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New Scientist
48K<>kuriøstYarn grown from human skin cells could be knitted into your bodyA yarn-like material made from human skin cells could be used for surgery and complex tissue reconstruction without triggering an immune response

5hBig Think5KIs masturbation the new cold & flu medicine?Achieving orgasm through masturbation provides a rush of feel-good hormones (such as dopamine, serotonin and oxytocin) and can re-balance our levels of cortisol (a stress-inducing hormone). This helps our immune system function at a higher level. The surge in "feel-good" hormones also promotes a more relaxed and calm state of being, making it easier to achieve restful sleep, which is a critical p

1hIngeniøren69Mindre plankton i Atlanterhavet kan påvirke klimaetMængden af fytoplankton er faldet drastisk i det nordlige Atlanterhav siden industrialiseringen satte ind.New ScientistPrivacy of hundreds of thousands of genetic volunteers may be at riskA team was able to uncover a dog's DNA in a research database – and it could mean the privacy of people who volunteer for genetic studies is at risk

nowScientific American ContentMiami Is the "Most Vulnerable" Coastal City WorldwideIn the next two decades, sea level rise, storm surge and winds will chew away at Florida's $1 trillion economy, a new report warns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6minBiochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily<>cancerCancer side-effects: Sweet nanoparticles trick kidneyResearchers engineer tiny particles with sugar molecules to prevent side effect in cancer therapy.

7minBiochemistry Research News — ScienceDailyWater, water everywhere, and it's weirder than you thinkResearchers show that liquid water has 2 distinct molecular arrangements: tetrahedral and non-tetrahedral. By computer simulations and analysis of X-ray scattering data, the researchers were able to settle a very old controversy in science.

7minBiochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily<>nålHigh-tech printing may help eliminate painful shotsPainful hypodermic needles may not be needed in the future to give shots, inject drugs and get blood samples. With 4D printing, engineers have created tiny needles that mimic parasites that attach to tissues and could replace hypodermic needles, according to a new study.

7minScienceDailyHigh-tech printing may help eliminate painful shotsPainful hypodermic needles may not be needed in the future to give shots, inject drugs and get blood samples. With 4D printing, engineers have created tiny needles that mimic parasites that attach to tissues and could replace hypodermic needles, according to a new study.

8minScienceDaily20<>deep-learningDeep learning accurately forecasts heat waves, cold spellsUsing an advanced form of deep learning, researchers created a computer system that learned how to accurately predict extreme weather events, like heat waves, up to five days in advance using minimal information about current weather conditions. Ironically, the self-learning 'capsule neural network' uses a method reminiscent of 'analog' weather forecasting, which was made obsolete by computers in

8minNatureCuba's rivers run clean after decades of sustainable farmingNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00263-6 The island's waterways have lower levels of fertilizer-linked pollution than the Mississippi River in the United States.

9minEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsOverall survival in patients with lung adenocarcinoma harboring 'niche' mutationsMutations were observed in all genes studied, except c-MET, DDR2, MAP2K1, and RET.The multivariable analysis showed that:Niche mutations had higher mortality than EGFR mutationsKRAS mutations had higher mortality than EGFR mutations, andNiche mutations presented similar mortality to KRAS mutations.

10minFuture(s) Studies<>246 Canadian academics call on government to act now to avoid global collapse. We refuse to continue supporting politicians who claim to be concerned about climate change while simultaneously approving oil pipelines, tar sands mines, and gas liquefaction facilities.submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

16minFuture(s) Studies<>rnaStep aside CRISPR, RNA editing is taking off – Making changes to the molecular messengers that create proteins might offer flexible therapies for cancer, pain or high cholesterol, in addition to genetic disorders.submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

16minFuture(s) StudiesNearing the Simulation Singularity: What Would Immersive Computing Mean to the Human Mentality?submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

16minFuture(s) StudiesPolish startup Nomagic's robots can replace human workers at warehousessubmitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

16minFuture(s) StudiesThe Fall and Rise of Passenger Rail in Americasubmitted by /u/thinkB4WeSpeak [link] [comments]

16minforskning.se<><>fakenewsOnlinespel kan fungera som "vaccin" mot fake newsDe som spelade onlinespelet Bad News blev bättre på att avslöja fejkade nyheter och desinformation – samtidigt som de behöll förtroendet för riktiga nyheter. Spelet har tagits fram just i detta syfte av forskare i Uppsala och Cambridge. – Vi kunde se att de som spelat Bad News blev signifikant mycket bättre på att avslöja falska nyheter och desinformation som bygger på till exempel fejkade konton

20minScience20<>coronaCoronavirus may delay China purchase of US goodsCommitment of $200bn under 'phase one' trade deal might happen slower than expected

23minNew on MIT Technology Review54Iowa's high-tech caucuses crashed, and paper ballots saved the dayDemocratic Sanders Iowa"This is a very clear lesson of why paper records are critical," said one election expert.

26minScientific American Blog PostsLessons for Aspiring STEM Grad StudentsI wish I'd known these things before starting my own PhD program — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28minEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsWildfires increase winter snowpack — but that isn't necessarily a good thingWildfires are altering ecosystems globally as they change in frequency, size, and severity. In unburned forests, snow has been shown to accumulate more in small clearings or in stands with low to moderate forest densities. A new study finds that peak snowpack across severe burn areas increased 15% in snow-water equivalence (SWE) and 17% in depth for every 20% increase in overstory tree mortality d

29minScience MagazineCould a habitable planet orbit a black hole?Theorists say it's technically possible, but it would be a weird place to live

30minThe Atlantic1KThe Audacity of PetePete Buttigieg IowaDES MOINES, Iowa—The thing about a victory speech, generally, is that it requires a victory. But when this year's Iowa caucus didn't quickly produce one, Pete Buttigieg claimed the win as his anyway. The other candidates who spoke last night mumbled about the mess, proclaimed "on to New Hampshire!," and said all the other things you're supposed to say when results are up in the air. Buttigieg str

31minScientific American ContentLessons for Aspiring STEM Grad StudentsI wish I'd known these things before starting my own PhD program — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

36minExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTechThe Future of Sensors for Self-Driving Cars: All Roads, All ConditionsRobotic hands on steering wheel while driving autonomous car. 3D illustration. Whatever your thoughts about how quickly autonomous vehicle technology will move forward, there is little doubt that it will need to rely on better and less expensive sensor technology than we have available today. Current test vehicles often have sensor suites costing over $100,000, and still can't deal with all types

38minScienceDaily44Pluto's icy heart makes winds blowA 'beating heart' of frozen nitrogen controls Pluto's winds and may give rise to features on its surface, according to a new study.

40minScienceDailyCancer side-effects: Sweet nanoparticles trick kidneyResearchers engineer tiny particles with sugar molecules to prevent side effect in cancer therapy.

40minScienceDailyWater, water everywhere, and it's weirder than you thinkResearchers show that liquid water has 2 distinct molecular arrangements: tetrahedral and non-tetrahedral. By computer simulations and analysis of X-ray scattering data, the researchers were able to settle a very old controversy in science.

40minScienceDaily28<>depressionMood disorders on genetic spectrumResearchers shed new light on the genetic relationship between three mood disorders associated with depression — major depression and bipolar disorder types 1 and 2, in a new study.

40minScienceDaily<>coronaEarly spread of coronavirus extends far beyond China's quarantine zoneInfectious disease researchers have concluded there is a high probability that the deadly Wuhan coronavirus spread beyond Wuhan and other quarantined cities before Chinese officials were able to put a quarantine in place.

40minforskning.se<>fiskSå mår fisk och skaldjur i svenska vatten​Statusen för torsk i Kattegatt och östra Östersjön och för hälleflundra i Västerhavet är så dålig att arterna inte bör fiskas alls. Utvecklingen är mer positiv för makrill, långa och nordhavsräka. Det visar SLU:s årliga översikt "Fisk- och skaldjursbestånd i svenska hav och sötvatten", som görs på uppdrag av Havs- och vattenmyndigheten. Rapporten tas fram av institutionen av akvatiska resurser (

52minEurekAlert! – Breaking News<>arScientists find new ways to prevent skin scarringA new study in Burns & Trauma, published by Oxford University Press, reveals promising new strategies to prevent skin scarring after injuries.

54minEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsMedicaid expansion slashed uninsured rates in Diabetes Belt, study findsThe Diabetes Belt is a swath of 644 counties across 15 southeastern states that are stricken with high diabetes rates. Improving access to care could help prevent or slow the progression of the disease.

54minEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsPeeking at the plumbing of one of the Aleutian's most-active volcanoesA new approach to analyzing seismic data reveals deep vertical zones of low seismic velocity in the plumbing system underlying Alaska's Cleveland volcano, one of the most-active of the more than 70 Aleutian volcanoes. Unlike typical seismic imaging experiments that deploy dozens of seismometers, this study used only eight.

54minEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsGrooves hold promise for sophisticated healingRice University bioengineers print 3D implants with layered cells destined to become distinct combinations of tissue, like bone and cartilage. The scaffolds degrade over time to leave the natural tissues in place.

54minNew Scientist24<>kontaktlinserContact lens senses UV light to tell you when it's time for sunscreenSkin patches and contact lenses that change colour when exposed to UV light could provide us with a visual alert to apply sunscreen or seek some shade

57minScience | The Guardian100+<>coronaCoronavirus is a deadly test: did the world learn the lessons of Sars? | Jennifer RohnPreparedness is everything – so it's chilling to realise that investment in it is actually being cut Merely a month after a mysterious respiratory illness arose in Wuhan, China, the world is already in the grip of a global outbreak. Now designated a "public health emergency of international concern" by the World Health Organization, and probably not far off earning the more sinister name "pandemi

1hScience<>coronaWHO expert says China too slow to report coronavirusEmergency committee member hits out at Beijing's 'reprehensible' response

1hPhys.orgMore grocery stores means less food waste—and a big carbon cutOne strategy for reducing food waste's environmental impact is as counterintuitive as it is straightforward: Open more grocery stores.

1hPopular Science | RSS<>coronaWuhan's new hospitals are sorely needed, but they won't stop the spread of diseaseThe huge facility will help streamline treatment. (DepositPhoto/) At least 427 people are dead and more than 20,000 people are sick in what the World Health Organization has labelled a "global health emergency." The epicenter of the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak is Wuhan, a city in Central China, and its province, Hubei. As public health officials around the world work to prevent pe

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsResearchers say early spread of coronavirus extends far beyond China's quarantine zoneInfectious disease researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and other institutions in Hong Kong, mainland China and France have concluded there is a high probability that the deadly Wuhan coronavirus spread beyond Wuhan and other quarantined cities before Chinese officials were able to put a quarantine in place.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsHigh-tech printing may help eliminate painful shotsPainful hypodermic needles may not be needed in the future to give shots, inject drugs and get blood samples. With 4D printing, Rutgers engineers have created tiny needles that mimic parasites that attach to tissues and could replace hypodermic needles, according to a study in the journal Advanced Functional Materials.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking News<>diabetesYale studies suggest new path for reversing type-2 diabetes and liver fibrosisIn a pair of related studies, a team of Yale researchers has found a way to reverse type-2 diabetes and liver fibrosis in mice, and has shown that the underlying processes are conserved in humans.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsClostridium perfringens enterotoxin induces claudin-4 to activate YAP in oral squamous cellOncotarget Volume 11, Issue 4: Treatment of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines HSC3 and HSC4 with Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin, induced CLDN4 nuclear translocation to enhance epithelial-mesenchymal transition, stemness, cell proliferation, and invasive ability.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking News<>autoimmunDietary interventions may slow onset of inflammatory and autoimmune disordersSignificantly reducing dietary levels of the amino acid methionine could slow onset and progression of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis in high-risk individuals, according to findings published today in Cell Metabolism.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsDoes animal size in zoos matter?Does size matter? New study connects larger charismatic animals, more diverse species, to higher zoo attendance and conservation funding in the wild.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsNeurological disorders are linked to elevated suicide ratesA newly published study in JAMA shows that people with neurological disorders have a 75% higher suicide rate than people with no neurological disorders. Still, suicide deaths are rare events. While the suicide rate for the general population is around 20 per 100,000, the rate for people with neurological disorders is around 40 per 100,000 person-years. The study is based on the data covering the e

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsSize matters! What drives zoo attendance and how does footfall impact conservation?Conserving species in the wild remains the gold standard but there is an increasing relevance and importance to the role played by the thousands of zoos and aquariums across the globe in supporting conservation in the wild. This study provides global evidence to suggest that zoos don't need to compromise their economic viability and entertainment value in order to have a significant value to conse

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking News<>skleroseNew discovery provides hope for improved multiple sclerosis therapiesScientists from Trinity College Dublin have made an important discovery that could lead to more effective treatments for people living with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsAre neurological disorders associated with increased risk of suicide?Nearly 40 years of registry data for 7.3 million people living in Denmark were used to examine whether people diagnosed with neurological disorders, including dementia, stroke, epilepsy, Parkinson disease and multiple sclerosis, die by suicide more often than others.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking News<>atrazinWasps' gut microbes help them — and their offspring — survive pesticidesExposure to the widely used pesticide atrazine leads to heritable changes in the gut microbiome of wasps, finds a study publishing Feb. 4 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. Additionally, the altered microbiome confers atrazine resistance, which is inherited across successive generations not exposed to the pesticide.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking News<>brainResearchers discover method to detect motor-related brain activityMotor-related brain activity is of great interest to researchers looking to improve neurorehabilitation, and one factor is the suppression of the specific rhythmic activity of neurons within the sensorimotor cortex of the brain. Studies indicate this feature suffers from variability when using traditional methods to explore it. In the journal Chaos, scientists are approaching the problem from a di

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsJohns Hopkins physicians propose quality measures to improve medical billingIf you're concerned about rising health care costs and overwhelming medical bills, you're not alone.

1hNature<>coronaCalling all coronavirus researchers: keep sharing, stay openNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00307-x As the new coronavirus continues its deadly spread, researchers must ensure that their work on this outbreak is shared rapidly and openly.

1hPhys.orgHerringbone pattern in plant cell walls critical to cell growthPlant cells tend to grow longer instead of wider due to the alignment of the many layers of cellulose that make up their cell walls, according to a new study that may have implications for biofuels research. The study, which appears online Feb. 4 in the Journal of Experimental Botany, reveals that the protein CSI1 and the alternating angle of the cell wall's layers, creating a herringbone pattern,

1hPhys.orgRed coral effectively recovers in Mediterranean protected areasProtection measures of the Marine Protected Areas have enable red coral colonies (Corallium rubrum) to recover partially in the Mediterranean Sea, reaching health levels similar to those of the 1980s in Catalonia and of the 1960s in the Ligurian Sea (Northwestern Italy). This is shown in a recent study carried out by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Uni

1hPhys.orgSweet nanoparticles trick kidneyIn the past decade nanomedicine has contributed to better detection and treatment of cancer. Nanoparticles are hundreds of times smaller than the smallest grain of sand and can therefore easily travel in the blood stream to reach the tumor. However, they are still too big to be removed by the kidneys. Since several doses of nanoparticles are necessary to treat a tumor, over time the nanoparticles

1hPhys.org24Pluto's icy heart makes winds blowA "beating heart" of frozen nitrogen controls Pluto's winds and may give rise to features on its surface, according to a new study.

1hPhys.orgSouthern Illinois' Len Small levee likely to fail even if repaired, study saysAlexander County sits near the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, at the southernmost tip of Illinois. The sparsely populated jurisdiction is perhaps best known for devastating floods resulting from repeated failures of the Len Small levee in 1993, 2011, and 2016. Homes and businesses have been severely damaged, residents stranded, and rich agricultural land irreversibly degraded by sa

1hPhys.orgDouble X-ray vision helps tuberculosis and osteoporosis researchWith an advanced X-ray combination technique, scientists have traced nanocarriers for tuberculosis drugs within cells with very high precision. The method combines two sophisticated scanning X-ray measurements and can locate minute amounts of various metals in biological samples at very high resolution, as a team around DESY scientist Karolina Stachnik reports in the journal Scientific Reports. To

1hPhys.orgFirst-of-its-kind hydrogel platform enables on-demand production of medicines, chemicalsA team of chemical engineers has developed a new way to produce medicines and chemicals on demand and preserve them using portable "biofactories" embedded in water-based gels called hydrogels. The approach could help people in remote villages or on military missions, where the absence of pharmacies, doctor's offices or even basic refrigeration makes it hard to access critical medicines, daily use

1hPhys.orgAlmost 10% of NC State students experienced homelessnessA representative survey of undergraduate and graduate students at North Carolina State University finds that almost 10% of students experienced homelessness in the previous year, and more than 14% of students dealt with food insecurity in the previous 30 days. The study highlights the housing and food security challenges facing higher education students and institutions across the country.

1hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, BiotechnologyHerringbone pattern in plant cell walls critical to cell growthPlant cells tend to grow longer instead of wider due to the alignment of the many layers of cellulose that make up their cell walls, according to a new study that may have implications for biofuels research. The study, which appears online Feb. 4 in the Journal of Experimental Botany, reveals that the protein CSI1 and the alternating angle of the cell wall's layers, creating a herringbone pattern,

1hIngeniørenStor test af hiv-vaccine stoppet: Viste skuffende resultaterEn stort anlagt test af ny hiv-vaccine i Sydafrika har slået fejl. Den gav lige så mange hiv-tilfælde som placebo-sprøjten.

1hFuturism!<>coronaScientists Warn: You Can Catch Coronavirus More Than OnceWhile most patients who contract the coronavirus 2019-nCoV eventually make a full recovery, they don't walk away from the encounter immunized against the disease, as one might expect after a viral infection. Rather, Business Insider reports that you can theoretically catch the coronavirus multiple times, creating an unusual challenge for health officials trying to contain the outbreak. The underl

1hQuanta Magazine1KMathematicians Prove Universal Law of TurbulencePicture a calm river. Now picture a torrent of white water. What is the difference between the two? To mathematicians and physicists it's this: The smooth river flows in one direction, while the torrent flows in many different directions at once. Physical systems with this kind of haphazard motion are called turbulent. The fact that their motion unfolds in so many different ways at once makes the

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsHerringbone pattern in plant cell walls critical to cell growthPlant cells tend to grow longer instead of wider due to the alignment of the many layers of cellulose that make up their cell walls, according to a new study that may have implications for biofuels research. The study reveals that the protein CSI1 and the alternating angle of the cell wall's layers, creating a herringbone pattern, are critical for cell growth.

1hWired200+For Those With Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity, Electronic Devices Are the EnemyItalian photographer Claudia Gori documented Italians who suffer from the controversial and scientifically unproven condition.

1hNature Communications – current – nature.com science feedsA system wide approach to managing zoo collections for visitor attendance and in situ conservationNature Communications, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14303-2 Zoos contribute to conservation actions in the wild. Here, Mooney et al. use a global dataset to show that, while zoos with more and larger animals attract the most visitors and contribute the most to conservation projects, there are viable alternative strategies to maximise attendance and conservation activ

1hNature Communications – current – nature.com science feedsUsing remarkability to define coastal flooding thresholdsNature Communications, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13935-3 The degree of flooding in a particular location depends sensitively on local topography and bathymetry. Here the authors used the remarkability of flood events to estimate county-specific flood thresholds for shoreline counties along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States and found that several ar

1hTED Talks Daily (SD video)40Tiny robots with giant potential | Paul McEuen and Marc MiskinTake a trip down the microworld as roboticists Paul McEuen and Marc Miskin explain how they design and mass-produce microrobots the size of a single cell, powered by atomically thin legs — and show how these machines could one day be "piloted" to battle crop diseases or study your brain at the level of individual neurons.

1hPhys.orgWasps' gut microbes help them—and their offspring—survive pesticidesExposure to the widely used pesticide atrazine leads to heritable changes in the gut microbiome of wasps, finds a study publishing February 4 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. Additionally, the altered microbiome confers atrazine resistance, which is inherited across successive generations not exposed to the pesticide.

1hPhys.orgResearchers discover method to detect motor-related brain activityMotor-related brain activity, particularly its accurate detection, quantification and classification capabilities, is of great interest to researchers. They are searching for a better way to help patients with cognitive or motor impairments or to improve neurorehabilitation for patients with nervous system injuries.

1hPhys.orgSize matters! What drives zoo attendance and how does footfall impact conservation?Scientists from Trinity College Dublin, Species360 and NUI Galway have quantified what drives attendance to zoos by assessing how variations in animal collections affect footfall. Crucially, they link their findings to the contributions made to conservation efforts in situ (in the wild), and find that zoos are making significant, positive impacts on our attempts to conserve biodiversity.

1hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, BiotechnologyWasps' gut microbes help them—and their offspring—survive pesticidesExposure to the widely used pesticide atrazine leads to heritable changes in the gut microbiome of wasps, finds a study publishing February 4 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. Additionally, the altered microbiome confers atrazine resistance, which is inherited across successive generations not exposed to the pesticide.

1hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, BiotechnologySize matters! What drives zoo attendance and how does footfall impact conservation?Scientists from Trinity College Dublin, Species360 and NUI Galway have quantified what drives attendance to zoos by assessing how variations in animal collections affect footfall. Crucially, they link their findings to the contributions made to conservation efforts in situ (in the wild), and find that zoos are making significant, positive impacts on our attempts to conserve biodiversity.

1hFuturity.orgYoung people with diabetes are 3x more likely to attempt suicideThe risks of psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts are substantially higher for young people from 15 to 25 years old with type 1 diabetes, a new study shows. Researchers looked at the risk of psychiatric disorders in a group of adolescents and emerging adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Quebec, Canada compared to the same age population without diabetes. The findings in Diabetes Care highl

1hBig Think29The Fourth Industrial Revolution is here. We need a new education model.Technological advancements are predicted to take as many as 75 million jobs from humans worldwide before 2022. However, 133 million new jobs are expected to be created in that same time. Software developer jobs are growing more than 4x faster than other occupations, a demand that translates to a median wage of $105,590 per year (or $50.77 per hour). Kenzie Academy , an online software and UX engi

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsPluto's icy heart makes winds blowA 'beating heart' of frozen nitrogen controls Pluto's winds and may give rise to features on its surface, according to a new study. Pluto's famous heart-shaped structure, named Tombaugh Regio, quickly became famous after NASA's New Horizons mission captured footage of the dwarf planet in 2015 and revealed it isn't the barren world scientists thought it was.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsStudy shows advanced colorectal cancers at recommended screening ageA study analyzing LSU Health's Louisiana Tumor Registry and other NCI-designated tumor registry data found that by the time recommended screening for colorectal begins, cancers have already spread in a high percentage of people.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsSweet nanoparticles trick kidneyResearchers engineer tiny particles with sugar molecules to prevent side effect in cancer therapy.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsSouthern Illinois' Len Small levee likely to fail even if repaired, study saysAlexander County sits near the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, at the southernmost tip of Illinois. The sparsely populated jurisdiction is perhaps best known for devastating floods resulting from repeated failures of the Len Small levee in 1993, 2011, and 2016. Homes and businesses have been severely damaged, residents stranded, and rich agricultural land irreversibly degraded by sa

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsAll things considered, wooden pallets are more eco-friendly than plastic palletsWeighing in on a debate that has raged for decades, Penn State researchers, after conducting a series of ultra-detailed comparisons, have declared that shipping pallets made of wood are slightly more environmentally friendly and sustainable than those made of plastic.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsMore pieces of the autism puzzle uncoveredA major international study from the Autism Sequencing Consortium with participation of researchers from the Danish iPSYCH psychiatry project, has recently mapped 102 new autism genes. The new findings provide a new understanding of the biology behind autism, which could in the future be utilised to provide an earlier and more precise diagnosis and better treatment options.

1hEurekAlert! – Breaking News!<>svampSynthetic mushroom toxinThe death cap mushroom is highly toxic. However, some of its toxins can also be healing: amanitins are potential components for antibody-based cancer treatments. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German scientists have now introduced a new synthetic route for alpha-amanitin. Their method seems suitable for production on a larger scale, finally making enough of the toxin available for further resea

1hFuturism500+This Horrific "Yarn" Is Made From Human FleshA team of researchers at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research in Bordeaux have grown yarn from human skin cells that they call a "human textile" — and they say it could be used by surgeons to close wounds or assemble implantable skin grafts. "These human textiles offer a unique level of biocompatibility and represent a new generation of completely biological tissue-enginee

1hBBC News – Science & Environment94Rules around human waste in farming are 'out of date'Sewage used as fertiliser could harm agricultural land, says a report for the Environment Agency.

1hScienceDaily69New thalattosaur species discovered in Southeast AlaskaScientists have identified a new species of thalattosaur, a marine reptile that lived more than 200 million years ago. The new species, Gunakadeit joseeae, is the most complete thalattosaur ever found in North America and has given paleontologists new insights about the thalattosaurs' family tree.

1hScienceDaily48Children's mental health is effected by sleep durationDepression, anxiety, impulsive behavior and poor cognitive performance in children is effected by the amount of sleep they have researchers have found.

1hScienceDaily200+First childhood flu helps explain why virus hits some people harder than othersWhy are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.

1hScienceDaily35Green infrastructure provides benefits that residents are willing to work for, study showsUrban areas face increasing problems with stormwater management. Green infrastructure, including features such as rain barrels, green roofs, rain gardens, and on-site water treatment, can provide affordable and environmentally sound ways to manage precipitation. However, green infrastructure is challenging to maintain, because it is decentralized across a city and requires constant maintenance and

1hScienceDaily200+Sand dunes can 'communicate' with each otherEven though they are inanimate objects, sand dunes can 'communicate' with each other. A team from the University of Cambridge has found that as they move, sand dunes interact with and repel their downstream neighbors.

1hScienceDaily'Oldest bamboo' fossil from Eocene Patagonia turns out to be a coniferA recent examination revealed that Chusquea oxyphylla, a fossilized leafy branch from the early Eocene in Patagonia, which has been widely cited as the oldest bamboo fossil and as evidence for a Gondwanan origin of bamboos is actually a conifer.

1hScienceDailyAltruistic babies? Infants are willing to give up food, help othersNew research finds that altruism may begin in infancy. In a study of nearly 100 19-month-olds, researchers found that children, even when hungry, gave a tasty snack to a stranger in need.

1hScienceDailySmartphone texting linked to compromised pedestrian safetySmartphone texting is linked to compromised pedestrian safety, with higher rates of 'near misses' and failure to look left and right before crossing a road than either listening to music or talking on the phone, indicates a pooled analysis of the available evidence.

1hFuturity.org<>fungiPine forests could lose vast amounts of 'friendly' fungiBy 2070, climate change could cause the local loss of over a quarter of ectomycorrhizal fungal species from 3.5 million square kilometers of North American pine forests. That's an area twice the size of Alaska, about 1.3 million square miles. If you indulge in truffles, or porcini and chanterelle mushrooms, you have enjoyed a product of ectomycorrhizal fungi. Forming symbiotic relationships with

1hPhys.orgMathematician develops method to explore the structure of moleculesA scientist from the Mathematical Laboratory of RUDN University has obtained new results in a study of the inverse problem for coupled Schrödinger equations. This result will be useful for describing the interaction of laser beams and particles with molecules and the analysis of molecular structures. The article is published in Inverse Problems.

2hBBC News – Science & EnvironmentBoris Johnson: 'Global warming is taking its toll'The prime minister says climate change is harming "the most vulnerable populations around the planet".

2hIngeniøren100+Inden lukketid: Novozymes og Hofor realiserer stort overskudsvarmeprojektUnder de gældende regler for overskudsvarme vil Hofor etablere en 4 MW stor varmepumpe, der omdanner overskudsvarmen fra enzymproduktion til varme for 6.000 københavnere.

2hNatureBirds that make the heart singNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00276-1 A population of sparrows that migrated to an urban habitat inspires awe and joy in Pamela Yeh, who studies them.

2hNatureOld tapes reveal new details of a deadly volcanic outburstNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00264-5 Scientific sleuthing uncovers data from the run-up to a massive blast at Mount St. Helens.

2hThe Atlantic1KCongress Has Lost Its Power Over TrumpIf the nation's Founders didn't want to constrain the president's power, they wouldn't have put impeachment in the Constitution. "They gave us the tools to do the job," Representative Adam Schiff declared yesterday in his closing argument in Donald Trump's trial. The president's camp, meanwhile, insists that the legislative branch still has several levers of power against Trump. The defense attor

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsKidney stem cells can be isolated from urineResearchers from the Institute for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine (ISRM) at the Medical Faculty of Heinrich Heine University-Duesseldorf under the directorship of Prof. Dr. James Adjaye have developed a protocol for the reproducible isolation and characterization of kidney stem cells, urine derived renal progenitor cells (UdRPCs) from donors of distinct ages, gender and ethnicity. Th

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsRed coral effectively recovers in Mediterranean protected areasProtection measures of the Marine Protected Areas have enable red coral colonies (Corallium rubrum) to recover partially in the Mediterranean Sea, reaching health levels similar to those of the 1980s in Catalonia and of the 1960s in the Ligurian Sea (Northwestern Italy). This is shown in a recent study carried out by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Uni

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsAlmost 10% of NC state students experienced homelessnessA representative survey of undergraduate and graduate students at North Carolina State University finds that almost 10% of students experienced homelessness in the previous year, and more than 14% of students dealt with food insecurity in the previous 30 days. The study highlights the housing and food security challenges facing higher education students and institutions across the country.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsMood disorders on genetic spectrumResearchers shed new light on the genetic relationship between three mood disorders associated with depression–major depression and bipolar disorder types 1 and 2, in a new study in the journal Biological Psychiatry, published by Elsevier.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsFast screening for potential new catalystsThe success of the energy transition depends significantly on efficient electrocatalysts, for instance for fuel cells or the reduction of CO2. Special alloys made from five or more elements are promising candidates. A team of researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has developed a concept in order to quickly screen an abundance of possible element combinations to identify which are worth op

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking News<>medicinDouble X-ray vision helps tuberculosis and osteoporosis researchWith an X-ray combination technique, scientists have traced nanocarriers for tuberculosis drugs within cells with very high precision. The method combines two scanning X-ray measurements and can locate minute amounts of metals in biological samples at very high resolution, as the team reports in the journal Scientific Reports. To illustrate its versatility, the researchers have also used the combi

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking News<>immunHow an immune system regulator shifts the balance of immune cellsResearchers have provided new insight on the role of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in regulating the immune response.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking News<>nitrogenA never-before described natural process in soil can convert nitrogen gases into nitratesThis finding is important, not only because it involves a never-before described natural process, but also because the nitrogen in the soil is crucial for global sustainability, as it affects the productivity of the ecosystem and air quality for living organisms, including humans.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsFirst-of-its-kind hydrogel platform enables on-demand production of medicines, chemicalsA team of chemical engineers has developed a new way to produce medicines and chemicals on demand and preserve them using portable "biofactories" embedded in water-based gels called hydrogels. The approach could help people in remote villages or on military missions, where the absence of pharmacies, doctor's offices or even basic refrigeration makes it hard to access critical medicines, daily use

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsStudy links high stillbirth rates worldwide to gender inequalityIn the first comprehensive study mapping global patterns of stillbirth rates, University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers have found that pregnant women who are poor and have lower access to education and employment are more likely to experience a child's death at delivery.

2hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology<>carbonEcologists find how forest age affects the accumulation of carbon in the soilEcologists from RUDN University have studied abandoned vineyards and forests in Italy and found that a high concentration of nitrogen and carbon could be observed in the soil of an old oak forest left free from anthropogenic stress for about 200 years, while in the soils of vineyards abandoned relatively recently, the concentration is many times less. The data show that even Mediterranean soils, a

2hPhys.org36<>astronomiAstronomers search for gravitational-wave memoryAstronomers regularly observe gravitational waves (GW)—ripples in space and time—that are caused by pairs of black holes merging into one. Einstein's theory of gravity predicts that GW, which squeeze and stretch space as they pass, will permanently distort space, leaving a "memory" of the wave behind. However, this memory effect has not yet been detected, as it would be extremely small, leaving on

2hPhys.org<>kemiChemist synthesizes gold-based electrocatalystsA RUDN chemist has synthesized an electrocatalyst based on gold nanoparticles with organic ligands that can trigger both hydrogen production reactions and oxygen reduction reactions in fuel cells. The yield of products with the new catalyst was twice as high as when using a traditional platinum-based catalyst. The article was published in Journal of Materials Chemistry A.

2hPhys.org<>fysikVibrations on a chip feel a magnetic fieldAMOLF physicists have made mechanical vibrations on a chip behave as if they were electrical currents flowing in a magnetic field. Because of their charge, electrons are influenced by magnetic fields, which curve their trajectories. Sound waves or more precisely the propagating mechanical vibrations don't feel a magnetic field, because they don't carry charge. By illuminating strings with laser li

2hPhys.orgEcologists find how forest age affects the accumulation of carbon in the soilEcologists from RUDN University have studied abandoned vineyards and forests in Italy and found that a high concentration of nitrogen and carbon could be observed in the soil of an old oak forest left free from anthropogenic stress for about 200 years, while in the soils of vineyards abandoned relatively recently, the concentration is many times less. The data show that even Mediterranean soils, a

2hPhys.orgImage: Ariane 6 launch zone at Europe's SpaceportEurope's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana is gearing up for the arrival of Ariane 6, Europe's next-generation launch vehicle. This aerial view taken in January 2020 shows the main elements of the new launch complex.

2hPhys.org<>retinaRetina-inspired carbon nitride-based photonic synapses for selective detection of UV lightResearchers at Seoul National University and Inha University in South Korea have developed photo-sensitive artificial nerves that emulated functions of a retina by using 2-dimensional carbon nitride (C3N4) nanodot materials. Further, through the photo-sensitive artificial nerves which selectively detected ultraviolet (UV) light and processed the information, a smart window platform was demonstrate

2hPhys.org34New algorithm helps uncover forgotten figures beneath Da Vinci paintingImperial and National Gallery researchers have used a new algorithm to help visualise hidden drawings beneath Leonardo Da Vinci's Virgin of the Rocks.

2hPhys.orgResearch: Hyper-realistic masks are extremely hard to spotIt's easy to spot someone wearing a mask, right? Well, new research suggests that it can be much harder than you think.

2hPhys.org500+<>fysikNew quasi-particle discovered: Introducing the Pi-tonIn physics, there are very different types of particles: Elementary particles are the fundamental building blocks of matter. Other particles, such as atoms, are bound states consisting of several smaller constituents. And then there are so-called "quasi-particles"—excitations in a system that consists of many particles, which in many ways behave just like a particle themselves.

2hPhys.org<>fysikFast screening for potential new catalystsA new concept makes it possible to identify the most promising among an abundance of possible element combinations.

2hPhys.orgWater, water everywhere—and it's weirder than you thinkResearchers at The University of Tokyo have used computational methods and analysis of recent experimental data to demonstrate that water molecules take two distinct structures in the liquid state. The team investigated the scattering of X-ray photons through water samples and showed a bimodal distribution hidden under the first diffraction peak that resulted from tetrahedral and non-tetrahedral a

2hFuturity.orgSimulations sort Alzheimer's tau: fibrils and 'tumbleweeds'New simulations suggest tau proteins take either of two paths to form aggregates suspected of promoting, and perhaps causing, Alzheimer's and Pick's (aka frontotemporal dementia) diseases. Precisely why remains a mystery, but figuring it out offers the possibility of controlling their fates. Tau proteins, particularly in neurons, primarily regulate microtubules , the filaments that serve as roadw

2hFuture(s) Studies<>hydrogenWorld's first commercial green H2 project powered by surplus renewables unveiled – Hyport Oostende in Belgium, to be powered solely by excess offshore wind, is also set to become the first project to use green hydrogen as energy storagesubmitted by /u/speckz [link] [comments]

2hFuture(s) StudiesCould Star Trek's DATA Be a Patent Inventor?submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

2hFuture(s) Studies<>coronaAI applications surge as China battles coronavirus outbreaksubmitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

2hFuture(s) StudiesBon Appétit! Robotic Restaurants Are The Futuresubmitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

2hFuture(s) StudiesOrigami-inspired robots that could fit in a cell? | Research Blogsubmitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

2hFuture(s) Studies<>superlederRoom temperature superconductor breakthrough: "For decades, the 'holy grail' was to find a material that superconducts at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. We're hopeful that an inexpensive, stable metal like zirconium vanadium hydride can be tailored to provide just such a superconductor."submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

2hFuture(s) StudiesScientists find another threat to Greenland's glaciers lurking beneath the ice. A survey revealed an underwater current more than a mile wide where warm water from the Atlantic Ocean is able to flow directly towards the glacier, accelerating the glacier's melting.submitted by /u/ngt_ [link] [comments]

2hFuture(s) StudiesElection season may cause people to get sick. "We determine that elections increased health care use and expense only during legally specified campaign periods by as much 19%."submitted by /u/ngt_ [link] [comments]

2hScientific American ContentCost to Message London Is "Exorbitant"Originally published in August 1866 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2hScientific American Content<>coronaCoronavirus Is a Reminder: The Best Defense against a New Outbreak Is Early DetectionInfectious disease surveillance networks already exist, but they can be highly porous — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2hPhys.orgIs hiring more black officers the key to reducing police violence?High-profile cases of officer brutality against black citizens in recent years have caused Americans to question the racial makeup of their police departments.

2hPhys.orgSingle-atom probe uses quantum information for the first timeSensors collect certain parameters such as temperature and air pressure in their proximity. Physicists from Kaiserslautern and a colleague from Hanover have succeeded for the first time in using a single cesium atom as a sensor for ultracold temperatures. To determine the measured data, they used quantum states—the spin or angular momentum of the atom. With these spins, they measured the temperatu

2hFuturity.orgSelf-care cuts stress for parents caring for kids with FASDNew research examines how confidence in and frequency of self-care relates to stress, parenting attitudes, and family needs for parents caring for kids with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Children diagnosed with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD)—caused by prenatal alcohol exposure—often face lifelong developmental, cognitive, and behavioral problems. Without the right support they are at

2hWired100+<><>This Identity Activist Wants to Make Facebook ObsoleteYour digital self is fragmented and owned by third parties. Kaliya Young has a plan to change that—and make tech fairer for all.

2hScientific American Blog PostsCoronavirus Is a Reminder: The Best Defense against a New Outbreak Is Early DetectionInfectious disease surveillance networks already exist, but they can be highly porous — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2hSingularity HubVerily's Bold New Project Aims to Predict Depression Using Your PhoneDepression is a shifting, amorphous beast that silently haunts millions. It's also difficult to pinpoint. Psychiatry has formulated well-tested questionnaires to diagnose depression. But these tests require patients to reach out and only provide snapshots of their disorder in time. The trajectory of depression can massively vary depending on sex, age, and socioeconomic status, as can the course o

2hPhys.orgMore than 250 scientists call for Australian leaders to act on climate changeMore than 250 active scientists with expertise in climate, fire and meteorology have signed a statement that calls on our leaders to urgently reduce Australia's greenhouse gas emissions and engage constructively in international agreements to reduce total global emissions to net-zero by 2050.

2hPhys.orgA 3-D camera for safer autonomy and advanced biomedical imagingResearchers have demonstrated the use of stacked, transparent graphene photodetectors combined with image processing algorithms to produce 3-D images and range detection.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsNew quasi-particle discovered: The Pi-tonNew particles are usually only found in huge particle accelerators. But something quite similar can be found in a simple lab or in computer simulations: a quasiparticle. It behaves just like a particle, but its existence depends, in some subtle way, on its environment. Scientists in Vienna have now discovered a surprising new quasiparticle called 'pi-ton'.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsUnlocking the secret of cell regulationRibonucleic acids (RNA) ensure that the blueprint in the cell nucleus is translated into vital proteins and that cell functions are regulated. However, little is known about the structure and function of particularly long RNAs, which consist of hundreds of building blocks. Chemists at the University of Bonn have now developed a new method for this purpose: They mark the complex molecules with tiny

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsHeart muscle cells change their energy source during heart regenerationResearchers from the Hubrecht Institute (KNAW) have found that the muscle cells in the heart of zebrafish change their metabolism during heart regeneration. Contrary to the human heart, the zebrafish heart can regenerate after injury. Studying zebrafish heart regeneration may help to better understand this process, and find ways to stimulate regeneration after a heart attack in humans in the futur

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsRetina-inspired carbon nitride-based photonic synapses for selective detection of UV lightResearchers at Seoul National University and Inha University in South Korea developed photo-sensitive artificial nerves that emulated functions of a retina by using 2-dimensional carbon nitride (C3N4) nanodot materials. Further, through the photo-sensitive artificial nerves which selectively detected ultraviolet (UV) light and processed the information, smart window platform was demonstrated for i

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsDeep learning accurately forecasts heat waves, cold spellsUsing an advanced form of deep learning, Rice University researchers created a computer system that learned how to accurately predict extreme weather events, like heat waves, up to five days in advance using minimal information about current weather conditions. Ironically, the self-learning 'capsule neural network' uses a method reminiscent of 'analog' weather forecasting, which was made obsolete

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsChitosan-graft-Polyacrylamide tested as inhibitor of hydrate formationCurrently, 90% of the hydrocarbon resources of the entire continental shelf of Russia are concentrated in the Arctic, including 70% on the shelf of the Barents and Kara Seas. Scientists understand that the shelf is a promising future, and the necessary technological basis for its future development should already be created.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsWater, water everywhere — and it's weirder than you thinkResearchers at The University of Tokyo show that liquid water has 2 distinct molecular arrangements: tetrahedral and non-tetrahedral. By computer simulations and analysis of X-ray scattering data, the researchers were able to settle a very old controversy in science.

2hThe Scientist RSS97Another HIV Vaccine Clinical Trial FailsThe study showed that a vaccine combining a variety of immune-stimulating components was no more effective than a placebo.

2hSciencemagArguing on AI Drug DiscoveryHere's a letter from Pat Walters and Mark Murcko of Relay Therapeutics on the September report from Insilico Medicine ( blogged here ) of a drug discovered by AI, specifically generative methods. Here's their working definition of what that means, which I think most folks in the field can agree with: . . .In this technique, a deep learning model is trained based on a corpus of existing molecules.

2hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, BiotechnologyCross-country dingoes have differently shaped headsA new University of Sydney study has revealed differences in skull shapes among dingoes from different Australian regions, lending support for the idea of two dingo subgroups, rather than three.

2hPhys.orgCross-country dingoes have differently shaped headsA new University of Sydney study has revealed differences in skull shapes among dingoes from different Australian regions, lending support for the idea of two dingo subgroups, rather than three.

2hPhys.orgSeize the moment: People want to help nature after the bushfiresAs the devastation of this season of bushfires unfolds, many people have asked themselves: what can I do to help? Perhaps they donated money, left food out for wildlife or thought about joining a bush regeneration group.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsHow cells respond appropriately in harsh environments arising from global warmingUnder severe environmental stresses such as high temperature, dryness and high salination, cells survive by responding appropriately through elaborate mechanisms, according to new cell biology research from the Laboratory of Molecular Genetics at The Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsChildren's mental health is effected by sleep durationDepression, anxiety, impulsive behaviour and poor cognitive performance in children is effected by the amount of sleep they have researchers from the University of Warwick have found.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsHow many rare diseases are there?Dr. Tudor Oprea says a better method for classifying rare diseases will lead to improved patient care.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsMore than half of dental prescriptions for opioids exceed pain-management guidelinesA new study suggests that roughly half of the opioid prescriptions written by dentists in the United States exceed the 3-day supply recommended by federal dental pain-management guidelines.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking News<>cannabisStudy paints picture of marijuana use in pregnant womenAs marijuana is increasingly being legalized in US states, daily marijuana use among pregnant women is rising, despite evidence that this could harm their babies. Researchers at Washington State University Health Sciences Spokane have published findings from a study that delves deeper into pregnant women's use of marijuana, providing key insights that will help inform patient education efforts. Th

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsNew thalattosaur species discovered in Southeast AlaskaScientists at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have identified a new species of thalattosaur, a marine reptile that lived more than 200 million years ago. The new species, Gunakadeit joseeae, is the most complete thalattosaur ever found in North America and has given paleontologists new insights about the thalattosaurs' family tree.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsFirst childhood flu helps explain why virus hits some people harder than othersWhy are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.

2hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsFragile: Handle with careAbout 1.6 million patients are transferred between hospitals each year, but the risk of death remains higher for transfer patients than for patients admitted locally via the emergency department. A new study shows that patient-level characteristics do have an impact on the relationship between interhospital transfer and higher mortality but confirms that the higher death risk is present even when

2hScienceDaily24<>astronomiClues to how hazardous space radiation beginsScientists have unlocked one of the mysteries of how particles from flares on the sun accumulate at early stages in the energization of hazardous radiation that is harmful to astronauts, satellites and electronic equipment. Using data from NASA's Parker Solar Probe, they observed one of the largest events that shows how plasma is released after a solar flare can accelerate and pile up energetic pa

2hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology<>insektTrees in South Africa are under attack—and it's proving hard to manageMore than two years have passed since the detection of what is arguably the most damaging tree pest ever to arrive in South Africa: the polyphagous shot hole borer (Euwallacea fornicatus). The beetle kills trees and there are no proven remedies.

2hPhys.orgAvoiding bubble troubles: Investigating the relationship between bubbles and electrochemistryBubbles are known to influence energy and mass transfer in gas-evolving electrodes. Many electrochemical reactions produce gas that can lead to bubbles forming at the reaction site. Those bubbles can reduce the efficiency of reaction which leads to energy losses. David Fernandez Rivas, and his collaborators of the University of Twente and New York University, published different strategies to miti

3hPhys.orgTrees in South Africa are under attack—and it's proving hard to manageMore than two years have passed since the detection of what is arguably the most damaging tree pest ever to arrive in South Africa: the polyphagous shot hole borer (Euwallacea fornicatus). The beetle kills trees and there are no proven remedies.

3hFuturity.org<>sleepHow much sleep kids get affects their mental healthThere's a link between children's sleep duration and depression, anxiety, impulsive behavior, and poor cognitive performance, researchers report. In a new paper in Molecular Psychiatry , researchers examine the relationship between sleep duration and brain structure in 11,000 children ages 9-11 from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development dataset. The researchers found that measures of depress

3hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, BiotechnologyLocust invasion threatens wildlife and livelihoods in KenyaKenya is bracing itself for a humanitarian and conservation catastrophe in the wake of a desert locust invasion on an unprecedented scale. The infestation is already affecting more than a quarter of the entire country and in danger of wreaking havoc nationwide.

3hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, BiotechnologyUnlocking the secret of cell regulation: New method offers a closer look at noncoding RNARibonucleic acids (RNA) ensure that the blueprint in the cell nucleus is translated into vital proteins and that cell functions are regulated. However, little is known about the structure and function of particularly long RNAs, which consist of hundreds or thousands of building blocks. Chemists at the University of Bonn have now developed a new method for this purpose: They mark the complex molecu

3hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, BiotechnologyVeterinary medicine researchers develop new method to improve food safetyFaculty members from the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine have developed a faster, more efficient method of detecting "Shiga toxin-producing E. coli," or STEC, in ground beef, which often causes recalls of ground beef and vegetables.

3hPhys.orgWhy some green policies can actually slow progress on climate changeYou'd be forgiven for thinking that businesses are racing ahead in the green transition. After all, big corporations like Sainsbury's and Microsoft have made public announcements about going carbon neutral, or even carbon negative in the near future.

3hPhys.org<>fungiHow fungi can help create a green construction industryThe world of fungi has attracted a lot of interest and seems to be becoming very fashionable of late. A new exhibition at Somerset House in London, for example, is dedicated to "the remarkable mushroom." No surprise: we're being promised that mushrooms may be the key to a sustainable future in fields as diverse as fashion, toxic spill clean ups, mental health and construction. It's in this last fi

3hPhys.org100+Applying advantage distillation to device-independent quantum key distribution (DIQKD)Researchers at ETH Zürich and National University of Singapore have carried out a study investigating whether advantage distillation, a classical cryptography technique that has so far never been successfully implemented, can be applied to device-independent quantum key distribution (DIQKD) systems with the aim of creating a secret key for communication between different parties. The term DIQKD de

3hPhys.orgNickel catalyst facilitates creation of single stereoisomer with two chiral centersA team of researchers at California Institute of Technology has found a nickel catalyst that bonds alkyl nucleophile and alkyl electrophiles to make a single stereoisomer with two chiral centers. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their process. Jianyu Xu and Mary Watson with the University of Delaware have published a Perspective piece on the work done by the tea

3hPhys.org<>climateUK boosts climate effort by banning new gas vehicles by 2035Britain announced Tuesday that it plans to ban the sale of new gas and diesel cars by 2035—five years earlier than its previous target—in a bid to speed up efforts to tackle climate change.

3hPhys.org500+New thalattosaur species discovered in Southeast AlaskaScientists at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have identified a new species of thalattosaur, a marine reptile that lived more than 200 million years ago.

3hPhys.orgLocust invasion threatens wildlife and livelihoods in KenyaKenya is bracing itself for a humanitarian and conservation catastrophe in the wake of a desert locust invasion on an unprecedented scale. The infestation is already affecting more than a quarter of the entire country and in danger of wreaking havoc nationwide.

3hPhys.orgUnlocking the secret of cell regulation: New method offers a closer look at noncoding RNARibonucleic acids (RNA) ensure that the blueprint in the cell nucleus is translated into vital proteins and that cell functions are regulated. However, little is known about the structure and function of particularly long RNAs, which consist of hundreds or thousands of building blocks. Chemists at the University of Bonn have now developed a new method for this purpose: They mark the complex molecu

3hPhys.orgVeterinary medicine researchers develop new method to improve food safetyFaculty members from the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine have developed a faster, more efficient method of detecting "Shiga toxin-producing E. coli," or STEC, in ground beef, which often causes recalls of ground beef and vegetables.

3hPhys.orgMAVEN explores Mars to understand radio interference on EarthNASA's MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN) spacecraft has discovered "layers" and "rifts" in the electrically charged part of the upper atmosphere (the ionosphere) of Mars. The phenomenon is very common at Earth and causes unpredictable disruptions to radio communications. However, we do not fully understand them because they form at altitudes that are very difficult to explore at Earth

3hPhys.orgNew synthetic route for amanitin, a therapeutically interesting mushroom toxinThe death cap mushroom is highly toxic. However, some of its toxins can also be healing: amanitins are potential components for antibody-based cancer treatments. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German scientists have now introduced a new synthetic route for α-amanitin. Their method seems suitable for production on a larger scale, finally making enough of the toxin available for further research.

3hPhys.org100+Study investigates over 70 variable stars in the Sh 2-170 star-forming regionUsing three ground-based telescopes, astronomers have conducted a long-term photometric monitoring of the Sh 2-170 star-forming region. The new observations have identified 71 variable stars in this region and provided essential information about their properties. Results of the study were presented in a paper published January 24 on arXiv.org.

3hPhys.orgVernalization study defines additional phase in universal epigenetic mechanismIn many plants the timing of flowering is controlled by a range of environmental and molecular signals.

3hPhys.orgUsing bone's natural electricity to promote regenerationSome materials show promise promoting bone regeneration by enhancing its natural electrical properties, according to a review in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.

3hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsScientists find RNA affecting skin cancer progressionResearchers at the University of Turku, Turku University Central Hospital, and Western Cancer Center (FICAN West) have discovered a new RNA molecule, PRECSIT, which regulates the growth and invasion of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. In the future, PRECSIT could potentially serve as a new marker for the detection of rapidly advancing or spreading squamous cell carcinoma and as a target for ne

3hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsMore grocery stores means less food waste — and a big carbon cutOne strategy for reducing food waste's environmental impact is as counterintuitive as it is straightforward: Open more grocery stores.

3hBiochemistry News – Chemistry NewsNew synthetic route for amanitin, a therapeutically interesting mushroom toxinThe death cap mushroom is highly toxic. However, some of its toxins can also be healing: amanitins are potential components for antibody-based cancer treatments. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German scientists have now introduced a new synthetic route for α-amanitin. Their method seems suitable for production on a larger scale, finally making enough of the toxin available for further research.

3hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology<>blomstringVernalization study defines additional phase in universal epigenetic mechanismIn many plants the timing of flowering is controlled by a range of environmental and molecular signalst.

3hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, BiotechnologyResearchers obtain the most complete genetic map of peppersThe most complete genetic map of peppers cultivated in Spain has been created by Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV). The results make it possible to learn the smallest detail of this crop, of which Spain is one of the main worldwide producers. And more importantly, they establish the bases for obtaining new landraces with better organoleptic properties, and which may even be more resistant to

3hPhys.orgCollaboration leads to increased trust in agricultural nature managementCollectively organizing agricultural nature management leads to increased levels of trust between those involved, as well as to a more confidence in the policy. This conclusion was formulated by researchers from Wageningen University & Research following a two-year study of one of these collectives, Agricultural Nature Drenthe (known by its Dutch acronym AND). Their conclusion reflects findings ga

3hPhys.org<>climate<>oceanDeep ocean oxygen levels may be more susceptible to climate change than expectedMuch more oxygen than previously thought is transported deep into the ocean interior through a 'trap door" in the Labrador Sea that some researchers say could be closing as a result of climate change.

3hPhys.orgResearchers obtain the most complete genetic map of peppersThe most complete genetic map of peppers cultivated in Spain has been created by Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV). The results make it possible to learn the smallest detail of this crop, of which Spain is one of the main worldwide producers. And more importantly, they establish the bases for obtaining new landraces with better organoleptic properties, and which may even be more resistant to

3hPhys.orgWhen it comes to your mutual funds, managers' political beliefs matterWe know extreme political polarization isn't great for the democratic process, but one University of Virginia professor wanted to know what it does to our investments.

3hPopular Science | RSS81Google's wants AI to choose your best photos and mail you prints every monthHow are you going to leave an old shoebox full of prints if you never actually order any? (Pixabay/) Back in the days of 1-hour photo labs, you didn't have to pick which photos you wanted printed. Film processing typically included a 4×6-inch print of each image from your roll as well as the negatives in sleeves in case you wanted to print them again later. Now, if you print photos at all, you ha

3hPhys.org<>matematikCreativity important to lift math educationInnovative research at Flinders University supports the importance of creativity in problem-solving to invigorate interest in mathematics.

3hWired94<><>fakenewsAmerica Needs a Ministry of (Actual) TruthToday's deepfakes are more sophisticated than any state fakery in 1984. But an Orwell-inspired agency can help us snuff out a AI-generated dystopia.

3hNature34<>RNA Step aside CRISPR, RNA editing is taking offNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00272-5 Making changes to the molecular messengers that create proteins might offer flexible therapies for cancer, pain or high cholesterol, in addition to genetic disorders.

3hNatureOut of office replies and what they can say about youNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00275-2 An automated e-mail response posted on Twitter unleashed a social-media debate about the importance of work–life balance.

3hNatureFrom the archiveNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00214-1 How Nature reported the first attempt to fly across the whole of Africa in 1920, and the heat and perspiration produced by cows, in 1970.

3hPhys.org<>coronaCoronavirus could hobble Chinese economy at a precarious momentThis week, as the danger of the coronavirus outbreak in China became apparent, airlines suspended flights to the Chinese mainland and multinational companies shut down their activities there. We asked Stephen Roach, a senior fellow at the Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs and the former chairman of Morgan Stanley Asia, what the epidemic could mean for the economy in China and the rest of t

3hPhys.orgAll things considered, wooden pallets are more ecofriendly than plastic palletsWeighing in on a debate that has raged for decades, Penn State researchers, after conducting a series of ultra-detailed comparisons, have declared that shipping pallets made of wood are slightly more environmentally friendly and sustainable than those made of plastic.

3hPhys.orgModify hurricane relief strategies, National Academies of Science report recommendsAlleviating suffering more effectively in the wake of hurricanes may require a shift in relief strategies, says a new committee report by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.

3hPhys.orgResearchers develop framework for climate change mitigation in miningUniversity of Queensland researchers have developed a framework that aims to reduce the mining industry's impact on climate change by accounting for sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

3hPhys.orgSome immigrants perceive legal status as a pathway to deportationFor some Latin American immigrants living in Dallas, Texas, holding a legal status—like a green card—does not stop them from fearing deportation. If anything, it can make some more fearful of deportation because they are now known to immigration authorities who could easily deport them, Stanford sociologist Asad L. Asad has found.

3hPhys.org58Breakthrough creates tough material able to stretch, heal and defend itselfWhile eating takeout one day, University of Chicago scientists Bozhi Tian and Yin Fang started thinking about the noodles—specifically, their elasticity. A specialty of Xi'an, Tian's hometown in China, is wheat noodles stretched by hand until they become chewy—strong and elastic. Why, the two materials scientists wondered, didn't they get thin and weak instead?

3hFuturity.org29<><>religionSeeing God as a white man shapes views of leadershipThe characteristics that US Christians assign to God—e.g., male, female, black, white, old, young—are the same identities they attribute to a boss, research finds. The researchers, led by Stanford psychologist Steven O. Roberts, conducted a series of studies with US Christians and found that when people conceptualize God as a white man, they are more likely to perceive white male job candidates a

3hScience | The Guardian100+<>coronaCoronavirus crisis: Raab urges Britons to leave ChinaUK citizens should leave 'if they can' to reduce risk of exposure to virus, says foreign secretary Coronavirus crisis – live updates Dominic Raab has urged all British nationals in China to leave the country if they can following the outbreak of the coronavirus, which has spread to two dozen countries. The foreign secretary said in statement: "The safety and security of British people will always

3hScientific American Content2KNo One Can Explain Why Planes Stay in the AirDo recent explanations solve the mysteries of aerodynamic lift? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3hDagens MedicinLægestafetten: Den omvendte børnelægeBarbara Rubek Nielsen kalder sig det modsatte af en børnelæge. Som geriater er hun den ældre patients advokat. Og så arrangerer hun både løbetræning i mosen for lokale kvinder og cykler på arbejde på svigerfars racercykel. Men hun elsker også at passe familiens oldeforældre.

3hNature<><>People will not trust unkind scienceNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00269-0 A mean and aggressive research working culture threatens the public's respect for scientists and their expertise, says Gail Cardew.

3hFuturity.orgAnts have to 'unlock' anger toward intrudersAnts have a specific mechanism that's responsible for unlocking aggressive behaviors toward other ants, researchers report. For most social animals, even humans, the ability to distinguish friend versus foe can be a challenge that often can lead to knee-jerk aggression. When it comes to ants getting aggressive, there's a more sophisticated method to their madness. The research—the first to pinpoi

3hScience | The Guardian100Coronavirus quarantine precautions around the worldPlanes have been chartered and quarantines set up – but some countries have been slow to react Coronavirus – latest updates How to protect yourself On Tuesday night, at least 144 people who have been trapped in Wuhan, the centre of the outbreak, are expected to arrive in Thailand on an evacuation flight. They will remain in isolation for 14 days, reportedly at a navy base in Chonburi province. Th

3hPopular Science | RSS57Did a high sex drive really save the giant tortoise from extinction?Diego, the giant tortoise, photographed at the Darwin Research Center in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador, in 2017. (RPBDeposit Photos/) Diego has put in a lot of hard work these past few years. The centenarian made headlines in January after his "raging sex drive" aided the survival of his species: He's fathered close to 40 percent of the giant tortoises bred at a research station in the Galápagos

3hScienceCoronavirus/casinos: busted flushIf the outbreak lasts anywhere as long as Sars, the industry's business model could come undone

3hDagens MedicinLad os lære af reumatologienTidlig og aggressiv behandling og en systematisk kvalitetsdatabase kan også hjælpe danskere med kroniske hudsygdomme, skriver tre patientforeninger.

4hNatureThe long road to fairer algorithmsNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00274-3 Build models that identify and mitigate the causes of discrimination.

4hExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTechResearchers Say 'Anti-Solar Panels' Could Generate Power at NightCredit: Getty Images There is free energy raining down on Earth in the form of sunlight, but harnessing all of that energy has proven difficult. The sun only shines during the day, and those solar panels are useless at night, or at least they are right now. Researchers from the University of California Davis suggest you could generate power at night using " anti-solar panels ." Of course, it's al

4hFor Better Science100+Predatory authors, by Wolfgang Dreybrodt"Publishing in natural sciences proceeds under structures similar to the mafia. Professors exploit the creativity of their subordinates. Predatory authorship increases the number of authors. This leads to a loss of scientific quality and destroys trust in science."

4hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology27International team identifies areas of top priority for deep-sea monitoring and conservationTo classify the most important ecological and biological components of the deep sea, an international team including Professor Roberto Danovaro from Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn Napoli, Italy and Dr. Moriaki Yasuhara from The Swire Institute of Marine Science (SWIMS) and School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong (HKU) sent a questionnaire-based survey to the world's leading deep

4hNeuroLogica Blog1KNew York Times Goop FailThis has to be the worst opinion piece I have read in a major news outlet in a long time. The authors, Elisa Albert and Jennifer Block, leave behind them a killing field of straw men and empty containers of metaphorical "Kool Aid." Here is the short version – they are defending Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop and the recent Netflix series Goop Lab with all the tropes of pseudoscience they can muster. They

4hPhys.org23International team identifies areas of top priority for deep-sea monitoring and conservationTo classify the most important ecological and biological components of the deep sea, an international team including Professor Roberto Danovaro from Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn Napoli, Italy and Dr. Moriaki Yasuhara from The Swire Institute of Marine Science (SWIMS) and School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong (HKU) sent a questionnaire-based survey to the world's leading deep

4hPhys.orgThinning down Weyl semimetals provides a new twist to spintronicsSpin is a fundamental quantum property that influences a range of physical and chemical phenomena associated with it. Using a material's spin property to carry current has applications in transferring data at much higher speed, for example, and achieves better energy efficiency than traditional devices that rely on electrical charges. However, this requires a material that can generate long-lived

4hPhys.org100+Study details how auto emissions pose human health problems worldwideUltrafine particles in the atmosphere are unregulated, according to the World Health Organization, but a team of international researchers that includes a Texas A&M University professor and two graduate students has found that auto emissions are a key factor in the creation of the particles, and pose a significant health problem in many urban areas.

4hPhys.org300+Quantum computers flip the script on spin chemistryTo build cheaper and more efficient sustainable energy options, we need to know a lot more than we currently do about the chemical reactions that convert solar energy into electricity. One of the best ways to do that is through computer models that simulate complex molecular interactions. Although classical computers have served this purpose well over the past few decades, we explain in a new rese

4hWired100+This Cloth Destroys Deadly Nerve Agents in MinutesChemists are collaborating with the US Army to build uniforms that can quickly break down toxic substances, protecting soldiers from chemical weapons.

4hScience100+Coronavirus forces Hyundai to close South Korea plantsCarmaker runs out of components from China as outbreak ripples through supply chains

4hCosmos MagazineSand dunes play a team gameThat's why they don't collide.

4hCosmos MagazineBiodiversity hotspots most at risk from accelerated climate changeRefuges enabled organisms to survive past climatic cataclysms.

4hCosmos MagazineHow does the Wuhan coronavirus cause severe illness?There are four known ways, and some can occur at the same time.

4hCosmos MagazineAn intelligent interaction between light and materialResearchers hope it's a new platform for computing.

4hCosmos MagazineThe oldest bamboo fossil isn'tIt's old, and it's a fossil, but it was a conifer.

4hCosmos MagazineWhen colloidal particles attractScientists develop a gel that's not sticky.

4hThe Scientist RSSImage of the Day: Dinosaur TracksFootprints in southern Africa's Karoo Basin show mammals and dinosaurs navigating a "land of fire," as researchers describe the volcanic landscape.

4hforskning.se65Ullen blev viktigare än bronsetSjälvhushåll på ull, garn och tyg var ingen självklarhet på bronsåldersgårdarna. Fynd från gravar visar att ullen kom långväga i från. Forskning visar att textilproduktion var en viktig del av ekonomin och handelsnätverken under bronsåldern, och stora mängder importerades till Norden. − Produktionen av textilier har länge varit ett förbisett ämne inom många historiska perioder, eftersom den har a

4hFuture(s) StudiesIn this new Dutch neighborhood, there will be 1 shared car for every 3 households. Merwede, a new proposed neighborhood in Utrecht is being designed specifically to enhance Dutch biking culture.submitted by /u/ngt_ [link] [comments]

4hFuture(s) StudiesHow to turn garbage into graphenesubmitted by /u/strangeattractors [link] [comments]

4hFuture(s) Studies25Experimental handheld bioprinter treats severe burns by 'printing' new skins cells directly onto wound. It uses a bioink based on fibrin — involved in the clotting of blood — infused with mesenchymal stromal cells, which support the growth of local cells and assist in the body's immune response.submitted by /u/ngt_ [link] [comments]

4hFuture(s) StudiesRoom temperature superconductor breakthrough: "For decades, the 'holy grail' was to find a material that superconducts at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. We're hopeful that an inexpensive, stable metal like zirconium vanadium hydride can be tailored to provide just such a superconductor."submitted by /u/ngt_ [link] [comments]

4hFuture(s) StudiesPermafrost is thawing so fast, it's gouging holes in the Arctic. Normally, these terrains of frozen soil thaw gradually. But in some places, it's thawing so abruptly that landscapes are collapsing in on themselves.submitted by /u/ngt_ [link] [comments]

4hFuture(s) StudiesEarth in 100-200 years from now, possibly more?Here's how I view it (Note that I'm 17, so I'm probably uneducated about a lot of things, if I sound ignorant, please feel free to correct me) Global Warming and Climate Change will take a toll. From what I've learned a lot of it has to do with heating up the planet more, as the global temperature will be higher by then compared to now, from what I've learned this causes a lot of issues for some

4hFuture(s) StudiesNew ransomware doesn't just encrypt data. It also meddles with critical infrastructure. A ransomware strain discovered last month and dubbed 'Ekans' contains code that actively seeks out and forcibly stops applications used in industrial control systems.submitted by /u/ngt_ [link] [comments]

4hFuture(s) StudiesWearable sweat sensor promises complete real-time picture of well-being. The (still experimental) device features a replaceable strip on the underside that rests against the person's skin, where embedded chemical sensors gather sweat data and feed it to hardware inside the device.submitted by /u/ngt_ [link] [comments]

4hFuture(s) StudiesNew Zealand Government Supports Self Flying Taxi Trials in Christchurchsubmitted by /u/ChasingAverage [link] [comments]

4hFuture(s) StudiesCould this be a working time machine?submitted by /u/jicbeatz [link] [comments]

4hDagens MedicinNy professor i ulykkesforskning og forebyggelse på OUH og SDUOverlæge Jens Lauritsen er netop blevet udnævnt til professor med fokus på ulykkesforskning og ulykkesforebyggelse.

4hIngeniøren21Boeing 767 måtte nødlande i MadridAir Canada fik assistance fra et jagerfly over Barajas Airport i Madrid.

4hIngeniørenVenstre siger ja til ansigtsgenkendelseNy udmelding kommer samtidig med nye forhandlinger om forlig på politi-området.

5hIngeniøren35Fejl på nye vandrør forsinker RigshospitaletRigshospitalet vurderer, at metalspåner eller for højt klorindhold i vandet er årsag til skader på varmtvandsrør

5hScientific American: Mind & Brain21Living with No Sense of DirectionFor those with developmental topographical disorientation, ordinary travel is extraordinarily difficult — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5hScientific American Blog Posts21Living with No Sense of DirectionFor those with developmental topographical disorientation, ordinary travel is extraordinarily difficult — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5hWired500+Amid Coronavirus Fears, a Mask Shortage Could Spread GloballyMost of the world's supply of masks and respirators comes from China, and a supply chain gap poses a risk to everyday health care beyond the viral epidemic.

5hWired100+Who Should Control the Internet's .Org Addresses?The group that administers .org domains may be sold to a for-profit company. Critics worry that nonprofits and activists could suffer.

5hThe Atlantic500+Do People Crave Foods Their Moms Ate During Pregnancy?Every couple of months, a 21-year-old Chicagoan named Erynn Nicholson will scoop some vanilla ice cream into a bowl, crumble a fistful of Ruffles potato chips on top, and then mix it all together. Then she'll call or text her mom. "I always let her know I'm eating our snack," she told me. Ice cream with potato chips has been their snack since before Nicholson was born—when she was still in the wo

5hScientific American Content41Living with No Sense of DirectionFor those with developmental topographical disorientation, ordinary travel is extraordinarily difficult — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5hPhys.org100+Researchers find microscopic airlock mechanism in cellular transport systemBulky globular proteins require specialized transport systems for insertion into membranes. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have determined the structure of such a system for the first time, and propose that it exploits the principle of the airlock.

5hForskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvarFör lite problemlösning i läroböcker i matematikJonas Jäder har studerat läroböcker i matematik på gymnasienivå och konstaterar i sin avhandling från Umeå universitet att uppgifterna som kräver problemlösning är få. – De kommer dessutom ofta i slutet av olika kapitel. Och det är inte säkert att alla elever kommer så långt i boken.

5hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology100+Researchers find microscopic airlock mechanism in cellular transport systemBulky globular proteins require specialized transport systems for insertion into membranes. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have determined the structure of such a system for the first time, and propose that it exploits the principle of the airlock.

5hScientific American Content41Penicillium Fungus Hosts Surprising Opioid CompoundsNext-generation opioids may spring from a tiny fungus protein — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5hBBC News – Science & Environment70Sir David Attenborough: 'Now is the moment'The broadcaster and naturalist says the Glasgow climate summit later this year is "extremely important".

6hScience | The Guardian100+African countries rush to reinforce 'fragile' defences against coronavirusHealth officials raise concerns that many African countries are ill-equipped to combat the virus Coronavirus – latest updates African countries are rushing to reinforce their defences against the rapidly spreading coronavirus, as health officials say many countries on the continent are ill-equipped to combat the potentially lethal disease. There have been no verified infections in Africa to date,

6hRetraction Watch100+Former grad student forges his supervisor's authorship — and gets smacked downOn December 29, Jan Behrends, of the Institute of Physiology at the University of Freiburg, in Germany, was checking his Google Scholar profile when he saw his name on a paper — one he'd played no part in writing. The article, "Microelectrochemical cell arrays for whole-cell currents recording through ion channel proteins based on trans-electroporation … Continue reading

6hThe Atlantic3KA Republic, If We Can Keep ItIn the days leading up to the Senate's impeachment trial, some people hoped that Chief Justice John Roberts, presiding over the trial, would use his position to send a strong message to the senators on what the Constitution requires of them. He had, in fact, already sent such a message, just weeks earlier, on what the Constitution requires of all Americans. On December 31, in a letter accompanyin

6hNyheder – Forskning – VidenskabLivet i populært rejseparadis: Fattige familier undertrykkes af magtfuld naturparkSystematisk undertrykkelse gennem chikane, vold og bureaukrati. Sådan oplever familier hverdagen…

6hNyheder – Forskning – Videnskab29-årig dansk fysiker hjælper verdensførende Harvard-forskere med at forstå kræftFysiker Mathias Heltberg fra Københavns Universitet har sammen med verdensførende forskere…

6hBig ThinkSports and politics: How strong is group identity?It is often suggested that identity politics is something that marginalized groups do. American journalist and Vox co-founder Ezra Klein argues that it's something we all do. "All politics all the time is influenced by identity." In social psychology, experiments in the minimum viable group paradigm methodology have shown that no matter how arbitrary the distinction, those who belong to one group

6hScience | The Guardian100+What is coronavirus and how worried should we be?What are the symptoms of the virus from Wuhan in China, how does it spread, and when should you see a doctor? Coronavirus: how to protect yourself from infection Coronavirus – latest updates It is a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of those initially infected either worked or frequently shopped in the

6hNew Scientist36Legal action could be used to stop Starlink affecting telescope imagesA group of astronomers has called for legal action to stop the launch of thousands of satellites designed by companies like SpaceX and OneWeb to beam high-speed internet around the world

6hNature Communications – current – nature.com science feedsThe megabiota are disproportionately important for biosphere functioningNature Communications, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14369-y Human-driven losses of megafauna and megaflora may have disproportionate ecological consequences. Here, the authors combine metabolic scaling theory and global simulation models to show that past and continued reduction of megabiota have and will continue to decrease ecosystem and biosphere functioning.

7hNature Communications – current – nature.com science feedsCompartmentalized microbes and co-cultures in hydrogels for on-demand bioproduction and preservationNature Communications, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14371-4 Large scale suspension fermentation technology is not easily portable or reusable. Here the authors describe a hydrogel system suitable for long-term and reusable production with both single and multi-organism consortia.

7hNature Communications – current – nature.com science feedsTbD1 deletion as a driver of the evolutionary success of modern epidemic Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineagesNature Communications, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14508-5 Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) modern strains emerged from a common progenitor after the loss of Mtb-specific deletion 1 region (TbD1). Here, the authors show that deletion of TbD1 correlates with enhanced Mtb virulence in animal models, mirroring the development of hypoxic granulomas in human disease prog

7hNature Communications – current – nature.com science feedsHuman large-scale cooperation as a product of competition between cultural groupsNature Communications, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14416-8 The authors here show that readiness to cooperate between individuals from different groups corresponds to the degree of cultural similarity between those groups. This is consistent with the theory of Cultural Group Selection as an explanation for the rise of human large-scale cooperation.

7hNature Communications – current – nature.com science feedsAuthor Correction: Prefrontal cortical ChAT-VIP interneurons provide local excitation by cholinergic synaptic transmission and control attentionNature Communications, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14315-y

7hNature Communications – current – nature.com science feedsDNA repair by Rad52 liquid dropletsNature Communications, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14546-z Genome dynamics allow cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are highly toxic DNA lesions. Here the authors reveal that in S. cerevisiae, Rad52 DNA repair proteins assemble in liquid droplets that work with dynamic nuclear microtubules to relocalize lesions to the nuclear periphery for repair

7hNature Communications – current – nature.com science feedsSpatiotemporal functional organization of excitatory synaptic inputs onto macaque V1 neuronsNature Communications, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14501-y The integration of synaptic inputs onto dendrites provides the basis for neuronal computation. Here the authors perform two-photon dendritic imaging with a genetically-encoded glutamate sensor in awake monkeys, and map the excitatory synaptic inputs on dendrites of individual V1 superficial layer neurons wit

7hNature Communications – current – nature.com science feedsDNA unwinding mechanism of a eukaryotic replicative CMG helicaseNature Communications, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14577-6 The DNA duplex is known to be split apart in a steric exclusion manner during replication, but the specific mechanism has remained unclear. Here the authors present a cryo-EM structure of a eukaryotic replicative CMG helicase on forked DNA, revealing the mechanism of DNA unwinding.

7hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsAnalyzing the differences in antibiotic resistance between the gut and mouth microbiomeThe threat of antimicrobial resistance to medication is a global health issue. Recent years have seen a surge in our awareness of resistance genes; and as a result of the prevalence of these genes, antibiotics are becoming less effective at treating microbial infections, such as TB and gonorrhea.

7hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsIs human cooperativity an outcome of competition between cultural groups?A study by ASU researchers looks at how culture may have fueled our capacity to cooperate with strangers. The idea is that culturally different groups compete, causing the spread of traits that give groups a competitive edge.

7hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsBrain links to embryonic immunity, guiding response of the 'troops' that battle infectionResearchers have discovered that the brains of developing embryos provide signals to a nascent immune system that help it ward off infections and significantly improve the embryo's ability to survive a bacterial challenge. Frog embryos with brains removed can survive for some time, but exhibit chaotic and ineffective responses to infection. The presence of a brain enables a targeted and effective

7hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsAltruistic babies? Study shows infants are willing to give up food, help othersNew research by the University of Washington's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences finds that altruism may begin in infancy. In a study of nearly 100 19-month-olds, researchers found that children, even when hungry, gave a tasty snack to a stranger in need.

7hScienceHow the state's invisible hand works in China stocks'National team' of government-backed entities is ready to support asset prices as coronavirus spreads

7hScientific Reports – nature.com science feeds$${\mathscr{PT}}$$PT -symmetry from Lindblad dynamics in a linearized optomechanical systemScientific Reports, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58582-7 -symmetry from Lindblad dynamics in a linearized optomechanical system

7hScientific Reports – nature.com science feedsChanges in microbiome and metabolomic profiles of fecal samples stored with stabilizing solution at room temperature: a pilot studyScientific Reports, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58719-8

7hScientific Reports – nature.com science feedsInferring quantity and qualities of superimposed reaction rates from single molecule survival time distributionsScientific Reports, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58634-y

7hScientific Reports – nature.com science feedsProtein stability governed by its structural plasticity is inferred by physicochemical factors and salt bridgesScientific Reports, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58825-7

7hScientific Reports – nature.com science feedsA CRISPR/Cas13-based approach demonstrates biological relevance of vlinc class of long non-coding RNAs in anticancer drug responseScientific Reports, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58104-5

7hScientific Reports – nature.com science feedsProjecting an ultra-strongly-coupled system in a non-energy-eigenbasis with a driven nonlinear resonatorScientific Reports, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56866-1

7hScientific Reports – nature.com science feeds200+An articulated Late Triassic (Norian) thalattosauroid from Alaska and ecomorphology and extinction of ThalattosauriaScientific Reports, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57939-2

7hIngeniørenComputere og robotter kan snuppe hvert tredje jobPLUS. Danmark er det land i Norden, hvor den største andel af stillinger står til at blive automatiseret

7hNatureDon't recruit graduates on flawed criteriaNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00303-1

7hNatureBrazil's mystery oil spill: an ongoing social disasterNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00242-x

7hNatureAnti-nuclear bias has no place in NatureNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00304-0

7hNatureDon't cheat Chinese environment laws with quick fixesNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00302-2

7hNYT > Science10KCan the World's Strangest Mammal Survive?Habitat loss, predation by feral cats, and now wildfires wrought by climate change — how long can the world's strangest mammal survive?

7hThe Atlantic1KThe Ominous Rise of Toddler MilkThe next move after a child is done with infant formula, according to nutrition experts, is to give them water or cow's milk. But according to formula manufacturers, it's to give them toddler milk. This is a powdered drink that is supposed to provide 1-to-3-year-olds with extra nutrients between the bites of broccoli they might be tentatively trying. And as infant-formula sales have slumped in re

7hUndark Magazine36The Value of One: What Can We Learn from Case Studies?Compared with large, randomized control trials, case studies can seem meager or anecdotal at first glance. But when done properly, a growing number of scientists say, one-person studies can have all of the statistical power and scientific rigor of studies involving hundreds or thousands of people.

7hBBC News – Science & Environment32O'Neill: PM 'doesn't really get' climate changeFormer minister Claire O'Neill has said the prime minister "doesn't really get" climate change.

7hPhys.org300+Is human cooperativity an outcome of competition between cultural groups?It may not always seem so, but scientists are convinced that humans are unusually cooperative. Unlike other animals, we cooperate not just with kith and kin, but also with genetically unrelated strangers. Consider how often we rely on the good behavior of acquaintances and strangers— from the life-saving services of firefighters and nurses, to mundane activities like our morning commute and queuei

7hIngeniøren73Tilskud giver rekord i privat urørt skovPenge fra Miljøstyrelsen til 14 skovejere har givet 285 hektar urørt skov. De døde træer bliver hjem for rødlistede arter.

7hForskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvarGråsälar klappar "händerna"Beteendet filmades under en dykexpedition vid Farne Island, som ligger utanför Englands nordöstra kust. Filmen visar en gråsälshanne som närmar sig ett antal honor och som klappar ihop sina fenor med stor kraft så att en ljudlig knall uppstår. Själva ljudet är känt sedan tidigare, det har förekommit på flera ljudupptagningar från gråsälars parningssäsonger. Men först nu har man lyckats visa hur de

7hFuture(s) StudiesWhat happened to Claytronics? Self-reconfigurable Modular Robots?There was some research about a technology called 'Claytronics' at CMU back in somewhere around 2007. Does anyone know what happened to it? They stopped updating any info on the CMU webpage a long time ago, and the Intel webpage for it is a dead link. It was no where near completion and it had such an ambitious future ahead. I'm very curious of what happened to it because I was a fond of the idea

7hFuture(s) StudiesDisrupting dairy with precision fermentation: 'By 2035, industrial cattle farming will be obsolete'submitted by /u/tweekieyoung [link] [comments]

7hFuture(s) StudiesTop Skills To Learn in The Tech Worldsubmitted by /u/techxiler [link] [comments]

7hFuture(s) StudiesWhat every mining CEO needs to know: The report warns of a backlash from investors and society if the mining industry does not take strong action to tackle global warming, including cutting emissionssubmitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

7hFuture(s) StudiesWhen do you think artificial organ farming begin ?And will e publicly acceptable. submitted by /u/user35user [link] [comments]

7hBBC News – Science & Environment62KThe Chinese doctor who tried to warn others about coronavirusWhen Li Wenliang warned about a Sars-like virus at his hospital in Wuhan, authorities tried to silence him.

7hVetenskap | SVT Nyheter99Falska nyheter sprids om coronaviruset: "Avancerade konspirationer och skämt"I nyhetsflödet sprids både konspirationsteorier och missuppfattningar om coronaviruset. En kinesisk influencer har till exempel hamnat i hetluften på grund av en flera år gammal video. – Just det här klippet har inget att göra med smittospridningen, säger Emma Frans, doktor i medicinsk epidemiologi, i SVT:s Morgonstudion.

8hNew on MIT Technology Review100+How Instagram is making jigsaw puzzles cool againInstagram, TikTok, and YouTube are suddenly full of people earnestly completing jigsaw puzzles. What's going on?

8hBBC News – Science & Environment6KCOP26: PM 'doesn't get' climate change, says sacked presidentBoris Johnson has failed to lead over the UK's hosting of a key climate summit, its former boss says.

8hViden1KForbyder flyrejser: Gymnasium vil vise vejen – og tager kun tog og bus på studietureEleverne på Det Frie Gymnasium i København nægter sig selv at flyve, selvom det oftest er billigst og hurtigst.

8hScientific Reports – nature.com science feedsPublisher Correction: The Interplay between Incipient Species and Social Polymorphism in the Desert Ant CataglyphisScientific Reports, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57950-7

8hBBC News – Science & Environment3KWho is Greta Thunberg, the teenage climate change activist?The Swedish teenager started a climate change protest that grew into a global movement of millions.

8hcognitive scienceHow can we learn about human depression by studying rodents?submitted by /u/scottsteinberg [link] [comments]

8hBBC News – Science & Environment4KClimate change: Australian TV audience boos sceptical senatorJim Molan was laughed at while on a live TV show, in an incident that has got Australia talking.

8hScience200+Coronavirus outbreak: UK urges all its citizens to leave China[no content]

9hPhys.org200+Shoes fit for the Gods go on display at Italy's Pitti PalaceAs sandal season fast approaches, a new exhibit on ancient footwear at a top Italian museum seeks to remind today's well-heeled that when it comes to fashion, do as the Romans did.

9hVetenskap och Hälsa87Vi uppmärksammar Världscancerdagen 2020Minst var tredje nu levande person i Sverige kommer att få ett cancerbesked, men många fler berörs. Antalet cancerfall beräknas att öka samtidigt som risken att dö i cancer minskar tack vare effektivare behandlingar och bättre diagnostiska metoder. Denna positiva utveckling hade inte varit möjligt utan forskning! Här kan du läsa mer om spännande cancerforskning som görs i Skåne.

9hScience | The Guardian500+Global heating a serious threat to the world's climate refuges, study findsBiodiversity hotspots with millions of years of climate stability could be among the world's hardest hit regions Biodiversity hotspots that have given species a safe haven from changing climates for millions of years will come under threat from human-driven global heating, a new study has found. Species that have evolved in tropical regions such Australia's wet tropics , the Guinean forests of We

9hScience-Based Medicine500+Alternative Medicine Exploits Coronavirus FearsAlternative medicine has been quick to capitalize on the public's fear of coronavirus. They offer an array of bogus treatments.

9hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, BiotechnologyStudy identifies interaction site for serotonin type 3A and RIC-3 chaperoneTo address the receptor dysfunction associated with several serious neurological diseases, Michaela Jansen, Pharm.D., Ph.D., from the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine recently completed a study that provides novel insights into a protein-protein interaction that may one day lead to more effective treatments for these disorders. The study, "Delineating the site of int

9hPhys.org33'Oldest bamboo' fossil from Eocene Patagonia turns out to be a coniferA fossilised leafy branch from the early Eocene in Patagonia described in 1941 is still often cited as the oldest bamboo fossil and the main fossil evidence for a Gondwanan origin of bamboos. However, a recent examination by Dr. Peter Wilf from Pennsylvania State University revealed the real nature of Chusquea oxyphylla. The recent findings, published in the paper in the open-access journal Phytok

9hPhys.orgPublicly sharing a goal could help you persist after hitting failurePublicly sharing a goal may help you persist after hitting a failure, but only if you care about what others think of you, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

9hPhys.orgStudy identifies interaction site for serotonin type 3A and RIC-3 chaperoneTo address the receptor dysfunction associated with several serious neurological diseases, Michaela Jansen, Pharm.D., Ph.D., from the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine recently completed a study that provides novel insights into a protein-protein interaction that may one day lead to more effective treatments for these disorders. The study, "Delineating the site of int

9hScience | The Guardian300+Elon Musk's SpaceX clears first hurdle to Australian broadband marketCommunications regulator allows Starlink satellites over Australian airspace, but Foxtel objects Elon Musk's SpaceX satellite broadband service has taken its first step into the Australian market. The communications regulator has added the company to a list of satellite operators allowed over Australian airspace. But Foxtel has raised concerns the service might conflict with its subscription TV s

9hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsNCRI data shows increase in cancer research funding following five years of growthAnalysis of the NCRI's 18 partner organizations shows that cancer research funders in the UK have increased their collective spend, for the first time spending over £700 million in the year 2018/19. This follows five years of spending increases and the highest level of funding since NCRI started collecting data in 2002.

10hScience | The Guardian200+New 1,000-bed Wuhan hospital takes its first coronavirus patientsFacility was built in less than two weeks in city at the centre of the viral outbreak The first coronavirus patients have arrived at a Chinese field hospital built from scratch in under two weeks at the frontline of the outbreak, state media said. The 1,000-bed facility was built to relieve hospitals swamped with patients in Wuhan, the city of 11 million people in Hubei province. The national hea

10hScienceAlert – Latest500+Scientists Grab First Glimpse Deep Underneath Antarctica's Unstable Thwaites GlacierWhat lies below.

10hThe Atlantic100+The Problem of Britain Taking Back ControlOccasionally, taking politicians at their word is more revealing than looking for the hidden meaning. When Donald Trump says he loves tariffs, maybe he does. When Emmanuel Macron says NATO is brain-dead and needs fundamental reform to survive, he might mean it. And when Boris Johnson says Brexit is about taking back control, perhaps he believes this too. That was certainly the message the prime m

11hScienceAlert – Latest1KCigarettes Produce Invisible Chemical Emissions Even After They've Been ExtinguishedWe had no idea this was happening.

11hScienceAlert – Latest5KThe Beautiful Glow of Fireflies Is Going Dark, And It's All Because of UsFlashing signals through the gloom.

11hThe Atlantic1KChaos at the CaucusUpdated on February 4 at 8:19 a.m. ET Could it have gone much worse? The much-anticipated start to the 2020 presidential-election season was plagued by delays, as the Iowa Democratic Party struggled to incorporate a new reporting system aimed at increasing transparency in the complicated first-in-the-nation voting tradition. More than 12 hours after the caucus began, the party had yet to release

11hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsGeneral anesthesia in cesarean deliveries increases odds of postpartum depression by 54 percentA new study shows that having general anesthesia in a cesarean delivery is linked with significantly increased odds of severe postpartum depression requiring hospitalization, thoughts of suicide or self-inflicted injury. The study is the first to examine the effect of the mode of anesthesia for cesarean delivery on the risk of postpartum depression and the possible protective effect of having regi

12hEurekAlert! – Breaking News'Oldest bamboo' fossil from Eocene Patagonia turns out to be a coniferA recent examination revealed that Chusquea oxyphylla, a fossilized leafy branch from the early Eocene in Patagonia, which has been widely cited as the oldest bamboo fossil and as evidence for a Gondwanan origin of bamboos is actually a conifer. The results of the finding are published in the open-access journal Phytokeys.

12hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsStudy identifies interaction site for serotonin type 3A and RIC-3 chaperoneSerotonin type 3A is a member of the protein superfamily known as pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. When these channels don't function properly, these proteins have been linked to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, schizophrenia, alcohol addiction and myasthenia gravis. Michaela Jansen, Pharm.D., Ph.D., from the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center recently completed a

12hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsPublicly sharing a goal could help you persist after hitting failurePublicly sharing a goal may help you persist after hitting a failure, but only if you care about what others think of you, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

12hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsSand dunes can 'communicate' with each otherEven though they are inanimate objects, sand dunes can 'communicate' with each other. A team from the University of Cambridge has found that as they move, sand dunes interact with and repel their downstream neighbors.

12hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsNew single-cell prenatal blood test can identify genetic abnormalitiesNon-invasive prenatal tests (NIPTs) are used for fetal genetic disease screening in pregnant women. In contrast, invasive tests like amniocentesis carry the risk of causing fetal harm. A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, describes the development of a single-cell DNA assessment method with high sensitivity and specificity. This noninvasive test enables direct e

12hEurekAlert! – Breaking News25Feeding bluebirds helps fend off parasitesIf you feed the birds in your backyard, you may be doing more than just making sure they have a source of food: you may be helping baby birds give parasites the boot.

12hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsAd spending on toddler milks increased four-fold from 2006 to 2015Formula companies quadrupled their advertising of toddler milk products over a ten- year period, contributing to a 2.6 times increase in the amount of toddler milk sold, according to a new paper published in Public Health Nutrition from researchers at the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut. This rapid increase in sales occurred despite recommendations from healt

12hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsMore than half of US opioid prescriptions for dental procedures exceeded 3-day supply recommendations from CDC 2016 guidelinesDentists are among top prescribers of opioids in the US, however, whether their opioid prescribing exceeds guidance had not been investigated. A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine indicates that more than half of opioid prescriptions issued by dentists exceed the three-day supply recommended by the CDC for acute dental pain management. The findings also show that 29% of denta

12hViden500+WHO advarer: 60 procent flere kræfttilfælde om 20 årDer skal især sættes ind overfor rygning, HPV og Hepatitis, hvis udviklingen skal vendes.

12hNYT > Science2KCoronavirus Live Updates: Xi Urges Tougher Response to the CrisisChina's leader called the outbreak "a major test of China's system." Macau said it was closing its casinos, and Hong Kong reported its first death from the virus.

12hScience24Stocks recover after deep coronavirus sell-offChinese benchmark index closes 2.6% higher following its biggest one-day fall since 2015

12hScience100+Medics face daunting task to test all coronavirus casesNumber of patients and fear of misleading results show need for fast diagnosis

12hPhys.org2KSand dunes can 'communicate' with each otherEven though they are inanimate objects, sand dunes can 'communicate' with each other. A team from the University of Cambridge has found that as they move, sand dunes interact with and repel their downstream neighbours.

12hPhys.org1KFeeding bluebirds helps fend off parasitesIf you feed the birds in your backyard, you may be doing more than just making sure they have a source of food: you may be helping baby birds give parasites the boot.

12hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology1KFeeding bluebirds helps fend off parasitesIf you feed the birds in your backyard, you may be doing more than just making sure they have a source of food: you may be helping baby birds give parasites the boot.

12hScienceAlert – Latest38High-Tempo Music Can Enhance Performance During Exercise, Study SuggestsHarder, Better, Faster, Stronger.

12hFuture(s) Studies28Metal Gear Solid 2 predicted the future of censorship, filter bubbles, fake news, etc. in the post-truth era.submitted by /u/dark_z3r0 [link] [comments]

12hScience | The Guardian500+Australian doctors warn of rise in racist abuse over coronavirusEmergency doctors call for calm amid reports of abuse of Asian-Australians Doctors have warned of a rise in racist incidents as Asian-Australians have been targeted amid coronavirus fears. Guardian Australia has been told of one involving a young mother who was racially abused on a Sydney train. The body representing Australian doctors working in emergency departments called for a calm and fact-b

12hIngeniørenMinister: Fra 2023 bliver bæredygtighed et krav i byggerietPLUS. Om tre år skal der laves livscyklusanalyser og beregnes totaløkonomi på alle nye byggerier. Desuden skal energi- og vandforbruget på byggepladsen opgøres og flere skrappe indeklimakrav opfyldes

13hScienceAlert – Latest200+The History of Quarantines to Isolate The Sick Dates Back Thousands of YearsHumans have herded contagion for millennia.

13hScienceMetals markets fall on coronavirus riskA prolonged disruption in China will have significant impact on global markets

13hScience1KHK confirms first coronavirus death as Macau shuts casinosMan is second fatality outside mainland China as Beijing says infections exceed 20,000

13hNature Communications – current – nature.com science feedsIce Ic without stacking disorder by evacuating hydrogen from hydrogen hydrateNature Communications, Published online: 03 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14346-5 Metastable cubic ice has been identified in several conditions relevant to geo and astrochemistry, but was always characterized by stacking disorder. Here the authors synthesize a hydrogen hydrate and degas hydrogen, obtaining pure non-defected cubic ice, observed by X-ray and neutron diffraction.

14hSkeptical ScienceStartups aim to pay farmers to bury carbon pollution in soilThis is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Sarah Wesseler As one result of modern farming practices that strip organic matter from the ground, between 20 and 60% of the carbon once stored in the world's agricultural soils has been lost. Putting it back – a process known as carbon farming or regenerative agriculture – has been hailed as a promising climate mitigation solution . According t

15h60-Second ScienceScience News Briefs from All OverA few brief reports about international science and technology from around the world, including one from Congo about a toad that has evolved coloring that makes it look like a deadly snake's head.

15hScienceAlert – Latest7KVirologists Find Coronavirus Is 80% The Same as SARS, Which May Help Us Neutralise ItKnow your enemy.

15hScientific AmericanScience News Briefs from All OverA few brief reports about international science and technology from around the world, including one from Congo about a toad that has evolved coloring that makes it look like a deadly snake's head. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15hBBC News – Science & Environment22KCoronavirus: China wildlife trade ban 'should be permanent'China should apply a permanent ban on the wildlife trade in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak.

15hScientific American ContentScience News Briefs from All OverA few brief reports about international science and technology from around the world, including one from Congo about a toad that has evolved coloring that makes it look like a deadly snake's head. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15hBBC News – Science & Environment58KPetrol and diesel car sales ban brought forward to 2035Boris Johnson unveils the plan as he launches a "year of climate action" alongside Sir David Attenborough.

16hScienceAlert – Latest6KNew Research Explains How Solar Panels Could Soon Be Generating Power at NightPrototypes are in development.

16hScience500+Tale of two doctors reveals how China controls the narrativeAs coronavirus spreads, Beijing cracks down on any dissent from the party line

16hFuture(s) Studies48Researchers have created a graphene amplifier which will unlock the elusive terahertz wavelengths and make revolutionary new technologies possiblesubmitted by /u/derangedkilr [link] [comments]

16hFuture(s) StudiesMaking Graphene Foam From Table Sugarsubmitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

16hScientific American Blog Posts66New Book Food or War Outlines How to Avoid a Soylent Green FutureJulian Cribb's sobering new book gives dire climate change warnings but also reasons for hope — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17hEurekAlert! – Breaking News35The Lancet Infectious Diseases: First clinical trial of antibody to neutralize henipaviruses finds it is safe and well tolerated in healthy volunteersThe first ever treatment for preventing a group of viruses from causing potentially lethal infections has been tested in a phase I clinical trial, and was found to be safe and able to neutralize the viruses, according to results from 40 patients published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. The trial was conducted in healthy participants and further trials will be needed to demonstrate its

17hScienceAlert – Latest7KWuhan Coronavirus Likely to Soon Be Declared a Pandemic, Scientists WarnHere's what you need to know.

17hNatureAuthor Correction: Robust and persistent reactivation of SIV and HIV by N-803 and depletion of CD8+ cellsNature, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2002-9 Author Correction: Robust and persistent reactivation of SIV and HIV by N-803 and depletion of CD8 + cells

17hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsESMO reaffirms commitment to education as key lever to make cancer prevention effective. International survey results on public's behaviours around cancer released. Alarming contrast in responses between socio-economic groups. ESMO highlights improved prevention knowledge and wider accessibility to care as key priorities.

18hNYT > Science10KChina, Desperate to Stop Coronavirus, Turns Neighbor Against NeighborThe authorities hunt for people from Wuhan, the center of the outbreak, encouraging citizens to inform on others. Even those without symptoms are being ostracized.

18hScientific Reports – nature.com science feedsAuthor Correction: Telmisartan induces browning of fully differentiated white adipocytes via M2 macrophage polarizationScientific Reports, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58948-x

18hScientific Reports – nature.com science feedsAuthor Correction: Micro RNAs upregulated in Vitiligo skin play an important role in its aetiopathogenesis by altering TRP1 expression and keratinocyte-melanocytes cross-talkScientific Reports, Published online: 04 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58949-w

18hBig Think100+Meet the ancestry test that can help you live a healthier lifeVitagene offers ancestry details and a full DNA analysis of your health and dietary needs. Vitagene findings offer food choices, supplement recommendations and workout routines tailored specifically to you. The Vitagene DNA Premium Test Kit is now $40 off, just $99.99. Last year, MIT estimated that more than 26 million people had taken an at-home ancestry test. At the trend's current wildly popul

18hPopular Science | RSS41Shrink your ever-expanding walletMost likely, the bulk in your wallet is not from all those $100 bills. (AntonMatyukha via Depositphotos/) I'm on a constant mission to downsize my wallet. I'm tired of a bulky billfold, bursting at the seams, digging into my rear end every time I sit down. I'd get rid of all my credit cards if I could, but for now, I'll settle for a super-slim clip—with all the non-essentials offloaded to my phon

18hFuture(s) StudiesGoogle's new Meena chatbot: Does another huge AI language model prove anything?submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

18hPopular Science | RSSStain removers that make tough spots disappearStains be gone. (Depositphotos/) Spills and stains are just a fact of our messy and imperfect lives. Life happens, but that doesn't mean we should just accept that everything we own will eventually be ruined by a slipped cup of coffee. Keep stubborn stains out of your clothes and carpets with these fantastic stain removers. Stain removal anywhere. (Amazon/) If you're a parent, you probably alread

18hBiochemistry Research News — ScienceDailyMolecular motors direct the fate of stem cellsScientists used molecular motors to manipulate the protein matrix on which bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells are grown. Rotating motors altered the protein structure, which resulted in a bias of the stem cells to differentiate into bone cells (osteoblasts). Without rotation, the stem cells tended to remain multipotent.

18hBiochemistry Research News — ScienceDailyNot 'brains in a dish': Cerebral organoids flunk comparison to developing nervous systemA new study offers a more restrained perspective on brain organoids suggested for lab experiments, by showing that widely used organoid models fail to replicate even basic features of brain development and organization, much less the complex circuitry needed to model complex brain diseases or normal cognition.

18hThe Atlantic63The Atlantic Politics Daily: How the Iowa Caucus Goes HaywireIt's Monday, February 3. A blizzard of a week will begin with the first votes of the 2020 presidential contest tonight, followed by the State of the Union, the final impeachment vote, and a Democratic debate in New Hampshire. In the rest of today's newsletter: What to expect in Iowa tonight. Plus: Nate Silver in the time of 2016-election PTSD. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (JOSHUA LOTT / GETTY) How the

18hScience MagazineStudy claiming new coronavirus can be transmitted by people without symptoms was flawedA traveler to Germany from China who infected another person did feel ill, contradicting New England Journal of Medicine report

18hNPRResearchers Link Autism To A System That Insulates Brain WiringBrains affected by autism appear to share a problem with cells that make myelin, the insulating coating surrounding nerve fibers that controls the speed at which the fibers convey electrical signals. (Image credit: Jose Luis Calvo/Science Source)

18hDiscover Magazine100+SARS Vaccine Could Be Stopgap Measure Against the New Coronavirus, Study SuggestsVaccines developed, but never used, against SARS could offer hope in the search for treatments for the new coronavirus.

18hFuturism1KIdiot Hacks Nintendo Servers, Gets Caught With Child PornographyBad Stuff In June 2019, FBI agents raided the home of 21-year-old Californian Ryan Hernandez , whom they suspected of hacking multiple servers owned by multinational gaming company Nintendo. On the devices they seized, the FBI found thousands of confidential Nintendo files confirming their suspicions, according to a newly released statement from the Department of Justice — as well as a folder dir

19hExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTechRising Seas: Record Warmth Found at 'Doomsday Glacier' Water Line"Cavity Camp on Thwaites Glacier," Ted Scambos The Thwaites Glacier, in West Antarctica, is one of the glaciers considered most at-risk for collapse over the next century, earning it the nickname "doomsday glacier." Scientists have been studying the glacier with increasing concern over the past decade and they've learned a great deal about the interaction between the glacier and the bedrock it si

19hScienceA dicey period for risk sentimentMike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets

19hPhys.org300+Researchers study the intricate link between climate and conflictNew research from the University of Notre Dame is shedding light on the unexpected effects climate change could have on regional instability and violent conflict.

19hPhys.org21Green infrastructure provides benefits that residents are willing to work for, study showsUrban areas face increasing problems with stormwater management. Impervious surfaces on roads and buildings cause flooding, which impacts the water quality of streams, rivers and lakes. Green infrastructure, including features such as rain barrels, green roofs, rain gardens, and on-site water treatment, can provide affordable and environmentally sound ways to manage precipitation.

19hPhys.org48Researchers find clues to how hazardous space radiation beginsScientists at the University of New Hampshire have unlocked one of the mysteries of how particles from flares on the sun accumulate at early stages in the energization of hazardous radiation that is harmful to astronauts, satellites and electronic equipment in space. Using data obtained by NASA's Parker Solar Probe (PSP), researchers observed one of the largest events so far during the mission. Th

19hPopular Science | RSSEasy mesh WiFi systems for killing dead zonesExpand your reach. (Glenn Carstens-Peters via Unsplash/) When everything from your refrigerator to your toothbrush has a WiFi connection, one lonely router tucked away under your office desk just isn't going to cut it. Mesh WiFi systems allow you to create a network within your living space that virtually eliminates dead zones or weak signals, and ensures that every device you own is up and runni

19hFuturism23KClimate Activist Greta Thunberg Nominated for Nobel Peace PrizeNobel Effort 17-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, the Associated Press reports . It's the second consecutive year that Thunberg has been nominated for the coveted prize. Jens Holm and Hakan Svenneling, both members of Sweden's Left Party, said that Thunberg "has worked hard to make politicians open their eyes to the climate crisis" and

19hPhys.org300+Team identifies low-energy solar particles from beyond Earth near the SunUsing data from NASA's Parker Solar Probe (PSP), a team led by Southwest Research Institute identified low-energy particles lurking near the Sun that likely originated from solar wind interactions well beyond Earth orbit. PSP is venturing closer to the Sun than any previous probe, carrying hardware SwRI helped develop. Scientists are probing the enigmatic features of the Sun to answer many questio

19hPopular Science | RSSGreat portable speakers for your next outdoor partySpeakers to make your party a blast. (Cassie Gallegos via Unsplash/) You need only three things for a good outdoor party: snacks, friends, and music to keep the energy up and the spirit alive. Every good host knows that the speaker on your phone or laptop just won't cut it, but setting up a complicated stereo system outside isn't necessary—not when there are so many portable, rechargeable loudspe

19hPhys.org28Australia's orroral valley fire consumes over 155,000 acres in a weekNASA's Terra satellite saw yet another fire, known as the Orroral Valley Fire, break out in the Canberra region of Australia, specifically in and around the ?Namadgi National Park. In one week, these fires have consumed 62,988 hectares (155,646 acres) according to the Australian Capital Territory Emergency Services Agency as of Feb. 04, 2020 (2:30 am local Australian time). The Department of Defen

19hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsFirst-ever experimental Sudan virus specific antibody treatment protects animalsArmy scientists working with partners from industry and academia have developed an experimental treatment that protects animals from Sudan virus, which is closely related to Ebola. Their work is published online today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

19hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsGreen infrastructure provides benefits that residents are willing to work for, study showsUrban areas face increasing problems with stormwater management. Green infrastructure, including features such as rain barrels, green roofs, rain gardens, and on-site water treatment, can provide affordable and environmentally sound ways to manage precipitation. However, green infrastructure is challenging to maintain, because it is decentralized across a city and requires constant maintenance and

19hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsAuthentic behavior at work leads to greater productivity, study showsMatching behavior with the way you feel — in other words, not faking it — is more productive at work and leads to other benefits, according to a new study co-authored by Chris Rosen, management professor in the Sam M. Walton College of Business.

19hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsResearchers study the intricate link between climate and conflictNew research from the University of Notre Dame is shedding light on the unexpected effects climate change could have on regional instability and violent conflict.

19hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology100+How ants get angry: Precise 'lock and key' process regulates aggression, acceptanceFor most social animals, even humans, the ability to distinguish friend versus foe can be a challenge that often can lead to knee-jerk aggression. But when it comes to ants getting aggressive, there's a more sophisticated method to their madness.

19hWired500+Mysterious New Ransomware Targets Industrial Control SystemsEKANS appears to be the work of cybercriminals, rather than nation-state hackers—a worrying development, if so.

19hWired200+YouTube's Disinformation Crackdown, Coronavirus Wild Cards, and More NewsCatch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

19hFuturism500+Elon Musk Is Hosting a "Super Fun" Hackathon at His HouseSmarties Wanted On Sunday, Elon Musk encouraged the Twittersphere to apply to join Tesla's artificial intelligence division — emphasizing that he communicates with the team "almost every day." If the opportunity to work alongside Musk on the reg isn't enough to draw the best minds in AI to Tesla, however, the CEO also has a backup plan: offer them a chance to come chill at his house. Party at Elo

19hPhys.org3KArctic permafrost thaw plays greater role in climate change than previously estimatedAbrupt thawing of permafrost will double previous estimates of potential carbon emissions from permafrost thaw in the Arctic, and is already rapidly changing the landscape and ecology of the circumpolar north, a new CU Boulder-led study finds.

19hPhys.org500+Making high-temperature superconductivity disappear to understand its originWhen there are several processes going on at once, establishing cause-and-effect relationships is difficult. This scenario holds true for a class of high-temperature superconductors known as the cuprates. Discovered nearly 35 years ago, these copper-oxygen compounds can conduct electricity without resistance under certain conditions. They must be chemically modified ("doped") with additional atoms

19hPhys.org100Finding the source of chemical reactionsScientists are constantly searching for the source of things like the origin of the universe, matter or life. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in a collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and several other universities, have demonstrated a way to experimentally detect the most hidden aspect of all chemical reactions—the ext

19hPhys.org100+How ants get angry: Precise 'lock and key' process regulates aggression, acceptanceFor most social animals, even humans, the ability to distinguish friend versus foe can be a challenge that often can lead to knee-jerk aggression. But when it comes to ants getting aggressive, there's a more sophisticated method to their madness.

19hPhys.org2KNew quantum switch turns metals into insulatorsMost modern electronic devices rely on tiny, finely-tuned electrical currents to process and store information. These currents dictate how fast our computers run, how regularly our pacemakers tick and how securely our money is stored in the bank.

19hPhys.orgGovernment grants deliver highest returns for college financing, says studyMerit-based grants are a government's best bet for providing effective student aid for long-term economic growth—increasing both welfare (measured in terms of long-term well-being outcomes) and efficiency, according to a new joint study from the University of British Columbia, Queen's, Princeton and Yale. The study focuses on current education policy in the United States, and finds that the curren

19hPhys.org44Study finds the fingerprint of paddy rice in atmospheric methane concentration dynamicsA University of Oklahoma-led study shows that paddy rice (both area and plant growth) is significantly related to the spatial-temporal dynamics of atmospheric methane concentration in monsoon Asia, where 87% of paddy rice fields are situated in the world.

19hPhys.orgUT scientists' fossil-finding board game is a success in classroomsBecoming a fossil is the ultimate game of chance.

19hPhys.org400+Chemists unveil the structure of an influenza B proteinA team of MIT chemists has discovered the structure of a key influenza protein, a finding that could help researchers design drugs that block the protein and prevent the virus from spreading.

19hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology400+Chemists unveil the structure of an influenza B proteinA team of MIT chemists has discovered the structure of a key influenza protein, a finding that could help researchers design drugs that block the protein and prevent the virus from spreading.

19hScience MagazineColombia's first ever science minister faces calls to resign over fungi-based cancer treatmentCritics say Mabel Gisela Torres Torres backed "pseudoscience"

19hPhys.org38US sea-level report cards: 2019 data adds to trend in accelerationThe annual update of their sea level "report cards" by researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science adds evidence of an accelerating rate of sea-level rise at nearly all tidal stations along the U.S. coastline. The latest report cards were published on January 30th.

19hPhys.orgScientists listen to whales, walruses, seals in a changing arctic seascapeA year-round acoustic study of marine mammals in the northern Bering Sea is providing scientists with a valuable snapshot of an Arctic world already under drastic pressure from climate change, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), Columbia University, Southall Environmental Associates, and the University of Washington.

19hPhys.org89Study: Aerosols have an outsized impact on extreme weatherScientists at Caltech and JPL have tied a shift in winter weather patterns in Europe and northern Eurasia to a reduction in air pollution.

19hBig Think46This company scraped social media to feed its AI facial recognition tool. Is that legal?Recent reporting has revealed the existence of a company that has probably scraped your personal data for its facial recognition database. Though social platforms forbid it, the company has nonetheless collected personal data from everywhere it can. The company's claims of accuracy and popularity with law enforcement agencies is a bit murky. Your face is all over the internet in images you and ot

19hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, BiotechnologyScientists listen to whales, walruses, seals in a changing arctic seascapeA year-round acoustic study of marine mammals in the northern Bering Sea is providing scientists with a valuable snapshot of an Arctic world already under drastic pressure from climate change, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), Columbia University, Southall Environmental Associates, and the University of Washington.

19hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology200+Probing the genetic basis of Roundup resistance in morning glory, a noxious weedThe herbicide Roundup is the most widely used agricultural chemical in history. But over the past two decades, a growing number of weed species have evolved resistance to Roundup's active ingredient, glyphosate, reducing the product's dominance somewhat.

19hPhys.org3KResearchers create 'intelligent' interaction between light and materialA collaboration between McMaster and Harvard researchers has generated a new platform in which light beams communicate with one another through solid matter, establishing the foundation to explore a new form of computing.

19hPhys.org200+Probing the genetic basis of Roundup resistance in morning glory, a noxious weedThe herbicide Roundup is the most widely used agricultural chemical in history. But over the past two decades, a growing number of weed species have evolved resistance to Roundup's active ingredient, glyphosate, reducing the product's dominance somewhat.

19hNature300+Colombian science minister's cancer claims spark controversyNature, Published online: 03 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00235-w Mabel Torres, the leader of Colombia's new science agency, says she has created a fungus extract that can treat cancer.

20hFuturism3KCoronavirus Has Now Killed More People in China Than SARS DidSpeaking purely in terms of the death toll in mainland China, the ongoing coronavirus outbreak has now officially surpassed the SARS outbreak of 2002 and 2003. On Monday, the official death toll from the coronavirus reached 362 people , all but one of whom died in China. SARS only ever killed 349 people in China, according to The New York Times — illustrating the gravity of the ongoing 2019-nCoV

20hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsLink between chronic kidney disease and heart failure is identified in patientsPeople with chronic kidney disease have a higher risk for heart disease and heart-disease death. Now, for the first time in humans, researchers have identified a pathological change that appears to link kidney disease to progressive heart disease. This offers a potential treatment target, which could have wide benefit because 14 percent of the US adult population has chronic kidney disease.

20hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsNew research finds that ACOs are struggling to integrate social services with medical careNew findings from a Dartmouth-led study, published in the February issue of Health Affairs, show that despite effort and attention on the part of some healthcare providers to better address their patients' social needs, little progress is being made to integrate social services with medical care.

20hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsUNH researchers find clues to how hazardous space radiation beginsScientists at the University of New Hampshire have unlocked one of the mysteries of how particles from flares on the sun accumulate at early stages in the energization of hazardous radiation that is harmful to astronauts, satellites and electronic equipment. Using data from NASA's Parker Solar Probe, they observed one of the largest events that shows how plasma is released after a solar flare can

20hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsUT scientists' fossil-finding board game is a success in classroomsDrawing inspiration straight from the source material, two researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have designed their own game of chance and skill — a board game that puts students in the role of time-travelling paleontologists — to teach key concepts about how fossils form.

20hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsTwo million Americans lost health coverage/access in Trump's first year: BU studyA new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that two million more Americans avoided health care because of inability to pay, and/or did not have health insurance, at the end of 2017 compared to the end of 2016.

20hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsPolitical TV ads referencing guns increased eightfold over four election cyclesThe number of political candidate television advertisements that refer to guns increased significantly across four election cycles in US media markets, according to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesThe {alpha}-synuclein hereditary mutation E46K unlocks a more stable, pathogenic fibril structure [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Aggregation of α-synuclein is a defining molecular feature of Parkinson's disease, Lewy body dementia, and multiple systems atrophy. Hereditary mutations in α-synuclein are linked to both Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia; in particular, patients bearing the E46K disease mutation manifest a clinical picture of parkinsonism and Lewy body dementia,…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesSpatiotemporal dynamic monitoring of fatty acid-receptor interaction on single living cells by multiplexed Raman imaging [Applied Biological Sciences]Numerous fatty acid receptors have proven to play critical roles in normal physiology. Interactions among these receptor types and their subsequent membrane trafficking has not been fully elucidated, due in part to the lack of efficient tools to track these cellular events. In this study, we fabricated the surface-enhanced Raman…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesIndividual-specific functional connectivity of the amygdala: A substrate for precision psychiatry [Neuroscience]The amygdala is central to the pathophysiology of many psychiatric illnesses. An imprecise understanding of how the amygdala fits into the larger network organization of the human brain, however, limits our ability to create models of dysfunction in individual patients to guide personalized treatment. Therefore, we investigated the position of…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles100+Synaptotagmin 1 oligomers clamp and regulate different modes of neurotransmitter release [Neuroscience]Synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) synchronizes neurotransmitter release to action potentials (APs) acting as the fast Ca2+ release sensor and as the inhibitor (clamp) of spontaneous and delayed asynchronous release. While the Syt1 Ca2+ activation mechanism has been well-characterized, how Syt1 clamps transmitter release remains enigmatic. Here we show that C2B domain-dependent…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesSynonymous codon substitutions perturb cotranslational protein folding in vivo and impair cell fitness [Biophysics and Computational Biology]In the cell, proteins are synthesized from N to C terminus and begin to fold during translation. Cotranslational folding mechanisms are therefore linked to elongation rate, which varies as a function of synonymous codon usage. However, synonymous codon substitutions can affect many distinct cellular processes, which has complicated attempts to…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesDark biological superoxide production as a significant flux and sink of marine dissolved oxygen [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The balance between sources and sinks of molecular oxygen in the oceans has greatly impacted the composition of Earth's atmosphere since the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, thereby exerting key influence on Earth's climate and the redox state of (sub)surface Earth. The canonical source and sink terms of the marine oxygen…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesNAD deficiency due to environmental factors or gene-environment interactions causes congenital malformations and miscarriage in mice [Medical Sciences]Causes for miscarriages and congenital malformations can be genetic, environmental, or a combination of both. Genetic variants, hypoxia, malnutrition, or other factors individually may not affect embryo development, however, they may do so collectively. Biallelic loss-of-function variants in HAAO or KYNU, two genes of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthesis…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesDrosophila YBX1 homolog YPS promotes ovarian germ line stem cell development by preferentially recognizing 5-methylcytosine RNAs [Biophysics and Computational Biology]5-Methylcytosine (m5C) is a RNA modification that exists in tRNAs and rRNAs and was recently found in mRNAs. Although it has been suggested to regulate diverse biological functions, whether m5C RNA modification influences adult stem cell development remains undetermined. In this study, we show that Ypsilon schachtel (YPS), a homolog…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesListeria monocytogenes exploits host exocytosis to promote cell-to-cell spread [Microbiology]The facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes uses an actin-based motility process to spread within human tissues. Filamentous actin from the human cell forms a tail behind bacteria, propelling microbes through the cytoplasm. Motile bacteria remodel the host plasma membrane into protrusions that are internalized by neighboring cells. A critical unresolved…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesDevelopment of an antibody cocktail for treatment of Sudan virus infection [Microbiology]Antibody-based therapies are a promising treatment option for managing ebolavirus infections. Several Ebola virus (EBOV)-specific and, more recently, pan-ebolavirus antibody cocktails have been described. Here, we report the development and assessment of a Sudan virus (SUDV)-specific antibody cocktail. We produced a panel of SUDV glycoprotein (GP)-specific human chimeric monoclonal antibodies…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles32Parent coaching increases conversational turns and advances infant language development [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Parental language input is one of the best predictors of children's language achievement. Parentese, a near-universal speaking style distinguished by higher pitch, slower tempo, and exaggerated intonation, has been documented in speech directed toward young children in many countries. Previous research shows that the use of parentese and parent–child turn-taking…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesProtection of cochlear synapses from noise-induced excitotoxic trauma by blockade of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors [Neuroscience]Exposure to loud sound damages the postsynaptic terminals of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) on cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs), resulting in loss of synapses, a process termed synaptopathy. Glutamatergic neurotransmission via α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type receptors is required for synaptopathy, and here we identify a possible involvement of GluA2-lacking Ca2+-pe

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles75Kv2.1 channels play opposing roles in regulating membrane potential, Ca2+ channel function, and myogenic tone in arterial smooth muscle [Physiology]The accepted role of the protein Kv2.1 in arterial smooth muscle cells is to form K+ channels in the sarcolemma. Opening of Kv2.1 channels causes membrane hyperpolarization, which decreases the activity of L-type CaV1.2 channels, lowering intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and causing smooth muscle relaxation. A limitation of this model is…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesConformational spread and dynamics in allostery of NMDA receptors [Neuroscience]Allostery can be manifested as a combination of repression and activation in multidomain proteins allowing for fine tuning of regulatory mechanisms. Here we have used single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanism of allostery underlying negative cooperativity between the two agonists glutamate…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesHigh-throughput quantitative microscopy-based half-life measurements of intravenously injected agents [Engineering]Accurate analysis of blood concentration and circulation half-life is an important consideration for any intravenously administered agent in preclinical development or for therapeutic application. However, the currently available tools to measure these parameters are laborious, expensive, and inefficient for handling multiple samples from complex multivariable experiments. Here we describe a…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesHuman MutL{gamma}, the MLH1-MLH3 heterodimer, is an endonuclease that promotes DNA expansion [Biochemistry]MutL proteins are ubiquitous and play important roles in DNA metabolism. MutLγ (MLH1–MLH3 heterodimer) is a poorly understood member of the eukaryotic family of MutL proteins that has been implicated in triplet repeat expansion, but its action in this deleterious process has remained unknown. In humans, triplet repeat expansion is…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesImpacts of current and future large dams on the geographic range connectivity of freshwater fish worldwide [Environmental Sciences]Dams contribute to water security, energy supply, and flood protection but also fragment habitats of freshwater species. Yet, a global species-level assessment of dam-induced fragmentation is lacking. Here, we assessed the degree of fragmentation of the occurrence ranges of ∼10,000 lotic fish species worldwide due to ∼40,000 existing large dams…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesShape-preserving amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of CaCO3 revealed by in situ TEM [Chemistry]Organisms use inorganic ions and macromolecules to regulate crystallization from amorphous precursors, endowing natural biominerals with complex morphologies and enhanced properties. The mechanisms by which modifiers enable these shape-preserving transformations are poorly understood. We used in situ liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy to follow the evolution from amorphous calcium carbo

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles200+Rhizosphere microbiome mediates systemic root metabolite exudation by root-to-root signaling [Plant Biology]Microbial communities associated with roots confer specific functions to their hosts, thereby modulating plant growth, health, and productivity. Yet, seminal questions remain largely unaddressed including whether and how the rhizosphere microbiome modulates root metabolism and exudation and, consequently, how plants fine tune this complex belowground web of interactions. Here we…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesM2 amphipathic helices facilitate pH-dependent conformational transition in influenza A virus [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The matrix-2 (M2) protein from influenza A virus is a tetrameric, integral transmembrane (TM) protein that plays a vital role in viral replication by proton flux into the virus. The His37 tetrad is a pH sensor in the center of the M2 TM helix that activates the channel in response…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesUnique subsite specificity and potential natural function of a chitosan deacetylase from the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans [Biochemistry]Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that infects ∼280,000 people every year, causing >180,000 deaths. The human immune system recognizes chitin as one of the major cell-wall components of invading fungi, but C. neoformans can circumvent this immunosurveillance mechanism by instead exposing chitosan, the partly or fully deacetylated form…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesCorrection for Yu et al., Wildfire prevention through prophylactic treatment of high-risk landscapes using viscoelastic retardant fluids [Corrections]APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Wildfire prevention through prophylactic treatment of high-risk landscapes using viscoelastic retardant fluids," by Anthony C. Yu, Hector Lopez Hernandez, Andrew H. Kim, Lyndsay M. Stapleton, Reuben J. Brand, Eric T. Mellor, Cameron P. Bauer, Gregory D. McCurdy, Albert J. Wolff III, Doreen Chan, Craig S….

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesCombining microenvironment normalization strategies to improve cancer immunotherapy [Engineering]Advances in immunotherapy have revolutionized the treatment of multiple cancers. Unfortunately, tumors usually have impaired blood perfusion, which limits the delivery of therapeutics and cytotoxic immune cells to tumors and also results in hypoxia—a hallmark of the abnormal tumor microenvironment (TME)—that causes immunosuppression. We proposed that normalization of TME using…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesAcoustically powered surface-slipping mobile microrobots [Engineering]Untethered synthetic microrobots have significant potential to revolutionize minimally invasive medical interventions in the future. However, their relatively slow speed and low controllability near surfaces typically are some of the barriers standing in the way of their medical applications. Here, we introduce acoustically powered microrobots with a fast, unidirectional surface-slipping…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles51Canine olfactory detection of a vectored phytobacterial pathogen, Liberibacter asiaticus, and integration with disease control [Agricultural Sciences]Early detection and rapid response are crucial to avoid severe epidemics of exotic pathogens. However, most detection methods (molecular, serological, chemical) are logistically limited for large-scale survey of outbreaks due to intrinsic sampling issues and laboratory throughput. Evaluation of 10 canines trained for detection of a severe exotic phytobacterial arboreal…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesOn the collision of rods in a quiescent fluid [Applied Physical Sciences]Rods settling under gravity in a quiescent fluid can overcome the bottleneck associated with aggregation of equal-size spheres because they collide by virtue of their orientation-dependent settling velocity. We find the corresponding collision kernel Γrods=lβ1ΔρVrodg/(16Aμ), where l, A, and Vrod are the rods' length, aspect ratio (length divided by width),…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesCorrection for Hammond et al., Insights into the lower torso in late Miocene hominoid Oreopithecus bambolii [Corrections]ANTHROPOLOGY Correction for "Insights into the lower torso in late Miocene hominoid Oreopithecus bambolii," by Ashley S. Hammond, Lorenzo Rook, Alisha D. Anaya, Elisabetta Cioppi, Loïc Costeur, Salvador Moyà-Solà, and Sergio Almécija, which was first published December 23, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1911896116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 278–284). The editors note…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesHsp47 promotes cancer metastasis by enhancing collagen-dependent cancer cell-platelet interaction [Medical Sciences]Increased expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) suggests potential function of cancer cell-produced ECM in initiation of cancer cell colonization. Here, we showed that collagen and heat shock protein 47 (Hsp47), a chaperone facilitating collagen secretion and deposition, were highly expressed during the epithelial-mesenchymal transition…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles97Shale gas development has limited effects on stream biology and geochemistry in a gradient-based, multiparameter study in Pennsylvania [Environmental Sciences]The number of horizontally drilled shale oil and gas wells in the United States has increased from nearly 28,000 in 2007 to nearly 127,000 in 2017, and research has suggested the potential for the development of shale resources to affect nearby stream ecosystems. However, the ability to generalize current studies…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesRemarkable nucleation and growth of ultrafine particles from vehicular exhaust [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]High levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs; diameter of less than 50 nm) are frequently produced from new particle formation under urban conditions, with profound implications on human health, weather, and climate. However, the fundamental mechanisms of new particle formation remain elusive, and few experimental studies have realistically replicated the relevant…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesThe displacement field associated with the freezing of a melt and its role in determining crystal growth kinetics [Chemistry]The atomic displacements associated with the freezing of metals and salts are calculated by treating crystal growth as an assignment problem through the use of an optimal transport algorithm. Converting these displacements into timescales based on the dynamics of the bulk liquid, we show that we can predict the activation…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesEcological drivers of bacterial community assembly in synthetic phycospheres [Ecology]In the nutrient-rich region surrounding marine phytoplankton cells, heterotrophic bacterioplankton transform a major fraction of recently fixed carbon through the uptake and catabolism of phytoplankton metabolites. We sought to understand the rules by which marine bacterial communities assemble in these nutrient-enhanced phycospheres, specifically addressing the role of host resources in…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesCorrection for Brutsaert et al., Association of EGLN1 gene with high aerobic capacity of Peruvian Quechua at high altitude [Corrections]ANTHROPOLOGY Correction for "Association of EGLN1 gene with high aerobic capacity of Peruvian Quechua at high altitude," by Tom D. Brutsaert, Melisa Kiyamu, Gianpietro Elias Revollendo, Jenna L. Isherwood, Frank S. Lee, Maria Rivera-Ch, Fabiola Leon-Velarde, Sudipta Ghosh, and Abigail W. Bigham, which was first published November 11, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1906171116…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesMeasuring the effectiveness of high-performance Co-Optima biofuels on suppressing soot formation at high temperature [Engineering]Soot emissions in combustion are unwanted consequences of burning hydrocarbon fuels. The presence of soot during and following combustion processes is an indication of incomplete combustion and has several negative consequences including the emission of harmful particulates and increased operational costs. Efforts have been made to reduce soot production in…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesAll-digital histopathology by infrared-optical hybrid microscopy [Medical Sciences]Optical microscopy for biomedical samples requires expertise in staining to visualize structure and composition. Midinfrared (mid-IR) spectroscopic imaging offers label-free molecular recording and virtual staining by probing fundamental vibrational modes of molecular components. This quantitative signal can be combined with machine learning to enable microscopy in diverse fields from cancer…

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articlesFacilitative and synergistic interactions between fungal and plant viruses [Microbiology]Plants and fungi are closely associated through parasitic or symbiotic relationships in which bidirectional exchanges of cellular contents occur. Recently, a plant virus was shown to be transmitted from a plant to a fungus, but it is unknown whether fungal viruses can also cross host barriers and spread to plants….

20hPNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles200+Activation of mosquito immunity blocks the development of transmission-stage filarial nematodes [Immunology and Inflammation]Mosquito-borne helminth infections are responsible for a significant worldwide disease burden in both humans and animals. Accordingly, development of novel strategies to reduce disease transmission by targeting these pathogens in the vector are of paramount importance. We found that a strain of Aedes aegypti that is refractory to infection by…

20hFuturity.org24Watch-sized device tracks your health via sweatA device the size of a wristwatch uses sweat to monitor your body chemistry to help improve athletic performance and identify potential health problems. The device can detect dehydration, track athletic recovery, and more. It has a wide variety of applications, including military training and competitive sports. "This technology allows us to test for a wide range of metabolites in almost real tim

20hFuturity.orgEarth's early magnetic field was stronger than we thoughtThe magnetic field that first formed around Earth was even stronger than scientists previously believed, new research suggests. Deep within Earth, swirling liquid iron generates our planet's protective magnetic field. This magnetic field is invisible but is vital for life on Earth's surface: it shields the planet from harmful solar wind and cosmic rays from the sun. Given the importance of the ma

20hPhys.orgNew device identifies high-quality blood donorsBlood banks have long known about high-quality donors—individuals whose red blood cells stay viable for longer in storage and in the recipient's body.

20hScienceDaily400+'Parentese' helps parents, babies make 'conversation' and boosts language developmentA new study finds the value of using 'parentese,' an exaggerated speaking style that conveys total engagement with a child.

20hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, BiotechnologyScientists examine bacterial cannibalismResearchers from Sechenov University and their colleagues summarised the results of various studies devoted to a process that can be described as bacterial cannibalism. Why some microorganisms start to kill their relatives of the same species and whether we can use this phenomenon to combat infectious diseases is explained in the article published in Antibiotics.

20hPhys.orgScientists examine bacterial cannibalismResearchers from Sechenov University and their colleagues summarised the results of various studies devoted to a process that can be described as bacterial cannibalism. Why some microorganisms start to kill their relatives of the same species and whether we can use this phenomenon to combat infectious diseases is explained in the article published in Antibiotics.

20hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsShift in treatment modalities associated with improved outcomes in uveal melanoma patients with liveNew retrospective study indicates that the shift of treatment from systemic chemotherapies to liver-directed therapies provides survival benefits.

20hScience | Smithsonian Magazine2KCan Disease-Sniffing Dogs Save the World's Citrus?Once trained, canines can detect citrus greening disease earlier and more accurately than current diagnostics

20hFuturism2KMayo Clinic Doctor: Coronavirus Is "Basically at a Pandemic Now"The Chinese coronavirus outbreak might not have been a pandemic just one week ago — but it certainly looks like one now. The virus originated in Wuhan, China, in late 2019. Though it quickly spread to other nations , health experts in late January still considered it to be an epidemic given that most of the people affected were still in one place: China. Since then, however, the World Health Orga

20hScienceDailyChemists unveil the structure of an influenza B proteinChemists have discovered the structure of an influenza B protein called BM2, a finding that could help researchers design drugs that block the protein and help prevent the virus from spreading.

20hScienceDaily37Tailor-made vaccines could almost halve rates of serious bacterial diseaseNew research has found that rates of disease caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae could be substantially reduced by changing our approach to vaccination. Researchers combined genomic data, models of bacterial evolution and predictive modelling to identify how vaccines could be optimized for specific age groups, geographic regions and communities of bacteria.

20hScienceDaily33Exposing a virus's hiding place reveals new potential vaccineBy figuring out how a common virus hides from the immune system, scientists have identified a potential vaccine to prevent sometimes deadly respiratory infections in humans.

20hScienceDailyThe secret life of microbes: Molecules in a deep-sea symbiosisMussels in the deep sea can only survive there thanks to symbiotic bacteria living inside of them. Researchers have now succeeded for the first time in simultaneously identifying individual bacteria in the symbiosis and measuring which metabolites they convert. This enables a new understanding of many biological processes.

20hScienceDaily24Losing coastal plant communities to climate change will weaken sea defensesNew research suggests the impact of rising sea levels and the increased frequency and intensity of extreme storm events on coastal plants needs to be placed in greater focus.

20hScienceDaily22How and when spines changed in mammalian evolutionResearchers compared modern and ancient animals to explore how mammalian vertebrae have evolved into sophisticated physical structures that can carry out multiple functions. The comparison between complex spine of cats, the more uniform spine of lizard, and CT scans of synapsid fossils showed that the evolution of functions (e.g. bending, twisting) is driven by both selective pressures/behavior an

20hNYT > Science1KFireflies Have a Mating Problem: The Lights Are Always OnHabitat loss and pesticides are threatening firefly populations, a new study has found. It also cited a problem unique to glowing bugs: light pollution.

20hScienceDaily75Scientists listen to whales, walruses and seals in a changing Arctic seascapeA year-round acoustic study of marine mammals in the northern Bering Sea is providing scientists with a valuable snapshot of an Arctic world already under drastic pressure from climate change.

20hScienceDaily32How ants get angry: Precise 'lock and key' process regulates aggression, acceptanceScientists report definitive evidence of a mechanism within ants that is responsible for unlocking aggression. The research — the first to pinpoint this mechanism and its precise role in ant biology — reports a social characteristic which could help account for their evolutionary success.

20hScienceDaily20Making high-temperature superconductivity disappear to understand its originPurely electronic interactions could be behind copper-oxygen compounds conducting electricity without resistance at relatively high temperatures.

20hScienceDailyBlood test identifies risk of disease linked to stroke and dementiaA new study has found that levels of six proteins in the blood can be used to gauge a person's risk for cerebral small vessel disease, a brain disease that affects an estimated 11 million older adults in the U.S.

20hScienceDaily63Building a safer CAR-T therapyA new study has devised a new type of chimeric antigen-receptor (CAR) T cell — a family of promising immunotherapies for cancer — that can be switched on and off on demand.

20hScienceDaily100+Lower protein diet may lessen risk for cardiovascular diseaseA plant-based diet may be key to lowering risk for heart disease. Researchers determined that diets with reduced sulfur amino acids — which occur in protein-rich foods, such as meats, dairy, nuts and soy — were associated with a decreased risk for cardiovascular disease. The team also found that the average American consumes almost two and a half times more sulfur amino acids than the estimated

20hScienceDailyIf cancer were easy, every cell would do itA new article puts an evolutionary twist on a classic question. Instead of asking why we get cancer, researchers use signaling theory to explore how our bodies have evolved to keep us from getting more cancer.

20hFuturism200+Idiots Are Driving Teslas In Mode That Disables Safety FeaturesTesla Drift Tesla recently released a hidden feature called "Dyno Mode," meant for testing purposes, which disables a host of safety features including traction control, stability control, and automatic emergency braking. But now, Electrek reports , morons are hitting the road with the dangerous mode activated — in hopes it'll turn their cars into " drift machines ." Power Play The purpose behind

20hScientific American Blog PostsThe Theorem That Made a MathematicianSometimes unimportant math can change your life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20hFuture(s) StudiesWhat do you think of Superintelligence by Nick Bostrom?For those who have read the book, do you agree with his thesis? A summary for whoever is interested. submitted by /u/Briskprogress [link] [comments]

20hFuture(s) StudiesWhy an internet that never forgets is especially bad for young peoplesubmitted by /u/ChickenTeriyakiBoy1 [link] [comments]

20hFuture(s) StudiesMars buildings could be built using components made from bacteriasubmitted by /u/upyoars [link] [comments]

20hFuture(s) StudiesTracking the future of remote workplaces: Apps, communication, and liabilitysubmitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

20hFuture(s) StudiesNeuralink: Elon Musk teases 'awesome' advancements will be revealed soonsubmitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

20hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsProbing the genetic basis of Roundup resistance in morning glory, a noxious weedThe herbicide Roundup is the most widely used agricultural chemical in history. But over the past two decades, a growing number of weed species have evolved resistance to Roundup's active ingredient, glyphosate, reducing the product's dominance somewhat.

20hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsFinding the source of chemical reactionsIn a collaborative project with MIT and other universities, scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have experimentally detected the fleeting transition state that occurs at the origin of a chemical reaction.

20hBiochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily20Making high-temperature superconductivity disappear to understand its originPurely electronic interactions could be behind copper-oxygen compounds conducting electricity without resistance at relatively high temperatures.

20hBiochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily63Building a safer CAR-T therapyA new study has devised a new type of chimeric antigen-receptor (CAR) T cell — a family of promising immunotherapies for cancer — that can be switched on and off on demand.

20hPopular Science | RSS2KHumans are putting fireflies at risk of extinctionLight pollution and habitat destruction were the biggest concerns. (DepositPhoto/) The flashy synchronous shows of Malaysia; the summertime magic of Japanese hotaru ; the rippling sparks of the Great Smoke Mountains: More than 2,000 different firefly species flit, flicker, and glimmer around the globe . But a new paper in the journal Bioscience warns that their lights could go out for good—and hu

21hScienceDaily36New quantum switch turns metals into insulatorsResearchers have demonstrated an entirely new way to precisely control electrical currents by leveraging the interaction between an electron's spin and its orbital rotation around the nucleus.

21hFuturism100+Online Marriage Counseling Is Changing the Way Couples Seek Relationship HelpTechnology improves your life in numerous ways, big and small, every single day. It makes it easier to get a ride somewhere, easier to find and share information, easier to order takeout, easier to earn a degree, easier to watch movies, easier to work from home, easier to stay in touch with friends and family—the list goes on and on. Now, thanks to innovative services like ReGain online couples a

21hFuturism1KDoctors Are Treating Coronavirus With Cocktail of HIV, Flu DrugsDoctors in Thailand have had some success treating coronavirus patients with a mixture of existing drugs more commonly used to treat HIV and influenza. The treatment rapidly improved multiple patients' condition, according to Reuters . For instance, a 70-year-old woman tested positive for the coronavirus for ten days straight, but was cleared 48 hours after doctors tried the experimental treatmen

21hNew Scientist500+Tackling air pollution may accidentally trigger serious health issuesCities are trying to cut levels of micrometre-scale particles in the air – but doing so leads to a rise in nanometre-scale particles that also damage health

21hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsValue transformation framework model seeks to guide transition to value-based healthcareWith a new focus on quality of care and outcomes achieved, healthcare organizations are challenged to make the transition to value-based care. A model called the Value Transformation Framework (VTF) provides a structured, step-by-step approach to help guide the shift to value-based healthcare, reports a paper in the Journal for Healthcare Quality (JHQ), the peer-reviewed journal of the National As

21hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsHelping patients with binge eating disorders: There's an app for thatStudy suggests that adaptation of smartphone technology is a scalable option that significantly improves clinical outcomes.

21hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsArctic permafrost thaw plays greater role in climate change than previously estimatedAbrupt thawing of permafrost will double previous estimates of potential carbon emissions from permafrost thaw in the Arctic, and is already rapidly changing the landscape and ecology of the circumpolar north, a new CU Boulder-led study finds.

21hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsMaking light workA collaboration between McMaster and Harvard researchers has generated a new platform in which light beams communicate with one another through solid matter, establishing the foundation to explore a new form of computing.

21hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsCold plasma patch could make immunotherapy more effective for treating melanomaAn interdisciplinary team of researchers at the UCLA has developed a medicated patch that can deliver immune checkpoint inhibitors and cold plasma directly to tumors to help boost the immune response and kill cancer cells.

21hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsClosely spaced hydrogen atoms could facilitate superconductivity in ambient conditionsAn international team of researchers discovered the hydrogen atoms in a common metal hydride material are much more tightly spaced than had been predicted for decades–a feature that could possibly facilitate superconductivity at or near room temperature and pressure. The scientists conducted neutron scattering experiments at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory on samples of z

21hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsTumbleweeds or fibrils: Tau proteins need to chooseSimulations by Rice scientists suggests two paths tau proteins may take in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's and Pick's diseases.

21hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsMath models add up to improved cancer immunotherapyA merger of math and medicine may help to improve the efficacy of immunotherapies, potentially life-saving treatments that enhance the ability of the patient's own immune system to attack cancerous tumors.

21hNatureA person before a PhD: understanding and combatting an academic identity crisisNature, Published online: 03 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00306-y Robert Seaborne's overcommitment to his PhD work led to a loss of identity. He explains three things that helped him to rediscover himself after graduate studies.

21hDiscover Magazine1KThis AI-Guided Drone Has Mapped One of Earth's Deepest Subterranean LakesA team of roboticists and divers used an AI-powered drone to explore underwater caves farther than humans ever have.

21hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsScientists listen to whales, walruses, and seals in a changing Arctic seascapeA year-round acoustic study of marine mammals in the northern Bering Sea is providing scientists with a valuable snapshot of an Arctic world already under drastic pressure from climate change, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), Columbia University, Southall Environmental Associates, and the University of Washington.

21hPhys.org1KClosely spaced hydrogen atoms could facilitate superconductivity in ambient conditionsAn international team of researchers has discovered the hydrogen atoms in a metal hydride material are much more tightly spaced than had been predicted for decades—a feature that could possibly facilitate superconductivity at or near room temperature and pressure.

21hPhys.org100+Tumbleweeds or fibrils: Tau proteins need to chooseNew simulations by Rice University scientists tell a tale of two taus and how they relate to neurological disease.

21hPhys.org200+Trained dogs are the most efficient way to hunt citrus industry's biggest threatDogs specially trained by Agriculture Research Service (ARS) scientists have proven to be the most efficient way to detect huanglongbing—also known as citrus greening—according to a paper just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

21hPhys.org70Planned hydropower dams threaten fish in the tropicsPlanned hydropower dams will greatly increase threats for freshwater fish species because of habitat fragmentation, especially in the tropics. This was already suspected, but environmental researchers at Radboud University, PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Stanford Natural Capital Project and others now provide evidence by mapping how future dams affect the habitats of 10,000 fish

21hThe Scientist RSS4KFlu and HIV Drugs Show Efficacy Against CoronavirusCombining the medications improved conditions in patients with severe 2019-nCoV infections, say doctors in Thailand.

21hNew on MIT Technology Review500+A Russian satellite is probably stalking a US spy satellite in orbitIt's a scenario that will almost certainly repeat over and over in the years to come.

21hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology200+Trained dogs are the most efficient way to hunt citrus industry's biggest threatDogs specially trained by Agriculture Research Service (ARS) scientists have proven to be the most efficient way to detect huanglongbing—also known as citrus greening—according to a paper just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

21hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology72Planned hydropower dams threaten fish in the tropicsPlanned hydropower dams will greatly increase threats for freshwater fish species because of habitat fragmentation, especially in the tropics. This was already suspected, but environmental researchers at Radboud University, PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Stanford Natural Capital Project and others now provide evidence by mapping how future dams affect the habitats of 10,000 fish

21hBiochemistry News – Chemistry News100+Tumbleweeds or fibrils: Tau proteins need to chooseNew simulations by Rice University scientists tell a tale of two taus and how they relate to neurological disease.

21hScience | Smithsonian Magazine500+New Generation of Dark Matter Experiments Gear Up to Search for Elusive ParticleDeep underground, in abandoned gold and nickel mines, vats of liquid xenon and silicon germanium crystals will be tuned to detect invisible matter

21hScienceDailyViscosity measurements offer new insights into Earth's mantleAn international research group has succeeded for the first time in measuring the viscosity that molten solids exhibit under the pressure and temperature conditions found in the lower earth mantle. The data obtained support the assumption that a bridgmanite-enriched rock layer was formed during the early history of the earth at a depth of around 1,000 kilometers.

21hScienceDaily39Oil spill clean-up: Better methodOil poses a considerable danger to aquatic life. Researchers have developed a new technology for the removal of such contaminations: Textiles with special surface properties passively skim off the oil and move it into a floating container. The scientists used surfaces from the plant kingdom as a model.

21hScienceDaily100+Flickering light mobilizes brain chemistry that may fight Alzheimer'sThe promise of flickering light to treat Alzheimer's takes another step forward in this new study, which reveals stark biochemical mechanisms: 40 Hertz stimulus triggers a marked release of signaling chemicals.

21hScienceDaily26How the development of skulls and beaks made Darwin's finches one of the most diverse speciesDarwin's finches are among the most celebrated examples of adaptive radiation in the evolution of modern vertebrates and now a new study has provided fresh insights into their rapid development and evolutionary success.

21hScienceDaily300+Low-energy solar particles from beyond Earth found near the SunScientists have identified low-energy particles lurking near the Sun that likely originated from solar wind interactions well beyond Earth orbit. NASA's Parker Solar Probe is venturing closer to the Sun than any previous probe. Scientists are probing the enigmatic features of the Sun to answer many questions, including how to protect space travelers and technology from the radiation associated wit

21hScienceDaily32The one ring — to track your finger's locationResearchers have created AuraRing, a ring and wristband combination that can detect the precise location of someone's index finger and continuously track hand movements.

21hScienceDaily100+'Wristwatch' monitors body chemistry to boost athletic performance, prevent injuryEngineering researchers have developed a device the size of a wristwatch that can monitor an individual's body chemistry to help improve athletic performance and identify potential health problems. The device can be used for everything from detecting dehydration to tracking athletic recovery, with applications ranging from military training to competitive sports.

21hScienceDaily35How nature tells us its formulasA team has developed methods with which these models can be directly obtained from experimental measurements. Instead of comparing the experimental results to theoretical model predictions, it is, in a certain sense, possible to measure the theory itself.

21hBig Think77Why some philosophers think you should be a vegetarianThe moral arguments behind vegetarianism are ancient, numerous, and well reasoned. They tend to focus on the actions behind meat production. While the question of what an ethical diet is remains unanswered, these thinkers and schools provide a good place to start. Vegetarianism is having a moment in the sun. Record numbers of people are giving it a try, the number of places offering vegetarian fo

21hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsHow ants get angry: Precise 'lock and key' process regulates aggression, acceptanceIn a new study, scientists at Vanderbilt report definitive evidence of a mechanism within ants that is responsible for unlocking aggression. The research–the first to pinpoint this mechanism and its precise role in ant biology–reports a social characteristic which could help account for their evolutionary success.

21hFuturism500+Nuclear Waste Storage Containers Break Down When Exposed to WaterWater Damage The U.S. government's plan for safely storing nuclear waste just hit a serious snag: Exposure to groundwater could corrode its new storage containers, spilling radioactive materials into the Earth. The plan, as it stands, was to trap nuclear waste in glass or ceramic and bury the horrible mixture in stainless steel containers, Science News reports . But the new groundwater study pote

22hPopular Science | RSSThree ski goggles that offer max protectionSee the slopes like never before. (Mauro Paillex via Unsplash/) Whether you're a seasoned skier or experiencing powder for the first time this winter, you'll need a reliable pair of ski goggles to help you navigate down the slopes with ease. There are several important factors to consider before you scoop up a pair of goggles, though: lens shape (cylindrical or spherical), ventilation, anti-fog c

22hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsGovernment grants deliver highest returns for college financing, says studyMerit-based grants are a government's best bet for providing effective student aid for long-term economic growth – increasing both welfare (measured in terms of long-term well-being outcomes) and efficiency, according to a new joint study from the University of British Columbia, Queen's, Princeton and Yale. The study focuses on current education policy in the United States, and finds that the curr

22hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsStudy: Aerosols have an outsized impact on extreme weatherA reduction in manmade aerosols in Europe has been tied to a reduction in extreme winter weather in the region.

22hFuturism1KProgrammers Are Creating Chatbots to Flirt on Tinder For ThemTinder Bots Apps like Tinder have streamlined the process of dating. You choose the people you're interested in, and if they're interested in you too, you chat online for a bit. If there's a spark, you meet up in real life. But according to a new Mashable story , even that process proved to be too time-consuming for some programmers — which is why they're developing Tinder bots to do both the cho

22hScience MagazineSamples from famed 19th century voyage reveal 'shocking' effects of ocean acidificationPlankton shells today are dramatically thinner than they were during HMS Challenger voyage

22hScienceDaily25For complex decisions, narrow options down to twoWhen choosing between multiple alternatives, people usually focus their attention on the two most promising options. The quicker we do that, the faster we make the decision.

22hScienceDaily100+How the ocean is gnawing away at glaciersThe Greenland Ice Sheet is melting faster today than it did only a few years ago. The reason: it's not just melting on the surface — but underwater, too.

22hScienceDaily28Showing how the tiniest particles in our universe saved us from complete annihilationGravitational waves could contain evidence to prove that neutrino particles reshuffled matter and anti-matter, explains a new study.

22hScienceDailyScientists discover new non-sticky gelsScientists have discovered a new class of material – non-sticky gels.

22hBig Think200+What meat eaters really think about veganism – new researchMost people in the UK are committed meat eaters – but for how long? My new research into the views of meat eaters found that most respondents viewed veganism as ethical in principle and good for the environment. It seems that practical matters of taste, price, and convenience are the main barriers preventing more people from adopting veganism – not disagreement with the fundamental idea. This cou

22hFuturity.orgSurvey: 75% of teen feelings about high school are negativeAsk a high school student how he or she typically feels at school, and you'll likely hear one of three answers: tired, bored, or stressed. For a new study, researchers surveyed 21,678 US high school students and found that nearly 75% of the students' self-reported feelings related to school were negative. The study included a second, "experience sampling" study in which 472 high school students i

22hFuturity.org59Can historical records change minds about reparations?Historical records could help us move toward more constructively addressing slavery's legacy in the United States, says journalist Rachel L. Swarns. "Growing up in Staten Island, New York, I lived just a few blocks away from a convent that ran a bookstore and a community festival that was a highlight of my childhood summers," recalls Swarns, professor of journalism at New York University and a co

22hNature100+First genomic study of schizophrenia in African people turns up broken genesNature, Published online: 03 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00255-6 Genetic studies of mental illness have largely been conducted in people with European ancestry.

22hScienceDaily25Butterflies can acquire new scent preferences and pass these on to their offspringNew studies demonstrate that insects can learn from their previous experiences and adjust their future behavior for survival and reproduction.

22hScienceDaily100+Sound of music: How melodic alarms could reduce morning grogginessNew research suggests melodic alarms could improve alertness, with harsh alarm tones linked to increased levels of morning grogginess.

22hScienceDailyHot pots helped ancient Siberian hunters survive the Ice AgeA new study shows that ancient Siberian hunters created heat resistant pots so that they could cook hot meals – surviving the harshest seasons of the ice age by extracting nutritious bone grease and marrow from meat.

22hScienceDailyHow plants are slowing global warmingA new article reveals how humans are helping to increase the Earth's plant and tree cover, which absorbs carbon from the atmosphere and cools our planet. The boom of vegetation, fueled by greenhouse gas emissions, could be skewing our perception of how fast we're warming the planet.

22hScienceDailySupercomputers help link quantum entanglement to cold coffeeTheoretical physicists have found a deep link between one of the most striking features of quantum mechanics — quantum entanglement — and thermalization, which is the process in which something comes into thermal equilibrium with its surroundings.

22hScienceDailyNot-so-dirty birds? Not enough evidence to link wild birds to food-borne illnessDespite the perception that wild birds in farm fields can cause food-borne illness, a new study has found little evidence linking birds to E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter outbreaks.

22hExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTechWhy the Best Super Bowl Commercials Were All Cars and TechSuper Bowls used to mean Tom Brady hoisting another trophy along with ads of polar bears drinking Coke on not-yet-melting polar ice caps, that and the Budweiser Clydesdales. Now the most memorable – sorry, memorably good – commercials are cars and tech. Car ads have always been part of the 54 Super Bowls, but in the dotcom boom years "tech ad" meant money frittered away. Remember Pets.com? Agillo

22hScienceDailyGet easily out of breath? It may be because you were small at birth, study findsBabies born with low birth weights are more likely to have poor cardiorespiratory fitness later in life than their normal-weight peers. New findings underscore the importance of prevention strategies to reduce low birth weights even among those carried to at term delivery.

22hScienceDailyPre-eruption seismograms recovered for 1980 Mount St. Helens eventNearly 40 years ago, analog data tapes faithfully recorded intense seismic activity in the two months before the historic eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State in May 1980. It took some lengthy and careful restoration efforts — including a turn in a kitchen oven for some of the tapes — to recover their data.

22hScienceDailyStudents' feelings about high school are mostly negativeIn a nationwide US survey of 21,678 US high school students, researchers found that nearly 75% of the students' self-reported feelings related to school were negative.

22hScienceDailyWant to change your personality? It may not be easy to do aloneMost people want to change an aspect of their personality, but left to their own devices, they may not be successful in changing, research shows.

22hScienceDailyNew clues into the genetic origins of schizophreniaThe first genetic analysis of schizophrenia in an ancestral African population, the South African Xhosa, appears in the Jan. 31 issue of the journal Science. An international group of scientists conducted the research, including investigators from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and New York State Psychiatric Institute, as well as the University of Cape Town and the University

22hScienceDailyAfraid? Presence of a stranger can have a calming effectIn uncanny situations, the mere presence of an unknown person can have a calming effect. This is shown in a study of anxiety disorders.

22hScienceDailyImaging study of key viral structure shows how HIV drugs work at atomic levelScientists have discovered how a powerful class of HIV drugs binds to a key piece of HIV machinery. By solving, for the first time, three-dimensional structures of this complex while different drugs were attached, the researchers showed what makes the therapy so potent. The work provides insights that could help design or improve new treatments for HIV.

22hScienceDailyResearch zeroing in on electronic nose for monitoring air quality, diagnosing diseaseResearch has pushed science closer to developing an electronic nose for monitoring air quality, detecting safety threats and diagnosing diseases by measuring gases in a patient's breath.

22hNew Scientist1KStone Age replica raft almost ready to repeat epic prehistoric voyageArchaeologists want to know how humans reached Australia 65,000 years ago – so they have built a raft using Stone Age tools and are about to repeat the voyage

22hNew Scientist500+Legal action could be used to stop Starlink ruining telescope imagesA group of astronomers has called for legal action to stop the launch of thousands of satellites designed by companies like SpaceX and OneWeb to beam high-speed internet around the world

22hFuture(s) StudiesClimate Models Are Running Red Hot, and Scientists Don't Know Why. Multiple research teams are now forecasting that the planet will heat up more catastrophically than previously anticipatedsubmitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

22hFuture(s) StudiesThe Origin of Consciousness in the Brain Is About to Be Testedsubmitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

22hFuture(s) StudiesScottish startup Skyrora successfully tests 3D-printed rocket engines powered by plastic wastesubmitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

22hFuture(s) StudiesI'm a high school student from the UK trying to write a report on artificial intelligence and sentience. It would be really helpful if anyone took part in this 4 question survey. Thanks!submitted by /u/trial_and_improve [link] [comments]

22hFuture(s) StudiesDualities and non-Abelian mechanics | Naturesubmitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

22hFuture(s) StudiesScientists discover hidden symmetries, opening new avenues for material designsubmitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

22hFuture(s) StudiesPsychedelics, virtual reality, and the future of humanitysubmitted by /u/bretcodes [link] [comments]

22hWired4KAn Artist Used 99 Phones to Fake a Google Maps Traffic JamGoogle Maps 99 TrafficWith his "Google Maps Hack," artist Simon Weckert draws attention to the systems we take for granted—and how we let them shape us.

22hWired1KYouTube Will Police Political Videos More CloselyThe social media site says it will remove manipulated videos and content that promotes conspiracy theories, marking a contrast with Facebook.

22hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsWeather radar records drastic drop in mayfly populationsResearchers at the University of Oklahoma, the University of Notre Dame and Virginia Tech applied radar technology — the same used for meteorology — to quantify the number of mayflies that emerged annually from two different bodies of water: the Upper Mississippi River and the Western Lake Erie Basin. Their goal was to characterize the size of these swarms using the same technique a meteorologis

22hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsOU study finds the fingerprint of paddy rice in atmospheric methane concentration dynamicsA University of Oklahoma-led study shows that paddy rice (both area and plant growth) is significantly related to the spatial-temporal dynamics of atmospheric methane concentration in monsoon Asia, where 87% of paddy rice fields are situated in the world.

22hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsAPS tip sheet: modeling the matter after big bang expansionMatter's fragmentation after the big bang.

22hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsMaking high-temperature superconductivity disappear to understand its originPurely electronic interactions could be behind copper-oxygen compounds conducting electricity without resistance at relatively high temperatures.

22hBiochemistry Research News — ScienceDailyResearch zeroing in on electronic nose for monitoring air quality, diagnosing diseaseResearch has pushed science closer to developing an electronic nose for monitoring air quality, detecting safety threats and diagnosing diseases by measuring gases in a patient's breath.

22hNYT > Science24KJapan Races to Build New Coal-Burning Power Plants, Despite the Climate RisksAs many as 22 new coal plants—one of the dirtiest power sources—will arise at 17 sites across Japan, just as the world must slash emissions to fight warming.

22hNature300+Harvard chemistry chief's arrest over China links shocks researchersNature, Published online: 03 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00291-2 Nanoscientist Charles Lieber allegedly lied about his involvement in China's Thousand Talents Plan.

23hNatureLi metal deposition and stripping in a solid-state battery via Coble creepNature, Published online: 03 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1972-y By containing lithium metal within oriented tubes of a mixed ionic-electronic conductor, a 3D anode for lithium metal batteries is produced that overcomes chemomechanical stability issues at the electrolyte interface.

23hViden300+Klappende gråsæl fanget på kamera for første gangForskere har længe været i tvivl, om sælerne kun klapper i fangenskab.

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsAustralia's Orroral Valley Fire consumes over 155,000 acres in a weekNASA's Terra satellite saw yet another fire, known as the Orroral Valley Fire, break out in the Canberra region of Australia, specifically in and around the Namadgi National Park. In one week, these fires have consumed 62,988 hectares (155,646 acres) according to the Australian Capital Territory Emergency Services Agency as of Feb. 04, 2020 (2:30 am local Australian time).

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsSwRI-led team identifies low-energy solar particles from beyond Earth near the SunUsing data from NASA's Parker Solar Probe (PSP), a team led by Southwest Research Institute identified low-energy particles lurking near the Sun that likely originated from solar wind interactions well beyond Earth orbit. PSP is venturing closer to the Sun than any previous probe, carrying hardware SwRI helped develop. Scientists are probing the enigmatic features of the Sun to answer many questio

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsBirth timing may affect brain developmentMoving birth a day early triggers an early start to widespread neuron death, according to new research in mice published in eNeuro.

23hScienceDaily32A previously unknown mechanism enables bacterial antibiotic resistanceResearchers have described a previously unrecognized mechanism of bacterial transcriptional regulation that is obviously widespread in bacteria. In the future, their findings could also help fight antibiotic resistance.

23hScienceDaily68Early life experiences biologically and functionally mature the brainExperiences early in life have an impact on the brain's biological and functional development, shows a new study by a team of neuroscientists.

23hScienceDaily1KEating red meat and processed meat hikes heart disease and death risk, study findsA large study links red and processed meat with higher risk of heart disease and death. Eating two servings of red meat, processed meat or poultry — but not fish — per week was linked to a 3 to 7 percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Eating two servings of red meat or processed meat — but not poultry or fish — per week was associated with a 3 percent higher risk of all causes of death

23hScienceDailyNew electrode design may lead to more powerful batteriesNew research could lead to batteries that can pack more power per pound and last longer, based on the long-sought goal of using pure lithium metal as one of the battery's two electrodes, the anode.

23hFuturism9KSeveral Climate Change Simulations Just Snapped Into Doomsday ModeNightmare Scenario Several models predicting the future of climate change have taken a drastic turn for the worse: multiple research teams are now forecasting that the planet will heat up more catastrophically than previously anticipated. The changes are so dire that some researchers are doubting their own work, according to Bloomberg . But if the simulations hold up, they convey a clear message:

23hScientific American ContentThe Rise of HumansOf all the species on Earth, why did ours rise to dominance? Previously, scientists thought many uniquely human traits resulted from sudden or brilliant adaptations, but new discoveries point to… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23hBiochemistry Research News — ScienceDailyPhysics of giant bubbles bursts secret of fluid mechanicsA study inspired by street performers making gigantic soap bubbles led to a discovery in fluid mechanics: Mixing different molecular sizes of polymers within a solution increases the ability of a thin film to stretch without breaking.

23hFuturity.orgPolymers are the physics secret behind huge soap bubblesMixing different molecular sizes of polymers within a solution increases the ability of a thin film to stretch without breaking, according to a new study. The researchers took inspiration from street performers making gigantic soap bubbles to make their fluid mechanics discovery. The findings could potentially lead to improving processes such as the flow of oils through industrial pipes and the c

23hThe Atlantic2KWill Lamar Alexander's Warning Restrain Trump?"Hopefully he won't do that again." That's what Senator Lamar Alexander told me on Friday, discussing President Donald Trump's push to have political rivals investigated by Ukraine. A lot of weight rests on those six words, especially the first. The veteran lawmaker would like the president not to abuse his power, and is relying on the political system to check him, even though Alexander does not

23hThe Atlantic100+The NFL's Most Valued Cause Is ItselfDuring last night's Super Bowl LIV, the National Football League aired a commercial it debuted last month during the AFC Championship Game. In the minute-long clip , the former Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Anquan Boldin speaks about his cousin Corey Jones, who was killed by a police officer in 2015. (At the time, Boldin was playing for the San Francisco 49ers, who lost Sunday to the Kansas Cit

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsBlood test identifies risk of disease linked to stroke and dementiaA UCLA-led study has found that levels of six proteins in the blood can be used to gauge a person's risk for cerebral small vessel disease, a brain disease that affects an estimated 11 million older adults in the U.S.

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking News'Wristwatch' monitors body chemistry to boost athletic performance, prevent injuryEngineering researchers have developed a device the size of a wristwatch that can monitor an individual's body chemistry to help improve athletic performance and identify potential health problems. The device can be used for everything from detecting dehydration to tracking athletic recovery, with applications ranging from military training to competitive sports.

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsBuilding a safer CAR-T therapyA Ludwig Cancer Research study has devised a new type of chimeric antigen-receptor (CAR) T cell — a family of promising immunotherapies for cancer — that can be switched on and off on demand.

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsNew quantum switch turns metals into insulatorsResearchers at the University of British Columbia have demonstrated an entirely new way to precisely control electrical currents by leveraging the interaction between an electron's spin and its orbital rotation around the nucleus.

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsThe one ring — to track your finger's locationUW researchers have created AuraRing, a ring and wristband combination that can detect the precise location of someone's index finger and continuously track hand movements.

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsNew device identifies high-quality blood donorsBlood banks have long known about high-quality donors – individuals whose red blood cells stay viable longer in storage and in the recipient's body. Now a new device developed at UBC is showing promise as a method to identify these donors, potentially helping more than 4.5 million patients who need blood transfusions every year in Canada and the United States.

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsIf cancer were easy, every cell would do itA new paper puts an evolutionary twist on a classic question. Instead of asking why we get cancer, researchers at Osnabrück University and the Santa Fe Institute use signaling theory to explore how our bodies have evolved to keep us from getting more cancer.

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsOccupational gender bias prevalent in online images, Rutgers study findsRutgers researchers say gender bias and stereotypes corresponding to certain occupations are prevalent on digital and social media platforms.

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsChemists unveil the structure of an influenza B proteinMIT chemists have discovered the structure of an influenza B protein called BM2, a finding that could help researchers design drugs that block the protein and help prevent the virus from spreading.

23hEurekAlert! – Breaking NewsQuestions and answers about cannabis use during pregnancyA new study shows that women have many medical questions about the use of cannabis both before and during pregnancy, and during the postpartum period while breastfeeding.

23hPhys.orgOccupational gender bias prevalent in online images, study findsRutgers researchers say gender bias and stereotypes corresponding to certain occupations are prevalent on digital and social media platforms.

23hPhys.org200+How the development of skulls and beaks made Darwin's finches one of the most diverse speciesDarwin's finches are among the most celebrated examples of adaptive radiation in the evolution of modern vertebrates and now a new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has provided fresh insights into their rapid development and evolutionary success.

23hPhys.org100+A fundamental discovery about how gene activity is regulatedResearchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered a fundamental mechanism that regulates gene activity in cells. The newly discovered mechanism targets RNA, or ribonucleic acid, a close cousin of DNA that plays an important role in cellular activity.

23hPhys.orgStudy maps areas of high concentrations in the Delaware BayEvery year, about 8 million metric tons of plastic are put into the world's oceans. Of particular concern are microplastics, materials found in the marine environment that occur in sizes below five millimeters and are the most abundant form of marine debris observed at the ocean surface.

23hPhys.org73How nature tells us its formulasMany of the biggest questions in physics can be answered with the help of quantum field theories: They are needed to describe the dynamics of many interacting particles, and thus they are just as important in solid state physics as in cosmology. Often, however, it is extremely complicated to develop a quantum field theoretical model for a specific problem—especially if the system in question consi

23hScienceDaily100+Grey seals discovered clapping underwater to communicateWild grey seals can clap their flippers underwater during breeding season.

23hScienceDaily28Patterns in the brain shed new light on how we functionPatterns of brain connectivity take us a step closer to understanding the key principles of cognition.

23hScienceDaily21Bacteria engineered to protect bees from pests and pathogensScientists report that they have developed a new strategy to protect honey bees from a deadly trend known as colony collapse: genetically engineered strains of bacteria. This is the first time anyone has improved the health of bees by genetically engineering their microbiome.

23hScienceDailyGene hunting: The power of precision medicineHumans and animals are made up of trillions of cells, and each cell contains DNA specific to that individual. Therefore, identifying DNA that causes genetic disorders gives researchers and clinicians a better understanding of how to treat inherited diseases and possibly prevent the diseases from being passed down to future generations.

23hScienceDaily33Rapid weather swings increase flu riskNew research shows that rapid weather variability as a result of climate change could increase the risk of a flu epidemic in some highly populated regions in the late 21st century.

23hScienceDailyPhysics of giant bubbles bursts secret of fluid mechanicsA study inspired by street performers making gigantic soap bubbles led to a discovery in fluid mechanics: Mixing different molecular sizes of polymers within a solution increases the ability of a thin film to stretch without breaking.

23hScienceDailyNew cellular mechanism discoveredScientists recently discovered a previously unknown mechanism cells can use to protect themselves from oxidative damage.

23hScienceDaily75High and low exercise intensity found to influence brain function differentlyA new study shows for the first time that low and high exercise intensities differentially influence brain function. Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (Rs-fMRI), a noninvasive technique that allows for studies on brain connectivity, researchers discovered that low-intensity exercise triggers brain networks involved in cognition control and attention processing, while high-i

23hScienceDailyResearchers discover new piece of the puzzle for Parkinson's diseaseBiomedical scientists have discovered that a defect in the ATP13A2 gene causes cell death by disrupting the cellular transport of polyamines. When this happens in the part of the brain that controls body movement, it can lead to Parkinson's disease.

23hScienceDailyCells' springy coils pump bursts of RNAModels by chemists calculate the chemical and mechanical energies involved in 'bursty' RNA production in cells. Their models show how RNA polymerases create supercoils of DNA allowing production of RNA that goes on to produce proteins.

23hScienceDailyCity in a test tube: Researchers simulate urban pollution to show how it damages the heartA unique study mimicking city centre pollution levels shows how just two hours of bad air adversely affects the heart and blood vessels for a whole day.

23hScienceDailySmaller detection device effective for nuclear treaty verification, archaeology digsMost nuclear data measurements are performed at accelerators large enough to occupy a geologic formation a kilometer wide. But a portable device that can reveal the composition of materials quickly on-site would greatly benefit cases such as in archaeology and nuclear arms treaty verification. New research used computational simulations to show that with the right geometric adjustments, it is poss

23hScienceDailyInfectious disease experts warn of outbreak risks in US border detention centersOver the past year, at least seven children have died from diseases including influenza while being detained by the US Department of Homeland Security's Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency. Infectious disease experts have called for protections like influenza vaccinations to prevent serious outbreaks.

23hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology200+How the development of skulls and beaks made Darwin's finches one of the most diverse speciesDarwin's finches are among the most celebrated examples of adaptive radiation in the evolution of modern vertebrates and now a new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has provided fresh insights into their rapid development and evolutionary success.

23hBiology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology100+A fundamental discovery about how gene activity is regulatedResearchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered a fundamental mechanism that regulates gene activity in cells. The newly discovered mechanism targets RNA, or ribonucleic acid, a close cousin of DNA that plays an important role in cellular activity.

23hQuanta Magazine3KThe Contrarian Who Cures CancersWhen I first met the immunology researcher James P. Allison in 2014, he was just becoming an icon. Columbia University had brought him to its campus to present him with the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize for the new type of cancer therapy he had developed. Instead of trying to burn, poison or surgically remove malignant cells from the body, his treatment mobilized a patient's immune system to destroy

23hBiochemistry Research News — ScienceDailyCheap nanoparticles stimulate immune response to cancer in the labResearchers have developed nanoparticles that, in the lab, can activate immune responses to cancer cells. If they are shown to work as well in the body as they do in the lab, the nanoparticles might provide an effective and more affordable way to fight cancer.

23hDiscover Magazine37Seven Worlds in the Solar System That Could Be Just As Weird As PlutoA new generation of ground-based telescopes and proposed space missions could soon reveal their secrets.

23hRetraction Watch20A preprint on coronavirus was retracted over the weekend. Here's why that was a good moment for science.Did you know that a preprint on the 2019 novel coronavirus was retracted this weekend? It happened so fast, you might have missed it. In STAT, our co-founders Ivan Oransky and Adam Marcus put the episode in context. Like Retraction Watch? You can make a tax-deductible contribution to support our work, follow us on Twitter, like us on … Continue reading

23hScienceDailyTougher start could help captive-bred game birdsTougher early lives could help captive-bred game birds develop survival skills for adulthood in the wild, new research suggests.

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