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nyheder2020februar10

Meet 'the Pablo Escobar of the Falcon Egg Trade'

In his new book, "The Falcon Thief," Joshua Hammer exposes the world's most notorious wild-bird trafficker.

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As Foreigners Flee China, Pakistan Tells Its Citizens to Stay

Pakistan has refused to evacuate 800 citizens in Wuhan, fearing an outbreak at home. Some stuck in the hot zone worry they are part of a larger geopolitical game.

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Using sound and light to generate ultra-fast data transfer

Researchers have made a breakthrough in the control of terahertz quantum cascade lasers, which could lead to the transmission of data at the rate of 100 gigabits per second—around one thousand times quicker than a fast Ethernet operating at 100 megabits a second.

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Artificial atoms create stable qubits for quantum computing

Quantum engineers from UNSW Sydney have created artificial atoms in silicon chips that offer improved stability for quantum computing.

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In a Flawed Health Care System, Doctors Lament 'Moral Injury'

Already overworked, America's doctors report struggling to cope with the "moral injury" of the health care system, whose bureaucratic hurdles regularly prevent them from providing their patients with the best possible care. The true toll of this sense of helplessness is now coming to light.

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Danske elbiler er kommet på museum: Kom med tilbage til da vi byggede elektriske biler

PLUS. Historien om elbiler er mere end 100 år gammel, og danske udviklere har ad flere omgange bidraget med nytænkning og innovation. Danmarks Tekniske Museum viser nogle af de danske biler i ny udstilling.

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Blinda och seende minns på samma sätt

Kan lukter och ljud framkalla minnen på samma sätt för blinda som hos seende? Ja, enligt forskning vid Stockholms universitet. Dessutom framkallar lukter en större andel barndomsminnen än ljud. Det tyder på att synen inte spelar någon avgörande roll för hur lukt- och ljudminnen kodas in och plockas fram. – Vi har i vår tidigare forskning visat att minnesledtrådar i form av till exempel ord, bilde

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China's food delivery drivers hailed as heroes

Couriers provide temperature readings when supplying millions quarantined at home

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Scientists built an AI to figure out what the universe is made of

submitted by /u/LimarcAmbalina [link] [comments]

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Dansk mailtjeneste stod pivåben: Nu har 250 myndigheder og virksomheder anmeldt sikkerhedsbrud

Indtil videre har Datatilsynet modtaget 251 anmeldelser fra kommuner, virksomheder og institutioner, der har anmeldt den danske mail-tjeneste 'Sikker Mail'.

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Foxconn recalls workers in phases from coronavirus shutdown

Return to full production at iPhone maker 'will take weeks' as infection rate rises

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It's better to focus on where you are going than how you are feeling

The notion that emotional pain and suffering reflect a deviation from a default happy baseline has been referred to as the 'assumption of healthy normality'. But it's a mistaken assumption. Estimates of the lifetime prevalence of psychiatric disorders indicate that around one in two adults will meet the criteria for a mental-health condition at some point in their lives. Given that psychological

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Coronavirus epidemic hits China dealmaking and IPOs

Acquisitions and listings tumble as travel bans and quarantines limit activity

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New threads: Nanowires made of tellurium and nanotubes hold promise for wearable tech

Wearable tech and electronic cloth may be the way of the future, but to get there the wiring needs to be strong, flexible and efficient.

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New method offers more stable, efficient electrocatalytic reactions

Northwestern University researchers have developed a more efficient and stable method to conduct electrocatalytic reactions.

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US stocks notch record high as investors calm nerves over virus

Moody's sees outbreak having 'muted' economic effect on Europe and America

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Adapting to climate change: We're doing it wrong

When it comes to adapting to the effects of climate change, scientists and policymakers are thinking too small, according to a new research review.

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Atom or noise? New method helps cryo-EM researchers tell the difference

Cryogenic electron microscopy, or cryo-EM, has reached the point where researchers could in principle image individual atoms in a 3-D reconstruction of a molecule—but just because they could see those details doesn't always mean they do. Now, researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have proposed a new way to quantify how accurate such

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Atom or noise? New method helps cryo-EM researchers tell the difference

Cryogenic electron microscopy, or cryo-EM, has reached the point where researchers could in principle image individual atoms in a 3-D reconstruction of a molecule—but just because they could see those details doesn't always mean they do. Now, researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have proposed a new way to quantify how accurate such

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How some mammals pause their pregnancies

How do some mammals postpone the development of their embryos to await better conditions for having offspring? A recent study at the UW Medicine Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine explored this reproductive enigma, which can occur in more than 130 species of mammals as well as in some marsupials.

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How some mammals pause their pregnancies

How do some mammals postpone the development of their embryos to await better conditions for having offspring? A recent study at the UW Medicine Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine explored this reproductive enigma, which can occur in more than 130 species of mammals as well as in some marsupials.

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Orb-weaver spiders' yellow and black pattern helps them lure prey

Being inconspicuous might seem the best strategy for spiders to catch potential prey in their webs, but many orb-web spiders, which hunt in this way, are brightly coloured. New research finds their distinct yellow and black pattern is actually essential in luring prey. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal: Functional Ecology.

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Orb-weaver spiders' yellow and black pattern helps them lure prey

Being inconspicuous might seem the best strategy for spiders to catch potential prey in their webs, but many orb-web spiders, which hunt in this way, are brightly coloured. New research finds their distinct yellow and black pattern is actually essential in luring prey. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal: Functional Ecology.

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Lower internet prices aren't enough to bridge 'digital divide'

Offering cheap internet service is a powerful tool to boost internet access among low-income customers, but pricing changes alone won't close the digital divide, according to new research. You can go almost anywhere in the United States and get online thanks to cable, satellite, DSL, and other services. And yet, according to the Pew Research Center, one in 10 Americans didn't have service at home

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Sällsynta cancerkloner upptäckta i akut myeloisk leukemi, AML

Akut myeloisk leukemi (AML), är en av de vanligaste formerna av leukemi hos vuxna. Nu har en forskargrupp vid Lunds universitet lyckats hitta cancerkloner med mutationer så sällsynta att de inte kan upptäckas vid diagnostillfället. Studien har också undersökt hur cancerklonerna utvecklas och konkurrerar med varandra. Det är ny kunskap som kan öka förståelsen för vad som orsakar återfall.

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Sydamerikanske skove ryddes for at fodre danske svin: 'Landbruget skal købe bæredygtig soja – nu'

Det går for langsomt med at bruge bæredygtig soja i dansk landbrug, lyder kritik.

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Chiropractic Webster Technique: Nonsense Based on Nonsense

The Chiropractic Webster Technique is a nonsensical method of adjusting the sacrum in a misguided effort to enhance pregnancy and to facilitate childbirth. The technique, unopposed in the United States, is under fire by a Canadian chiropractic regulatory body.

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HK banks offer relief to customers amid coronavirus outbreak

StanChart and HSBC to provide liquidity support to borrowers in their biggest market

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Høje unge mænd kan have lavere risiko for demens

Forskning fra Københavns Universitet viser, at høje unge mænd har lavere risiko for at…

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African nations step up efforts to prevent spread of coronavirus

If the new coronavirus reaches Africa, it could have a huge impact. But the continent is getting ready, and 29 countries will soon be able to test for the infection

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Nye miljøskibe atter forsinket efter fejl hos Kammeradvokaten

En fejl hos Kammeradvokaten betyder, at ombygningen af de to miljøskibe Sif og Frigg endnu engang skal i nyt udbud og derfor bliver yderligere forsinket.

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UK time limit on storing frozen eggs and sperm could be extended

Public consultation follows concerns 10-year limit affects women disproportionately The limit on how long frozen eggs, sperm and embryos can be stored may be extended amid concerns that women are being disproportionately affected, the government has announced. The maximum storage period is 10 years, after which families must decide whether to undergo fertility treatment or have their eggs, sperm

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Söker bästa sättet att lagra snö

Snölagring används av fler och fler skidanläggningar för att säkra snö till säsongsstarten eller till stora tävlingar. För att ta reda på vilka material som bäst bevarar snön testas de i en vindtunnel vid Mittuniversitetet. Frigolitlådor med snö täckta av sågspån, bark, flis och olika typer av textildukar utsätts för simulerat regn och blåst. Sedan mäter forskarna hur mycket snö som försvunnit.

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Can Taiwan's crypto-space survive without its Crypto Congressman?

submitted by /u/baguioyun92 [link] [comments]

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Why Extremists Need Therapy

How do you unmake a terrorist? It's an urgent question, particularly for Britain. About 220 people are in prison for terror offenses in the country, the majority of whom are Islamists. Until recently, 20-year-old Sudesh Amman was one of them. He was released in January after serving half of a three-year sentence for possessing extremist material. Ten days later, he was shot dead by police after s

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Coronavirus 'could infect 60% of global population if unchecked'

Exclusive: Public health epidemiologist says other countries should consider adopting China-style containment measures Coronavirus – latest updates The coronavirus epidemic could spread to about two-thirds of the world's population if it cannot be controlled, according to Hong Kong's leading public health epidemiologist. His warning came after the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) said

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Coronavirus: outspoken academic blames Xi Jinping for 'catastrophe' sweeping China

Xu Zhangrun says culture of suppression and 'systemic impotence' have created the crisis that has killed more than 1,000 people Coronavirus – latest updates A prominent Chinese intellectual has become the first high-profile public figure to lay the blame for the coronavirus crisis at the feet of the country's leader, Xi Jinping, saying the spread of the deadly virus has "revealed the rotten core

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Novel drug therapy shows promise for quality, quantity of kidneys available for transplant

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center (UH), Cleveland Clinic and Lifebanc (a Northeast Ohio organ-procurement organization) have developed a new way to preserve donated kidneys — a method that could extend the number and quality of kidneys available for transplant, saving more people with end-stage renal disease, more co

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Free radicals from immune cells are direct cause of salt-sensitive hypertension

In salt-sensitive hypertension, immune cells gather in the kidneys and shoot out free radicals, heightening blood pressure and damaging this pair of vital organs, scientists report.

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Atom or noise? New method helps cryo-EM researchers tell the difference

Cryogenic electron microscopy can in principle make out individual atoms in a molecule, but distinguishing the crisp from the blurry parts of an image can be a challenge. A new mathematical method may help.

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Understanding recent US mumps outbreaks

A single strain of mumps virus has dominated the US since 2006, and is responsible for many of the large numbers of cases seen across the country in the widespread 2016-17 outbreaks. In a paper publishing February 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, Pardis Sabeti from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and colleagues analyze over 200 whole mumps virus genomes from patient swab samples,

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Orb-weaver spiders' yellow and black pattern helps them lure prey

Being inconspicuous might seem the best strategy for spiders to catch potential prey in their webs, but many orb-web spiders, which hunt in this way, are brightly coloured. New research finds their distinct yellow and black pattern is actually essential in luring prey. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal: Functional Ecology.

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Alarmingly low rates of HIV testing among at-risk teenage boys

The majority of teenage boys most at risk for developing HIV are not being tested for the disease, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. This lack of testing feeds the growing epidemic of undiagnosed HIV infections in the United States.

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Coronavirus Updates: Virus Is Said to Spread Through Apartment Building's Pipes

Dozens of people were quarantined at a Hong Kong housing complex after the virus appeared to spread through the building's pipes. The number of total cases in China topped 42,000.

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UK active fund sales plummet on coronavirus fears

Investor inflows drop 90 per cent in January as slower global growth is expected

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Dollar's surge adds to risks for US economy

Currency's attraction as a safe haven poses a further threat to growth, say analysts

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Mertens' prime product formula, dissected

In 1874, Mertens famously proved an asymptotic formula for the product $p/(p-1)$ over all primes $p$ up to $x$. On the other hand, one may expand Mertens' prime product into series of over numbers $n$ with only small prime factors. It is natural to restrict such series to numbers $n$ with a fixed number $k$ of prime factors. In this article, we obtain asymptotic formulae for these series for each

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Coronavirus cancellations rock world's biggest smartphone event

Big groups scrap plans to attend Mobile World Congress amid health and safety fears

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Danfoss skifter teknologi i digitale termostater: Nye og gamle enheder kan ikke tale sammen

PLUS. Danfoss udskifter den trådløse netværksprotokol i deres smartvarme-løsning Danfoss Link. Gamle Link-produkter med Z-wave fungerer ikke sammen med den nye Link-generation med Zigbee. Det møder kritik fra kunder.

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Grizzly Bear Death Rates Are Climbing

Trains, cars and poaching have all contributed to a soaring number of fatalities, prompting fears for the grizzlies' future.

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3D printing with living organisms

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Wanting to seem honest can make us lie

In certain cases, people will lie in order to appear more honest, researchers report. They found evidence that highly favorable circumstances can prompt people to fudge the truth, even at personal monetary cost. Using a range of online experiments and interactive games, the researchers discovered that people sometimes weigh the cost to their reputation more heavily than the cost to their pockets.

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Coronavirus threatens Australia's record growth run

China-reliant country already reeling from fires has not had a recession in 28 years

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Coronavirus live updates: deaths pass 1,000 as infections rise over 42,000 – latest news

Xi Jinping makes rare appearance at Beijing hospital as nervous global investors turn to safe havens like gold. Follow updates live 'Come back soon': coronavirus wreaks havoc on global tourism hotspots Number of confirmed UK cases rises from four to eight Could the coronavirus mutate if a vaccine can't be found in time? 12.55am GMT Shanghai is still very quiet again today, after people returned t

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NASA soars and others plummet in Trump's budget proposal

Nature, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00348-2 US research sees deep cuts in the president's request for 2021. But Congress has resisted similar reductions in the past.

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Cervical cancer elimination possible within two decades in the US

At current levels of screening and HPV vaccination, cervical cancer incidence in the US is projected to fall below the threshold of elimination by 2038-2046. Scaling up screening coverage to 90% could expedite elimination timing by 10-13 years and avert an average of 1,400-2,088 additional cases per year.

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The Lancet Neurology: Discovery could speed diagnosis and treatment of children with life-threatening neurological diseases

A group of life-threatening neurological conditions affecting children have been linked to an antibody which points to potential treatment, according to an observational multicentre study involving 535 children with central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorders and encephalitis, published in The Lancet Neurology journal.

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Smartphone apps not accurate enough to spot all skin cancers

Smartphone apps that assess the risk of suspicious moles cannot be relied upon to detect all cases of skin cancer, finds a review of the evidence published by The BMJ today.

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Daily exposure to ozone pollution linked to increased risk of death

Daily exposure to ground level ozone in cities worldwide is associated with an increased risk of death, finds the largest study of its kind published by The BMJ today.

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: There Is No Unity Candidate

It's Monday, February 10. In today's newsletter: What Bernie Sanders has in common with Michael Bloomberg. Plus: What if transparency is the problem? * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (M. SCOTT BRAUER / REDUX) The "unity candidate" may be a myth. Bernie Sanders has been running for president as an anti-establishment insurgent for some five years now. But for the first time, he finds himself in a new positi

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Ocean Infinity: Exploration company goes for robot boats at scale

Uncrewed Surface Vessels are the future on water, just as driverless cars are on land.

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Author Correction: Circulating Levels of Inflammatory Proteins and Survival in Patients with Gallbladder Cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59761-2

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Author Correction: Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo antibiotic efficacy against a novel bioluminescent Shigella flexneri

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59766-x

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Author Correction: A mutation in the methionine aminopeptidase gene provides phage resistance in Streptococcus thermophilus

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59767-w

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Nanocatalytic activity of clean-surfaced, faceted nanocrystalline gold enhances remyelination in animal models of multiple sclerosis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58709-w

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Twelve ways to make your new browser tabs more exciting

You might be tempted to open new tabs just for the sake of opening new tabs. Don't though. Resist. (Campaign Creators via Unsplash/) Every time you open a new tab in your browser, the app has to display something to fill up the space. Most of the time, that's frequently visited links, a search box, or your bookmarks. But it doesn't have to be that bland. Plenty of third-party developers have been

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Oscars Woes for Netflix, Money for Yahoo Users, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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'Reaper of death': scientists discover new dinosaur species related to T rex

Species is thought to be the oldest member of the T rex family yet discovered in northern North America Scientists in Canada have announced the discovery of a new species of dinosaur closely related to Tyrannosaurus rex that strode the plain of North America about 80m years ago. Related: Dinosaurs had feathers ruffled by parasites, study finds Continue reading…

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Bruce McEwen, 81, Is Dead; Found Stress Can Alter the Brain

A neuroscientist, he showed how an unrelenting barrage of stress hormones can break down the body, leading to disease, depression, obesity and more.

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Ion Propulsion – The Plane With No Moving Parts

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

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City of Hope's Triplex vaccine reduces rate of CMV complications in transplant recipients

Patients who underwent a stem cell transplant and received the Triplex vaccine to prevent a type of herpes virus — cytomegalovirus (CMV) — from duplicating out of control were 50% less likely to develop health complications related to the virus than patients who did not take Triplex, according to a City of Hope-led study published today in Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Himalayan glacier shows evidence of start of Industrial Revolution

Human beings altered one of the highest peaks in the Himalayas hundreds of years before a person ever set foot there, new research has found. The study indicates that the byproducts of burning coal in Europe in the late 18th century made their way to the Dasuopu glacier in the central Himalayas, some 6,400 miles as the crow flies from London, the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution.

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Heavy Metal Pollution From the Industrial Revolution Turns Up in Himalayan Snows

Likely churned out by factories and engines over 6,000 miles away, iron, lead, uranium and more traveled halfway around the world.

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Solar Orbiter Sets Off for Mission to Study the Sun

The joint mission from the ESA and NASA will allow humans to get a closer look at the star at the center of our solar system.

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Are physics and astronomy about to experience a cultural shift?

A new report calls for doubling the number of undergrad degrees awarded to black students in physics and astronomy by 2030. In the United States, black students earned a total of 223 bachelor's degrees in physics and just 10 in astronomy in 2018. The report found that unsupportive environments in physics and astronomy departments and systemic financial challenges faced by black students contribut

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Space Force General: Russian Satellite Is "Unusual and Disturbing"

Close Encounters Two mysterious Russian satellites are tailing a US spy satellite — and it has US military officials on edge. "We view this behavior as unusual and disturbing," General John 'Jay' Raymond, the first recently appointed US Space Force general, told TIME in an exclusive interview . "It has the potential to create a dangerous situation in space." Circumstantial Evidence Russia launche

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A happy partner leads to a healthier future

Michigan State University research found that those who are optimistic contribute to the health of their partners, staving off the risk factors leading to Alzheimer's disease, dementia and cognitive decline as they grow old together.

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Creating the ideal nasal tip contour

The dramatic shift in how nasal tip surgery is being performed given changes in the intended goals and evolving techniques is highlighted in a Special Communication by and interview with Dean Toriumi, MD, published in the Official Journal of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Facial Plastic Surgery & Aesthetic Medicine, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert,

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New method offers more stable, efficient electrocatalytic reactions

By fluidizing catalyst particles in electrolyte instead of gluing them to electrodes, researchers made electrocatalytic reactions that are more efficient and longer lasting, which play an important role in energy storage.

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AMD's Radeon Instinct MI100 Leaks, Hint at Massive, 8192-core GPU

Back in 2018, AMD launched the MI50 and MI60, Vega-based accelerators built on TSMC's 7nm process node. Now, there are rumors of a massive new chip coming in that family, in a relatively svelte power envelope. "Arcturus" is a codename that's been floating around for a while, having first been mentioned by an AMD staffer in late 2018, but it's never been clear if the GPU was based on Navi or Vega.

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Gulf coast mollusks rode out past periods of climate change

About 55 million years ago, a rapidly warming climate decimated marine communities around the world. But according to new research, it was a different story for snails, clams and other mollusks living in the shallow waters along what is now the Gulf Coast of the United States. They were able to survive.

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To slow an epidemic, focus on handwashing

A new study estimates that improving the rates of handwashing by travelers passing through just 10 of the world's leading airports could significantly reduce the spread of many infectious diseases. And the greater the improvement in people's handwashing habits at airports, the more dramatic the effect on slowing the disease, the researchers found.

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Adapting to climate change: We're doing it wrong

When it comes to adapting to the effects of climate change, scientists and policymakers are thinking too small, according to a new research review.

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How some mammals pause their pregnancies

Some species of mammals can delay the implantation of their embryos until conditions are better for bearing and rearing offspring. This enigmatic reproductive strategy can help improve the odds of survival. Researchers have found some of the biological mechanisms behind this suspension of embryonic development. Similar reversible dormant states are also found in some cancer tumors.

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Global map highlights fish genetic diversity hotspots

A new global distribution map for genetic diversity among freshwater and marine fish will help protect species around the world, scientists say. In a population of animals or plants, genetic diversity can decline much more quickly than species diversity in response to various stress factors: disease, changes to habitat or climate, and so on. Yet not much is known about fish genetic diversity arou

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Mission impossible? WHO director fights to prevent a pandemic without offending China

New outbreak comes as Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus struggles to raise more money, thwart Ebola, and fight health misinformation

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New threads: Nanowires made of tellurium and nanotubes hold promise for wearable tech

Wearable tech requires both strength and flexibility. A new nanowire design — a boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) filled with tellurium atomic chains — holds promise for electronics triggered by light and pressure. In collaboration with Purdue University, Washington University and University of Texas at Dallas, Michigan Tech physicists created and tested the new nanowire alongside carbon nanotubes.

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Will That Antidepressant Work For You? The Answer May Lie In Your Brain Waves

Scientists say certain brain wave patterns can predict whether a person is likely to respond to a common antidepressant, or would do better with non-drug therapy. (Image credit: DrAfter123/Getty Images)

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Scientists Find "Mysterious" Virus With Almost No Known Genes

While looking for new viruses in an artificial lake in Brazil, an international team of researchers made an unexpected discovery. Among the giant viruses they found infecting the lake's amoeba population, they also spotted a much smaller specimen . When they analyzed the virus' genome, they discovered that more than 90 percent of its genes had never been recorded by scientists. In January, the re

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Distant giant planets form differently than 'failed stars'

Astronomers using two Maunakea Observatories, W. M. Keck Observatory and Subaru Telescope in Hawaii, have probed the formation process of giant exoplanets and brown dwarfs by using a combination of direct imaging of these objects and custom software to model their orbits.

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Chemistry technique is 'warp drive' for creating better synthetic molecules for medicine

In a study with implications for the future of drug discovery, scientists showed they were able to turn simple chemicals into unique 3-D structures resembling those found in nature — structures with desirable properties for medicines. In the process, they found a potential drug lead for inflammatory disease, which is now being investigated further.

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Impact of oil contaminated water on tubeworms and brittlestars

A new study adds a new layer to understanding how an oil spill could impact marine life. A diverse community of worms and other marine organisms on the seafloor plays a large role in nutrient cycling, organic matter burial, and remineralization. The burrowing and feeding activities of these organisms or bioturbation helps in the oxygenation of the sediment.

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Alcoholism in the family affects how your brain switches between active and resting states

A new study shows that just having a parent with an alcohol use disorder affects how your brain transitions between active and resting states — regardless of your own drinking habits.

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Reimagining the link between space and species could boost wildlife conservation

Investigators offer a new method for ecologists to calculate the correlation between geographic space and the number of species inhabiting that space.

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Is an Antidepressant Right for You? Ask Your Brain Waves

EEGs successfully picked out which depressed individuals got better on the drug Zoloft — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Gulf coast mollusks rode out past periods of climate change

About 55 million years ago, a rapidly warming climate decimated marine communities around the world. But according to new research, it was a different story for snails, clams and other mollusks living in the shallow waters along what is now the Gulf Coast of the United States. They were able to survive.

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Distant giant planets form differently than 'failed stars'

A team of astronomers led by Brendan Bowler of The University of Texas at Austin has probed the formation process of giant exoplanets and brown dwarfs, a class of objects that are more massive than giant planets, but not massive enough to ignite nuclear fusion in their cores to shine like true stars.

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An Alzheimer's Treatment Fails: 'We Don't Have Anything Now'

With high hopes, drugs to fight brain plaques were tested in people genetically destined to develop dementia. The drugs failed.

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Is an Antidepressant Right for You? Ask Your Brain Waves

EEGs successfully picked out which depressed individuals got better on the drug Zoloft — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Chemistry technique is 'warp drive' for creating better synthetic molecules for medicine

In a study with implications for the future of drug discovery, scientists showed they were able to turn simple chemicals into unique 3-D structures resembling those found in nature — structures with desirable properties for medicines. In the process, they found a potential drug lead for inflammatory disease, which is now being investigated further.

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Is an Antidepressant Right for You? Ask Your Brain Waves

EEGs successfully picked out which depressed individuals got better on the drug Zoloft — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Half-a-million insect species face extinction: scientists

Half of the one million animal and plant species on Earth facing extinction are insects, and their disappearance could be catastrophic for humankind, scientists have said in a "warning to humanity".

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Half-a-million insect species face extinction: scientists

Half of the one million animal and plant species on Earth facing extinction are insects, and their disappearance could be catastrophic for humankind, scientists have said in a "warning to humanity".

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Ett parasitiskt barrträd

Det finns många parasiter både bland alger och blomväxter, men bara en enda parasit är känd bland barrträden. Detta barrträd finns på ön Nya Kaledonien öster om Australien, som ockå hyser många andra speciella växter. Det parasiterar på ett annat barrträd i samma familj, Podocarpaceae, genom att förena sina rötter med värdträdets rötter. Parasiten har förlorat förmågan att själv utföra fotosyntes.

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Harnessing the domino effect for deployable structures

A team of researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have harnessed the domino effect to design deployable systems that expand quickly with a small push and are stable and locked into place after deployment.

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Study: To slow an epidemic, focus on handwashing

A new study estimates that improving the rates of handwashing by travelers passing through just 10 of the world's leading airports could significantly reduce the spread of many infectious diseases. And the greater the improvement in people's handwashing habits at airports, the more dramatic the effect on slowing the disease, the researchers found.

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Gulf coast mollusks rode out past periods of climate change

About 55 million years ago, a rapidly warming climate decimated marine communities around the world. But according to new research, it was a different story for snails, clams and other mollusks living in the shallow waters along what is now the Gulf Coast of the United States. They were able to survive.

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The science behind a firework's big ka-boom

Bang bang (Alessandro Rustighi/) Even the most elaborate fireworks show starts with a single crack , as black powder shoots shell from mortar. That launch sets off a cascade of whoosh es, zip s, and bang s that send colorful shapes soaring into the sky. Here's how engineers can tweak these pyrotechnics to provide spectators with stunning displays. Light Fireworks have followed the same basic form

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WHO Leader Warns of Worldwide Coronavirus Outbreaks

The leader of the World Health Organization (WHO) warned on Monday that the coronavirus kown as 2019-nCoV could lead to outbreaks across the world. "Our objective remains containment," said WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus at a press conference attended by CNBC . "We call on all countries to use the window of opportunity we have to prevent a bigger fire." Most cases of the disease

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Pet trackers that help you keep tabs on your furry friends

It's 9 a.m. Do you know where your pets are? (Alvan Nee via Unsplash/) Every pet parent worries about a worst-case scenario, where your best friend gets spooked and runs off, or gets into trouble on their daily prowl of the neighborhood. If you have an elderly or ailing pet, knowing that they are up and moving about while you're at work can help you feel better about the time you have to spend ap

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The 600 Mile Range Pick Up – Nikola Announces Badger – The Next Avenue

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Africa Must Choose Renewables Over Coal by Carlos Lopes

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DeepMind trains robots to insert USB keys and stack colored blocks

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Stor studie: Sömnproblem kan vara ärftliga

Sömnproblem riskerar att gå i arv. Det visar en ny nordisk studie som jämfört sömnvanorna mellan föräldrar och deras barn. – Sömnbesvär är vanligt förekommande och vi måste lära oss mer om vi ska kunna komma åt orsakerna, säger forskaren Eva Lindberg.

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New study examines ways to improve cancer literacy in young students

A new study led by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that implementing cancer education curricula in middle and high schools may improve cancer literacy in Kentuckians and ultimately help reduce cancer rates.

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Rare-earth element material could produce world's smallest transistors

A material from a rare earth element, tellurium, could produce the world's smallest transistor, thanks to an Army-funded project.

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Study: It's devastatingly common for African mothers to experience child loss

University of Southern California and University of Chicago sociologists propose new indicators to estimate how common it is for mothers to have experienced the death of a child. In contrast to traditional measures of infant and child mortality, their results capture the cumulative impact of child loss through a mother's lifetime.

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Scientists show solar system processes control the carbon cycle throughout Earth's history

This new work sheds fresh light on the complicated interplay of factors affecting global climate and the carbon cycle — and on what transpired millions of years ago to spark two of the most devastating extinction events in Earth's history.

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Tropical cyclones: How they contribute to better forecast in the Maritime Continent

Tropical cyclones in the North West Pacific can dry the archipelagos of Southeast Asia, as they reduce humidity in the area with their associated winds. A new study of the CMCC Foundation shows causes and implications of this relation.

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But what about flow? The effect of hydrodynamics on liquid-liquid transitions

The University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science researchers modeled the role of hydrodynamics in liquid-liquid transitions of a single-component system. They showed that domain formation is related to the density upon transition, which can be influenced by hydrodynamics. The findings could provide a basis for further investigations into shear flow systems, as well as a means of optimizing

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Himalayan glacier shows evidence of start of Industrial Revolution

Human beings altered one of the highest peaks in the Himalayas hundreds of years before a person ever set foot there, new research has found. The study, publishing today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, indicates that the byproducts of burning coal in Europe in the late 18th century made their way to the Dasuopu glacier in the central Himalayas, some 6,400 miles as the crow

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The human brain's meticulous interface with the bloodstream now on a precision chip

It can be the bain of brain drug developers: The interface between the human brain and the bloodstream, the blood-brain-barrier, is so meticulous that animal models often fail to represent it. This improved chip represents important features more accurately.

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China Is Spraying Entire City Blocks to Contain Outbreak

Chinese state-owned newspaper People's Daily has uploaded a video of disinfection work in the city of Wuhan, the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak that has spread across the globe. Full-front disinfection work has started in #Wuhan , an effort to contain the spread of #coronavirus pic.twitter.com/E3Vg8XcHTP — People's Daily, China (@PDChina) February 10, 2020 The clip is apocalyptic: workers

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Chemistry technique is 'warp drive' for creating better synthetic molecules for medicine

In a study with implications for the future of drug discovery, Scripps Research scientists showed they were able to turn simple chemicals into unique 3-D structures resembling those found in nature—structures with desirable properties for medicines.

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Chemists develop safer hydrogenation processes

Safe and environmentally-friendly hydrogen gas on demand could be on the horizon following a new "hydrogenation" chemical process in development at The City College of New York. Led by Mahesh K. Lakshman, the research uniquely bypasses the need for an external source of hydrogen gas to accomplish a wide range of hydrogenations. It appears as an inside cover feature in the 2020 issue #1 of journal

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Pangolins Are Suspected as a Potential Coronavirus Host

The world's most trafficked mammal may be involved in the Wuhan outbreak, but the evidence is far from clear.

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Superior 'bio-ink' for 3D printing pioneered

Biomedical engineers have developed a 'bio-ink' for 3D printed materials that could serve as scaffolds for growing human tissues to repair or replace damaged ones in the body.

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Chemists develop safer hydrogenation processes

Safe and environmentally-friendly hydrogen gas on demand could be on the horizon following a new 'hydrogenation' chemical process. The research uniquely bypasses the need for an external source of hydrogen gas to accomplish a wide range of hydrogenations.

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DNA-like material could bring even smaller transistors

A material shaped like a one-dimensional DNA helix might further push the limits on a transistor's size. The material comes from a rare earth element called tellurium.

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Study examines the impact of oil contaminated water on tubeworms and brittlestars

A new study published by Dauphin Island Sea Lab researchers adds a new layer to understanding how an oil spill could impact marine life.

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Coronavirus outbreak raises question: Why are bat viruses so deadly?

It's no coincidence that some of the worst viral disease outbreaks in recent years—SARS, MERS, Ebola, Marburg and likely the newly arrived 2019-nCoV virus—originated in bats.

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Superior 'bio-ink' for 3-D printing pioneered

Rutgers biomedical engineers have developed a "bio-ink" for 3-D printed materials that could serve as scaffolds for growing human tissues to repair or replace damaged ones in the body.

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Study examines the impact of oil contaminated water on tubeworms and brittlestars

A new study published by Dauphin Island Sea Lab researchers adds a new layer to understanding how an oil spill could impact marine life.

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Coronavirus outbreak raises question: Why are bat viruses so deadly?

It's no coincidence that some of the worst viral disease outbreaks in recent years—SARS, MERS, Ebola, Marburg and likely the newly arrived 2019-nCoV virus—originated in bats.

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Coronavirus outbreak raises question: Why are bat viruses so deadly?

A study of cultured bat cells shows that their strong immune responses, constantly primed to respond to viruses, can drive viruses to greater virulence. Modelling bat immune systems on a computer, the researchers showed that when bat cells quickly release interferon upon infection, other cells quickly wall themselves off. This drives viruses to faster reproduction. The increased virulence and infe

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Twist in the story of volcanism and mass extinctions

An emerging scientific consensus is that gases — in particular carbon gases — released by volcanic eruptions millions of years ago contributed to some of Earth's greatest mass extinctions. But new research suggests that that's not the entire story.

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What makes a 'good Samaritan' good? That opinion depends on the beneficiary

New research suggests that someone who helps a total stranger is generally viewed as morally better and more trustworthy than someone who helps a family member. But this is true only if the helper did not have to choose between those options.

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Superior 'bio-ink' for 3D printing pioneered

Biomedical engineers have developed a 'bio-ink' for 3D printed materials that could serve as scaffolds for growing human tissues to repair or replace damaged ones in the body.

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Chemists develop safer hydrogenation processes

Safe and environmentally-friendly hydrogen gas on demand could be on the horizon following a new 'hydrogenation' chemical process. The research uniquely bypasses the need for an external source of hydrogen gas to accomplish a wide range of hydrogenations.

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The many lives of charcoal

In sub-Saharan Africa, charcoal dominates as an energy resource for cooking. A graduate student traveled to her native Uganda to study how this fuel is produced, traded, and used.

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20 Things You Didn't Know About… Doors

Doors injure 300,000 people a year — not to mention the "Door to Hell." And what's up with trapdoor spiders?

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Cannabis may encourage false memories

Just one toke, and reliability hits a pothole.

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Himalayan glacier shows evidence of Industrial Revolution

Study reveals human impact long before people arrived.

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Tropical forests struggle to recover from El Niño

Studies reveal lingering impacts on carbon storage and biodiversity.

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DNA-like material could bring even smaller transistors

A material shaped like a one-dimensional DNA helix might further push the limits on a transistor's size. The material comes from a rare earth element called tellurium.

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Global warming and extinction risk

How can fossils predict the consequences of climate change? A research team compared data from fossil and marine organisms living today to predict which groups of animals are most at risk from climate change.

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Family history with alcohol may alter how your brain works

Regardless of your own drinking habits, having a parent with an alcohol use disorder affects how your brain transitions between active and resting states, according to new research. The study reveals that the brain reconfigures itself between completing a mentally demanding task and resting. This reconfiguration doesn't happen in the brain of someone with a family history of an alcohol use disord

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Study examines the impact of oil contaminated water on tubeworms and brittlestars

A new study published by Dauphin Island Sea Lab researchers adds a new layer to understanding how an oil spill could impact marine life. A diverse community of worms and other marine organisms on the seafloor plays a large role in nutrient cycling, organic matter burial, and remineralization. The burrowing and feeding activities of these organisms or bioturbation helps in the oxygenation of the se

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Chemistry technique is 'warp drive' for creating better synthetic molecules for medicine

In a study with implications for the future of drug discovery, Scripps Research scientists showed they were able to turn simple chemicals into unique 3-D structures resembling those found in nature — structures with desirable properties for medicines. In the process, they found a potential drug lead for inflammatory disease, which is now being investigated further. The research appears in Nature

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Superior 'bio-ink' for 3D printing pioneered

Rutgers biomedical engineers have developed a 'bio-ink' for 3D printed materials that could serve as scaffolds for growing human tissues to repair or replace damaged ones in the body. The study was published in the journal Biointerphases.

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Study: It's devastatingly common for African mothers to experience child loss

Experiencing the death of a child is seen as a violation of "the natural order." And yet, despite global health gains, such deaths remain prevalent in many poor countries and regions around the world. But just how often do mothers suffer this almost unfathomable loss?

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Scientists show solar system processes control the carbon cycle throughout Earth's history

The world is waking up to the fact that human-driven carbon emissions are responsible for warming our climate, driving unprecedented changes to ecosystems, and placing us on course for the sixth mass extinction event in Earth's history.

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Himalayan glacier shows evidence of start of Industrial Revolution

Human beings altered one of the highest peaks in the Himalayas hundreds of years before a person ever set foot there, new research has found.

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But what about flow? The effect of hydrodynamics on liquid-liquid transitions

For a long time, the liquid state of pure substances was believed to be a continuous state in which the component atoms or molecules are all equivalent. However, it has now been widely shown that there can be multiple phases within liquids, even those containing only one component. Understanding what causes the components of liquids to switch from one state to another is currently a subject of par

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Tropical cyclones: How they contribute to better forecast in the Maritime Continent

Tropical cyclones are important players within the Earth's climate system. While literature usually investigates their role in determining flood events and inducing precipitation, a new study led by the CMCC Foundation—Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change points out for the first time that they can also create drying effects in other regions due to induced zonal wind anomalies.

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The Global Donkey Crisis–Yes, Really

Koalas might be cuter, but donkeys are being abused and slaughtered en masse for their skins, which are used in traditional Chinese medicine — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Solar Orbiter Launches on a Mission to Study the Sun's Poles

The probe's long, historic journey is underway — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How viruses adapt from animals to humans

It may provide a clue to stopping coronavirus.

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AI may alter how doctors treat depression

Computer predicts patient outcomes based on EEG.

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Big potential in mini-gut organoid

Researchers explore treatment for an unpleasant condition.

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Did humans truly domesticate dogs? Canine history is more of a mystery than you think.

Dogs have a unique drive to bond, even with members of another species. Finnigan, the pet goldendoodle, is one of millions of examples in the US. (The Voorhes/) A black-and-white Boston terrier named Chevy, as sleek and dapper as a seal in a tuxedo, trots crisply into the soundproof testing room. His jaunty confidence will fade quickly as a team of researchers subjects him to a series of psycholo

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Scientists Invent Device to Generate Electricity From Rain

Brief Jolt A team of engineers has figured out how to take a single drop of rain and use it to generate a powerful flash of electricity. The City University of Hong Kong researchers behind the device, which they're calling a droplet-based electricity generator (DEG), say that a single rain droplet can briefly generate 140 volts. That was enough to briefly power 100 small lightbulbs and, while it'

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MRI contrast agent detects early stage liver cancer

A new way to detect liver cancer in its early stages uses a targeted MRI contrast agent that binds to proteins, researchers report. A study in Science Advances describes a newly identified biomarker for detection of liver metastases. With current tests like biopsies, doctors often only detect cancer in the liver in advanced stages, which can limit treatment options and lower overall survival rate

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NASA Will Only Tolerate So Much Danger

A lot went right during a recent attempt to reach the International Space Station. A lot went wrong too. The rocket launched just before sunrise on a cool, late December day, cutting a streak of gold across the sky in Florida's Cape Canaveral. The capsule it carried, which was designed and built for NASA by Boeing, was smoothly delivered past the edge of space. If the test had gone off without a

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Elon Musk Provides Peek Inside Starship Factory

Hard at Work In an image uploaded to Twitter on Sunday, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk provided a rare glimpse at the inside of his space company SpaceX's Starship production facility in Boca Chica, Texas. And the progress since the company's scaled-down "Starhopper" prototype flew for the last time only nine months ago is impressive. Back in Boca pic.twitter.com/RjiWpW28PT — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February

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What makes a 'good Samaritan' good? That opinion depends on the beneficiary

New research suggests that someone who helps a total stranger is generally viewed as morally better and more trustworthy than someone who helps a family member. But this is true only if the helper did not have to choose between those options.

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There's a twist in the story of volcanism & mass extinctions, say CCNY researchers

An emerging scientific consensus is that gases — in particular carbon gases — released by volcanic eruptions millions of years ago contributed to some of Earth's greatest mass extinctions. But new research at The City College of New York suggests that that's not the entire story.

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Coronavirus outbreak raises question: Why are bat viruses so deadly?

A UC Berkeley study of cultured bat cells shows that their strong immune responses, constantly primed to respond to viruses, can drive viruses to greater virulence. Modelling bat immune systems on a computer, the researchers showed that when bat cells quickly release interferon upon infection, other cells quickly wall themselves off. This drives viruses to faster reproduction. The increased virule

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Human textiles to repair blood vessels

As the leading cause of mortality worldwide, cardiovascular diseases claim over 17 million lives each year, according to World Health Organization estimates. To open up new research avenues into this serious public health problem, Inserm researchers are developing "human textiles" from collagen in order to repair damaged blood vessels.

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Is it hemp or marijuana? New scanner gives instant answer

Hemp is technically legal in Texas, but proving that hemp is not marijuana can be a hurdle, requiring testing in a licensed laboratory. Now, a team of researchers have created a 'hemp scanner' that could easily fit in a police cruiser and distinguish hemp and marijuana instantly, without damaging any of the product.

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Human textiles to repair blood vessels

As the leading cause of mortality worldwide, cardiovascular diseases claim over 17 million lives each year, according to World Health Organization estimates. To open up new research avenues into this serious public health problem, Inserm researchers are developing "human textiles" from collagen in order to repair damaged blood vessels.

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Finding a cure for dog's brain cancer may help us find a cure for ourselves

For cancers such as glioma, preclinical research models have failed to provide sufficient insight for medical progress. A team has now thoroughly analyzed sporadic canine gliomas and found that their molecular characteristics, including gene mutations and duplications, resemble those of humans. The results indicate that dogs provide an effective model for human gliomas, and learning how to more ef

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Oral traditions and volcanic eruptions in Australia

In Australia, the onset of human occupation (about 65,000 years ago?) and dispersion across the continent are the subjects of intense debate and are critical to understanding global human migration routes. A lack of ceramic artifacts and permanent structures has resulted in a scarcity of dateable archaeological sites older than about 10,000 years.

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Is it hemp or marijuana? New scanner gives instant answer

Hemp is technically legal in Texas, but proving that hemp is not marijuana can be a hurdle, requiring testing in a licensed laboratory. Now, a team of researchers have created a 'hemp scanner' that could easily fit in a police cruiser and distinguish hemp and marijuana instantly, without damaging any of the product.

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Melatonin receptor molecules can change biological clocks

Newly discovered molecules can modulate circadian rhythms by binding to a melatonin receptor in the biological clock, according to new research in mice. Like breathing or blinking, most people don't notice the behaviors our circadian rhythms regulate, such as digestion and sleep-wake cycles. But when circadian rhythms malfunction, the result can be any one of a broad range of serious, chronic dis

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Top Spider Biologist's Research Under Fire

After the initial announcements of two retractions, scientists have mobilized to interrogate the data in nearly 150 of Jonathan Pruitt's papers.

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Scientists Find First Fast Radio Burst That Repeats At Regular Intervals

Somewhere in the universe, a highly energetic Fast Radio Burst (FRB) is blasting outward from an unknown object, bathing the sky in radio waves. Scientists may be one step closer to understanding these mysterious signals. A new study of FRBs has revealed the first of these energetic signals that repeats at regular intervals . That could finally give astronomers the tools they need to characterize

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Trump's 2021 budget drowns science agencies in red ink, again

White House proposes big cuts to NIH, DOE, NASA and other programs

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Color-Changing Material Unites the Math and Physics of Knots

One sunny day last summer, Mathias Kolle, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, took a couple of eminent colleagues out sailing. They talked about their research. They had some drinks. Then Kolle noticed something was off: A rowboat tied to his boat had come loose and was drifting toward the horizon. As he tacked across the water to retrieve the wayward vessel, he realized his

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Trump's 2021 budget drowns science agencies in red ink, again

White House proposes big cuts to NIH, DOE, NASA and other programs

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Inner 'clockwork' sets the time for cell division in bacteria

Researchers have discovered a 'clockwork' mechanism that controls cell division in bacteria. They report how a small signaling molecule starts the 'clock', which informs the cell about the right time to reproduce.

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New treatment discovered for rare eye disease may prevent blindness

Patients with thyroid eye disease who used the minimally invasive insulin-like growth factor I blocking antibody, teprotumumab, experienced improvement in their symptoms, appearance and quality of life, according to a new study.

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On climate misinformation and accountability

Lately there has been a great deal of misinformation regarding the origins and purpose of Skeptical Science. As John Cook wrote nearly a decade ago , Skeptical Science is primarily a website that debunks climate misinformation with peer-reviewed science. Despite the ever-worsening impacts from climate change, with record after record being broken in our warming climate, misinformation casting dou

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Biochemist Stanley Cohen Dies

The Vanderbilt University professor was awarded a Nobel Prize for his discovery of epidermal growth factor.

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CCNY chemists develop safer hydrogenation processes

Safe and environmentally-friendly hydrogen gas on demand could be on the horizon following a new 'hydrogenation' chemical process in development at The City College of New York. Led by Mahesh K. Lakshman, the research uniquely bypasses the need for an external source of hydrogen gas to accomplish a wide range of hydrogenations. It appears as an inside cover feature in the 2020 issue #1 of journal

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Next NASA Mars Rover Will Sport a Rock-Vaporizing Laser

Coming In Peace The Mars 2020 rover, which NASA will be launching in July , is packing serious heat. Part of the rover's mission is to search for fossils or other evidence that Mars once hosted life — and NASA decided that the best way to do that is to use a laser so strong it can vaporize rocks, according to Digital Trends . It's a bizarre plan, but one that could finally determine whether the R

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The Guardian view on climate anxiety: we live in frightening times | Editorial

When psychologists warn that global heating could cause trauma to become normalised, world leaders should take notice "It makes sense" is the first thing to say about the phenomenon being described by psychologists as climate anxiety . Wherever in the world you live, there are very good reasons to feel anxious about the rate of global heating and the lack of adequate action to tackle it by governm

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Dissecting a lightning strike, from flash to boom

It shot me down (Alessandro Rustighi/) Most lightning just bounces around within its cloud of origin. But the rogue charges that ­escape are enough to dazzle observers, inspire awe and fear (which is fair—the zaps do kill a few dozen people in the US every year), and make some magnificent thunder. A typical cloud-​to-​ground strike lasts for just a fraction of a second. Here's how the short but b

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5 digital marketing courses to help you get ahead of the pack

These training bundles will help you become a force for online sales and message building. The courses cover SEO, affiliate marketing and social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn. All five course bundles are discounted up to 98%. How important are social media influencers in digital marketing? What impact does video make on your campaigns? And what's the next platform or deliv

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NASA examines Tropical Storm Uesi's heavy rainfall

NASA analyzed Tropical Storm Uesi's rainfall and found moderate to heavy rainfall around the storm's center and in a large band of thunderstorms south of the center. That heavy rainfall has triggered warnings for Vanuatu in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

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Simulations identify missing link to determine carbon in deep Earth reservoirs

Understanding the Earth's carbon cycle has important implications for understanding climate change and the health of biospheres.

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Is it hemp or marijuana? New scanner gives instant answer

Hemp is technically legal in Texas, but proving that hemp is not marijuana can be a hurdle, requiring testing in a licensed laboratory. So, when a truck carrying thousands of pounds of hemp was recently detained by law enforcement near Amarillo, the driver spent weeks in jail awaiting confirmation that the cargo was legal.

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Oral traditions and volcanic eruptions in Australia

In Australia, the onset of human occupation (about 65,000 years?) and dispersion across the continent are the subjects of intense debate and are critical to understanding global human migration routes. A lack of ceramic artifacts and permanent structures has resulted in a scarcity of dateable archaeological sites older than about 10,000 years.

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Record-breaking hot years look set to continue through the next decade

There is a 75 per cent chance that every year from 2019 to 2028 will be one of the all-time top 10 hottest years, and a 99 per cent chance that the majority will be

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World's largest linguistics database is getting too expensive for some researchers

Funding woes push widely used resource behind a higher paywall

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Camera provides view into Sun's polar regions

The Solar Orbiter mission will use a U.S. Naval Research Laboratory-designed and -built heliospheric camera, known as SoloHI, to provide unique perspectives and unprecedented views of the Sun's North and South poles. The spacecraft, a NASA and European Space Agency collaboration, launched aboard an Atlas V rocket at Cape Canaveral, Florida, Feb. 9.

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Simulations identify missing link to determine carbon in deep Earth reservoirs

How much carbon lies deep in the Earth's water reservoirs? Using complex computer simulations, Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering researcher Giulia Galli studied what happens when carbon dioxide is dissolved in water. Her work provides a step toward better understanding our planet's carbon cycle.

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NASA examines Tropical Storm Uesi's heavy rainfall

NASA analyzed Tropical Storm Uesi's rainfall and found moderate to heavy rainfall around the storm's center and in a large band of thunderstorms south of the center. That heavy rainfall has triggered warnings for Vanuatu in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

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Apps sladrer om dig til Facebook: 'Dit datingliv er super værdifuldt'

Tinder er en sladrehank, der fortæller Facebook, hvornår du åbner appen.

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Financial targets make CFOs less likely to disclose fraud

Corporate financial managers (CFOs) do a great job detecting signs of potential fraud, but are less likely to voice concerns externally when the company is under pressure to meet a financial target, a new study shows. "One of the take-away messages here is that auditors, investors, regulators, and other stakeholders should be prepared to identify red flags on their own, rather than expecting mana

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From 4.3GHz All-Core Overclocking to SMT Scaling: A Comprehensive Review of the AMD Threadripper 3990X

AMD has spent the last three years rewriting the rules of desktop performance. On Friday, the microprocessor manufacturer launched its AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X, the world's first single-socket 64-core CPU. I've already written a teaser for this article and gone over some of my early thoughts on the CPU, but here's where we dig into the data on the chip and see what the reports can tell us. Un

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Initial protective role of nervous system's 'star-shaped cells' in sporadic motor neuron disease uncovered

Support cells in the nervous system help protect motor neurons in the early-stages of sporadic motor neuron disease, according to new research from the Crick and UCL.

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Is it hemp or marijuana? New scanner gives instant answer

Hemp is technically legal in Texas, but proving that hemp is not marijuana can be a hurdle, requiring testing in a licensed laboratory. Now, a team of Texas A&M AgriLife researchers have created a 'hemp scanner' that could easily fit in a police cruiser and distinguish hemp and marijuana instantly, without damaging any of the product.

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Hackers Hijack Facebook's Twitter, Instagram Accounts

Account Takeovers Dubai-based hacking group OurMine has struck again, this time taking over social media giant Facebook's Instagram and Twitter accounts . On Friday, the Instagram accounts for both Facebook and Messenger briefly displayed a photo of OurMine's logo — a particularly egregious hack, since Facebook owns Instagram. Everything's Hackable While in control of Facebook's Twitter accounts,

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Super-precise CRISPR tool enhanced by enzyme engineering

Nature, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00340-w Improvements to a method known as base editing could pave the way for safer gene therapies.

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Why Did the Ancient Chimú Civilization Sacrifice Hundreds of Young Lives?

A mass sacrifice of children and llamas 550 years ago may have been a desperate attempt to appease the gods in the wake of heavy rain and flooding.

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Feeding Seaweed to Cows Could Curb Their Methane-Laden Burps

Moo-mentous research on using seaweed to fight climate change.

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Socialtjänsten förändras när allt ska mätas

Ökade krav på mätbarhet i socialtjänsten skapar merarbete för socialsekreterare och förskjuter uppmärksamheten från klienterna, enligt forskning från Lunds universitet. En våg av sifferstyrning har de senaste åren svept över den offentliga sektorn. Särskilt två strömningar under 1990-talet har bäddat för dagens mätkultur: New public management och evidensbaserad praktik. Den förra bygger på idén

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'Scary when it's on your doorstep': fear of coronavirus grips Brighton

The council says it is using 'robust infection control measures' after fifth case diagnosed Coronavirus – latest updates Coronavirus fears gripped Brighton on Monday as the number of people in the city diagnosed with the disease rose to five. Outside County Oak medical centre, which was closed after a member of staff contracted the virus, a number of local residents spoke of their concerns. Conti

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How 4 Chinese Hackers Allegedly Took Down Equifax

The Department of Justice has pinned the hack on China. Here's how it was done, according to the indictment.

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No One Knew Why Eminem Was at the Oscars

Regardless of whether your sweater's stained with spaghetti, don't dawdle. Eminem has told you and told you again: Opportunity knocks once in a lifetime, and you must answer. Ope! Scratch that. New rule. You get two shots. The second comes 17 years after the first. Last night's Oscars were surprisingly surprising. Parasite 's Best Picture win hinted that Hollywood's premier awards-giver can— plot

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Daily briefing: Pangolins suspected as source of coronavirus 2019-nCoV

Nature, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00387-9 Preliminary genetic evidence points to pangolins. Plus, spider-paper retractions rattle behavioural ecology and a European probe joins the run for the Sun.

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Oral traditions and volcanic eruptions in Australia

In Australia, the onset of human occupation (about 65,000 years?) and dispersion across the continent are the subjects of intense debate and are critical to understanding global human migration routes. A lack of ceramic artifacts and permanent structures has resulted in a scarcity of dateable archaeological sites older than about 10,000 years.

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Newly Discovered Tyrannosaur Was Key to the Rise of Giant Meat-Eaters

A partial skull found in Alberta helps put a timer on when the 'tyrant lizards' got big

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Hidden donors play significant role in political campaigns

A new Caltech study reveals that so-called hidden donors in a political campaign—those contributors who donate less than $200—can make up a sizable fraction of a candidate's campaign funds.

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The human brain's meticulous interface with the bloodstream now on a precision chip

A scrupulous gatekeeper stands between the brain and its circulatory system to let in the good and keep out the bad, but this porter, called the blood-brain barrier, also blocks trial drugs to treat diseases like Alzheimer's or cancer from getting into the brain.

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Lack of transparency in urban sustainability rankings

"The last two decades have seen significant growth in the spread of tools to classify and measure urban performance (rankings, indexes, etc.) across both the public and private institutions that use them, in response to different types of pressures encouraging uniformity. Naturally, all these tools are useful for guiding and assessing the policies implemented by local authorities in various fields

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NASA analyzes ex-Tropical Cyclone Damien's rainfall in Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Damien made landfall on Feb. 9 along the northern Pilbara coast of Western Australia. On Feb. 10, the GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite analyzed the rainfall generated by the remnants that triggered warnings.

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Spain and Mexico renew search for 17th-century treasure galleon

Project aims to locate Nuestra Señora del Juncal and train underwater archaeologists Almost 400 years after storms sent one of Spain's greatest treasure galleons to the bottom of the sea off Mexico, archaeologists from the two countries are to renew their search for the ship and its precious cargo of gold, silver and jewels. Even before the tempests hit, the omens for the Nuestra Señora del Junca

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That Story About Bill Gates Buying a $644 Million Yacht Is Fake

Big Spender If anyone could afford to buy a $644 million yacht, it's Bill Gates. In fact, with a net worth of $108.8 billion , he could afford to buy hundreds. Contrary to the many , many reports that circulated on the internet over the past few days, Gates is not actually planning to be the first owner of Aqua , a hydrogen-powered yacht concept Dutch yacht-design company Sinot presented at the 2

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Reimagining the link between geographic space and species could boost conservation and management efforts

In the latest issue of The American Naturalist, University of Kansas investigator Jorge Soberón offers a new method for ecologists to calculate the correlation between geographic space and the number of species inhabiting that space.

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The effects of China's one-child policy on women's education

Women's educational attainment has increased tremendously and even exceeded men's all over the world in the late 20th century. China's One-Child Policy had a beneficial effect on women's education and explains about half of the increase in educational attainment for women born between 1960-1980, according to a review published in Contemporary Economic Policy.

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Reimagining the link between geographic space and species could boost conservation and management efforts

In the latest issue of The American Naturalist, University of Kansas investigator Jorge Soberón offers a new method for ecologists to calculate the correlation between geographic space and the number of species inhabiting that space.

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Geothermal energy: Drilling a 3,000-meter-deep well

Although stopping climate change is challenging, it is imperative to slow it down as soon as possible by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. But how can we meet the growing energy demand while reducing our use of polluting fossil fuels? Geothermal energy is an efficient, non-polluting solution but in certain cases geothermal operations must be handled with care. Reaching the most powerful sources o

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Second Year of Major Spring Floods Forecast for U.S. Heartland

Swollen rivers could impede levee repairs, inundate homes and delay the planting of crops — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Make the most out of the latest, greatest apple—the Cosmic Crisp

Even an average Cosmic Crisp looks good enough to be on the cover of "Twilight." (A.A. Newton/) The apple you see in the photograph above is the result of more than two decades of selective breeding with one goal in mind: sheer perfection. Crisp, juicy, sweet, and tart, with a yearlong shelf life and glorious good looks, the Cosmic Crisp apple aims to be everything to everyone. And though it may

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Meet the Physicist Predicting When Online Hate Will Turn to Real-World Violence

The same principles that govern jostling molecules might also apply to groups of humans.

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Hidden donors play significant role in political campaigns

A new analysis of millions of campaign funding records reveals the role of small contributions.

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NASA analyzes ex-Tropical Cyclone Damien's rainfall in Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Damien made landfall on Feb. 9 along the northern Pilbara coast of Western Australia. On Feb. 10, the GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite analyzed the rainfall generated by the remnants that triggered warnings.

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Finding a cure for Fido's brain cancer may help us find a cure for ourselves

For cancers such as glioma, preclinical research models have failed to provide sufficient insight for medical progress. A team led by Jackson Laboratory's Roel Verhaak thoroughly analyzed sporadic canine gliomas and found that their molecular characteristics, including gene mutations and duplications, resemble those of humans. The results indicate that dogs provide an effective model for human gli

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Human textiles to repair blood vessels

As the leading cause of mortality worldwide, cardiovascular diseases claim over 17 million lives each year, according to World Health Organization estimates. To open up new research avenues into this serious public health problem, Inserm researcher Nicolas L'Heureux and his team at the Tissue Bioengineering unit (Inserm/Université de Bordeaux) are developing "human textiles" from collagen in order

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Increases in minimum wage may not have anticipated positive health effects, study shows

A new study by researchers at the University of Washington found that increases in minimum wages primarily had no effect on health overall. However, they did find a mix of negative and positive effects associated with the health of certain groups of working-age people.

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The human brain's meticulous interface with the bloodstream now on a precision chip

It can be the bain of brain drug developers: The interface between the human brain and the bloodstream, the blood-brain-barrier, is so meticulous that animal models often fail to represent it. This improved chip represents important features more accurately.

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Fun and fascinating science kits for kids

Expand your child's interest in science. (DepositPhotos/) We were all kids once—creative, curious, and always at the ready with a handful of questions about pretty much everything. How do magnets stick? Why is the sky blue? And do I have x-ray vision? (I didn't.) Science continues to progress by leaps and bounds, and these days it's easier than ever to augment our kids' education and inspire them

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With coronavirus, men are more vulnerable

Differences in immune function appear to start straight out of the womb

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If you're not an artist, Design Wizard Pro does the heavy lifting for you

Design Wizard Pro helps create eye-catching marketing materials in minutes. Templates with high quality elements create ads, social media posts, sales materials and more. Regularly almost $600, Design Wizard Pro is now just $39. If you were born a skilled entrepreneur or a talented resource manager or a persuasive sales professional, that doesn't mean you were also gifted with graphic design tale

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Global warming and extinction risk

How can fossils predict the consequences of climate change? A German research team from FAU, the Museum of Natural History Berlin and the Alfred Wegener Institute compared data from fossil and marine organisms living today to predict which groups of animals are most at risk from climate change. They published their results in the journal Nature Climate Change.

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Revolutionary cryo-EM is taking over structural biology

Nature, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00341-9 The number of protein structures being determined by cryo-electron microscopy is growing at an explosive rate.

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Global warming and extinction risk

How can fossils predict the consequences of climate change? A German research team from FAU, the Museum of Natural History Berlin and the Alfred Wegener Institute compared data from fossil and marine organisms living today to predict which groups of animals are most at risk from climate change. They published their results in the journal Nature Climate Change.

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AI, brain scans may alter how doctors treat depression

Artificial intelligence may soon play a critical role in choosing which depression therapy is best for patients.

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Supercharged light pulverizes asteroids

The majority of stars in the universe will become luminous enough to blast surrounding asteroids into successively smaller fragments using their light alone, according to an astronomer.

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Sensory perception is not superficial brain work

How does the brain decide which of the senses it will focus attention on when two interact? For the first time, scientists measured the sensory signals at different depths in the cortex.

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Sensitive and specific potassium nanosensors to detect epileptic seizures

Researchers at the Center for Nanoparticle Research, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) in collaboration with collaborators at Zhejiang University, China, have reported a highly sensitive and specific nanosensor that can monitor dynamic changes of potassium ions in mice undergoing epileptic seizures, indicating their intensity and origin in the brain.

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Did you solve it? Are you smart enough for MIT?

The answers to today's puzzles Earlier today I set you the four puzzles below, taken from the MIT Technology Review 's Puzzle Corner. 1. What is the numerically largest Roman numeral that is a normal English word? Continue reading…

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Michael Pollan Explains Caffeine Cravings (And Why You Don't Have To Quit)

When Pollan decided to write about caffeine, he gave it up — cold turkey. "I just couldn't focus," he says. "I was irritable. I lost confidence." Caffeine reshapes the brain in surprising ways. (Image credit: Abdulrhman Al Shidokhi/Getty Images)

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APS tip sheet: Predicting epidemics' speed

New analysis predicts how quickly an epidemic could spread globally.

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Lack of transparency in urban sustainability rankings

UPV/EHU researchers have looked at the quality and good methodological practices employed and published in 21 rankings, indexes and similar tools used for classifying and monitoring urban sustainability. They concluded that these tools neglect complex causalities in their design and lack methodological transparency in relation to data gathering, weighting and aggregation process; they also tend to

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Powering the future: Smallest all-digital circuit opens doors to 5 nm next-gen semiconductor

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Socionext Inc. have designed the world's smallest all-digital phase-locked loop (PLL). PLLs are critical clocking circuits in virtually all digital applications, and reducing their size and improving their performance is a necessary step to enabling the development of next-generation technologies.

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The many lives of charcoal

In sub-Saharan Africa, charcoal dominates as an energy resource for cooking. Catherine Nabukalu, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Master of Environmental Studies program, traveled to her native Uganda to study how this fuel is produced, traded, and used. In a new article, she and School of Arts and Sciences' Professor Reto Gieré share information about the livelihoods that depend on ch

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The effects of China's one-child policy on women's education

Women's educational attainment has increased tremendously and even exceeded men's all over the world in the late 20th century. China's One-Child Policy had a beneficial effect on women's education and explains about half of the increase in educational attainment for women born between 1960-1980, according to a review published in Contemporary Economic Policy.

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DNA-like material could bring even smaller transistors

A material shaped like a one-dimensional DNA helix might further push the limits on a transistor's size. The material comes from a rare earth element called tellurium.

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Reimagining the link between space and species could boost wildlife conservation

University of Kansas investigator Jorge Sobero?n offers a new method for ecologists to calculate the correlation between geographic space and the number of species inhabiting that space.

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More teens coming out as LGBQ, but suicide attempts still high: BU study

A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that the proportion of high school students identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning (LGBQ) doubled from 2009 to 2017, while the LGBQ teen rate of attempted suicide went from five times the rate for their straight peers to nearly four times the rate. The study was published in the journal Pediatrics.

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Magnetic building toys for creative kids

They'll pull you in. (DepositPhotos/) If you're looking for a quality toy that encourages critical thinking and imagination, try out a set of magnetic building blocks. The premise is simple: they're buildable, stackable tiles in simple geometric shapes and bright colors. Your kids can build 3D models of imaginary friends, invent complex palaces and buildings, or create sturdy structures. A durabl

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How to Protect People against Phishing and Other Scams

If you think educating them on ways to spot suspicious e-mails is the answer, think again — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A thermometer that can be stretched and deformed by water

Recent outbreaks of the novel coronavirus have emphasized the importance of quarantine and prevention more than ever. When monitoring changes in our body, body temperature is measured first, so it is very important to measure the temperature accurately and promptly. With this regard, a research team recently developed a stretchable and deformable polymer ionic conductor to realize a thermal sensor

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'Reverse fuel cell' converts waste carbon to valuable products at record rates

Fuel cells turn chemicals into electricity. Now, a University of Toronto Engineering team has adapted technology from fuel cells to do the reverse: harness electricity to make valuable chemicals from waste carbon (CO2).

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Not everything is ferromagnetic in high magnetic fields

High magnetic fields have a potential to modify the microscopic arrangement of magnetic moments because they overcome interactions existing in a zero field. Usually, high fields exceeding a certain critical value force the moments to align in the same direction as the field, leading to ferromagnetic arrangement. However, a recent study showed that this is not always the case. The experiments took

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How to Protect People against Phishing and Other Scams

If you think educating them on ways to spot suspicious emails is the answer, think again — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Easy-to-use 3D printers for beginners

Beginner 3D printers. (ZMorph Multitool 3D Printer via Unsplash/) The arrival of 3D printing has changed everything from toys to automobile design, but for a long time the barrier for entry was just way too high for the general public. Like all new technology, however, what was once a sci-fi luxury can now be a common addition to your home office. If you've been curious to give 3D printing a whir

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Oblique electrostatic inject-deposited TiO2 film for efficient perovskite solar cells

The need to efficiently harvest solar energy for a more sustainable future is increasingly becoming accepted across the globe. A new family of solar cells based on perovskites — materials with a particular crystal structure — is now competing with conventional silicon materials to satisfy the demand in this area. Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are continually being optimized to fulfill their comm

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Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy connected to elevated risk of ADHD

The risk of ADHD was 34 percent higher in children whose mother had a vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy than in those children whose mother's vitamin D level was sufficient during the first and second trimesters. The result was adjusted for maternal age, socioeconomic status and psychiatric history.

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Innate protein restricts HIV replication by targeting lipid rafts

A recent study suggests that the innate protein AIBP restricts HIV-1 replications by targeting the lipid rafts the virus relies on.

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Not everything is ferromagnetic in high magnetic fields

High magnetic fields have a potential to modify the microscopic arrangement of magnetic moments because they overcome interactions existing in zero field. Usually, high fields exceeding a certain critical value force the moments to align in the same direction as the field leading to ferromagnetic arrangement. However, a recent study showed that this is not always the case.

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The brain of migraine sufferers is hyper-excitable

Individuals who suffer from migraine headaches appear to have a hyper-excitable visual cortex.

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Epigenetics: Inheritance of epigenetic marks

A study undertaken by a molecular biologist sheds new light on the mechanisms that control the establishment of epigenetic modifications on newly synthesized histones following cell division.

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New world map of fish genetic diversity

An international research team has studied genetic diversity among fish around the world for the first time. Their research produced a map that will serve as a tool in improving the protection of species and genetic diversity in the future.

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Model shows how to make on-farm sustainable energy projects profitable

Researchers have developed a model that could boost investment in farm-based sustainable energy projects by allowing investors to more accurately predict whether a project will turn a profit. The model improves on earlier efforts by using advanced computational techniques to address uncertainty.

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Efter år med grønne insekt-løfter: Insekter kræver mere varme og luft end forventet

PLUS. Flere pilotprojekter med danske insekter viser, at energiforbrug og CO2-udledning er højere end forventet. Insekter belaster dog stadig klima og miljø markant mindre end kødproduktion.

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Thousands of Fossils Sit Forgotten in Museum Drawers. How one Paleontologist is Changing That

Paleontologist Peter Roopnarine wants to bring forgotten fossils into the spotlight.

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Taking Zinc Can Shorten Your Cold. Thank A 91-Year-Old Scientist For The Discovery

Dr. Ananda Prasad first turned up zinc's benefits to human growth back in the 1960s. Years later, his study and others found that the right dose of zinc can cut a cold's duration by days. (Image credit: Karl Tapales/Getty Images)

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Global warming and extinction risk

How can fossils predict the consequences of climate change? A German research team from Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the Museum of Natural History Berlin and the Alfred Wegener Institute compared data from fossil and marine organisms living today to predict which groups of animals are most at risk from climate change. They published their results in the journal Nature C

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Alcoholism in the family affects how your brain switches between active and resting states

A new study shows that just having a parent with an alcohol use disorder affects how your brain transitions between active and resting states — regardless of your own drinking habits.

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Netflix Had a Disappointing Night at the Oscars

The streaming service was nominated for 24 awards, but only won two.

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Not everything is ferromagnetic in high magnetic fields

High magnetic fields have a potential to modify the microscopic arrangement of magnetic moments because they overcome interactions existing in zero field. Usually, high fields exceeding a certain critical value force the moments to align in the same direction as the field leading to ferromagnetic arrangement. However, a recent study showed that this is not always the case.

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Fire safety equipment everyone should own

Safety first. (Piotr Chrobot via Unsplash/) Nobody wants to spend their time thinking about worst-case scenarios, but taking steps to protect yourself and your family in the event of a fire could save lives. It's definitely a situation in which a little productive worry goes a long way toward minimizing risk. If you haven't already, review the fire safety guide for your apartment or condo, or che

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The 2020 Democrats All Have the Same Problem

ROCHESTER, N.H.—Like last week's muddled Iowa caucus, tomorrow's New Hampshire primary may reveal as much about the limits of the leading Democratic candidates as it does their strengths. The results from Iowa, polls in New Hampshire, and surveys of Democrats beyond those states all point toward the same conclusion: So far, none of the candidates has built a coalition that reaches broadly across

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A Prospective Alzheimer's Trial Reports

For the past several years, a clinical trial from Washington University (St. Louis) has been underway in people with genetic mutations that lead to early-onset Alzheimer's. The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network (Trials Unit), DIAN-TU, has been dosing 194 such patients with one of two anti-amyloid antibodies, either Lilly's solanezumab or Roche/Genentech's gantenerumab (or placebo), and loo

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Brain scans can help predict who'll benefit from an antidepressant

A machine-learning algorithm can predict who is most likely to respond best to an antidepressant by analysing the brain scans of people with depression

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Jupiter is wetter than we thought, which helps explain how it formed

NASA's Juno spacecraft has found that Jupiter contains more water than measured by its predecessor, Galileo, solving a long-running planetary mystery

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Bill Gates 'not buying our hydrogen yacht'

submitted by /u/CertainTour [link] [comments]

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Lyme disease cases may rise 92 per cent in US due to climate change

submitted by /u/the_karma_llama [link] [comments]

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Starlight alone can tear asteroids into pieces

The majority of stars in the universe will become luminous enough to blast surrounding asteroids into successively smaller fragments using their light alone, according to new research. Electromagnetic radiation from stars at the end of their "giant branch" phase—lasting just a few million years before they collapse into white dwarfs—would be strong enough to spin even distant asteroids at high sp

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Attosecond pulse shaping using a seeded free-electron laser

Nature, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2005-6 Generation of intense attosecond waveforms with independently controllable amplitude and phase is performed by using a seeded free-electron laser.

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Virtual discovery of melatonin receptor ligands to modulate circadian rhythms

Nature, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2027-0

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Seurat therapeutics announces novel mechanisms from rat migraine model of intranasal IGF-1

Studies demonstrated intranasal Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) safely and effectively dampens activation of the trigeminal system pain pathway in rats, a known site of pain origin in migraine headachesThe results support further development of nasal IGF-1 as a novel treatment for migraines, which afflict 39 million people in the USA.

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Novel melatonin receptor molecules make possible therapies to adjust biological clock

Researchers have discovered through a vast and novel computational library the first molecules that can modulate circadian rhythms by binding with high selectivity to the MT1 melatonin receptor in the brain.

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Sensitive and specific potassium nanosensors to detect epileptic seizures

IBS scientists in collaboration with collaborators at Zhejiang University,have reported a highly sensitive and specific nanosensor that can monitor dynamic changes of potassium ion in mice undergoing epileptic seizures, indicating their intensity and origin in the brain.

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Scientists closer to finding the cell of origin for ovarian cancer

Researchers have used a new technique to identify six previously unknown cell types in human Fallopian tubes, paving the way for faster identification and treatment of ovarian cancer.

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First artificial enzyme created with two non-biological groups

Scientists at the University of Groningen turned a non-enzymatic protein into a new, artificial enzyme by adding two abiological catalytic components: an unnatural amino acid and a catalytic copper complex. This is the first time that an enzyme has been created using two non-biological components to create an active site. The study demonstrates that such a synergistic combination is a powerful app

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Patient-partnered research finds clues about a rare cancer's genetic roots

Working in close partnership with patients, scientists have identified new causes of a rare cancer of blood vessel walls called angiosarcoma. The research also points to possible therapeutic options for patients with this aggressive disease, who often have a poor prognosis. The study is a result of the Angiosarcoma Project, a unique partnership between patients and scientists that empowers patient

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Brain-wave pattern can identify people likely to respond to antidepressant, study finds

A new method of interpreting brain activity could be used in clinics to help determine the best treatment options for depression, according to a Stanford-led trial.

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New technology could help solve AI's 'memory bottleneck'

Electrical engineers have developed a new magnetic memory device that could potentially support the surge of data-centric computing, which requires ever-increasing power, storage and speed.

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Long-term learning requires new nerve insulation

In a study published Feb. 10, 2020 in Nature Neuroscience, UC San Francisco scientists have discovered that mice quickly learn a fearful response to a situation perceived as threatening, but for such a conditioned response to become long-lasting requires brain cells to increase amounts of an insulating material called myelin.

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AI, brain scans may alter how doctors treat depression

Artificial intelligence may soon play a critical role in choosing which depression therapy is best for patients.

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Neural signature identifies people likely to respond to antidepressant medication

Researchers have discovered a neural signature that predicts whether individuals with depression are likely to benefit from sertraline, a commonly prescribed antidepressant medication. The findings, published in Nature Biotechnology, suggest that new machine learning techniques can identify complex patterns in a person's brain activity that correlate with meaningful clinical outcomes. The research

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Palliative vs. standard care for Parkinson's disease

This randomized clinical trial that included 210 patients with Parkinson's disease and related disorders and 175 caregivers examined whether outpatient palliative care was associated with better patient or caregiver outcomes compared with standard care.

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Pharmacological migraine prophylaxis shows almost no effect in children

Migraines affect not only adults but frequently also children and adolescents. Researchers from the University of Basel have concluded that in this age group, the preventive pharmacological treatment of migraine is no more effective than placebo in the long term. The results of the review, carried out as part of an international collaboration, have been published in the scientific journal JAMA Ped

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Testosterone levels affect risk of metabolic disease and cancers

Having genetically higher testosterone levels increases the risk of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes in women, while reducing the risk in men. Higher testosterone levels also increase the risks of breast and endometrial cancers in women, and prostate cancer in men.

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Expert: Coronavirus exposes 'cracks' in Chinese government

The Wuhan coronavirus outbreak reveals the breakdown of Chinese government structures, one expert argues. Xueguang Zhou, a professor in economic development at Stanford University and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute who specializes in institutional change in contemporary Chinese society, studies Chinese organizations, Chinese state building, and Chinese bureaucracy. His work sheds

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Storm Ciara wreaks destruction across Europe

Fierce winds and heavy rains claimed at least six lives across northern Europe on Monday as Storm Ciara disrupted travel, grounded hundreds of flights, flooded roads and left vast areas without power.

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Meet T-Rex's older cousin: The Reaper of Death

Scientists said Monday they had discovered a new species of dinosaur closely related to Tyrannosaurus rex that strode the plain of North America some 80 million years ago.

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Report: Movies can thrive without white male lead actors

Movies starring lead actors from underrepresented groups perform as well as those with white male leads, a new report shows. The work offers insight into how the gender, race, and ethnicity of leading characters relate to a film's economic success. The researchers investigated what researcher Rene Weber refers to as the "myth in Hollywood "—that films with female or underrepresented minority lead

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Astronomers caught a star-on-star smack down

These bubbles and clouds represent the end of two stars and the beginning of a nebula. (ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), Olofsson et al. Acknowledgement: Robert Cumming/) The lives of stars, not unlike human lives, often end in the relative blink of an eye. After burning for billions of years, a modestly sized star turns red, puffs up into a giant, and sloughs off its outer layers, all in the span of a mill

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Most men do not regret their choices for prostate cancer surgery

Men with localized prostate cancer are faced with deciding among a range of options for treatment – including a choice between robot-assisted versus conventional prostatectomy. A new follow-up study in the Journal of Urology® finds that most patients choosing surgery for prostate cancer don't regret their decisions. The Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (

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It's Iron, Man: ITMO scientists found a way to treat cancer with iron oxide nanoparticles

Particles previously loaded with the antitumor drug are injected in vivo and further accumulate at the tumor areas. In order to release the drug non-invasively, the carrier particles have to be light-sensitive. For this purpose, the polymer containers (capsules) can be modified with iron oxide resonant semiconductor nanoparticles. When irradiated with light, they get heated and induce drug release

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'Reverse fuel cell' converts waste carbon to valuable products at record rates

Fuel cells turn chemicals into electricity. Now, a U of T Engineering team has adapted technology from fuel cells to do the reverse: harness electricity to make valuable chemicals from waste carbon (CO2).

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Sensory perception is not superficial brain work

How does the brain decide which of the senses it will focus attention on when two interact? For the first time, scientists measured the sensory signals at different depths in the cortex.

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Imaginative sculptures that explore how we perceive reality | Alicia Eggert

TED Fellow Alicia Eggert takes us on a visual tour of her work — from a giant sculpture on an uninhabited island in Maine to an installation that inflates only when people hold hands to complete an electric current. Her work explores the power of art to inspire wonder and foster hope in dark times. As she puts it: "A brighter, more sustainable, more equitable future depends first on our ability t

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Girls beginning puberty almost a year earlier than in 1970s

Onset of glandular breast tissue development has shifted by three months per decade Girls are beginning puberty almost a year earlier than women 40 years ago, according to research. Scientists have found the onset of development of glandular breast tissue has crept forwards by about three months per decade since the late 1970s. Continue reading…

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First artificial enzyme created with two non-biological groups

Scientists at the University of Groningen turned a non-enzymatic protein into a new, artificial enzyme by adding two abiological catalytic components: an unnatural amino acid and a catalytic copper complex. This is the first time that an enzyme has been created using two non-biological components to create an active site. The study demonstrates that such a synergistic combination is a powerful app

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First artificial enzyme created with two non-biological groups

Scientists at the University of Groningen turned a non-enzymatic protein into a new, artificial enzyme by adding two abiological catalytic components: an unnatural amino acid and a catalytic copper complex. This is the first time that an enzyme has been created using two non-biological components to create an active site. The study demonstrates that such a synergistic combination is a powerful app

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Quantum technologies: New insights into superconducting processes

The development of a quantum computer that can solve problems, which classical computers can only solve with great effort or not at all—this is the goal currently being pursued by an ever-growing number of research teams worldwide. The reason: Quantum effects, which originate from the world of the smallest particles and structures, enable many new technological applications. So-called superconduct

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Human gut-in-a-dish model helps define 'leaky gut,' and outline a pathway to treatment

UC San Diego researchers use 3D human gut organoids to reveal the molecular system that keeps intestinal linings sealed, demonstrate how the system breaks down and how it can be strengthened with the diabetes drug metformin.

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Diagnostics: Thermometer can be stretched and crumpled by water

A research team developed a flexible ionic conductor that is water-processable and thermal stable.

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På vej mod varmen: Europæisk sonde skal nærstudere Solens poler

PLUS. ESA's Solar Orbiter blev i morges sendt afsted for at gøre os klogere på solaktivitet og fremtidens solstorme og klima.

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Scrutinizing the effects of digital technology on mental health

Nature, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00296-x Does time spent using digital technology and social media have an adverse effect on mental health, especially that of adolescents? Here, two scientists discuss the question, and how digital devices might be used to improve well-being.

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Copley Scientific introduces a simple device for inhaled dose dissolution testing.

The new Inhaled Dissolution Dose Collector (IDDC) from Copley Scientific is a flexible, easy-to-use system for collecting the respirable fraction of the dose delivered by a metered dose or dry powder inhaler (MDI or DPI) for dissolution testing.

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Human gut-in-a-dish model helps define 'leaky gut,' and outline a pathway to treatment

UC San Diego researchers use 3D human gut organoids to reveal the molecular system that keeps intestinal linings sealed, demonstrate how the system breaks down and how it can be strengthened with the diabetes drug metformin.

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Quantum technologies: New insights into superconducting processes

Superconductors are regarded as promising components for quantum computers, but so far they only function at very low temperatures. Scientists at Münster University (Germany) now demonstrated a so-called energy quantization in nanowires of high-temperature superconductors. The study has been published in the journal "Nature Communications".

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Quantum fluctuations sustain the record superconductor

Calculations performed by an international team of researchers from Spain, Italy, France, Germany, and Japan show that the crystal structure of the record superconducting LaH10 compound is stabilized by atomic quantum fluctuations. This result suggests that superconductivity approaching room temperature may be possible in hydrogen-rich compounds at much lower pressures than previously expected wit

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Model shows how to make on-farm sustainable energy projects profitable

Researchers have developed a model that could boost investment in farm-based sustainable energy projects by allowing investors to more accurately predict whether a project will turn a profit. The model improves on earlier efforts by using advanced computational techniques to address uncertainty.

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Financial pressure makes CFOs less likely to blow the whistle

A recent study finds that corporate financial managers do a great job of detecting signs of potential fraud, but are less likely to voice these concerns externally when their company is under pressure to meet a financial target.

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Supercharged light pulverises asteroids, study finds

The majority of stars in the universe will become luminous enough to blast surrounding asteroids into successively smaller fragments using their light alone, according to a University of Warwick astronomer.

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New world map of fish genetic diversity

An international research team from ETH Zurich and French universities has studied genetic diversity among fish around the world for the first time. Their research produced a map that will serve as a tool in improving the protection of species and genetic diversity in the future.

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Inner 'clockwork' sets the time for cell division in bacteria

Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have discovered a 'clockwork' mechanism that controls cell division in bacteria. In two publications, in 'Nature Communications' und 'PNAS', they report how a small signaling molecule starts the 'clock', which informs the cell about the right time to reproduce.

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Study finds innate protein that restricts HIV replication by targeting lipid rafts

A recent study from the George Washington University suggests that the innate protein AIBP restricts HIV-1 replications by targeting the lipid rafts the virus relies on.

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Not everything is ferromagnetic in high magnetic fields

High magnetic fields have a potential to modify the microscopic arrangement of magnetic moments because they overcome interactions existing in zero field. Usually, high fields exceeding a certain critical value force the moments to align in the same direction as the field leading to ferromagnetic arrangement. However, a recent study showed that this is not always the case. The experiments took pla

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Statins may lower mortality in high-risk prostate cancer patients

Statin use alone or with metformin is associated with lower prostate cancer mortality from all causes, among high-risk patients.

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Epigenetics: Inheritance of epigenetic marks

A study undertaken by an international team led by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich molecular biologist Axel Imhof sheds new light on the mechanisms that control the establishment of epigenetic modifications on newly synthesized histones following cell division.

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New research supports previous studies on global sea level rise

As a result of global warming, the world's oceans have risen by an average of around 3 mm a year since the early 1990s. But how much they have risen year on year has been a matter of some debate among experts, for instance in the UN's climate panel IPCC. Is the rise constant, or is it accelerating every year?

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The Nuclear Family Wasn't Built to Last

We're in a moment of cultural lag, says the contributing writer David Brooks. The culprit? The pervasive and enduring myth of the American family. "We have an archaic idea of what family is," Brooks says in a new episode of The Idea File . The nuclear-family unit, Brooks argues, is a privilege of the wealthy. Around the world, 38 percent of people still live with extended family. And over the pas

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Yorkshire farmer argued homosexuality is natural in 1810 diary discovery

In a newly-discovered passage from a private diary, a Yorkshire farmer argues in 1810 that homosexuality is innate and should not be punished by death.

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New research supports previous studies on global sea level rise

Using data from European satellites, a student has demonstrated that the global sea level rise has accelerated over the past four decades.

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Financial pressure makes CFOs less likely to blow the whistle on potential fraud

A recent study finds that corporate financial managers do a great job of detecting signs of potential fraud, but are less likely to voice these concerns externally when their company is under pressure to meet a financial target.

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Eternygen presents data demonstrating INDY inhibition as novel therapeutic option in NASH

Study to be presented at 3rd Global NASH Congress in London, U.K., February 10, 11. Data shows, for the first time, that INDY inhibition attenuates diet-induced NASH and mINDY inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic option. In a murine NASH model, a small molecule INDY inhibitor reduced transaminases, hepatic injury, steatosis and inflammation, and improved glucose metabolism and body composition co

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New repair mechanism for DNA breaks

Researchers from the University of Seville and the Andalusian Centre of Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (CABIMER) have identified new factors that are necessary for the repair of these breaks. These factors, in contrast with those already known, only affect the repair between sister chromatids of breaks that have arisen during chromosome duplication.

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The brain of migraine sufferers is hyper-excitable, new study suggests

Individuals who suffer from migraine headaches appear to have a hyper-excitable visual cortex researchers at the Universities of Birmingham and Lancaster suggest.

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Statins: Researchers uncover how cholesterol-lowering drugs cause muscle pain

Patients who take statins in order to lower their blood cholesterol levels often complain about muscle problems, typically muscle pain. But why this occurs is still largely unresolved. In a recent study, the pharmaceutical scientists Professor Alexandra K. Kiemer und Jessica Hoppstädter from Saarland University have identified a potential causal relationship. According to the results of their work

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Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy connected to elevated risk of ADHD

According to a study conducted in Finland, the risk of ADHD was 34 percent higher in children whose mother had a vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy than in those children whose mother's vitamin D level was sufficient during the first and second trimesters. The result was adjusted for maternal age, socioeconomic status and psychiatric history.

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Experimental measurement of the quantum geometric tensor using coupled qubits in diamond

Geometry and topology are fundamental concepts in matter science. In quantum mechanics, the geometry of quantum states is fully captured by the quantum geometric tensor. The complete quantum geometric tensor of a solid-state spin system is measured through coherent dynamical responses.

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Tumor vs. immune system: A battle to decide the host's fate

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that soluble CD155 suppresses NK cells of the innate immune system to promote tumor growth by interfering with DNAM-1. These findings could be exploited to develop novel therapies for cancer by targeting soluble CD155.

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How Your Laptop Ruined Your Life

The New York City subway is a terrible place for productivity. During the morning commute, the crowds force many people to stand, one hand occupied by a pole for balance, so getting any real work done is often impossible. Riders can use their phones to browse their inboxes or draft a couple of emails, but internet access in the city's tunnels is spotty. When you look around, people mostly are rea

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New world map of fish genetic diversity

An international research team from ETH Zurich and French universities has studied genetic diversity among fish around the world for the first time. Their research produced a map that will serve as a tool in improving the protection of species and genetic diversity in the future.

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ESA's next sun mission will be shadow-casting pair

After Solar Orbiter, ESA's next mission observing the sun will not be one spacecraft but two: the double satellites making up Proba-3 will fly in formation to cast an artificial solar eclipse, opening up the clearest view yet of the sun's faint atmosphere—probing the mysteries of its million degree heat and magnetic eruptions.

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Qarman CubeSat: Falling into a fireball

This Wednesday 12 February, ESA's latest mission will enter the vacuum of space, not aboard a rocket but by being released from the International Space Station. The first task of the shoebox-sized Qarman CubeSat is simply to fall. While typical space missions resist orbital decay, Qarman will drift down month by month until it reenters the atmosphere, at which point it will gather a wealth of data

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New world map of fish genetic diversity

An international research team from ETH Zurich and French universities has studied genetic diversity among fish around the world for the first time. Their research produced a map that will serve as a tool in improving the protection of species and genetic diversity in the future.

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Lone wolf that traveled 8,700 miles looking for a mate found dead in California

An endangered female gray wolf known as OR-54 didn't live long enough to find a mate, despite making an 8,700-mile meandering journey through three states looking for one.

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Lone wolf that traveled 8,700 miles looking for a mate found dead in California

An endangered female gray wolf known as OR-54 didn't live long enough to find a mate, despite making an 8,700-mile meandering journey through three states looking for one.

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Geothermal energy: Drilling a 3,000-meter deep well

Destabilizing the precarious equilibrium at depth with geothermal wells may reactivate the geological layers causing earthquakes. Researchers have studied the seismic activity linked to a geothermal drilling in search of supercritical fluids. They discovered that the drilling did not cause uncontrolled seismic activity. This drilling under such critical conditions suggests that the technology is o

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You Can't Take This Photo: The Colossal Underbelly of an Iceberg

Tobias Friedrich dove into 27ºF water to capture the ice formations most people never see.

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Turn Your Ikea Frekvens Gear Into a Boombox—or a Chicken

The new collection, a collaboration with Teenage Engineering, has its own set of 3D-printable accessories.

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The rise of renters-by-choice: 'I wouldn't want to buy even if I had the money'

The private rental sector has expanded at more than twice the rate of the increase in Australian households in the last two decades. This increasingly diverse form of tenure now houses about one in four of us.

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A convex-optimization-based quantum process tomography method for reconstructing quantum channels

Researchers from SJTU have developed a convex-optimization-based quantum process tomography method for reconstructing quantum channels, and have shown the validity to seawater channels and general channels, enabling a more precise and robust estimation of the elements of the process matrix with less demands on preliminary resources. The method offers a more universal tool and suggests a crossover

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Oblique electrostatic inject-deposited TiO2 film leads efficient perovskite solar cells

Kanazawa University researchers used a novel technique to deposit TiO 2 layers for efficient perovskite solar cells (PSCs). The inkjet-deposited layers applied at an angle of 45°, without the need for a vacuum, were uniform and their thickness could be controlled by manipulating coating times. The resulting PSCs had an efficiency of 13.19%, making the technique promising as a simple, low-cost meth

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Adding sewage sludge on soils does not promote antibiotic resistance, Swedish study shows

Adding sewage sludge on soils does not promote antibiotic resistance, a study from University of Gothenburg shows.

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Geothermal energy: Drilling a 3,000 meters deep well

Destabilising the precarious equilibrium at depth with geothermal wells may reactivate the geological layers causing earthquakes. Researchers (UNIGE/CNR) have studied the seismic activity linked to a geothermal drilling in search of supercritical fluids. They discovered that the drilling did not cause uncontrolled seismic activity. This drilling under such critical conditions suggests that the tec

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Observing proteins in their natural environment

Certain medications, such as those used to treat cancer, lose their effect because proteins in the membrane of the target cell simply expel them again. A team at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) was able to observe a responsible transport protein in its natural environment for the first time. They labelled it with small sequences of antibodies to which a contrast agent was linked.

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The Company That Wants to Fling Rockets Into Space With a Giant Centrifuge

The rapidly falling cost of getting into orbit has spurred a boom in the space industry as a host of new applications become economical. Now a secretive startup plans to slash the cost to just $250,000 by flinging rockets into space rather than firing them . Over the last decade, the pioneering work done by Space X has shown that getting stuff into orbit doesn't need to be so expensive and that t

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Kenyan fossil reveals chameleons may have 'rafted' from Africa to Madagascar

Chameleons (Chamaeleonidae) are a family of unique lizards with unusual characteristics: rapidly extendable tongues, feet with two toes pointing forward and two backward, a prehensile tail, and eyes that can move independently of each other. Many species also have the ability to change the color of their skin.

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When a Women-Led Campaign Made It Illegal to Spit in Public in New York City

While the efficacy of the spitting policy in preventing disease transmission was questionable, it helped usher in an era of modern public health laws

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Staying undocumented seems safer to some immigrants

Holding a legal status—like a green card—makes some undocumented immigrants even more fearful of deportation, a new study in Dallas, Texas shows. They may worry that that kind of documentation makes them known to immigration authorities who could easily deport them, says Asad L. Asad, an assistant professor of sociology at Stanford University. Asad conducted multiple, in-depth interviews with 50

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Could illegally trafficked pangolins be the missing link in the coronavirus outbreak?

The deadly coronavirus outbreak, which has killed over 600 people and infected thousands more, may have been transmitted from bats to humans via pangolins, according to new research.

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Could illegally trafficked pangolins be the missing link in the coronavirus outbreak?

The deadly coronavirus outbreak, which has killed over 600 people and infected thousands more, may have been transmitted from bats to humans via pangolins, according to new research.

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One giant leap for microplastics

Sometimes, in the enormity of the global climate emergency, we forget about the importance of the small stuff.

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The latest in climate change attribution and the law

The evolving field of climate change attribution science plays a critical role in shaping our understanding of how humans are affecting the global climate system, and in informing discussions about responsibility for climate change impacts. Attribution science provides the evidence establishing that anthropogenic climate change is real, that it is here, and that scientific predictions of future ch

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New DTU research supports previous studies on global sea level rise

Using data from European satellites, a young student at DTU Space has demonstrated that the global sea level rise has accelerated over the past four decades. The new research supports previous studies and has been published in the scientific journal Advances in Space Research.

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Summary report on small cell lung cancer research points to progress and challenges

In 2017, a group of lung cancer experts posed the question: 'Can recent advances in tumor biology that have led to progress treating non-small cell lung cancer translate into improved outcomes for small cell lung cancer?'According to an article "New Approaches to Small Cell Lung Cancer Therapy : From the Laboratory to the Clinic," published in the February issue of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology

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Observing proteins in their natural environment

Proteins can be responsible for the fact that the active ingredients of drugs are simply released from the target cells. You can watch them do this now.

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Inner 'clockwork' sets the time for cell division in bacteria

Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have discovered a "clockwork" mechanism that controls cell division in bacteria. In two publications, in Nature Communications and PNAS, they report how a small signaling molecule starts the clock, which informs the cell about the right time to reproduce.

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Supercharged light pulverises asteroids, study finds

The majority of stars in the universe will become luminous enough to blast surrounding asteroids into successively smaller fragments using their light alone, according to a University of Warwick astronomer.

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New repair mechanism for DNA breaks

Chromosomal breaks are the most harmful damage for cells. If they are not repaired, they block the duplication and segregation of chromosomes, stop the growth cycle and cause cell death. These breaks appear frequently in tumor cells and are produced spontaneously during the replication of genetic material. To be able to repair this damage in the genetic material, the cell transfers the information

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Her's how to make sure social housing tenants have voices heard

In the aftermath of the Grenfell fire tragedy in London in 2017, many commentators noted that concerns and warnings from tenants and residents appeared to have been ignored. The ability to influence the activities and decisions of landlords is vital to prevent the voices of people living in social housing from becoming marginalized.

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The Amish and the Anthropocene: Religion, science and climate change

Religion and science are often pitted against one another. "I wanted to start a conversation that was different," says Nicole Welk-Joerger about her article "Restoring Eden in the Anthropocene," published in the journal Environmental Humanities. Welk-Joerger, a doctoral candidate in the Department of History and Sociology of Science, used research she'd done earlier in her academic career to lay o

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Study: Adding sewage sludge to soils does not promote antibiotic resistance

Adding sewage sludge on soils does not promote antibiotic resistance, a study from University of Gothenburg shows.

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The many lives of charcoal

In Africa, charcoal is ubiquitous as an energy source for cooking, even in urban areas where electricity and gas are available. Yet when Catherine Nabukalu was taking courses on energy as part of her degree in the Master of Environmental Studies program at Penn, she noticed charcoal was often left out of the conversation about energy sources and their contribution to global carbon emissions.

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Observing proteins in their natural environment

Proteins can be responsible for the fact that the active ingredients of drugs are simply released from the target cells. You can watch them do this now.

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Inner 'clockwork' sets the time for cell division in bacteria

Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have discovered a "clockwork" mechanism that controls cell division in bacteria. In two publications, in Nature Communications and PNAS, they report how a small signaling molecule starts the clock, which informs the cell about the right time to reproduce.

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New repair mechanism for DNA breaks

Chromosomal breaks are the most harmful damage for cells. If they are not repaired, they block the duplication and segregation of chromosomes, stop the growth cycle and cause cell death. These breaks appear frequently in tumor cells and are produced spontaneously during the replication of genetic material. To be able to repair this damage in the genetic material, the cell transfers the information

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Study: Adding sewage sludge to soils does not promote antibiotic resistance

Adding sewage sludge on soils does not promote antibiotic resistance, a study from University of Gothenburg shows.

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'Rule breaking' plants may be climate change survivors

Plants that break some of the 'rules' of ecology by adapting in unconventional ways may have a higher chance of surviving climate change, according to researchers.

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Novo Nordisk investerer 800 millioner kr i vestsjællandsk insulin-fabrik

Novo Nordisk planlægger at investere 800 millioner kroner til en udvidelse af virksomhedens fabrik i Kalundborg. Det det skal sikre fremtidig produktion af diabetesprodukter.

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Dolphins gather in female family groups

Social clusters including mothers' groups play an important role in the life of southern Australian bottlenose dolphins, a new study shows. Like giraffes, lions, hyenas and grey kangaroos, bottlenose dolphins appear to form social bonds with kin and other females in similar reproductive condition, while maintaining moderate and loose social bonds with some same-sex individuals.

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A thermometer can be stretched and crumpled by water

Prof. Taiho Park and his research team developed a flexible ionic conductor that is water-processable and thermal stable.

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Common medication may lower risk of 'broken heart' during bereavement

The increased risk of heart attack or 'a broken heart' in early bereavement could be reduced by using common medication in a novel way, according to a world-first study led by the University of Sydney and funded by Heart Research Australia.

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Rifles and shotguns used more often in youth and rural suicides

The researchers say their findings, published Feb. 3 in Injury Epidemiology, suggest that adopting safety measures for rifles or shotguns may prevent suicides, particularly among young people and rural-area residents.

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Youth with HIV less likely than adults to achieve viral suppression

Despite similar rates of enrollment into medical care, youth with HIV have much lower rates of viral suppression –reducing HIV to undetectable levels — compared to adults, according to an analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health.

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Human gut-in-a-dish model helps define 'leaky gut,' and outline a pathway to treatment

UC San Diego researchers use 3D human gut organoids to reveal the molecular system that keeps intestinal linings sealed, demonstrate how the system breaks down and how it can be strengthened with the diabetes drug metformin.

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New treatment discovered for rare eye disease may prevent blindness

Patients with thyroid eye disease who used the minimally invasive insulin-like growth factor I blocking antibody, teprotumumab, experienced improvement in their symptoms, appearance and quality of life, according to a study recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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'Rule breaking' plants may be climate change survivors

Plants that break some of the 'rules' of ecology by adapting in unconventional ways may have a higher chance of surviving climate change, according to researchers from the University of Queensland and Trinity College Dublin.Dr Annabel Smith, from UQ's School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, and Professor Yvonne Buckley, from UQ's School of Biological Sciences and Trinity College Dublin Ireland, s

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Bill Gates orders £500m hydrogen-powered superyacht

submitted by /u/filosoful [link] [comments]

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Bees and crop plants subjects of new 'pollination guide' for Brazil

University of Freiburg publishes a guide on the importance of pollinators for Brazilian farmers.

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Fast radio burst with steady 16-day cycle observed

A large team of space scientists working in Canada has found evidence of a fast radio burst with a steady 16-day cycle. The team has published a paper describing their findings on the arXiv preprint server.

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Heart emoji: The language of love in the 21st century

It may not be a Shakespearean sonnet, but the language of love in the 21st century is just as affectionate and meaningful as it ever was, according to University of South Australia linguist, Dr. David Caldwell.

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Bees and crop plants subjects of new 'pollination guide' for Brazil

University of Freiburg publishes a guide on the importance of pollinators for Brazilian farmers.

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Do soils need a low-salt diet?

Doctors often tell their patients to reduce their salt intake as part of a healthy lifestyle. When we start looking at food labels, we may find salt in surprising places—like baked goods, drinks and canned foods.

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Cerium oxide nanoparticles may improve hepatocellular carcinoma prognosis

Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common liver cancer and ranks third in the world in terms of mortality. Its appearance is related to the hepatitis B and C viruses, alcoholism, metabolic diseases of the liver and exposure to certain toxins. Although its molecular mechanisms have been described in detail, no effective treatment is currently available after the early stages of the disease. When

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Can 'feminist design' save hiring algorithms from bias?

Software developers should incorporate the concept of "feminist design thinking" into their development process to improve equity, particularly in the development of software for the hiring process, researchers propose. "There seem to be countless stories of ways that bias in AI is manifesting itself, and there are many thought pieces out there on what contributes to this bias," says co-lead auth

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Model shows users how to make on-farm sustainable energy projects more profitable

Researchers have developed a model that could boost investment in farm-based sustainable energy projects by allowing investors to more accurately predict whether a project will turn a profit. The model improves on earlier efforts by using advanced computational techniques to address uncertainty.

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Harnessing the sun to bring fresh water to remote or disaster-struck communities

A device that takes a novel approach to removing salt from water has been developed in Bath, paving the way for small, solar-powered desalination units

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CHEOPS space telescope takes its first pictures

The tension was high: In front of a large screen at the house near Madrid where members of the Consortium participating in the commissioning of the satellite live, as well as at the other institutes involved in CHEOPS, the team waited for the first images from the space telescope. "The first images that were about to appear on the screen were crucial for us to be able to determine if the telescope

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Using long-wavelength terahertz radiation to produce video with a high frame rate

A team of researchers at Durham University has found a way to use long-wavelength terahertz radiation to produce video with a high frame rate. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their technique and its possible uses.

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Experts: Trade wars bad for US and global energy security

Policy that raises barriers to international trade does not bode well for U.S. and global energy security, according to a new research paper by experts in the Center for Energy Studies at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy and at the Korea Energy Economics Institute.

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Negative encounters with police have mental health consequences for black men

Adversarial encounters with police have a powerful negative effect on black men's mental health, as do efforts to avoid such encounters, according to a study from a team at the George Washington University.

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Dolphins gather in female family groups

Social clusters including mothers' groups play an important role in the life of southern Australian bottlenose dolphins, a new study shows.

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French bracelet among surprises in mysterious Havering hoard

Bronze age specialists split on why so many objects would have been broken and buried One of the largest and most mysterious bronze age hoards ever found in the UK contains objects that have astonished archaeologists, including items more commonly found in France and the Alps. The Museum of London on Monday revealed new finds among the Havering hoard , a remarkable collection of 453 swords, axes,

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Dolphins gather in female family groups

Social clusters including mothers' groups play an important role in the life of southern Australian bottlenose dolphins, a new study shows.

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Surfing space dust bunnies spawn interplanetary magnetic fields

A 40-year-old enigma about ghostly magnetic fields in interplanetary space may have finally been solved by new data from a constellation of 12 satellites in near-Earth space.

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A twist in the story of volcanic eruptions and mass extinctions

An emerging scientific consensus is that gases—in particular carbon gases–released by volcanic eruptions millions of years ago contributed to some of Earth's greatest mass extinctions. But new research at The City College of New York suggests that that's not the entire story.

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Proper etiquette in the presence of bison

Since the start of the Life Bison Project in 2016, 56 bison have been translocated from Germany and Poland—55 to reintroduction areas and one to the breeding center in Hunedoara. The bison roam freely at two main reintroduction sites in the Țarcu and Poiana Ruscă Mountains of Romania. These areas comprise one of Europe's largest wilderness areas and encompass 4 national parks and 1 natural park, t

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Bees prioritize their unique waggle dance to find flowers

Researchers at Royal Holloway have developed a method to track bee-to-bee communication in honeybee hives, showing how bees have many means to learn from their nest mates about the best flowers to visit, but it is their unique waggle dance which is prioritised above all else to find the best food sites.

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A Proposed EPA Regulation Would Endanger the Public's Health

Under a new rule, the agency would be prevented from using crucial studies that include confidential information — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researcher: Conducting research in China is complicated by the Communist Party's influence

What is the coronavirus? How does it spread? Should I be worried? When a new virus surfaces, the unknowns loom big. When a new virus comes out of China, potentially clarifying information needs to be weighed and considered alongside the realities of practicing science and research there.

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Proper etiquette in the presence of bison

Since the start of the Life Bison Project in 2016, 56 bison have been translocated from Germany and Poland—55 to reintroduction areas and one to the breeding center in Hunedoara. The bison roam freely at two main reintroduction sites in the Țarcu and Poiana Ruscă Mountains of Romania. These areas comprise one of Europe's largest wilderness areas and encompass 4 national parks and 1 natural park, t

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New coastal overtopping forecast made available to the public

One of the greatest challenges facing coastal communities during extreme storms is to predict where, and when, coastal flooding might occur.

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Molecular oxygen detected in the nearest quasar

Observations using the IRAM 30 meter telescope and the NOEMA Interferometer have unveiled the presence of molecular oxygen in Markarian 231—the nearest known quasar. The finding, detailed in a paper published on the arXiv preprint server, could be crucial for better understanding the properties of molecular gas in this object.

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Coronavirus/food stocks: theme pork

The case for staying invested in pig producers remains strong

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The Real Message of Janelle Monáe's Oscars Performance

The Oscars knew it had some explaining to do. Going into Sunday night's ceremony, the Academy had not only failed to nominate a single female director despite a spike in women-directed films , but also nominated just one actor of color across all performing categories—stats that once again landed the organization in hot water. The show acknowledged the criticisms immediately. To open the evening,

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Bees prioritize their unique waggle dance to find flowers

Researchers at Royal Holloway have developed a method to track bee-to-bee communication in honeybee hives, showing how bees have many means to learn from their nest mates about the best flowers to visit, but it is their unique waggle dance which is prioritised above all else to find the best food sites.

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Predicting chaos using aerosols and AI

If a poisonous gas were released in a bioterrorism attack, the ability to predict the path of its molecules—through turbulent winds, temperature changes and unstable buoyancies—could mean life or death. Understanding how a city will grow and change over a 20-year period could lead to more sustainable planning and affordable housing.

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Powering H. pylori pathogenesis

The bacterium Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomach in half of the world's population and increases the risk of gastric cancer.

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Scientists explain why naked mole-rats' longevity contradicts accepted aging theory

Dr. Chen Hou and his research collaborators have found an answer to the decades-old question of why naked mole-rats with high oxidative damage live 10 times longer than mice of comparative weight.

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Yes, more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere helps plants grow, but it's no excuse to downplay climate change

The alarming rate of carbon dioxide flowing into our atmosphere is affecting plant life in interesting ways—but perhaps not in the way you'd expect.

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'Rule-breaking' plants may be climate change survivors

Plants that break some of the 'rules' of ecology by adapting in unconventional ways may have a higher chance of surviving climate change, according to researchers from the University of Queensland and Trinity College Dublin.

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Powering H. pylori pathogenesis

The bacterium Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomach in half of the world's population and increases the risk of gastric cancer.

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Scientists explain why naked mole-rats' longevity contradicts accepted aging theory

Dr. Chen Hou and his research collaborators have found an answer to the decades-old question of why naked mole-rats with high oxidative damage live 10 times longer than mice of comparative weight.

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'Rule-breaking' plants may be climate change survivors

Plants that break some of the 'rules' of ecology by adapting in unconventional ways may have a higher chance of surviving climate change, according to researchers from the University of Queensland and Trinity College Dublin.

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Health insurance is a huge worry for middle-aged Americans

Health insurance costs weigh heavily on the minds of many middle-aged adults, and many worry what they will face in retirement or if federal health policies change, according to a new survey. More than a quarter of people in their 50s and early 60s lack confidence that they'll be able to afford health insurance in the next year, and the number goes up to nearly half when they look ahead to retire

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5 ways to create stronger connections | Robert Reffkin

In a tech-obsessed culture, it can be difficult to build genuine relationships with people, especially in the workplace. Robert Reffkin shares his tips and tricks for establishing authentic connections on the job.

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How to know if it's time to change careers | Chieh Huang

Quitting your job can be scary, but sometimes it's the best thing you can do for your career, says entrepreneur Chieh Huang. He shares how to know when it's time to move on — and what can you do to prepare.

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3 things new parents should consider before going back to work | Emily Oster

Should you go back to work after having kids? It's an emotional decision, but weighing three factors can make it easier, says author and economist Emily Oster.

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6 ways to improve your relationship with money | Thasunda Duckett

Taking control of our personal finances can feel overwhelming — but it doesn't have to be. Thasunda Duckett shares how to minimize shame around money and start having honest conversations about how to save.

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The secret to giving great feedback | LeeAnn Renninger

Humans have been coming up with ways to give constructive criticism for centuries, but somehow we're still pretty terrible at it. Cognitive psychologist LeeAnn Renniger shares a scientifically proven method for giving effective feedback.

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How to embrace emotions at work | Liz Fosslien

"You can't just flip a switch when you step into the office and turn your emotions off. Feeling feelings is part of being human," says author and illustrator Liz Fosslien. She shares why selective vulnerability is the key to bringing your authentic self to work.

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How burnout makes us less creative | Rahaf Harfoush

Our obsession with productivity — to-do lists, life hacks, morning routines — is making us less productive, says digital anthropologist Rahaf Harfoush. She explains why we need to redesign our workday around creativity — not just efficiency.

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How to make faster decisions | Patrick McGinnis

In a world of endless reviews and options, it's easy to become paralyzed by indecision. Investor and writer Patrick McGinnis shares the dangers of "FOBO" — the fear of better options — and how to overcome it.

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Men better than women at self-promotion on job, leading to inequities

Self-promotion is an essential tool for career advancement, whether in job or performance reviews, or just networking. But not everyone feels equally comfortable doing it. A new study suggests men are far more at ease with self-promotion than women, which contributes to a broad disparity in promotions and pay. According to a recent National Bureau of Economic Research working paper, women consiste

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Linguistics: The pronunciation paradox

Learners of foreign languages can hear the errors in pronunciation that fellow learners tend to make, but continue to fall foul of them themselves despite years of practice. A new study of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich shows that everyone believes their own pronunciation to be best.

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The cosmic confusion of the microwave background

Roughly 380,000 years after the Big Bang, about 13.7 billion years ago, matter (mostly hydrogen) cooled enough for neutral atoms to form, and light was able to traverse space freely. That light, the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), comes to us from every direction in the sky, uniform except for faint ripples and bumps at brightness levels of only a few part in one hundred thousand, th

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Using the power of pop to change minds over sea turtle meat consumption

Researchers at the University of Oxford and Programa Tatô have developed a catchy way to reach communities on the island of São Tomé, in West Africa.

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Scientists warn humanity about worldwide insect decline

Insect declines and extinctions are accelerating in many parts of the world. With this comes the disappearance of irreplaceable services to humans, the consequences of which are unpredictable. A group of scientists from around the globe has united to warn humanity of such dangers.

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Chinese date extract improves the immune system of fish

A RUDN University biologist reports that the extract of the fruit of the Chinese date boosts immunity in carp. The addition of date juice to the diet increases the reaction of the immune system of fish to extraneous compounds. The results are published in the journal Fish and Shellfish Immunology.

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Using the power of pop to change minds over sea turtle meat consumption

Researchers at the University of Oxford and Programa Tatô have developed a catchy way to reach communities on the island of São Tomé, in West Africa.

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Scientists warn humanity about worldwide insect decline

Insect declines and extinctions are accelerating in many parts of the world. With this comes the disappearance of irreplaceable services to humans, the consequences of which are unpredictable. A group of scientists from around the globe has united to warn humanity of such dangers.

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Chinese date extract improves the immune system of fish

A RUDN University biologist reports that the extract of the fruit of the Chinese date boosts immunity in carp. The addition of date juice to the diet increases the reaction of the immune system of fish to extraneous compounds. The results are published in the journal Fish and Shellfish Immunology.

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A Job Overseas, but Stranded by Coronavirus Travel Bans

A software engineer finds herself unable to return to her job in Hong Kong after the Philippine government banned travel to the city.

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Varmt vand smelter Grønlands kæmpegletsjere nedefra

PLUS. Et nyt studie viser, at varmt havvand strømmer ind under Zachariæ gletsjeren og gletsjeren i Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden i Grønland og får dem til at smelte hurtigere.

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How China's one-child policy helped shrink the education gap

A new study uses China's one-child policy to show that having fewer children leads women to achieve higher levels of education.The research found that the one-child policy alone accounted for about half of the additional education that women in China achieved after the policy was put in place.

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AAAS panel focuses on roadmap to 'radical transformation of the AI research enterprise'

At an upcoming panel at AAAS, Lehigh University's Dan Lopresti and the Computing Community Consortium will present a twenty-year roadmap for artificial intelligence (AI) research in the U.S., offering a vision of a strategic path to unleashing the full potential of AI for the greatest societal benefit

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Föräldrar till missbrukande personer en utsatt grupp

Föräldrar utsätts ofta för kränkningar och brott av sina missbrukande vuxna barn. Det visar forskare vid Malmö universitet som intervjuat 32 föräldrar för att öka kunskapen om deras situation. – Detta är en förbisedd och utsatt grupp som är i stort behov av stöd, säger Bengt Svensson, professor i socialt arbete vid Malmö universitet, som tillsammans med docent Torkel Richert och professor Björn J

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Romaner översatta utifrån läsarnas referensram fungerar för fler

En översatt roman har mycket att vinna på att läsas som ett självständigt verk snarare än ett verk som står i relation till ett original. Det visar en avhandling i slaviska språk från Göteborgs universitet. Originalet, eller källtexten, ses ofta som överlägset i relation till en översättning och översättningsforskningen har därför också fokuserat på frågor som rör hur man bäst kan överföra origin

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Single HPV vaccine dose may be effective against cervical cancer

New research indicates that a single dose of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is as effective as multiple doses for preventing preinvasive cervical disease, which can later develop into cervical cancer.

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Acid-loving microbe can improve understanding of past climate

Study of an 'extremophile' found in the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park can be used to help researchers understand climate change.

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El Niño contributes to insect collapse in the Amazon

Hotter and drier El Niño events are having an alarming effect on biodiversity in the Amazon Rainforest and further add to a disturbing global insect collapse, scientists show. A new study focusing on the humble, but ecologically key, dung beetle has revealed for the first time that intense droughts and wildfires during the last El Niño climate phenomenon, combined with human disturbance, led to be

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Scientists warn humanity about worldwide insect decline

Insect declines and extinctions are accelerating in many parts of the world. With this comes the disappearance of irreplaceable services to humans, the consequences of which are unpredictable. A group of scientists from across the globe has united to warn humanity of such dangers.

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We Need to Talk About 'Cloud Neutrality'

A multibillion-dollar, privately-owned infrastructure is now essential to the modern internet economy. That should freak you out.

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Image of the Day: Jetpack Jellyfish

Jellyfish fitted with energy efficient controllers could one day find a job on ocean explorations.

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One of the most important laws protecting birds in the US just got gutted

Birds like this American kestrel could soon be left unprotected (James Lee/Unsplash/) The Trump Administration just laid out their plans to gut one of the most important laws protecting birds in the United States. On Jan. 30, wildlife officials unveiled their new rule for the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), which chops out language from the legislation that has been crucial to conservation effo

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From Big Bang to cosmic bounce: an astronomical journey through space and time

Nature, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00356-2 A physicist and humanist takes us on a grand tour of all time. By Philip Ball

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Homeopathic X-rays

Homeopathy is pure pseudoscience . No reasonable review of the evidence can come to another conclusion. Most people who use homeopathic products don't even know what it is – they generally think that the term refers to herbal or natural remedies. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, for most people, when I tell them what homeopathy actually is, their first reaction is disbelief. As s

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Straf giver ikke mere læring, men hvordan lærer vi så?

Jeg vil bytte al den snak om straf ud med en forpligtelse i sundhedsvæsnet til at sætte sig i spidsen for at sikre en fremtidig kultur med psykologisk tryghed, der er nysgerrig efter at italesætte, forstå, udbedre og sprede viden om fejl, skriver faren til Mathias, som døde af meningitis.

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True AI will be created when

It starts giving instructions to the creator to upgrade itself. submitted by /u/tianeptinehub [link] [comments]

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This Psychological Concept Could Be Shaping the Presidential Election – Facts So Romantic

Could Warren's political fate in 2020 turn on voters who think she would make a great president choosing another candidate because they think that's what their neighbors will do? Photograph by Maverick Pictures / Shutterstock Not too long ago, I briefly met Elizabeth Warren in a restaurant in Cambridge, near Harvard, where I'm now a postdoc in psychology. My dad and I saw the Massachusetts senato

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Bombs Dropped from Zeppelins Are Highly Accurate

Originally published in May 1914 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dear Therapist: I'm Considering Leaving My Wife for My Co-worker

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, Months ago, on a business trip, a female co-worker and I attempted to meet up with others for drinks, but when everyone else bailed, we decided to still go out. After multiple rounds of drinks, barhopping, and

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What Is the Internet of Things? A WIRED Guide

What you need to know about the promise (and peril) of networked lightbulbs, ovens, cameras, speakers and, well … everything.

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What Scientists Can Learn From Alien Hunters

The history of the search for extraterrestrial life is a good way to understand the unintended consequences of fence-building and boundary-setting in other disciplines.

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Today's Cartoon: Twitter Battles

A sign of a healthy marriage is being able to tell your significant other to log off.

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The Global Donkey Crisis–Yes, Really

Koalas might be cuter, but donkeys are being abused and slaughtered en masse for their skins, which are used in traditional Chinese medicine — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ireland's Nationalist Party Breaks Through

Mainstream parties falter, only for a new, populist force to fill the vacuum: It's a familiar tale that has been recounted several times in recent years—in Britain with Brexit, in the United States with the election of Donald Trump, and in scores of other countries around the world. Ireland, however, has been conspicuously absent from this global populist wave. Unlike many of its European counter

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Meet "Spikey," a Possible Pair of Merging Supermassive Black Holes

A flare predicted for this spring could confirm the object is indeed two monstrous black holes coming together — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Xi Jinping faces China's Chernobyl moment

The coronavirus crisis could lay bare the absurdities of autocracy for all to see

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Meet "Spikey," a Possible Pair of Merging Supermassive Black Holes

A flare predicted for this spring could confirm the object is indeed two monstrous black holes coming together — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ny rekord: Blæsende søndag gav 27 pct. vind i det europæiske elsystem

Vindkraft dækkede hele 27,4 pct. af elforbruget i EU 28 søndag den 9. februar. Det er den højeste andel nogensinde – efter at vindkraften i december sidste år kom op på 26,2 pct.

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»De opfører sig jo ikke ligefrem som grise«: Problemerne står i kø for insektavlere

PLUS. Danske insektavlere må erkende, at der er en del tekniske udfordringer ved at holde insekter. Men hos Enorm Biofactory tror de på et kommercielt anlæg næste år.

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This Is How Reaganism and Thatcherism End

This article was updated at 10:17 ET on February 10, 2020 In an Italian hotel ballroom of spectacular opulence—on red velvet chairs, beneath glittering crystal chandeliers and a stained-glass ceiling—the conservative movement that once inspired people across Europe, built bridges across the Iron Curtain and helped to win the Cold War came, finally, to an end. The occasion was a conference in Rome

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Charbel Massaad et la lutte contre la fraude

Charbel Massaad is head of biomedical sciences at University of Paris Descartes. He even put forward his candidacy as rector, advocating for science ethics. Unironically.

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What is coronavirus and how worried should we be?

What are the symptoms caused by the virus from Wuhan in China, how does it spread, and should you call a doctor? Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection It is a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of those initially infected either worked or frequently shopped in the

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The Best Speech of Oscars Night

Much of this year's host-free Oscar ceremony was dedicated to the Academy Awards' many shortcomings. Natalie Portman walked the red carpet in a cape embroidered with the names of women snubbed for Best Director. Chris Rock and Steve Martin, two prior emcees, mocked the lack of racial diversity in the acting categories. "Think how much the Oscars have changed in the past 92 years. Back in 1929, th

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How Joaquin Phoenix Disrupted Awards Season

Joaquin Phoenix has never been a fan of awards season. The things that lesser humans crave—praise, ritualized recognition by a roomful of your peers, the opportunity to wear an outfit for one night that costs more than a car—seem to leave the actor cold. "I'm just saying that I think it's bullshit," Phoenix told Interview 's Elvis Mitchell in 2012 , as critical appreciation and Oscars speculation

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"The Nuclear Family Was a Mistake" — In The Atlantic's March issue, David Brooks considers a better way to live together

For The Atlantic 's March cover, David Brooks makes a powerful and provocative argument that " The Nuclear Family Was a Mistake ." His story is an examination of the shift over the past century from a familial structure that prized interconnected extended families, with grandparents upstairs and aunts across the street, to one that idealizes detached nuclear families—and how this structure has be

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The Nuclear Family Was a Mistake

T he scene is one many of us have somewhere in our family history: Dozens of people celebrating Thanksgiving or some other holiday around a makeshift stretch of family tables—siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles, great-aunts. The grandparents are telling the old family stories for the 37th time. "It was the most beautiful place you've ever seen in your life," says one, remembering his first day in Am

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Ledende overlæge vil sikre internationalt niveau på Hjertemedicinsk Afdeling i hovedstadsområdet

Fra første 1. februar er Magnus T. Jensen tiltrådt som ledende overlæge på ny Hjertemedicinsk Afdeling på Amager og Hvidovre Hospital.

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'Those unfortunate events:' Second retraction for stem cell scientist in Canada accused of misconduct

Citing a misconduct investigation, the journal Stem Cells has retracted a 2009 article coauthored by a researcher whose work has been under suspicion for roughly five years. The paper was titled "Cell adhesion and spreading affect adipogenesis from embryonic stem cells: the role of calreticulin." The retraction notice, which is behind a paywall, states: The … Continue reading

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CRISPR gene editing proves safe in a clinical trial

Nature, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00339-3 Immune cells whose genomes have been altered with CRISPR are well-tolerated by three people with cancer.

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UK adopts powers to enforce coronavirus quarantine

Mandatory isolation to apply in England as diagnoses in Britain rise to 8

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Slamspridning på åkrar ökar inte risken för antibiotikaresistens

Antibiotikarester i rötslam från reningsverk tycks inte bidra till ökad antibiotikaresistens när slammet sprids på åkermark, visar en studie från Göteborgs universitet. Rester av den antibiotika vi äter hamnar tillsammans med resistenta tarmbakterier i slammet vid våra reningsverk. Därför har det länge funnits en oro för att spridning av rötslam på åkermark bidrar till att antibiotikaresistens sk

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Climate assembly considers flying bananas

The UK's climate assembly considers the issues of flying bananas and indoor fleeces.

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Artificial relativistic molecules

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14635-z Artificial molecules supported on templated surfaces attract enormous interest due to their tunable electronic properties. Here the authors use STM experiments and DFT calculations to show the formation of Pb artificial clusters on a IrTe2 honeycomb template that are maximally stabilized by relativistic effe

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Global determinants of freshwater and marine fish genetic diversity

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14409-7 Biogeographic patterns of genetic diversity are poorly documented, especially for fish species. Here the authors show that (mitochondrial) genetic diversity has global spatial organization patterns with different environmental drivers for marine and freshwater fishes, where genetic diversity is only partly c

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Neurology-related protein biomarkers are associated with cognitive ability and brain volume in older age

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14161-7 Late-life cognitive dysfunction is common, but the biological substrates are largely unknown. Here, the authors examined a panel of 90 neurology-related protein biomarkers and show that plasma levels of 22 of these proteins are associated with general fluid cognitive ability in later life.

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Training deep quantum neural networks

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14454-2 It is hard to design quantum neural networks able to work with quantum data. Here, the authors propose a noise-robust architecture for a feedforward quantum neural network, with qudits as neurons and arbitrary unitary operations as perceptrons, whose training procedure is efficient in the number of layers.

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Temporal dynamics of protein complex formation and dissociation during human cytomegalovirus infection

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14586-5 Here, Hashimoto et al. apply mass spectrometry-based thermal proximity coaggregation to characterize the temporal dynamics of virus-host protein-protein interactions during human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, uncovering proviral functions including the internalization of the HCMV receptor integrin beta 1

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Immunological history governs human stem cell memory CD4 heterogeneity via the Wnt signaling pathway

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14442-6 Aging is associated with immune attrition that may impact the effectiveness of the immune system to protect the host from pathogens. Here the authors show that immune aging is associated with alterations in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduced stem cell memory T lymphocytes, hinting the Wnt/β-catenin path

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Discovering the genes mediating the interactions between chronic respiratory diseases in the human interactome

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14600-w Complex diseases often share genetic determinants and symptoms, but the mechanistic basis of disease interactions remains elusive. Here, the authors propose a network topological measure to identify proteins linking complex diseases in the interactome, and identify mediators between COPD and asthma.

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Serum neurofilament light levels in normal aging and their association with morphologic brain changes

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14612-6 Neurofilament (NfL) levels in CSF and blood have been established as a biomarker of neuronal damage in neurodegenerative diseases, and there is an age-dependent increase in NfL levels in CSF. Here the authors demonstrate that serum NfL levels increase in healthy aging people and predict and correlate with br

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Over 12 millioner rejste med Cityringen i 2019

Den nye metrolinje overgår forventningerne i de første måneder.

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Researchers virtually 'unwind' lithium battery for the first time

An international team led by researchers at UCL has revealed new insights into the workings of a lithium battery by virtually 'unrolling' its coil of electrode layers using an algorithm designed for papyrus scrolls.

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NIH scientists link higher maternal blood pressure to placental gene changes

Higher maternal blood pressure in pregnancy is associated with chemical modifications to placental genes, according to a study by researchers from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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Bernie Sanders's Secret Weapon

I f Senator Bernie Sanders wins the Democratic primary in New Hampshire on Tuesday, it'll likely be thanks to voters who are—like him—not actually Democrats. The Vermont senator's lead in several public polls is bolstered by his strong support among independent, or undeclared, voters, who are welcome to participate in New Hampshire's primary and could make up as much as 40 percent of the electora

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Small-worldness favours network inference in synthetic neural networks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59198-7

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The endocannabinoid hydrolase FAAH is an allosteric enzyme

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59120-1

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3D Patterning of cells in Magnetic Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58738-5

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Effect of mild blast-induced TBI on dendritic architecture of the cortex and hippocampus in the mouse

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59252-4

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Investigation of spin stiffness in spin-depolarized states of two-dimensional electron systems with time-resolved Kerr rotation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58658-4

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Hinged-3D metamaterials with giant and strain-independent Poisson's ratios

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59205-x

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Autophagy Activation in Zebrafish Heart Regeneration

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59106-z

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GDPR forhindrer læger i at kontakte 3000 ubehandlede hepatitis C-patienter

Den ubehandlede sygdom er blevet opdaget fordi, patienterne er i en forskningsdatabase. Men lovgivningen gør, at lægerne ikke må kontakte de mange danskere, der går rundt med leverbetændelse.

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Automation apocalypse: Too many robots? More like not enough.

Ezra Klein, editor-at-large and cofounder of Vox, doesn't buy into automation apocalypse theories. The data is not there to support those predictions. "In many cases, part of the problem in our economy is not that we have too many robots but that we don't have enough robots," says Klein. "If we were being able to do a better job automating things … we would be getting richer faster and we would

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Svartmunnad smörbult har fått arvsmassan kartlagd

Den svartmunnade smörbulten har spridit sig i svenska vatten sedan 2008. Nu har forskare kartlagt fiskens arvsmassa för att bättre förstå invasiva arters framgång – och även ge nya verktyg för att bedöma smörbultens kapacitet för fortsatt spridning. Svartmunnad smörbult ( Neogobius melanostomus ; engelska Round goby ) är en oerhört framgångsrik invasiv fisk. Den fanns ursprungligen i och kring Ka

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With Australia's Hillsides Stripped Bare By Fire, Scientists Rush To Predict Mudflows

Heavy rains in eastern Australia are causing mudslides and debris flows in areas that burned. Scientists are trying to predict when and where slides are likely to happen. (Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR)

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For a Scientist Turned Novelist, an Experiment Pays Off

"Real Life" follows a pivotal weekend in the life of a black gay student in the Midwest, something Brandon Taylor said was an effort to write himself into the campus-life genre he loves reading.

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Africa, a Thunder and Lightning Hot Spot, May See Even More Storms

The size and frequency of thunderstorms has risen along with global temperatures, researchers at the University of Tel Aviv found.

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For Israelis and Palestinians, a Battle Over a Humble Plant

In 2005, Israel banned the collection of akoub — an edible thistle-like plant — stating that over-harvesting was decimating its wild population. The ban will be eased this year, but many Palestinians, who have long considered akoub a vital part of their cultural heritage, say the restrictions are unfair.

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Could the coronavirus mutate if a vaccine can't be found in time?

As scientists race to trace out paths the virus might take we ask the crucial questions In just a month, the coronavirus outbreak has snowballed from a handful of cases to more than 40,000, reaching four continents and prompting an all-out battle to stop the spread across China and beyond. As those in Wuhan face shortages of hospital beds and supplies that have been likened to "wartime conditions

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50 mio. kr. til cykelparkering skal lokke flere i sadlen

Regeringen og rød blok er blevet enige om, hvordan midlerne fra cykelpuljen skal bruges.

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Jim Keller: Elon Musk and Tesla Autopilot | AI Podcast Clips

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Mobile devices in 2030?

https://imgur.com/a/4nsal0a https://imgur.com/a/c9YT4vG https://imgur.com/a/jLMDfAd The above are three images from 2000, 2010 and 2020 showing a modern mobile device of the time, what will mobile devices do/look like in ten years? submitted by /u/TL127R [link] [comments]

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Ny Pentagon-rapport: F-35 har fortsat store mangler

Der er ifølge en amerikansk gennemgang 873 afvigelser eller mangler på F-35.

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Rumsonde skal udforske Solen i op til 500 graders varme

Sonden skal blandt andet undersøge de kraftige solstorme, som ind i mellem rammer Jorden.

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Kannibaler bland bakterier väcker hopp om nya mediciner

Pneumokocker är ett släkte bakterier som orsakar infektioner som lunginflammation, blodförgiftning och hjärnhinneinflammation. Pneumokockerna blir allt mer resistenta mot antibiotika och därför finns det ett stort behov att utveckla nya behandlingsformer. Pneumokocker kan mörda sina artfränder En del pneumokocker blir kannibaler under själva infektionsförloppet. De mördar sina artfränder med enzym

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Space station delivery from Virginia nixed at last minute

Northrop Grumman delayed a space station delivery from Virginia on Sunday because of trouble with ground equipment.

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No, James Lyons-Weiler did not "break the coronavirus code"

Last week, a new conspiracy theory about the coronavirus outbreak by James Lyons-Weiler went viral (if you'll excuse the term) after antivax conspiracy theorist Del Bigtree interviewed him. Lyons-Weiler strongly implies that the strain of coronavirus behind the outbreak (2019-nCoV) has a SARS-like sequence that came from a laboratory working on a SARS vaccine. Fortunately, Dr. Gorski has the mad m

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Coronavirus: number of confirmed UK cases rises from four to eight

News comes after UK declared outbreak was 'serious threat' to health Coronavirus – latest updates The number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK has doubled from four to eight, as the government announced new powers to detain people suspected of having the virus. The four new cases – three men and one woman – were transferred from where they were diagnosed in Brighton to London over the w

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Downpours to end Australia bushfires within days

Australia's months-long bushfires crisis will likely be over within days, officials said Monday as heavy rainfall extinguished several massive blazes and was forecast to douse dozens more as downpours swept south.

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Din profil i biomolekylernas sociala nätverk

Kan vi dra lärdom från tekniken bakom sociala medier när vi studerar sjukdomar? Ett socialt nätverk är en förenklad bild av relationer mellan olika personer. Olika typer av relationer finns också inom komplexa biologiska system, där särskilda konstellationer kan säga oss något om risken att utveckla en viss sjukdom. Att tillämpa nätverksanalys för att beskriva komplexa system med en förenklad stru

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Solar Orbiter blasts off to capture 1st look at sun's poles

Europe and NASA's Solar Orbiter rocketed into space Sunday night on an unprecedented mission to capture the first pictures of the sun's elusive poles.

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Storm Ciara sows trail of destruction across Europe (Update)

Storm Ciara caused travel chaos on Monday, severely disrupting commutes and grounding hundreds of flights as swathes of Europe were left without power by torrential rain and winds of up to 180 kilometres (110 miles) per hour that also caused flash flooding and the cancellation of sporting fixtures.

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Acid-loving microbe can improve understanding of past climate

Food and energy availability cause physical changes in acid-loving microorganisms that are used to study Earth's climate history, according to research from Dartmouth College.

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New research shows that El Nino contributes to insect collapse in the Amazon

Hotter and drier El Niño events are having an alarming effect on biodiversity in the Amazon Rainforest and further add to a disturbing global insect collapse, scientists show.

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Acid-loving microbe can improve understanding of past climate

Food and energy availability cause physical changes in acid-loving microorganisms that are used to study Earth's climate history, according to research from Dartmouth College.

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Place-based tax incentives stimulate employment in remote regions

A place-based payroll tax incentive can be effective in stimulating employment in remote and underdeveloped regions, helping to address regional inequalities, according to a new UCL and University of Oslo study.

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New research shows that El Nino contributes to insect collapse in the Amazon

Hotter and drier El Niño events are having an alarming effect on biodiversity in the Amazon Rainforest and further add to a disturbing global insect collapse, scientists show.

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China struggles to return to work after coronavirus shutdown

Xi Jinping says large-scale layoffs must be avoided as many workplaces remain shut

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Can you solve it? Are you smart enough for MIT?

Teasers from MIT's puzzle guy UPDATE: The solutions can now be seen here Today's problems come from what might be the longest-running puzzle column in the history of the printed word. In 1966, MIT student Allan Gottlieb published his first Puzzle Corner in the MIT Technology Review. Continue reading…

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Fires and floods: maps of Europe predict scale of climate catastrophe

Without urgent action, rising sea levels by end of century could leave cities under water A series of detailed maps have laid bare the scale of possible forest fires, floods, droughts and deluges that Europe could face by the end of the century without urgent action to adapt to and confront global heating. An average one-metre rise in sea levels by the end of the century – without any flood preve

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