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Record-setting thermoelectric figure of merit achieved for metal oxides
Scientists at Hokkaido University have developed a layered cobalt oxide with a record-setting thermoelectric figure of merit, which can be used to enhance thermoelectric power generation.
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Combustion-derived water vapor may worsen winter air quality
Water vapor is an important medium for the wet growth of particulate matter. The increase of water vapor content will accelerate the liquid-phase oxidation of primary pollutants, promoting the generation of new particles and further worsening air quality.
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New coronavirus variant: What is the spike protein and why are mutations on it important?
The emergence of a new variant of coronavirus has sparked renewed interest in the part of the virus known as the spike protein.
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Development of a new technique for growing high-quality gallium nitride crystals
Gallium nitride crystals are a promising material for the development of next-generation power semiconductor devices. NIMS and the Tokyo Tech developed a technique for growing high-quality GaN crystals with considerably fewer defects than those grown using existing techniques. Unlike conventional techniques in which a crystal is grown directly in a solution, this technique uses a substrate coated
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Masks block 99.9% of large COVID-linked droplets: study
Face masks reduce the risk of spreading large COVID-linked droplets when speaking or coughing by up to 99.9 percent, according to a lab experiment with mechanical mannequins and human subjects, researchers said Wednesday.
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US Government Orders 100 Million COVID-19 Vaccines
The United States government has announced it will pay pharmaceutical company Pfizer almost $2 billion for an additional 100 million doses of its COVID-19 vaccine, Reuters reports . Seventy million doses will be supplied by June 30 and the rest will arrive by July 31, according to Pfizer. The government so far has ordered a total of 200 million doses. It's a tight race. The U.S. is still experien
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New coronavirus variant: What is the spike protein and why are mutations on it important?
The emergence of a new variant of coronavirus has sparked renewed interest in the part of the virus known as the spike protein.
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Amazon's New Robotaxi Has No Steering Wheel, But It Can Drive for 16 Hours Straight
After almost a year of limiting our contact with the people in our lives and humanity in general, it's hard to imagine a future where we freely move about our cities and towns going to meetings, errands, and social events. And it may be even harder to envision doing so in driverless taxis that look sort of like giant toasters on wheels. But go ahead and fire up your imagination—and your hope for
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Fewer tourists meant less money for wildlife during the pandemic – but there's an alternative
"Nature is healing" read social media posts at the outset of the pandemic, as birdsong replaced the drone of traffic during lockdown. But for wildlife conservation in Africa, the reality was very different. Anti-poaching operations in protected areas were paused or restricted to limit the spread of the virus, leaving populations of threatened species like the African lion vulnerable. Now these are
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The Kaleidoscopic Art of Threatened Corals
Resilient corals in Miami may signal what the future holds for these creatures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Disposable surgical masks best for being heard clearly when speaking, study finds
Researcher Ryan Corey recently heard from a friend who teaches at a school where some of the students have hearing loss. The friend wanted to know if he had any ideas to help her communicate with these students while wearing a mask to slow the spread of COVID-19. Corey, who also has hearing loss, did not know what to tell her. So, he headed to the Illinois Augmented Listening Laboratory to look fo
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Study suggests great earthquakes cause of Arctic warming
A researcher from MIPT has proposed a new explanation for the Arctic's rapid warming. In his recent paper in Geosciences, he suggests that the warming could have been triggered by a series of great earthquakes.
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Fewer tourists meant less money for wildlife during the pandemic – but there's an alternative
"Nature is healing" read social media posts at the outset of the pandemic, as birdsong replaced the drone of traffic during lockdown. But for wildlife conservation in Africa, the reality was very different. Anti-poaching operations in protected areas were paused or restricted to limit the spread of the virus, leaving populations of threatened species like the African lion vulnerable. Now these are
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Ralphie from 'A Christmas Story' could have been the first child in space. Then disaster struck.
Challenger lifts off on a mission in 1984. (NASA/) Countless children dream of going to space, but one 14-year-old in 1986 may actually have had a shot at it: Peter Billingsley. Billingsley played the adorable, doe-eyed 9-year old Ralphie Parker in the holiday movie A Christmas Story —the goofy, sometimes hilarious 1983 classic that has become one of the best known, and most beloved , Christmas f
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The F-14 and the Secret History of the First Microprocessor
In a weird way, I've known Ray Holt all my life, but I never knew what he had accomplished—or how his inventions wove their way into my own family.
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We'll cross the global warming threshold in 6-21 years
The threshold for dangerous global warming will likely be crossed between 2027 and 2042, research indicates. That's a much narrower window than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimate of between now and 2052. In a study published in Climate Dynamics , researchers introduce a new and more precise way to project the Earth's temperature. Based on historical data, it considerably red
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Video: Tiny shape-shifting polymers developed for potential medical applications
Engineers at Caltech have developed a process for generating three-dimensional architected polymers with heat-dependent "shape memory" properties: That is, when heated, the material folds and unfolds itself into a new preordained shape.
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Using AI to count and map craters on the moon
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China, one from Italy and one from Iceland has used a machine-learning artificial intelligence application to count and note the location of over 100,000 craters on the moon. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes programming their system to recognize craters by training it with data collected
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Electro-sprayed micro-droplets help kill bacteria and viruses
With COVID-19 raging around the globe, researchers are doubling down on methods for developing diverse antimicrobial technologies that could be effective in killing a virus, but harmless to humans and the environment.
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Making jet fuel out of carbon dioxide
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.K. and one in Saudi Arabia has developed a way to produce jet fuel using carbon dioxide as a main ingredient. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their process and its efficiency.
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Climate change demands same leadership as COVID-19, and Australia is failing
A leading Australian medical clinician and researcher has called on the Federal Government and the health sector to commit to showing the same leadership on climate change as was shown during the COVID-19 public health crisis.
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Forskere advarer om radioaktiv forurening under udgravning af flod nær Tjernobyl
En ny sejlrute fra Sortehavet til Østersøen kræver udgravninger af floden Priyiat kun 2,5 kilometer fra Tjernobyl-reaktoren.
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E-cigarettes, as consumer products, do not help people quit smoking, study finds
E-cigarette use has risen steeply and mostly without regulation over the past decade. The devices have diversified into a dizzying array of vape pens, tank systems, "mods," and more, mass-marketed and sold to the public. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is in the midst of considering whether to approve thousands of pre-market applications for the sale of e-cigarettes as consumer product
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Slow start of plate tectonics despite a hot early Earth
Scientists present important new constraints showing that plate tectonics started relatively slow, although the early Earth's interior was much hotter than today.
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Liquid bandage detects tissue oxygenation without the drawbacks of wired oximeters
A paint-on, transparent bandage containing phosphorescent materials reads the amount of oxygen reaching transplanted tissue — a critical component of a transplant's success. Existing oximeter technology is complicated to use, restricts patients' movements, and is subject to false alarms. The first human trial of the liquid bandage in women undergoing breast reconstruction after cancer found that
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The Kaleidoscopic Art of Threatened Corals
Resilient corals in Miami may signal what the future holds for these creatures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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You're probably emitting an astonishing amount of carbon dioxide in your daily routine
Few people would stop to consider if their sporting activities damage the environment. But our research shows Victorians use a huge chunk of their "personal carbon budget" driving to and from sport events each year—either to watch or participate, or to transport children.
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A proposal for a neutrino detection array spanning 200,000 square kilometers
Sometimes in astronomy, the acronym for a project fits it particularly well. That would absolutely be the case for the Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection, which researchers hope to scale up to a size of 200,000 km2 in an effort to measure ultra-high-energy tau neutrinos. Is it ambitious? Yes, but that doesn't really stop humanity from exploring when it wants to.
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How COVID-19 polarized Australian politics: #IStandWithDan versus #DictatorDan
A QUT study of two interrelated Twitter hashtag campaigns in relation to the Victorian Premier Dan Andrews' handling of the COVID-19 second wave found the activity was driven by a "small, hyper-partisan core of highly active participants" and not bot accounts.
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Christmas trees can be green because of a photosynthetic short-cut
How can conifers that are used for example as Christmas trees keep their green needles over the boreal winter when most trees shed their leaves? Science has not provided a good answer to this question but now an international team of scientists, including researchers from Umeå University, has deciphered that a short-cut in the photosynthetic machinery allows the needles of pine trees to stay green
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Don't panic about the latest coronavirus mutations, say drug companies
Earlier this month a mutated variant of the coronavirus was detected in the UK, setting off alarms across Europe and causing some countries to ban travelers from Britain. But it's still not clear that the new variant is much more easily transmitted, as some scientists have warned. Moreover, several companies with authorized vaccines or therapeutic drugs for covid-19—Moderna, Pfizer/BioNTech, Rege
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Octopuses filmed punching fish in the Red Sea
Scientists have filmed octopuses in the Red Sea lashing out at fish during a group hunt.
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Kernowite: New mineral found on rock mined in Cornwall
The dark green mineral has been called kernowite as the rock comes from a mine in Cornwall.
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Proper methods to estimate fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation for vegetation
Continuous and accurate ground measurements of the fraction of absorbed (fAPAR) or intercepted (fIPAR) photosynthetically active radiation by green canopy components is important to monitor canopy functioning.
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Food production-driven land use leads to changes in water-related ecosystem services
With global population growth, accompanied by factors like COVID-19 and natural disasters, increasing food yield has become a major concern worldwide. However, the links between food production and local land-use driven water-related ecosystem services (WESs) changes remain underestimated and unrevealed.
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Christmas trees can be green because of a photosynthetic short-cut
How can conifers that are used for example as Christmas trees keep their green needles over the boreal winter when most trees shed their leaves? Science has not provided a good answer to this question but now an international team of scientists, including researchers from Umeå University, has deciphered that a short-cut in the photosynthetic machinery allows the needles of pine trees to stay green
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With Covid mutating, it's clearer than ever that we must eliminate this virus | Devi Sridhar
Unless this government stops dithering and works to eradicate Covid-19, more variants are bound to emerge An emotional rollercoaster is probably the best way to describe the past few weeks. The UK government has lurched from allowing Christmas bubbles to cancelling Christmas altogether. Weeks after an effective vaccine was approved, the virus turned a new corner. Some have argued the new mutation
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Disposable surgical masks best for being heard clearly when speaking, study finds
Researcher Ryan Corey recently heard from a friend who teaches at a school where some of the students have hearing loss. The friend wanted to know if he had any ideas to help her communicate with these students while wearing a mask to slow the spread of COVID-19. Corey, who also has hearing loss, did not know what to tell her. So, he headed to the Illinois Augmented Listening Laboratory to look fo
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How the US can fight the opioid epidemic during COVID-19
A new report offers recommendations aimed at federal, state, and local policymakers to address the opioid epidemic during the COVID-19 pandemic. The recommendations detail policy solutions in the areas of data and surveillance, harm reduction, and treatment, with special considerations for vulnerable populations. The report, Saving Lives from Overdose During a Pandemic , draws from peer-reviewed
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The Race for a Covid Vaccine Was More About Luck Than Tech
Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna's mRNA platforms are amazing—but they could easily have been overtaken by more conventional rivals.
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New mammogram measures of breast cancer risk could revolutionize screening
World-first techniques for predicting breast cancer risk from mammograms could revolutionize breast screening by allowing it to be tailored to women at minimal extra cost.
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Increased meat consumption associated with symptoms of childhood asthma
Substances present in cooked meats are associated with increased wheezing in children, researchers report.
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New imaging method views soil carbon at near-atomic scales
The Earth's soils contain more than three times the amount of carbon than is found in the atmosphere, but the processes that bind carbon in the soil are still not well understood.
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Controlling cardiac waves with light to better understand abnormally rapid heart rhythms
Over 300,000 people die each year in the US due to sudden cardiac death. In many cases, sudden cardiac death is caused by abnormally rapid heart rhythms called tachycardias, which means the heart cannot pump adequate blood to the body. In Chaos, researchers use mice to study tachycardias and find there are intrinsic mechanisms that exist in heart tissue that they hypothesize lead to the self-termi
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Cannabis use blunts stress reactivity in female rats
Female rats that inhaled vaporized cannabis daily for a month developed a blunted physiological response to stress, according to a new study. In contrast, male rats that were provided access to the same potency of cannabis over the same 30-day window did not experience any physiological changes in how they responded to a stressful situation.
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Scientists discover mutations associated with early onset dementia
Scientists have announced a significant advance in our understanding of an early onset form of dementia that may also progress our understanding of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. Adult onset Leukoencephalopathy with axonal Spheroids and Pigmented glia (ALSP) is an ultra-rare condition that manifests initially with psychiatric and behavioural changes in patients followed by a rapid progres
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More data needed before giving just one vaccine dose, says Covid adviser
Tony Blair and others make argument for giving more people a single jab, rather than fewer people the recommended two doses Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A senior government scientific adviser has said more data is needed before adopting a proposal to give as many people as possible a single dose of a Covid vaccine, rather than preserving stocks so there is enough
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A Stranded Scientist Is Bitten By a Venomous Snake and Tells the Tale
The symptomatology of the Medo pit viper's bite hadn't been recorded by science until herpetologist Gerry Martin grabbed one by the tail. He plans to include details from the frightening experience in an upcoming paper about the species.
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How Would Deadpool Jump Into a Moving Vehicle?
Our sardonic superhero needs to get the timing just right to crash through the sunroof and beat up the bad guys.
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The Death of FOMO As We Knew It
During a global pandemic, the fear of missing out was replaced by something else: dread over not experiencing what could have been.
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The Biden Administration Needs a VP of Engineering, Not a CTO
If our government wants to implement a tech-forward agenda, it needs someone who looks at broken infrastructure with a debugger's eye.
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Black hole X-ray binary GRS 1915+105 has a variable magnetic disc wind, study suggests
Using NASA's Chandra spacecraft, astronomers have performed high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of a transient black hole X-ray binary known as GRS 1915+105. They report that the source exhibits a variable magnetic accretion disc wind. The study was detailed in a paper published December 16 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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New mammogram measures of breast cancer risk could revolutionize screening
World-first techniques for predicting breast cancer risk from mammograms could revolutionize breast screening by allowing it to be tailored to women at minimal extra cost.
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How the Actors of 'The Midnight Sky' Prepared to Play Astronauts
Actors David Oyelowo and Demián Bechir discuss their roles as astronauts investigating a potentially habitable Jovian moon
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The Biology of Mistletoe
Best known as a holiday trimming, the parasitic plant is a botanical luminary in its own right
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Secondary blood infection linked to worse COVID-19 outcomes
People with severe COVID-19 and a secondary blood infection were significantly sicker upon hospital admission, had longer hospital stays, and poorer outcomes, research finds. The study, published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases , is the first to assess the microbiology, risk factors, and outcomes in hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19 and secondary bloodstream infections. The r
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2020 – The Good and the Bad
What 2020 has taught us about the power of science and the harm of pseudoscience. The post 2020 – The Good and the Bad first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Chest pain risk assessment may reduce treatment disparities
The use of a standardized tool for assessing the risk of serious outcomes in patients with chest pain was associated with women at high risk receiving comparable care to men, according to new research published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine . Care received by women at low and intermediate risk was consistent with current clinical recommendations. Men received more stress testing and were mor
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Dads falter at talking to daughters about body image
Fathers often feel uncomfortable discussing body image and health with their daughters, a study indicates. Though she is the Director of the Center for Body Image Research at the University of Missouri, even Virginia Ramseyer Winter still often worries if her family is doing everything they can to make sure her daughter has a positive relationship with her body. "I have a daughter that falls in t
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Wonder Woman 1984 Has a Surprisingly Deep Message
Once upon a time, before anyone had ever uttered the words cinematic universe , superhero movies existed as effortless summer entertainment. Even though comic-book films have always had inflated budgets, big action set pieces, and broad target audiences, they used to be more self-contained. Following in this mold, Wonder Woman 1984 , Patty Jenkins's long-awaited, pandemic-delayed sequel to 2017's
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A Unique Alliance Could Help Warn Us of Toxic Algae
In Washington state, scientists, coastal communities, and state agencies are banding together to manage the growing threat of harmful algal blooms.
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The Best Indie Games You May Have Missed This Year
2020 wasn't just a year for big-budget blockbusters. Here are the best debuts from smaller shops—that are all worth playing into 2021.
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Amazon's Fourth-Gen Echo Looks—and Sounds—Even Better
Thanks to a rounded design and improved drivers, the company's newest smart speaker outshines the competition.
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Protein may clarify Alzheimer's and body clock link
A brain protein may help explain the link between circadian rhythm and Alzheimer's disease, researchers report. Fractured sleep, daytime sleepiness, and other signs of disturbance in one's circadian rhythm are common complaints of people with Alzheimer's disease, and the problems only get worse as the disease progresses. Researchers say that a clue may lie in the brain protein YKL-40. The researc
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Tsunami May Have Seeded a Fungal Outbreak in Pacific Northwest
A bold hypothesis could account for the perplexing presence of multiple fungi — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Klar til i morgen? Sådan forbereder du tarm og mavesæk til det store ædegilde
Spar på de fede snacks inden julemåltidet og dyrk lidt motion for tarmen.
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Researchers develop layered cobalt oxide with a record-setting thermoelectric figure of merit
Waste heat is a highly promising source of renewable energy; however, the efficiency of using heat to generate energy has historically been much lower than hydroelectric, wind or solar power. While there are a number of materials that can be used for the generation of energy from waste heat, they all suffer from various issues ranging from low stability to low efficiency. Nevertheless, the fact th
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Researchers develop new way to break reciprocity law
An international research team lead by Aalto University has found a new and simple route to break the reciprocity law in the electromagnetic world, by changing a material's property periodically in time. The breakthrough could help to create efficient nonreciprocal devices, such as compact isolators and circulators, that are needed for the next generation of microwave and optical communications sy
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Forhandlinger om ny OK-aftale for praktiserende læger udskudt igen
I denne uge måtte PLO og Danske Regioner igen kastet håndklædet i ringen, da det ikke lykkedes at nå frem til en ny overenskomstaftale. Forhandlingerne genoptages om et par måneder, meddeler parterne.
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Mechano-responsive hydrogel developed for wound healing
Dr. Wang Rong's team from the Cixi Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in cooperation with the researchers from Sun Yat-sen University and Nanchang University, has developed a mechano-responsive antibacterial hydrogel with controllable drug release behavior for wound healing application. The study
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Nanomaterial theory describes strongly correlated electrons in quantum dots
Osaka City University scientists have developed mathematical formulas to describe the current and fluctuations of strongly correlated electrons in quantum dots. Their theoretical predictions could soon be tested experimentally.
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Transporter protein that regulates cell membrane cholesterol likely played an important role in vertebrate evolution
Almost four decades of research have led scientists at Japan's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) to propose that a family of transporter proteins has played an important role in species evolution. One protein in particular, called ABCA1, was likely crucial for vertebrate evolution by helping regulate when signals involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration e
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Mechano-responsive hydrogel developed for wound healing
Dr. Wang Rong's team from the Cixi Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in cooperation with the researchers from Sun Yat-sen University and Nanchang University, has developed a mechano-responsive antibacterial hydrogel with controllable drug release behavior for wound healing application. The study
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Researchers realize half-metallicity in A-type antiferromagnets with ferroelectric control
Recently, Prof. Zheng Xiaohong's research group from the Institute of Solid State Physics (ISSP) of the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS), in cooperation with Prof. Stefano Sanvito from Trinity College Dublin, demonstrated a novel idea to achieve half-metallicity in A-type van der Waals (vdW) antiferromagnets via ferroelectric control.
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Image: Space bauble produced by the Multiscale Boiling experiment
Deck the halls with space-based bubbles!
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Image: Hubble sees a 'molten ring'
The narrow galaxy elegantly curving around its spherical companion in this image is a fantastic example of a truly strange and very rare phenomenon. This image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, depicts GAL-CLUS-022058s, located in the southern hemisphere constellation of Fornax (the Furnace). GAL-CLUS-022058s is the largest and one of the most complete Einstein rings ever discovered
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Caspian crisis: Sinking sea levels threaten biodiversity, economy and regional stability
Coastal nations are rightly worried about sea level rise, but in the countries around the Caspian Sea, over 100 million people are facing the opposite problem: an enormous drop in sea level. Technically, this sea is a land-locked lake, but it is the largest on the planet (371.000 km2), and quite salty. Since the '90s, the water level has been dropping a few centimeters every year. This drop will a
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Genetic engineering without unwanted side effects helps fight parasites
Modified CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing scissors are enabling researchers at the University of Zurich to make alterations to the genetic material of single-cell organisms that are indistinguishable from natural mutations. This method makes it possible to develop a harmless experimental live vaccine for the widespread parasite Toxoplasma gondii.
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Transporter protein that regulates cell membrane cholesterol likely played an important role in vertebrate evolution
Almost four decades of research have led scientists at Japan's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) to propose that a family of transporter proteins has played an important role in species evolution. One protein in particular, called ABCA1, was likely crucial for vertebrate evolution by helping regulate when signals involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration e
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Genetic engineering without unwanted side effects helps fight parasites
Modified CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing scissors are enabling researchers at the University of Zurich to make alterations to the genetic material of single-cell organisms that are indistinguishable from natural mutations. This method makes it possible to develop a harmless experimental live vaccine for the widespread parasite Toxoplasma gondii.
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Christmas Day to be heaviest Covid day so far for England's hospitals
Exclusive : April peak of 18,974 coronavirus patients expected to be surpassed in days Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Hospitals in England will be treating more coronavirus patients on Christmas Day than at any point in the pandemic, official data suggests, leading to fresh concern about the ability of the NHS to cope with the surge in cases over winter. At the heig
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COVID-19-regning løber op i 6,8 mia. kr. for i år: Skæv refusion kan koste stillinger
Sundhedssektorens merudgifter i forbindelse med COVID-19 er små sammenlignet med det øvrige samfunds, men en skæv statslig refusion kan resultere i fyringer, frygter sundhedsøkonom Lars Holger Ehlers.
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We All Know Smoke Is Bad For Your Health. It Could Be Worse Than You Think
Could smoke carry disease-causing microorganisms? "It's a very new idea to think of smoke as having a living component," says Leda Kobziar, co-author of an article that explores this theory. (Image credit: Ray Chavez/MediaNews Group/The Mercury News via Getty Images)
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2020 Shows the Danger of a Decapitated Cyber Regime
Trump's White House has long been AWOL on cybersecurity. That lack of oversight almost seemed to be working—until the SolarWinds hack.
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Yes, Cyberpunk 2077 Is Buggy. But Mostly, It Has No Heart
People misunderstand why I dislike the game. It's not the bugs—it's that everyone in it sucks.
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Endelig en god nyhed: Dansk strøm har aldrig været grønnere end i 2020
PLUS. Vind og sol fylder mere i både Danmark og Europa, og selv om kulforbruget er steget en anelse, har den samlede CO2-pris aldrig været lavere.
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Rotating Sails Help to Revive Wind-Powered Shipping
A century-old concept, Flettner rotors, gets a fresh look as shippers cut back fuel — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Best Children's Books About Space of 2020
The year's best aviation- and space-themed books for young readers
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'I thought I had messed up my experiment': How a grad student discovered an error that might affect hundreds of papers
Earlier this month, we reported on how Susanne Stoll, a graduate student in the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University College London, discovered an error that toppled a highly-cited 2014 article — and which might affect hundreds of other papers in the field of perception. We spoke with Stoll about the experience. Retraction Watch … Continue reading
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Trump's Pardons Make the Unimaginable Real
Y esterday evening , President Donald Trump issued 15 pardons and five commutations, including two for individuals found guilty of charges arising from Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation. He is reportedly considering a raft of other Christmas pardons—for sympathetic allies, for loyal retainers, and even for family members. The prospect of a president using his power to protect aides a
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Artificial intelligence predicts the immunogenic landscape of SARS-CoV-2 leading to universal blueprints for vaccine designs
Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78758-5
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Pantoprazole impairs fracture healing in aged mice
Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79605-3
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The morphology of VO2/TiO2(001): terraces, facets, and cracks
Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78584-9 The morphology of VO 2 /TiO 2 (001): terraces, facets, and cracks
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Schistosoma mansoni eggs induce Wnt/β-catenin signaling and activate the protooncogene c-Jun in human and hamster colon
Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79450-4
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Art has been brutalized by tech's giants. How can it survive?
There are two stories you hear about making a living as an artist in the digital age, and they are diametrically opposed. One comes from Silicon Valley and its boosters in the media. There's never been a better time to be an artist, it goes. If you've got a laptop, you've got a recording studio. If you've got an iPhone, you've got a movie camera. GarageBand, Final Cut Pro: all the tools are at yo
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Her er året løntopscorere: Særligt to brancher skiller sig ud
Lønudviklingen for ingeniører i den private sektor har været mere behersket end sidste år, særligt hos konsulenterne. Men trods epidemien har det ikke været noget dårligt år.
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Why I Read King Lear Each Advent
Each Advent, I do something unusual; I reread King Lear . Revisiting Shakespeare's dark exploration of the dissolution of family, friendship, personality, and nation has become part of my annual rhythm. That might seem odd, particularly during this most difficult of years: With short winter days, and so much national, international, and personal pain all around us, who needs more darkness? As a C
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Ep. 51: Defining 'Habitat' — and the Future of Conservation
This month: A recent U.S. Supreme Court decision on the dusky gopher frog now has conservationists and developers squaring off over the legal definition of the term habitat. The accepted meaning will guide American lawmakers in designating protected areas for endangered species across the country.
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Politiske konspirationer på forhudsfronten
Jeg har fuld forståelse for, at Morten Frisch er skuffet over, at ingen af hans påstande om konsekvenser af mandlig omskæring er reflekteret i de nationale og internationale udmeldinger. Men som forskere må vi altid være indstillet på at justere vores opfattelse af virkeligheden, i takt med at ny forskning rokker ved tidligere hypoteser, skriver Dan Meyrowitsch.
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Prestigious AI meeting takes steps to improve ethics of research
Nature, Published online: 23 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03611-8 For the first time, the organizers of NeurIPS required speakers to consider the societal impact of their work.
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Remembrance of things practiced with fast and slow learning in cortical and subcortical pathways
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19788-5 Surprisingly, motor cortex becomes less involved in performing skilled motor behaviors as they are practiced. This is addressed by a model of two descending pathways featuring different types of learning: fast learning in a cortical pathway to maximize rewards and slow learning in a subcortical pathway to re
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Travel bans aren't an effective response to the new Covid variant | Angela Rasmussen
Dramatic international gestures are unlikely to have much impact. It's hands, masks and space we should be focusing on By now we all know a new variant of Sars-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, has been detected in the UK and is spreading rapidly . Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer for England, announced that the variant, called B.1.1.7 , is up to 70% more transmissible based on modell
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Climate crisis is causing lakes to shrink
Climate change is impacting not only the oceans, but also large inland lakes. As the world's largest lake, the Caspian Sea is a perfect example of how a body of water can and will change. In an article in the Nature journal Communications Earth & Environment, Dr. Matthias Prange of MARUM – Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen, and his colleagues discuss the possible
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Caspian crisis: Sinking sea levels threaten biodiversity, economy and regional stability
Coastal nations are rightly worried about a sea level rise, but in the countries around the Caspian Sea over a hundred million people are facing the opposite problem: an enormous drop in sea level. Since the '90s, the water level has been dropping a few centimeters every year. This drop will accelerate during the upcoming decades, scientists from the German universities of Gießen and Bremen calcul
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The People vs. Hate
W illiam Lamar, the pastor of Metropolitan AME Church, in Washington, D.C., was making final preparations for virtual Sunday service on December 13 when he received a text from a friend. "I'm sorry about what happened at Metropolitan," Karen Brown, the pastor of another local church, wrote. He was confused. "Karen, what are you talking about?" Brown sent Lamar a link to a video. The night before,
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Finding aliens: Is there a 'theory of everything' for life?
What, should it exist, is the universal law that connects all living things? To even dream of answering that question, and to one day find alien life elsewhere in the cosmos, humans must first reconcile the fact that our definition of life is inadequate. For astrobiologist Sara Walker, understanding the universe, its origin, and our place in it starts with a deep investigation into the chemistry
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Mystisk radiosignal fra vores nabostjerne opdaget
Men det er nok ikke rumvæsner, der har sendt den, siger dansk forsker.
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Asteroid treasure, COVID vaccine and public peer review
Nature, Published online: 23 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03553-1 The latest science news, in brief.
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Are two phases of quarantine better than one?
The importance of strict quarantine has been widely debated during the COVID-19 epidemic. The public debate on lockdown strategy raises the question of whether it is better to have a two-phase lockdown (a strict lockdown followed by a relaxation of restrictions) or a single, softer quarantine policy (the Swedish model).
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The number of tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic
2020 has been an unusual and challenging year in many ways. One was the record-breaking number of named tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic (and the Carribean Sea). There has been 30 named North Atlantic tropical cyclones in 2020, beating the previous record of 28 from 2005 by two. A natural question then is whether we can expect this high number in the future or if the number of tropical sto
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Are two phases of quarantine better than one?
New research into this question shows that the second wave of an epidemic is very different if a population has a homogenous distribution of contacts, compared to the scenario of subpopulations with diverse number of contacts.
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Videnskabens Top-5: Sådan udløser tordenvejr gammastråling
PLUS. Med et danskudviklet instrument på Den Internationale Rumstation er forskerne kommet nærmere en forklaring på et mærkværdigt atmosfærefænomen.
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Pandemic sends US single mothers into poverty
When the coronavirus pandemic shuttered restaurants in California, Aleida Ramirez lost her job as a waitress, plunging her—along with many other single mothers—into a vicious cycle of poverty, unpaid bills and reliance on food banks.
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Virus hunters delve into Gabon forest in search for next threat
The scene looks like something out of a science fiction movie, or maybe some dystopian TV series.
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Virus hunters delve into Gabon forest in search for next threat
The scene looks like something out of a science fiction movie, or maybe some dystopian TV series.
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Lava lake forms as Hawaii volcano erupts after 2-year break
Lava was rising more than 3 feet (1 meter) per hour in the deep crater of a Hawaii volcano that began erupting over the weekend after a two-year break, scientists said Tuesday.
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Danske og kinesiske tunger smager broccoli og chokolade forskelligt
Studier fra Københavns Universitet viser, at danskere ikke er lige så gode til at smage bitre…
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Delicious and disease-free: scientists attempting new citrus varieties
UC Riverside scientists are betting an ancient solution will solve citrus growers' biggest problem by breeding new fruits with natural resistance to a deadly tree disease.
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Delicious and disease-free: scientists attempting new citrus varieties
UC Riverside scientists are betting an ancient solution will solve citrus growers' biggest problem by breeding new fruits with natural resistance to a deadly tree disease.
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Highest levels of microplastics found in molluscs, new study says
Mussels, oysters and scallops have the highest levels of microplastic contamination among seafood, a new study reveals.
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Survival of the thickest: Big brains make mammal populations less dense
Mammals with big brains tend to be less abundant in local areas than those with smaller brains, new research has shown.
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Molecular reporters expose the allies of the brain tumor
Until recently, it was unclear how and why cancer cells adapt to their environment. A team led by Gaetano Gargiulo at MDC has now developed a technology that can be used to observe the molecular processes in living cells. The researchers present their results in the journal Cancer Discovery.
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Survival of the thickest: Big brains make mammal populations less dense
Mammals with big brains tend to be less abundant in local areas than those with smaller brains, new research has shown.
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Taiwan imposes new regulations after first Covid case since April
Citizens urged to stay vigilant as investigation continues into New Zealand-born pilot blamed for spreading infection Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The change in Taipei was subtle but apparent. Within hours of authorities announcing Taiwan's first community transmission of Covid-19 since April, more people were wearing masks in more places, and hand sanitiser dispe
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Nasa's Mars rover and the 'seven minutes of terror'
The US space agency releases an animation to show how its Perseverance robot will land on Mars.
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Covid: More of England could move into tier 4 from Boxing Day, says minister
Robert Jenrick says government to meet to discuss measures to combat 'very worrying' new variant Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The communities secretary, Robert Jenrick, has suggested more areas of England will be placed under tier 4 coronavirus restrictions as soon as Boxing Day to combat the "very worrying" hyper-infectious variant of Covid-19. Jenrick said the g
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Xin Xing, Giant Panda With Progeny Around the Globe, Dies at 38
The star of China's Chongqing Zoo was the world's oldest panda in captivity. More than 150 of her descendants have lived in several countries.
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Omer Nour and Magnus Willander guilty of research misconduct
"The Board assesses that there are no scientifically acceptable explanations for why the notified researchers have fabricated research results in the manner that has occurred in the notified articles. Raw data also does not support the reported results. [..] In summary, the Board finds therefore that the notified researchers have been guilty of misconduct in research."
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A Thai Rescue Worker Saved a Baby Elephant With CPR, And We Are Crying
The heart-warming story we all need right now.
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Når havisen forsvinder i Arktis påvirkes plantevæksten på land
Center for Permafrost ved Københavns Universitet er med i et nyt studie, der viser, at plantevæksten…
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Genetic engineering without unwanted side effects helps fight parasites
Modified CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing scissors are enabling researchers at UZH to make alterations to the genetic material of single-cell organisms that are indistinguishable from natural mutations. This method is making it possible to develop a (harmless) experimental live vaccine for the widespread parasite Toxoplasma gondii.
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Highest levels of microplastics found in molluscs, new study says
Mussels, oysters and scallops have the highest levels of microplastic contamination among seafood, a new study reveals.
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Survival of the thickest: Big brains make mammal populations less dense
Body size and diet are known to influence mammal abundance in different areas, but brain size had not been considered previously. This new study shows that larger brains correlate with lower population densities, likely because of the additional resources they require.
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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 23. december
Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2020. Hver dag med nye præmier!
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Juldelikatess utrotningshotad: "Stoppa fisket omedelbart"
Forskare kräver att fisket av ål måste stoppas omedelbart för att den ska ha en chans att återhämta sig.
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57 000 år gammal vargvalp funnen i Kanada
En mumifierad varg hittades i Yukon Kanada för över fyra år sedan. Nu har forskarna kommit fram till hur vargen levde och vad den slutligen dog av. Spela videon för att se bilder på vargmumien.
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Fraser Island Blaze Began With Campfire, Australian Officials Say
The police said the men started an illegal campfire, but experts said the region would remain vulnerable to more fires as climate change worsens dry conditions.
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Fraser Island Fire Blamed on Campfire, Australian Official Say
The police said the men started an illegal campfire, but experts said the region would remain vulnerable to more fires as climate change worsens dry conditions.
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Silkeborgs '2 minus 1-veje' vækker opsigt: Ingen uheld og stigning i cyklismen
PLUS. I sin seneste handlingsplan gentager Færdselssikkerhedskommissionen sin anbefaling af vejtypen, som er et billigere alternativ til cykelstier og cykelbaner.
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Trial of High-Dose Blood Thinners in I.C.U. Coronavirus Patients Is Halted
Giving anticoagulants to hospitalized Covid-19 patients is routine. But high doses may sometimes do more harm than good, a safety board finds.
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It-ekspert om SolarWinds-hack: »Hatten af for dem, der har lavet det angreb«
Selvom SolarWinds software havde nogle sikkerhedshuller, så var hackerangrebet så giftigt og velorkestreret, at det kan være svært for virksomheder at dæmme op for lignende situationer i fremtiden, fortæller direktør i it-sikkerhedsfirmaet Dubex.
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Model predicts where ticks, Lyme disease will appear next in Midwest states
By drawing from decades of studies, scientists created a timeline marking the arrival of black-legged ticks, also known as deer ticks, in hundreds of counties across 10 Midwestern states. They used these data – along with an analysis of county-level landscape features associated with the spread of ticks – to build a model that can predict where ticks are likely to appear in future years.
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A powerful computational tool for efficient analysis of cell division 4D image data
A research team has developed a novel computational tool that can reconstruct and visualize three-dimensional (3D) shapes and temporal changes of cells, speeding up the analyzing process from hundreds of hours by hand to a few hours by the computer. Revolutionizing the way biologists analyze image data, this tool can advance further studies in developmental and cell biology, such as the growth of
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Birds: Competition for mates leads to a deeper voice than expected based on size
Competition for mates leads to a deeper voice than expected based on size.
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Mouse-controlled mouse helps researchers understand intentional control
Researchers have devised a brain machine interface (BMI) that allows mice to learn to guide a cursor using only their brain activity. By monitoring this mouse-controlled mouse moving to a target location to receive a reward, the researchers were able to study how the brain represents intentional control.
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Chemists synthesize 'flat' silicon compounds
Chemists have synthesized extremely unusual compounds. Their central building block is a silicon atom. Different from usual, however, is the arrangement of the four bonding partners of the atom, which are not in the form of a tetrahedron around it, but flat like a trapezoid. This arrangement is usually energetically extremely unfavorable, yet the molecules are very stable.
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In shaky times, focus on past successes, if overly anxious, depressed
The more chaotic things get, the harder it is for people with clinical anxiety and/or depression to make sound decisions and to learn from their mistakes. On a positive note, overly anxious and depressed people's judgment can improve if they focus on what they get right, instead of what they get wrong, suggests a new study.
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A powerful computational tool for efficient analysis of cell division 4D image data
A research team has developed a novel computational tool that can reconstruct and visualize three-dimensional (3D) shapes and temporal changes of cells, speeding up the analyzing process from hundreds of hours by hand to a few hours by the computer. Revolutionizing the way biologists analyze image data, this tool can advance further studies in developmental and cell biology, such as the growth of
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Extracting energy from manure to meet peak heating demands
Cornell University is developing a system to extract energy from cattle manure to meet the campus's peak demands for heat in the winter months. Scientists involved with the project give a detailed analysis of the issues required to make this work, including scientific, economic, and energy policy considerations.
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How a large protein complex assembles in a cell
A team of researchers has developed a method that allows them to study the assembly process for large protein complexes in detail for the first time. As their case study, the biologists chose one of the largest cellular complexes: the nuclear pore complex in yeast cells.
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The Atlantic Daily: 3 Things to Know About COVID-19
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . PETER CADE / GETTY A little more than a week is left in the year that became defined by COVID-19. Here are three important things to know about the coronavirus right now. 1. Sleep could be a key
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Fluvial mapping of Mars
It took fifteen years of imaging and nearly three years of stitching the pieces together to create the largest image ever made, the 8-trillion-pixel mosaic of Mars' surface. Now, the first study to utilize the image in its entirety provides unprecedented insight into the ancient river systems that once covered the expansive plains in the planet's southern hemisphere.
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Scientists invent glue activated by magnetic field
Scientists have developed a new way to cure adhesives using a magnetic field.
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Droughts, viruses and road networks: Trends that will impact our forests
A new study assembled an array of experts to highlight major trends that will impact the world's forests, and the people living around them, in the decade ahead. These trends include drought, viral outbreaks and vast infrastructure expansions across the globe. According to the researchers, a global strategy for human-nature interaction must be developed if we intend on ensuring the survival of bot
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Brain gene expression patterns predict behavior of individual honey bees
An unusual study that involved bar coding and tracking the behavior of thousands of individual honey bees in six queenless bee hives and analyzing gene expression in their brains offers new insights into how gene regulation contributes to social behavior.
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Japanese art technique inspires new engineering technique
A team of engineers is using ideas taken from paper-folding practices to create a sophisticated alternative to 3D printing.
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Japanese art technique inspires new engineering technique
A team of engineers is using ideas taken from paper-folding practices to create a sophisticated alternative to 3D printing.
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What the data say about border closures and COVID spread
Nature, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03605-6 Models estimate that travel restrictions worked early in the pandemic, but became less effective throughout the year.
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Model predicts where ticks, Lyme disease will appear next in Midwest states
By drawing from decades of studies, scientists created a timeline marking the arrival of black-legged ticks, also known as deer ticks, in hundreds of counties across 10 Midwestern states. They used these data – along with an analysis of county-level landscape features associated with the spread of ticks – to build a model that can predict where ticks are likely to appear in future years.
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Model predicts where ticks, Lyme disease will appear next in Midwest states
By drawing from decades of studies, scientists created a timeline marking the arrival of black-legged ticks, also known as deer ticks, in hundreds of counties across 10 Midwestern states. They used these data—along with an analysis of county-level landscape features associated with the spread of ticks—to build a model that can predict where ticks are likely to appear in future years.
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Model predicts where ticks, Lyme disease will appear next in Midwest states
By drawing from decades of studies, scientists created a timeline marking the arrival of black-legged ticks, also known as deer ticks, in hundreds of counties across 10 Midwestern states. They used these data—along with an analysis of county-level landscape features associated with the spread of ticks—to build a model that can predict where ticks are likely to appear in future years.
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The 10 best science and technology books of 2020
The best science books push us to think, feel, and behave differently. This list includes new releases by authors Merlin Sheldrake, Isabel Wilkerson, James Nestor, David Attenborough, and others. Besides making us more knowledgeable, these books inspire curiosity, passion, and empathy for the universe in and around us. The best science books have the power to shift perspectives, pushing us to thi
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COVID-19 pandemic has shown the need to share precious intensive care bed resources across Europe
New research shows that a majority of European anesthesiologists and intensive care specialists believe that precious intensive care (ICU) capacity should be shared between nations during international emergencies such as the COVID-19 pandemic, allowing countries with excess capacity to help those that are being overwhelmed at any particular moment.
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Artificial Intelligence Simulators: The Next Generation Crystal Balls
Deep learning is powering new ways to simulate the world, which should have dramatic impacts on everything from weather forecasts to drug design.
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Massive 2021 U.S. spending bill leaves research advocates hoping for more
Small boost this year completes 4 years of substantial growth despite Trump
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New mammogram measures of breast cancer risk could revolutionise screening
World-first techniques for predicting breast cancer risk from mammograms that were developed in Melbourne could revolutionise breast screening by allowing it to be tailored to women at minimal extra cost.
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How the American child welfare system lost its way
Black children are removed from their families at much greater rates than any other race or ethnicity in this country. At the same time the sheer number of all child abuse investigations in the US is staggering: experts estimate that by age 18 one out of three children has been the subject of a child protective services investigation. Yet, many of these investigations and removals are unjustified,
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Results of NIH-sponsored ACTIV-3 trial published
Preliminary results of a Phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial testing the investigative monoclonal antibody LY-CoV555 in hospitalized COVID-19 patients were published today in NEJM. The antibody did not provide clinical benefit compared to placebo. The trial, which had been halted to new enrollment in late October following a recommendation by the independent Data and Safety Moni
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Study finds patients with kidney failure are ready and willing to use mobile health
* In a survey of adults with kidney failure who were receiving dialysis, most owned mobile devices and had intermediate or advanced mobile health proficiency.* The main reasons for using mobile health were for making appointments, communicating with healthcare personnel, and obtaining laboratory results.
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Liver tumor in gene therapy recipient raises concerns about virus widely used in treatment
Investigation of hemophilia patient will seek to rule out role for adeno-associated virus in causing cancer
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The Weekly Planet: The 5 Biggest Climate Stories of 2020
Every Tuesday, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox . It's been an enormous month and a half for climate-change news in the United States. First, and most obvious, Joe Biden won the presidential election
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Secondary bloodstream infections associated with severe COVID-19
People with severe COVID-19 and a secondary blood infection were significantly sicker upon hospital admission, had longer hospital stays and poorer outcomes, according to a Rutgers study.
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Enzyme discovery can help rein in blood vessels that fuel cancer
Most living things need oxygen to grow and thrive. Even cancerous tumors. That's why tumors will readily sprout new blood vessels if their oxygen is starved, creating new lifelines for survival. A study published today from Scripps Research pinpoints the precise molecular machinery that makes this happen, providing scientific insights that can potentially be translated into medicines that help kil
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Putting on the pressure improves glass for fiber optics
Rapid, accurate communication worldwide is possible via fiber optic cables, but as good as they are, they are not perfect. Now, researchers from Penn State and AGC Inc. in Japan suggest that the silica glass used for these cables would have less signal loss if it were manufactured under high pressure.
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Male fairy-wrens show looks can be deceiving
In many animals, female preference for males with the most elaborate appearance is an important factor in the evolution of bright and dramatic colors.
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A powerful computational tool for efficient analysis of cell division 4-D image data
A joint research team co-led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a novel computational tool that can reconstruct and visualize three-dimensional (3-D) shapes and temporal changes of cells, speeding up the analyzing process from hundreds of hours by hand to a few hours by the computer. Revolutionizing the way biologists analyze image data, this tool can advance further studies in
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Male fairy-wrens show looks can be deceiving
In many animals, female preference for males with the most elaborate appearance is an important factor in the evolution of bright and dramatic colors.
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A powerful computational tool for efficient analysis of cell division 4-D image data
A joint research team co-led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a novel computational tool that can reconstruct and visualize three-dimensional (3-D) shapes and temporal changes of cells, speeding up the analyzing process from hundreds of hours by hand to a few hours by the computer. Revolutionizing the way biologists analyze image data, this tool can advance further studies in
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New imaging method views soil carbon at near-atomic scales
The Earth's soils contain more than three times the amount of carbon than is found in the atmosphere, but the processes that bind carbon in the soil are still not well understood.
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Detailed structure of ribosomes in nerve cells revealed
Protein synthesis is a finely tuned process in the cell by macromolecules known as ribosomes. Which regulators are responsible for controlling protein synthesis in the brain, and how do they exert their control on the ribosome? To address this question, a team of researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin studied the structure of the brain's ribosomal complexes in great detail. The team
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Oil drilling 150 miles off Florida's coast prompts dire warning from members of Congress
Exploratory drilling began this week for an offshore oil well just 150 miles from South Florida, prompting a warning from 18 members of Congress, including the entire South Florida delegation, of the potential for "severe, even catastrophic, impact" if a spill occurs.
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Elon Musk Reveals That Apple Refused to Buy Tesla
Clash of the Titans According to a recent Reuters exclusive , tech giant Apple is working on a self-driving car that could hit the market as soon as 2024. The vehicle, known as Project Titan, has been in the works for over six years. Despite layoffs, Apple has ambitious plans for its first foray into the passenger vehicle market: a "radically" redesigned car battery that uses "next-level" technol
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Detailed structure of ribosomes in nerve cells revealed
Protein synthesis is a finely tuned process in the cell by macromolecules known as ribosomes. Which regulators are responsible for controlling protein synthesis in the brain, and how do they exert their control on the ribosome? To address this question, a team of researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin studied the structure of the brain's ribosomal complexes in great detail. The team
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Perspective: Why opioids cannot fix chronic pain
New epidemiological and neuroscientific evidence suggests that the relationship between chronic pain and emotional distress is bidirectional. Pain experts at University of Washington School of Medicine explain the relation in Annals of Family Medicine .
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Why an early start is key to developing musical skill later in life
Is there, as some have suggested, a developmental period early in life when the brain is especially receptive to musical training? The answer, according to new research published in the journal Psychological Science , is probably not.
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Putting on the pressure improves glass for fiber optics
Rapid, accurate communication worldwide is possible via fiber optic cables, but as good as they are, they are not perfect. Now, researchers from Penn State and AGC Inc. in Japan suggest that the silica glass used for these cables would have less signal loss if it were manufactured under high pressure.
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5 facts about positive affect for 2021
2021 won't reset the ills of 2020, but for many it's become a symbol of a fresh start. A positive affect is contagious, correlates with better health, and leads to more supportive social connections. However, positivity must be balanced with realism if it is to improve our well-being. The year 2020 was an unrelenting nightmare of negative stimuli. The coronavirus hit early and, in coastal cities
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Safe gun storage counseling and lock distribution could lower military suicide rate
Military members who receive gun locks and lethal means counseling, which focuses on ways to limit a person's access to specific methods for suicide, are more likely to use a gun safe and unload firearms before they are stored, according to the Gun Violence Research Center, based at Rutgers
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Watch an Electric F-150 Truck Absolutely Shred on a Snowy Track
Winter Wonderland Ford may be marketing its upcoming electric Ford F-150 pickup truck as a true work truck — but that doesn't mean it won't be hella fun to drive as well. In a new ad, the carmaker showed off a prototype of the massive truck tearing through a winter wonderland, drifting around a frozen lake track like a pro. Curious how the #FordF150 BEV prototype stacks up in the snow?​ See for y
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High-altitude living has changed more than just the genes of some Peruvians
Study finds epigenetic modifications may help the Quechua rapidly adapt to life in the Andes
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Community spread of COVID-19 tied to patient survival rates at area hospitals
Discovering wide variation in hospitals' COVID-19 survival rates, researchers found that the levels of novel coronavirus in the surrounding community was likely the driving factor.
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Masks not enough to stop COVID-19's spread without distancing, study finds
Wearing a mask may not be enough to prevent the spread of COVID-19 without social distancing. Researchers tested how different types of mask impacted the spread of droplets that carry the coronavirus when we cough or sneeze. Every material tested dramatically reduced the number of droplets that were spread. But at distances of less than 6 feet, enough droplets to potentially cause illness still ma
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Pandemic and forthcoming stimulus funds could bring climate targets in sight — or not
The lockdowns that resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic have reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, in the recovery phase, emissions could rise to levels above those projected before the pandemic. It all depends on how the stimulus money that governments inject into their economies is spent. A team of scientists has quantified how different recovery scenarios may affect global emissions and cli
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The pandemic has had a dramatic effect on drug overdoses
The early months of the pandemic (March to May 2020) saw a spike in overdose deaths. (Pexels/) The COVID-19 pandemic has overtaken the health news cycle this year. And though the novel coronavirus remains a major public health threat, other substantial health issues that affect Americans—like the opioid epidemic—haven't gone away and many of them have gotten worse in light of the pandemic. New da
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People in these countries think their government did a good job of dealing with the pandemic
How well did your country respond to the pandemic? It's a subjective question, the answers to which are reflected in new research recording the diversity of opinion around the world. Spoiler alert: globally, more people approved of their own country's response than disapproved. A Pew Research Center survey of more than 14,000 adults across 14 advanced economies in Europe, Asia, North America and
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"Vaccine passports could further erode trust"
Experts are debating the pros and cons of covid-19 vaccine passports or other types of certification as they attempt to begin reopening public spaces. The idea seems simple on its face: those who can prove they've been vaccinated for covid-19 would be able to go places and do things that unvaccinated people would not. There's early evidence that the vaccines authorized by the Food and Drug Admini
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The New Mutations
OK, time to write about the topic that's been the talk of the coronavirus world the last day or two: the new strain that has been detected in the UK. I'll go ahead and put the bottom line right here, and then go into the details: I'm not sounding any alarm bells, but this does bear watching. The signal/noise on this story started out rather low (as has been the case with all the breaking news dur
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Consequences of seafood mislabeling for marine populations and fisheries management
Perhaps that sauteed snapper you enjoyed last evening at your neighborhood restaurant was not snapper at all. Perhaps it was Pacific Ocean perch, cloaked in a wine sauce to disguise its true identity. The same goes for that grouper you paid a handsome price for at your local fishmonger's and cooked up at home. Instead, you may have been feasting on a plateful of whitefin weakfish and been none the
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Light flips genetic switch in bacteria inside transparent worms
Researchers from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have shown that colored light can both activate and deactivate genes of gut bacteria in the intestines of worms. The research shows how optogenetic technology can be used to investigate the health impacts of gut bacteria.
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Diversity, severity of autism symptoms linked to mutation locations
In children with certain autism mutations, the diversity and severity of symptoms are often related to the identity and properties of gene units, called exons, targeted by the mutations.
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New electron microscopy technique offers first look at previously hidden processes
Northwestern researchers have developed a new microscopy method that allows scientists to see the building blocks of "smart" materials being formed at the nanoscale.
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Consequences of seafood mislabeling for marine populations and fisheries management
Perhaps that sauteed snapper you enjoyed last evening at your neighborhood restaurant was not snapper at all. Perhaps it was Pacific Ocean perch, cloaked in a wine sauce to disguise its true identity. The same goes for that grouper you paid a handsome price for at your local fishmonger's and cooked up at home. Instead, you may have been feasting on a plateful of whitefin weakfish and been none the
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Fluvial mapping of Mars
It took fifteen years of imaging and nearly three years of stitching the pieces together to create the largest image ever made, the 8-trillion-pixel mosaic of Mars' surface. Now, the first study to utilize the image in its entirety provides unprecedented insight into the ancient river systems that once covered the expansive plains in the planet's southern hemisphere. These three billion-year-old s
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Chemists synthesize 'flat' silicon compounds
Chemists at the University of Bonn (Germany) have synthesized extremely unusual compounds. Their central building block is a silicon atom. Different from usual, however, is the arrangement of the four bonding partners of the atom, which are not in the form of a tetrahedron around it, but flat like a trapezoid. This arrangement is usually energetically extremely unfavorable, yet the molecules are v
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Nanomaterial System Detects Coronavirus Antibodies In Just Seconds
A new biosensor can examine the tiniest drop of blood and tell whether someone has antibodies for the coronavirus — in about ten seconds. The nanomaterial system can identify two separate antibodies generated in response to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and send results to a phone, according to research published Tuesday in the journal Advanced Materials . If adopted, the test stand
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Harvard Astronomer Says We Should Hunt for Alien Probes
Harvard astrophysics faculty member Avi Loeb is calling on the scientific community to search not just for mysterious radio signals emanating from the vast reaches of the observable universe — but for alien probes sent to us as "messages in a bottle" as well. In a new essay for Scientific American , Loeb argues that the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, or SETI, should not only focus on d
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New drug inhibits the growth of cancer cells
A newly developed compound starves cancer cells by attacking their "power plants"—the so-called mitochondria. The new compound prevents the genetic information within mitochondria from being read. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne, the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and the University of Gothenburg report in their study that this compound could be used a
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U.S. Marines use sensor buoys to better understand ocean battlespace
Flying several thousand feet above the Pacific Ocean, an air crew and a scientist from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution tossed cylindrical floats from a U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey aircraft. Packed with data-gathering sensors to measure underwater conditions, the floats fell fast before orange parachutes opened to ease splashdown.
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New drug inhibits the growth of cancer cells
A newly developed compound starves cancer cells by attacking their "power plants"—the so-called mitochondria. The new compound prevents the genetic information within mitochondria from being read. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne, the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and the University of Gothenburg report in their study that this compound could be used a
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Keeping up appearances: male fairy-wrens show looks can be deceiving
A new study examines whether conspicuous colours of superb fairy-wrens signal male quality.
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What pandemic messaging around changing holiday rituals gets wrong
From Catholics performing the sign of the cross to Americans reciting the Pledge of Allegiance, group rituals have strikingly consistent features over time. Because group rituals symbolize sacred group values, even minor alterations to them provoke moral outrage and punishment.
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This Ridiculously Affordable VR Sex Toy Is Almost as Enjoyable as the Real Thing
With more people stuck at home than at any other time in living memory, adult entertainment is booming. But the way in which people consume adult content is drastically changing. That's because virtual reality sex is moving from the realm of science fiction to the realm of science fact. And t hanks to the people at KIIROO, the creators of the KIIROO Titan VR sex toy, realistic, immersive VR sex i
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Pregnant women in third trimester unlikely to pass SARS-CoV-2 infection to newborns
Pregnant women who are infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, during the third trimester are unlikely to pass the infection to their newborns, new research suggests. The study followed 127 pregnant women who were admitted to Boston hospitals during the spring of 2020. Among the 64 pregnant women who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, no newborns tested positive for the virus.
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Hand-held device measures aerosols for coronavirus risk assessment
Understanding aerosol concentrations and persistence in public spaces can help determine infection risks. However, measuring these concentrations is difficult, requiring specialized personnel and equipment. Now, researchers demonstrate that a commercial hand-held particle counter can be used for this purpose and help determine the impacts of risk-reducing measures, like ventilation improvements.
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Congress Passes Major Climate Legislation in Year-End Omnibus
The bill calls for phasing down emissions of hydrofluorocarbons, a potent greenhouse gas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists suggested a method to improve performance of methanol fuel cells
Fuel cells based on methanol oxidation have a huge potential in the motor and technical industries. To increase their energy performance, scientists suggest using electrodes made of thin palladium-based metallic glass films. A group of researchers from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Austria, Turkey, Switzerland, and the UK has developed a new metallic glass for this application. The result
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Killer cotton and planes dropping moths wiped out these pests
A strategy combining genetically engineered cotton with classical pest control tactics eradicated the invasive pink bollworm from cotton-producing areas of the continental US and Mexico, a new study shows. "Although pink bollworm remains a daunting pest in over 100 countries, our strategic coalition rid the US and Mexico of this invasive insect," says Bruce Tabashnik, professor in the University
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Oxford Scientists Turn Carbon Dioxide Into Jet Fuel
Reverse Engineering A team of scientists from the University of Oxford has made an unusual development in the push for clean energy: Turning carbon dioxide back into jet fuel. The technology, Wired reports , could help reduce the aviation industry's massive impact on the environment, both by helping prevent carbon dioxide pollution by feeding emissions into the system and by cleaning up the jet f
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Meteorite Fragment Points to Missing Dwarf Planet in Early Solar System
Every asteroid that falls to Earth is a potential window into the origins of the solar system, but scientists have stumbled upon something quite strange when studying a fragment of the Almahata Sitta asteroid. It contains evidence of a huge, previously unknown object in our solar system — perhaps a long since destroyed dwarf planet. The Almahata Sitta asteroid collection consists of about 600 fra
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Makers of successful COVID-19 vaccines wrestle with options for placebo recipients
Multiple schemes for "unblinding" trial participants provoke scientific and ethical debate that FDA must resolve quickly
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Ancient DNA sheds light on the peopling of the Mariana Islands
Compared to the first peopling of Polynesia, the settlement of the Mariana Islands in the Western Pacific, which happened around 3,500 years ago, has received little attention. Researchers have now obtained answers to long debated questions regarding the origin of the first colonizers of the Marianas and their relationship to the people who initially settled in Polynesia.
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The Scientist Speaks Podcast – Episode 12
Decoding Smell: Demystifying Human Disease and Behavior
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Bio-inspired endoscope provides 3D visible and near-infrared images simultaneously
Researchers have developed a new bio-inspired medical endoscope that can acquire 3D visible light and near-infrared fluorescence images at the same time. It features an optical design that combines the high-resolution 3D imaging of human vision with the mantis shrimp's capability to simultaneously detect multiple wavelengths of light.
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New drug inhibits the growth of cancer cells
Blocking gene expression in mitochondria in mice stops cancer cells from growing
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Mayo Clinic Model of Care and Research leads to favorable outcomes for patients with COVID-19
Patients with COVID-19 who received care at Mayo Clinic, whether in the hospital or at home, had outcomes that compared favorably to those reported nationally and internationally. These results demonstrate the value of an integrated, team-based approach to patient care and monitoring, according to a retrospective study of all patients with COVID-19 treated at Mayo Clinic March 1-July 31.
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COVID-19 isolation hurting women more than men
A study by University of Calgary researchers with the Hotchkiss Brain Institute examining sex and gender differences on sleep, empathy and mood during months of isolation due to COVID-19 has found that women are suffering more than men with poorer sleep and more anxiety, depression and trauma, while also feeling more empathetic than men.
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Global study on bird song frequency
Competition for mates leads to a deeper voice than expected based on size
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Chemists describe a new form of ice
Scientists from the United States, China, and Russia have described the structure and properties of a novel hydrogen clathrate hydrate that forms at room temperature and relatively low pressure. Hydrogen hydrates are a potential solution for hydrogen storage and transportation, the most environmentally friendly fuel.
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COVID immunity lasts up to 8 months, new data reveals
Australian researchers have revealed — for the first time — that people who have been infected with the COVID-19 virus have immune memory to protect against reinfection for at least eight months.The research is the strongest evidence for the likelihood that vaccines against the virus, SARS-CoV-2, will work for long periods.
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A blazar in the early universe
Observations with the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) reveal previously unseen details in a jet of material ejected from the core of a galaxy seen as it was when the universe was only about 7% of its current age.
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Bio-inspired endoscope provides 3D visible and near-infrared images simultaneously
Researchers have developed a new bio-inspired medical endoscope that can acquire 3D visible light and near-infrared fluorescence images at the same time. It features an optical design that combines the high-resolution 3D imaging of human vision with the mantis shrimp's capability to simultaneously detect multiple wavelengths of light.
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'Soft' nanoparticles give plasmons new potential
Scientists couple gold nanoparticles with soft polymers that pull energy from the gold's plasmonic response to light. That energy can then be used to catalyze chemical reactions.
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New drug combination could improve glucose and weight control in diabetes
Scientists have shown that adding an experimental cancer drug to a widely used diabetes treatment improves blood glucose control and weight loss in mice, according to a new study.
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Stuck at home? Trick your brain into treating a staycation like the real thing.
Get outside your head without leaving your house. (Unsplash/) Taking a vacation has many benefits for your body and mind. A timely getaway can lower your stress and, with it, your risk of life-threatening issues like heart attack , stroke, and diabetes . Even short vacations— four nights, according to one study —can significantly improve your feeling of well-being. Traveling to faraway lands can
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Bait and switch
Seafood is the world's most highly traded food commodity, and reports of seafood mislabeling have increased over the past decade. However, proof of the environmental effects of mislabeled seafood has been scant as has research. So, Arizona State University researcher Kailin Kroetz and her colleagues analyzed the impact of seafood mislabeling on marine population health, fishery management effectiv
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Gates Foundation helps UC study sexual health of South African youth
An important new finding by University of Cincinnati researchers could help slow the transmission of HIV/AIDS and reduce pregnancies among adolescent girls in rural South Africa.
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Fluvial mapping of Mars
It took fifteen years of imaging and nearly three years of stitching the pieces together to create the largest image ever made, the 8-trillion-pixel mosaic of Mars' surface. Now, the first study to utilize the image in its entirety provides unprecedented insight into the ancient river systems that once covered the expansive plains in the planet's southern hemisphere.
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In shaky times, focus on past successes, if overly anxious, depressed
The more chaotic things get, the harder it is for people with clinical anxiety and/or depression to make sound decisions and to learn from their mistakes. On a positive note, overly anxious and depressed people's judgment can improve if they focus on what they get right, instead of what they get wrong, suggests a new University of California, Berkeley, study.
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Chemists synthesize 'flat' silicon compounds
Chemists at the University of Bonn (Germany) have synthesized extremely unusual compounds. Their central building block is a silicon atom. Different from usual, however, is the arrangement of the four bonding partners of the atom, which are not in the form of a tetrahedron around it, but flat like a trapezoid. This arrangement is usually energetically extremely unfavorable, yet the molecules are v
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Mouse-controlled mouse helps researchers understand intentional control
Researchers at the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre have devised a brain machine interface (BMI) that allows mice to learn to guide a cursor using only their brain activity. By monitoring this mouse-controlled mouse moving to a target location to receive a reward, the researchers were able to study how the brain represents intentional control.
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2020 Seen Through the Lens of Justin Sullivan
Justin Sullivan has been a staff photographer with Getty Images since 2003. Primarily working out of California, Sullivan covered nearly the full spectrum of U.S. news stories in 2020, from the New Hampshire primaries to the early days of the pandemic, through a summer of lockdowns, protests, social distancing, and wildfires, to the November election, and much more. Below, in roughly chronologica
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Global disparities in vaccination persist and leave many children at risk
Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, tens of millions of children worldwide were not receiving basic doses of vaccines. New research finds there continue to be significant disparities in childhood vaccination, and poorer children from under-represented and minority groups in most countries are more likely to be less fully vaccinated with all the recommended immunizations. A special supplement to the
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New electron microscopy technique offers first look at previously hidden processes
Northwestern researchers have developed a new microscopy method that allows scientists to see the building blocks of 'smart' materials being formed at the nanoscale.
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The brain's protein factories at work
Protein synthesis is a finely tuned process in the cell by macromolecules known as ribosomes. Which regulators are responsible for controlling protein synthesis in the brain? To address this question, researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin studied the structure of the brain's ribosomal complexes in great detail. The team was able to identify a new factor which is also involved in co
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Scientists Say There Was a Huge, Mysterious Object in the Early Solar System
Lost World After studying one of the fragments of an asteroid that exploded over Sudan, a team of scientists arrived at a provocative conclusion. The researchers suggest that at least one giant space rock, the size of a dwarf planet, orbited the Sun during the earliest days of our solar system. Inside of the tiny asteroid splinter allocated to the study, they found an unusual crystal structure th
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Publisher Correction: Inhibition of LTβR signalling activates WNT-induced regeneration in lung
Nature, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03087-6
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Why Experts Think Travel Bans Won't Stop Coronavirus Variant Spread
It isn't clear how widely the new variants are already circulating. So the latest moves by countries to bar international travelers may once again be too little, too late.
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Surgery may offer survival advantage in certain metastatic breast cancers
Surgery, in addition to treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy, may increase the length of survival for metastatic breast cancer patients, according to researchers.
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A new species of mammal may have been found in Africa's montane forests
A research team has discovered a tree hyrax in the Taita Hills, Kenya, which may belong to a species previously unknown to science.
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What if clean air benefits during COVID-19 shutdown continued post-pandemic?
A new study poses a hypothetical question: What if air quality improvements in New York City during the spring COVID-19 shutdown were sustained for five years without the economic and health costs of the pandemic? Cumulative benefits during this period would amount to thousands of avoided cases of illness and death in children and adults, as well as associated economic benefits between $32 to $77
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Modeling study suggests mitigation efforts can prevent most college campus COVID-19 cases
As colleges and universities consider strategies for the spring semester to keep COVID-19 cases down, a study in epidemic modeling may help shed light on what mitigation strategies may be most effective, both in terms of infections prevented and cost.
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New method for imaging exhaled breath could provide insights into COVID-19 transmission
A new method for visualizing breath that is exhaled while someone is speaking or singing could provide important new insights into how diseases such as COVID-19 spread and the effectiveness of face masks.
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Surgery may offer survival advantage in certain metastatic breast cancers
Surgery, in addition to treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy, may increase the length of survival for metastatic breast cancer patients, according to Penn State College of Medicine and Penn State Cancer Institute researchers.
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Tweets from emergency docs may spark COVID caution
A new study suggests tweets from health care workers about COVID-19 can make an impact. Anyone who's been online lately has probably seen them: Passionate pleas from health care workers , asking for the public to realize how bad the COVID-19 pandemic has gotten, and urging them to take steps to slow the spread of coronavirus. A personal appeal from an emergency physician , asking for the public's
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Brain gene expression patterns predict behavior of individual honey bees
An unusual study that involved bar coding and tracking the behavior of thousands of individual honey bees in six queenless bee hives and analyzing gene expression in their brains offers new insights into how gene regulation contributes to social behavior.
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Japanese artform inspires new engineering technique
Paper snowflakes, pop-up children's books and elaborate paper cards are of interest to more than just crafters. A team of Northwestern University engineers is using ideas taken from paper-folding practices to create a sophisticated alternative to 3-D printing.
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'Soft' nanoparticles give plasmons new potential
Bigger is not always better, but here's something that starts small and gets better as it gets bigger.
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Harvard scientists advance controversial plan to dim sunlight
Swedish space agency allows Harvard researchers to test a stratospheric balloon next year. The balloon may eventually be used to release particles into the atmosphere to reflect sunlight. The goal would be to cool Earth and fight back against global warming but the approach has critics. Harvard University researchers were given permission by the Swedish Space Corporation to carry out a test next
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Brain gene expression patterns predict behavior of individual honey bees
An unusual study that involved bar coding and tracking the behavior of thousands of individual honey bees in six queenless bee hives and analyzing gene expression in their brains offers new insights into how gene regulation contributes to social behavior.
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Opacity dogs Chinese and Russian Covid vaccines
Sharing data would boost confidence and global inoculation prospects
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How roundworms decide the time is right to grow
Transforming a fertilized egg into a fully functional adult is a complicated task. Cells must divide, move, and mature at specific times. Developmental genes control that process, turning on and off in a choreographed way. However, the environment influences development. A team of researchers led by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Associate Professor Christopher Hammell reported December 22, 2020 in
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How roundworms decide the time is right to grow
Transforming a fertilized egg into a fully functional adult is a complicated task. Cells must divide, move, and mature at specific times. Developmental genes control that process, turning on and off in a choreographed way. However, the environment influences development. A team of researchers led by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Associate Professor Christopher Hammell reported December 22, 2020 in
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A powerful computational tool for efficient analysis of cell division 4D image data
A joint research team co-led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a novel computational tool that can reconstruct and visualise three-dimensional (3D) shapes and temporal changes of cells, speeding up the analysing process from hundreds of hours by hand to a few hours by the computer. Revolutionising the way biologists analyse image data, this tool can advance further studies in d
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New imaging method views soil carbon at near-atomic scales
The Earth's soils contain more than three times the amount of carbon than is found in the atmosphere, but the processes that bind carbon in the soil are still not well understood.
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Scientists suggested a way to measure soil properties at any depth without digging
A team of scientists from RUDN University and the Dokuchyaev Soil Science Institute developed a method for identifying the color of soil at different depths and the structure of soil profile using ground-penetrating radar. With this methodology, scientists can identify the chemical composition of the soil and classify it for potential use in construction, agriculture, or mining without digging soi
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The college student in a pandemic
A study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that in a group of first-year university students COVID-19 mitigation protocols, including remote learning and stay-at-home orders had a modest, but persistent, impact on mood and wellness behaviors. Students enrolled in the university's wellness program, however, had improved
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Can we be manipulated into sharing private info online? Yes, says Ben-Gurion U. study
The Ben-Gurion U. researchers showed that by using digital "foot-in-the-door" techniques, such as requesting personal information from less important to more private (ascending privacy-intrusion order), websites can successfully entice users to reveal more of their private information. Similarly, by placing each request on consecutive, separate webpages, users are more likely to reveal more privat
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Better learners in collared flycatchers are more likely to imitate competitors
Many animal species use social information—from conspecifics or other species—to inform their behavioral choices, for example where to look for food or build a nest. In a recent study, ornithologists have shown for the first time that the ability to use such information can depend on an individual's cognitive skills. In the collared flycatcher, females that mastered a learning task faster were mor
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A blazar in the early Universe
The supersharp radio 'vision' of the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) has revealed previously unseen details in a jet of material ejected at three-quarters the speed of light from the core of a galaxy some 12.8 billion light-years from Earth. The galaxy, dubbed PSO J0309+27, is a blazar, with its jet pointed toward Earth, and is the brightest radio-emitting blazar yet
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Better learners in collared flycatchers are more likely to imitate competitors
Many animal species use social information—from conspecifics or other species—to inform their behavioral choices, for example where to look for food or build a nest. In a recent study, ornithologists have shown for the first time that the ability to use such information can depend on an individual's cognitive skills. In the collared flycatcher, females that mastered a learning task faster were mor
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Cancelled Christmas shows there is a better way to fight the virus
The UK's approach must change from one of blunt instruments to encouraging personal responsibility
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Bonobo and chimp genomes shed light on huge differences
A whole-genome comparison of bonobos and chimps reveals the gene pathways associated with the striking differences between the two species' diets, sociality, and sexual behaviors. Chimpanzees and bonobos, sister species that diverged around 1.8 million years ago as the Congo River formed a geographic boundary, evolved in separate environments. "Our paper is the first whole-genome positive selecti
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How Midwives Have Stepped in in Mexico as Covid-19 Overshadows Childbirth
Midwives and doctors struggle to help women give birth safely during the grim days of the pandemic.
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It's vital we act now to suppress the new coronavirus variant | Alan McNally
We don't know if B117 is more deadly, but we do have evidence it's transmitting fast. Failure to react could be catastrophic Alan McNally is a professor in microbial genomics at the University of Birmingham On Friday 11 December I was alerted to the fact that a large number of the samples showing positive in our Covid-19 testing laboratory in Birmingham were unusual. Like the other Lighthouse lab
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Two dimensional heterostructures composed of layers with slightly different lattice vectors
New periodic structures known as moiré lattices can be observed in two-dimensional (2-D) heterostructures containing layers with slightly different lattice vectors, which can in turn support new topological phenomena. It is therefore important to obtain high-resolution imaging of these moiré lattices and superstructures to understand the emerging physics. In a new report now published in Science A
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Pulse Oximeters and Coronavirus: Devices Have Higher Error Rate in Black Patients
A study showed that the devices, which measure oxygen levels in the blood, were three times more likely to give misleading readings among African-American patients.
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Scientists pinpoint molecular cause for severe disorder in children
A team of scientists from the University of Ottawa have opened a window into the cause of a rare genetic disorder that causes mortality in young children.
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Promising clinical data for fenofibrate's ability to prevent lung damage in COVID patients
In what has the potential to significantly change how Corona patients are being treated and the severity of the disease, research spearheaded at Jerusalem's Hebrew University gathered early clinical evidence demonstrating the efficacy of an existing drug in treating COVID-19.
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Japanese art technique inspires new engineering technique
A team of Northwestern University engineers is using ideas taken from paper-folding practices to create a sophisticated alternative to 3D printing.
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Increased meat consumption associated with symptoms of childhood asthma
Substances present in cooked meats are associated with increased wheezing in children, Mount Sinai researchers report.
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Research news tip sheet: Story ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine
Research story ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine.
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'Soft' nanoparticles give plasmons new potential
Rice University scientists couple gold nanoparticles with soft polymers that pull energy from the gold's plasmonic response to light. That energy can then be used to catalyze chemical reactions.
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Bio-inspired endoscope provides 3D visible and near-infrared images simultaneously
Researchers have developed a new bio-inspired medical endoscope that can acquire 3D visible light and near-infrared fluorescence images at the same time. It features an optical design that combines the high-resolution 3D imaging of human vision with the mantis shrimp's capability to simultaneously detect multiple wavelengths of light.
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Brain gene expression patterns predict behavior of individual honey bees
An unusual study that involved bar coding and tracking the behavior of thousands of individual honey bees in six queenless bee hives and analyzing gene expression in their brains offers new insights into how gene regulation contributes to social behavior.
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How roundworms decide the time is right
The roundworm C. elegans matches its development to the amount of food in its environment. It uses a protein called BLMP-1 to open up a large set of developmental genes, priming them to turn on when food is plentiful. Humans have a protein with a similar function that is known to be overactive in some blood cancers.
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Former SpaceX, Teslas Designers Selling "Pods" for Human Habitation
Juped? Startup Jupe is selling prefabricated portable shelters that were designed by ex-Tesla and SpaceX designers, Business Insider reports . The off-the-grid shelters offer 111 square feet of living space and cost $17,500 per pod. All images courtesy of Jupe "Jupe is an off-grid escape from the city, whether to the middle of a sprawling desert, a windswept cliff by the sea or your own backyard,
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Ancient DNA sheds light on the peopling of the Mariana Islands
To reach the Mariana Islands in the Western Pacific, humans crossed more than 2,000 kilometers of open ocean, and around 2,000 years earlier than any other sea travel over an equally long distance. They settled in the Marianas around 3,500 years ago, slightly earlier than the initial settlement of Polynesia.
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Scientists invent glue activated by magnetic field
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), have developed a new way to cure adhesives using a magnetic field.
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Pangolins in peril get a hand from human neighbours
Nature, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03635-0 The expertise of local people could help to protect an extremely rare Philippine species.
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A review of 2020 through Nature's editorials
Nature, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03560-2 From the COVID pandemic to a momentous US election, Nature's editorials provide a lens through which to view an extraordinary year.
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A new species of mammal may have been found in Africa's montane forests
A research team from the University of Helsinki has discovered a tree hyrax in the Taita Hills, Kenya, which may belong to a species previously unknown to science.
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Polymer to capture ammonia pollution realized
Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute and the Department of Chemistry at University of Copenhagen, have recently designed a porous polymer aiming for the capture of small molecules. Ammonia is a toxic gas widely used as a reagent in industrial processes or resulting from agricultural activities, causing irritation in the throat, eye damage and even death to humans. Being able to capture it with
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Pandemic and forthcoming stimulus funds could bring climate targets in sight—or not
The lockdowns that resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic have reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, in the recovery phase, emissions could rise to levels above those projected before the pandemic. It all depends on how the stimulus money that governments inject into their economies is spent. A team of scientists, led by Dr. Yuli Shan and Professor Klaus Hubacek from the University of Groningen,
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Slow start of plate tectonics despite a hot early Earth
Writing in PNAS, scientists from Cologne university present important new constraints showing that plate tectonics started relatively slow, although the early Earth's interior was much hotter than today.
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A new species of mammal may have been found in Africa's montane forests
A research team from the University of Helsinki has discovered a tree hyrax in the Taita Hills, Kenya, which may belong to a species previously unknown to science.
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Don't underestimate the cheapfake
On November 30, Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Lijian Zhao pinned an image to his Twitter profile. In it, a soldier stands on an Australian flag and grins maniacally as he holds a bloodied knife to a boy's throat. The boy, whose face is covered by a semi-transparent veil, carries a lamb. Alongside the image, Zhao tweeted, "Shocked by murder of Afghan civilians & prisoners by Australian soldie
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Trade in wild animals is thriving online, despite risk of disease transmission
Despite COVID-19 restrictions and the risk of animal to human disease transmission, illegal wildlife trade on social media networks has continued, with wild animals sometimes sold as 'lockdown pets'. Researchers from Oxford Brookes University and the University of Western Australia, having analyzed around 20,000 Facebook posts about wild pet trade, are urging increased governance on social media s
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CVIA has just published a new issue, Volume 5 Issue 2
The journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published the second issue of Volume 5. This issue brings together important research from authors in the USA and China, and includes new papers on 'Current Management Strategies in Patients with Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation' and 'Epicardial Adipose Tissue in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Systematic Review
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Surgery may offer survival advantage in certain metastatic breast cancers
Surgery, in addition to treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy, may increase the length of survival for metastatic breast cancer patients, according to Penn State College of Medicine and Penn State Cancer Institute researchers. They studied nearly 13,000 stage four breast cancer patients and found that those who had surgery in addition to their other treatments had a survival advantage
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Study shows significant sex, age differences for nonfatal opioid overdoses in youth
Results of a national study show significant sex and age-based differences among youth and young adults who experience a nonfatal opioid overdose.
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Better learners in collared flycatchers are more likely to imitate competitors
Researchers have shown for the first time in wild birds that the capacity to use information from competing species when choosing a nest site depend partly on individual cognitive ability. In the collared flycatcher, females that learned to solve a cognitive task faster were more likely to copy the nest site choices of great and blue tits, species that breed in the same area and forage on the same
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New drug combination could improve glucose and weight control in diabetes
Scientists have shown that adding an experimental cancer drug to a widely used diabetes treatment improves blood glucose control and weight loss in mice, according to a study published today in eLife.
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A blazar in the early universe
Observations with the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) reveal previously unseen details in a jet of material ejected from the core of a galaxy seen as it was when the universe was only about 7% of its current age.
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Kan vi stole på fødevareforskning? Mange undersøgelser er betalt af industrien
Når industrien støtter forskningen, bliver resultatet oftere til deres fordel.
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Russian Space Chief Accuses US of Sabotaging Russian Space Program
Rogozin Scorned Once again, Dmitry Rogozin, the director general of Russia's Roscosmos space agency, is lashing out at the U.S. government. On Monday, the U.S. Commerce Department raised economic sanctions against a long list of Chinese and Russian companies that have ties to their respective militaries, Ars Technica reports . Among them is the Progress Rocket Space Center in Samara, Russia, whic
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Trade in wild animals is thriving online, despite risk of disease transmission
Despite COVID-19 restrictions and the risk of animal to human disease transmission, illegal wildlife trade on social media networks has continued, with wild animals sometimes sold as 'lockdown pets'. Researchers from Oxford Brookes University and the University of Western Australia, having analyzed around 20,000 Facebook posts about wild pet trade, are urging increased governance on social media s
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NASA Killed All Its Monkeys on the Same Day, Investigation Reveals
Mass Euthanasia NASA euthanized all 27 primates at the agency's Ames research center in California in February 2019, The Guardian reports , causing outrage among animal welfare groups. According to the newspaper, the culling eliminated all the agency's monkeys. According to animal rights advocates, the monkeys could have easily gone to sanctuaries. John Gluck, an expert in animal ethics at the Un
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An inside look at how fiber optic glass is made
You may never see fiber, but it plays a huge part in your online life. (Christopher Payne /) Fiber optics helped bring this article to whatever device you're reading it on. The tiny strands of ultra-clear glass play a crucial role in just about everything that happens on the web—from connecting massive data centers to delivering The Mandalorian to your TV. And with broadband usage up by more than
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Ancient mummified wolf cub in Canada 'lived 56,000 years ago'
Scientists say the cub, which died about 56,000 years ago, is "the most complete wolf mummy known".
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Airline disruption continues as more countries impose UK travel bans
Logistics companies report rise in demand for moving cargo by air to leapfrog port blockages
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Liquid bandage detects tissue oxygenation without the drawbacks of wired oximeters
A paint-on, transparent bandage containing phosphorescent materials reads the amount of oxygen reaching transplanted tissue — a critical component of a transplant's success. Existing oximeter technology is complicated to use, restricts patients' movements, and is subject to false alarms. The first human trial of the liquid bandage in women undergoing breast reconstruction after cancer found that
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It's electrifying! This is how Earth could be entirely powered by sustainable energy
Can you imagine a world powered by 100% renewable electricity and fuels? It may seem fantasy, but a collaborative team of scientists has just shown this dream is theoretically possible – if we can garner global buy-in. The study explores what changes are needed in our energy mix and consumption patterns if we are to achieve 100% renewability in a way that supports everyone and the myriad of life o
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Droughts, viruses and road networks: Trends that will impact our forests
A new UCPH study assembled an array of experts to highlight major trends that will impact the world's forests, and the people living around them, in the decade ahead. These trends include drought, viral outbreaks and vast infrastructure expansions across the globe. According to the researchers, a global strategy for human-nature interaction must be developed if we intend on ensuring the survival o
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This Ridiculously Cool Robot Arm Is Also a 3D Printer, Laser Engraver, and AI Assistant
Cool technology has a funny way of trickling down to regular people. Ten years ago, if you wanted to do 3D printing and laser engraving with an AI-driven robotic arm , you would have needed a PhD and a job at Caltech or MIT. But today all you need is a computer and a credit card to order yourself the Rotrics DexArm, an incredible desktop robot arm that will make you feel like you're Tony freakin'
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BioNTech CEO Says 'Highly Likely' Vaccine Is Effective Against U.K. Virus Variant
"Scientifically, it is highly likely that the immune response by this vaccine also can deal with the new virus variant," BioNTech CEO Ugur Sahin said Tuesday. (Image credit: David Goldman/AP)
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Parents want parks to be fun and safe
While parents from diverse backgrounds most often value parks that offer amenities like playgrounds, sports fields, and green spaces, they also want parks to feel safe, according to a new study. Researchers drew the findings from a survey of 278 parents with children aged 5 to 10 who visited parks in North Carolina's Triangle region and in New York City in the spring and summer of 2017 and 2018.
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The Virus Is Showing Black People What They Knew All Along
All skinfolk ain't kinfolk, but as Black people in America, we still feel a connection with one another. A reciprocated smile as we pass one another on the street; a spontaneous, but still synchronized, "Swag Surfin'" dip at the club; a "Cupid Shuffle" kick at the cookout. Small moments like these reinforce the bond I feel with other Black people. But these days, as I quarantine at home, the Blac
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Flow driven robotic navigation of microengineered endovascular probes
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20195-z The navigation of catheters through blood vessels requires flexible guiding wires that are pushable and tractable at the same time. Pancaldi et al. rely on hydrodynamic forces and magnetic torque in order to access even rather small capillaries with an ultraflexible magnetomechanical probe.
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NTU Singapore scientists invent glue activated by magnetic field
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), have developed a new way to cure adhesives using a magnetic field.
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Voluntary or compulsory? New evidence on motivation for anti-COVID-19 policies
A study by the University of Konstanz shows that voluntary motivation to comply with anti-Covid-19 policies is relatively high in Germany, but can be undermined by enforcement — the consequence of this finding differs depending on the policy.
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A new species of mammal may have been found in Africa's montane forests
A research team from the University of Helsinki has discovered a tree hyrax in the Taita Hills, Kenya, which may belong to a species previously unknown to science.
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Ancient DNA sheds light on the peopling of the Mariana Islands
Compared to the first peopling of Polynesia, the settlement of the Mariana Islands in the Western Pacific, which happened around 3,500 years ago, has received little attention. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, the Australian National University and the University of Guam have now obtained answers to long debated questions regarding the origin of the first co
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How a large protein complex assembles in a cell
A team of ETH researchers led by Karsten Weis has developed a method that allows them to study the assembly process for large protein complexes in detail for the first time. As their case study, the biologists chose one of the largest cellular complexes: the nuclear pore complex in yeast cells.
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Pandemic and forthcoming stimulus funds could bring climate targets in sight — or not
The lockdowns that resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic have reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, in the recovery phase, emissions could rise to levels above those projected before the pandemic. It all depends on how the stimulus money that governments inject into their economies is spent. A team of scientists, led by Dr. Yuli Shan and Professor Klaus Hubacek, University of Groningen, has qua
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New study: available drugs can prevent rejection and tissue injury after transplantation
Controlling inflammation after transplantation of organs, cells, or tissues is critical for graft survival; however, it can be difficult. Continuing injuries due to chronic rejection can be particularly problematic. Now, a team of researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine report that neutralizing the cell signaling molecule, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), can prevent cascades of injurious
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Review on functional hydrogel coatings
Hydrogel-coated substrates combine the merits of both the substrates and hydrogels, enabling new functions and applications. Typical applications of hydrogel coatings can be found in both medical and non-medical areas, such as soft devices and robotics, invasive medical devices and implants. The emerging topic of functional hydrogel coatings are reviewed from three aspects: functions and applicati
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Trade in wild animals is thriving online, despite risk of disease transmission
Despite COVID-19 restrictions and the risk of animal to human disease transmission, illegal wildlife trade on social media networks has continued, with wild animals sometimes sold as 'lockdown pets'.
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Nanoparticles could improve oil production
A team of scientists from Siberian Federal University together with their colleagues from Novosibirsk studied the effect of nanoparticles on oil production efficiency. When added to the water that displaces oil from a reservoir, nanoparticles improve the separation of oil drops from mine rock and their washing to the surface. The work received a grant from the Russian Science Foundation, and an ar
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Newly discovered receptor helps to sneak a peek at evolution
Certain proteins call for unusual ways to get incorporated into membranes, because the signal sequence required for this process is located at their rear end instead of at the front. The relevant mechanism and its components are well-known and well-studied in yeast and mammals. Scientists have already hypothesised that it also occurs in plants, but there was no evidence of an indispensable recepto
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Variation in US hospital mortality rates for patients admitted with COVID-19 during the 1st 6 months of pandemic
Researchers used data from a large national health insurer in the U.S. to examine whether hospital outcomes for patients with COVID-19 are improving.
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Even after long-term exposure, bionic touch does not remap the brain
A new study by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago and Chalmers University of Technology demonstrates that the brain does not remap itself even with long-term bionic limb use, posing challenges for the development of realistic prosthetic limbs.
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Controlling cardiac waves with light to better understand abnormally rapid heart rhythms
Over 300,000 people die each year in the US due to sudden cardiac death. In many cases, sudden cardiac death is caused by abnormally rapid heart rhythms called tachycardias, which means the heart cannot pump adequate blood to the body. In Chaos, researchers use mice to study tachycardias and find there are intrinsic mechanisms that exist in heart tissue that they hypothesize lead to the self-termi
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Study finds cancer survivors run greater risk of developing, dying from second cancers
A new American Cancer Society study finds that adult-onset cancer survivors run a greater risk of developing and dying from subsequent primary cancers (SPCs) than the general population.
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Masks not enough to stop COVID-19's spread without distancing
Wearing a mask may not be enough to prevent the spread of COVID-19 without social distancing. In Physics of Fluids, researchers tested how different types of mask impacted the spread of droplets that carry the coronavirus when we cough or sneeze. Every material tested dramatically reduced the number of droplets that were spread. But at distances of less than 6 feet, enough droplets to potentially
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Pregnant women with COVID-19 pass no virus but fewer-than-expected antibodies to newborns
Pregnant women may be especially vulnerable to developing more severe cases of COVID-19, but little is known about their anti-SARS-CoV-2 immune response or how it may affect their offspring. A new study provides new insights that could help improve care for these women and their newborns and emphasizes the need for pregnant women to be considered in vaccine rollout plans.
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Strategies for adults experiencing sheltered homelessness during COVID-19 pandemic
What The Study Did: In this modeling study of simulated adults living in homeless shelters, daily symptom screening with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of individuals who had positive symptom screening paired with management at a nonhospital care site of people with mild to moderate COVID-19 was associated with a substantial decrease in infections and lowered costs over four months compar
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Assessing maternal, neonatal SARS-CoV-2 viral load, transplacental antibody transfer, placental pathology
This report of maternal viral load, transplacental antibody transmission and placental pathology in 127 pregnancies during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic provides needed data about maternal viral control, reduced transplacental transfer of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and lack of vertical transmission in mother-newborn pairs.
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The first endovascular technology that can explore capillaries
EPFL scientists have invented a technique to navigate electronic devices that are smaller than human hair inside blood vessels and reach arterioles. The next step will be conducting in vivo tests.
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Americans underestimate public support for key gun policies
Gun safety policies, including universal background checks and mandatory waiting periods, receive wide support among American gun owners, yet most Americans fail to recognize this fact, a new study suggests.That disconnect may make it hard to adopt these policies, according to the researchers.
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Community-based programs reduce sexual violence, study shows
Through small, neighborhood classes, researchers at UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh and Promundo-US significantly reduced sexual violence among teenage boys living in areas of concentrated disadvantage. The study appears in JAMA.
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Too much of a good thing – persistent IFNγ depletes progenitor blood cells via BST2
Long-term exposure to IFNγ stimulates the production of protein BST2 on blood stem cells, which resulted in their emergence from the quiescent state, persistent proliferation and finally exhaustion.
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Community spread of COVID-19 tied to patient survival rates at area hospitals
Discovering wide variation in hospitals' COVID-19 survival rates, researchers found that the levels of novel coronavirus in the surrounding community was likely the driving factor
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Pregnant women in third trimester unlikely to pass SARS-CoV-2 infection to newborns
Pregnant women who are infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, during the third trimester are unlikely to pass the infection to their newborns, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The study followed 127 pregnant women who were admitted to Boston hospitals during the spring of 2020. Among the 64 pregnant women who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, no newbor
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Assessing progress in health care quality through lens of COVID-19
Observations about health system performance during the COVID-19 pandemic are offered in this Viewpoint, with an emphasis on system cohesion and 2 of 3 levels of health care described earlier by the National Academy of Medicine: health care organizational capabilities and the environment of care.
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Use of diagnosis code for COVID-19 among US hospitalizations
Researchers examined the use of COVID-19-specific coding, the transition from legacy coding and the accuracy of the COVID-19-specific code using SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing as the reference standard.
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Hand-held device measures aerosols for coronavirus risk assessment
Understanding aerosol concentrations and persistence in public spaces can help determine infection risks. However, measuring these concentrations is difficult, requiring specialized personnel and equipment. Now, researchers demonstrate that a commercial hand-held particle counter can be used for this purpose and help determine the impacts of risk-reducing measures, like ventilation improvements. T
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Cornell University to extract energy from manure to meet peak heating demands
Cornell University is developing a system to extract energy from cattle manure to meet the campus's peak demands for heat in the winter months. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy , scientists involved with the project give a detailed analysis of the issues required to make this work, including scientific, economic, and energy policy considerations.
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Hackers Stole Top Officials' Emails, Government Admits
They're In The massive cyberattack on the federal government known as SolarWinds has also breached high-level systems in the Treasury Department. The hack, which officials say was very likely perpetrated by Russian state-backed hackers, compromised dozens of senior officials' email accounts, according to The New York Times . It's the latest indicator of the scope and ambition of the attack — and
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Ravens Measure Up to Great Apes on Intelligence
Juvenile ravens performed just as well as chimps and orangutans in a battery of intelligence tests—except for assays of spatial skills. Christopher Intagliata reports.
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The power of value 4.0 for industrial internet of things
Many companies expected 2020 to be a challenging year. They anticipated technological shifts that would affect their business—like the transition from combustion to electric vehicles for automotive manufacturers—or ongoing instability due to raging trade wars or Brexit. But the impact of the covid pandemic on top of these challenges has, for many companies, been unprecedented. Never before have t
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Slowdown in plate tectonics may have led to Earth's ice sheets
Decreased ocean crust production tied to rapid cooling
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What are the COVID-19 vaccine's side effects?
It's totally normal to experience side effects from COVID-19 vaccines and William Moss can explain what you need to know. COVID-19 vaccines are the first to be produced using the mRNA platform. These vaccines are highly effective, but they are also "reactogenic," meaning that they're likely to cause a noticeable immune response. Here, Moss , an expert epidemiologist and executive director of the
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2020 in Neuroscience, Longevity, and AI—and What's to Come
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Federal NDP leader supports P.E.I. basic income pilot
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Will property outside cities become more sought after with the workforce working from home and eventually autonomous cars
Right now most people prefer or require living in big cities due to most work being located there as well as ease of access to transport and shops. And the absurdly high prices reflect this. It is however not hard to imagine a day in the future where many people (especially city people) can work exclusive from home. Do you think housing in the countryside might become preferred and thus quickly r
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Microplastics revealed in the placentas of unborn babies | Plastics
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AR & VR Training: The Future of Corporate Learning
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ESA signs deals for its first reusable transport spaceplane | European Space Agency
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Remote Workers Fleeing High Cost Cities | City Journal
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This Solar Cell Just Set an Astounding Efficiency Record
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Visible hydrogels for rapid hemorrhage control and monitoring
There are many different events which may lead to excessive and uncontrolled bleeding within the body. This can occur as a result of inflammation and ulcerations, abnormalities in the blood vessels or trauma-related injuries. Individuals with predisposing conditions, such as cardiac patients, are at particular risk of internal bleeding due to the anticoagulants they are often prescribed as a preve
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BioAFMviewer software for simulated atomic force microscopy of biomolecules
Nowadays nanotechnology allows one to observe single proteins at work. Under atomic force microscopy (AFM), e.g., their surface can be rapidly scanned, and functional motions monitored, which is of great importance for applications in all fields of the life sciences. The analysis and interpretation of experimental results remains however challenging because the resolution of obtained images or mol
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Waste to treasure: Crayfish shells to store energy
More than just a spicy night snack, the crayfish has been endowed with greater significance. Prof. Zhu Xifeng's team from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) made it possible to use crayfish shell as the biological template for high-performance supercapacitors. This work was published in Carbon.
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How Claude Shannon Invented the Future
Science seeks the basic laws of nature. Mathematics searches for new theorems to build upon the old. Engineering builds systems to solve human needs. The three disciplines are interdependent but distinct. Very rarely does one individual simultaneously make central contributions to all three — but Claude Shannon was a rare individual. Despite being the subject of the recent documentary The Bit Pla
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BioAFMviewer software for simulated atomic force microscopy of biomolecules
Nowadays nanotechnology allows one to observe single proteins at work. Under atomic force microscopy (AFM), e.g., their surface can be rapidly scanned, and functional motions monitored, which is of great importance for applications in all fields of the life sciences. The analysis and interpretation of experimental results remains however challenging because the resolution of obtained images or mol
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Could Carbon Dioxide Be Turned Into Jet Fuel?
A team at Oxford University has reverse engineered fuel from the greenhouse gas—but so far just in the lab.
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Satellitbilder kartlägger tvångsarbete på fiskeflottor
Satellitbilder och maskininlärning har använts för att kartlägga tvångsarbete på fiskeflottor runtom i världen. 100 000 människor arbetar på fartyg som befinner sig i riskzonen, visar en ny studie.
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Masks not enough to stop COVID-19's spread without distancing: study
Simply wearing a mask may not be enough to prevent the spread of COVID-19 without social distancing.
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Slow start of plate tectonics despite a hot early Earth
Writing in PNAS, scientists from Cologne university present important new constraints showing that plate tectonics started relatively slow, although the early Earth's interior was much hotter than today.
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Wi-Fi technology with fiber optic-like performance for Industry 4.0
It is the first step towards high performance wireless communications in the manufacturing industry
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Astigmatism measures and corneal power obtained with different devices
The aim of the research is to compare the keratometric and total corneal astigmatism measures provided by three different technologies as well as to assess the level of interchangeability among them.
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Key clues to understanding the death of stars
New research has found that by studying all three 'flavors' involved in a supernova, they've unlocked more clues as to how and why stars die.
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Anti-diarrhea drug drives cancer cells to cell death
In cell culture, loperamide, a drug commonly used against diarrhea, proves effective against glioblastoma cells. A research team has now unraveled the drug's mechanisms of action of cell death induction and – in doing so – has shown how this compound could help attack brain tumors that otherwise are difficult to treat.
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PHOTOS: Great Conjunction Dazzles Stargazers Around The World
On Monday evening, Jupiter and Saturn appeared closer to each other in the sky than they have for hundreds of years in what has become known as the Great Conjunction. (Image credit: Yasser Al-Zayyat/AFP via Getty Images)
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Elon Musk: `Full Self-Driving´ som abonnementsordning klar næste år
På nuværende tidspunkt testes en beta-version af FSD-softwaren i USA. Den gør teslabilen i stand til at holde for rødt, foretage venstre- og højresving og navigere i rundkørsler.
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Researchers further reveal inner workings of pathogenic bacteria
Using some of the world's most powerful microscopes, three international research teams—from Australia, the Czech Republic and a German/US/Finnish consortium—have discovered a unique molecular mechanism that allows pathogenic bacteria to maintain efficient gene expression.
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SETI Institute Admits That Proxima Centauri Signal Is Very Strange
Over the weekend, astronomers made a tantalizing discovery : a mysterious radio beam that emanated from the vicinity of Proxima Centauri, the Sun's closest stellar neighbor, as first reported by The Guardian . The discovery, made by Breakthrough Listen, a project dedicated to hunt for signals from extraterrestrial life affiliated with the late physicist Stephen Hawking, led to widespread speculat
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Researchers further reveal inner workings of pathogenic bacteria
Using some of the world's most powerful microscopes, three international research teams—from Australia, the Czech Republic and a German/US/Finnish consortium—have discovered a unique molecular mechanism that allows pathogenic bacteria to maintain efficient gene expression.
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Lockdown looms for Scotland amid reports more of England will enter tier 4
MSPs told tough measures likely in coming days, while ministers may soon extend English restrictions Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Nicola Sturgeon has warned MSPs she may have to introduce full lockdown measures across Scotland in the coming days to contain the faster-spreading Covid variant, which has already led to Wales bringing forward a countrywide lockdown fr
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Den gik heller ikke tredje gang: Oliejagt i Arktis er ikke et brud på norsk grundlov
Nu har den norske Højesteret slået endelig fast, at en grundlovsformulering om "retten til et sundt helbred" ikke er møntet på klimakonsekvenserne af olieudvinding.
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'Hovering' cuts hospital returns after joint replacement
The rate of hospital readmissions for hip and knee replacement patients declined from roughly 12% to 3% when they were part of a "hovering" program, according to a new study. "There are great opportunities for health systems and clinicians to improve the quality and value of care for patients getting hip and knee joint replacement surgery , and some of the most important advances are focused on w
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Reliable anti-counterfeit checks under extreme conditions
NUS researchers invented DeepKey, a new anti-counterfeiting technology that performs reliable AI-based authentication under extreme environmental conditions. It is suitable for tagging high-value products such as vaccines, drugs, jewelry and electronics.
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Visible hydrogels for rapid hemorrhage control and monitoring
A collaborative team of clinical intervention radiology specialist and bioengineering researchers create a visual hydrogel for rapid hemorrhage control and monitoring by adding imaging particles made from tantalum hydrogel mixture.
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BioAFMviewer software for simulated atomic force microscopy of biomolecules
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows to obtain images and movies showing proteins at work, however with limited resolution. The developed BioAFMviewer software opens the opportunity to use the enormous amount of available high-resolution protein data to better understand experiments. Within an interactive interface with rich functionality, the BioAFMviewer computationally emulates tip-scanning of
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Cannabis use blunts stress reactivity in female rats
Female rats that inhaled vaporized cannabis daily for a month developed a blunted physiological response to stress, according to a new study by Washington State University researchers. In contrast, male rats that were provided access to the same potency of cannabis over the same 30-day window did not experience any physiological changes in how they responded to a stressful situation.
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Waste to treasure: Crayfish shells to store energy
Other than a spicy night snack, the crayfish has been endowed with greater significance. Prof. ZHU Xifeng's team from University of Science and Technology of China made it possible to use crayfish shell as the biological template for high-performance supercapacitors.
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Experiments first verify distributed quantum phase estimation
Professor PAN Jianwei and his colleges from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have achieved the experimental verification of distribution quantum phase estimation for the first time. This work was published on Nature Photonics.
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Study: Bumble bees lacking high-quality habitat have higher pathogen loads
Bumble bees found in low-quality landscapes—characterized by a relative lack of spring flowers and quality nesting habitat—had higher levels of disease pathogens, as did bumble bees in areas with higher numbers of managed honey bee hives, according to research led by Penn State scientists.
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New experiment provides better understanding of fundamental photo-induced X-ray processes
An international team from Germany, Sweden, Russia and the USA, led by scientists from European XFEL, has published the results of an experiment that could provide a blueprint for the analysis of transitions states in atoms and molecules. This would open up new opportunities to gain insights into important processes such as photocatalysis, elementary steps in photosynthesis and radiation damage.
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Detecting COVID-19 antibodies in 10 seconds
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University report findings on an advanced nanomaterial-based biosensing platform that detects, within seconds, antibodies specific to SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to testing, the platform will help to quantify patient immunological response to the new vaccines with precision.
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Giant iceberg A68a shatters into large fragments
The giant iceberg that's been drifting through the South Atlantic experiences a major break-up.
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Bumblebees lacking high-quality habitat have higher pathogen loads
Bumblebees found in low-quality landscapes — characterized by a relative lack of spring flowers and quality nesting habitat — had higher levels of disease pathogens, as did bumblebees in areas with higher numbers of managed honey bee hives, according to scientists.
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Neuroscientists isolate promising mini antibodies against COVID-19 from a llama
Researchers have isolated a set of promising, tiny antibodies, or 'nanobodies,' against SARS-CoV-2 that were produced by a llama named Cormac. Preliminary results suggest that at least one of these nanobodies, called NIH-CoVnb-112, could prevent infections and detect virus particles by grabbing hold of SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins. In addition, the nanobody appeared to work equally well in either liq
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The aroma of distant worlds
Asian spices such as turmeric and fruits like the banana had already reached the Mediterranean more than 3000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought. A team of researchers has shown that even in the Bronze Age, long-distance trade in food was already connecting distant societies.
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The upside of volatile space weather
Although stellar flares are typically viewed as a detriment to habitability, study shows 'life might still have a fighting chance.' Researchers find that flares drive a planets atmospheric composition to a new chemical equilibrium.
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Evolution of a killer: How African Salmonella made the leap from gut to bloodstream
Scientists have exploited the combined power of genomics and epidemiology to understand how a type of Salmonella bacteria evolved to kill hundreds of thousands of immunocompromised people in Africa.
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Coastal ecosystems 'bright spots' for repairing marine ecosystems
Scientists have identified coastal 'bright spots' to repair marine ecosystems globally, paving the way to boost biodiversity, local economies and human wellbeing.
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Study: Bumble bees lacking high-quality habitat have higher pathogen loads
Bumble bees found in low-quality landscapes—characterized by a relative lack of spring flowers and quality nesting habitat—had higher levels of disease pathogens, as did bumble bees in areas with higher numbers of managed honey bee hives, according to research led by Penn State scientists.
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Frequent, fast, accessible testing should be public health tool during COVID-19 pandemic
In a perspective piece published in Science, Brigham and Women's Hospital's Michael Mina, MD, PhD, and his co-author, Kristian G. Andersen, PhD, describe the power of public health screening, which focuses on mitigating transmission of the virus at the population level, and how it may be a crucial and overlooked tool.
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Anti-diarrhoea drug drives cancer cells to cell death
In cell culture, loperamide, a drug commonly used against diarrhoea, proves effective against glioblastoma cells. A research team at Goethe University has now unravelled the drug's mechanisms of action of cell death induction and – in doing so – has shown how this compound could help attack brain tumours that otherwise are difficult to treat.
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Three flavors are better than one — in ice cream and supernova research
New research from Northwestern University has found that by studying all three "flavors" involved in a supernova, they've unlocked more clues as to how and why stars die.
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Ravens Measure Up to Great Apes on Intelligence
Juvenile ravens performed just as well as chimps and orangutans in a battery of intelligence tests—except for assays of spatial skills. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists Think This May Be the Farthest Galaxy in the Universe
GN-z11's light signatures helped researchers estimate its distance from Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New flower from 100 million years ago brings fresh holiday beauty to 2020
Oregon State University researchers have identified a spectacular new genus and species of flower from the mid-Cretaceous period, a male specimen whose sunburst-like reach for the heavens was frozen in time by Burmese amber.
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New flower from 100 million years ago brings fresh holiday beauty to 2020
Oregon State University researchers have identified a spectacular new genus and species of flower from the mid-Cretaceous period, a male specimen whose sunburst-like reach for the heavens was frozen in time by Burmese amber.
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Coronavirus Has Officially Hit Antarctica
The coronavirus has officially reached the final continent: Antarctica. A Chilean research base on the frosty landmass has reported 36 new infections, including 26 members of the Chilean army and 10 maintenance workers, The Guardian reports . These are the first cases reported in Antarctica, which had been the last continent to escape the pandemic. According to Newsweek , three crew members on a
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5 Ways to Monitor Your Blood Pressure Wherever You Are
These portable devices can send results to your phone—and help you keep track of your health.
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A groggy climate giant: Subsea permafrost is still waking up after 12,000 years
After the Last Glacial Maximum some 14,000 years ago, rising temperature melted glaciers and ice caps worldwide. Over thousands of years, sea levels rose by more than 400 feet (130 meters).
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Frozen: Cutting-edge technology reveals structures within cells
Temperatures of minus 196 degrees Celsius enable high-resolution imaging of the cell's interior. Researchers are thus able to show for the first time how the active form of a protein complex plays critical roles in cell motility and other important biological functions look like.
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Discovery of 66 new Roman Army sites shows more clues about one of the empire
The discovery of dozens of new Roman Army sites thanks to remote sensing technology has revealed more about one of the empire's most infamous conflicts.
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2020 in Neuroscience, Longevity, and AI—and What's to Come
Covid-19 sucked most of the oxygen out of science this year. But we still had brilliant wins. The pandemic couldn't bring rockets or humans down: multiple missions blasted off to the red planet in the "summer of Mars." Two astronauts launched to the International Space Station—and made it safely back —in a game-changer for commercial space travel. NASA released dozens of findings on how space tra
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Video: Low-cost interventions could help combat the 'psychological poverty trap'
Worldwide research shows how to ease emotional and financial distress in poor communities
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Customers drive grocery store worker distress during pandemic
A new study shows that 20% of grocery store workers in Arizona report experiencing severe levels of mental distress during the COVID-19 pandemic. One of the main sources of stress? Customer behavior. "The mental health of these workers was much worse than we thought," says Brian Mayer , an associate professor in the University of Arizona School of Sociology in the College of Social and Behavioral
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Mapping out a transient atom
A new experiment provides better understanding of fundamental photo-induced processes with special importance for photocatalysis, photosynthesis and radiation damage
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New flower from 100 million years ago brings fresh holiday beauty to 2020
Researchers have identified a spectacular new genus and species of flower from the mid-Cretaceous period, a male specimen whose sunburst-like reach for the heavens was frozen in time by Burmese amber.
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Study: Bumble bees lacking high-quality habitat have higher pathogen loads
Bumble bees found in low-quality landscapes — characterized by a relative lack of spring flowers and quality nesting habitat — had higher levels of disease pathogens, as did bumble bees in areas with higher numbers of managed honey bee hives, according to research led by Penn State scientists.
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Ravens Measure Up to Great Apes on Intelligence
Juvenile ravens performed just as well as chimps and orangutans in a battery of intelligence tests—except for assays of spatial skills. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ravens Measure Up to Great Apes on Intelligence
Juvenile ravens performed just as well as chimps and orangutans on a battery of intelligence tests—except for spatial skills. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Frozen: Cutting-edge technology reveals structures within cells
Temperatures of minus 196 degrees Celsius enable high-resolution imaging of the cell's interior. Researchers are thus able to show for the first time how the active form of a protein complex plays critical roles in cell motility and other important biological functions look like.
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Preventing nurse suicides as new study finds shift in method
UC San Diego researchers find a distinct shift from using pharmacological poisoning to firearms in female nurses who die by suicide.
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How a large protein complex assembles in a cell
A team of ETH researchers led by Karsten Weis has developed a method that allows them to study the assembly process for large protein complexes in detail for the first time. As their case study, the biologists chose one of the largest cellular complexes: the nuclear pore complex in yeast cells.
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