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Circular reasoning

Circular RNA may play a role in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

6h

Secularism and tolerance of minority groups predicts future prosperity of countries

Secular cultures which are tolerant of minority groups and respectful of individuals' rights tend to have more wealth, education and democracy, a new study by University of Bristol scientists has found.

9h

Endnu en alvorlig sårbarhed i Yousee-hardware: TDC vil ikke oplyse, hvor mange der er ramt

Wifi-extendere hentede opdateringer fra en FTP-server, som alle og enhver kunne skrive til. Dermed har Yousee-produkter gjort kunder sårbare hackerangreb, uden at TDC's egne folk fangede sikkerhedshullerne. Alligevel stoler TDC fortsat på processen.

16h

Zuck's Lost Notebook, Marsupial Trouble, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

now

Researchers link quartz microbalance measurements to international measurement system

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have found a way to link measurements made by a device integral to microchip fabrication and other industries directly to the recently redefined International System of Units (SI, the modern metric system). That traceability can greatly increase users' confidence in their measurements because the SI is now based entirely on f

6min

Protecting redundancy in the food web helps ensure ecological resilience

In 2014, a disease of epidemic proportions gripped the West Coast of the U.S. You may not have noticed, though, unless you were underwater.

6min

Bacteriophages may play a role in childhood stunting… and be able to help treat it

New research spearheaded by McGill University has discovered that bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) found in the intestinal tracts of children may play a role in childhood stunting, a significant impediment to growth that affects 22% of children under the age of five around the world.

6min

How bird flocks with multiple species behave like K-pop groups

Birds of a feather don't always flock together: Peer into a forest canopy, and you will likely spot multiple bird species flying and feeding together, a phenomenon most spectacular in the Amazon where 50 species may travel as a unit. But are birds in these mixed flocks cooperating with one another or competing?

6min

Cracks in perovskite films for solar cells easily healed, study finds

A new study reveals good news for the possibility of using perovskite materials in next-generation solar cells.

6min

Faith-centered tattoos are analyzed in study of university students

With more than a quarter of U.S. adults now having tattoos—and nearly half of millennials sporting them—only a handful of studies have focused on religious tattoos. But a new study by researchers at Baylor University and Texas Tech University analyzes faith-centered tattoos and is the first to use visual images of them.

6min

Researchers develop new method for analyzing metal

Warfighters on the battlefield often rely on machines, vehicles and other technologies with rotating parts to complete their mission. Army researchers have devised a new method of testing for a major factor in equipment failure and breakdown in order to ensure that those tools meet the proper standard of quality.

6min

New etching technique could advance the way semiconductor devices are made

Microelectronics like semiconductor devices are at the heart of the technologies we use each day. As we move into an era where we are stretching the limits of Moore's Law, it is essential to find new ways to continue to pack more circuitry into each individual device in order to increase the speed and capability of our computers.

6min

Bacteriophages may play a role in childhood stunting… and be able to help treat it

New research has discovered that bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) found in the intestinal tracts of children may play a role in childhood stunting, a significant impediment to growth that affects 22% of children under the age of five around the world.

7min

Bubble-capturing surface helps get rid of foam

Bubbly buildup can hinder many industrial processes, but a new method can reduce or even eliminate it.

7min

A coral's symbiotic community may predict how well it resists climate stress

U.S. and Australian researchers have found a potential tool for identifying stress-tolerant "super corals." In experiments that simulated climate change stress, researchers found corals that best survived had symbiotic algae communities with similar features.

7min

Antibiotics discovered that kill bacteria in a new way

A new group of antibiotics with a unique approach to attacking bacteria has been discovered, making it a promising clinical candidate in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. The newly-found corbomycin and the lesser-known complestatin have a never-before-seen way to kill bacteria, which is achieved by blocking the function of the bacterial cell wall. The discovery comes from a family of ant

7min

US National Institutes of Health launches supplementary grants for researchers with family commitments

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00420-x The programme aims to help postdocs and other researchers to temporarily step away from the lab to handle caregiving responsibilities.

8min

How Many Coronavirus Cases in China? Officials Tweak the Answer

China's health authorities have decided to no longer count as confirmed cases those patients who test positive but don't show symptoms. Skepticism was immediate.

10min

Scientists ♥ Their Emojis, But It's Complicated

The latest batch of new emojis is coming soon and it contains some wins for science-lovers. But scientists have mixed feelings about some of the new images from nature. (Image credit: Emojipedia)

12min

Fossilized insect from 100 million years ago is oldest record of primitive bee with pollen

Beetle parasites clinging to a primitive bee 100 million years ago may have caused the flight error that, while deadly for the insect, is a boon for science today.

12min

Protecting redundancy in the food web helps ensure ecological resilience

In 2014, a disease of epidemic proportions gripped the West Coast of the U.S. You may not have noticed, though, unless you were underwater.

13min

Bacteriophages may play a role in childhood stunting… and be able to help treat it

New research spearheaded by McGill University has discovered that bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) found in the intestinal tracts of children may play a role in childhood stunting, a significant impediment to growth that affects 22% of children under the age of five around the world.

13min

How bird flocks with multiple species behave like K-pop groups

Birds of a feather don't always flock together: Peer into a forest canopy, and you will likely spot multiple bird species flying and feeding together, a phenomenon most spectacular in the Amazon where 50 species may travel as a unit. But are birds in these mixed flocks cooperating with one another or competing?

13min

Cracks in perovskite films for solar cells easily healed, study finds

A new study finds that cracks in brittle perovskite films can be easily healed with compression or mild heating, a good sign for the use of perovskites in next-generation solar cells.

15min

What is the best way to encourage innovation? Competitive pay may be the answer

Economists and business leaders agree that innovation is a major force behind economic growth, but many disagree on what is the best way to encourage workers to produce the "think-outside-of-the-box" ideas that create newer and better products and services. New research from the University of California San Diego indicates that competitive "winner-takes-all" pay structures are most effective in ge

15min

Mind the trust gap: It's wider than you think

New Yorkers are more trusting of others compared to Alabamans or Texans. While this regional divide between southerners and the rest of Americans is well documented, the gap is wider than perceived, a study from York University reveals.

15min

Love matters: How parents' love shapes children's lives

Parents often put their own relationship on the back burner to concentrate on their children, but a new study shows that when spouses love each other, children stay in school longer and marry later in life.

15min

Having fewer children reduced the education gap in China

A new study uses China's one-child policy to show that having fewer children leads women to achieve higher levels of education.

15min

18min

18min

Airbus unveils futuristic airplane prototype with one giant wing

submitted by /u/The_Write_Stuff [link] [comments]

18min

Algae team rosters could help ID 'super corals'

U.S. and Australian researchers have found a potential tool for identifying "super corals" that can tolerate a limited amount of climate change.

22min

French unions played key role in protecting workers' mental health

During a three-year organizational restructuring at France Telecom that began in 2007—which called for the downsizing of 22,000 employees, often based on ethically questionable methods—there was a wave of employee suicides. Published reports put the total number of deaths at 35.

23min

NASA finds heavy rain southwest of tropical cyclone Uesi's center

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite provided a look at the rainfall occurring within Tropical Cyclone Uesi and found heaviest rainfall in the southern quadrant of the storm.

23min

Algae team rosters could help ID 'super corals'

U.S. and Australian researchers have found a potential tool for identifying "super corals" that can tolerate a limited amount of climate change.

23min

BP announces a "net zero" emissions plan that misses big parts of the math

Can an oil and gas company really go carbon free?

25min

We're worse with food waste than we think

Every person in the world is wasting about 500 calories of food a day, according to a new study.

30min

Genetic Traces of Mysterious Human Lineage Detected in People Living in West Africa

Researchers found a "ghost population" that interbred with the ancestors of modern humans. ghostlineage_topNteaser.jpg Zacarias Pereira da Mata/Shutterstock Human Wednesday, February 12, 2020 – 16:30 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A mysterious extinct "ghost" human lineage that was an even more distant relation than Neanderthals may have interbred with the ancestors of modern W

31min

How citizen scientists can help protect water quality

Citizen groups could help improve access to plentiful, clean water and possibly avoid water-related crises, according to new research. Researchers studied the water quality monitoring practices of more than a dozen citizen groups and university and government organizations in Centre County, Pennsylvania (where Penn State's University Park campus is located). The 13 water groups the researchers st

31min

Electrode Brain Implant Could Potentially Zap People Out of Comas

Zapped Awake Generally, patients who have been in comas for a long time face long odds of waking up. But via OneZero , a newly-published study demonstrated how using electrodes to deliver jolts to a specific region of the brain associated with consciousness itself could offer hope. Electric Feel The study, run by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and published in the journal Neuron , in

32min

Preclinical study links human gene variant to THC reward in adolescent females

A common variation in a human gene that affects the brain's reward processing circuit increases vulnerability to the rewarding effects of the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis in adolescent females, but not males, according to preclinical research by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators. As adolescence represents a highly sensitive period of brain development with the highest risk for initi

33min

New data shows rising repeat ER visits for opioid-related emergencies

The emergency department is being increasingly utilized as a patient's best or only treatment option for opioid use disorder (OUD). New analysis in Annals of Emergency Medicine shows that the prevalence of patients who visited emergency departments at four Indiana hospital systems for repeat opioid-related emergencies jumped from 8.8 percent of all opioid-related visits in 2012 to 34.1% in 2017 —

33min

Graphene forms under microscope's eye

Scientists record the formation of foamy laser-induced graphene made with a small laser mounted to a scanning electron microscope. The reduced size of the conductive material may make it more useful for flexible electronics.

33min

Hybrid microscope could bring digital biopsy to the clinic

By adding infrared capability to the ubiquitous, standard optical microscope, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign hope to bring cancer diagnosis into the digital era. Pairing infrared measurements with high-resolution optical images and machine learning algorithms, the researchers created digital biopsies that closely correlated with traditional pathology techniques and a

33min

New material has highest electron mobility among known layered magnetic materials

A new material created in the lab at Princeton has properties that make it a promising candidate for new areas like magnetic twistronic devices and spintronics, as well as advances in data storage and device design.

33min

French unions played key role in protecting workers' mental health

Virginia Doellgast, associate professor of comparative employment relations in Cornell University's ILR School, examines the role unions played in the aftermath of those deaths. Her paper, "After the Social Crisis: The Transformation of Employment Relations at France Telecom," was published Feb. 11 in Socio-Economic Review.

33min

E3 Is Evolving—and Maybe Not for the Best

Gaming show host Geoff Keighley has joined Sony and Nintendo as the latest prominent E3 holdout. The trade show's future has never been less certain.

36min

One-third of plant and animal species could be gone in 50 years, study says

Accurately predicting biodiversity loss from climate change requires a detailed understanding of what aspects of climate change cause extinctions, and what mechanisms may allow species to survive.

44min

One-third of plant and animal species could be gone in 50 years, study says

Accurately predicting biodiversity loss from climate change requires a detailed understanding of what aspects of climate change cause extinctions, and what mechanisms may allow species to survive.

46min

Preparing for climate change

As global temperatures continue to rise, scientists are warning the world to brace for heat waves, extreme storms, wildfires and other dire consequences. While chemists are actively searching for new ways to mitigate climate change, they are also developing technologies to allow people and ecosystems to not only survive, but thrive, in a warmer world, according to a special issue of Chemical & Eng

46min

New technique reduces pathogen identification time from two weeks to less than one hour

Transmitted by insects, especially the aster leafhopper, aster yellows (AY) outbreaks can cause severe production losses in many crops, including carrots, lettuce, and canola. Canola is a billion-dollar crop for Canada but the growing season in Western Canada is very short. Depending on the environmental conditions and number of infected leafhoppers, AY can be transmitted to canola in less than 24

53min

New technique reduces pathogen identification time from two weeks to less than one hour

Transmitted by insects, especially the aster leafhopper, aster yellows (AY) outbreaks can cause severe production losses in many crops, including carrots, lettuce, and canola. Canola is a billion-dollar crop for Canada but the growing season in Western Canada is very short. Depending on the environmental conditions and number of infected leafhoppers, AY can be transmitted to canola in less than 24

54min

Multi-center neuroimaging study offers new insights on schizophrenia

thanks to the pooled data and insights from researchers around the world, USC researchers have the clearest picture yet of brain abnormalities associated with schizophrenia, a serious mental illness that impacts 20 million people worldwide

55min

NASA finds heavy rain southwest of tropical cyclone Uesi's center

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite provided a look at the rainfall occurring within Tropical Cyclone Uesi and found heaviest rainfall in the southern quadrant of the storm.

55min

What would it take to make FMT mainstream? Two publications consider the opportunities

Fecal microbiota transplant treatment for most microbiome-associated diseases has not been rigorously studied in humans–and any such studies would be subject to regulation by the Food and Drug Administration. In a pair of forums publishing February 12 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, clinicians and an FDA scientist detail some areas of FMT research that could facilitate the development of safe

55min

Ninth confirmed UK case of coronavirus reported in London

Patient infected in China transferred to specialist NHS centre at Guy's and St Thomas' hospital

1h

Automated system can rewrite outdated sentences in Wikipedia articles

A system created by MIT researchers could be used to automatically update factual inconsistencies in Wikipedia articles, reducing time and effort spent by human editors who now do the task manually.

1h

New Argonne etching technique could advance the way semiconductor devices are made

Researchers uncover a technique known as molecular layer etching which aid in building intricate 3D nanostructures for semiconductor devices and other microelectronics.

1h

Answers to microbiome mysteries in the gills of rainbow trout

In trout, the University of Pennsylvanias J. Oriol Sunyer and colleagues discovered that a particular type of primitive antibody is essential for fighting microbes that cause disease while preserving others that make up a healthy microbiome.

1h

Asteroids go to pieces when their host star dies

Dense, hot stellar remnants often host rings of dust, gas, and asteroids. A new report helps explain how they came to be that way. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/) When astronomers look out into the galaxy, they find that many star systems fall into one of two types: alive or dead. There are plenty of healthy yellow and red stars hosting planets, not so unlike our solar system. And then there are "dead" white

1h

Opinion: Disclosures Scientists Must Make of Foreign Ties

Federal science agencies vary in their requirements. Here's how researchers can follow the rules.

1h

A little heat can fix cracks in perovskite films

Perovskite films tend to crack easily, but a new study shows that a little bit of heat or compression can easily heal those cracks. That bodes well for the possibility of using inexpensive, but fragile, perovskite materials to replace or complement pricey silicon in solar cell technologies, researchers say. "The efficiency of perovskite solar cells has grown very quickly and now rivals silicon in

1h

BP Pledges to Cut Emissions to Zero but Offers Few Details

It is the first oil giant to make a zero-emissions climate pledge that covers the burning of fuel it extracts.

1h

Coronavirus Test Kits Sent to States, 30 Countries Are Flawed, C.D.C. Says

Some tests distributed by the agency deliver "inconclusive" results. The C.D.C. will need to ship new ingredients, further delaying results.

1h

People Born Blind Don't Develop Schizophrenia, Baffling Doctors

In all of medical history, there hasn't been a single documented case of someone who was born blind and also developed schizophrenia — and doctors aren't sure why not. Over the years, different doctors have arrived at a variety of possible explanations, according to Vice , but none have landed on a definitive understanding of what it is about congenital blindness that creates a shield from the ps

1h

Extinct giant turtle had horned shell of up to three meters

Paleobiologists have discovered exceptional specimens in Venezuela and Colombia of an extinct giant freshwater turtle called Stupendemys. The carapace of this turtle, which is the largest ever known, measured between 2.4 to almost 3 meters. Moreover, the shell of male Stupendemys had horns – a rare feature in turtles.

1h

Why the FTC Wants to Revisit Hundreds of Deals by Big Tech

Silicon Valley's "if you can't beat 'em, buy 'em" approach comes under federal scrutiny. Some antitrust experts say better late than never.

1h

Charles Darwin's Publisher Didn't Believe in Evolution, but Sold His Revolutionary Book Anyway

The famed naturalist and conservative stalwart John Murray III formed an unlikely alliance in popularizing a radical idea

1h

Butterflies can pass acquired traits to the next generation

The inheritance of acquired traits occurs among butterflies, according to research on the bush brown butterfly. It was long thought that physical characteristics that organisms acquired during their lifetime could not pass on to their offspring. However, in recent years, the theory of inheritance of acquired traits has gained support, with studies showing how offspring of rats and tiny worms inhe

1h

A teenager's body clock can ring in school success

Nature, Published online: 10 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00375-z When lessons start at 7:45 a.m., morning-loving students do better than those who naturally wake up later.

1h

Herd immunity: Disease transmission from wildlife to livestock

Scientists provide guidelines for minimizing the risk of spreading disease between elk and cattle in Southern Alberta.

1h

Army researchers develop new method for analyzing metal

Warfighters on the battlefield often rely on machines, vehicles and other technologies with rotating parts to complete their mission. Army researchers have devised a new method of testing for a major factor in equipment failure and breakdown in order to ensure that those tools meet the proper standard of quality.

1h

So, Uh, the Last Woolly Mammoths Were Inbred, Mutated Wretches

Woolly Broken We know that the last of the woolly mammoths went extinct about 4,000 years ago, in Wrangel Island, in the Arctic Ocean, not far off the Siberian coast. And in 2017, we learned that an "excess" of genomic effects plagued the last of this kind. Now, we know why : a hostile environment and inbreeding. Woolly Bad According to a study published earlier this month in journal Genome Biolo

1h

Tool monitors flu mutations in real time

A new tool can monitor influenza A virus mutations in real time, researchers report. The tool could help virologists learn how to stop viruses from replicating, according to the new study. The gold nanoparticle-based probe measures viral RNA in live influenza A cells. It is the first time in virology that experts have used imaging tools with gold nanoparticles to monitor mutations in influenza, w

1h

NIST researchers link quartz microbalance measurements to international measurement system

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have found a way to link measurements made by a device integral to microchip fabrication and other industries directly to the recently redefined International System of Units (SI, the modern metric system).

1h

Harvard Prof: Deep Space Signal May Be From Alien Civilization

Earlier this month, Canadian researchers announced they'd discovered a powerful radio signal, emanating from a distant galaxy in bursts every 16 days. And Avi Loeb, the chair of Harvard University's astronomy department, told Futurism this week that he thinks one possibility is that the signals are coming from an alien civilization. To be clear, Loeb also acknowledged that the signals — "fast rad

1h

'A bit chaotic.' Christening of new coronavirus and its disease name create confusion

Apparent reference to earlier severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in virus name may meet resistance in China

2h

How bird flocks with multiple species behave like K-pop groups

Peer into a forest canopy, and you will likely spot multiple bird species flying and feeding together. But are birds in these flocks cooperating with one another or competing? A new study suggests both.

2h

AJR: Smartphone, laptop prove reliable and accurate for acute ischemic stroke decision

A unique assessment of imaging-based recommendations for the administration of IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator based on unenhanced brain CT scans, the results published ahead-of-print in this April article from the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) constitute a strong foundation for the development of mobile-based telestroke services because they increase neuroradiologist availab

2h

Algae team rosters could help ID 'super corals'

U.S. and Australian researchers have found a potential tool for identifying stress-tolerant "super corals." In experiments that simulated climate change stress, researchers found corals that best survived had symbiotic algae communities with similar features.

2h

What is the best way to encourage innovation? Competitive pay may be the answer

Economists and business leaders agree that innovation is a major force behind economic growth, but many disagree on what is the best way to encourage workers to produce the 'think-outside-of-the-box' ideas that create newer and better products and services. New research from the University of California San Diego indicates that competitive 'winner-takes-all' pay structures are most effective in ge

2h

From models of galaxies to atoms, simple AI shortcuts speed up simulations by billions of times

With little training, neural networks create accurate emulators for physics, astronomy, and earth science

2h

Tasty homemade 'energy balls' could help French soldiers get the fuel they need

A soldier holds one of the snacks. (MOS Nutrition/) The French armed forces are renowned the world over for their sophisticated combat rations—their version of American MREs . Still, troops on operations, particularly special forces soldiers , will lose weight if they expend more energy than they get from the calories they ingest. So their militaries provide snacks in addition to their meal ratio

2h

2h

Meet MUSA, the Robot That Just Aced Supermicrosurgery for the First Time

Try to move your hand just a single millimeter. Guess what? You probably overshot your target. Good thing you're not a supermicrosurgeon, who operate on vessels sized 0.2 to 0.8 millimeters in diameter. If this sounds like a rare feat of daring, it is: Only a handful of the world's best doctors can pull it off. That's why it's extraordinary that a Dutch robotics system just aced the world's first

2h

'Ghost' DNA In West Africans Complicates Story Of Human Origins

Modern genomes from Nigeria and Sierra Leone show signals that scientists call "ghost" DNA — from an unknown human ancestor. That means that prehistoric humans likely procreated with an unknown group. (Image credit: Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61)

2h

Huge bacteria-eating viruses close gap between life and non-life

Bacterial viruses, called bacteriophages, are simple genetic machines, relying on their bacterial hosts to replicate and spread. But scientists have found hundreds of huge phages that carry a slew of bacterial proteins that the phages evidently use to more efficiently manipulate their microbial hosts. These proteins include those involved with ribosomal production of proteins and the CRISPR bacter

2h

Climate warming disrupts tree seed production

Research has revealed the effect of climate warming on the complex interactions between tree masting and the insects that eat their seeds.

2h

3D Printing Is Changing the World | VICE

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2h

The irreversible emissions of a permafrost 'tipping point'

submitted by /u/SexyCrimes [link] [comments]

2h

Tesla News: Next-Gen Battery Cell Production In Fremont

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2h

We've Sequenced the Human Genome. So Why Haven't We Cured More Diseases?

Unlocking the blueprint to human life was a big step for biology. But most diseases are too complex to pin to a single gene.

2h

How Hospitals Changed How They Deal With Stillbirth

AARHUS, Denmark—When Ane Petrea Ørnstrand's daughter was born stillborn at 37 weeks, she and her husband spent five days in the hospital grieving with their dead daughter's body. They held her and cried. They took photos. They welcomed family and friends as visitors. And then they brought her home for four more days, where she laid on ice packs that they changed every eight hours. If you had aske

2h

American Justice Isn't Impartial Anymore

The resignation yesterday of a career federal prosecutor—and the withdrawal of three of his colleagues from a case against a friend of the president—followed what is perhaps the most alarming example to date of the Justice Department's politicization. DOJ officials in Washington signaled their intent to intervene in the criminal case against Roger Stone, a political operative who is a longtime co

2h

Autonomous vehicle technology may improve safety for US Army convoys, report says

US Army convoys could be made safer for soldiers by implementing autonomous vehicle technology to reduce the number of service members needed to operate the vehicles, according to a new study from the RAND Corporation.

2h

Love matters: How parents' love shapes children's lives

Parents often put their own relationship on the back burner to concentrate on their children, but a new study shows that when spouses love each other, children stay in school longer and marry later in life.

2h

Scientists find ally in fight against brain tumors: Ebola

Glioblastomas are relentless, hard-to-treat, and often lethal brain tumors. Yale scientists have enlisted a most unlikely ally in efforts to treat this form of cancer — elements of the Ebola virus.

2h

Component of human breast milk enhances cognitive development in babies

CHLA investigators show that early exposure to a carbohydrate found in breast milk, called 2'FL, positively influences neurodevelopment.

2h

Study: One-third of plant and animal species could be gone in 50 years

University of Arizona researchers studied recent extinctions from climate change to estimate the loss of plant and animal species by 2070. Their results suggest that as many as one in three species could face extinction unless warming is reduced.

2h

Machine learning implemented for quantum optics by Skoltech scientists

As machine learning continues to surpass human performance in a growing number of tasks, scientists at Skoltech have applied deep learning to reconstruct quantum properties of optical systems.

2h

ORNL researchers develop 'multitasking' AI tool to extract cancer data in record time

To better leverage cancer data for research, scientists at ORNL are developing an artificial intelligence (AI)-based natural language processing tool to improve information extraction from textual pathology reports. In a first for cancer pathology reports, the team developed a multitask convolutional neural network (CNN) — a deep learning model that learns to perform tasks, such as identifying ke

2h

Researchers find test to ID children at higher risk for cystic fibrosis liver disease

A major multi-center investigation of children with cystic fibrosis has identified a test that allows earlier identification of those at risk for cystic fibrosis liver disease. The study, which includes 11 clinical sites in North America, was led by Michael Narkewicz, MD, professor of pediatrics from the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado. The findings of th

2h

Faith-centered tattoos are analyzed in study of university students

With more than a quarter of US adults now having tattoos — and nearly half of millennials — only a handful of studies have focused on religious tattoos. But a new study by researchers at Baylor University and Texas Tech University analyzes faith-centered tattoos and is the first to use visual images of them.

2h

Study: Diet makes a difference in fight against hospital-acquired infection

Popular diets low in carbs and high in fat and protein might be good for the waistline, but a new UNLV study shows that just the opposite may help to alleviate the hospital-acquired infection Clostridioides difficile.

2h

Increasing number of grocery stores in some areas could reduce food waste up to 9%

Food waste is a big problem in the United States. According to the US Department of Agriculture, food waste is estimated at between 30-40 percent of the food supply. New research in the INFORMS journal Manufacturing & Service Operations Management finds that increasing the number of grocery stores in certain areas can drastically decrease waste.

2h

Climate change to create farmland in the north, but at environmental costs, study reveals

Areas that may become suitable for crops cover an area equal to more than 30 per cent of the landmass already being farmed worldwide. More than half of that landmass lies in Canada (4.2 million square kilometres) and Russia (4.3 million square kilometres). However, if these areas became farmland about 177 gigatonnes of carbon would be released from soils, biodiversity would be threatened in Centra

2h

Tracking a silent killer: New biomarker identified for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy

Scientists have identified a metabolic biomarker that could help track the progression of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) — an inherited heart condition that can kill swiftly and without warning — in a study of heart tissue and plasma from patients with AC.

2h

Extinct giant turtle had horned shell of up to three meters

Paleobiologists from the University of Zurich have discovered exceptional specimens in Venezuela and Colombia of an extinct giant freshwater turtle called Stupendemys. The carapace of this turtle, which is the largest ever known, measured between 2.4 to almost 3 meters. Moreover, the shell of male Stupendemys had horns – a rare feature in turtles.

2h

Designer probiotic treatment for cancer immunotherapy

Columbia Engineers have engineered probiotics to safely deliver immunotherapies within tumors, including nanobodies against two proven therapeutic targets — PD-L1 and CTLA-4. Continuously released by bacteria, the drugs continue to attack the tumor after just one dose, facilitating an immune response resulting in tumor regression. The versatile probiotic platform can also be used to deliver multi

2h

New study shows Deepwater Horizon oil spill larger than previously thought

Toxic and invisible oil spread well beyond the known satellite footprint of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, according to a new study led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel school of Marine and Atmospheric Science. These new findings have important implications for environmental health during future oil spills.

2h

'Ghost' of mysterious hominin found in West African genomes

Ancestors of modern West Africans interbred with a yet-undiscovered species of archaic human, similar to how ancient Europeans mated with Neanderthals, researchers report. Their work helps inform how archaic hominins added to the genetic variation of present-day Africans, which has been poorly understood, in part because of the sparse fossil record in Africa.

2h

CRISPR 'minigene' approach stops genetic liver disease in mice

A new CRISPR gene-editing technique prevented a genetic liver disease known to be driven by hundreds of different mutations and improved clinical symptoms in mice.

2h

SwRI models hint at longer timescale for Mars formation

The early solar system was a chaotic place, with evidence indicating that Mars was likely struck by planetesimals, small protoplanets up to 1,200 miles in diameter, early in its history. Southwest Research Institute scientists modeled the mixing of materials associated with these impacts, revealing that the Red Planet may have formed over a longer timescale than previously thought.

2h

Gene therapy/gene editing combo could offer hope for some genetic disorders

A hybrid approach that combines elements of gene therapy with gene editing converted an experimental model of a rare genetic disease into a milder form, significantly enhancing survival, shows a multi-institutional study led by the University of Pennsylvania and Children's National Hospital in Washington, D.C. The findings, published online Feb. 12, 2020, in Science Advances, could offer hope for

2h

Mount Sinai discovers new drug combo to induce high rates of human beta cell regeneration

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered a novel combination of two classes of drugs that, together, cause the highest rate of proliferation ever observed in adult human beta cells — the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. The result is an important step toward a diabetes treatment that restores the body's ability to produce insulin.

2h

Climate-driven farming 'frontiers' pose major environmental risks

Future farming in regions that were previously unsuitable for agriculture could significantly impact biodiversity, water resources, and greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Lee Hannah of Conservation International's Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science in Arlington, Va., and colleagues present a new analysis of these risks in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

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Consumers may be wasting more than twice as much food as commonly believed

Consumers are likely wasting much more food than commonly believed, according to a study published Feb. 12, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Monika van den Bos Verma and colleagues from Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands.

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Deepwater Horizon spill may have been 30 per cent bigger than thought

An analysis suggests that the extent of the US's worst ever oil spill may have been 30 per cent greater than satellite images previously suggested

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The huge problem of food waste could be twice as big as we thought

A widely cited estimate of food waste appears to be wrong because it fails to account for how much more food rich people waste than poorer people

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DNA analysis of people in West Africa reveals 'ghost' human ancestor

Four West African populations may carry genes from an undiscovered archaic hominin that diverged from a shared ancestor of Neanderthals, Denisovans and modern humans

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Mars may have formed 15 million years later than we thought

Young Mars may have endured a series of huge collisions that smashed its mantle, throwing off our measurements of when it formed by up to 15 million years

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Big telescopes join hunt for things that go flash in the night

Automation key to chasing comets, supernovae, and colliding neutron stars

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Quantum entanglement over 30 miles of fiber has brought super secure internet closer

The lab test suggests a reliable quantum internet between cities might be possible.

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The Australian bearded dragon may hold secrets to human sleep

Findings suggest an unexpected function for a mysterious part of the human brain

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Lexus: New Autopilot-Like Feature Will Allow Hands-Free Driving

No Hands Lexus claims its upcoming assisted driver technology , Highway Teammate, will be so sophisticated, drivers can take their hands off the steering wheel while driving highways. Company president Koji Sato boasted that the system would be more advanced and safer than Tesla's similar Autopilot technology , describing it to Automotive News Europe as "hands-off but not eyes-off." Stay Safe Hig

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New clues to the age of Mars

Meteorites, mantle and modelling hint at a different timeline to what we've thought.

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Scientists find evidence of 'ghost population' of ancient humans

Traces of unknown ancestor emerged when researchers analysed genomes from west African populations Scientists have found evidence for a mysterious "ghost population" of ancient humans that lived in Africa about half a million years ago and whose genes live on in people today. Traces of the unknown ancestor emerged when researchers analysed genomes from west African populations and found that up t

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Ghost DNA Hints at Africa's Missing Ancient Humans

Genes in some living West Africans shed light on human genetic diversity, which has been difficult to find in the continent's fossil record.

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Invisible oil beyond the Deepwater Horizon satellite footprint

Major oil spills are catastrophic events that immensely affect the environment and society, yet determining their spatial extent is a highly complex task. During the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout, ~149,000 km 2 of the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) was covered by oil slicks and vast areas of the Gulf were closed for fishing. Yet, the satellite footprint does not necessarily capture the entire oil spill e

2h

Pervasive head-to-tail insertions of DNA templates mask desired CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing events

CRISPR-Cas9–mediated homology-directed DNA repair is the method of choice for precise gene editing in a wide range of model organisms, including mouse and human. Broad use by the biomedical community refined the method, making it more efficient and sequence specific. Nevertheless, the rapidly evolving technique still contains pitfalls. During the generation of six different conditional knockout m

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Cryo-EM structures of undocked innexin-6 hemichannels in phospholipids

Gap junctions form intercellular conduits with a large pore size whose closed and open states regulate communication between adjacent cells. The structural basis of the mechanism by which gap junctions close, however, remains uncertain. Here, we show the cryo–electron microscopy structures of Caenorhabditis elegans innexin-6 (INX-6) gap junction proteins in an undocked hemichannel form. In the na

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Recovering signals of ghost archaic introgression in African populations

While introgression from Neanderthals and Denisovans has been documented in modern humans outside Africa, the contribution of archaic hominins to the genetic variation of present-day Africans remains poorly understood. We provide complementary lines of evidence for archaic introgression into four West African populations. Our analyses of site frequency spectra indicate that these populations deri

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A mutation-independent CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene targeting approach to treat a murine model of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency

Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is an X-linked urea cycle disorder associated with high mortality. Although a promising treatment for late-onset OTC deficiency, adeno-associated virus (AAV) neonatal gene therapy would only provide short-term therapeutic effects as the non-integrated genome gets lost during hepatocyte proliferation. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated homology-directed repair can cor

2h

Strong future increases in Arctic precipitation variability linked to poleward moisture transport

The Arctic region is projected to experience amplified warming as well as strongly increasing precipitation rates. Equally important to trends in the mean climate are changes in interannual variability, but changes in precipitation fluctuations are highly uncertain and the associated processes are unknown. Here, we use various state-of-the-art global climate model simulations to show that interan

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Locally sequential synaptic reactivation during hippocampal ripples

The sequential reactivation of memory-relevant neuronal ensembles during hippocampal sharp-wave (SW) ripple oscillations reflects cognitive processing. However, how a downstream neuron decodes this spatiotemporally organized activity remains unexplored. Using subcellular calcium imaging from CA1 pyramidal neurons in ex vivo hippocampal networks, we discovered that neighboring spines are activated

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Endocannabinoid genetic variation enhances vulnerability to THC reward in adolescent female mice

Adolescence represents a developmental period with the highest risk for initiating cannabis use. Little is known about whether genetic variation in the endocannabinoid system alters mesolimbic reward circuitry to produce vulnerability to the rewarding properties of the exogenous cannabinoid 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Using a genetic knock-in mouse model (FAAH C/A ) that biologically recapitul

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Transient glacial incision in the Patagonian Andes from ~6 Ma to present

We report a mountain-scale record of erosion rates in the central Patagonian Andes from >10 million years (Ma) ago to present, which covers the transition from a fluvial to alpine glaciated landscape. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages of 72 granitic cobbles from alpine glacial deposits show slow erosion before ~6 Ma ago, followed by a two- to threefold increase in the spatially averaged erosion rate of the

2h

Nanocrystals as phenotypic expression of genotypes–An example in coralline red algae

Coralline red algae (CRA) are important ecosystem engineers in the world's oceans. They play key roles as primary food source and carbonate producers in marine habitats. CRA are also vital for modern reef systems where they act as substrate for coral growth and stabilizers of reef frameworks. However, morphotaxonomic identification of these important marine organisms is hampered by the fact that

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A compositionally heterogeneous martian mantle due to late accretion

The approximately chondritic estimated relative abundances of highly siderophile elements (HSE) in the bulk martian mantle suggest that these elements were added after Mars' core formed. The shergottite-nakhlite-chassigny (SNC) meteorites imply an average mantle Pt abundance of 3 to 5 parts per billion, which requires the addition of 1.6 x 10 21 kilograms of chondritic material, or 0.25% martian

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Osteogenic preconditioning in perfusion bioreactors improves vascularization and bone formation by human bone marrow aspirates

Cell-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) provides a niche to promote osteogenic differentiation, cell adhesion, survival, and trophic factor secretion. To determine whether osteogenic preconditioning would improve the bone-forming potential of unfractionated bone marrow aspirate (BMA), we perfused cells on ECM-coated scaffolds to generate naïve and preconditioned constructs, respectively. The com

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Specificity and mutagenesis bias of the mycobacterial alternative mismatch repair analyzed by mutation accumulation studies

The postreplicative mismatch repair (MMR) is an almost ubiquitous DNA repair essential for maintaining genome stability. It has been suggested that Mycobacteria have an alternative MMR in which NucS, an endonuclease with no structural homology to the canonical MMR proteins (MutS/MutL), is the key factor. Here, we analyze the spontaneous mutations accumulated in a neutral manner over thousands of

2h

The anatomy, paleobiology, and evolutionary relationships of the largest extinct side-necked turtle

Despite being among the largest turtles that ever lived, the biology and systematics of Stupendemys geographicus remain largely unknown because of scant, fragmentary finds. We describe exceptional specimens and new localities of S. geographicus from the Miocene of Venezuela and Colombia. We document the largest shell reported for any extant or extinct turtle, with a carapace length of 2.40 m and

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Ultrasensitive and ultrathin phototransistors and photonic synapses using perovskite quantum dots grown from graphene lattice

Organic-inorganic halide perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) constitute an attractive class of materials for many optoelectronic applications. However, their charge transport properties are inferior to materials like graphene. On the other hand, the charge generation efficiency of graphene is too low to be used in many optoelectronic applications. Here, we demonstrate the development of ultrathin phot

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Iron isotope evidence for very rapid accretion and differentiation of the proto-Earth

Nucleosynthetic isotope variability among solar system objects provides insights into the accretion history of terrestrial planets. We report on the nucleosynthetic Fe isotope composition (μ 54 Fe) of various meteorites and show that the only material matching the terrestrial composition is CI (Ivuna-type) carbonaceous chondrites, which represent the bulk solar system composition. All other meteo

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Broadly conserved roles of TMEM131 family proteins in intracellular collagen assembly and secretory cargo trafficking

Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. Its dysregulation contributes to aging and many human disorders, including pathological tissue fibrosis in major organs. How premature collagen proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) assemble and route for secretion remains molecularly undefined. From an RNA interference screen, we identified an uncharacterized Caenorhabditis elegans gene tmem

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On the glacial-interglacial variability of the Asian monsoon in speleothem {delta}18O records

While Asian monsoon (AM) changes have been clearly captured in Chinese speleothem oxygen isotope ( 18 O) records, the lack of glacial-interglacial variability in the records remains puzzling. Here, we report speleothem 18 O records from three locations along the trajectory of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM), a major branch of the AM, and characterize AM rainfall over the past 180,000 years. We ha

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Editing a {gamma}-globin repressor binding site restores fetal hemoglobin synthesis and corrects the sickle cell disease phenotype

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is caused by a single amino acid change in the adult hemoglobin (Hb) β chain that causes Hb polymerization and red blood cell (RBC) sickling. The co-inheritance of mutations causing fetal -globin production in adult life hereditary persistence of fetal Hb (HPFH) reduces the clinical severity of SCD. HPFH mutations in the HBG -globin promoters disrupt binding sites for th

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Marked structural rearrangement of mannose 6-phosphate/IGF2 receptor at different pH environments

Many cell surface receptors internalize their ligands and deliver them to endosomes, where the acidic pH causes the ligand to dissociate. The liberated receptor returns to the cell surface in a process called receptor cycling. The structural basis for pH-dependent ligand dissociation is not well understood. In some receptors, the ligand binding domain is composed of multiple repeated sequences. T

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Battle-scarred fossils suggest giant turtles fought each other—and crocodiles three times their size

New specimens reveal ancient giants once ranged across South America

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Consumers may be wasting more than twice as much food as commonly believed

Consumers are likely wasting much more food than commonly believed, according to a study published February 12, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Monika van den Bos Verma and colleagues from Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands.

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New models hint at longer timescale for Mars formation

The early solar system was a chaotic place, with evidence indicating that Mars was likely struck by planetesimals, small protoplanets up to 1,200 miles in diameter, early in its history. Southwest Research Institute scientists modeled the mixing of materials associated with these impacts, revealing that the Red Planet may have formed over a longer timescale than previously thought.

2h

Climate change to create farmland in the north, but at environmental costs, study reveals

Climate Change to Create Farmland in the North, But at Environmental Costs, Study Reveals

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New study shows Deepwater Horizon oil spill larger than previously thought

Toxic and invisible oil spread well beyond the known satellite footprint of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, according to a new study led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel school of Marine and Atmospheric Science. These new findings have important implications for environmental health during future oil spills.

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Extinct giant turtle had horned shell of up to three meters

Paleobiologists from the University of Zurich have discovered exceptional specimens in Venezuela and Colombia of an extinct giant freshwater turtle called Stupendemys. The carapace of this turtle, which is the largest ever known, measured between 2.4 to almost 3 meters. Moreover, the shell of male Stupendemys had horns—a rare feature in turtles.

2h

Lessons to learn from the Last Interglacial

It didn't take much for Antarctic ice to melt and seas to rise, research shows.

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Smart birds remember new tricks

And this impressive skill could boost their survival.

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Containing the contrails

Small altitude changes could cut the climate impact of aircraft, study suggests.

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Teen cows get moody too

During puberty their personalities become inconsistent.

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A giant turtle with surprises

The carapace wasn't just big, it sometimes had horns.

2h

Cancer and the Microbiome

Download this case study from Sanguine to learn about how simplified patient sampling drives cutting-edge cancer research

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New air-pressure sensor could improve everyday devices

A team of mechanical engineers at Binghamton University, State University of New York investigating a revolutionary kind of micro-switch has found another application for its ongoing research.

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Cracks in perovskite films for solar cells easily healed, study finds

A new study finds that cracks in brittle perovskite films can be easily healed with compression or mild heating, a good sign for the use of perovskites in next-generation solar cells.

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Global CO2 Emissions Were Flat in 2019–But Don't Cheer Yet

Developing economies continue to build coal power plants, and growth in oil and gas has been persistent — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Protecting redundancy in the food web helps ensure ecological resilience

In 2014, a disease of epidemic proportions gripped the West Coast of the US. You may not have noticed, though, unless you were underwater.

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Children's fingertip injuries could signal abuse

Many children who suffer fingertip injuries have been abused, according to a new study. The researchers found that children who had a documented history of abuse or neglect were 23 percent more likely to suffer a fingertip injury before age 12.

2h

Color-changing amphibians: Lane change in the cytoskeleton

Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. Scientists have now investigated the molecular mechanisms in the cytoskeleton necessary for this and revealed potential evolutionary paths.

2h

Researchers develop smaller, lighter radiation shielding

Researchers have developed a new technique for shielding electronics in military and space exploration technology from ionizing radiation. The new approach is more cost effective than existing techniques, and the secret ingredient is…rust.

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Modified clay can remove herbicide from water

By creating neatly spaced slits in a clay mineral, scientists were able to filter water to remove a toxic herbicide. After removing the pollutant by heating the material, the clay can be reused.

2h

Your Phone Charger Is Probably Smarter Than the Apollo Guidance Computer

Reaching the moon more than 50 years ago took all the technological might the US could muster. The communication and navigation systems aboard the Apollo 11 capsule were cutting edge for the time, but today even the simplest devices are more powerful. Apple developer Forrest Heller has posted an analysis of several USB Type-C chargers, demonstrating they all have more processing power than the Ap

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2h

Birds gliding through bubbles reveal aerodynamic trick

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00418-5 Gliding birds use tail to generate extra lift and reduce drag.

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Gene 'scorecard' could personalize cancer diagnosis

A personalized tool could help detect cancer and predict patient survival, researchers report. The new tool could also predict how well a cancer patient would respond to immunotherapy. It's a specially-designed cancer "scorecard" for use alongside the standard blood test for cancer (also known as liquid biopsy). This "scorecard," which the team calls the Tumor Matrisome Index (TMI), is a panel of

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Record-breaking quantum memory brings quantum internet one step closer

A communications network secured by the laws of quantum physics would be unhackable, but building one requires a component called a quantum memory, which is still being developed

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New Orleans is vulnerable to growing storm surges

The US East and Gulf Coasts will experience greater—but different—storm surges as global warming progresses, according to a new study. The two regions differ in how ocean and atmospheric circulation and sea level interact to produce storm surges, researchers say. The study is the first to compare how different parts of the Atlantic Coast might fare during storms. Scientists examined the effects o

3h

Pollinating opossums confirm decades-long theory

In Brazil there is a plant so strange that researchers predicted — and 27 years later, proved — that opossums are key to its pollination.

3h

Researchers discover new arsenic compounds in rice fields

Researchers have systematically investigated under which conditions, and to what extent, sulfur-containing arsenic compounds are formed in rice-growing soils. Their work highlights the urgent need for research with a view to protecting consumers from health risks.

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America's Hopelessly Anemic Response to One of the Largest Personal-Data Breaches Ever

The Justice Department raised eyebrows on Monday when it unveiled charges against four members of China's People's Liberation Army for hacking into the credit-reporting agency Equifax and stealing sensitive information on 147 million Americans. The charges are the latest in a campaign of indictments against Chinese-government-linked hackers that dates to 2014 but has ramped up considerably since

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Having fewer children reduced the education gap in China

A new study uses China's one-child policy to show that having fewer children leads women to achieve higher levels of education.The research found that the one-child policy alone accounted for about half of the additional education that women in China achieved after the policy was put in place.

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Study shows increased hand hygiene at top 10 airports can reduce spread of coronavirus by 37 percent

The study finds that increasing traveler engagement with proper hand-hygiene at all airports has the potential to reduce the risk of a potential pandemic by 24-69 percent. The researchers also identified ten critical airports, central to the global air-transportation network, and if hand-washing mitigation strategies are implemented in just these ten locations, the pandemic risk can drop by up to

3h

Gut feelings: Gut bacteria are linked to our personality

Sociable people have a higher abundance of certain types of gut bacteria and also more diverse bacteria, an Oxford University study has found.

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Bubble-capturing surface helps get rid of foam

Bubbly buildup can hinder many industrial processes, but a new method can reduce or even eliminate it.

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Bacteriophages may play a role in childhood stunting… and be able to help treat it

New research spearheaded by McGill University has discovered that bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) found in the intestinal tracts of children may play a role in childhood stunting, a significant impediment to growth that affects 22% of children under the age of five around the world.

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Calculating Air Pollution's Death Toll, Across State Lines

About half of the premature deaths caused by poor air quality are linked to pollutants that blow in from other states, a new study found.

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Finding Dolphins Shot and Stabbed, Authorities Offer $20,000 for Help

With the latest two dead dolphins, nearly 30 animals have been found shot or impaled in the southeastern United States since 2002.

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NASA Puts a Price on a 2024 Moon Landing

Last year, the vice president directed the space agency to put astronauts back on the moon. NASA crunched the numbers—and it won't come cheap.

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Climate change may not claim as many species as we thought

Tropical species are the most likely to go extinct (Jan Gemerle/Unsplash/) Humans are putting ecosystems to the test in the global science experiment that is climate change. Organisms are shifting to new habitats as their preferred climate moves up in elevation or poleward (or is outright destroyed ), and are going extinct at rates amped up about 1,000 times by humans. Ecologists have yet to sett

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Epidemiologist Veteran of SARS and MERS Shares Coronavirus Insights after China Trip

Columbia University professor W. Ian Lipkin looks for lessons from the new disease COVID-19 to prevent the next disaster — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Epidemiologist Veteran of SARS and MERS Shares Coronavirus Insights after China Trip

Columbia University professor W. Ian Lipkin looks for lessons from the new disease COVID-19 to prevent the next disaster — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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EPA fails to follow landmark law to protect children from pesticides in food

The landmark Food Quality Protection Act requires the Environmental Protection Agency to protect children's health by applying an extra margin of safety to legal limits for pesticides in food. But an investigation by EWG, published this week in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, found that the EPA has failed to add the mandated children's health safety factor to the allowable limits for almost 90

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Fighting climate change at the sink: A guide to greener dishwashing

If you're an environmentally conscious consumer, you've probably heard that today's highly efficient dishwashers use less energy and water than traditional hand-washing techniques.

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New technique reduces pathogen identification time from two weeks to less than one hour

Canola is a billion-dollar crop for Canada but the growing season in Western Canada is very short. Depending on the environmental conditions and number of infected leafhoppers, AY can be transmitted to canola in less than 24 hours and the leafhoppers can continue spreading the disease for the rest of their lives.

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Predators to spare

In 2014, a disease of epidemic proportions gripped the West Coast of the US. You may not have noticed, though, unless you were underwater.

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Mind the trust gap: it's wider than you think

The regional gap in trust is not a result of the higher percentage of Black Americans — who tend to have lower trust – living in the south, York University sociologist Prof. Cary Wu, who conducted the study said. Instead, the distrust is deeply rooted in the unique social and political culture shaped by the defeat in the Civil War, history of slavery, poverty, and prominence of religion in the so

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Lane change in the cytoskeleton

Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. Munich-based scientists have now investigated the molecular mechanisms in the cytoskeleton necessary for this and revealed potential evolutionary paths.

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First electrically-driven 'topological' laser developed by Singapore and UK scientists

Scientists and engineers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and the University of Leeds in the UK have created the first electrically-driven 'topological' laser, which has the ability to route light particles around corners — and to cope with defects in the manufacture of the device.

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Absent p53, oral cancers recruit and reprogram nerves to fuel tumor growth

Loss of an important tumor-suppressing gene allows head and neck cancer to spin off signals to nearby nerves, changing their function and recruiting them to the tumor, where they fuel growth and cancer progress.

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Huge bacteria-eating viruses close gap between life and non-life

Bacterial viruses, called bacteriophages, are simple genetic machines, relying on their bacterial hosts to replicate and spread. But UC Berkeley scientists have found hundreds of huge phages that carry a slew of bacterial proteins that the phages evidently use to more efficiently manipulate their microbial hosts. These proteins include those involved with ribosomal production of proteins and the C

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New mouse model for celiac disease to speed research on treatments

Researchers at the University of Chicago have developed the first truly accurate mouse model of celiac disease. The animals have the same genetic and immune system characteristics as humans who develop celiac after eating gluten. This provides a vital research tool for developing and testing new treatments for the disease.

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Antibiotics discovered that kill bacteria in a new way: McMaster

A new group of antibiotics with a unique approach to attacking bacteria has been discovered, making it a promising clinical candidate in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. The newly-found corbomycin and the lesser-known complestatin have a never-before-seen way to kill bacteria, which is achieved by blocking the function of the bacterial cell wall. The discovery comes from a family of ant

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Half of US deaths related to air pollution are linked to out-of-state emissions

More than half of all air-quality-related early deaths in the United States are a result of emissions originating outside of the state in which those deaths occur, MIT researchers report in the journal Nature.

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MAFG-driven astrocytes promote CNS inflammation

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1999-0 Single-cell RNA sequencing of cells from humans with multiple sclerosis and mice with a model of the disease identifies a population of disease-promoting astrocytes in which anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory proteins are suppressed.

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Novel tau filament fold in corticobasal degeneration

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2043-0

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Podcast: The puzzling structures of muddled materials, and paving the way for the quantum internet

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00409-6 Hear the latest from the world of science, brought to you by Nick Howe and Shamini Bundell.

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Adopt a carbon tax to protect tropical forests

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00324-w A levy on fossil fuels can support and restore ecosystems that help to stem climate change.

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Ordered absences observed in porous framework materials

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00329-5 Prussian blue analogues are archetypes of coordination solids, in which metal ions are bridged by ligands to form extended network structures. An analysis reveals a surprising ordering of the gaps found in their crystal lattices.

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Electrically pumped topological laser with valley edge modes

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1981-x A topological laser based on the valley degree of freedom in a compact photonic crystal can be pumped electrically, bringing topological physics concepts closer to real-life applications.

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Forest age and water yield

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1941-5

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The promise and challenge of therapeutic genome editing

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1978-5 The scientific, technical and ethical aspects of using CRISPR technology for therapeutic applications in humans are discussed, highlighting both opportunities and challenges of this technology to treat, cure and prevent genetic disease.

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The strength and pattern of natural selection on gene expression in rice

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1997-2 Phenotypic selection analysis is used to estimate the type and strength of selection that acts on more than 15,000 transcripts in rice (Oryza sativa), which provides insight into the adaptive evolutionary role of selection on gene expression.

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IL-15, gluten and HLA-DQ8 drive tissue destruction in coeliac disease

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2003-8 An HLA- and gluten-dependent mouse model of coeliac disease with villous atrophy provides evidence for the cooperative role of IL-15 and gluten-specific CD4+ T cells in licensing the full activation of cytotoxic T cells that are necessary for inducing epithelial damage.

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TLR9 and beclin 1 crosstalk regulates muscle AMPK activation in exercise

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1992-7 In mice, the interaction of the innate immune sensor TLR9 with beclin 1 is shown to have a role in glucose metabolism and AMPK activation in skeletal muscle during exercise.

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Entanglement of two quantum memories via fibres over dozens of kilometres

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1976-7 The entanglement of two atomic-ensemble quantum memories via optical fibres, enabled by the use of cavity enhancement and quantum frequency conversion, is demonstrated over dozens of kilometres.

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Premature mortality related to United States cross-state air pollution

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1983-8 This analysis of the exchange of air pollution amongst the contiguous United States finds that, on average, around half of the early deaths caused by a state's air pollution occurs outside that state, with different contributions by different emission sectors and chemical species.

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Daily briefing: The potential for repurposing existing drugs to fight COVID-19 coronavirus

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00412-x Time is of the essence — here's what we've already got. Plus, biology's cryo-electron microscopy boom and why Scotland is bringing back bogs.

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NEDD8 nucleates a multivalent cullin–RING–UBE2D ubiquitin ligation assembly

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2000-y A cryo-electron microscopy structure provides insights into the activation of cullin–RING E3 ligases by NEDD8 and the consequent catalysis of ubiquitylation reactions.

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Evolution-guided discovery of antibiotics that inhibit peptidoglycan remodelling

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1990-9 The glycopeptide antibiotic-related compounds complestatin and corbomycin function by binding to peptidoglycan and blocking the action of autolysins—peptidoglycan hydrolase enzymes that remodel the cell wall during growth.

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Mechanical regulation of glycolysis via cytoskeleton architecture

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1998-1 Glycolysis in normal epithelial cells responds to microenvironmental mechanics via the modulation of actin bundles that sequester the phosphofructokinase-targeting ubiquitin ligase TRIM21, a process superseded by persistent actin bundles in cancer cells.

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Transfer of ubiquitin protein caught in the act

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00325-9 A process termed ubiquitination mediates the regulated destruction of cellular proteins, thereby preventing disease or infection. Structural data now reveal how a crucial regulator of ubiquitination enzymes coordinates this process.

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Retraction Note: Global analysis of streamflow response to forest management

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1945-1

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A claustrum in reptiles and its role in slow-wave sleep

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1993-6 A structure homologous to the mammalian claustrum exists in reptiles and has a role in generating sharp waves in the brain during slow-wave sleep.

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Quantum cascade laser lives on the edge

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00323-x Devices known as quantum cascade lasers produce useful terahertz radiation, but are typically highly sensitive to fabrication defects. This limitation has now been overcome using a property called topological robustness.

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Loss of p53 protein strikes a nerve to aid tumour growth

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00328-6 Tumours often grow entangled among neurons, which makes the cancer difficult to treat. The finding that cancer cells hijack neighbouring neurons to promote tumour growth suggests new therapeutic targets.

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Hidden diversity of vacancy networks in Prussian blue analogues

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1980-y The growth of single-crystal Prussian blue analogues and their analysis using X-ray diffuse scattering reveals diverse, non-random vacancy arrangements and information about the micropore-network characteristics of these materials.

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Clades of huge phages from across Earth's ecosystems

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2007-4 Genomic analyses of major clades of huge phages sampled from across Earth's ecosystems show that they have diverse genetic inventories, including a variety of CRISPR–Cas systems and translation-relevant genes.

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Streamflow response to forest management

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1940-6

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Loss of p53 drives neuron reprogramming in head and neck cancer

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1996-3 MicroRNAs from head and neck cancer cells, shuttled to sensory neurons by extracellular vesicles, cause a shift to an adrenergic neuronal phenotype that promotes tumour progression.

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Feeding-dependent VIP neuron–ILC3 circuit regulates the intestinal barrier

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2039-9

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Tension in tumour cells keeps metabolism high

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00314-y Tumours are often stiffer than normal tissues and show abnormally fast metabolism of glucose. It emerges that the link between these two traits involves tension in a network of protein filaments in cells.

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Twitter Is Not as Important as Journalists Make It Seem

Why Twitter May Be Ruinous for the Left Twitter exhibits a curiously tight grip on American culture, Robinson Meyer argued last month. Tweets are embedded in news stories, screencapped for Instagram, and quoted on TV shows and podcasts. The platform, however, can also misconstrue people's ideas and identities, he writes: "On Twitter, ideas are so commodified that to say something is simultaneousl

3h

Wildfire researcher deported amid growing rift between Indonesian government and scientists

Researchers fear growing political pressure against unwelcome environmental data

3h

Deadly Air Pollution Doesn't Respect State Borders

U.S. federal authorities have recently been reluctant to step in to mediate cross-border air quality issues among states — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Video af grævling og prærieulv på eventyr hitter: Her er nogle af naturens umage makkerpar

Selvom du er en lille frø, kan du sagtens bo sammen med en giftig kæmpe-edderkop.

3h

Deadly Air Pollution Doesn't Respect State Borders

U.S. federal authorities have recently been reluctant to step in to mediate cross-border air quality issues among states — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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EPA fails to follow landmark law to protect children from pesticides in food

The landmark Food Quality Protection Act requires the Environmental Protection Agency to protect children's health by applying an extra margin of safety to legal limits for pesticides in food. But an investigation by EWG, published this week in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, found that the EPA has failed to add the mandated children's health safety factor to the allowable limits for almost 90

3h

Physics of Life — Lane change in the cytoskeleton

Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. Munich-based scientists have now investigated the molecular mechanisms in the cytoskeleton necessary for this and revealed potential evolutionary paths.

3h

Bu researchers identify privacy law gaps in high school STI health services

A new commentary by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers published in the journal Pediatrics uses the example of high school sexually transmitted infection (STI) programs to highlight how collaborations between schools and health departments can create gaps in student privacy.

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Fighting climate change at the sink: A guide to greener dishwashing

If you're an environmentally conscious consumer, you've probably heard that today's highly efficient dishwashers use less energy and water than traditional hand-washing techniques.

3h

Early treatment of schizophrenia may not slow disease progression

A Stony Brook University-led study reveals that, despite the common view that early intervention in schizophrenia slows or stops mental decline, those who receive early intervention eventually experience the same declines as those whose treatment started later.

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Silica increases water availability for plants

As a result of climate change, more frequent and longer drought periods are predicted in the future. Drought risks are suggested to decrease agricultural yield. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth and the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) have now discovered a way to mitigate this problem: Amorphous silica is able to significantly increase the amount of available wate

3h

Pollinating opossums confirm decades-long theory

In Brazil there is a plant so strange that researchers predicted—and 27 years later, proved—that opossums are key to its pollination. The findings are published in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecology.

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Pollinating opossums confirm decades-long theory

In Brazil there is a plant so strange that researchers predicted—and 27 years later, proved—that opossums are key to its pollination. The findings are published in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecology.

3h

Human language most likely evolved gradually

One of the most controversial hypotheses for the origin of the human language faculty is the evolutionary conjecture that language arose instantaneously in humans through a single gene mutation. `

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Tiny device records single neurons in the brain

An ultra-small, wireless, battery-free device uses light to record individual neurons so neuroscientists can see how the brain is working, researchers report. The mammalian brain is the most complex organ in the body, capable of processing thousands of stimuli simultaneously to analyze patterns, predict changes, and generate highly measured action. How the brain does all this—within fractions of

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Human language most likely evolved gradually

One of the most controversial hypotheses for the origin of the human language faculty is the evolutionary conjecture that language arose instantaneously in humans through a single gene mutation. `

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Huge bacteria-eating viruses close gap between life and non-life

Scientists have discovered hundreds of unusually large, bacteria-killing viruses with capabilities normally associated with living organisms, blurring the line between living microbes and viral machines.

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Antibiotics discovered that kill bacteria in a new way

A new group of antibiotics with a unique approach to attacking bacteria has been discovered, making it a promising clinical candidate in the fight against antimicrobial resistance.

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Documenting Penguin Decline in Antarctica

Ueslei Marcelino, a photojournalist with Reuters, recently accompanied a team of scientists on an expedition to Antarctica, where they used drones and manual techniques to count various populations of chinstrap penguins. Reuters reports : "The number of chinstrap penguins in some colonies in Western Antarctica has fallen by as much as 77 percent since they were last surveyed in the 1970s, say sci

3h

Huge bacteria-eating viruses close gap between life and non-life

Scientists have discovered hundreds of unusually large, bacteria-killing viruses with capabilities normally associated with living organisms, blurring the line between living microbes and viral machines.

3h

Antibiotics discovered that kill bacteria in a new way

A new group of antibiotics with a unique approach to attacking bacteria has been discovered, making it a promising clinical candidate in the fight against antimicrobial resistance.

3h

Half of US deaths related to air pollution are linked to out-of-state emissions

More than half of all air-quality-related early deaths in the United States are a result of emissions originating outside of the state in which those deaths occur, MIT researchers report in the journal Nature.

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Salt water may periodically form on the surface of Mars

Briny water may form on the surface of Mars a few days per year, research by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Norbert Schorghofer shows.

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Astronomers discover potential near earth objects

Three astronomers from Leiden University (the Netherlands) have shown that some asteroids that are considered harmless for now can collide with the earth in the future. They did their research with the help of an artificial neural network. The results have been accepted for publication in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.

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Conserving Earth's 'giants' has outsize impact

Protecting Earth's giants, such as elephants, whales, and the sequoias, has a disproportionate positive impact on the health of the planet and resilience to climate change. Habitat loss, hunting, logging, and climate change have put many of the world's most charismatic species at risk. A new study, led by the University of Arizona, has found that not only are larger plants and animals at higher r

3h

Philip Leder, Who Deciphered Amino Acid Sequences, Dies

The Harvard Medical School researcher's work on the genetic basis of protein coding and production led him to make groundbreaking discoveries in immunology, molecular biology, and cancer genetics.

3h

John Locke vs. John Stuart Mill: Using metaethics to examine claims

As a branch of analytical philosophy, metaethics explores the status, foundation, and scope of morality. Through this lens we can examine moral claims like those in classical liberalist thought. Two voices stand out when it comes to liberalism and rights: John Locke's naturalistic point of view, and John Stuart Mill's moralistic/utilitarian stance. Locke believed that right and wrong could be det

4h

Teen born without half her brain has above average reading skills

An 18-year-old who was born without the left half of her brain scores well on IQ tests and plans to attend university, revealing our brain's incredible adaptability

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PFAS chemicals are creeping through soil to groundwater

The reported levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, in groundwater could be "just the tip of the iceberg," as most of the chemicals are still migrating down slowly through the soil, researchers say. Nearly 3,000 synthetic chemicals belong to the PFAS class. They have been used since the 1940s in food packaging, water-resistant fabrics, non-stick products, pizza boxes, paints, fir

4h

New drug leads could battle brain-eating amoebae

Brain-eating amoebae can cause particularly harmful forms of encephalitis, and more than 95% of people who develop these rare but devastating infections die. Despite the high mortality rate, there is currently no single effective drug available to fight these microbes. Now, however, researchers have designed some new compounds that show promise in the laboratory as treatments, according to a repor

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Children's fingertip injuries could signal abuse

Many children who suffer fingertip injuries have been abused, according to a Rutgers study. The researchers found that children who had a documented history of abuse or neglect were 23 percent more likely to suffer a fingertip injury before age 12. The study, published in Journal of Hand Surgery Global Online, is the first to look at the link between children's fingertip injures and abuse or negle

4h

Gene therapy prevents disorders with alcohol exposure in ALDH2 deficiency

A new study has shown that gene therapy to treat one of the most common hereditary disorders, aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 (ALDH2) deficiency, may prevent increased risk for esophageal cancer and osteoporosis associated with chronic alcohol exposure.

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Small altitude changes could cut climate impact of aircraft by up to 59%

Altering the altitudes of less than 2% of flights could reduce contrail-linked climate change by 59%, says a new study.

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Thyroid cancer, genetic variations, cell phones linked in new study

New research finds that radiation from cell phones is associated with higher rates of thyroid cancer among people with genetic variations in specific genes.

4h

In Somalia, an unprecedented effort to kill massive locust swarms with biocontrol

Fungal biopesticide would be used at largest scale so far

4h

Pollinating opossums confirm decades-long theory

In Brazil there is a plant so strange that researchers predicted — and 27 years later, proved — that opossums are key to its pollination. The findings are published in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecology.

4h

Are robots designed to include the LGBTQ+ community?

Robot technology is flourishing in multiple sectors of society, including the retail, health care, industry and education sectors. However, are the perspectives of minority groups, such as the LGBTQ+ community, considered in robot and AI development?

4h

Cancer cells alter protein production machinery to hasten metastasis

An increase in ribosomes, the protein-making machinery found in every living cell, increases their potential to form metastatic tumors.

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Empty SV40 capsids increase survival of septic rats by eliciting numerous host signaling networks

The cover for issue 6 of Oncotarget features Figure 3, 'The effect of NCs treatments on routine lab results during disease and recovery progress,' by Ben-Nun-Shaul, et al.

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Secularism and tolerance of minority groups predicts future prosperity of countries

Secular cultures which are tolerant of minority groups and respectful of individuals' rights tend to have more wealth, education and democracy, a new study by University of Bristol scientists has found.New research, which surveyed nearly half a million people across 109 countries, shows that changes in culture generally comes before any improvements in wealth, education and?democracy, rather than

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Robot-assisted high-precision surgery has passed its first test in humans

submitted by /u/quantumcipher [link] [comments]

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Oil giant BP plans to be carbon neutral by 2050

submitted by /u/Abscess2 [link] [comments]

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What emerging technologies are likely to make the biggest impact on mankind?

submitted by /u/newmanstartover [link] [comments]

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Elon Musk doubles as solar salesman

submitted by /u/Abscess2 [link] [comments]

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Bioplastics

I am working on a project based on bioplastics. I was wondering if you guys would use bioplastics on the daily even though they are not recyclable? submitted by /u/MiddleMix0 [link] [comments]

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This eye-tracking system uses AI to diagnose multiple sclerosis

submitted by /u/redkemper [link] [comments]

4h

How Chocolate Can Help Save the Planet

Your Valentine's treat can be relatively climate-friendly—as long as it's shade-grown — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Modified clay can remove herbicide from water

By creating neatly spaced slits in a clay mineral, University of Groningen Professor of Experimental Solid State Physics Petra Rudolf was able to filter water to remove a toxic herbicide. After removing the pollutant by heating the material, the clay can be reused. Together with colleagues from Greece, Rudolf presents this proof of principle study in the journal Environmental Science Nano.

4h

Pea instead of soy in animal feed

By far the largest proportion of soybeans grown worldwide is used for animal feed. This is particularly problematic because soybean cultivation inflicts massive environmental damage on supplier countries. The Institute of Agricultural and Nutritional Sciences at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) is therefore currently researching domestic alternatives as part of the SilaToast project

4h

Citizen scientists discover rare cosmic pairing

Citizen scientists have uncovered a bizarre pairing of two brown dwarfs, objects much smaller than the Sun that lack enough mass for nuclear fusion. The discovery, reported in The Astrophysical Journal and confirmed by a scientific team led by astrophysicist Jackie Faherty at the American Museum of Natural History, shows that brown dwarf systems—the formation of which are still poorly understood—c

4h

X-ray microscopy at BESSY II: Nanoparticles can change cells

Nanoparticles easily enter into cells. New insights about how they are distributed and what they do there are shown for the first time by high-resolution 3D microscopy images from BESSY II. For example, certain nanoparticles accumulate preferentially in certain organelles of the cell. This can increase the energy costs in the cell. "The cell looks like it has just run a marathon, apparently, the c

4h

Chinese must not cherry-pick calls for free speech

Public wrath over the treatment of the coronavirus whistleblower does not extend to others

4h

Golfing regularly could be a hole-in-one for older adults' health

Regularly golfing, at least once per month, was found to lower the risk of death among older adults. While the protective effects of playing golf have not been linked to reduction of heart attack and stroke risk, researchers note the positive effects of exercise and social interaction for older adults unable to participate in more strenuous exercise.

4h

Pea instead of soy in animal feed

By far the largest proportion of soybeans grown worldwide is used for animal feed. This is particularly problematic because soybean cultivation inflicts massive environmental damage on supplier countries. The Institute of Agricultural and Nutritional Sciences at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) is therefore currently researching domestic alternatives as part of the SilaToast project

4h

An ever-changing room of Ikea furniture could help AI navigate the world

The Allen Institute wants to crowdsource navigation algorithms by letting researchers turn their robots loose in its physical and virtual apartments.

4h

This Group is Collecting Designs For a Martian City

Martian City State The Mars Society, a space advocacy group dedicated to the exploration and settlement of Mars, is holding an international contest for the best design of a Martian city state that can accommodate a million inhabitants. The winner will be awarded with $10,000. The Society held a similar contest last year asking participants to design a Mars colony for just 1,000 people. An MIT te

4h

Human language most likely evolved gradually

One of the most controversial hypotheses for the origin of human language faculty is the evolutionary conjecture that language arose instantaneously in humans through a single gene mutation.

4h

Heart rate measurements of wearable monitors vary by activity, not skin color

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that while different wearable technologies, like smart watches and fitness trackers, can accurately measure heart rate across a variety of skin tones, the accuracy between devices begins to vary wildly when they measure heart rate during different types of everyday activities, like typing.

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Prolonged use of hormone therapy may minimize muscle loss associated with aging

Skeletal muscle mass and strength are critical in helping prevent falls, fractures, and disability. Yet, they continue to decline during the menopause transition. A new study showed that the prolonged use (defined as ≥13 mo) of hormone therapy (HT) was associated with higher muscle mass and less chance of sarcopenia. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North A

4h

Discovery brings nanoscale thermal switches needed for next-gen computing

Researchers working on an Army project developed nanoscale thermal switches that are key to thermal management of nanoscale devices, refrigeration, data storage, thermal computing and heat management of buildings.

4h

How to learn new skills online

Put your glasses on—it's learning time. (GaudiLab via Depositphotos/) There's a lot wrong with the internet, but one of the best things about it is how easy it is to learn new skills. It's actually one of the big reasons I have this job: I taught myself photography and photo editing, and I got my break writing about it . There are hundreds of thousands of videos out there teaching pretty much eve

4h

How Chocolate Can Help Save the Planet

Your Valentine's treat can be relatively climate-friendly—as long as it's shade-grown — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tesla Driver's Autopilot Often Swerved Toward the Same Barrier. One Day, It Killed Him.

Dangerous Glitch In March 2018, Apple engineer Walter Huang died in a car crash while he was using his Tesla's Autopilot assisted driving system. Many of the details surrounding the crash remained undisclosed for almost two years. But the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) released documents Tuesday that reveal Autopilot was definitely engaged at the time, The Associated Press reports .

4h

How roots find their way to water

Plants use their roots to search for water. While the main root digs downwards, a large number of fine lateral roots explore the soil on all sides. As researchers from Nottingham, Heidelberg and Goethe University of Frankfurt report in the current issue of Nature Plants, the lateral roots already "know" very early on where they can find water.

5h

New quasiparticle unveiled in room temperature semiconductors

Physicists from Switzerland and Germany have unveiled fingerprints of the long-sought particle known as the Mahan exciton in the room temperature optical response of the popular methylammonium lead halide perovskites.

5h

How plants in the cabbage family look inward when sulfur is scarce

New research from Kyushu University in Japan provides a better understanding of how chemicals thought to impart unique health benefits to plants in the cabbage family are broken down to promote growth in conditions lacking sufficient sulfur, and could aid in the future development of broccoli and cabbage that are even healthier for you.

5h

Discovery brings nanoscale thermal switches needed for next-gen computing

Researchers working on an Army project developed nanoscale thermal switches that are key to thermal management of nanoscale devices, refrigeration, data storage, thermal computing and heat management of buildings.

5h

Animal-research data show effects of EU's tough regulations

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00352-6 The European Commission has published its first review of strict legislation designed to protect research animals.

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How kirigami can help us study the muscular activity of athletes

Scientists devise an elastic and durable skin-contact patch for measuring the electromyographic activity of the palm muscle inspired by ancient Japanese paper crafts.

5h

Optimism linked to lower stroke severity, inflammation

Optimistic stroke survivors had lower inflammation levels, reduced stroke severity and less initial physical disability after three months compared to less optimistic survivors, according to the findings of a small study. Previous studies have associated optimism with improved health outcomes for other medical conditions, however, no studies previously assessed if this association exists among str

5h

Stimulation of nerve cluster during stroke may have beneficial effects

Promising new stimulation treatment increases blood flow to the brain, improves hand strength in patients with minor stroke and may decrease disability in many patients with stroke. Nerve cluster stimulation could provide a new treatment option to stroke patients who aren't eligible for clot-dissolving drugs or clot removal.

5h

Golfing regularly could be a hole-in-one for older adults' health

Regularly golfing, at least once per month, was found to lower the risk of death among older adults. While the protective effects of playing golf have not been linked to reduction of heart attack and stroke risk, researchers note the positive effects of exercise and social interaction for older adults unable to participate in more strenuous exercise.

5h

How roots find their way to water

Plants use their roots to search for water. While the main root digs downwards, a large number of fine lateral roots explore the soil on all sides. As researchers from Nottingham, Heidelberg and Goethe University of Frankfurt report in the current issue of Nature Plants, the lateral roots already "know" very early on where they can find water.

5h

How plants in the cabbage family look inward when sulfur is scarce

New research from Kyushu University in Japan provides a better understanding of how chemicals thought to impart unique health benefits to plants in the cabbage family are broken down to promote growth in conditions lacking sufficient sulfur, and could aid in the future development of broccoli and cabbage that are even healthier for you.

5h

Thyroid cancer, genetic variations, cell phones linked in YSPH study

Radiation from cell phones is associated with higher rates of thyroid cancer among people with genetic variations in specific genes, a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health finds.

5h

Modified clay can remove herbicide from water

By creating neatly spaced slits in a clay mineral, University of Groningen Professor of Experimental Solid State Physics Petra Rudolf was able to filter water to remove a toxic herbicide. After removing the pollutant by heating the material, the clay can be reused. Together with colleagues from Greece, Rudolf presents this proof of principle study in the journal Environmental Science Nano.

5h

Pea instead of soy in animal feed

By far the largest proportion of soybeans grown worldwide is used for animal feed. This is particularly problematic because soybean cultivation inflicts massive environmental damage on supplier countries. The Institute of Agricultural and Nutritional Sciences at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) is therefore currently researching domestic alternatives as part of the SilaToast project

5h

Researchers develop smaller, lighter radiation shielding

Researchers have developed a new technique for shielding electronics in military and space exploration technology from ionizing radiation. The new approach is more cost effective than existing techniques, and the secret ingredient is…rust.

5h

Small altitude changes could cut climate impact of aircraft by up to 59%

Altering the altitudes of less than 2% of flights could reduce contrail-linked climate change by 59%, says a new Imperial study.

5h

Researchers stimulate areas vital to consciousness in monkeys' brains — and it wakes them up

One of the central questions in neuroscience is clarifying where in the brain consciousness, which is the ability to experience internal and external sensations, arises. Researchers report that a specific area in the brain, the central lateral thalamus, appears to play a key role. In monkeys under anesthesia, stimulating this area was enough to wake the animals and elicit normal waking behaviors.

5h

Taming age survival of Asian elephants three times higher than in the 1970s

Researchers and veterinarians have investigated the trends behind Asian elephant calf mortality during the taming period. They found that calves that were younger at the onset of taming and those with less experienced mothers were more likely to die during taming. Calf mortality in taming age was notably higher than that of wild elephants of the same age.

5h

X-ray microscopy at BESSY II: Nanoparticles can change cells

Nanoparticles easily enter into cells. New insights about how they are distributed and what they do there are shown for the first time by high-resolution 3D microscopy images from BESSY II. For example, certain nanoparticles accumulate preferentially in certain organelles of the cell. This can increase the energy costs in the cell.

5h

How roots find their way to water

Plants use their roots to search for water. While the main root digs downwards, a large number of fine lateral roots explore the soil on all sides. Interestingly, lateral roots appear to already 'know' very early on where they can find water.

5h

Right beneath the skin we all have the same bacteria

In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender. This has been shown in a new study which has studied skin samples from knees and hips. The researchers hope it is a step in the direction of a better understanding of why skin disorders occur.

5h

Scientists reverse reproductive clock in mice

Researchers have lifted fertility rates in older female mice with small doses of a metabolic compound that reverses the aging process in eggs, offering hope for some women struggling to conceive.

5h

X-ray microscopy at BESSY II: Nanoparticles can change cells

Nanoparticles easily enter into cells. New insights about how they are distributed and what they do there are shown for the first time by high-resolution 3D microscopy images from BESSY II. For example, certain nanoparticles accumulate preferentially in certain organelles of the cell. This can increase the energy costs in the cell.

5h

New Report Counters Claims on the Origin of Gastric Cancer

Several studies have supported the idea that "chief" cells in the stomach revert to stem cells and lead to cancer, but new results do not observe such dedifferentiation.

5h

Dataspel hjälper barn att själva bestämma över sin vård

Barn har rätt att vara delaktiga i beslut om sin livssituation och sin hälsa. Med hjälp av dataspel kan barn med sjukdomar och funktionsvariationer lättare kommunicera om sin egen vård – också om de svåraste frågorna. Dataspelet är skapat av forskare vid Högskolan i Halmstad. Spelet är inte enbart utformat för barn, utan också tillsammans med barn. I forskningsprojektet ingår även en modell för e

5h

Atom or noise? New method helps cryo-EM researchers tell the difference

Cryogenic electron microscopy can in principle make out individual atoms in a molecule, but distinguishing the crisp from the blurry parts of an image can be a challenge. A new mathematical method may help.

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Biologists Are Already Printing the Deadly COVID-19 Virus

Biologists across the world are already printing synthetic copies of the genetic code of the deadly COVID-19 virus, The Verge reports . But don't worry, scientists say — the printed segments can't infect people, and they could provide researchers with material needed to develop tests and vaccines for the oubreak, which, as of Wednesday morning, has killed more than 1,100 . "We are not creating mo

5h

Climate warming disrupts tree seed production

Research involving the University of Liverpool has revealed the effect of climate warming on the complex interactions between tree masting and the insects that eat their seeds.

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Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people — and now scientists know why

This information could help develop less toxic and better repellents, more effective traps, and lead to an understanding of how the mosquito brain responds to sensory information — including the cues that, on occasion, lead a female mosquito to bite one of us.

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X-ray microscopy at BESSY II: Nanoparticles can change cells

Nanoparticles easily enter into cells. New insights about how they are distributed and what they do there are shown for the first time by high-resolution 3D microscopy images from BESSY II. For example, certain nanoparticles accumulate preferentially in certain organelles of the cell. This can increase the energy costs in the cell. 'The cell looks like it has just run a marathon, apparently, the c

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Taming age survival of Asian elephants three times higher than in the 1970s

Researchers from the University of Turku (UTU) in Finland, and veterinarians from the Myanma Timber Enterprise (MTE) in Myanmar have investigated the trends behind Asian elephant calf mortality during the taming period. They found that calves that were younger at the onset of taming and those with less experienced mothers were more likely to die during taming. Calf mortality in taming age was nota

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Overweight from cosmetics

Parabens are used as preservatives in cosmetics. If pregnant women use cosmetics containing parabens that remain on the skin for protracted periods, this may have consequences for their child's subsequent weight development. This is demonstrated in a study published in the journal Nature Communications by researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) in collaboration with

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Gay and bisexual men have higher rate of skin cancer

In the largest study of skin cancer rates among gay, lesbian or bisexual individuals, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital report important differences in skin cancer prevalence among sexual minorities.

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Cracking the code for hookworm infestation

Monash University researchers have uncovered a key way that hookworms evade the immune system – providing new hope in the search for a vaccine.

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Evaluating skin cancer history by sexual orientation, gender identity

These two related studies and editorial examined the association of sexual orientation and gender identity with a history of self-reported skin cancer.

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Researchers stimulate areas vital to consciousness in monkeys' brains — and it wakes them up

One of the central questions in neuroscience is clarifying where in the brain consciousness, which is the ability to experience internal and external sensations, arises. On Feb. 12 in the journal Neuron, researchers report that a specific area in the brain, the central lateral thalamus, appears to play a key role. In monkeys under anesthesia, stimulating this area was enough to wake the animals an

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Citizen scientists discover rare cosmic pairing

Citizen scientists have uncovered a bizarre pairing of two brown dwarfs, objects much smaller than the Sun that lack enough mass for nuclear fusion. The discovery, reported in The Astrophysical Journal and confirmed by a scientific team led by astrophysicist Jackie Faherty at the American Museum of Natural History, shows that brown dwarf systems–the formation of which are still poorly understood-

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Fluidic Analytics launches rapid, easy-to-use protein labeling kit

Fluidiphore rapid amine 503 enables labeling in just 30 minutes with no need for purification

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Arbor Biosciences® Produces Novel 2019 Coronavirus Panel and Offers for Free to Research Community

A hybridization-based panel for isolation and NGS analysis of the 2019 novel coronavirus, for research use only.

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Atom or noise? New method helps cryo-EM researchers tell the difference

Cryogenic electron microscopy can in principle make out individual atoms in a molecule, but distinguishing the crisp from the blurry parts of an image can be a challenge. A new mathematical method may help.

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Samsung's 100x zooming smartphone camera requires a fancy lens and impossibly steady hands

Samsung uses clever tech to cram a big zoom lens into its skinny Galaxy S20 phone. (Samsung/) Yesterday, Samsung threw a big party on the west coast to debut its new smartphones. The flashy Galaxy Z Fold with its flexible glass screen stole most of the spotlight, but the company also announced new flagship phones. The Galaxy S20 comes in three versions, all of which have fancy new 120 Hz refresh

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Grafik: Intelligent solskærm holder solen væk fra øjnene

PLUS. Den klassiske solskærm er på vej mod fornyelse. Tyske Bosch arbejder på en elektronisk version, hvor et kamera løbende overvåger førerens øjne og kun blokerer solen der, hvor den ellers ville genere føreren.

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Longer thumbs lead to more smartphone touch errors

People with long thumbs have a tougher time hitting the right keys on their smartphone, according to a new study. Computer scientists studied how the size and shape of hands and fingers influence the accuracy of the user's touch performance on the phone. They found people with long thumbs are more likely to make errors on their touchscreens. "Our study demonstrates that long thumbs alone can expl

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What a nun can teach a scientist about ecology | Victoria Gill

To save the achoque — an exotic (and adorable) salamander found in a lake in northern Mexico — scientists teamed up with an unexpected research partner: a group of nuns called the Sisters of the Immaculate Health. In this delightful talk, science journalist Victoria Gill shares the story of how this unusual collaboration saved the achoque from extinction — and demonstrates how local and indigen

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Will the covid-19 coronavirus outbreak die out in the summer's heat?

It has been suggested the covid-19 outbreak could fade as the northern hemisphere warms, but we don't know if this is the case

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We discovered a coronavirus similar to the covid-19 virus 7 years ago

The covid-19 virus is similar to a coronavirus detected in bats in China back in 2013, but we failed to act on the warnings of those who studied it

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Invasive species that threaten biodiversity on the Antarctic Peninsula are identified

Invasive species are non-native ones that are introduced into a new habitat and are able to adapt to it, displacing indigenous species or causing them to go extinct. This threat is increased by the fact that people and things are constantly moving all over the world, and this is one of the main causes of biodiversity worldwide. Though it is uninhabited, Antarctica is not free from this problem. Du

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Polar bears in Baffin Bay skinnier, having fewer cubs due to less sea ice

Polar bears are spending more time on land than they did in the 1990s due to reduced sea ice, new University of Washington-led research shows. Bears in Baffin Bay are getting thinner and adult females are having fewer cubs than when sea ice was more available.

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Vården missar andra hälsoproblem hos patienter med depression

Personer med svårbehandlad depression lider ofta av samsjuklighet, exempelvis personlighetssyndrom eller ångestsjukdomar. Forskare vid Lunds universitet har jämfört olika metoder för att utreda patienter med depression. Det visar sig att den metod som är praxis inom specialistpsykiatrin inte fångar upp samsjuklighet i tillräcklig utsträckning. I studien har forskarna jämfört olika metoder* för di

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Invasive species that threaten biodiversity on the Antarctic Peninsula are identified

Invasive species are non-native ones that are introduced into a new habitat and are able to adapt to it, displacing indigenous species or causing them to go extinct. This threat is increased by the fact that people and things are constantly moving all over the world, and this is one of the main causes of biodiversity worldwide. Though it is uninhabited, Antarctica is not free from this problem. Du

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Polar bears in Baffin Bay skinnier, having fewer cubs due to less sea ice

Polar bears are spending more time on land than they did in the 1990s due to reduced sea ice, new University of Washington-led research shows. Bears in Baffin Bay are getting thinner and adult females are having fewer cubs than when sea ice was more available.

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China accused of under-reporting coronavirus outbreak

Health experts say official testing system captures only a fraction of cases

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Cricut Joy Review: An Easy Way to Start Crafting

Cute and compact, this crafting machine is a great entry point for new and aspiring artists.

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Cervical cancer could soon be a disease of the past

Researchers estimated how many new cases of cervical cancer would emerge if more people are regularly screened or vaccinated. The United States is on track to quash cervical cancer as a public health problem within two to three decades, according to a new report published February 10 in The Lancet Public Health . Cervical cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancers. The disease is most

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Hackers could shut down satellites–or turn them into weapons

Last month, SpaceX became the operator of the world's largest active satellite constellation. As of the end of January, the company had 242 satellites orbiting the planet with plans to launch 42,000 over the next decade. This is part of its ambitious project to provide internet access across the globe. The race to put satellites in space is on, with Amazon, U.K.-based OneWeb and other companies ch

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Right beneath the skin we all have the same bacteria

In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender. This has been shown by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study which has studied skin samples from knees and hips. The researchers hope it is a step in the direction of a better understanding of why skin disorders occur.

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Biodiversity offsetting is contentious — here's an alternative

A new approach to compensate for the impact of development may be an effective alternative to biodiversity offsetting — and help nations achieve international biodiversity targets. Scientists say target-based ecological compensation provides greater certainty and clarity, while ensuring the management of impacts from projects like new mines, roads or housing estates directly contributes to broade

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Mental illness: Special form of RNA in brain

Circular RNA may play a role in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

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New method to allow corals to rapidly respond to climate change

A team of marine biology and environmental genomics researchers have demonstrated that epigenetic modifications in reef-building corals can be transmitted from parents to their offspring.

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Who will lead the global surveillance of antimicrobial resistance via sewage?

A professor calls for someone to carry on a global surveillance of antimicrobial resistance and infectious diseases via sewage.

5h

Shape-shifting stem cells are key to cancer metastasis and immune evasion

Scientists have discovered that cancer cells rely on the biology of regeneration, wound healing, and embryonic development to spread to other organs and escape detection by the immune system.

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Right beneath the skin we all have the same bacteria

In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender. This has been shown by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study which has studied skin samples from knees and hips. The researchers hope it is a step in the direction of a better understanding of why skin disorders occur.

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Young sexual minority men need more info on HPV risks

Young sexual minority men do not fully understand their risk for human papillomavirus (HPV) due to a lack of information from health care providers, according to new research. The study in the Journal of Community Health examines what young sexual minority men—a high-risk and high-need population including those who are gay, bisexual, queer, or straight-identified men who have sex with men——know

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Irreproducibility is not a sign of failure, but an inspiration for fresh ideas

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00380-2 The history of metrology holds valuable lessons for initiatives to reproduce results — and for efforts to enhance trust in research.

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Girls consistently outperform boys in reading skills—but this could be changing

Girls consistently outperform boys on reading tests – and have done so for several decades around the world. Lack of motivation, a weak vocabulary, poor reading engagement and lack of role models have all been considered possible reasons for this disparity.

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Marvelous mycorrhizae: The fungal networks that boost food production

It's the end of a long, dry growing season. The earth is parched, soils have turned to dust and hungry birds have eaten the bulk of the crop, leaving next to nothing for the harvest. Perhaps expanding the field by cutting down nearby trees could help increase food supply? The soils there are full of nutrients and would offer a good chance of securing food for next year…

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Taming age survival of Asian elephants three times higher than in the 1970s—certain calves still more at risk

Researchers from the University of Turku (UTU) in Finland, and veterinarians from the Myanmar Timber Enterprise (MTE) in Myanmar have investigated the trends behind Asian elephant calf mortality during the taming period. They found that calves that were younger at the onset of taming and those with less experienced mothers were more likely to die during taming. Calf mortality in taming age was not

6h

Think you'll make a great boss? Research shows that power can corrupt

People often complain that their boss lacks understanding and compassion, thinking they would have approached the job entirely differently. But are leaders really deficient when it comes to empathy? And if so, why?

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Disgust drives some religious thoughts and feelings—new research suggests

Even the most secular people and societies usually have their behaviour shaped by religion. We can see its influence in behavioural codes that set out what is considered right and wrong. But we can also see it in more general attitudes to authority, sexuality and what to do with the people who don't follow these codes.

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Marvelous mycorrhizae: The fungal networks that boost food production

It's the end of a long, dry growing season. The earth is parched, soils have turned to dust and hungry birds have eaten the bulk of the crop, leaving next to nothing for the harvest. Perhaps expanding the field by cutting down nearby trees could help increase food supply? The soils there are full of nutrients and would offer a good chance of securing food for next year…

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Taming age survival of Asian elephants three times higher than in the 1970s—certain calves still more at risk

Researchers from the University of Turku (UTU) in Finland, and veterinarians from the Myanmar Timber Enterprise (MTE) in Myanmar have investigated the trends behind Asian elephant calf mortality during the taming period. They found that calves that were younger at the onset of taming and those with less experienced mothers were more likely to die during taming. Calf mortality in taming age was not

6h

Study highlights complexity of public responses to corporate crises

An analysis of the public's response to a United Airlines crisis in 2017 finds that stakeholder reactions can be extremely complex, with individual customers being willing to both boycott the airline and work with it to resolve the crisis. As part of the study, researchers developed a tool to help organizations better understand stakeholder responses and respond to future crises.

6h

Video: Lagrange mission to provide solar warning

Earth's magnetic field protects life on Earth from the intense radiation and titanic amounts of energetic material our Sun blasts in every direction. However, astronauts and satellites in space, future explorers travelling to the Moon and Mars, and infrastructure on Earth such as power grids and communication systems remain vulnerable to these violent outbursts.

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Silica increases water availability for plants: Researchers discover a way to enhance food security

As a result of climate change, more frequent and longer drought periods are predicted in the future. Drought risks may decrease agricultural yield. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth and the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) have now discovered a way to mitigate this problem: Amorphous silica is able to significantly increase the amount of available water for plants.

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Small altitude changes could cut contrail impact of flights by up to 59 percent

Altering the altitudes of less than 2% of flights could reduce contrail-linked climate change by 59%, says a new Imperial study.

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Researchers develop smaller, lighter radiation shielding

Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a new technique for shielding electronics in military and space exploration technology from ionizing radiation. The new approach is more cost effective than existing techniques, and the secret ingredient is … rust.

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Right beneath the skin we all have the same bacteria

In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender. This has been shown by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study which has studied skin samples from knees and hips. The researchers hope it is a step in the direction of a better understanding of why skin disorders occur.

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How roots find their way to water

Plants use their roots to search for water. While the main root digs down-wards, a large number of fine lateral roots explore the soil on all sides. As researchers from Nottingham, Heidelberg and Goethe University of Frankfurt report in the current issue of 'Nature Plants', the lateral roots already 'know' very early on where they can find water.

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Time spent watching television does not replace physical activity for Finnish men

A large proportion of highly active men watch more television than their low-active peers do. In contrast, highly active women watch less television than low-active women do.

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New Clues About 'Ambigram' Viruses With Strange Reversible Genes

In 1971, microbiologists examining yeast cells discovered strange, rogue fragments of RNA that turned out to be viruses. These "narnaviruses" (a portmanteau of "naked RNA viruses") had several odd properties. They were tiny — essentially a single gene encoding an enzyme that helped the virus make copies of itself. Moreover, unlike other single-stranded RNA viruses like Ebola and influenza, they h

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Bacteria genes help researchers keep track of human environmental impact in oceans

The gene expression of marine bacteria can be a valuable sensor for discovering environmental changes caused by humans. Furthermore, bacteria help to clean our oceans and hopefully they could be used to purify drinking water from harmful environmental toxins in the future. This is shown in a new dissertation in marine microbial ecology by Christofer Osbeck at Linnaeus University.

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Bacteria genes help researchers keep track of human environmental impact in oceans

The gene expression of marine bacteria can be a valuable sensor for discovering environmental changes caused by humans. Furthermore, bacteria help to clean our oceans and hopefully they could be used to purify drinking water from harmful environmental toxins in the future. This is shown in a new dissertation in marine microbial ecology by Christofer Osbeck at Linnaeus University.

6h

Here's Where You Can Apply to Be a NASA Moon Astronaut

Taking Names NASA is officially accepting applications for astronauts to travel to the Moon as part of its Artemis mission . You can send in your own application, if you think you have what it takes, between March 2 and 31. "We're celebrating our 20th year of continuous presence aboard the International Space Station in low-Earth orbit this year, and we're on the verge of sending the first woman

6h

Mobile World Congress cancelled over coronavirus

Telecom and tech groups opted not to attend industry's biggest show in Europe in wake of outbreak

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New method for calculating optimal trajectories for flight to the moon

A RUDN University mathematician has developed a method for finding low-cost quasi-optimal trajectories of flight from Earth orbit to the moon for spacecraft with an electric propulsion engine. The trajectories calculated using this method reduce the fuel costs by 56% with a some increase in the flight time. The paper is published in the journal Cosmic Research.

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Antiferromagnetic bimeron shows chaotic behaviors

Magnetic bimeron is a topological spin texture with particle-like characteristics, which can exist in chiral magnets with in-plane magnetic anisotropy. The magnetic bimeron with topological charge of one can be regarded as a counterpart of the magnetic skyrmion in perpendicularly magnetized systems. So far, the studies on magnetic bimerons focus on the ferromagnetic systems. The dynamics of the bi

6h

Professor teaches tiny nanoparticles to prevent heart attacks

An associate professor from Michigan State University has helped invent a potential treatment for coronary artery disease—a sub-microscopic scouring process he likens to "taking out the garbage."

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Rising seas already overwhelm the Bay Area. Here is the desperate bid to avert disaster

When Jeff Moneda first started working for Foster City, where trails wind along the town's scenic lagoons and the nicest homes perch along its picturesque canals, he received an email from federal emergency officials that jolted him into action.

6h

The use of jargon kills people's interest in science, politics

When scientists and others use their specialized jargon terms while communicating with the general public, the effects are much worse than just making what they're saying hard to understand.

6h

Antarctica's big new iceberg: Up close with B49

A US research ship is the first vessel to encounter Antarctica's giant new iceberg.

6h

Invasive species that threaten biodiversity on the Antarctic Peninsula are identified

Mediterranean mussels, seaweed and some species of land plants and invertebrates are among the 13 species that are most likely to damage the ecosystems on the Antarctic Peninsula.

6h

Identified a brain circuit that could indicate the risk of developing Alzheimer's

The first brain changes associated with Alzheimer disease may appear years before the first symptoms. A study has provided evidences that a poor neuronal connection between the brainstem and cerebellum may be predictive of the risk of developing Alzheimer's.

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Polar bears in Baffin Bay skinnier, having fewer cubs due to less sea ice

Satellite tracking of adult females and visual monitoring of polar bears in Baffin Bay show changes from the 1990s to the period from 2009 to 2015. Bears in Baffin Bay are getting thinner and adult females are having fewer cubs than when sea ice was more available.

6h

Researchers describe new condition involving numerous GI polyps in cancer survivors

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers report newly discovered condition known as therapy-associated polyposis, or TAP in which childhood cancer survivors develop numerous colorectal growths called polyps.

6h

How plants in the cabbage family look inward when sulfur is scarce

Studying genetically modified model plants from the cabbage family, researchers at Kyushu University found that disrupting the production of two enzymes in thale cress plants growing in sulfur-deficient environments further stunts growth by reducing their ability to breakdown sulfur-containing glucosinolates. This new insight could one day help shed light on designing strategies for improving the

6h

Microsoft Excel doesn't have to be scary. This $29.99 training breaks it all down.

The Complete Microsoft Excel and VBA Bundle offers full Excel 2019, 2016 and 2013 training. The package also shows how to use VBA, Excel's key programming language. The $300 package is on sale now for just $29.99. If you're looking to save time and be more efficient, Microsoft Excel is a very useful tool to get you there. For organization and data management, there's probably never been a more im

6h

People's skin microbiomes look alike under the surface

The bacterial microbiome of the skin's outer layer, the epidermis, may be unique to each person, but that's not the case with the layer below, the dermis. A new study using skin samples from knees and hips finds the same bacteria across age and sex in the dermis layer. According to the researchers, this knowledge is important for improving the understanding and treatment of skin disorders such as

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Mars City State Design Competition Announced – The Mars Society

submitted by /u/Galileos_grandson [link] [comments]

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NASA: Next Moon landing will cost about $35 billion

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Space Force general: Russian satellite is "unusual and disturbing"

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Human Body Temperature Is Getting Cooler, Study Finds

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Testkørsel på Nordhavnsmetro kan forstyrre Cityringen i over en måned

Cityringen er knapt kommet til at køre igen, før den næste plage rammer de københavnske metropassagerer.

6h

Timetable For A Vaccine Against The New Coronavirus? Maybe This Fall

Recent advances in biotech make scientists optimistic that they might have a vaccine that has passed basic tests of human safety and efficacy ready to go to clinics as soon as this fall. (Image credit: Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images)

6h

Lab-made cells outdo animal testing for cancer research

Electrospun synthetic cell scaffolds are more consistent than animal cells for cancer research, and could even replace animal testing, researchers report. In the field of cancer research, the idea that scientists can disrupt cancer growth by changing the environment in which cancerous cells divide is growing in popularity. The primary way researchers have tested this theory is to conduct experime

6h

Chrome Is Fixing the Web's Most Annoying Video Problem

Google has finally decided to clamp down on those intrusive autoplay video ads.

6h

Why the Future of Advertising Is the End of Advertising

Today, less than two decades after the arrival of the internet, Google and Facebook together command more advertising dollars than all print media on the planet. In 2017, Google's ad campaign revenue totaled over $95 billion, while Facebook's reached more than 39 billion . Taken together, this is roughly 25 percent of all global advertising expenditure. Fueled by open source e-commerce platforms,

6h

Lane change in the cytoskeleton

Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. Munich-based scientists have now investigated the molecular mechanisms in the cytoskeleton necessary for this and revealed potential evolutionary paths.

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Lane change in the cytoskeleton

Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. Munich-based scientists have now investigated the molecular mechanisms in the cytoskeleton necessary for this and revealed potential evolutionary paths.

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SpaceX Hires Former NASA Chief of Human Spaceflight

Space Expert William Gerstenmaier spent more than four decades with NASA, serving as the head of the agency's human spaceflight program from 2005 until July 2019, when NASA chief Jim Bridenstine effectively fired him for not moving fast enough toward the goal of returning humans to the Moon. On Tuesday, CNBC reported that Gerstenmaier has found himself new gig: working at SpaceX. Moving On A Spac

6h

Blizzard Confirms WoW Subscriber Base Doubled After Classic Launched

I'm still working on my WoW leveling comparison between Retail and Classic (I know, I know, I KNOW), but there's now hard evidence that a substantial group of people are logging into WoW to play a version of the game they enjoyed 15 years ago. One of the most common arguments I saw people making before Classic launched — an argument I had a lot of fun discussing with friends, though I didn't nece

7h

Ten things we've learned about the sun from NASA's SDO this decade

In February 2020, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory—SDO—is celebrating its 10th year in space. Over the past decade the spacecraft has kept a constant eye on the sun, studying how the sun creates solar activity and drives space weather—the dynamic conditions in space that impact the entire solar system, including Earth.

7h

Giant extinct ancient rodent had a tiny brain

A team of researchers with Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Universidade Federal do Acre and the Paleontological Institute and Museum has discovered the ancient remains of a giant, extinct, tiny-brained rodent that once lived in South America. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes the skeletal remains they found and how the rodent likely appeared when ali

7h

Web tool offers instant access to global climate data

While Julien Pierret was conducting research for his Ph.D. in climate data, he was playing around with a web graphics library and looking for a reason to learn about it.

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'Rosetta stone' for urban scaling makes sense of how cities change across time and space

Cities change as they grow—not only by adding area or population but also in a variety of other ways, from the length and width of their roads to economic growth to the distribution of elementary schools. Social scientists often clash over the best way to measure change as a city swells. Traditionally, they've taken a cross-sectional approach, which means collecting data on a large number of citie

7h

Dairy cattle found to have less stable personality traits during puberty

A team of researchers at the University of British Columbia has found that dairy cattle have less stable personality traits during puberty. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes experiments they carried out with dairy cattle and what they learned.

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Smoothing out the rough diamonds

Easier access to information and better communication tools has empowered consumers and allows them to make informed and perhaps more socially responsible purchasing decisions. At the same time, corporate responsibility and sustainability are gaining momentum. One might imagine that such positive moves in the world of commerce are universal. However, the diamond industry remains opaque.

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How kirigami can help us study the muscular activity of athletes

Scientists devise an elastic and durable skin-contact patch for measuring the electromyographic activity of the palm muscle inspired by ancient Japanese paper crafts.

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Something from nothing: Using waste heat to power electronics

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba developed an improved thermocell design to convert heat into electricity. The thermocell contained a material that exhibited a phase transition from one arrangement of atoms to another when heated to 50 °C. The phase transition caused the output voltage of the thermocell to increase substantially to a level sufficient to power electronics. This thermocell

7h

Gas-skepsis stemt ned: Parlament godkender EU-liste over 151 infrastruktur-projekter

De 151 projekter omfatter en hel del naturgas-projekter og derfor stemte den grønne gruppe i Parlamentet imod at godkende listen, men et stort flertal sagde ja.

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After 'Parasite,' Are Subtitles Still a One-Inch Barrier for Americans?

The South Korean film made history at the Academy Awards. Are we finally ready to embrace subtitles?

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Dairy cattle found to have less stable personality traits during puberty

A team of researchers at the University of British Columbia has found that dairy cattle have less stable personality traits during puberty. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes experiments they carried out with dairy cattle and what they learned.

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'Bio-ink' could form a scaffold for growing human tissue

A "bio-ink" for 3D-printed materials could serve as scaffolds for growing human tissues to repair or replace damaged ones in the body, say bioengineers. Bioengineered tissues show promise in regenerative, precision, and personalized medicine; product development; and basic research, especially with the advent of 3D printing of biomaterials that could serve as scaffolds, or temporary structures to

7h

Artificial atoms create stable qubits for quantum computing

Quantum computing researchers have made improved qubits by exploiting concepts from high school chemistry.

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Distant giant planets form differently than 'failed stars'

Astronomers have probed the formation process of giant exoplanets and brown dwarfs by using a combination of direct imaging of these objects and custom software to model their orbits.

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Initial protective role of nervous system's 'star-shaped cells' in sporadic motor neuron disease uncovered

Support cells in the nervous system help protect motor neurons in the early-stages of sporadic motor neuron disease, according to new research from the Crick and UCL.

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Time crystals and topological superconductors merge

"Powering a topological superconductor using a time crystal gives you more than the sum of its parts," says Jason Alicea, a researcher at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in the US. The discovery of topological states has bred reams of research revealing new condensed matter and quantum physics, with potential technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. Similarly,

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Animal simulations and smart drug design: Nanomaterial transport to individual cells

Bioengineers can design smart drugs for antibody and nanomaterial-based therapies to optimize drug efficiency for increasingly efficient, early-stage preclinical trials. The ideal drug will have maximum efficiency at target tissue sites for transport from the tissue vasculature to the cellular environment. Researchers can use biological simulations coupled to in vitro approaches to predict their e

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Ointresse för dricksvattnet bland kommunpolitiker

Vårt dricksvatten är inte en prioriterad fråga bland kommunala politiker och tjänstemän. Det visar forskning vid Göteborgs universitet som även pekar på de konsekvenser detta kan få, som att gamla reningsverk och rör inte ersätts för att dricksvattenförsörjningen ska fungera i framtiden. Att vrida på kranen och få dricksvatten av hög kvalitet är något som vi tar för givet. Men de senaste åren har

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Biodiversity offsetting is contentious — here's an alternative

A new approach to compensate for the impact of development may be an effective alternative to biodiversity offsetting — and help nations achieve international biodiversity targets. University of Queensland scientists say target-based ecological compensation provides greater certainty and clarity, while ensuring the management of impacts from projects like new mines, roads or housing estates direc

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Second wind: New technology to help diagnose and manage respiratory diseases

Researchers at Australia's Monash University have developed radical non-invasive technology that can be used to diagnose respiratory lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and lung cancer, and potentially fast-track treatments for patients.

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Research reverses the reproductive clock in mice

Researchers have lifted fertility rates in older female mice with small doses of a metabolic compound that reverses the ageing process in eggs, offering hope for some women struggling to conceive.

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Many teens are victims of digital dating abuse; boys get the brunt of it

It's almost Valentine's Day, but there is nothing romantic about new research illuminating how teen dating abuse is manifesting online. A study of US middle and high school students showed that 28.1% had been the victim of at least one form of digital dating abuse. More than one-third had been the victim of traditional dating abuse (offline). Boys experienced all forms of digital dating abuse more

7h

UK plans to regulate the internet won't make much difference at all

The UK government has announced plans to police content on platforms like YouTube and Facebook, but it won't be able to do more than the social networks are already doing

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Pumper kører på højtryk i Vesthimmerland: Fjerner 210 kubikmeter vand i timen

Regnvand skal pumpes over højvandsikringerne i Løgstør og Aggersund.

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Research reveals surprising seasonal changes in Hudson Bay currents

Research by University of Alberta oceanographers is shedding new light on the complexities of currents in Hudson Bay—and how the hydroelectric power industry may be affecting them.

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Downhill Remakes a Movie That Was Already Perfect

Will Ferrell is one of America's finest buffoons. The Saturday Night Live alumnus has spent an entire generation as one of cinema's most consistent comedy stars, filling a role formerly occupied by such actors as Jim Carrey and Robin Williams. So it's easy to understand why, after 20 years of playing characters such as Anchorman 's Ron Burgundy and Talladega Nights ' Ricky Bobby, Ferrell would wa

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The Best Towel Warmers (2020): Zadro and Haven

We toasted towels and repeatedly touched hot surfaces to find which warmers, if any, are worth your money.

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3 Ways for Big Tech to Protect Teens From Harm

Two psychiatrists offer key changes that social media platforms can make to stop doing harm and start doing good for those who may struggle with their mental health.

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Astronomers have serious concerns about satellite constellations

Picture the space around Earth filled with tens of thousands of communications satellites. That scenario is slowly coming into being, and it has astronomers concerned. Now, a group of astronomers has written a paper outlining detailed concerns, and how all of these satellites could have a severe, negative impact on ground-based astronomy.

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Dependency on Chinese travelers makes the impact of new coronavirus novel

Australia has joined New Zealand, the United States, Indonesia, India, Israel and other countries in deciding to refuse entry to all foreigners flying from or who have recently been in mainland China.

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Half of Australians over 55 are open to downsizing, but struggle to find suitable homes

More than half of Australians over the age of 55 are open to downsizing, according to a new report based on a survey of 2,400 households. The main barrier to moving to a smaller home is a lack of housing that matches their needs and preferences. The rapid growth in the number of older Australians adds to the major challenge housing markets face in meeting their diverse housing needs.

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222 scientists say cascading crises are the biggest threat to the well-being of future generations

The bushfires raging across Australia this summer have sharpened the focus on how climate change affects human health. This season bushfires have already claimed more than 30 human lives, and many people have grappled with smoke inhalation and mental health concerns.

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The use of jargon kills people's interest in science, politics

When scientists and others use their specialized jargon terms while communicating with the general public, the effects are much worse than just making what they're saying hard to understand. In a new study, people exposed to jargon when reading about subjects like self-driving cars and surgical robots later said they were less interested in science than others who read about the same topics, but w

7h

Oil giant BP says it will cut carbon emissions to net zero by 2050

BP says it will transform its business to meet a target of net zero carbon emissions by 2050, but green campaigners have criticised the firm for a lack of detailed plans

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Teen born without left half of her brain is leading a normal life

An 18-year-old who was born without the left half of her brain scores well on IQ tests and plans to attend university, revealing our brain's incredible adaptability

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VLT observations detect a low-mass companion of the young massive star MWC 297

Using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, astronomers have discovered a low-mass stellar companion embedded in the disk of the young pre-main-sequence (PMS) massive star designated MWC 297. The finding is detailed in a paper published February 5 on the arXiv pre-print server.

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Gene associated with autism also controls growth of the embryonic brain

A UCLA-led study reveals a new role for a gene that's associated with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability and language impairment.

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Jackdaws Have Different Rules for Different Flocks

New work shows how jackdaw flocks (sometimes) transition from chaos to order — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bringing public health to the forefront in gene set enrichment analysis

Gene set enrichment analysis is integral to the study of genomics, allowing researchers to interpret data collected at the level of single genes by their collective involvement in biological pathways. However, the assessment and comparison of such methods has been generally ad hoc and lacking in data related to public health.

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Bringing public health to the forefront in gene set enrichment analysis

Gene set enrichment analysis is integral to the study of genomics, allowing researchers to interpret data collected at the level of single genes by their collective involvement in biological pathways. However, the assessment and comparison of such methods has been generally ad hoc and lacking in data related to public health.

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Children as young as 9 can have suicidal thoughts

Children as young as 9 and 10 years old have suicidal thoughts, but the majority of caregivers either don't know or don't report them, researchers say. Suicide deaths in children has reached a 30-year high in the United States. During middle and high school, 10% to 15% of kids have thoughts of suicide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "There's already been press about

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Fler utlandsfödda lämnar Sverige än folkbokföringen visar

Officiella siffror i Sverige överskattar antalet migranter som bor i landet. Det beror på att fler utlandsfödda lämnar Sverige än vad som tidigare varit känt, enligt en ny studie i demografi från Stockholms universitet. – I folkbokföringen ser det ut som att det bor fler utlandsfödda i Sverige än vad det faktiskt gör. Intressant är även att felet tycks öka, säger Andrea Monti, doktorand i sociolo

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Drug Dosing

First in man! That's a big step for a drug project – you've identified a clinical candidate with enough potency, selectivity, etc. to be a plausible drug, you've made it past toxicity testing (always a black-box cross-your-fingers exercise), and you've figured out a way to dose the stuff in human subjects. But how do you know how much drug to dose? That's a big question that has had a lot of work

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Vertebral size and shape potentially linked to generalized back problems

According to a multidisciplinary study at the University of Oulu, contemporary Finns' vertebrae have not grown in the same proportion to body size compared to people who lived 200 to 500 years ago. The smaller size of vertebrae may be linked to contemporary back problems.

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Gold's wobbly nucleus: What the short-lived Au187 isotope teaches us about fundamental science research

As Earth rotates along its axis, it wobbles a little bit. This wobbling comes, in part, from how mass is distributed across the planet. Nuclear physics researchers have now observed this same type of wobbling in Au187—a gold isotope that lives for just eight minutes. Fundamental science research like this can lead to major breakthroughs in a range of fields, including medical care.

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Moving precision communication, metrology, quantum applications from lab to chip

The field of photonic integration—the area of photonics in which waveguides and devices are fabricated as an integrated system onto a flat wafer—is relatively young compared to electronics. Photonic integration has focused on communications applications traditionally fabricated on silicon chips, because these are less expensive and more easily manufactured.

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Vertebral size and shape potentially linked to generalized back problems

According to a multidisciplinary study at the University of Oulu, contemporary Finns' vertebrae have not grown in the same proportion to body size compared to people who lived 200 to 500 years ago. The smaller size of vertebrae may be linked to contemporary back problems.

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Electric solid propellant: Can it take the heat?

Electric solid propellants are being explored as a safer option for pyrotechnics, mining, and in-space propulsion because they only ignite with an electric current. But because all of these applications require high heat, it's important to understand how the high temperatures change the propellants' chemistry. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Missouri University of

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Small world: atom-scale materials are the next tech frontier

Every age in the history of human civilization has a signature material, from the Stone Age, to the Bronze and Iron Ages. We might even call today's information-driven society the Silicon Age.

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Coronavirus Is Spreading Because Humans Are Healthier

An outbreak of a deadly new coronavirus in Wuhan, China, has crippled the world's second-largest economy and spread in 26 countries, causing more than 1,000 deaths and 43,000 laboratory-confirmed cases worldwide. A continent and two oceans away, the Ebola virus has been terrorizing the most heavily populated provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo since August 2018. Even though the epidemic

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Scientists develop non-invasive method to predict onset of dementia

Information gathered from routine visits to the doctor is enough to accurately predict a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, according to new research. The researchers developed and tested machine learning algorithms using data from electronic medical records to identify patients who may be at risk for developing the dementia.

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Stigmatising 'super-spreaders' won't help the fight against coronavirus | Philip Ball

The idea that people who infect a large number of others are 'culprits' is scientifically flawed – and deeply unfair Few people believe any longer that illness is divine punishment for sin. But if you want to see signs that health is still considered today a moral affair, take a look at how we respond to epidemics like the coronavirus . The Brighton businessman identified as a "super-spreader" of

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BP aiming for net zero carbon emissions by 2050

British energy giant BP, under the leadership of new chief executive Bernard Looney, declared Wednesday its aim to achieve "net zero" carbon emissions by 2050, although it was vague on how it planned to hit the target.

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The use of jargon kills people's interest in science, politics

When scientists and others use their specialized jargon terms while communicating with the general public, the effects are much worse than just making what they're saying hard to understand.In a new study, people exposed to jargon when reading about subjects like self-driving cars and surgical robots later said they were less interested in science than others who read about the same topics, but wi

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Small altitude changes could cut the climate impact of aircraft

Contrails — the white, fluffy streaks in the sky that form behind planes — can harm the environment. Now, scientists report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that small flight path adjustments could reduce the climate impact of these emissions.

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Letting young children skip school can have long-term consequences

A trip to Disney World. A few days over at Grandma's house (over the course of a year) to bake cookies. Letting your kid stay home because, well, it suits your schedule better.

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A Drawn-Out Nomination Fight Is More Likely Than Ever

Senator Bernie Sanders's unexpectedly narrow victory in New Hampshire underscored the splintering of the Democratic presidential field that was evident in last week's murky Iowa caucus—and left two of his opponents facing grim questions about their future viability. Just as in Iowa, the results illuminated the inability of any of the contenders to build a coalition broad enough to span the party

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'We Knew They Had Cooked the Books'

ANN ARBOR, Mich.—On a drizzly day in January 2018, Jeff Alson, an engineer at the Environmental Protection Agency's motor-vehicles office, gathered with his colleagues to make a video call to Washington, D.C. They had made the same call dozens of times before. For nearly a decade, the EPA team had worked closely with another group of engineers in the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

8h

The Cancer Industry: Hype vs. Reality

Cancer medicine generates enormous revenues but marginal benefits for patients — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Shingles vaccine may also reduce stroke risk

The shingles vaccine appears to reduce stroke risk by about 16% in older adults. In addition, the shingles vaccine may offer the strongest protection against stroke for people younger than 80.

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Making 3-D printing smarter with machine learning

3-D printing is often touted as the future of manufacturing. However it has a high degree of error, and manufacturers often need many iterations of a print before they get it right. A team of researchers is tackling this problem, with a new set of machine learning algorithms and a software tool called PrintFixer, improving print accuracy by 50 percent or more, making the process more economical an

8h

Sitting still linked to increased risk of depression in adolescents

Too much time sitting still — sedentary behavior — is linked to an increased risk of depressive symptoms in adolescents, finds a new study.

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Clostridioides difficile infection flourishes with a high-protein, high-fat diet

Mice fed a high-fat, high-protein diet were more likely to develop and die from antibiotic-driven Clostridioides difficile infections than mice fed a standard diet. In the same study, a high-carbohydrate diet was protective against severe C. difficile infection — but the researchers suspect that such a diet could produce healthy, asymptomatic carriers that can spread the pathogen.

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Long-distance skiers may have 'motor reserve' that can delay onset of Parkinson's disease

To better understand the relationship between physical activity and Parkinson's Disease (PD) investigators in Sweden analyzed medical records of nearly 200,000 long-distance skiers who took part in the Vasaloppet cross-country ski race. They established that a physically active lifestyle is associated with close to a 30% reduced risk for PD, which might be explained by a motor reserve among the ph

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Simple blood test could help predict progression of Parkinson's disease

In order to provide the best medical care for newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, a method of predicting their cognitive and motor progression, beyond using purely clinical parameters, would have major implications for their management.

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Rabies: New prophylactic and therapeutic avenues

Rabies is still responsible for approximately 60,000 human deaths per year mostly in Asia and Africa and affects especially underserved people. Prophylactic measures have significantly improved. They are now composed of the vaccine allied to purified human or equine rabies immunoglobulins. However, these immunoglobulins are expensive and not easy to reach in developing settings. Researchers have v

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CRISPR enhancement, coronavirus source and a controversial appointment

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00360-6 The latest science news, in brief.

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Some disassembly required

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00359-z Problems on the production line.

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Politiska historien kring USA:s presidentval

Den här veckan inleddes primärvalen i USA där partiernas kandidater till det 59:e presidentvalet den 3 november ska utses. I och med det har kampen om presidentposten inletts på allvar. Men hur gick det till när de första presidenterna valdes och hur såg kampanjerna ut då? − De första presidentvalen föregicks inte av några egentliga kampanjer. Enligt tidens ideal ansågs det förkastligt att aktivt

8h

Kvinnliga invandrare får jobb senare när familj väntar i Sverige

Två år. Så mycket förlängs tiden till första jobbet för kvinnliga flyktingar och anhöriginvandrare som redan före flytten har familj i Sverige jämfört med dem som inte har familj här. Det är forskare vid Stockholms universitet som har undersökt könsskillnader i migranters nytta av att ha kontakter på plats före flytten för att gå jobb. Migranter fick svara på om de hade familj i Sverige, och själ

8h

Some sorghum can 'hide' from witchweed

Sorghum crops in areas where the agricultural parasite striga, also known as witchweed, is common are more likely to have genetic adaptations to help them resist the parasite, researchers say. Witchweed, one of the greatest threats to food security in Africa, causes billions of dollars in crop losses annually and has a variety of hosts, including sorghum , the world's fifth most important cereal

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Det er længden og ikke tykkelsen der tæller: Folk med lang tommelfinger rammer oftere forkert på telefonen

Folk med lange tommelfingre har sværere ved at ramme rigtigt på telefoner med touch-skærm….

8h

Bacteria under the microscope: A new growth model for tuberculosis

For centuries, scientists have peered down the lens of a microscope and watched as bacteria – some circular, others rod-shaped – multiply before their eyes. Yet, much about the details of how cells grow and divide is still hidden, in part because the technology to resolve this process is lacking. A team of engineers, biologists, and physicists at EPFL have now used a combination of state-of-the-ar

8h

How Many Exoplanets Have Been Discovered, and How Many Are Waiting to Be Found?

Astronomers estimate that there are billions of worlds beyond our solar system.

8h

Bacteria under the microscope: A new growth model for tuberculosis

For centuries, scientists have peered down the lens of a microscope and watched as bacteria – some circular, others rod-shaped – multiply before their eyes. Yet, much about the details of how cells grow and divide is still hidden, in part because the technology to resolve this process is lacking. A team of engineers, biologists, and physicists at EPFL have now used a combination of state-of-the-ar

8h

Study: Ocean fish farming in tropics and sub-tropics most impacted by climate change

Diners may soon find more farmed oysters and fewer Atlantic salmon on their plates as climate change warms Canada's Pacific coast.

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Handwashing to Prevent Pandemic

A new study finds that handwashing at airports is probably the single most effective method for preventing pandemics.

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Russian Spacecraft Tailing U.S. Spy Satellite, General Says | Time

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How mattresses could solve hunger

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Penguins starving as Antarctica warms: Drones help count the losses

Elephant Island, Antarctica—Yang Liu packs his drone, puts on his hiking boots, and dons a life vest before climbing into the inflatable boat that will take him and a team of researchers to a small island 150 miles off the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula.

8h

The challenges and opportunities of inclusive conservation in Salonga

Within the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in an area so remote that it can only be accessed by water or air, lies the Salonga National Park.

8h

Image of the Day: Memory Erasure

By trimming synapses in the adult mouse hippocampus, microglia help facilitate forgetting.

8h

Penguins starving as Antarctica warms: Drones help count the losses

Elephant Island, Antarctica—Yang Liu packs his drone, puts on his hiking boots, and dons a life vest before climbing into the inflatable boat that will take him and a team of researchers to a small island 150 miles off the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula.

8h

The challenges and opportunities of inclusive conservation in Salonga

Within the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in an area so remote that it can only be accessed by water or air, lies the Salonga National Park.

8h

A less-contentious alternative to biodiversity offsetting

A new approach to compensate for the impact of development may be an effective alternative to biodiversity offsetting—and help nations achieve international biodiversity targets.

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A less-contentious alternative to biodiversity offsetting

A new approach to compensate for the impact of development may be an effective alternative to biodiversity offsetting—and help nations achieve international biodiversity targets.

8h

New class of materials shows strange electron properties

A method to observe a new class of topological materials, called Weyl semimetals, was developed by researchers at Penn State, MIT, Tohoku University, Japan and the Indonesian Institute of Sciences. The material's unusual electronic properties could be useful in future electronics and in quantum physics.

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This simple trick (PAUSING BEFORE SHARING) could help stop the spread of misinformation on social media

The proliferation of false news stories is a big problem in social media, but there may be a very simple remedy, according to a new Vanderbilt University study published in Harvard Kennedy School Misinformation Review.

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Young people are talking politics on TikTok. Is this a good thing?

A meme has been making the rounds on the internet recently, purporting that the U.S. Constitution allows an impeached president to run for office an additional two terms so long as there is no conviction by the Senate.

8h

Researchers track dust pollution, health to spot dangers in West Africa

Comparing dust simulations and health data for Senegal, an international team of researchers found dust to be responsible for poor air quality, which is followed by a rise in poor health outcomes.

8h

Coronavirus: How well prepared are countries for a covid-19 pandemic?

No country is fully prepared for a coronavirus pandemic, according to a public health expert. But some countries will be better placed to handle an outbreak than others

8h

'Reaper of death' who fed on other dinosaurs discovered

Scientists in Canada discover a new species of dinosaur. The species is named Thanatotheristes degrootorum, which stands for "Reaper of Death" The dinosaur lived about 79 million years ago. A new dinosaur species was found in Alberta, Canada. Related to Tyrannosaurs, the Thanatotheristes degrootorum is the oldest dinosaur ever found in the country, roaming its lands about 79 millions years ago. T

9h

Technology takes a step forward in genetic research

New research brings combined computational and laboratory genome engineering a step closer following the design of smaller and smaller genomes, to advance genetic manipulation, using supercomputers by researchers at the University of Bristol.

9h

Bubble-capturing surface helps get rid of foam

In many industrial processes, such as in bioreactors that produce fuels or pharmaceuticals, foam can get in the way. Frothy bubbles can take up a lot of space, limiting the volume available for making the product and sometimes gumming up pipes and valves or damaging living cells. Companies spend an estimated $3 billion a year on chemical additives called defoamers, but these can affect the purity

9h

Technology takes a step forward in genetic research

New research brings combined computational and laboratory genome engineering a step closer following the design of smaller and smaller genomes, to advance genetic manipulation, using supercomputers by researchers at the University of Bristol.

9h

Asteroid experts catch final glimpse of Solar Orbiter

Last night, ESA's Planetary Defence team observed the rare moment in which an object escaped our planet's gravity, in contrast to their normal objects of study—potentially hazardous rocks that could strike it.

9h

Tinder's Most Notorious Men

Alex is 27 years old. He lives in or has access to a home with an enormous kitchen and granite countertops. I have seen his face dozens of times, always with the same expression—stoic, content, smirking. Absolutely identical to that of the Mona Lisa, plus horn-rimmed glasses. Most days, his Tinder profile has six or seven photos, and in every single one, he reclines against the same immaculate ki

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What is coronavirus, what are its symptoms and how worried should we be?

What symptoms are related to the Covid-19 virus from Wuhan in China, how is it spread and when should you call a doctor? Nine schools in East Sussex testing staff or pupils for coronavirus How to protect yourself from coronavirus infection Explainer: could the coronavirus mutate if a vaccine can't be found in time? Latest updates It is a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encoun

9h

Global Financial Giants Swear Off Funding an Especially Dirty Fuel

Lenders and investors, under pressure to act on climate change, have stopped funding Alberta's vast oil-sands developments, and the province is fighting back.

9h

The New Rules of Music Snobbery

Oliver Munday T wenty-five years after Nick Hornby's novel High Fidelity psychoanalyzed fussy record-store clerks, and 20 years after the movie adaptation made John Cusack their avatar, the once-inescapable and now-obscure archetype of the music snob is being reissued. Hulu's charming High Fidelity reboot stars Zoë Kravitz in a 10-episode riff on the ways that music culture—and the preposterously

9h

The Illusion of Genetic Romance

Matchmaking based on "DNA compatibility" may sound intriguing, but the underlying science is hardly convincing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Ny professor skal forske i skulderskader

Susanne Wulff Svendsen er ny klinisk professor på Arbejds- og Miljømedicinsk Afdeling på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital.

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Bättre beräkningar för säkrare broar och byggnader

Små mätfel kan få stora konsekvenser. Det finns många exempel. Örebroforskaren Andrii Dmytryshyn räknar ut hur de små felen påverkar slutresultatet – för till exempel en bro eller byggnad. – Det blir alltid fel i mätningar, eftersom man måste avrunda. Mätfelen får en effekt på beräkningarna. När ingenjörer designar broar, byggnader och höghastighetståg måste de veta att deras beräkningar håller s

9h

Steam Locomotives Make Subway Air Sweet and Pleasant

Originally published in May 1862 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Eliteudøvere med astma kan få medicin, som ikke er på dopinglisten

Mange eliteidrætsudøvere med astma oplever administrative byrder, når de skal søge dispensation for medicin, som indeholder stoffer på dopinglisten. Behandlende læger kan faktisk lette det administrative arbejde for deres patienter ved at undersøge muligheden for at udskrive astmapræparater, som er tilladte at benytte.

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Love the stars? Astronomers have a unique suggestion for Valentine's Day

Few sights are more romantic than a star-filled sky, but there are fewer and fewer places on Earth where we can still enjoy a truly dark, star-filled sky. Light pollution means we risk losing one of the most romantic spectacles in nature, so this Valentine's Day astronomers are asking the public to help show their love for the stars by making light pollution observations as part of the Globe at Ni

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ATLAS Experiment releases 13 TeV LHC open data for science education

The ATLAS Collaboration at CERN has just released the first open dataset from the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) highest-energy run at 13 teraelectronvolts (TeV). The new release is specially developed for science education, underlining the collaboration's longstanding commitment to students and teachers using open-access ATLAS data and related tools.

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With In-Car AR, Drivers Get a New View of the Road Ahead

Navigation screens with augmented reality are the latest in an arms race among upscale auto makers like Mercedes and Cadillac.

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Can a Database of Animal Viruses Help Predict the Next Pandemic?

A scientist spent years building a tool to identify coronaviruses that can jump species. Then this winter's virus emerged—and put his system to the test.

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Control of a mitochondrial protective mechanism identified

Mitochondria are essential for normal functioning of almost all cells, since they are the main production sites of the energy-carrying molecule adenosine triphosphate (ATP). In addition, mitochondria are the key sites of biosynthesis of various proteins, lipids, nucleotides and signaling molecules. Interestingly, mitochondria appear to descend from bacteria that were incorporated into cells and pu

9h

Monitoring organs and cells in living fly larvae

Small changes in a cell's composition can radically transform its function and drive the development of diseases like diabetes, cancer or neuronal dysfunction. Scientists led by the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, the Institute for Genetics of the University of Cologne, the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, and CECAD and the CMMC in Cologne have developed a method to

9h

Anatomical details of rare electric fish revealed by an advanced imaging technique

In an article published in the journal PLOS ONE, a group of researchers supported by FAPESP has updated the description of the Ghost knifefish, Tembeassu marauna, a neotropical electric fish species found only once in the wild.

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Control of a mitochondrial protective mechanism identified

Mitochondria are essential for normal functioning of almost all cells, since they are the main production sites of the energy-carrying molecule adenosine triphosphate (ATP). In addition, mitochondria are the key sites of biosynthesis of various proteins, lipids, nucleotides and signaling molecules. Interestingly, mitochondria appear to descend from bacteria that were incorporated into cells and pu

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Scientists discover the nearest-known 'baby giant planet'

Scientists from Rochester Institute of Technology have discovered a newborn massive planet closer to Earth than any other of similarly young age found to date. The baby giant planet, called 2MASS 1155-7919 b, is located in the Epsilon Chamaeleontis Association and lies only about 330 light years from our solar system.

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Monitoring organs and cells in living fly larvae

Small changes in a cell's composition can radically transform its function and drive the development of diseases like diabetes, cancer or neuronal dysfunction. Scientists led by the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, the Institute for Genetics of the University of Cologne, the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, and CECAD and the CMMC in Cologne have developed a method to

9h

Anatomical details of rare electric fish revealed by an advanced imaging technique

In an article published in the journal PLOS ONE, a group of researchers supported by FAPESP has updated the description of the Ghost knifefish, Tembeassu marauna, a neotropical electric fish species found only once in the wild.

9h

The Illusion of Genetic Romance

Matchmaking based on "DNA compatibility" may sound intriguing, but the underlying science is hardly convincing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

The Illusion of Genetic Romance

Matchmaking based on "DNA compatibility" may sound intriguing, but the underlying science is hardly convincing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Reducing Street Sprawl Could Help Combat Climate Change

Building more disconnected thoroughfares might lock cities into a dependence on greenhouse-gas emitting cars — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why Shouldn't a Horsefly Be Named After Beyoncé? – Facts So Romantic

At best, names for species derived from celebrities and scientists become maps to hidden treasure, rewarding those who follow the trail of clues with stories of fascinating people and human history. Photograph by Ronald Woan / Flickr David Bowie and Beyoncé never shared a stage, but they share the distinction of having cleverly eponymous species names in their honor. Bowie, the British glam-rock

10h

Reducing Street Sprawl Could Help Combat Climate Change

Building more disconnected thoroughfares might lock cities into a dependence on greenhouse-gas emitting cars — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Danske ingeniører siger bye-bye til Storbritannien efter Brexit

PLUS. Siden den britiske EU-afstemning i juni 2016 er antallet af IDA-medlemmer bosat i landet faldet med 40 pct: »Brexit har hamret fast med syvtommersøm, at jeg er udlænding,« siger akademiingeniør Karsten Meyer, der har besluttet at vende tilbage til Danmark om to år efter næsten 25 år i London.

10h

Impeachment Will Never Be the Same Again

It took 230 years for a U.S. president to be impeached and tried by a divided Congress, with one party controlling the House and another the Senate. The country has now witnessed why that matters. Baseline cooperation between the chambers may not guarantee a particular outcome—but in every prior impeachment it has secured a reasonable amount of process. Donald Trump's breakneck acquittal marks th

10h

Sanders Is Winning Because He's Popular

Bernie Sanders's 2020 slogan is "Not me. Us." The sentiment is uplifting, and it's good politics—the kind of phrase that makes voters feel as if they're part of a movement rather than a cult of personality. It's also probably wrong. Sanders's narrow win Tuesday night in the New Hampshire primary cements his status as the front-runner in the Democratic presidential race. It will inspire many procl

10h

Daily briefing: How inbreeding doomed the last island of woolly mammoths

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00398-6 Harmful mutations in the last woolly mammoths on Earth. Plus, how a super-precise version of CRISPR just got even better and the coronavirus disease has an official name.

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Biolog vil råbe læger op: Kig på evolutionen for nemmere at finde vores sygdoms-gener

PLUS. Vil man behandle nutidens livsstilssygdomme, kan det betale sig at se på, hvad naturlig selektion og genudveksling kan fortælle, lyder det fra evolutionsbiolog Rasmus Nielsen.

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Marina bakterier som miljöövervakare i havet

Marina bakteriers genuttryck kan vara en värdefull sensor för att upptäcka miljöförändringar orsakade av oss människor. Bakterierna hjälper dessutom till att rena haven och på sikt kan de förhoppningsvis rena dricksvatten från skadliga miljögifter, menar forskare marinekologi vid Linnéuniversitetet. Marina bakterier finns i stor mängd i alla marina ekosystem, där de som nedbrytare av organiskt ma

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Fall in eurozone industrial production raises growth fears

Sector's output in single currency zone fell 2.1 per cent in December

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Kering says assessing coronavirus impact is 'impossible'

Gucci and Yves St Laurent owner is reallocating China inventory and weighing cost cuts

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The coronavirus is the first true social-media "infodemic"

Social media has zipped information and misinformation around the world at unprecedented speeds, fueling panic, racism … and hope.

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Journals retract 13 papers by Hans Eysenck, flag 18, some 60 years old

Two journals have retracted 13 papers co-authored by the late — and controversial — psychologist Hans Eysenck, following a university investigation that found dozens of his papers to be "unsafe." One of the journals, Perceptual and Motor Skills, subjected eight of Eysenck's papers to expressions of concern, while another — Psychological Reports — subjected 10 … Continue reading

10h

Inside Mark Zuckerberg's Lost Notebook

In the early days of Facebook, Zuck kept his plans for world domination in handwritten journals. He destroyed them. But a few revealing pages survived.

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John Locke vs. John Stuart Mill: Using metaethics to examine claims

There are two schools of thought when it comes to liberalism and rights: John Locke's naturalistic point of view, and John Stuart Mill's moralistic/utilitarian stance. Locke believed that right and wrong could be determined rationally, while Mill believed in moral rules and the idea that what's right and wrong should be in service of human happiness. Philosophy professor Daniel Jacobson argues th

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Piloternes 'fitness-app' virker: Norwegian reducerer CO2-udslip

Norwegian reducerer deres årlige CO2-udslip. Det er et resultat af implementeringen af nye teknologier, der skal formindske brændstofsforbruget på flyvningerne.

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Image of mice tussling wins a Wildlife Photographer of the Year prize

Saw Rowley has won the Wildlife Photographer of the Year LUMIX People's Choice Award with his image named "Station Squabble", which features two mice fighting over a morsel of food

11h

USA: Huawei har haft adgang til mobilnetværk i 10 år

Huawei har siden 2009 haft adgang til de netværk, firmaet har sat op for kunder. Firmaet bruger bagdør beregnet til politi-myndigheder.

11h

Sygehus og praktiserende læger går tættere sammen om patienterne

Specialister fra Sygehus Lillebælt og praktiserende læger fra hospitalets optageområde er gået sammen i et nyt pilotprojekt. Formålet er at lægge en plan for behandlingen af deres fælles patienter. Indtil videre på hjerteområdet.

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Alle er klar til at lave en plan for sundhedsvæsenet på nær ministeren

KL, Danske Regioner og en række sundhedsaktører bl.a. PLO opfordrer i et fælles brev regeringen til at lave en plan for sundhedsvæsenet snarest. Men ministeren vil ikke komme en dato nærmere.

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Hjemmeside med kommunale tilbud bygger bro til almen praksis

Det er nemt og overskueligt for praksislæger i Aalborg at henvise til de kommunale sundhedstilbud, fordi de er samlet på en hjemmeside. Hjemmesiden gør livet nemmere som læge, siger praksiskonsulent.

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ATM and PRDM9 regulate SPO11-bound recombination intermediates during meiosis

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14654-w Recombination requires DNA break formation by SPO11, following which SPO11 is thought to be released. Here, the authors show that meiotic hotspots retain SPO11 through a recombination intermediate dependent on the methyltransferase PRDM9, and that the ATM kinase governs the release of SPO11.

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Edge-driven nanomembrane-based vertical organic transistors showing a multi-sensing capability

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14661-x For vertical organic field-effect transistors (VOFETs) to reach their potential for display and sensor applications, further improvements to fabrication methods are required. Here, the authors report microfabricated VOFETs featuring rolled-up metallic nanomembrane electrodes and displaying multi-sensing capa

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Deriving disease modules from the compressed transcriptional space embedded in a deep autoencoder

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14666-6 The study of disease modules facilitates insight into complex diseases, but their identification relies on knowledge of molecular networks. Here, the authors show that disease modules and genes can also be discovered in deep autoencoder representations of large human gene expression datasets.

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Thermally activated triplet exciton release for highly efficient tri-mode organic afterglow

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14669-3 The development of organic afterglow materials that do not contain heavy metals is of interest for biological applications. Here, the authors report on the development of a thermally activated organic molecule with tri-mode afterglow and an afterglow efficiency of up to 45%.

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Tripartite phase separation of two signal effectors with vesicles priming B cell responsiveness

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14544-1 Antibody-mediated immune responses rely on antigen recognition by the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) and SLP65 is a key scaffold protein mediating BCR signaling. Here authors show that effective B cell activation requires tripartite phase separation of SLP65, CIN85, and lipid vesicles.

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Vapor–liquid–solid growth of large-area multilayer hexagonal boron nitride on dielectric substrates

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14596-3 Multilayer hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a desirable dielectric substrate for 2D electronics but its controllable synthesis is challenging. Here, the authors report a vapor–liquid–solid growth method to achieve uniform multilayer hBN by using a molten Fe82B18 alloy and N2 as reactants.

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Mahan excitons in room-temperature methylammonium lead bromide perovskites

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14683-5 The Mahan exciton, exotic quasiparticle predicted in 1967, had never been found in room temperature semiconductors. With ultrafast optics and many-body theory, Palmieri et al. show that methylammonium lead bromide perovskites are ideal platforms to unveil Mahan exciton physics at room temperature.

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Mode-phase-difference photothermal spectroscopy for gas detection with an anti-resonant hollow-core optical fiber

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14707-0 Typically, the performance of the state-of-the-art laser sensors is insufficient for many high precision applications. Here, the authors report mode-phase-difference photothermal spectroscopy with a dual-mode anti-resonant hollow-core optical fiber and demonstrate acetylene detection with ultra-high sensitiv

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Nutrition a key ingredient for psychological health in Canadian adults

A new study investigating factors that contribute to psychological distress in adults has found that that risk of malnourishment is linked to psychological distress among Canadians aged 45 years and older.

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Developing seizures after stroke may increase risk of death, disability

Developing seizures after severe stroke was linked to higher risk of death or disability.Brain injury caused by severe stroke, recurrent stroke or stroke at a younger age are linked with seizures after stroke.

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Genetics enhance sex's role as a stroke, heart attack risk factor

Genetics enhances the role sex plays to increase the risk of stroke and heart attack in healthy middle-aged adults.In the future, genetic risk scores may be used to assess stroke and heart attack risk and develop preventive efforts specific to people in middle-age without obvious risks.

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Gum disease, inflammation, hardened arteries may be linked to stroke risk

Two studies raise the possibility that treating gum disease may help prevent the development of artery blockage, thus reducing stroke risk.Patients with gum disease were twice as likely to have a stroke caused by hardening of large arteries within the brain than those without gum disease.Gingivitis, a common gum infection that results in inflammation, was associated with a higher risk of severe bl

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Blacks, Hispanics of Caribbean descent have higher stroke risk than white neighbors

Both blacks and Hispanics, mostly of Caribbean descent, were found to have a higher risk of stroke than non-Hispanic whites living in the same New York City neighborhoods.The increased stroke risk persisted into old age (70 and older), and it appeared to be related to low socioeconomic status and other heart disease and stroke risk factors.

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Moving later in life may not lower cognitive decline linked to Stroke Belt

People who spent their childhood or early adulthood in the Stroke Belt are more likely to develop cognitive impairment later, even if they have moved away.Conversely, those who reside in the Stroke Belt when they are middle-aged and older yet lived somewhere else as a child or young adult are provided some protection.

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Stimulation of nerve cluster during stroke may have beneficial effects

Promising new stimulation treatment increases blood flow to the brain, improves hand strength in patients with minor stroke and may decrease disability in many patients with stroke.Nerve cluster stimulation could provide a new treatment option to stroke patients who aren't eligible for clot-dissolving drugs or clot removal.

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Golfing regularly could be a hole-in-one for older adults' health

Regularly golfing, at least once per month, was found to lower the risk of death among older adults.While the protective effects of playing golf have not been linked to reduction of heart attack and stroke risk, researchers note the positive effects of exercise and social interaction for older adults unable to participate in more strenuous exercise.

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Smoking rates falling in adults, but stroke survivors' smoking rates remain steady

While the rate of Americans who smoke tobacco has fallen steadily over the last two decades, the rate of stroke survivors who smoke has not changed significantly.Researchers say the persistent rate of smoking among stroke survivors, who should be motivated to quit, speaks to the highly addictive nature of nicotine and should spur clinicians to target smoking cessation after stroke.

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Sex hormone-related protein levels may impact stroke risk in women

Women with lower blood levels of a protein that binds to and transports sex hormones like estradiol and testosterone may have a higher risk of ischemic stroke.Hormonal biomarkers may someday improve the ability to predict ischemic stroke risk in women.

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More stroke awareness, better eating habits may help reduce stroke risk for young adult African-Americans

Young African-Americans are experiencing higher rates of stroke because of health conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity, yet their perception of their stroke risk is low. Increased education and better eating habits are important to help reduce stroke risk in young adults.

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Optimism reduces stroke severity, inflammation

Optimistic stroke survivors had lower inflammation levels, reduced stroke severity and less initial physical disability after three months compared to less optimistic survivors, according to the findings of a small study. Previous studies have associated optimism with improved health outcomes for other medical conditions, however, no studies previously assessed if this association exists among str

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Shingles vaccine may also reduce stroke risk

The shingles vaccine appears to reduce stroke risk by about 16% in older adults.In addition, the shingles vaccine may offer the strongest protection against stroke for people younger than 80.

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Damaged eye vessels may indicate higher stroke risk for adults with diabetes

Damage to small blood vessels of the eye may be a marker for heightened risk of stroke in people with diabetes.Damage to small blood vessels in the eye may also indicate injury to other blood vessels that can result in stroke or vascular dementia.

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Portable MRIs bring diagnostics to stroke patients' bedside

For the first time, portable, low-field MRIs have successfully imaged patients' brains to evaluate stroke at their bedside.The findings suggest that a bedside MRI is safe and potentially practical in multiple settings.

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New model may help predict stroke risk in adults with migraine and aura

Simple risk score prediction model may help determine stroke risk in adults who have migraine with aura.Migraine with aura increases the risk of ischemic stroke in a younger population otherwise considered to be at a lower stroke risk.According to the researchers, the new risk score prediction tool may be ready for clinical use once validated in a larger population.

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GPS face-off: Why countries are vying to rule the skies with satnav

A geopolitical battle is being played out in orbit as countries vie for the best satellite navigation system

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Population genetics of the European rabbit along a rural-to-urban gradient

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57962-3

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The association between predicted inflammatory status and colorectal adenoma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59271-1

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DJ-1 protects retinal pericytes against high glucose-induced oxidative stress through the Nrf2 signaling pathway

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59408-2

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A Highly-sensitized Response of B-type Natriuretic Peptide to Cardiac Ischaemia Quantified by Intracoronary Pressure Measurements

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59309-4

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A data-driven approach to decompose motion data into task-relevant and task-irrelevant components in categorical outcome

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59257-z

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How peat could protect the planet

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00355-3 Across the globe, drained peatlands are emitting billions of tonnes of carbon dioxide each year. Scotland has emerged as a leader in efforts to restore bogs to health.

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