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nyheder2020februar13

Study uncovers new electronic state of matter

A research team led by professors from the University of Pittsburgh Department of Physics and Astronomy has announced the discovery of a new electronic state of matter.

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Reconnecting with nature key for the health of people and the planet

Researchers at the University of Plymouth, Natural England, the University of Exeter and the University of Derby are the first to investigate — within a single study — the contribution of both nature contact and connection to human health, wellbeing and pro-environmental behaviours.

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Hollandsk forsker vil inddæmme Nordsøen for at modvirke klimahøjvande

En dæmning mellem Skotland og Norge og en mellem Frankrig og den sydvestlige del af England vil kunne skærme mere end 25 millioner europæere mod højere vandstand som følge af klimaforandringer.

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Deadly Outbreak COVID-19 Reportedly Spreads to North Korea

South Korean newspaper Chosun Ilbo reported today that the deadly coronavirus COVID-19 is spreading in North Korea. The development is grim for several reasons. For one thing, Pyongyang's crackdown and quarantine protocol, given their abysmal human rights record, could be brutal. For another, public health experts have been publicly warning for weeks about how bad the outbreak could become in cou

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NASA mission finalists would explore Venus or outer-planet moons

Venus mission candidates follows recent snubs for Earth's near neighbor

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Desert solar farms can improve tortoise habitat

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Department of Energy Announces $50 Million for Fusion Energy R&D

submitted by /u/PartyOfLions [link] [comments]

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Want Unlimited Clean Energy? Just Drill the World's Hottest Well

An engineering team bored two miles into hot rock without causing major earthquakes—a good sign for harnessing the Earth's heat as a power source.

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NASA missions may go to Venus or our solar system's strangest moons

NASA has selected four potential future missions to visit Jupiter's fiery moon Io, Neptune's icy moon Triton, or to explore the atmosphere of Venus

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New Horizons team uncovers a critical piece of the planetary formation puzzle

Data from NASA's New Horizons mission are providing new insights into how planets and planetesimals — the building blocks of the planets — were formed.

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Researchers finally get access to data on Facebook's role in political discourse

But increased privacy protection could complicate analysis of how misinformation spreads

32min

Harvard, Yale Investigated for Undisclosed Foreign Funding

The US Department of Education is looking into allegations that the institutions failed to report hundreds of millions of dollars in gifts from other countries.

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Coronavirus Spurs Prejudice. History Suggests That's No Surprise.

From 14th century plague to HIV/AIDS and the recent round of Ebola, infectious disease outbreaks have often coincided with surges of prejudice and marginalization. "That strikes me as extraordinary," said Yale historian Frank Snowden, "that we seem unwilling to learn the lessons of the past."

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Polymers to the rescue! Saving cells from damaging ice

Research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society by University of Utah chemists Pavithra Naullage and Valeria Molinero provides the foundation to design efficient polymers that can prevent the growth of ice that damages cells.

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Caribbean sharks in need of large marine protected areas

Governments must provide larger spatial protections in the Greater Caribbean for threatened, highly migratory species such as sharks, is the call from a diverse group of marine scientists including Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) PhD Candidate, Oliver Shipley.

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Brain inflammation in veterans with Gulf War illness

In a new discovery, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have detected widespread inflammation in the brains of veterans diagnosed with Gulf War Illness.

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Disney's Live-Action "Mulan" Could Flop in China Due to Virus Outbreak

As the live-action remake of Disney's classic "Mulan" on March 27 draws closer, experts predict the studio could lose out on substantial earnings in China due to the recent outbreak of the coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, Business Insider reports . The outbreak has claimed over 1,000 deaths in China alone and has infected just over 60,000. Needless to say, typical daily life in China has been

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NASA's Next Potential Discovery Missions are Very Volcanic

The four finalists for NASA's next Discovery Mission have been announced and they're all to worlds where volcanism is vital.

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The Heat Goes On: Last Month Was The Warmest January On Record

The four warmest Januaries documented in the climate record have all occurred since 2016.

56min

Bloomberg's Influencer Campaign, a Hackable Voting App, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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How Doctors on Earth Treated a Blood Clot on the ISS

A scan revealed a clot in a patient's jugular. The challenge? That patient was an astronaut, 250 miles overhead in the International Space Station.

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Person with coronavirus attended Westminster conference

Organisers rush to trace contacts of participant at UK Bus Summit in QEII Centre

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Tourists pose continued risks for disease transmission to endangered mountain gorillas

Researchers at Ohio University have published a new study in collaboration with Ugandan scientists, cautioning that humans place endangered mountain gorillas at risk of disease transmission during tourism encounters.

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Texas Heart Institute and UCLA reveal innovative pacing system in Scientific Reports

Researchers at Texas Heart Institute and UCLA crossed a major milestone in the development of a wirelessly powered, leadless pacemaker and further advanced the possibility of using wirelessly powered, biventricular pacing to address cardiac resynchronization challenges. In Nature Research Scientific Reports, they reported the first proof of the novel pacing system's ability to provide synchronized

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Effectiveness of travel bans — readily used during infectious disease outbreaks — mostly unknown, study finds

While travel bans are frequently used to stop the spread of an emerging infectious disease, a new University of Washington and Johns Hopkins University study of published research found that the effectiveness of travel bans is mostly unknown.

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UH Law center professors urge tighter controls on data held by health tech companies

University of Houston Law Center Professors Jim Hawkins and Jessica L. Roberts call for stronger consumer safeguards to protect the privacy of personal information collected online by health-related companies.

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Venomous Snot Helps These Jellyfish Sting Without Their Tentacles

For decades, people couldn't figure out why swimming over upside-down jellyfish made their skin hurt. Scientists finally cracked the code.

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NASA: Mars Astronauts Will Use Lasers to Communicate With Earth

Mars Charge NASA's ambitious Mars timeline calls for a human expedition to the Red Planet by the mid-2030s. To lay the groundwork for that epic journey, Inverse reports , the space agency is building a huge dish in California it hopes will allow Mars astronauts to communicate with Earth — using high-powered lasers. Radio Star For decades, NASA largely stuck with old-fashioned radio waves to commu

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10,000 steps a day: Not a magical formula for preventing weight gain

For years now, 10,000 steps a day has become the gold standard for people trying to improve their health — and recent research shows some benefits can come from even just 7,500 steps. But if you're trying to prevent weight gain, a new study suggests no number of steps alone will do the trick.

1h

Making the mouse gut microbiome more human-like

Researchers find that when rodents are prevented from consuming feces, their small-intestine microbiota more closely resembles the microbial communities found in human intestines.

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From petroleum to wood in the chemical industry: Cost-efficient and more sustainable

An interdisciplinary team of bio-engineers and economists has mapped out how wood could replace petroleum in the chemical industry. They not only looked at the technological requirements, but also whether that scenario would be financially viable. A shift from petroleum to wood would lead to a reduction in CO2 emissions, the researchers state.

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As groundwater depletes, arid American West is moving east

Loss of groundwater may accelerate drying trends in the eastern United States, according to research that applied supercomputing to create an in-depth model of how groundwater will respond to warming.

1h

Why Is John Kelly Speaking Out Now?

MORRISTOWN, N.J.—John Kelly had just finished his speech and opened up the floor to questions when a woman in the audience walked up to a microphone. She asked him how he plans "to atone for the blood of those immigrant children that are dying in detention centers" and while crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. The accusation summed up the substantial skepticism and hostility that Kelly, the former W

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Astronaut Christina Koch's 328 Days in Space Are Helping Us Better Prepare for a Trip to Mars

After spending nearly a full year in space, scientists will use Koch's mission to study how microgravity affects women.

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AMD is Investigating Black Screen Driver Issues on Radeon Cards

AMD is aware of user complaints regarding black screen driver crashes on Radeon GPUs and general instability and is investigating these concerns. That's the word from company representatives, after ET reached out to discuss the situation. For those of you just tuning in, the AMD subreddit has been buzzing lately about various issues and instabilities affecting the Radeon driver stack. Complaints

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Disappearing snakes and the biodiversity crisis

A new study should sound alarm bells regarding the 'biodiversity crisis' or the loss of wildlife around the world.

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Forests bouncing back from beetles, but elk and deer slowing recovery

New research reveals that even simultaneous bark beetle outbreaks are not a death sentence to the state's beloved forests. The study found that high-elevation forests in the southern Rocky Mountains actually have a good chance of recovery, even after overlapping outbreaks with different kinds of beetles. One thing that is slowing their recovery down: Foraging elk and deer.

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Skyrmions like it hot: Spin structures are controllable even at high temperatures

Researchers who had previously demonstrated the use of new spin structures for future magnetic storage devices has yet achieved another milestone. The international team is working on structures that could serve as magnetic shift registers, so called racetrack memory devices. This type of storage promises low access times, high information density, and low energy consumption.

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Study: Bariatric surgeries can double peak blood alcohol levels, patients may be unaware

Two popular forms of bariatric surgery may dramatically change women's sensitivity to and absorption of alcohol – but patients may be unaware, according to research led by professor of food science and human nutrition M. Yanina Pepino, left. Maria Belen Acevedo, a postdoctoral research associate in the department, was the first author of the study

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Study: Text messaging an effective tool to improve access to prenatal health information

Pregnant urban African American and immigrant Afro-Caribbean women are more likely to receive the prenatal health information they need if they are given access to mhealth apps like Text4baby. That is the finding of a new study from SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University School of Public Health.

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Latest Data From New Horizons' Flyby of Arrokoth Reveals Clues to Solar System's Formation

Data from the tiny world known as Arrokoth reveal brand new insights into how our planet's came together.

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Human organs made transparent reveal their inner secrets

Nature, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00410-z Machine learning helps to expose the molecules and structures within a human kidney, eye and thyroid.

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Lawsuit: Juul Targeted Kids with Nickelodeon, Cartoon Network Ads

In a new lawsuit , Massachusetts prosecutors claim the market-dominating vape brand Juul marketed explicitly to kids, with ad buys on gaming websites aimed at young children, and — even more insidiously — tot-friendly TV websites including Nickelodeon and Cartoon Network. "Juul knew it was selling to kids," said state Attorney General Maura Healey at a news conference, as reported by BuzzFeed New

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If You're Going to Use Nootropics, Shouldn't You Know Exactly What You're Taking?

More and more people are using nootropics to give themselves a mental boost, and it's not hard to understand why. Studies have shown that nootropic supplements may enhance cognitive functions such as reasoning, memory, alertness, focus, willpower, creativity, flexibility, and verbal fluency. But with so many different nootropics currently on the market, how do you know which type is right for you

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Watch a Las Vegas-Sized Iceberg Break Off Antarctica

SOME PIG! Since 2017, an iceberg the size of Las Vegas has been slowly cracking and breaking off the massive Pine Island Glacier, on the coast of Antarctica . The European Space Agency (ESA) has kept satellite cameras trained on the iceberg — dubbed PIG — since then, Inverse reports , and now the space agency released a time-lapse video of the ongoing split. It's a disturbing video, especially wh

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Argentine researchers find distant Tyrannosaurus relative

The remains of a 90-million-year-old carnivorous dinosaur distantly related to Tyrannosaurus rex has been discovered in Argentine Patagonia by a team of paleontologists.

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Last month was hottest January on record, US scientists say

Last month was the hottest January since scientists began keeping temperature records in 1880, U.S. government forecasters said Thursday.

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Trump's Path to Weaker Fuel Efficiency Rules May Lead to a Dead End

President Trump's long-promised rollback of Obama-era fuel economy standards may not be completed until this summer, and may not be tenable even then.

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3 Anxiety-Related Disorders You Might Not Know About

Some psychological disorders fly under the radar, but they're no less real for the people who suffer from them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Remdesivir prevents MERS coronavirus disease in monkeys

The experimental antiviral remdesivir successfully prevented disease in rhesus macaques infected with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), according to a new study from National Institutes of Health scientists. Remdesivir prevented disease when administered before infection and improved the condition of macaques when given after the animals already were infected.

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Much shorter radiation treatment found to be safe, effective for people with soft tissue sarcoma

A new study led by researchers at UCLA found that treating soft tissue sarcoma with radiation over a significantly shorter period of time is safe, and likely just as effective, as a much longer conventional course of treatment.

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'Quit vaping searches increased during lung-disease outbreak

Researchers found that searches on such terms as "quit vaping" increased as much as 3.7-fold during the vaping-related illness outbreak.

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The curious case of the disappearing snakes

A Michigan State University- and University of Maryland-led study featured on the cover of this week's Science magazine should sound alarm bells regarding the "biodiversity crisis" or the loss of wildlife around the world.

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3 Anxiety-Related Disorders You Might Not Know About

Some psychological disorders fly under the radar, but they're no less real for the people who suffer from them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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High-fidelity continuum modeling predicts avian voiced sound production [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Voiced sound production is the primary form of acoustic communication in terrestrial vertebrates, particularly birds and mammals, including humans. Developing a causal physics-based model that ultimately links descending vocal motor control to tissue vibration and sound requires embodied approaches that include realistic representations of voice physiology. Here, we first implement…

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Incubation periods impact the spatial predictability of cholera and Ebola outbreaks in Sierra Leone [Population Biology]

Forecasting the spatiotemporal spread of infectious diseases during an outbreak is an important component of epidemic response. However, it remains challenging both methodologically and with respect to data requirements, as disease spread is influenced by numerous factors, including the pathogen's underlying transmission parameters and epidemiological dynamics, social networks and population…

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Deterministic and stochastic control of kirigami topology [Engineering]

Kirigami, the creative art of paper cutting, is a promising paradigm for mechanical metamaterials. However, to make kirigami-inspired structures a reality requires controlling the topology of kirigami to achieve connectivity and rigidity. We address this question by deriving the maximum number of cuts (minimum number of links) that still allow…

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Prophylactic and therapeutic remdesivir (GS-5734) treatment in the rhesus macaque model of MERS-CoV infection [Microbiology]

The continued emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) cases with a high case fatality rate stresses the need for the availability of effective antiviral treatments. Remdesivir (GS-5734) effectively inhibited MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) replication in vitro, and showed efficacy against Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-CoV in a mouse model. Here,…

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Veridical data science [Statistics]

Building and expanding on principles of statistics, machine learning, and scientific inquiry, we propose the predictability, computability, and stability (PCS) framework for veridical data science. Our framework, composed of both a workflow and documentation, aims to provide responsible, reliable, reproducible, and transparent results across the data science life cycle. The…

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Coalescence modeling of intrainfection Bacillus anthracis populations allows estimation of infection parameters in wild populations [Genetics]

Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is a well-established model organism. For B. anthracis and most other infectious diseases, knowledge regarding transmission and infection parameters in natural systems, in large part, comprises data gathered from closely controlled laboratory experiments. Fatal, natural anthrax infections transmit the bacterium through new host−pathogen…

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Using 3-D Organoids to Answer Questions About Human Health

A panel of experts will discuss how researchers use human cerebral and tumor-derived organoids to better mimic the state of living tissue for drug development and infection studies.

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Thoughts on Space Warfare?

With the advent of the United States Space Force, the Artemis Lunar colony project and the Mars colony project, is there any possibility of future space warfare or "stellar imperialism" within the next 100 to 200 years? submitted by /u/LordEd5 [link] [comments]

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Spying on his ex girlfriend with an insect sized drone!!

submitted by /u/danishblacksmith [link] [comments]

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Microsoft's plan to store data for 10,000 years

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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How a tiny and strange marine animal produces unlimited eggs and sperm over its lifetime

A little-known ocean-dwelling creature most commonly found growing on dead hermit crab shells may sound like an unlikely study subject for researchers, but this animal has a rare ability—it can make eggs and sperm for the duration of its lifetime. This animal, called Hydractinia, does so because it produces germ cells, which are precursors to eggs and sperm, nonstop throughout its life. Studying t

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As groundwater depletes, arid American West is moving east

Even under modest climate warming scenarios, the continental United States faces a significant loss of groundwater—about 119 million cubic meters, or roughly enough to fill Lake Powell four times or one quarter of Lake Erie, a first-of-its-kind study has shown.

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High-tech imaging under UV light shows which parts go where when millipedes mate

Scientists have a pretty good handle on how the birds and the bees work, but it comes to mating, almost all millipedes have been a mystery—until now. For the first time, researchers have puzzled out how these tiny creatures' complex genitalia work, thanks to new imaging techniques and blacklights that make the different tissues glow. The findings are published in a new paper in the journal Arthrop

2h

How a tiny and strange marine animal produces unlimited eggs and sperm over its lifetime

A little-known ocean-dwelling creature most commonly found growing on dead hermit crab shells may sound like an unlikely study subject for researchers, but this animal has a rare ability—it can make eggs and sperm for the duration of its lifetime. This animal, called Hydractinia, does so because it produces germ cells, which are precursors to eggs and sperm, nonstop throughout its life. Studying t

2h

High-tech imaging under UV light shows which parts go where when millipedes mate

Scientists have a pretty good handle on how the birds and the bees work, but it comes to mating, almost all millipedes have been a mystery—until now. For the first time, researchers have puzzled out how these tiny creatures' complex genitalia work, thanks to new imaging techniques and blacklights that make the different tissues glow. The findings are published in a new paper in the journal Arthrop

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Scholarly journals work together to disseminate knowledge in ob-gyn

Rutgers-led study found substantial differences between top-cited ob-gyn articles that were published in non-specialty journals compared to those published in ob-gyn journals.

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How early life trauma can contribute to functional neurological disorder

Findings may provide a better understanding of what happens in the brains of some patients with FND, as well as those with various other trauma-related brain disorders.

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Forests bouncing back from beetles, but elk and deer slowing recovery

New research from University of Colorado Boulder reveals that even simultaneous bark beetle outbreaks are not a death sentence to the state's beloved forests. The study, published this month in the journal Ecology, found that high-elevation forests in the southern Rocky Mountains actually have a good chance of recovery, even after overlapping outbreaks with different kinds of beetles. One thing th

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From petroleum to wood in the chemical industry: cost-efficient and more sustainable

An interdisciplinary team of bio-engineers and economists from KU Leuven has mapped out how wood could replace petroleum in the chemical industry. They not only looked at the technological requirements, but also whether that scenario would be financially viable. A shift from petroleum to wood would lead to a reduction in CO2 emissions, the researchers state in Science.

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Predicting autism risk may begin with a drop of blood

A novel research study by UC San Diego researchers will determine whether testing stored blood drops, recorded at birth, for 1,000 different molecules and chemicals can help predict autism risk years before symptoms would likely appear.

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California agricultural employers, workers approach smoke concerns differently

A new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis, finds that while wildfires and smoke exposure are recognized by farmworkers and employers as a growing threat and safety concern, the means to address these concerns differs between the two groups.

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Children miss more school when their mothers experience high physical violence

A new study published in Maternal and Child Health Journal, led by Anna M. Scolese, Master of Public Health student at George Mason University, found that 23.3% of women who experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) reported their child's school attendance was disrupted due to IPV. The study used baseline data from a sub-sample of 659 women in Mexico City who recently experienced IPV and reporte

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Ceramides predict vascular brain injury and dementia

In a study published in Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, a team led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital describes the role of plasma ceramides in dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their potential as a blood-based biomarker.

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Here's the One Thing Not to Do on Valentine's Day

Avoid the example of animals that practice semelparity, and don't murder your mate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A paper on cats and female students uses up one of its nine lives

Facing a social media storm, a biology journal has temporarily removed a paper arguing that the proliferation of feral cats around university campuses in China is directly related to the proportion of female students — who evidently are more welcoming than men of the wild felines. Facing a social media storm, a biology journal has … Continue reading

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Bloomberg Hires Fyre Fest Promoters to Make Memes

How Do You Do Fellow Kids? As the 2020 presidential primary crescendoes, we've seen an app catastrophe in Iowa and new legislation intended to curb political deepfakes . But the (well-financed) Michael Bloomberg campaign just took its online media warfare to new heights (or lows) — in the form of paid memes from some of Instagram's top meme accounts, according to the New York Times . One Fyre-y M

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The First Molecule in the Universe

Scientists have identified mystery molecules in space and the compound thought to have started chemistry in the cosmos — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Here's the One Thing Not to Do on Valentine's Day

Avoid the example of animals that practice semelparity, and don't murder your mate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Quantum internet closer as physicists stretch spooky link between atoms

Scientists entangle atoms through tens of kilometers of standard optical fiber

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How Congress could reverse cuts in Trump's budget request for NSF

Agency officials hope that combining White House priorities and legislative favorites is a winning formula

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How a tiny and strange marine animal produces unlimited eggs and sperm over its lifetime

During human embryonic development, a small pool of germ cells that will eventually become gametes is set aside, and all sperm or eggs that humans produce during their lives are the descendants of those original few germ cells. But a strange and tiny animal called Hydractinia forms germ cells continuously in adult life — hence producing unlimited eggs and sperm.

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Blood and sweat: Wearable medical sensors will get major sensitivity boost

Scientists explain how to increase the sensitivity of biosensors to the point where they can be integrated into smartphones, smart watches, and other wearable devices. The proposed solution can be not only easily fabricated but also integrated with materials like graphene oxide for providing adsorption of the biomolecules on the sensitive part of the optical elements.

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Poop matters: Making the mouse gut microbiome more human-like

Caltech researchers find that when rodents are prevented from consuming feces, their small-intestine microbiota more closely resembles the microbial communities found in human intestines.

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As groundwater depletes, arid American West is moving east

Loss of groundwater may accelerate drying trends in the eastern United States, according to research that applied supercomputing to create an in-depth model of how groundwater will respond to warming.

2h

Scientists finally figure out how millipedes actually do it

Scientists have a pretty good handle on how the birds and the bees work, but it comes to mating, almost all millipedes have been a mystery — until now. For the first time, researchers have puzzled out how these tiny creatures' complex genitalia work, thanks to new imaging techniques and blacklights that make the different tissues glow.

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Pitt study uncovers new electronic state of matter

The discovery shows that when electrons can be made to attract one another, they can form bunches of two, three, four and five electrons that behave like new types of particles.

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Biomedical engineers create 'smart' bandages to heal chronic wounds

Chronic and non-healing wounds—one of the most devastating complications of diabetes and the leading cause of limb amputation—affects millions of Americans each year. Due to the complex nature of these wounds, proper clinical treatment has been limited.

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Newly developed home lead screening kits shown to be highly accurate

An inexpensive lead sample collection kit distributed to homes in St. Joseph County is comparable in accuracy and sensitivity to more costly in-home analysis, according to research published this month in Environmental Research.

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NASA's space snowman reveals secrets: few craters, no water

NASA's space snowman is revealing fresh secrets from its home far beyond Pluto.

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Here's the One Thing Not to Do on Valentine's Day

Avoid the example of animals that practice semelparity, and don't murder your mate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Touch Screen Repeating Pipette with Advanced Features from BrandTech® Scientific

NEW! The BRAND® HandyStep® touch S repeating pipette has advanced pipetting features for versatility.

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Titanium femurs are real, but so are their risks

This total femur from Stryker is made from titanium, cobalt chrome, and polyethylene. (Stryker/) For February, we're focusing on the body parts that shape us, oxygenate us, and power us as we take long walks on the beach. Bony bonafide bones. These skeletal building blocks inspire curiosity and spark fear in different folks—we hope our stories, covering everything from surgeries and supplements t

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10,000 steps a day: Not a magical formula for preventing weight gain

For years now, 10,000 steps a day has become the gold standard for people trying to improve their health — and recent research shows some benefits can come from even just 7,500 steps. But if you're trying to prevent weight gain, a new Brigham Young University study suggests no number of steps alone will do the trick.

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Novel biotechnological route developed to obtain fine chemicals from agricultural waste

Preliminary calculations show that the new biotechnological route can increase the value of sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw up to 5,000-fold and multiply the price of ferulic acid by a factor of up to 75 when these residues are converted into coniferol.

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UConn biomedical engineer creates 'smart' bandages to heal chronic wounds

A new 'smart bandage' developed at UConn could help improve clinical care for people with chronic wounds.

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'Rosetta stone' for urban scaling makes sense of how cities change across time and space

New work reconciles divergent methods used to analyze the scaling behavior of cities.

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Skyrmions like it hot: Spin structures are controllable even at high temperatures

The joint research project of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that had previously demonstrated the use of new spin structures for future magnetic storage devices has yet achieved another milestone. The international team is working on structures that could serve as magnetic shift registers, so called racetrack memory devices. This type

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University of Notre Dame-developed home lead screening kits shown to be highly accurate

An inexpensive lead sample collection kit distributed to homes in St. Joseph County is comparable in accuracy and sensitivity to more costly in-home analysis, according to research published this month in the Journal of Environmental Research.

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Huge bacteria-eating viruses found in DNA from gut of pregnant women and Tibetan hot spring

University of Melbourne and the University of California, Berkeley, scientists have discovered hundreds of unusually large, bacteria-killing viruses with capabilities normally associated with living organisms. The findings provide new insight into the constant warfare between phages and bacteria. They also have implications for human disease.

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Ancient people tried to stop rising seas with spears or fiery boulders

When natural global warming raised seas by 120 metres starting around 18,000 years ago, people tried to protect themselves by building walls or rolling fiery boulders into the sea

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Researchers find unique organ-specific signature profiles for blood vessel cells

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered that endothelial cells—those that create the inner lining of blood vessels—have unique genetic signatures based on their location in the body.

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Scientists make organs transparent so you can see inside

By manipulating light refraction in organ tissue, it can be made transparent. Coloring internal structures is as "simple" as slipping dyes between tissue cells. A new method paves the way for fully 3D imagery of mature human organs. As science dives deeper into the physiology of human organs, and in particular the human brain, it has become clear that viewing such organs in three dimensions and i

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Researchers find unique organ-specific signature profiles for blood vessel cells

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered that endothelial cells—those that create the inner lining of blood vessels—have unique genetic signatures based on their location in the body.

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Research identifies potential cause of Minamata mercury poisoning

One of the world's most horrific environmental disasters—the 1950 and 60s mercury poisoning in Minamata, Japan—may have been caused by a previously unstudied form of mercury discharged directly from a chemical factory, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found.

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Face-to-face contact with police builds trust in fledgling states

After times of major conflict, such as the civil wars in Liberia from 1980 to 2003, peace often leaves a power vacuum, especially in remote areas not yet reached by a developing government.

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NASA finds wind shear affecting tropical cyclone Uesi

NASA satellite imagery revealed that vertical wind shear appears to be affecting Tropical Cyclone Uesi in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

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China Launches a Crush of Clinical Trials Aimed at Covid-19

The country's health care system, with its expertise in conducting clinical research, is ready to run new drug tests. But coordinating them all is another matter.

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This Site Uses AI to Generate Fake News Articles

A new website, " NotRealNews.net ," uses artificial intelligence to populate what resembles a news site's home page, complete with AI-written fake news stories . The website, a project by the AI development company Big Bird , is supposed to be a showcase of how the company's algorithms can help journalists quickly write compelling news, according to the website's " about " page. But despite the w

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How bird flocks with multiple species behave like K-pop groups

Peer into a forest canopy, and you will likely spot multiple bird species flying and feeding together. But are birds in these flocks cooperating with one another or competing? A new study suggests both.

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Data experts battle to map path of coronavirus outbreak

Researchers have to rely on statistics from China that have been called into doubt

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Study surveys molecular landscape of endometrial cancer

The most comprehensive molecular study of endometrial cancer to date has further defined the contributions of key genes and proteins to the disease.

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Autophagy genes act as tumor suppressors in ovarian cancer

Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and University of California at San Diego report in PLOS Genetics that the loss of BECN1 promoted early ovarian cancer formation and genomic instability.

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Consider workplace AI's impact before it's too late, study says

The paper, "Beyond Design and Use: How Scholars Should Study Intelligent Design Technologies," states that scholars and policymakers need to start thinking about it far more broadly if they want to have a say in what the future looks like.

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Moving precision communication, metrology, quantum applications from lab to chip

Photonic integration has focused on communications applications traditionally fabricated on silicon chips, because these are less expensive and more easily manufactured, and researchers are exploring promising new waveguide platforms that provide these same benefits for applications that operate in the ultraviolet to the infrared spectrum. These platforms enable a broader range of applications, su

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Oceans: particle fragmentation plays a major role in carbon sequestration

A French-British team has just discovered that a little known process regulates the capacity of oceans to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2). Photosynthesis performed by phytoplankton on the ocean's surface transforms atmospheric CO2 into organic particles, some of which later sink to its depths. However, approximately 70% of this particle flux is reduced between a depth of 100 and 1,000 metres. Here

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Cigarette prices have risen following standardised packaging, despite warnings

New study highlights how the introduction of minimum excise tax and the advent of 'plain packs' for cigarettes in the UK has seen prices rise.

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When frogs die off, snake diversity plummets

A new study in the journal Science, shows that the snake community become more homogenized and the number of species declined dramatically after chytrid fungus decimated frog populations in a remote forest in Panama.

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Brain imaging study reveals new clues about PTSD in victims of terrorist attacks

A new study published in Science suggests new therapeutic avenues for PTSD patients, after researchers explored the brainq of victims of the November 13, 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris.

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Unilateral terms of service change may put health-tech consumer welfare at risk

Given the intimate nature of the data handled by health technology companies, Jessica Roberts and Jim Hawkins argue, in this Policy Forum, for stronger consumer protections.

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mystery solved: Why ocean's carbon budget plummets beyond the twilight zone

Helping fill a gap in the understanding of the biological carbon pump — a major climate regulator — a new study shows that fragmentation of large organic particles into small ones accounts for roughly half of particle loss in the ocean, making it perhaps the most important process controlling the sequestration of sinking organic carbon in the oceans.

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The demise of tropical snakes, an 'invisible' outcome of biodiversity loss

That tropical amphibian populations have been crippled by the chytrid fungus is well-known, but a new study linking this loss to an 'invisible' decline of tropical snake communities suggests that the permeating impacts of the biodiversity crisis are not as apparent.

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A close-up of Arrokoth reveals how planetary building blocks were constructed

The farthest, most primitive object in the Solar System ever to be visited by a spacecraft – a bi-lobed Kuiper Belt Object known as Arrokoth — is described in detail in three new reports.

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Fragile topology: Two new studies explain the strange electron flow in future materials

Crystalline materials known as topological insulators conduct surface current perfectly, except when they don't. In two new studies published in the journal Science, Princeton researchers and their collaborators explain how these 'fragile' poorly conducting topological states form, and how conductivity can be restored.

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In Its Dying Gasp, Our Sun Will Obliterate the Asteroid Belt

Angry Sun Before it finally goes out, scientists say, our Sun will abruptly become so bright, it'll grind the entire asteroid belt down into dust — obliterating it with the ferociously bright light of a dying star. "Not only will our own asteroid belt be destroyed, but it will be done quickly and violently," said University of Warwick researcher Dimitri Veras , a lead author of the new research.

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A case report of multiple primary prostate tumors with differential drug sensitivity

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14657-7 Prostate cancer is often a multifocal disease but how best to manage this clinically remains unclear. Here, the authors report a single case study of a patient with two genetically diverse tumours which showed differential response to therapy.

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Life without ice

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News at a glance

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The health carer

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Physics meets Bohemia

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Mentor a job seeker

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Thresholds of aridity

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Transcription factor AP2 controls cnidarian germ cell induction

Clonal animals do not sequester a germ line during embryogenesis. Instead, they have adult stem cells that contribute to somatic tissues or gametes. How germ fate is induced in these animals, and whether this process is related to bilaterian embryonic germline induction, is unknown. We show that transcription factor AP2 (Tfap2), a regulator of mammalian germ lines, acts to commit adult stem cells

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The pan-genome effector-triggered immunity landscape of a host-pathogen interaction

Effector-triggered immunity (ETI), induced by host immune receptors in response to microbial effectors, protects plants against virulent pathogens. However, a systematic study of ETI prevalence against species-wide pathogen diversity is lacking. We constructed the Pseudomonas syringae Type III Effector Compendium (PsyTEC) to reduce the pan-genome complexity of 5127 unique effector proteins, distr

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Pascal conductance series in ballistic one-dimensional LaAlO3/SrTiO3 channels

One-dimensional electronic systems can support exotic collective phases because of the enhanced role of electron correlations. We describe the experimental observation of a series of quantized conductance steps within strongly interacting electron waveguides formed at the lanthanum aluminate–strontium titanate (LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 ) interface. The waveguide conductance follows a characteristic seque

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Ionoelastomer junctions between polymer networks of fixed anions and cations

Soft ionic conductors have enabled stretchable and transparent devices, but liquids in such devices tend to leak and evaporate. In this study, we demonstrate diodes and transistors using liquid-free ionoelastomers, in which either anions or cations are fixed to an elastomer network and the other ionic species are mobile. The junction of the two ionoelastomers of opposite polarity yields an ionic

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Dry reforming of methane by stable Ni-Mo nanocatalysts on single-crystalline MgO

Large-scale carbon fixation requires high-volume chemicals production from carbon dioxide. Dry reforming of methane could provide an economically feasible route if coke- and sintering-resistant catalysts were developed. Here, we report a molybdenum-doped nickel nanocatalyst that is stabilized at the edges of a single-crystalline magnesium oxide (MgO) support and show quantitative production of sy

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Helical quantum Hall phase in graphene on SrTiO3

The ground state of charge-neutral graphene under perpendicular magnetic field was predicted to be a quantum Hall topological insulator with a ferromagnetic order and spin-filtered, helical edge channels. In most experiments, however, an insulating state is observed that is accounted for by lattice-scale interactions that promote a broken-symmetry state with gapped bulk and edge excitations. We t

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Global ecosystem thresholds driven by aridity

Aridity, which is increasing worldwide because of climate change, affects the structure and functioning of dryland ecosystems. Whether aridification leads to gradual (versus abrupt) and systemic (versus specific) ecosystem changes is largely unknown. We investigated how 20 structural and functional ecosystem attributes respond to aridity in global drylands. Aridification led to systemic and abrup

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Major role of particle fragmentation in regulating biological sequestration of CO2 by the oceans

A critical driver of the ocean carbon cycle is the downward flux of sinking organic particles, which acts to lower the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. This downward flux is reduced by more than 70% in the mesopelagic zone (100 to 1000 meters of depth), but this loss cannot be fully accounted for by current measurements. For decades, it has been hypothesized that the missing loss could b

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Twisted bulk-boundary correspondence of fragile topology

A topological insulator reveals its nontrivial bulk through the presence of gapless edge states: This is called the bulk-boundary correspondence. However, the recent discovery of "fragile" topological states with no gapless edges casts doubt on this concept. We propose a generalization of the bulk-boundary correspondence: a transformation under which the gap between the fragile phase and other ba

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Experimental characterization of fragile topology in an acoustic metamaterial

Symmetries crucially underlie the classification of topological phases of matter. Most materials, both natural as well as architectured, possess crystalline symmetries. Recent theoretical works unveiled that these crystalline symmetries can stabilize fragile Bloch bands that challenge our very notion of topology: Although answering to the most basic definition of topology, one can trivialize thes

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Circadian rhythms in the absence of the clock gene Bmal1

Circadian (~24 hour) clocks have a fundamental role in regulating daily physiology. The transcription factor BMAL1 is a principal driver of a molecular clock in mammals. Bmal1 deletion abolishes 24-hour activity patterning, one measure of clock output. We determined whether Bmal1 function is necessary for daily molecular oscillations in skin fibroblasts and liver slices. Unexpectedly, in Bmal1 kn

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Structural basis of second-generation HIV integrase inhibitor action and viral resistance

Although second-generation HIV integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are prescribed throughout the world, the mechanistic basis for the superiority of these drugs is poorly understood. We used single-particle cryo–electron microscopy to visualize the mode of action of the advanced INSTIs dolutegravir and bictegravir at near-atomic resolution. Glutamine-148->histidine (Q148H) and glycine-1

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Structural basis for strand-transfer inhibitor binding to HIV intasomes

The HIV intasome is a large nucleoprotein assembly that mediates the integration of a DNA copy of the viral genome into host chromatin. Intasomes are targeted by the latest generation of antiretroviral drugs, integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). Challenges associated with lentiviral intasome biochemistry have hindered high-resolution structural studies of how INSTIs bind to their native

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Tropical snake diversity collapses after widespread amphibian loss

Biodiversity is declining at unprecedented rates worldwide. Yet cascading effects of biodiversity loss on other taxa are largely unknown because baseline data are often unavailable. We document the collapse of a Neotropical snake community after the invasive fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis caused a chytridiomycosis epizootic leading to the catastrophic loss of amphibians, a food so

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New Products

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Lineage tracing on transcriptional landscapes links state to fate during differentiation

A challenge in biology is to associate molecular differences among progenitor cells with their capacity to generate mature cell types. Here, we used expressed DNA barcodes to clonally trace transcriptomes over time and applied this to study fate determination in hematopoiesis. We identified states of primed fate potential and located them on a continuous transcriptional landscape. We identified t

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Resilience after trauma: The role of memory suppression

In the aftermath of trauma, little is known about why the unwanted and unbidden recollection of traumatic memories persists in some individuals but not others. We implemented neutral and inoffensive intrusive memories in the laboratory in a group of 102 individuals exposed to the 2015 Paris terrorist attacks and 73 nonexposed individuals, who were not in Paris during the attacks. While reexperien

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Thresholds of aridity

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'Not just a space potato': Nasa unveils 'astonishing' details of most distant object ever visited

It's red, it's cold, it's 4bn years old: Nasa data from Arrokoth reveals 'profound truths' about the solar system Nasa has unveiled details of the most distant object visited by a spacecraft, in observations that could resolve a decades-long puzzle of how the planets first emerged from the hazy dust of the early solar system. The ultra-red, peanut-shaped object, called Arrokoth, sits located 1bn

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The Cascading Consequences of the Worst Disease Ever

Karen Lips could hear that the frogs had gone. Since 1997, she had been working in the national park near El Copé, Panama—an area whose forests were rich in amphibians, and whose air resounded with their croaks and ribbits . But since 2004, when a deadly fungus called Bd swept through the region, that chorus has all but disappeared. "It's pretty obvious," says Lips, who is based at the University

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Most distant world visited from Earth comes into focus

Arrokoth lies in the Kuiper Belt, 6.5bn km from Earth

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A snowman-shaped space rock is teaching us how planets form

Here's what we learned from when NASA's New Horizons probe flew by the most distant object ever visited: Arrokoth.

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Fragile topology: Two new studies explain the strange electron flow in future materials

Electrons race along the surface of certain unusual crystalline materials, except that sometimes they don't. Two new studies from Princeton researchers and their collaborators explain the source of the surprising behavior and chart a course for restoring conductivity in these remarkable crystals, prized for their potential use in future technologies including quantum computers.

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When frogs die off, snake diversity plummets

Since 1998, scientists have documented the global loss of amphibians. More than 500 amphibian species have declined in numbers, including 90 that have gone extinct, due to the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium, commonly known as chytrid.

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New Horizons spacecraft 'alters theory of planet formation'

Scientists say they have overturned the prevailing idea for how the planets in our Solar System formed.

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Voting App Flaws Could Have Let Hackers Manipulate Results

New research from MIT shows that the Voatz app appears to have some glaring security holes.

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When frogs die off, snake diversity plummets

Since 1998, scientists have documented the global loss of amphibians. More than 500 amphibian species have declined in numbers, including 90 that have gone extinct, due to the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium, commonly known as chytrid.

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Solar System's distant snowman comes into sharp focus

Nature, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00419-4 NASA data reveal reddish world coated in frosty molecules.

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NASA finds wind shear affecting tropical cyclone Uesi

NASA satellite imagery revealed that vertical wind shear appears to be affecting Tropical Cyclone Uesi in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

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Boom and bust for ancient sea dragons

A new study by scientists from the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences, shows a well-known group of extinct marine reptiles had an early burst in their diversity and evolution – but that a failure to adapt in the long-run may have led to their extinction.

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New potential cause of Minamata mercury poisoning identified

One of the world's most horrific environmental disasters–the 1950 and 60s mercury poisoning in Minamata, Japan–may have been caused by a previously unstudied form of mercury discharged directly from a chemical factory, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found.

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Some bird flocks are a lot like K-pop groups

Birds in flocks that include multiple species both cooperate with and compete against each other, a new study suggests. In an analysis of nearly 100 North Florida flocks, Florida Museum of Natural History researchers found similar bird species were significantly more likely to flock together than hunt alone, working as a group to stay safe from predators while cruising the canopy in search of ins

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Automated system can rewrite outdated sentences in Wikipedia articles

A new system could be used to automatically update factual inconsistencies in Wikipedia articles, reducing time and effort spent by human editors who now do the task manually.

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New study shows Deepwater Horizon oil spill larger than previously thought

Toxic and invisible oil spread well beyond the known satellite footprint of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, according to a new study. These new findings have important implications for environmental health during future oil spills.

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Scientists find ally in fight against brain tumors: Ebola

Glioblastomas are relentless, hard-to-treat, and often lethal brain tumors. Scientists have enlisted a most unlikely ally in efforts to treat this form of cancer — elements of the Ebola virus.

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'Multitasking' AI tool to extract cancer data in record time

To better leverage cancer data for research, scientists are developing an artificial intelligence (AI)-based natural language processing tool to improve information extraction from textual pathology reports. In a first for cancer pathology reports, the team developed a multitask convolutional neural network (CNN) — a deep learning model that learns to perform tasks, such as identifying key words

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Climate-driven farming 'frontiers' pose major environmental risks

Future farming in regions that were previously unsuitable for agriculture could significantly impact biodiversity, water resources, and greenhouse gas emissions worldwide.

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New air-pressure sensor could improve everyday devices

A team of mechanical engineers investigating a revolutionary kind of micro-switch has found another application for its ongoing research.

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Face-to-face contact with police builds trust in fledgling states

The paper, "Relational State Building in Areas of Limited Statehood: Experimental Evidence on the Attitudes of the Police," finds that personal contact between police officers and citizens encourages a positive attitude about the country's central authority because such relationships provide information and facilitate social bonds.

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UIC researchers find unique organ-specific signature profiles for blood vessel cells

Researchers have discovered that endothelial cells have unique genetic signatures based on their location in the body.

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Electric solid propellant — can it take the heat?

Electric solid propellants are being explored as a safer option for pyrotechnics, mining, and in-space propulsion because they only ignite with an electric current. But because all of these applications require high heat, it's important to understand how the high temperatures change the propellants' chemistry. Researchers from the University of Illinois, Missouri University of Science and Technolo

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Transparent human organs allow 3D maps at the cellular level

For the first time, researchers managed to make intact human organs transparent. Using microscopic imaging they could revealed underlying complex structures of the see-through organs at the cellular level. Resulting organ maps can serve as templates for 3D-bioprinting technologies. In the future, this could lead to the creation of on demand artificial organs for many patients in need. The findings

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E-cigarette use among teens may be higher than previously thought, study finds

Juul may have influenced high school students' perception of vaping such that some Juul users do not consider themselves e-cigarette users, a Rutgers-led study finds.

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Artificial intelligence finds disease-related genes

An artificial neural network can reveal patterns in huge amounts of gene expression data, and discover groups of disease-related genes. This has been shown by a new study led by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, published in Nature Communications. The scientists hope that the method can eventually be applied within precision medicine and individualized treatment.

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The nations that are the world's biggest wasters of food

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00407-8 New research explains why food waste is low in the Philippines but high in Belgium.

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Watch a Robodog Drag Adam Savage Around in a Goth Rickshaw

Goth Rickshaw Former "Mythbusters" co-host and YouTube tinkerer Adam Savage has built a one-person rickshaw carriage so that his Boston Dynamics Spot robot can lug him around. Let's hope this demeaning stunt won't lead to an uprising of the machines. Kaching! Savage hand-built the odd-looking rickshaw contraption over five days in his workshop — a design he characterized as "steampunk, Victorian,

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Archery is not nearly as easy as movies make it seem

Tom Clum shooting a trad bow. (Tom Clum/) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life You couldn't pick a better time to get into traditional archery. There's a wide variety of good, affordable gear. Plus, there are great online resources for new shooters (more on that in a moment). However, there are a few hard truths about getting into trad. First, it's going to be difficult—you will likely

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Nuclear Fusion Power Without Regular Tokamaks or Stellarators

submitted by /u/lavenderowid [link] [comments]

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Global Oil Demand Set to Drop First Time in Decade on Virus

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Immune cells consult with neighbors to make decisions

Researchers have uncovered new evidence that immune cells count their neighbors before deciding whether or not the immune system should kick into high gear.

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Heart rate measurements of wearable monitors vary by activity, not skin color

Biomedical engineers have demonstrated that while different wearable technologies, like smart watches and fitness trackers, can accurately measure heart rate across a variety of skin tones, the accuracy between devices begins to vary wildly when they measure heart rate during different types of everyday activities, like typing.

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If pregnant women use cosmetics containing parabens, this may have consequences

Parabens are used as preservatives in cosmetics. If pregnant women use cosmetics containing parabens that remain on the skin for protracted periods, this may have consequences for their child's subsequent weight development.

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Nope, chocolate isn't actually an aphrodisiac

The idea that chocolate is an aphrodisiac is "just wishful thinking," says psychologist and neuroscientist Don Katz. Many people who love its decadent taste will give it as a gift to that special someone on Valentine's Day. And some of those people will do this because they think chocolate is a catalyst for romance. But are they right? Katz, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Brandeis

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Sea ice loss led to skinnier polar bears and fewer cubs

Due to reduced sea ice, polar bears in Baffin Bay are getting thinner, having fewer babies, and spending more time on land than they did in the 1990s, new research shows. The new study in Ecological Applications includes satellite tracking and visual monitoring of polar bears in the 1990s compared with more recent years. "Climate-induced changes in the Arctic are clearly affecting polar bears ,"

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Tiny eye motions let you spot stuff at a distance

If you fail an eye exam, structural defects in the eye aren't the only explanation. Small eye movements also play a role in visual acuity, researchers report. Visual acuity is the ability to discern letters, numbers, and objects from a distance. It's essential for many tasks, from recognizing a friend across a room to driving a car. Researchers previously assumed that visual acuity was primarily

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A Different Kind of Climate Refugee

Research on past climates is showing how we can help plants that are running out of places to go as their habitats warm.

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Top Shots From the 2019 International Landscape Photographer of the Year

More than 3,400 entries were received in this year's landscape-photography competition, from professional and amateur photographers around the world. Judges of the International Landscape Photographer of the Year contest narrowed the field down to a "Top 101," then further to award several category prizes and the International Landscape Photographer of the Year award, which went to the Russian ph

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Two Couples Tried a Group Marriage. It Didn't Work.

It was 1969, and 8-year-old Amy Grappell thought her house was haunted. She'd seen shadows pass her bedroom door in the dark of night. Once, she was sure she'd heard a ghost; the stairs creaked as if the specter were walking in the hallway. Amy mustered some courage and got out of bed. A strange man was coming out of her mother's bedroom. Was he real? They met eyes. "Are you sleeping with my moth

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Very tough and essential for survival

The brains of most fish and amphibian species contain a pair of conspicuously large nerve cells. These are the largest cells found in any animal brain. Biologists at the University of Bayreuth have now shown that these Mauthner cells have unique functions essential for survival, the loss of which cannot be compensated for by other nerve cells. In addition, they have discovered that Mauthner cells

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Can bilingualism protect the brain even with early stages of dementia?

A study by York University psychology researchers provides new evidence that bilingualism can delay symptoms of dementia. Researchers found bilingualism provides the brain with greater cognitive reserve, delaying onset of symptoms.

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Novel targeted drug shows promise in advanced kidney cancer

Scientists report promising activity of a novel drug that targets a key molecular driver of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) in patients with metastatic disease.

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Romance, scent, and sleep: The stuff that dreams are made of

New research accepted for publication in the journal Psychological Science suggests that the scent of a romantic partner can improve your quality of sleep. This is true regardless of whether or not you are consciously aware that the scent is even present.

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Graphene forms under microscope's eye

Scientists record the formation of foamy laser-induced graphene made with a small laser mounted to a scanning electron microscope. The reduced size of the conductive material may make it more useful for flexible electronics.

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Half of US deaths related to air pollution are linked to out-of-state emissions

More than half of all air-quality-related early deaths in the United States are a result of emissions originating outside of the state in which those deaths occur, researchers report.

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Twin Dangers of Scorching Days and Sweltering Nights Are on the Rise

The combination of day and night extreme heat will only get more frequent—and hotter—in the future — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Plutonium i det skarpe lys

PLUS. Amerikansk våbenlaboratorium vil bygge nyt kostbart anlæg til at studere aldring af plutonium-tændsatser i kernevåben.

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Red meat causes heart disease. Except when it doesn't?

A recent meta-analysis found red and processed meats increased the risk of developing heart disease by 3–7 percent. The study comes just months after an infamous review claimed Americans did not need to change their meat-eating ways. The problem is not scientific consensus, but how specialists analyze risk when proffering public guidelines. Americans love meat. Love it! Worldwide, a person consum

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Mathematical model reveals behavior of cellular enzymes

Everything a cell does, from dividing in two to migrating to a different part of the body, is controlled by enzymes that chemically modify other proteins in the cell. Researchers at Princeton University have devised a new mathematical technique to describe the behavior of many cellular enzymes. The approach, which will be published February 13 in the journal Current Biology, will help researchers

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Improving protection of wildlife in national parks

How are wild animals managed in European national parks and what factors influence management decisions? The team of Suzanne van Beeck Calkoen and associate professor Dr. Marco Heurich of the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Management at the University of Freiburg has examined differences in national policies for wild animal management in European national parks. Due to major variations in wild

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Farmers to tackle locust swarms armed with new app

A new smartphone app to tackle pests destroying crops has been developed—and it could soon help farmers whose lands are being decimated by swarms of locusts, something the UN has called for "rapid action" action on.

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Sea lions could point the way to monitor riverbed erosion

A recent research study conducted by City, University of London's Professor Christoph Bruecker and his team, has revealed a novel correlation in the way sealions and rats use their whiskers, which paves the way for the online-monitoring underwater events which trigger riverbed erosion.

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Stinging water mystery solved: Jellyfish can sting swimmers, prey with 'mucus grenades'

In warm coastal waters around the world, swimmers can often spot large groups of jellyfish pulsing rhythmically on the seafloor. Unless properly prepared with protective clothing, it is best to steer clear of areas that Cassiopea, or upside-down jellyfish inhabit: getting too close can lead to irritating stings, even without direct contact.

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Educational keyboards and kits to best jumpstart your kids' computer education

The keys to life. (Depositphotos/) Computer literacy is a basic building block of education, like reading, writing, and arithmetic. Modern education requires children be comfortable with computers, so the earlier you can start them fiddling around with keyboards and monitors, the better. Sure, you want to teach them the value of unplugging and being active, too, but there is no question they will

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French press coffee makers to help you brew the perfect cup

Press to impress. (Helena Lopes via Unsplash/) Extracting your morning cup (or three) from a French press has its advantages. You can save paper and money since you don't need a filter, and you can switch easily between coffee and loose leaf tea. Just add your ground coffee or tea leaves to the carafe, fill with hot water, and press down the plunger when your brew is at the desired strength. Here

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Organize your catastrophic digital photo library

Digital photos are free and don't take up any physical space. No wonder most of us are digital hoarders. (Antonio Gravante via Depositphotos/) Since we started carrying smartphones with decent cameras in our pockets wherever we go, we've collectively taken more and more photos. Over the past decade, I've shot maybe 50,000 with my iPhones, which makes for a hell of a lot of mediocre pictures—and v

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Affordable bath mats for an instant bathroom upgrade

Next bathroom purchase: a velveteen tufted sofa. (Yann Maignan via Unsplash/) If you are moving or want an easy upgrade for your bathroom, go for a new bath mat, which can add color and texture as well as keep you from slipping and breaking your tailbone. Below, affordable bathroom rugs of various sizes, colors, and materials. Comfy. (Amazon/) The Genteele bath mat will feel cozy on your feet whe

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The novel coronavirus finally has a name—two of them, actually

The novel coronavirus. (CDC/) After weeks of referring to the outbreak that emerged in China in late 2019 by the hard-to-say name 2019-nCoV or the problematic moniker "Wuhan coronavirus," after the city where the disease emerged, the illness finally has an official name: COVID-19, pronounced phonetically. On a Wednesday press briefing, the CDC's Nancy Messonier switched between 2019-nCoV and the

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Mike Bloomberg's Meme Campaign Is Just the Beginning

Presidential campaign #spon may be cringeworthy but it will likely be around for a while.

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Mathematical model reveals behavior of cellular enzymes

Everything a cell does, from dividing in two to migrating to a different part of the body, is controlled by enzymes that chemically modify other proteins in the cell. Researchers at Princeton University have devised a new mathematical technique to describe the behavior of many cellular enzymes. The approach, which will be published February 13 in the journal Current Biology, will help researchers

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Improving protection of wildlife in national parks

How are wild animals managed in European national parks and what factors influence management decisions? The team of Suzanne van Beeck Calkoen and associate professor Dr. Marco Heurich of the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Management at the University of Freiburg has examined differences in national policies for wild animal management in European national parks. Due to major variations in wild

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Farmers to tackle locust swarms armed with new app

A new smartphone app to tackle pests destroying crops has been developed—and it could soon help farmers whose lands are being decimated by swarms of locusts, something the UN has called for "rapid action" action on.

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Sea lions could point the way to monitor riverbed erosion

A recent research study conducted by City, University of London's Professor Christoph Bruecker and his team, has revealed a novel correlation in the way sealions and rats use their whiskers, which paves the way for the online-monitoring underwater events which trigger riverbed erosion.

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Nitrogen-fixing trees help tropical forests grow faster and store more carbon

Tropical forests are allies in the fight against climate change. Growing trees absorb carbon emissions and store them as woody biomass. As a result, reforestation of land once cleared for logging, mining, and agriculture is seen as a powerful tool for locking up large amounts of carbon emissions throughout the South American tropics.

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Organic photovoltaic cell with 17% efficiency and superior processability for large-area coating

Organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have attracted considerable research interest because of advantages of lightweight, flexibility and low-cost solution processing. With the development of organic photoactive materials, especially the new-emerging non-fullerene electron acceptors (NFAs), OPV cells have yielded power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of over 16% in recent years. However, these devices w

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Kitsch religious souvenirs can rekindle pilgrimage experience

'Tacky' and 'kitsch' religious souvenirs brought back from pilgrimage sites offer pilgrims and their friends and family who cannot make the journey a deeper religious connection.

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Stinging water mystery solved: Jellyfish can sting swimmers, prey with 'mucus grenades'

In warm coastal waters around the world, swimmers can often spot large groups of jellyfish pulsing rhythmically on the seafloor. Unless properly prepared with protective clothing, it is best to steer clear of areas that Cassiopea, or upside-down jellyfish inhabit: getting too close can lead to irritating stings, even without direct contact.

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Scientists propose new properties in hollow multishell structure

The Chinese puzzle ball is an ornate decorative artwork consisting of several concentric shells that move independently of each other. In the recent decade, Chinese scientists provided a universal method for the fabrication of a conceptually similar micronanoscale structure, called the hollow multishell structure (HoMS).

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Fup eller fairtrade: Her er din guide til bæredygtig Valentine-chokolade

Det er svært at finde rundt i de forskellige chokolade-mærkninger. Men her er et par huskeregler.

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Human brain parts left over from surgery boosts research

Experts are developing a better knowledge of the brain by studying tissue left over from surgery.

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Var med och studera kriser hemma − innan de ägt rum

Forskarna vid Mittuniversitetet har byggt upp ett virtuellt hem, där de i realtid kan följa hur människor agerar när olika kriser drabbar hemmavid. − Vi söker nu personer som vill delta i experimentet. Genom att studera människor under en simulerad kris kan vi så att säga studera krisen innan den har ägt rum, säger Minna Lundgren, huvudansvarig för experimentet. − Kunskapen om hur människor omsät

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Fysiker i spänd väntan inför utbrott i Vintergatan

​Blir det bara ett kraftfullt energiutbrott eller en riktigt stor explosion – en supernova? Med spänning följer fysikern Henrik Hartman och forskare över hela världen dagligen utvecklingen i en av Vintergatans största stjärnor – Eta Carinae. Den 17 februari vet vi svaret. Eta Carinae är namnet på två stjärnor som omsluts av ett stort och ljusstarkt gasmoln, en nebulosa. Denna gas har kastats ut v

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When Two Scientists Fall in Love

Partnering in life with a fellow researcher brings unique challenges as well as rewards.

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Coronavirus Test Kits May Yield Inconclusive Results

Some US states are waiting for the CDC to send replacement enzymes necessary for carrying out SARS-CoV-2 assays.

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Journals Open Access to Coronavirus Resources

Nearly 100 academic journals, societies, institutes, and companies sign a commitment to make research and data on COVID-19 freely available, at least for the duration of the outbreak.

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Opinion: Taking the Pulse of Horizon Europe

The plan to revitalize the European innovation landscape is entering a transition.

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Resolving Continuous Expression Vectors of scRNAseq with RNAscope

ACD invites you to join them for an educational webinar.

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Rarer than gold: wobbling gold

Nature, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00406-9 Scientists catch their first glimpse of an intricate type of nuclear movement.

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Research calls for graphic warning labels to be added to cigarette packages

Experts at the Center for Tobacco Research and The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center are making a case for why the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) proposed rule to add 13 new graphic warnings for cigarette packages and advertisements should be allowed to go into effect.

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Are all sources of carbohydrates created equal?

Potatoes are often equated with refined grains due to their carbohydrate content. Yet, potatoes contain fiber, resistant starch, and micronutrients that Americans need more of. A randomized crossover study that included 50 generally healthy adults directly compared the nutrient quality and impact on cardiometabolic risk factors of non-fried potatoes to refined grains. Its findings demonstrate that

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Fossilized insect from 100 million years ago is oldest record of primitive bee with pollen

Beetle parasites clinging to a primitive bee 100 million years ago may have caused the flight error that, while deadly for the insect, is a boon for science today.

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January 2020: Earth's Warmest January on Record

The month was our planet's warmest ever recorded without an El Niño being present — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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China's coronavirus app could have unintended consequences

Tracking people to tell them whether they've been in close contact with a virus carrier might cause a whole new series of complicated issues.

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What is coronavirus and what should I do if I have symptoms?

What are the symptoms caused by the virus from Wuhan in China, how does it spread, and should you call a doctor? Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Coronavirus: live updates It is a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of those initially infected either worked or

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Energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide have stabilised, for now

But the capacity of the Amazon to absorb the gas is falling

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Fish, like people, must pay for their accommodation

Otherwise bad things may happen to them

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Mathematical model reveals behavior of cellular enzymes

Mathematical modeling helps researchers to understand how enzymes in the body work to ensure normal functioning. The models also can show how genetic mutations alter the enzymes' behavior in ways that cause disease, including cancer.

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Mending a broken heart — the bioengineering way

Bioengineers from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, have developed a prototype patch that does the same job as crucial aspects of heart tissue. Their work essentially takes us one step closer to being able to mend a broken heart.

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'It's Not Easy For Anyone': Coronavirus Disrupts Life And Work In Hong Kong

Students, business owners, sanitation workers and doctors are all struggling to cope with the daily frustrations of living in a city of 7 million that's afraid of an outbreak of COVID-19. (Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR)

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This is how jellyfish can sting you without even touching you

Upside-down jellyfish release tiny balls of stinging cells that can move through water on their own and survive for days – leaving a network of mucus that can sting you

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Election cyberattacks? It's incompetence we need to worry about

Concerns about adversaries hacking democracy abound, but it's sheer incompetence we should really be worried about, writes Annalee Newitz

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How electric fields affect a molecular twist within light-sensitive proteins

A team of scientists has gained insight into how electric fields affect the way energy from light drives molecular motion and transformation in a protein commonly used in biological imaging.

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Hybrid microscope could bring digital biopsy to the clinic

By adding infrared capability to the ubiquitous, standard optical microscope, researchers hope to bring cancer diagnosis into the digital era. Pairing infrared measurements with high-resolution optical images and machine learning algorithms, the researchers created digital biopsies that closely correlated with traditional pathology techniques and also outperformed state-of-the-art infrared microsc

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Reconnecting with nature key for the health of people and the planet

Researchers are the first to investigate — within a single study — the contribution of both nature contact and connection to human health, well-being and pro-environmental behaviors.

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Inquiry-based labs give physics students experimental edge

New research shows that traditional physics labs, which strive to reinforce the concepts students learn in lecture courses, can actually have a negative impact on students. At the same time, nontraditional, inquiry-based labs that encourage experimentation can improve student performance and engagement without lowering exam scores.

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Harnessing the sun to bring fresh water to remote or disaster-struck communities

Researchers have developed a revolutionary desalination process that has the potential to be operated in mobile, solar-powered units.

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Babies mimic songs, study finds

Researchers — and parents — have long known that babies learn to speak by mimicking the words they hear. But a new study shows that babies also might try to imitate the singing they hear in songs.

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US Military Issues Executive Order to Prevent COVID-19 Pandemic

American military leaders issued an executive order this week that mobilized the entire Department of Defense to prepare for a potential pandemic-level outbreak of the coronavirus COVID-19. The order was referenced in memos sent out to Navy and Marine Corps officials this week, according to the Military Times . It includes plans to impose fourteen-day quarantines for servicemembers who recently t

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Improving protection of wildlife in national parks

Researchers call for uniform regulations to manage wild animals in European national parks.

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Benefits and barriers of prescription drug lists for asthma medications

A new study led by the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute examines the benefits and barriers of Prescription Drug List coverage for preventive asthma medications. The study, 'Preventive Drug Lists as Tools for Managing Asthma Medication Costs', appears in the February edition of The American Journal of Managed Care.

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Farmers to tackle locust swarms armed with new app

A new smartphone app to tackle pests destroying crops has been developed — and it could soon help farmers whose lands are being decimated by swarms of locusts, something the UN has called for 'rapid action' action on.

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Shale drilling activity linked to increased sexually transmitted infections in Texas, Yale study

Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found that rates of two sexually transmitted infections (STIs), gonorrhea and chlamydia, are 15% and 10% higher, respectively, in Texas counties with high shale drilling activity ("fracking"), compared to counties without any fracking.

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BU Study: State alcohol laws focus on drunk driving; they could do much more

A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds a substantial increase in the number and strength of state laws to reduce impaired driving over the last 20 years, while laws to reduce excessive drinking remained unchanged.

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Nitrogen-fixing trees help tropical forests grow faster and store more carbon

New research published in Nature Communications shows that the ability of tropical forests to lock up carbon depends critically upon a group of trees that possess a unique talent — the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere.

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Gentle touch loses its pleasure in migraine patients

Psychophysical data suggest that migraine patients may have abnormal affective aspects of sensorial functioning, by showing reduced sensation of pleasure associated with touch.

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New Brazilian study describes neural inflammatory processes in lab-developed human cells

Astrocytes are neural cells with many important functions in the nervous system. The inflammation of these cells occurs in brain infections and neurodegenerative disorders, a process called astrogliosis. Aware of this fundamental process for the prevention of diseases and improvement of current treatments, a team led by researchers at the D'Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR) and other

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Clinical practice guideline approval process introduces potential conflicts of interest

A new study of the approval processes used by the 43 medical-specialty-society members of the Council of Medical Specialty Societies in the US to create evidence-based guidelines finds that most use an approval procedure that has the potential to undermine editorial independence of the guideline development committee.

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Genetic profile may predict type 2 diabetes risk among women with gestational diabetes

Women who go on to develop type 2 diabetes after having gestational, or pregnancy-related, diabetes are more likely to have particular genetic profiles, suggests an analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. The findings provide insight into the genetic factors underlying the risk of type 2 diabetes and may inform strategies for reducing this risk among wo

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Prenatal vitamin D supplements don't protect kids from asthma

Taking prenatal vitamin D supplements has little effect on preventing asthma and recurrent wheezing in young children up to age 6, a new study shows. The study continues previous research—completed in 2016—that suggested that prenatal vitamin D supplementation provides a protective effect on asthma in children up to age three. The study aimed to determine whether, when maternal levels of 25-hydro

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These Jellyfish Don't Need Tentacles to Deliver a Toxic Sting

Smithsonian scientists discovered that tiny 'mucus grenades' are responsible for a mysterious phenomenon known as 'stinging water'

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Cancer Therapy in 2020

The promise of host response profiling — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This Is What an AI Said When Asked to Predict the Year Ahead

"What's past is prologue." So says the famed quote from Shakespeare's The Tempest, alleging that we can look to what has already happened as an indication of what will happen next. This idea could be interpreted as being rather bleak; are we doomed to repeat the errors of the past until we correct them? We certainly do need to learn and re-learn life lessons—whether in our work, relationships, fi

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A Diesel Powered Surf Boat! | Diesel Brothers

Heavy D and Diesel Dave convert a Vietnam-era bridge boat into the world's only diesel-powered surf boat. Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DieselB

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Common investing mistakes that beginners should avoid

Taking control of your money and making better financial decisions is something that everyone can and should do. There is a bit of a learning curve when it comes to investing. A big part of making money is learning how to avoid common mistakes. Buying cheap stocks instead of smart ones, being too reactive to news headlines, and thinking short term are a few of the things that new investors often

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Bloodhound diary: Planning the next steps

Driver Andy Green describes what needs to be done to achieve a land speed record.

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New species of flies found in Lochaber forest

An expert identified the tiny gnats from tens of thousands of creatures caught in an insect trap.

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Wanted: New astronauts for Nasa Moon mission

The US space agency is looking for new astronauts to join future missions to the Moon and Mars.

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Car-sized turtle fossils unearthed

The turtle is believed to have lived in northern South America between 13 and seven million years ago.

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To Fight Coronavirus Outbreak, Doctors Deploy Drugs Targeting HIV, Malaria and Ebola

Despite flimsy evidence, trying these drugs in humans is the only way to know if they will work against COVID-19 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Test Kits are Broken in America, Scarce in China

THE BIG CATCH in containing the COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic has been, of course, detecting it. Testing needed to be developed, and then those tests need to get all over the world. The problem, currently: In America, the rush to get testing kits out in America hasn't gone well, with faulty kits being shipped around the country. And in China, there simply aren't enough kits to go around. On a Wed

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Experts: Corporations Could Do Terrible Things With Your DNA

Once again, experts are warning that using a consumer DNA test is effectively signing away any notion of your genetic privacy . While it can be fun to learn about your ancestry by spitting in a tube and letting some startup analyze your genome, it also potentially makes you vulnerable to discrimination or unfair treatment based on what your genes reveal about your health and medical conditions, K

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Cancer Therapy in 2020

The promise of host response profiling — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Relx forced to postpone events in China as coronavirus crisis grows

Chairman of academic publisher and exhibitions group to step down after decade in role

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Conferences: cancellation fever

Empty exhibition halls have a nasty knock-on effect for host cities

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JCB to cut UK production as virus hits supply chain

Digger maker to reduce working hours as it faces parts shortages from China

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Two-thirds of Chinese airlines' planes grounded over coronavirus

Passenger numbers tumble due to travel restrictions and fear sparked by outbreak

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Alibaba: germs and conditions

Coronavirus has meant more people shopping online but an extended outbreak would hit revenues

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Global shipping market reels from coronavirus

China shutdown leaves crews stuck at sea, shipyards deserted and shipowners hunting for work

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If the Nuclear Family Has Failed, What Comes Next?

In the cover story of The Atlantic 's March issue , David Brooks charts the rise of the nuclear family as the idealized American household unit. He analyzes the shift over the past century from "big, interconnected, and extended families" to "smaller, detached nuclear families," arguing that the latter has left many Americans lonelier, with fewer role models, and with a weaker support network to

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Politics this week

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KAL's cartoon

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Cats in China Are Wearing Face Masks to Ward Off Virus

With more than 1,000 confirmed deaths and almost 60,000 cases, the devastating coronavirus COVID-19 is causing global supplies of face masks to run out , stock markets to plummet , and cruise ship trips to be cancelled . Luckily, many Chinese residents haven't forgotten about their furry companions. In photos and videos posted to social media, cats in makeshift protective wear — including face ma

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The ancient roots of psychotherapy matter now

Cognitive behavioral therapy, a 20th century invention, points to Greek Stoicism for inspiration. Stoicism and CBT share an emphasis on using logic and reasoning to overcome emotional difficulties. Knowing how to respond to challenges lies at the foundation of modern psychotherapeutic practices. Where do thoughts come from? Though we've advanced our understanding of the physiological actions that

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You Didn't Touch These Jellyfish, but They Can Sting You With Tiny Grenades

The upside-down jellyfish is mostly stationary, so it evolved self-propelling cells that can swim over and sting you on its behalf.

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Shaping waveforms

Researchers have succeeded for the first time in temporally shaping the electric field of an attosecond pulse.

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Capillary shrinkage triggers high-density porous structure

The capillary shrinkage of graphene oxide hydrogels was investigated to illustrate the relationship between the surface tension of the evaporating solvent and the associated capillary force, which was released by Quan-Hong Yang et al. in Science China Materials.

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Computer-based weather forecast: New algorithm outperforms mainframe computer systems

The exponential growth in computer processing power seen over the past 60 years may soon come to a halt. Complex systems such as those used in weather forecast, for example, require high computing capacities, but the costs for running supercomputers to process large quantities of data can become a limiting factor. German and Swiss researchers have recently unveiled an algorithm that can solve comp

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Understanding how a protein wreaks havoc in the brain in Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease is a long-term (chronic) neurological condition that affects the way the brain co-ordinates body movements like walking and talking, as well as cognitive abilities. There is currently no cure for the disease, but researchers at Trinity have recently published findings of a study which may lead to better treatments for this debilitating illness. The paper has been published in t

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New, detailed molecular roadmap boosts fight against endometrial cancer

Scientists have taken an unprecedented look at the proteins involved in endometrial cancer, commonly known as uterine cancer. The study offers insights about how physicians might be able to better identify which patients will need aggressive treatment and which won't, and offers clues about why a common cancer treatment is not effective with some patients.

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Research pinpoints rogue cells at root of autoimmune disease

Breakthrough cellular genomics technology has allowed Garvan and UNSW Sydney researchers to reveal genetic mutations causing rogue behaviour in the cells that cause autoimmune disease.

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Researchers validate link between genetic variant and poor outcomes in advanced prostate cancer

In a new Cleveland Clinic-led study published in JAMA Oncology, researchers show that a testosterone-related genetic variant — HSD3B1(1245C) — is associated with more aggressive disease and shorter survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer.

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Feasibility of using cells from fat tissue to treat scarred vocal cords

This small trial examined the feasibility and effectiveness of injecting cells with regenerative properties that are from a patient's fat tissue into scarred vocal cords of patients who had difficulty speaking.

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Factors associated with health-related quality of life in patients with facial palsy

Patients with facial palsy completed questionnaires to help identify socioeconomic, personality and mental health factors associated with their health-related quality of life, information that may be beneficial in interpreting treatment outcomes.

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Clinical trial examines subconcussive head impacts from soccer

Subconcussive head impacts from sports are those that don't cause symptoms of a concussion. This randomized clinical trial evaluated whether such subconcussive head impacts from soccer-ball headings impaired brain circuitry linking eye and cognitive functions in adult soccer players compared with a control group of players that only kicked the soccer ball.

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State of mind: The end of personality as we know it

In a study published today researchers propose that changing states of mind are holistic in that they exert all-encompassing and coordinated effects simultaneously on our perception, attention, thought, affect, and behavior. They provide evidence and a framework for the concept of SoM, proposing a unifying principle for the underlying cortical mechanism whereby SoM is determined. This novel global

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Stinging water mystery solved: Jellyfish can sting swimmers, prey with 'mucus grenades'

In warm coastal waters around the world, swimmers can often spot large groups of jellyfish pulsing on the seafloor. It is best to avoid areas that upside-down jellyfish inhabit: getting close can lead to irritating stings, even without contact. Researchers have taken a close look at the cause of this mysterious 'stinging water.' Now, a team of scientists reports in Nature Communications Biology on

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Minimum wage hikes may have mixed effect on health

Increases in minimum wages may not have the expected positive effect on all workers' health, according to a new study. Researchers did find, however, a mix of negative and positive effects associated with the health of certain groups of working-age people. In the decade-long absence of federal action, many states, counties, and cities have increased minimum wages to help improve the lives of work

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Nye dna-studier åbner nyt kapitel i menneskets historie

PLUS. Et kig ned i nulevende afrikaneres gener viser, at Homo Sapiens udvandrede fra Afrika langt tidligere end antaget. Og en ukendt menneskerace spøger i koderne.

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How the Celebrated "Pale Blue Dot" Image Came to Be

How the Celebrated "Pale Blue Dot" Image Came to Be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Upside-Down Jellyfish Can Sting People Without Touching Them

They release "mobile grenades" — tiny balls of stinging cells that are shaped like popcorn and can swim under their own power. Cassiosomes_cropped.jpg These popcorn-shaped objects are tiny balls of jellyfish cells called cassiosomes. The white dots on the outer edges of the lumps are stinging structures called nematocysts. The brownish circles in the middle are symbiotic algae. Image credits: C

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China Announces Spike in Deadly Virus Infections, Deaths

Officials at the Health Commission of Hubei Province in China — the epicenter of the deadly COVID-19 outbreak — announced a huge uptick in cases on Thursday morning, the BBC reports . "The deaths are quite worrisome, there is an increased number of deaths reported, but if you look overall at the total number of deaths and the total number of cases, the fatality ratio is about the same as it has b

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Having fewer kids will not save us from climate change

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This Is What an AI Said When Asked to Predict the Year Ahead

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A Growing Presence on the Farm: Robots

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West Africans share genes with ancient mystery man

Genome analysis suggests 'ghost' hominin interbred with their ancestors.

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Revealed: the mystery of stinging water

It's the mucus of upside-down jellyfish.

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Snap cooled muons could beat LHC at its own game

Physicists looking to up the collider energy.

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Atom-scale materials are the next tech frontier

Getting ready for when silicon nanomaterials run their course.

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Research reverses reproductive clock in mice

Finding offers hope to women struggling to conceive.

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An iconic image updated

NASA releases new version of the Pale Blue Dot.

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How the Celebrated "Pale Blue Dot" Image Came to Be

How the Celebrated "Pale Blue Dot" Image Came to Be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Online predators spread fake porn of me. Here's how I fought back | Noelle Martin

A casual reverse-image search unleashed a nightmarish reality on Noelle Martin when she discovered her face edited into pornographic materials across the internet. Join Martin as she recounts years battling shadowy online figures to reclaim her identity, narrative and peace of mind — and learn how she helped change Australian law. (This talk contains mature content.)

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Three Authentic Writers Have Occupied the Oval Office

"Good God," scratched Harry Truman in pencil on the manuscript of a soon-to-be-ex-ghostwriter of his Memoirs , "what crap." Theodore Roosevelt, miserably immersed in his Autobiography , wrote de profundis to his daughter: "I am working with heated unintelligence … I fairly loathe it now." John Adams found prose composition physically distressing, "almost like a blow on the elbow or the knee." D

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Coronavirus Is a Data Time Bomb

So far, less than 0.0008 percent of the humans on Earth have been diagnosed with the coronavirus known as COVID-19. But thanks to the circulation of disease and capital, the whole world has been affected. Chinese manufacturing cities such as Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak, are intimately entangled with the supply chains of the entire world. That means that both the disease and the containme

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Organic photovoltaic cell with 17% efficiency and superior processability for large-area coating

The research group from the Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, led by Prof. Jian-Hui Hou, reported that organic photovoltaic cells achieved an efficiency of 17% via fine-modification of the flexible side chains of non-fullerene acceptors. As the optimal material has a suitable solubility and a desirable morphology, when the blade-coating method was used to extend the active area

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Living in greener neighborhoods may postpone the natural onset of menopause

For the first time, a study led by the University of Bergen and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a centre supported by 'la Caixa', has found that living in a greener neighbourhood is associated with older age at the onset of menopause.

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Kitsch religious souvenirs can rekindle pilgrimage experience

'Tacky and 'kitsch' religious souvenirs brought back from pilgrimage sites offer pilgrims and their friends and family who cannot make the journey a deeper religious connection.

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Studying electrons, bridging two realms of physics: connecting solids and soft matter

Condensed matter physics, which analyzes the behavior of electrons in organized solid matter, has been treated as a completely separate field of study from soft matter physics, which deals with liquids, gels, etc. But in a new study, researchers from Japan have now revealed that under certain special conditions, the electrons in solid matter exhibit similar properties to the constituent particles

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Artificial intelligence is becoming sustainable!

A research group from Politecnico di Milano has developed a new computing circuit that can execute advanced operations, typical of neural networks for artificial intelligence, in one single operation. The study has been recently published in the prestigious Science Advances.

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Researchers uncover the Moscow subway microbiome

Recently, a group of ITMO University researchers has looked into the microbiome of the Moscow subway. Turns out that bacterial world of the Russian capital's subway system might be similar to that of New York's public transportation.

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Autophagy degrades liquid droplets, but not aggregates, of proteins

Autophagy is a mechanism through which cellular protein is degraded. Selective autophagy had been thought to prevent the onset of diseases, but the state of proteins in which they could be efficiently degraded had been unclear. A team of Japanese scientists have discovered that autophagy is effective for selectively degrading protein in a state of liquid droplet that is formed through liquid-liqui

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Kazan University's telescope assists in discovering a binary star system

In this article, a group of Polish scientists, based on international cooperative observations and their own theoretical calculations, built a geometric picture of the occurrence of the Gaia16aye microlensing phenomenon.

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Scientists propose new properties in hollow multishell structure

A new study led by Prof. WANG Dan from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposes a novel concept of temporal-spatial ordering and dynamic smart behavior in HoMSs.

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Method combination allows deep insights into ultrafast light-induced processes

Researchers from Graz University of Technology and the University of Vienna are demonstrating for the first time how the energy flow between strongly interacting molecular states can be better described.

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New gene mutation associated with Fabry cardiomyopathy

The A143T variant of the GLA gene is associated with an increased risk of Fabry cardiomyopathy, according to a new study. The variant plays a role in lipid metabolism. According to the researchers, patients carrying the mutation and manifesting changes in the heart should initiate treatment to prevent the disease from progressing.

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Heat transport property at the lowermost part of the Earth's mantle

Lattice thermal conductivities of MgSiO3 bridgmanite and postperovskite (PPv) phases under the Earth's deepest mantle conditions were determined by quantum mechanical computer simulations. We found a substantial increase in the conductivity associated with the phase change. This indicates that the PPv phase boundary is the boundary not only of the mineralogy but also the thermal conductivity. The

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Simple N-terminal modification of proteins

Osaka University researchers report efficient one-step modification of protein N termini using functional molecules containing 1 H -1,2,3-triazole-4-carbaldehyde (TA4C) groups. The conversion was found to be up to 92%. Amine-containing functional molecules were converted to TA4C reagents via Dimroth rearrangement in one simple step. Overall, the 2-step process offers a simple approach that is expe

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Timing of brain cell death uncovers a new target for Alzheimer's treatment

Alzheimer's disease affects millions of people worldwide and is characterized by neuron loss and beta-amyloid plaque formation in the brain. Researchers led by Tokyo Medical and Dental University have now found that neuron degeneration beings much earlier than originally thought and is dependent on a protein called YAP. Supplementation with a YAP analog restored cognitive function and prevented ne

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Second antibiotic no advantage for treating super-bug Golden Staph

A world-first clinical trial has called into question the effectiveness of using more than one antibiotic to treat the deadly 'super-bug', Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Bacteremia, commonly known as Golden Staph.

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One's internal clock could be targeted to prevent or slow the progression of breast cancer

City of Hope scientists have identified an unlikely way to potentially prevent or slow the progression of aggressive breast cancer: target one's internal clock. Studies have shown that women who take frequent night shifts have disrupted internal clocks and increased risk of developing breast cancer. Now, City of Hope's David K. Ann, Ph.D., has linked the 'clock gene' to triple-negative breast canc

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70% of Americans rarely discuss the environmental impact of their food

American consumers are hungry for more climate-friendly plant-based diets, but they need more information, according to a new survey by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication and the Earth Day Network.

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2020 Jeep Gladiator Review: You Know You Want This Off-Roading Pickup

2020 Jeep Gladiator Rubicon 4×4 Jan-Feb 2020 – Lisle NY Town Hall – Route 79 What you see is what you get with the 2020 Jeep Gladiator: It has the soul of a Jeep Wrangler SUV, which means it goes off-road. It has a pickup bed, which means it goes to and from Home Depot. And it has four doors and two rows of seats which (along with the pickup bed) means it's more than 18 feet long, so even if the

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Tool finds software update bugs in hours, not days

A new tool identifies the source of errors that result from software updates. It's a common frustration—software updates intended to make our applications run faster inadvertently end up doing just the opposite. These bugs, called performance regressions in the field of computer science, are time-consuming to fix because locating software errors normally requires substantial human intervention. T

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Sony Envisions an AI-Fueled World, From Kitchen Bots to Games

The maker of the Aibo robot dog wants to infuse artificial intelligence in its cameras, sensors, game characters, and kitchen gear.

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Canada's divorce is data revealing—and still murky

Cupid seems to be working overtime in Canada—and, thanks to one Western researcher, we have the data to prove it for the first time in a decade.

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Movement of a liquid droplet generates over 5 volts of electricity

Energy harvesting, a technology to transform small quantities of naturally occurring energy (e.g. light, heat and vibration) into electricity, is gaining attention as a method to power internet of things (IoT) devices. This technology helps reduce environmental impacts and has a potential to power electronic devices in a stable and long-term manner, unlike batteries that need recharging or replaci

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70% of Americans rarely discuss the environmental impact of their food

American consumers are hungry for more climate-friendly plant-based diets, but they need more information, according to results from a national survey released today by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication (YPCCC) and the Earth Day Network (EDN).

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Slavery is not a crime in almost half the countries of the world

"Slavery is illegal everywhere." So said the New York Times, repeated at the World Economic Forum, and used as a mantra of advocacy for over 40 years. The truth of this statement has been taken for granted for decades. Yet our new research reveals that almost half of all countries in the world have yet to actually make it a crime to enslave another human being.

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Så får du hjärtat att må bra

Lagom av allt. Det är en sanning också när det gäller hjärtat och hälsan, säger Katarina Steding-Ehrenborg, docent i experimentell klinisk fysiologi och lektor vid Lunds universitet. Att sitta stilla må vara skönt, men knappast för våra kroppar. Människan är skapad för ett liv i rörelse, likt det vi levde som samlare och jägare. I dag sitter många långa stunder framför datorn, på möten eller i bil

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Gifta på nätet

Internet är i dag det vanligaste sättet att träffa sin partner. Men hur påverkas kärleken av att vänner ersätts av algoritmer för att hitta den rätta? Inte så mycket, enligt forskare som undersökt kärlek på nätet.

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For bacteria, your community determines whether you evolve or not

A study of puddles has shown that bacteria evolve and adapt differently depending on the make-up of the community of bacteria they live within.

7h

Using digital cameras for basic health checks saves zoo animals from anesthetics

A pilot study undertaken by researchers from the University of South Australia at Adelaide Zoo, has developed a new way to undertake basic health checks of exotic wildlife using a digital camera.

7h

'Ghost' DNA found in some West African people

A team of researchers at the University of California, has found evidence of "ghost" DNA in some modern West African people. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of genetic samples collected from the Yoruba and Mende groups and what they found.

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Alternatives to antibiotics found in sheep poo and on human skin

Scientists at the APC Microbiome Ireland SFI Research Centre have added to their arsenal of new antimicrobials with discoveries of Nisin J, a new antimicrobial produced from staphylococcal bacteria found on human skin and actifensins produced by Actinomycetes isolated from sheep feces.

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Overcharged cell process clears dangerous ALS 'junk'

A surprising discovery about the aggregates that build up in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease, could pave the way for a new kind of intervention. ALS is the progressive degeneration of motor neurons that causes people to lose the ability to move and eventually speak, eat, and breathe. Within the neuronal cells of patients with ALS and other ne

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Fingertip injuries may be a clue to child abuse

Children with a documented history of abuse or neglect are 23% more likely to suffer a fingertip injury before age 12, a new study finds. The researchers used a New York state database that tracks medical discharge records to identify 79,108 children from infancy to 12 years old who sought emergency treatment between 2004 and 2013 for fingertip injuries, such as amputation, tissue damage, or crus

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See the fossil shell: This extinct turtle was truly enormous

An extinct giant freshwater turtle called Stupendemys has the largest shell ever known, report researchers. The shell, or carapace, of Stupendemys measures between 2.4 to almost 3 meters or nearly 8-10 feet. Paleobiologists discovered exceptional specimens in Venezuela and Colombia. The tropical region of South America is one of the world's hot spots when it comes to animal diversity. The region'

7h

What's behind Kenya's strange weather?

Many parts of Kenya have been experiencing torrential rainfall for a couple of months now. This has resulted in floods and landslides.

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We expect cities to foster multiculturalism, but they are struggling

During the past decade the idea that multiculturalism is a failed experiment has spread across Europe. The introduction of policies that target migrants and people of migrant backgrounds seem to suggest that the "multicultural moment"—if ever there was one—is truly over.

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You May Not Even Know You're Spreading Lies

But here's a simple thing we all can do to make the internet slightly less terrible.

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Nyudviklede nødhjælpstelte skal modstå verdens klimaforandringer

Unicef har udviklet en ny type telt, som skal bruges i katastroferamte områder. Teltet er især blevet udviklet med henblik på at kunne modstå mere ekstreme vejrforhold.

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Techtopia #141: Musik lærer børn at programmere

Der er ikke den store forskel på at lave musik og programmere en computer, mener den britiske programmør Sam Aron. Derfor har han lavet programmet Sonic Pi, hvor live-programmerer en computer til at spille musik.

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Proper-fitting fire-retardant workwear for women

After bulky, ill-fitting coveralls caused her to have some near-misses in her job as a heavy equipment operator, Jess Black decided to take matters into her own hands and create a line of clothing for women working in heavy-duty industries like oil and gas, and construction.

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Fires contained in hard-hit Australia state, but now floods threaten

All the blazes in Australia's hard-hit state of New South Wales have been brought under control, firefighters said on Thursday, signalling the end of a "black summer" that claimed 33 lives nationwide.

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Images: The two halves of Mars' whole

Mars is very much a world of two halves, as this new image from ESA's Mars Express highlights, showing where these dramatically different regions come together as one.

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For bacteria, your community determines whether you evolve or not

A study of puddles has shown that bacteria evolve and adapt differently depending on the make-up of the community of bacteria they live within.

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Inquiry-based labs give physics students experimental edge

New research shows that traditional physics labs, which strive to reinforce the concepts students learn in lecture courses, can actually have a negative impact on students. At the same time, nontraditional, inquiry-based labs that encourage experimentation can improve student performance and engagement without lowering exam scores.

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First drive in the new $103,200 Jaguar F-Type

The new 2021 Jaguar F-Type R coupe in "Sorrento yellow." (Jaguar /) The philosophical distance between the Portuguese cities of workaday Porto and cosmopolitan Lisbon can feel greater than the physical distance. Perhaps that made the route between them—including an eastward diversion to spend time on some of Europe's finest driving roads—the perfect place for Jaguar to demonstrate changes to the

7h

For Adults, Snow Days Feel Like Divine Permission to Rest

George Silk / The LIFE Picture Collection / Getty Images One time in college, I had to stay up all night to write a paper. It happened to be the same night that a blizzard covered New York City in more than two feet of snow, at the time the largest snowfall in the city since record-keeping began in the late 1800s. The snow had been predicted by late afternoon the previous day. I remember the fest

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Temporally shaping the electric field of an attosecond pulse

Chemical reactions are determined at their most fundamental level by their respective electronic structure and dynamics. Steered by a stimulus such as light irradiation, electrons rearrange themselves in liquids or solids. This process takes only a few hundred attoseconds, whereby one attosecond is the billionth part of a billionth of a second. Electrons are sensitive to external fields, so resear

7h

Using digital cameras for basic health checks saves zoo animals from anesthetics

A pilot study undertaken by researchers from the University of South Australia at Adelaide Zoo, has developed a new way to undertake basic health checks of exotic wildlife using a digital camera.

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Transgender Americans are more likely to be unemployed and poor

The United States Supreme Court will issue a ruling this year in a landmark case that will determine whether transgender people—individuals whose sex assigned at birth does not match their current innate sense of being male, female, both or neither—are protected by federal law from employment discrimination.

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Bioengineers take step toward a patch that could mend a broken heart

Bioengineers from Trinity have developed a prototype patch that does the same job as crucial aspects of heart tissue.

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Erupting Indonesian volcano spews ash, lava

Indonesia's Mount Merapi, one of the world's most active volcanoes, erupted Thursday as fiery red molten lava streamed down from the crater and it belched clouds of grey ash 2,000 metres (6,500 feet) into the sky.

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Better protection for critical pipelines during land movement

Researchers at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have developed a cost-effective and practical method to protect pipelines and keep them operating during significant fault rupture incidents and large ground movements.

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Researcher finds a mathematical pattern in human conflict using data science

A Columbian College of Arts and Sciences professor used computational modeling to prove that human conflicts throughout history have a hidden pattern—a breakthrough that came to him while watching his son play video games.

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Better approaches needed to tackle informal gold mining

NUS ecologists found that current approaches involving enforcement and provision of alternative livelihoods are unlikely to succeed in deterring informal gold mining in Myanmar.

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'Ghost' DNA found in some West African people

A team of researchers at the University of California, has found evidence of "ghost" DNA in some modern West African people. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of genetic samples collected from the Yoruba and Mende groups and what they found.

7h

Alternatives to antibiotics found in sheep poo and on human skin

Scientists at the APC Microbiome Ireland SFI Research Centre have added to their arsenal of new antimicrobials with discoveries of Nisin J, a new antimicrobial produced from staphylococcal bacteria found on human skin and actifensins produced by Actinomycetes isolated from sheep feces.

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Boom and bust for ancient sea dragons

A new study by scientists from the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences, shows a well-known group of extinct marine reptiles had an early burst in their diversity and evolution—but that a failure to adapt in the long-run may have led to their extinction.

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Resistance is futile: Superconductivity will herald the age of electric flight

As air travel comes under pressure to reduce its environmental impact and prompts us to reconsider our transport choices, scientists are searching for greener ways to power flight.

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Quantum anomalous Hall effect in intrinsic magnetic topological insulator

Nontrivial band topology can combine with magnetic order in a magnetic topological insulator to produce exotic states of matter such as quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) insulators and axion insulators. An aim of condensed matter physics is to find new materials with useful properties and apply quantum mechanics to study them. The field has allowed physicists to better understand the uses of magnets fo

7h

The secondhand smoke you're breathing may have come from another state

Scientists estimate that each year in the U.S., outdoor air pollution shortens the lives of about 100,000 people by one to two decades.

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1 in 5 kids start school with health or emotional difficulties that challenge their learning

Teachers identify one in five children as having emerging health or developmental concerns when they start school. This might include a child being disruptive, having difficulties understanding the teacher's instructions, or experiencing fears and anxieties at a level that makes it difficult for them to learn.

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Heat transport property at the lowermost part of the Earth's mantle

Lattice thermal conductivities of MgSiO3 bridgmanite and postperovskite (PPv) phases under the Earth's deepest mantle conditions have been determined by quantum mechanical computer simulations. Researchers at Ehime University found a substantial increase in the conductivity associated with the phase change. This indicates that the PPv phase boundary is the boundary not only of the mineralogy but a

7h

Neuron-like activity detected in an unforeseen place

The cells under Sanford M. Simon's microscope could easily be mistaken for neurons—they sport the characteristic long branches, and blips of light indicating bursts of calcium traveling from cell to cell. But looks can deceive. Members of the lab have found that neuron-like signaling exists outside of the nervous system—what you're actually seeing is skin cells known as melanocytes.

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Romosexuality: Embracing queer sex and love in Ancient times

Greek homosexuality has been set upon a pedestal, deemed a worthy and respectable model for romance by philosophers, writers and lovers alike. The reality is, though, that love and sex for the queer community owe more to the ancient Romans. Their approach was grittier, dirtier and sometimes just as romantic. However, it's an outlook on sex and love we are only now coming to embrace.

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Environmentally friendly textile material is easy and cheap to manufacture

When doctoral student Mostafa Jabbari began his research project, the aim was to improve the properties of the material used for textile bioreactors. But he changed tracks and developed a whole new textile material with better properties than was the original goal. The material is lighter, stronger, more heat and weather resistant, cheaper to manufacture, uses fewer chemicals, and is 100% recyclab

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New nanosensor detects cancer biomarkers in drop of blood

Looking for cancer biomarkers in blood is a promising method for detecting metastatic cancer. It is less demanding than imaging techniques like MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). The main challenge to overcome is the extremely low concentrations of these markers, which makes it difficult to detect them. Researchers of the University of Twente and Wageningen University developed a nanosensor that ac

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Simple single-step N-terminal modification of proteins

Proteins are widely used in medicine, biology and chemistry. Enhancing their inherent properties by adding functional molecules to their structures is a common and important step in many fields. For example, adding fluorescent molecules allows proteins to be traced and quantified. Many modification strategies with various advantages have been described. Osaka University researchers now report a si

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Simulation experiment allows deeper insights into ultrafast light-induced processes

Researchers from Graz University of Technology and the University of Vienna have better described the energy flow between strongly interacting molecular states. Since the 1990s, femtochemistry has been researching ultrafast processes at the molecular level. In the last few years, the research group Femtosecond Dynamics at TU Graz's Institute of Experimental Physics has been able to achieve a numbe

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Autophagy degrades liquid droplets—but not aggregates—of proteins

Under JST's Strategic Basic Research Programs, Noda Nobuo and Yamasaki Akinori at the Institute of Microbial Chemistry, in collaboration with other researchers, have discovered that autophagy is effective for selectively degrading protein in a liquid droplet state that is formed through liquid-liquid phase separation, but does poorly with the degradation of protein in aggregation or solid state.

7h

The Mystery of Superbolt Lightning

Superbolts unleash a thousand times more energy than normal lightning. The Mystery of Superbolt Lightning Video of The Mystery of Superbolt Lightning Earth Thursday, February 13, 2020 – 09:30 Emilie Lorditch, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — While studying space plasma physics, Robert Holzworth, from the University of Washington, and his team needed to keep track of lightning strikes around the

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Archaeologists Find That Ancient Canals in Modern Iraq Were Lined with Art

Assyrian sculptures date from the good times when the water flowed. Faida-Carvings.jpg The reliefs recently excavated along the canal near Faida show gods, sacred animals, and Assyrian king Sargon II Image credits: Daniele Morandi Bonacossi Culture Thursday, February 13, 2020 – 08:30 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — Almost 3,000 years ago, an ancient people called the Assyrians dug

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How electric fields affect a molecular twist within light-sensitive proteins

A team of scientists has gained insight into how electric fields affect the way energy from light drives molecular motion and transformation in a protein commonly used in biological imaging.

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Hybrid microscope could bring digital biopsy to the clinic

By adding infrared capability to the ubiquitous, standard optical microscope, researchers hope to bring cancer diagnosis into the digital era. Pairing infrared measurements with high-resolution optical images and machine learning algorithms, the researchers created digital biopsies that closely correlated with traditional pathology techniques and also outperformed state-of-the-art infrared microsc

7h

Harnessing the sun to bring fresh water to remote or disaster-struck communities

Researchers have developed a revolutionary desalination process that has the potential to be operated in mobile, solar-powered units.

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Bioengineers take step toward a patch that could mend a broken heart

Bioengineers from Trinity have developed a prototype patch that does the same job as crucial aspects of heart tissue.

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P.S. I Still Love You and What Comes After the Happy Ending

It's an age-old romantic quandary: Once the initial excitement fades, even the most loving relationships can fall into a comfortable monotony. Peter Kavinsky's got it especially tough. After all, how do you dazzle a girl when you've already posed as her fake boyfriend, twirled her around the high-school cafeteria with your hand in her back pocket , written her daily notes, driven to the Korean gr

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Protecting pipelines during land movements

Researchers at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have developed a cost-effective and practical method to protect pipelines and keep them operating during significant fault rupture incidents and large ground movements.

8h

I spy with my digital eye … a tiger's breathing, a lion's pulse

A pilot study undertaken by researchers from the University of South Australia at Adelaide Zoo, has developed a new way to undertake basic health checks of exotic wildlife using a digital camera, saving them the stress of an anaesthetic.

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Movement of a liquid droplet generates over 5 volts of electricity

Scientists have developed an energy harvesting device that generates over 5 volts of electricity from a liquid droplet. This device, made of flexible thin films, generates electricity when drops of liquid slide down along its surface. This technology is expected to be applied to IoT devices, such as self-powered sensors to monitor the quality of industrial wastewater.

8h

Smelling your lover's shirt could improve your sleep

The scent of a romantic partner can improve sleep, suggests new psychology research from the University of British Columbia.

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Acid reflux drug is a surprising candidate to curb preterm birth

Lansoprazole, an over-the-counter acid reflux drug that is often taken by pregnant women, may be a promising therapy to reduce preterm birth, according to a computational drug repurposing study that also tested several of the drugs in mice.

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Kisspeptin hormone injection can boost brain activity associated with attraction

The hormone kisspeptin can enhance brain activity associated with attraction, according to a new study.

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Kvinnor och män kan drabbas olika av sömnapné

Många studier visar samband mellan sömnapné och hjärt-kärlsjukdom. Och flera pekar på att upprepade andningsuppehåll under drömsömn kan vara specifikt skadliga. Nästan alla är gjorda på män. Nu ska forskare vid Uppsala universitet undersöka om det finns skillnad på hur män och kvinnor drabbas. – Om studier visar att det finns skillnader mellan könen skulle det ha stor betydelse för diagnostik och

8h

Neuron-like activity detected in an unforeseen place

The cells under Sanford M. Simon's microscope could easily be mistaken for neurons—they sport the characteristic long branches, and blips of light indicating bursts of calcium traveling from cell to cell. But looks can deceive. Members of the lab have found that neuron-like signaling exists outside of the nervous system—what you're actually seeing is skin cells known as melanocytes.

8h

Madison's Nightmare Has Come to America

The Senate's impeachment trial of President Donald Trump is over, ending with all but one Republican voting to acquit. But the effort to make sense of its constitutional ramifications is only beginning. Almost a half century ago, President Richard Nixon's resignation was thought to have proved that the constitutional system worked, with the House, the Senate, and a special prosecutor each having

8h

What Happens to University-Based Biotech Startups – And Why

Here's a useful article that looks at the fate of university-licensed startup (ULS) life sciencecompanies over the last few years. There are more and more such companies (a greater than tenfold increase in their number since 1990), but a comprehensive look at success rates (and how such rates vary according to the universities involved) has been harder to come by. A lot of work went into this ove

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External hard drives creative professionals can rely on

Save all of your work, even if today you hate it. ( Jonathan Farber/) If you're a photographer, videographer, graphic designer, or musician you know that creative files take up a lot of digital space. Reliable storage means you don't have to decide now if something's a keeper. After all, that magnificent failure from a year ago could be the foundation of your greatest achievement. Spend less time

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Projectors that turn your home into a cinema

Your TV doesn't need to be a focal point in the room. (Chirayu Trivedi via Unsplash/) What if the whole world was your theater? If you've snoozed through a Powerpoint presentation at the office and gawked at a B-movie classic at a garden party, it already is. With sufficient darkness and a good projector, anyone can harness the power of light to cast images onto a surface, in any location. Here a

8h

Simple single-step N-terminal modification of proteins

Proteins are widely used in medicine, biology and chemistry. Enhancing their inherent properties by adding functional molecules to their structures is a common and important step in many fields. For example, adding fluorescent molecules allows proteins to be traced and quantified. Many modification strategies with various advantages have been described. Osaka University researchers now report a si

8h

How electric fields affect a molecular twist within light-sensitive proteins

A team of scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University has gained insight into how electric fields affect the way energy from light drives molecular motion and transformation in a protein commonly used in biological imaging. A better understanding of this phenomenon, which is crucial to many processes that occur in biological systems and m

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Danske lastbiler udleder millioner af ton CO2: I Sverige skal elektriske veje løse problemet

Danmark ender som en 'diesel-ø', hvis den grønne omstilling ikke snart kommer i gang, lyder kritikken fra Dansk Industri.

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Maps of a now-submerged land help reconstruct the lives of ancient Europeans

The lost frontiers of the North Sea come into focus

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Coral nurseries can shelter threatened species

Coral nurseries, which provide coral fragments for transplantation in barren areas, could also help in the conservation of threatened species, researchers report. This bit of good news came from the final-year project of Crystle Wee, who earned a bachelor of environmental studies from the National University of Singapore. She worked on the paper in the Journal for Nature Conservation with Chou Lo

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Predator overlap keeps prey from getting out of control

Protecting redundancy in the food web helps maintain ecosystem resilience, researchers report. In 2014, a disease of epidemic proportions gripped the West Coast of the US. You may not have noticed, though, unless you were underwater. Fueled by abnormally hot ocean temperatures, sea star wasting disease ravaged these echinoderms from Alaska to Mexico. "When you have multiple different species all

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How electric fields affect a molecular twist within light-sensitive proteins

A team of scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University has gained insight into how electric fields affect the way energy from light drives molecular motion and transformation in a protein commonly used in biological imaging.

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Molecular switch mechanism explains how mutations shorten biological clocks

A new study of molecular interactions central to the functioning of biological clocks explains how certain mutations can shorten clock timing, making some people extreme 'morning larks' because their internal clocks operate on a 20-hour cycle instead of being synchronized with the 24-hour cycle of day and night. Researchers found that the same molecular switch mechanism affected by these mutations

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All That We Might Possibly Know

What if consciousness is not something special that the brain does but is instead a quality inherent to all matter? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Autophagy degrades liquid droplets—but not aggregates—of proteins

Under JST's Strategic Basic Research Programs, Noda Nobuo and Yamasaki Akinori at the Institute of Microbial Chemistry, in collaboration with other researchers, have discovered that autophagy is effective for selectively degrading protein in a liquid droplet state that is formed through liquid-liquid phase separation, but does poorly with the degradation of protein in aggregation or solid state.

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A fast light detector made of two-dimensional materials

Two research groups at ETH Zurich have joined forces to develop a novel light detector. It consists of two-dimensional layers of different materials that are coupled to a silicon optical waveguide. In the future, this approach can also be used to make LEDs and optical modulators.

8h

Rethinking fire with data analytics and systems design

From record-setting fires in the western United States to the devastating and still-blazing bushfires in Australia, it is increasingly apparent that society must forge a new relationship with fire. Factors that include changing climate, expanding human development, and accumulating fuels mean new approaches are needed, and many experts are calling for increasing resiliency by suppressing fewer fir

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How electric fields affect a molecular twist within light-sensitive proteins

A team of scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University has gained insight into how electric fields affect the way energy from light drives molecular motion and transformation in a protein commonly used in biological imaging. A better understanding of this phenomenon, which is crucial to many processes that occur in biological systems and m

8h

Printing tiny, high-precision objects in a matter of seconds

Researchers at EPFL have developed a new, high-precision method for 3-D-printing small, soft objects. The process, which takes less than 30 seconds from start to finish, has potential applications in a wide range of fields, including 3-D bioprinting.

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Researchers announce extinction of the Chinese paddlefish

The new decade 2020 began with the sad announcement that another species is now extinct—the Chinese Paddlefish (Psephurus gladius), a close relative of the sturgeon family. A paper by Chinese scientists concluded (based on IUCN criteria) that after 200 million years, the "Panda of the Yangtze" which reached up to 7m is now gone from the Yangtze forever. Although the paper received wide coverage in

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Ny textil – lätt, miljövänlig och billig att framställa

Lättare, starkare, mer värme- och väderbeständigt, billigare att tillverka, mindre kemikalier involverade och hundra procent återvinningsbart. Det är egenskaperna i ett helt nytt textil material som utvecklats i ett forskningsprojekt vid Högskolan i Borås. Doktoranden Mostafa Jabbari berättar om forskningsprojektet som först var tänkt att förbättra egenskaperna i ett material som används för att

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The Case for Fewer Heart Procedures

For some of the most common cardiac conditions, medication is a solid alternative — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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All That We Might Possibly Know

What if consciousness is not something special that the brain does but is instead a quality inherent to all matter? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Harnessing the sun to bring fresh water to remote or disaster-struck communities

Researchers at the University of Bath have developed a revolutionary desalination process that has the potential to be operated in mobile, solar-powered units.

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Storytelling can reduce VR cybersickness

A storyline with emotionally evocative details can reduce virtual reality cybersickness for some people, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of Waterloo found that storylines that provide context and details can help users feel immersed in VR experiences and can reduce feelings of nausea, disorientation and eye strain, depending on a user's gaming experience.

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New process for preserving lumber could offer advantages over pressure treating

Researchers have developed a new method that could one day replace conventional pressure treating as a way to make lumber not only fungal-resistant but also nearly impervious to water — and more thermally insulating.

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America May Be Nearing the End of the Roe Era

This story was updated on February 13, 2020 at 10:06am. Next month, the Supreme Court will hear a high-stakes abortion case, June Medical Services v. Russo . I would summarize the question presented as Now that Justice Kennedy is gone at last, do his old precedents still apply? June Medical Services presents the identical issue as a 2016 case, Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt . In Hellerstedt,

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Researchers announce extinction of the Chinese paddlefish

The new decade 2020 began with the sad announcement that another species is now extinct—the Chinese Paddlefish (Psephurus gladius), a close relative of the sturgeon family. A paper by Chinese scientists concluded (based on IUCN criteria) that after 200 million years, the "Panda of the Yangtze" which reached up to 7m is now gone from the Yangtze forever. Although the paper received wide coverage in

9h

Why C. difficile infection spreads despite increased sanitation practices

New research from MIT suggests the risk of becoming colonized by Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) increases immediately following gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances that result in diarrhea.

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Understanding different brown bear personalities may help reduce clashes with people

The brown bear is one of Europe's five large carnivores and can sometimes cross paths with people, with potentially fatal consequences. But bears have different personalities and behaviours, say researchers, and understanding this is the key to reducing conflict and protecting both them and humans.

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'Utopia Falls' Is a Bold Attempt to Make a Better YA Dystopia

Hulu's new series brings in modern themes that make it stand out in a crowded genre.

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Heavy rains are great news for Sydney's dams, but they come with a big caveat

Throughout summer, Sydney's water storage level fell alarmingly. Level 2 water restrictions were imposed and the New South Wales government prepared to double the capacity of its desalination plant.

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New process for preserving lumber could offer advantages over pressure treating

Pressure treating—which involves putting lumber inside a pressurized watertight tank and forcing chemicals into the boards—has been used for more than a century to help stave off the fungus that causes wood rot in wet environments.

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Quantum memories entangled over 50-kilometer cable

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has succeeded in sending entangled quantum memories over a 50-kilometer coiled fiber cable. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes several experiments they conducted involving entangling quantum memory over long distances, the challenges they overcame, and problems still to be addressed.

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Why C. difficile infection spreads despite increased sanitation practices

New research from MIT suggests the risk of becoming colonized by Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) increases immediately following gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances that result in diarrhea.

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Understanding different brown bear personalities may help reduce clashes with people

The brown bear is one of Europe's five large carnivores and can sometimes cross paths with people, with potentially fatal consequences. But bears have different personalities and behaviours, say researchers, and understanding this is the key to reducing conflict and protecting both them and humans.

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Remnants of Extinct Hominin Species Found in West African Genomes

A study points to the existence of an ancient human relative that interbred with Homo sapiens.

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Alok Sharma to be president of UN climate conference

The UK government's new business secretary will also lead this year's big UN climate meeting.

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Jordbrukspolitik ger övergödning av Östersjön

De nuvarande jordbrukspolitiska direktstöden gör så att övergödningen är större än den hade varit utan stöd. Enkla tekniska åtgärder i hanteringen av stallgödsel kan minska övergödningen, visar forskare vid SLU tillsammans med forskare från universiteten i Stockholm och Aarhus. Studierna använde en kedja av beräkningsmodeller för att undersöka hur jordbruket i länderna kring Östersjön påverkas av

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Debat: Minedrift er nødvendig – men der er brug for ændringer

PLUS. Tanker om at udvinde eftertragtede mineraler i dybhavet af miljømæssige og etiske grunde er helt forkerte, mener to danske geologer.

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Scientists discover how to use time crystals to power superconductors

A team of scientists proposes using time crystals to power topological superconductors. The approach could lead to error-free quantum computers. Time crystals appear to break laws of physics. The concept of time crystals comes from the realm of counterintuitive mind-melding physics ideas that may actually turn out to have real-world applications. Now comes news that a paper proposes merging time

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Meet the Azawakh, the latest breed to enter the Westminster Dog Show

These beauties have been traveling with nomadic groups in West Africa for over a thousand years. (Alona Rjabceva/) As the Westminster Dog Show came to a close this week, New York City became just a bit less fluffy. It can be hard to say goodbye to the gorgeous pooches ranging from wee Pomeranians to giant Bernese Mountain Dogs that have been trotting their hearts out around the rings in Madison S

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Coronavirus: medical chief says UK hopes to delay any outbreak until summer

Prof Chris Whitty says a four-point tactical plan is in place to help country cope with virus Coronavirus – live updates Britain is hoping to delay any possible outbreak of coronavirus in order to prepare the NHS if it cannot be contained, the chief medical officer, Prof Chris Whitty , has said. "If we are going to get an outbreak here in the UK, and it is an if, not a when, putting it back in ti

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If the UK cares about justice, it must fund forensic services properly | Angela Gallop

Budget cuts in England and Wales have reduced independent oversight – and could lead to serious miscarriages of justice In a case involving a knife attack in 2015 by a group of young people, one of the three victims who were stabbed was carrying a bag containing some of his clothes, which was discovered at the scene. When examined, the bag was found to have some blood on it that contained DNA matc

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Babies mimic songs, study finds

Researchers — and parents — have long known that babies learn to speak by mimicking the words they hear. But a new study shows that babies also might try to imitate the singing they hear in songs.

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Nasa 're-masters' classic 'Pale Blue Dot' image of Earth

The US space agency reprocesses the Voyager probe's iconic "Pale Blue Dot" picture of Planet Earth.

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Panamanian field expeditions examine how species persevere in face of climate change

Last month, two graduate students from the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University traveled to one of the most species-rich landscapes in the world: a remote strip of tropical rainforest at the narrowest point in the Central American country of Panama.

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Hidden away: An enigmatic mammalian brain area revealed in reptiles

Reptiles have a brain area previously suspected to play a role in mammalian higher cognitive processes, and establish its role in controlling brain dynamics in sleep.

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How cellular machinery labels proteins for degradation

Proteins are molecular work horses in the cell that perform specific tasks, but it is essential that the timing of protein activities is exquisitely controlled. When proteins have fulfilled their tasks, their degradation ends processes that are unneeded or detrimental. To control timing, a label called ubiquitin is attached to unwanted proteins, marking them for degradation. Although complex molec

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The bigger lessons of the coronavirus shock

What a sudden epidemic tells us about how the economy works

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Image of the Day: Stomach Stem Cells

A mouse model demonstrates that mutations in stomach stem cells can drive gastric cancer growth.

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Coronavirus: How maths is helping to answer crucial covid-19 questions

Getting a full picture of the coronavirus outbreak is extremely difficult. Maths can help fill in some of the gaps, says Adam Kucharski

10h

Tesla-biler jailbreakes for »retmæssigt« at beholde software

Tesla fjerner den software, der er installeret på brugte biler, og forlanger betaling, men ligesom man kender det fra smartphones, er der også folk der 'jailbreaker' Teslas elbiler.

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Never Say Wolf – Issue 81: Maps

Listen to them, the children of the night. What music they make!" So says Count Dracula to the hapless Jonathan Harker in Bram Stoker's novel. Dracula is talking about the wolves howling in the valley below his castle in the Carpathian mountains. This is the moment in the novel when Harker begins to feel the first twinges of fear. The howl of the wolf, and the fear that accompanies it, sounds acr

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Mapping Gay-Friendly Cities Through History – Issue 81: Maps

Claudius Ptolemy's monumental astronomy book, the Almagest , established a unified mathematical framework for computing the positions of the sun, moon, stars, and planets at any time in the past, present, or future. So comprehensive and so compelling was the Earth-centered cosmos it described that the Almagest would remain the final word in astronomy for nearly 1,500 years, until it was finally s

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How Geology Can Ease Your Mind – Issue 81: Maps

As a geologist and professor I speak and write rather cavalierly about eras and eons. One of the courses I routinely teach is "History of Earth and Life," a survey of the 4.5-billion-year saga of the entire planet—in a 10-week trimester. But as a human, and more specifically as a daughter, mother, and widow, I struggle like everyone else to look Time honestly in the face. That is, I admit to some

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Identifying the source of water pollution using synthetic DNA sand

Sometimes it's helpful to follow a stream of water to find out where the water is coming from and where it's likely to go.

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Panamanian field expeditions examine how species persevere in face of climate change

Last month, two graduate students from the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University traveled to one of the most species-rich landscapes in the world: a remote strip of tropical rainforest at the narrowest point in the Central American country of Panama.

10h

Hidden away: An enigmatic mammalian brain area revealed in reptiles

Reptiles have a brain area previously suspected to play a role in mammalian higher cognitive processes, and establish its role in controlling brain dynamics in sleep.

10h

How cellular machinery labels proteins for degradation

Proteins are molecular work horses in the cell that perform specific tasks, but it is essential that the timing of protein activities is exquisitely controlled. When proteins have fulfilled their tasks, their degradation ends processes that are unneeded or detrimental. To control timing, a label called ubiquitin is attached to unwanted proteins, marking them for degradation. Although complex molec

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Variations in precipitation at the North Pole set to increase sharply

The climate is warming, especially in the Arctic, which will bring increased precipitation. However, the year-to-year variations in precipitation will also increase sharply, it has been found, and for a totally different reason than the average increase in Arctic precipitation. This is the conclusion of TU Delft researcher Jesse Reusen and colleagues from the KNMI and the universities of Wageninge

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NASA's Mars 2020 rover goes coast-to-coast to prep for launch

NASA's next Mars rover has arrived in Florida to begin final preparations for its launch to the Red Planet this July. Two Air Force C-17 Globemaster cargo planes carrying the Mars 2020 rover as well as the cruise stage, descent stage and Mars Helicopter touched down at NASA's Kennedy Space Center at about 3 p.m. EST (12 p.m. PST) today, completing a 2,300-mile (3,700-kilometer) trip that began yes

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Image: 'Pale Blue Dot' revisited

For the 30th anniversary of one of the most iconic views from the Voyager mission, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, is publishing a new version of the image known as the "Pale Blue Dot."

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Machine learning implemented for quantum optics

As machine learning continues to surpass human performance in a growing number of tasks, scientists at Skoltech have applied deep learning to reconstruct quantum properties of optical systems.

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Scientists develop first electrically-driven 'topological' laser

Scientists and engineers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and the University of Leeds in the U.K. have created the first electrically driven topological laser, which has the ability to route light particles around corners and to cope with defects in the manufacture of the device.

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The Miracle of Capillary Action

Science can explain the phenomenon—but that doesn't keep it from creating a sense of reverence and awe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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H. G. Wells Envisions Atomic Bomb 30 Years ahead of Time

Originally published in May 1914 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why Are We Polarized? Don't Blame Social Media, Says Ezra Klein

The Vox editor explains why there's no chapter devoted to Facebook or Twitter in his new book about how the US is more divided than ever.

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Motorola Razr Review: A Cheap Phone in an Expensive Body

Motorola's first foldable smartphone makes a good case for the return of the clamshell design, but the Razr is still stuck in the past.

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Millions of hairy tarantula skins could be used to mop up oil spills

The dense, bristly hairs on the skins shed by tarantulas when they moult are naturally efficient sponges and could be used to soak up ocean oil spills

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Coronavirus infections spike to 15,000 new Chinese cases in a day

China has reported a massive increase in the number of its citizens infected by the new coronavirus, after Chinese officials changed how cases were defined to include people who are less seriously ill

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The #MeToo Case That Divided the Abortion-Rights Movement

On a 92-degree morning in September, three clinic escorts gathered in the meager shade of a tree outside the Alabama Women's Center for Reproductive Alternatives. They arrive here at 8:30 a.m. on the dot, regular as clock-punchers, on the three days a week the Huntsville clinic is open to perform abortions. The women and girls arrive dressed for comfort in sweatpants and shower slides, carrying p

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Here's How Computer Models Simulate the Future Spread of New Coronavirus

They aim for clarity amid confusion surrounding the outbreak — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Miracle of Capillary Action

Science can explain the phenomenon—but that doesn't keep it from creating a sense of reverence and awe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fourth retraction for Haruko Obokata, focus of STAP cell scandal, after Harvard investigation

More than five years after Nature retracted two highly suspect papers about what had been described as a major breakthrough in stem cell research, another journal has pulled a paper about the work. The scandal over so-called STAP stem cells took down more than just a few articles. The case centered on Haruko Obokata, a … Continue reading

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Here's How Computer Models Simulate the Future Spread of New Coronavirus

They aim for clarity amid confusion surrounding the outbreak — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Did Trump Lose His Big Gamble on Biden?

Joe Biden might not be out, but he's way, way down. After consecutive poor showings in Iowa and New Hampshire, the onetime prohibitive front-runner is in deep trouble. It's impossible to talk about this turn of events without talking about Donald Trump, and not only because he's the man Biden hopes to succeed as president. Biden's peak in the RealClearPolitics polling average came in early May 20

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Hovedløs praksis: Forbrugere skal stadig aflæse vandmålere to gange

PLUS. Der er fortsat ingen udsigt til fælles løsninger på lokale stridigheder om prisen på udveksling af målerdata. Borgerne i Roskilde, Holbæk og Lejre er blandt de uheldige, der må lave unødvendig dobbeltaflæsning.

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How maths is revealing undetected cases of the new coronavirus

Getting a full picture of the coronavirus outbreak is extremely difficult. Maths can help fill in some of the gaps, says Adam Kucharski

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SSI delte 2.000 kvinders sundhedsdata med USA uden juridisk grundlag

I en periode på næsten to og et halvt år sendte SSI data over Atlanterhavet uden at have retsgrundlag på plads. Professor: »Det er en ren tilståelsessag.«

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Hoftealloplastik: Komplethedsgraden tager et »utilfredsstillende« dyk

Efter et par år med stor indberetningslyst til Dansk Hoftealloplastik Register, viser årsrapporten for 2019 et mere mangelfuldt datasæt. Det er ikke tilfredsstillende, lyder dommen fra styregruppens formand, der håber at vende udviklingen i år.

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U.S. Response To China's Talent Plan Is Described As Heavy-Handed

The arrest of a Harvard researcher late last month has led to questions about a Chinese program to recruit American talent. Prosecutors say it's a form of economic espionage. Scientists disagree.

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Stop making graduate students pay up front for conferences

Nature, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00421-w John Malloy shares his experiences of risking debt to travel — and discusses what to do about it.

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Popular preprint servers face closure because of money troubles

Nature, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00363-3 Repositories like INA-Rxiv and IndiaRxiv boost regional science, but finding cash to run them is proving difficult.

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Time is Still a Mystery to 'Einstein's Dreams' Author

Why Alan Lightman, astrophysicist turned writer, traded black holes for black ink.

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A Growing Presence on the Farm: Robots

A new generation of autonomous robots is helping plant breeders shape the crops of tomorrow.

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Could genomics solve the climate change crisis?

Genomics is the study of genes and their functions. The branch of molecular biology presents the idea that the genome can be manipulated for added resilience against harm. Yale professor and editor Daniel C. Esty argues that genetic modification in nature as a way to improve sustainability should be seriously considered. In the book A Better Planet: Forty Big Ideas for a Sustainable Future , Esty

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Electrode brain implant could potentially zap people out of comas

submitted by /u/Tafistice [link] [comments]

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Sonic the Hedgehog Is No Longer Terrifying

Sonic the Hedgehog, the electric-blue anthropomorphized mammal who has starred in a slew of Sega video games over the decades, is a perfect emblem of 1990s branding. He's cute and cartoony, blessed with speedy superpowers, and possesses a seriously rude 'tude. According to the character's developers , his personality was inspired by Bill Clinton's "get it done" mind-set, the kind of vague compari

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Hard Drugs & Hard Facts

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes and is not intended to condone the use of drugs illicit or otherwise. Marijuana is being legalized and hitting pop culture with a force. With most focus being directed at this seemingly harmless drug it may be easy to forget about the more taboo drugs people are using. […]

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Elsevier's research integrity

A Chinese paper gets rejected at Elsevier after reviewer spotted fraud. Same paper re-appears unchanged in another Elsevier journal, the editors refuse any action.

12h

Immune cells consult with neighbors to make decisions

Researchers have uncovered new evidence that immune cells count their neighbors before deciding whether or not the immune system should kick into high gear.

12h

Fewer veterans dying or requiring amputations for critically blocked leg arteries

Between 2005 and 2014, there was a significant decline in the number of veterans hospitalized for critically blocked leg arteries.During the same period, more veterans underwent procedures to have critically blocked leg arteries opened, and fewer died or required amputation.

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Corona-frygt aflyser kæmpe mobilmesse: Elektronikindustrien holder vejret

Verdens største messe for mobilteknologi er aflyst i sidste øjeblik af frygt for corona-virus. Aflysningen viser, hvor afhængig den globale elektronikindustri er blevet af Kina, som oplever massive produktionsstop på grund af virusudbruddet.

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Enhanced homologous recombination by the modulation of targeting vector ends

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58893-9

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Label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of M. longissimus dorsi from cattle during dietary restriction and subsequent compensatory growth

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59412-6 Label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of M . longissimus dorsi from cattle during dietary restriction and subsequent compensatory growth

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The anti-tumoral potential of the saporin-based uPAR-targeting chimera ATF-SAP

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59313-8

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SLAM family member 8 is expressed in and enhances the growth of anaplastic large cell lymphoma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59530-1

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A record of seafloor methane seepage across the last 150 million years

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59431-3

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Risk factors and clinical correlates of neoplastic transformation in gastric hyperplastic polyps in Chinese patients

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58900-z

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Internet slukar mindre energi med enkla optimeringar

Vår digitala livstil på internet kräver en enorm förbrukning av elektricitet. Smarta, felrättande datachips som konstruerats så att de förbrukar tio gånger mindre energi, kan göra fiberoptiska kommunikationssystem mer energieffektiva. Vi strömmar film och musik, använder molnbaserade lagringstjänster, kollar sociala medier och är ständigt uppkopplade mot alla möjligheter som internet erbjuder. Me

12h

It's Time to Bring Wildlife Policy Into the 21st Century

Due to their status as the primary source of funding for state wildlife agencies, hunters exert disproportionate influence over wildlife management policy. On issues like deer population control, the result has been policies that prioritize hunting over public health concerns and the environment.

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Cross-talks of glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis with glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and ER-associated degradation

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14678-2 Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors are found on many cell surface proteins but their biosynthesis is not fully understood. Here, the authors identify genes involved in GPI galactosylation and reveal functional connections between GPI processing, glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and ER-associated degrad

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Epigenetic specifications of host chromosome docking sites for latent Epstein-Barr virus

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14152-8 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) episomes tether to the host chromosome via EBNA1. Here, using circular chromosome conformation capture (4C), Kim et al. identify attachment sites and show that EBV episomes preferentially associate with transcriptionally silenced genes in Burkitt lymphoma cells.

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Natural images are reliably represented by sparse and variable populations of neurons in visual cortex

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14645-x Natural scenes sparsely activate V1 neurons. Here, the authors show that a small number of active cells reliably represent visual contents of a natural image across trials regardless of response variability, due to the diverse and partially overlapping representations of individual cells.

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Benchmark performance of low-cost Sb2Se3 photocathodes for unassisted solar overall water splitting

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14704-3 While photoelectrochemical water splitting offers an integrated means to convert sunlight to a renewable fuel, cost-effective light-absorbers are rare. Here, authors report Sb2Se3 photocathodes for high-performance photoelectrochemical water splitting devices.

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Evapotranspiration depletes groundwater under warming over the contiguous United States

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14688-0 New hydrological simulations show for the first time how sensitive groundwater and surface water connections are to systematic warming across the continental United States. The authors here show a clear reduction in subsurface water storage under a warming climate and intensified aridification of north Ameri

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FMN reduces Amyloid-β toxicity in yeast by regulating redox status and cellular metabolism

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14525-4 Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model organism to study proteins involved in neurodegeneration. Here, the authors performed a yeast genome-wide synthetic genetic interaction array (SGA) to screen for toxicity modifiers of Aβ42 and identify riboflavin kinase and its metabolic product flavin mononucleotide as mo

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A conserved strategy of chalcone isomerase-like protein to rectify promiscuous chalcone synthase specificity

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14558-9 Chalcone synthase is the first committed enzyme in the plant flavonoid biosynthesis pathway, yet shows low product specificity in vitro. Here Waki et al. show that chalcone isomerase-like proteins bind to and reduce the catalytic promiscuity of chalcone synthase, ensuring efficient flavonoid production in pl

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Hierarchically-structured metalloprotein composite coatings biofabricated from co-existing condensed liquid phases

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14709-y The mussel byssus cuticle is a wear-resistant and extensible metalloprotein composite. Here, the authors probed the cuticle nanostructure and composition before, during and after fabrication revealing a crucial role of metal-binding proteins that self-organize via liquid-liquid phase separation.

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