wolf pup that had been locked in permafrost for 57,000 years. The remarkable condition of the pup, named Zhùr by the local Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in people, gave researchers a wealth of insights about her age, lifestyle, and relationship to modern wolves. The findings appear D
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Coastal ecosystems 'bright spots'
CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, has identified coastal 'bright spots' to repair marine ecosystems globally, paving the way to boost biodiversity, local economies and human wellbeing.
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Evolution of a killer: How African Salmonella made the leap from gut to bloodstream
University of Liverpool scientists have exploited the combined power of genomics and epidemiology to understand how a type of Salmonella bacteria evolved to kill hundreds of thousands of immunocompromised people in Africa.
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New fishway technology to get fish up and over those dam walls
Engineers and scientists at UNSW Sydney have come up with an ingenious way to get fish past dam walls, weirs and other barriers blocking their migration in Australian rivers.
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Moderna COVID Vaccine Becomes Second to Get U.S. Authorization
Two RNA vaccines will be useful as U.S. infections surge, but the speedy authorizations complicate clinical trials — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Research reveals diverse community benefits of small-scale fisheries
Marine fisheries provide many benefits to coastal communities. Fisheries generate food, provide employment and economic profit through the supply chain, and play an important role in a sense of community and individual identity.
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Crikey! Massive prehistoric croc emerges from South East Queensland
A prehistoric croc measuring more than five meters long—dubbed the 'swamp king' – ruled south eastern Queensland waterways only a few million years ago.
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Goldilocks and the three quantum dots: Just right for peak solar panel performance
Scientists in Australia have developed a process for calculating the perfect size and density of quantum dots needed to achieve record efficiency in solar panels.
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Performance breakthrough by topological-insulator into a waveguide-resonator system
Waveguides and resonators are core components in electronics, photonics, and phononics, both in existing and future scenarios. In certain situations (space or frequency), critical coupling can occur between the two components, i.e., no energy passes through the waveguide after the incoming wave is coupled into the resonator. The transmission spectral characteristics resulting from this phenomenon
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Transients and synchronization are unified in ecological networks
Synchronization and transients are two fundamental phenomena in nonlinear and complex dynamical systems, and they also emerge ubiquitously in ecology and evolutionary biology. Synchronization is commonly observed in spatially extended ecological systems and is regarded as the dynamical basis for the emergence of ecological cycles and orders, yet there is little understanding of the underlying mech
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Research reveals diverse community benefits of small-scale fisheries
Marine fisheries provide many benefits to coastal communities. Fisheries generate food, provide employment and economic profit through the supply chain, and play an important role in a sense of community and individual identity.
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Transients and synchronization are unified in ecological networks
Synchronization and transients are two fundamental phenomena in nonlinear and complex dynamical systems, and they also emerge ubiquitously in ecology and evolutionary biology. Synchronization is commonly observed in spatially extended ecological systems and is regarded as the dynamical basis for the emergence of ecological cycles and orders, yet there is little understanding of the underlying mech
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From IQ tests and sperm banks to 'The Queen's Gambit': A history of gifted children
In Netflix hit "The Queen's Gambit," we see young orphan Beth Harmon discover her talent for competitive chess. During a game played in the orphanage basement, Harmon's chess tutor, the janitor, tells the nine-year-old: "To tell you the truth of it, child, you're astounding"—contrasting her youth and naivety to her seemingly inherent gift.
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Scientists develop an efficient way to produce low-cost heatsinks
NUST MISIS scientists found a way to reduce the cost of industrial and electronics heatsinks production up to 10 times. Consequently, the product itself would also cost less. The proposed methods presume the use of rubbers and silicon carbide as components, i.e. these components are mixed, pressed and sintered. The article on the research is published in Polymers.
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SARS-CoV-2 induces inflammation, cytokine storm and stress in infected lung cells
The researchers Wasco Wruck and Prof. James Adjaye from the Institute of Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, Medical Faculty of Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, Germany, employed a bioinformatic approach on transcriptome data pertaining to human lung epithelial cells infected with SARS-CoV-2. The meta-analysis unveiled several adversely affected biological processes in the lung whi
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Jupiter og Saturn på linje skaber sjældent "julekys" på himlen
PLUS. Himmelfænomenet, som ikke er set de seneste 800 år, vil kunne observeres, hvis vejret er klart, og man har udsigt til horisonten mod sydvest.
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Climate warming linked to tree leaf unfolding and flowering growing apart
Climate warming is linked to a widening interval between leaf unfolding and flowering in European trees, with implications for tree fitness and the wider environment, according to new research.
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The Mystery of Mistletoe's Missing Genes
Holiday-season traditions stretching back for centuries have linked wintertime romance to decorative sprigs of mistletoe. The way that the plant's rounded evergreen leaves and white berries tightly hug the branches of the trees on which it grows probably inspired that association. The truth about this botanical intimacy is less romantic: Mistletoe is a kind of parasite. Its leaves produce sugars
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Governments Block Travel to Prevent Spread of New COVID Strain
A mysterious and potentially more contagious strain of the coronavirus is spreading fast in the United Kingdom. To stop it from reaching the mainland, a number of countries have already cut themselves off completely from the UK. Most of central Europe has shut down UK connections over the last few days. Even Israel, Canada , Hong Kong, and Saudi Arabia have put a temporary hold on any travel to a
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Jupiter, Saturn merging in night sky, closest in centuries
Jupiter and Saturn will merge in the night sky Monday, appearing closer to one another than they have since Galileo's time in the 17th century.
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Brazilian forests found to be transitioning from carbon sinks to carbon sources
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Brazil has found that some non-Amazonian forests in Brazil have already begun to transition from carbon sinks to carbon sources. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their 33-year study of deciduous, semi-deciduous and evergreen forests in Brazil's state of Minas Gerais.
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Det Europæiske Lægemiddelagentur godkender Pfizer/BioNTechs vaccine
De 10.000 første doser til Danmark afventer nu kun kommissionens ja. Samtidig rejser tysk medie tvivl om EU har sikret sig vaccine nok.
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Regulating off-centering distortion maximizes photoluminescence in halide perovskites
In work published in the National Science Review (nwaa288), a team at HPSTAR led by Dr. Xujie Lü applied high pressure to tune the remarkable photoluminescence (PL) properties in halide perovskites. For the first time, they reveal a universal relationship whereby regulating the level of off-centering distortion (towards 0.2) can achieve optimal PL performance.
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Virtual kidney transplant evaluation allows patients to be evaluated from home
A virtual telehealth platform is allowing the surgery program at the Medical University of South Carolina to evaluate and wait-list patients for kidney transplantation despite reductions in direct, in-person health care visits brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Scientists solve 'flea mystery'
Researchers from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) and the University of Bristol in the UK solved the 'Flea Mystery.'
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A Rosetta stone for planet formation
Planets are formed from the disk of gas and dust around a star, but the mechanisms for doing so are imperfectly understood. Gas is the key driver in the dynamical evolution of planets, for example, because it is the dominant component of the disk (by mass). The timescale over which the gas dissipates sets the timescale for planet formation, yet its distribution in disks is just starting to be care
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EU medicines regulator approves Pfizer/BioNTech Covid vaccine
First vaccinations expected to start across 27-member bloc within days
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Discovery sheds light on the great mystery of why the universe has less antimatter than matter
It's one of the greatest puzzles in physics. All the particles that make up the matter around us, such electrons and protons, have antimatter versions which are nearly identical, but with mirrored properties such as the opposite electric charge. When an antimatter and a matter particle meet, they annihilate in a flash of energy.
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How to get people from Earth to Mars and safely back again
There are many things humanity must overcome before any return journey to Mars is launched.
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Twenty-Five of Our Favorite Stories From 2020
Smithsonian editors highlight some articles you might have missed from the past year
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The Museum That Fell From the Sky
An Ohio native preserves the story of the Navy's first rigid airship
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Why India's plan to reintroduce cheetahs may run into problems
A nature reserve in India could soon be the only location in the world to host wild populations of four major big cat species—tiger, lion, leopard and cheetah. Kuno-Palpur, in central state of Madhya Pradesh, may not be one of India's best-known sanctuaries but it is certainly becoming one of its most controversial. In early 2020, the country's supreme court agreed that wildlife authorities there
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Winter survival shelters you should know how to build
When you're trapped in the snow, a simple shelter like this could save your life. (Marc Wieland/Unsplash/) This story was originally featured on Outdoor Life . In a winter wilderness emergency, there's no question that finding or building shelter is going to be your top priority (unless someone in your party requires urgent first aid). In the bone-aching cold, hypothermia can begin to take hold w
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Trump's Enablers Will Meet Their Shakespearean Ends
It is a mark of these astounding times that news of heated meetings at the White House considering, among other things, the confiscation of voting machines, declaration of martial law, and use of the military to preside over an election outcome more to the president's liking were met with a collective yawn by the American people. The news of the FDA's approval of the Moderna vaccine for the coron
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Why India's plan to reintroduce cheetahs may run into problems
A nature reserve in India could soon be the only location in the world to host wild populations of four major big cat species—tiger, lion, leopard and cheetah. Kuno-Palpur, in central state of Madhya Pradesh, may not be one of India's best-known sanctuaries but it is certainly becoming one of its most controversial. In early 2020, the country's supreme court agreed that wildlife authorities there
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Crikey! Massive prehistoric croc emerges from South East Queensland
A prehistoric croc measuring more than five meters long — dubbed the 'swamp king' — ruled south eastern Queensland waterways only a few million years ago.University of Queensland researchers identified the new species of prehistoric croc — which they named Paludirex vincenti — from fossils first unearthed in the 1980s.
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How cancers hurt themselves to hurt immune cells more
A study of melanoma cells explains a puzzling response they exhibit to ward off T cell attacks.
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Modeling rainfall drop by drop
A high-frequency model developed using data from new high-precision rain gauges gives fresh insight into the dynamics of rain and runoff events.
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Goldilocks and the three quantum dots: Just right for peak solar panel performance
Maximizing the efficiency of renewable energy technology is dependent on creating nanoparticles with ideal dimensions and density, new simulations have shown.
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Performance breakthrough by topological-insulator into a waveguide-resonator system
Topological insulator (TI), a major discovery in condensed matter physics since this century, has now been introduced into waveguide-resonator systems. Along with basic similarities with classical ones, a TI enhanced system shows great advantages. A recent research in Nanjing University boosted the confidence of using the concepts of TI for practical device performance and functionalities, with ap
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Medical oddity reveals unheard-of 'immunity gene' mutations and new way to screen them
Researchers baffled by an infant's rare encephalitis case unusual in children found unheard-of mutations and a new way to examine the 'immunity gene.'
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Protecting against atherosclerosis at the molecular level
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified a novel mechanism by which CREB3L3 protects against atherosclerosis. By studying the absence or overexpression of the protein in mice prone to develop atherosclerosis, the researchers demonstrated that the absence of CREB3L3 exacerbates the formation of atherosclerosis, whereby the overexpression protects against atherosclerosis. At the molecul
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A community-level intervention reduces alcohol-related crashes
New research from the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation shows that a community-level alcohol intervention in California resulted in a 17% reduction in alcohol-involved crashes among drivers aged 15-30.
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Transients and synchronization are unified in ecological networks
A new synchronization phenomenon is uncovered in spatially distributed ecological networks. The local patch dynamics are of the chaotic predator-prey type and the network possess certain symmetries in its structure. It is found that the populations of all patches are synchronized in phase but certain subsets of patches can also synchronize in amplitude. During the course of evolution, the subsets
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Seeking answers in ferroelectric patterning
Why do some ferroelectric materials display 'bubble'-shaped patterning, while others display complex, labyrinthine patterns? A FLEET/UNSW study finds the changing patterns in ferroelectric films are driven by non-equilibrium dynamics, with topological defects driving subsequent evolution. Understanding the physics behind ferroelectric material patterns is crucial for designing advanced low-energy
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Major changes coming over the horizon for the global space industry
The attention of the world has recently been captured by the return of Japan's Hayabusa-2 asteroid mission, the activities of Elon Musk's SpaceX venture, and China's Chang'e 5 moon landing, yet a quiet revolution is taking place in the global space industry. This revolution started in the 2010s and its full impact on global space industry should be measured over the next decade.
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Drinking milk while breastfeeding may reduce the child's food allergy risk
Children of mothers who drink relatively more cow's milk during breastfeeding are at reduced risk of developing food allergies. That is the conclusion of researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, in a new study published in the scientific journal Nutrients.
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Cannabis could reduce fentanyl use, reduce overdose risk: Study
New research suggests that cannabis use by people in care for opioid addiction might improve their treatment outcomes and reduce their risk of being exposed to fentanyl in the contaminated unregulated drug supply.
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Can You Learn How to Have a Lucid Dream?
Lucid dreamers are able to recognize that they're dreaming and may even gain some control of the narrative. While not everyone is able to experience lucid dreaming, there are some ways to boost your chances.
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You Can Get through This Dark Pandemic Winter Using Tips from Disaster Psychology
Deaths are surging, and mental health is strained. But coping strategies people use amid other catastrophes can help — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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You Can Get through This Dark Pandemic Winter Using Tips from Disaster Psychology
Deaths are surging, and mental health is strained. But coping strategies people use amid other catastrophes can help — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Designing high-performance hypergolic propellants for space rockets based on the materials genome
A new generation of rocket propellants for deep space exploration such as ionic liquid propellants with long endurance and high stability, are attracting significant attention. However, ionic liquid propellants are strongly restricted by their inadequate hypergolic (spontaneous ignition) reactivity between the fuel and the oxidant, where this defect can cause local burnout and accidental explosion
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How to cook Christmas dinner in the most environmentally friendly way possible
By now, most of us are aware that much of the food we eat, in one way or another, contributes to the climate crisis. From food production and waste, to food consumption and diets—the way we produce, eat, store, discard, source and harvest our food can all play a direct role.
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How COVID-19 puts women at more risk than men in Gauteng, South Africa
The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed stark inequalities and fissures in societies around the world. One of these ruptures has been the disproportionate impact of the pandemic on women. In South Africa, women have suffered severe economic and social impacts from the lockdown that was imposed to curb the spread of the virus.
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Snake and eggs for breakfast? Florida may soon encourage eating invasive pythons
Donna Kalil estimates she's eaten a dozen pythons in the last three years or so.
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Germany and Switzerland ban flights from South Africa over Covid variant
Mutation with similarities to UK strain is believed to be driving second wave of infections
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Snake and eggs for breakfast? Florida may soon encourage eating invasive pythons
Donna Kalil estimates she's eaten a dozen pythons in the last three years or so.
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Researchers invent method to 'sketch' quantum devices with focused electrons
A technique created by researchers out of the Department of Physics and Astronomy enables them to "sketch" patterns of electrons into a programmable quantum material–lanthanum aluminate/strontium titanate or "LAO/STO".
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Ancient European Hunters Carved Human Bones Into Weapons
Scientists suggest 10,000-year-old barbed points washed up on Dutch beaches were made for cultural reasons
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Watch an AI robot walk with a broken leg, thanks to a brain that never stops learning
So-called Hebbian rules could improve language translation, self- driving cars
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Researchers invent method to 'sketch' quantum devices with focused electrons
It has long been a dream to invent new materials from the "top down" choosing which atoms go where to engineer properties of interest. A technique created by researchers out of the Department of Physics and Astronomy enables them to "sketch" patterns of electrons into a programmable quantum material—lanthanum aluminate/strontium titanate or "LAO/STO". Using this approach, they can create quantum d
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Open cluster NGC 2158 investigated in detail
Using data from ESA's Gaia satellite, astronomers have investigated a low-metallicity galactic open cluster known as NGC 2158. The study, presented in a paper published December 11 on the arXiv pre-print server, provided important information about the properties of NGC 2158 and identified hundreds of the most likely cluster members.
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Dog sleep cycles matter for treating pups in pain
A new canine sleep study could serve as a baseline for research on chronic pain and cognitive dysfunction in dogs, potentially improving detection and treatment of these conditions. "The study was necessary because research on dogs and sleep has outpaced our basic knowledge about what a 'normal' sleep/wake cycle looks like," says Margaret Gruen, assistant professor of behavioral medicine at North
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Move Over Peloton. Myx Plus Is the Better Bargain
The $1,499 package includes a stationary bike with a tablet, a set of weights, and hours of streaming video workouts to shake off those 2020 blues.
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Nature Communications retracts much-criticized paper on mentorship
A month after announcing it would be conducting a "priority" investigation into a November 17 paper that claimed women in science fare better with male rather than female mentors, Nature Communications has retracted the article. In the article, "The association between early career informal mentorship in academic collaborations and junior author performance," the authors — … Continue reading
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Retraction Note: The association between early career informal mentorship in academic collaborations and junior author performance
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20617-y
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Regarding mentorship
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20618-x The publication of a paper on mentorship, now retracted, led us to reflect on our editorial processes and strengthened our determination in supporting diversity, equity and inclusion in research.
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Kīlauea Ends 2020 with a New Eruption
Kīlauea was next to silent much of the year, but ended 2020 with a new eruption at the summit.
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Europe's UK travel ban is not a punishment for Brexit | Mujtaba Rahman
For four years we've viewed nearly every EU-related event through the lens of Brexit. To do it this time would be wrong Though a ban on freight from the UK was imposed this weekend, France and some other European Union countries hope to be able to ease the restriction from Wednesday – for lorry drivers, returning citizens and other travellers who can prove they have recently tested negative for c
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Cellular exclusion of mitochondria protects cells from damage
Mitochondria are cellular organelles that generate most of the energy cells need to function, and thus play an important role in maintaining cell health. In a new study, researchers from Osaka University discovered a novel mechanism by which cells turn over mitochondria and contribute to cellular maintenance. They further showed how this novel pathway is involved in the development of Parkinson's
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High pressure causes hydrogen variants to collapse
Hydrogen exists as a gaseous compound of two hydrogen atoms (H2). Under normal laboratory conditions, H2 occurs in the variants "ortho hydrogen" and "para hydrogen." Until now, it has been unclear how these variants behave under very high pressure. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have now found the answer. Both ortho- and para-hydrogen become unstable under high pressure and cease to exi
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New model reveals previously unrecognized complexity of oceanic earthquake zones
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba applied seismic data from around the world to build a model of the 2020 Caribbean earthquake. Oceanic transform faults are generally considered to be linear and simple and have been widely used in studies of earthquake dynamics. However, the research team found that high complexity in rupture speed and direction can occur even in a supposedly simple linea
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Optoelectronic devices that emit warm and cool white light
The advantages of light-emitting diodes (LEDs), such as their tiny size, low cost and excellent power efficiency, mean they are found everywhere in modern life. A KAUST team has recently developed a way of producing a white-light LED that overcomes some critical challenges.
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Cellular exclusion of mitochondria protects cells from damage
Mitochondria are cellular organelles that generate most of the energy cells need to function, and thus play an important role in maintaining cell health. In a new study, researchers from Osaka University discovered a novel mechanism by which cells turn over mitochondria and contribute to cellular maintenance. They further showed how this novel pathway is involved in the development of Parkinson's
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Author Correction: Toroidal metasurface resonances in microwave waveguides
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79342-7
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2020 One of Hottest Years
The year 2020 will be either the hottest year on record , or just behind the hottest year, 2016. The top 10 hottest years have all been from 1998 and later, with every year starting at 2013 being in the top 10. 2020 will now knock 1998 off the list, making the 10 warmest years all since 2005. The reason 1998 stuck on the list so long is because it was an outlier El Nino year , a weather pattern t
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The Kilonova-Chasing Gravitational-Wave Optical Transient Observer is about to be watching the whole sky
Lately, there has been a flood of interest in gravitational waves. After the first official detection at LIGO / Virgo in 2015, data has been coming in showing how common these once theoretical phenomena actually are. Usually they are caused by unimaginably violent events, such as a merging pair of black holes. Such events also have a tendency to emit another type of phenomena—light. So far, it has
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How do desert plants respond to variations of nitrogen and water in arid regions?
Groundwater and its nutrients sustain the deep-rooted phreatophytes. However, how phreatophyte seedlings respond to water and nutrients in topsoil before their roots reach groundwater remains unclear.
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Researchers reveal negative effects of tributyltin on the reproductive system of seahorses
Seahorses epitomize the exuberance of evolution. They have the unique characteristic of male pregnancy, which includes the carrying of many embryos in a brood pouch that incubates and nourishes the embryos, similar to the mammalian placenta.
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The Biden Administration Must Double Down on Science
It's absolutely necessary if we're going to weather the inevitable crises we'll continue to face — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Kiwi adults know more te reo Māori than they realize, study reveals
Even when they can't speak te reo Māori, New Zealanders have a surprisingly sophisticated knowledge of the language, newly published University of Canterbury research shows.
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Santa's reindeer outdo U.S. senators at picking stocks, study finds
Santa's reindeer at Santa's Village in Jefferson, N.H., are more skilled at selecting stocks than U.S. Senators and members of Congress were in 2020, according to a Dartmouth study. In analyzing the performance of stocks bought and sold by legislators, the researchers found little evidence that confidential information had been leveraged in terms of market timing and stock selection. The findings
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Taking the yolk from the white: New filter separates trend and cycle in macroeconomic data
In research published in the International Journal of Computational Economics and Econometrics, Peng Zhou of Cardiff University proposes a new filter technique that can separate the yolk from egg white, figuratively speaking. The filter separates trend and cycle based on stylised economic properties, rather than relying on ad hoc statistical properties such as frequency, he writes. The effectivene
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How do desert plants respond to variations of nitrogen and water in arid regions?
Groundwater and its nutrients sustain the deep-rooted phreatophytes. However, how phreatophyte seedlings respond to water and nutrients in topsoil before their roots reach groundwater remains unclear.
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Researchers reveal negative effects of tributyltin on the reproductive system of seahorses
Seahorses epitomize the exuberance of evolution. They have the unique characteristic of male pregnancy, which includes the carrying of many embryos in a brood pouch that incubates and nourishes the embryos, similar to the mammalian placenta.
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Depth-dependent valence stratification in a lithium-rich layered cathode
A team of scientists from the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility at the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source at SLAC and Brookhaven National Laboratory used synchrotron-based nano-resolution spectro-tomography to study a typical lithium-rich nickel-manganese-cobalt (LirNMC) material (i.e., Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13O2
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Don't interrupt: Bonobos are sensitive to joint commitments in social interactions
Bonobos, when abruptly interrupted in a social activity with another bonobo, resume it as soon as the interruption is over with the same partner. This ability—the feeling of mutual obligation when interacting—has previously been assumed to be unique to humans. However, a study conducted at the University of Neuchâtel has just demonstrated its existence for the first time in the natural interaction
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Seeking answers in ferroelectric patterning
Why do some ferroelectric materials display bubble-shaped patterning, while others display complex, labyrinthine patterns?
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Researchers unveil the origin of Oobleck waves
"Oobleck" is a strange fluid made of equal parts of cornstarch and water. It flows like milk when gently stirred, but turns rock-solid when impacted at high speed. This fascinating phenomenon, known as shear-thickening, results in spectacular demonstrations like running on a pool of Oobleck without submerging into it, as long as the runner doesn't stop.
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Don't interrupt: Bonobos are sensitive to joint commitments in social interactions
Bonobos, when abruptly interrupted in a social activity with another bonobo, resume it as soon as the interruption is over with the same partner. This ability—the feeling of mutual obligation when interacting—has previously been assumed to be unique to humans. However, a study conducted at the University of Neuchâtel has just demonstrated its existence for the first time in the natural interaction
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Water and genes flow between the two largest Baltic salmon rivers
Salmon from upstream reaches of the two northernmost Baltic rivers are different from downstream salmon. A recent study found that upstream salmon from the large Tornio and Kalix Rivers in Finland and Sweden are genetically distinct and migrate at different times and ages than their downstream counterparts. However, there seems to be no such distinction between salmon from these two neighboring ri
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Water and genes flow between the two largest Baltic salmon rivers
Salmon from upstream reaches of the two northernmost Baltic rivers are different from downstream salmon. A recent study found that upstream salmon from the large Tornio and Kalix Rivers in Finland and Sweden are genetically distinct and migrate at different times and ages than their downstream counterparts. However, there seems to be no such distinction between salmon from these two neighboring ri
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Wolves show signs of self-cognition with innovative sniff test
Self-awareness has been a central theme in philosophical and biological research since ancient times. In the temple of Apollo at Delphi, the exhortation "Know yourself" is inscribed in Greek, an invitation to men to understand their own finitude, to understand their limits. In "Latin in his Discourse on the Method," René Descarte wrote, "Ego cogito, ergo sum, sive existo" (I think, therefore I am,
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Fungal RNA viruses: Unexpected complexity affecting more than your breakfast omelet
We've all suffered from viruses, but did you know that they are also a problem for mushrooms and molds? Mycoviruses are viruses that specifically infect fungi and have the potential to impact ecology, agriculture, food security, and public health. Understanding the nature of these viruses, including their number and evolution, can help us understand their origins and inform our understanding of vi
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How to photograph Monday's Winter Solstice from your phone
Another great photo opportunity occurs Monday after sundown: the Winter Solstice and the sighting of the "Christmas Star."
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Wolves show signs of self-cognition with innovative sniff test
Self-awareness has been a central theme in philosophical and biological research since ancient times. In the temple of Apollo at Delphi, the exhortation "Know yourself" is inscribed in Greek, an invitation to men to understand their own finitude, to understand their limits. In "Latin in his Discourse on the Method," René Descarte wrote, "Ego cogito, ergo sum, sive existo" (I think, therefore I am,
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Fungal RNA viruses: Unexpected complexity affecting more than your breakfast omelet
We've all suffered from viruses, but did you know that they are also a problem for mushrooms and molds? Mycoviruses are viruses that specifically infect fungi and have the potential to impact ecology, agriculture, food security, and public health. Understanding the nature of these viruses, including their number and evolution, can help us understand their origins and inform our understanding of vi
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Astronomers Have Detected a Planet's Radio Emissions 51 Light-Years Away
Astronomers have detected thousands of exoplanets, but there's only so much we can know about them from light-years away. A new study from Cornell University could help shed light on the conditions of exoplanets by analyzing radio emissions connected to their magnetic fields. The researchers claim this marks the first time an exoplanet has been detected in the radio bands . This project started w
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The White House–Scene of COVID Outbreaks under Trump–Will Get a Deep Clean for President-Elect Biden
Fears about lingering coronavirus are prompting a massive disinfection initiative before the Bidens move in — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Daily briefing: 2020 — an extraordinary year for science
Nature, Published online: 18 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03634-1 Highlights from science this year, the pandemic bookshelf and record-breaking lightning in the Arctic.
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Attenborough on Biden and forces of nature
Sir David examines how wildlife adapts to the forces of nature, such as volcanoes, in a new series.
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Dear Therapist: Christmas With My Divorced Parents Is Getting Harder
Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My parents were married for some 30 years. I grew up watching them mostly get along, but as my siblings and I got older, little problems just wouldn't go away. By the time I was in high school, a divorce seeme
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8th Fenix Infrastructure webinar: Using ICEI resources for processing personal data
This webinar provides a general introduction to the Protection of Personal Data (POPD) and the definition of personal data according to the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). It offers an overview of the current regulations for storing and processing of personal data within the Fenix infrastructure, concluding with a concrete example of a project that involves personal data. Rele
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Pet Prosthetics Get a Boost From 3D Printing
New modeling software is helping animal health experts develop more customizable prosthetics for pets with missing limbs. Still, not all legs are created equal.
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2020: The Year of Cancel(l)ed Culture
This year, monoculture floundered, but microculture flourished. Everyone found a niche—and learned what they could live without.
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Large Methane Leaks Reveal Long-Standing Shortfalls in Oversight
New rollbacks could make controlling fugitive emissions from oil and gas infrastructure even harder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Klimarådet går i rette med regeringens klimahandlingsplan: Vi er blevet klogere
PLUS. I går offentliggjorde regeringen sit mål for 2025. Det er mindre ambitiøst end forventet, blandt andet med udgangspunkt i argumenter lånt fra Klimarådets marts-rapport.
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This Was Supposed to Be the Year of the Female Movie Hero
From Wonder Woman 1984 to Black Widow, heroines were going to bust the box office in 2020. Then, they didn't.
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Large Methane Leaks Reveal Long-Standing Shortfalls in Oversight
New rollbacks could make controlling fugitive emissions from oil and gas infrastructure even harder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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See Fast Radio Bursts Come of Age
An incipient field of radio astronomy is about to go mainstream — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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