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nyheder2020februar26

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Babies from bilingual homes switch attention faster

Babies born into bilingual homes change the focus of their attention more quickly and more frequently than babies in homes where only one language is spoken, according to new research published in the journal Royal Society Open Science.

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Attention training may ease teen anxiety disorders

A simple computer-based program known as attention training may offer relief to teens with an anxiety disorder, according to a new study. Researchers discovered major reductions in anxiety among 64 youths after just four twice-weekly sessions of the attention training program. All the youths had diagnosed anxiety disorders and had completed cognitive behavior therapy (CBT)—the standard treatment

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Diabetic Mice "Cured Rapidly" Using Human Stem Cells

A team of researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis successfully converted human stem cells into cells capable of producing insulin. These insulin-producing cells were then able to control blood sugar levels in a demonstration involving diabetic mice. "These mice had very severe diabetes with blood sugar readings of more than 500 milligrams per deciliter of blood —

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Picking up a pingpong paddle may benefit people with Parkinson's

Pingpong may hold promise as a possible form of physical therapy for Parkinson's disease. People with Parkinson's who participated in a pingpong exercise program once a week for six months showed improvement in their Parkinson's symptoms, according to a preliminary study.

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Quitting smoking during the first trimester of pregnancy still puts the baby at risk

Although quitting smoking during the first trimester of pregnancy reduces the risk of low birth weight, it isn't enough to protect the unborn child from being born shorter and with smaller brain size, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The study looked at 1.4 million mother-child pairs in Finland.

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Vaping changes oral microbiome, increasing risk for infection

Using e-cigarettes alters the mouth's microbiome — the community of bacteria and other microorganisms — and makes users more prone to inflammation and infection, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry.

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How sleep helps teens deal with social stress

Study found that adequate sleep allowed students to cope with discrimination and challenges associated with ethnic or racial bias. It also helps them problem-solve more effectively and seek peer support when faced with hardships.

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PODD: Det händer i hjärnan när vi tränar

Hur påverkas vår hjärna av träning – och hur ser det ut med depression, demens och Parkinsons sjukdom bland dem som tränar jämfört med dem som inte är lika fysiskt aktiva? Den här gången fokuserar vi på vad som sker i hjärnan när man tränar.

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Video I made about a possible link between learning and sleep

submitted by /u/porterrossi [link] [comments]

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Chevron sends 300 UK workers home on coronavirus scare

Oil company tells staff in London to work remotely after employee reports symptoms

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China's BGI says it can sequence a genome for just $100

Super-cheap DNA sequencing could boost cancer screening, prenatal tests, and research into population genetics.

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Coronavirus and the etiquette of working from home

Millions are now trialling remote working. While the tech may be in place, the rules of engagement are not

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Coronavirus could cause 'severe disruption' in America, CDC says

Only five states can detect virus after testing kits found to be faulty – but Trump claims coronavirus 'is going to go away' WHO mission director warns world is 'simply not ready' for pandemic – follow live The US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has warned that the coronavirus outbreak could cause "severe disruption" to the lives of ordinary Americans, and urged families and commu

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Coronavirus fears grow as more cases found across Europe

Virus appeared in new cases in Italy, Spain, Austria, Switzerland and Croatia Coronavirus outbreak – live updates The spread of the coronavirus has accelerated across Europe with new cases in four countries and a rising death toll in Italy, which is desperately struggling to contain the outbreak. Concern about the proliferation of cases prompted a dozen UK schools to send home pupils and the teac

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Coronavirus in a war zone: Afghanistan braces for outbreak after first case

Lone Kabul laboratory preparing to treat patients in the midst of political turmoil and tentative peace talks, as border with Iran closed Coronavirus – latest updates Preparations for an outbreak of coronavirus were underway in Afghanistan as the country confirmed its first case in the western province of Herat, which borders Iran. Seven more suspected cases have been identified in Herat, and thr

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Coronavirus is very bad and needs to be avoided. Here are some handy hints to stick on your fridge and forget | First Dog on the Moon

At least now we know how COMPLETELY UNPREPARED THE WORLD IS Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Get all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading…

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Coronavirus latest updates: WHO mission director warns world is 'simply not ready'

Expert tells nations to access the expertise of China and prepare for a potential pandemic as the outbreak spreads across Europe Tenerife coronavirus: 1,000 guests at hotel quarantined Iran's deputy health minister: I have coronavirus Tell us: have you been affected by the coronavirus? What is coronavirus and what should I do if I have symptoms? 12.35am GMT I wanted to tell you that I got corona,

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Europe Is Threatened as Illness Spreads From Italy

Six other European countries have reported cases, and an American soldier in South Korea became the first member of the U.S. armed forces to be infected.

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Coronavirus opens new front in Hong Kong-Singapore rivalry

Outbreak pits financial hubs against each other over ability to deal with epidemics

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Coronavirus Precautions Stifle Research

Organizers have cancelled conferences, COVID-19 quarantines have prevented some scientists in China from visiting their labs, and travel restrictions have left researches stranded.

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Coronavirus spreads further as WHO expert warns world 'not ready' for pandemic

More cases in South Korea while first suspected infection is recorded in Latin America Coronavirus – latest updates Coronavirus has spread further around the world as a World Health Organisation expert warned that countries outside China are "simply not ready" for a pandemic. The virus has proliferated in parts of Asia, Europe and the Middle East in recent days, with the death toll rising in Iran

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Coronavirus threatens cancellation of Tokyo Olympics

Organisers will monitor situation with World Health Organization before making final decision

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Coronavirus/concerts: show-stopping number

With the outbreak yet to peak, live music events will continue to be cancelled

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Coronavirus's Genetics Reveal Its Global Travels

Random mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 pathogen's genome help researchers track the spread and transmission of COVID-19, the disease it causes.

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Could the US Contain a Coronavirus Outbreak?

The World Health Organization has urged other nations to learn from China's handling of the Covid-19 epidemic. But would an aggressive quarantine work here?

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Covid-19 and Surging Face Mask Prices, GIF vs. JIF, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Covid-19 Will Mark the End of Affluence Politics

The possibility of a global pandemic will reveal our inability to make and distribute the things people need—just in time for a presidential election.

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Covid-19: Why won't the WHO officially declare a coronavirus pandemic?

With outbreaks in multiple countries, the new coronavirus looks like a pandemic, but the World Health Organization won't declare one because governments may react in the wrong way

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Daily briefing: Coronavirus vaccine ready for human clinical trials, says US biotech company

Nature, Published online: 25 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00555-x Trials for one coronavirus vaccine could start by the end of April, antihydrogen offers clues to the great matter-antimatter mystery and powerful tools for synthetic biologists.

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Diageo warns of up to £200m profit hit from coronavirus outbreak

Spread of disease has sent Asia into lockdown and dealt a heavy blow to alcohol demand

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Diageo's coronavirus disclosure creates as much doubt as clarity

Drinks group and SSP put hard numbers on effect of virus in China; Unite justifies premium price

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Fed vice-chair gives no hint of rate cut despite coronavirus

Richard Clarida says the central bank is keeping close tabs on the disease's spread

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European companies face coronavirus hit to supply chains

Italian auto supplier warns car groups' production lines may be brought to a standstill

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As Covid-19 Spreads, Amazon Tries to Curb Mask Price Gouging

Sellers report receiving messages from the company that their face masks are too expensive, while users on Amazon's forum debate the ethics of raising prices during emergencies.

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Breakthrough virus simulations tackle the flu

A team of researchers from the University of California San Diego and the University of Pittsburgh offers a new approach for developing treatments for influenza.

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CT provides best diagnosis for COVID-19

In a study of more than 1,000 patients published in the journal Radiology, chest CT outperformed lab testing in the diagnosis of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The researchers concluded that CT should be used as the primary screening tool for COVID-19.

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Here's a Glossary for the Ongoing Coronavirus Outbreak's Vocab

As the ongoing coronavirus outbreak continues to spread, sickening and claiming the lives of patients around the world, a plethora of confusing and occasionally-conflicting information is spreading along with it. It doesn't help that it took so long for the World Health Organization (WHO) to nail down an official name for the disease. Nor is it ideal that the name we know it by, the name of the a

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Hermès seeks to soothe worries about coronavirus impact

Luxury group has reopened some China stores as business shows 'potential normalisation'

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Hong Kong offers cash handouts to ease coronavirus impact

Territory's finance minister predicts largest deficit on record for 2020-2021

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How to Prepare for Coronavirus

Wash your hands. Keep a supply of medicines. Get a flu shot. Experts offer practical tips on how to get ready for an outbreak.

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In Open Letter, Wuhan Nurses Cry for Global Help

As they try to fight the COVID-19 outbreak , medical staff in China are suffering from the seemingly endless slog of work, new cases, and the coronavirus itself. Nurses in Wuhan, the city where the outbreak began, are fainting on the job, developing painful rashes, sores, hypoglycemia, and psychological exhaustion — and that's why two of them published an impassioned plea for help from the rest o

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Italy needs support to cope with coronavirus

Brussels should relax fiscal rules to help Rome deal with the outbreak

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Kinesisk hospital bruger AI til at diagnosticere Corona-virus

I Wuhan har man taget et nyt middel i brug i kampen mod Corona-virusset. En AI-software skal aflaste personalet med diagnosticeringen af Covid-19.

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Lægeformand om coronavirus: Vi får travlt i almen praksis

Selvom praktiserende læger skal forsøge at holde patienter med mulig COVID-19 væk, vil udbruddet stadig skabe en masse travlhed i almen praksis, vurderer Anders Beich. Tropper patienterne alligevel fysisk op, mangler der beskyttelsesudstyr og lokaler flere steder.

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Ministers preparing for potential increase of Coronavirus cases

Amid concerns of an Italy-style breakout the government plan public information campaign Coronavirus latest – live updates Ministers are racing to prepare the UK for a potential sudden increase in the spread of the Coronavirus, with officials fearing it could take just 72 hours for an outbreak the size of Italy's to take hold. Amid growing concerns around the world about the pace of the spreading

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More new coronavirus cases outside China than inside, says WHO

Latest figures on new infections suggest Beijing's strict response to the crisis is paying off Coronavirus crisis – live updates The number of new coronavirus cases being officially reported outside China has overtaken those reported by Beijing for the first time since the outbreak began, the World Health Organization (WHO) has said. According to WHO, 427 cases were reported by 37 countries on Tu

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Mount Sinai physicians first in US analyzing lung disease in coronavirus patients

Findings from CT scans of COVID-19 cases from China provide new insight that could lead to quicker diagnosis.

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Mystery deepens over animal source of coronavirus

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00548-w Pangolins are a prime suspect, but a slew of genetic analyses has yet to find conclusive proof.

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New compounds thwart multiple viruses, including coronavirus

According to a Feb. 13 report from the World Health Organization, the Wuhan coronavirus has stricken more than 46,000 people and has caused over 1,300 deaths since the first cases in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Now, researchers have designed compounds that block the replication of similar coronaviruses, as well as other disease-causing viruses, in the lab. The compounds have not yet been teste

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Schools not being advised to shut over coronavirus, says PHE

Public health agency outlines general guidance after at least a dozen schools sent pupils home Coronavirus – latest updates Public Health England has said it is not advising that schools shut in an attempt to stem the spread of coronavirus. The organisation's medical director, Paul Cosford, said: "Schools have to take difficult decisions given the complexity of issues that they are facing. What I

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Stock sell-off pauses even as coronavirus concerns mount

Stoxx 600 index had fallen for a third day as outbreak spreads and companies warn on impact

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The coronavirus is unstoppable. Now what do we do?

A pandemic seems inevitable, but its speed and impact can be mitigated

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The coronavirus seems unstoppable. What should the world do now?

A pandemic seems inevitable, but its speed and impact can be mitigated

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The Guardian view on the new coronavirus: buying time can save lives | Editorial

Many experts believe this outbreak will soon be declared a pandemic. Even if it is not containable, it can still be slowed It now appears almost inevitable that the new coronavirus outbreak will soon be identified as a global pandemic . There has been a surge in cases in Iran, South Korea and Italy, and incidents confirmed in numerous countries, in addition to the almost 80,000 cases seen in China

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The Tokyo Olympics May Be Canceled Due to Coronavirus Outbreak

It's possible the Summer Olympics in Tokyo will be canceled due to the international coronavirus outbreak, according to a high-ranking organizer of the event. It goes without saying, but the Olympic cancellation, were it to happen, would be one of historic proportions. If the Olympic committee determines that it wouldn't be safe to hold the massive event, "you're probably looking at a cancellatio

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Time to use the p-word? Coronavirus enters dangerous new phase

Nature, Published online: 25 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00551-1 As outbreaks surge worldwide, scientists fear that COVID-19 might soon become pandemic.

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Trump Administration Pressed On Coronavirus Preparedness

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer says there is "no plan" for potential outbreaks in the U.S. The White House says it has the situation "contained" and has requested emergency funding. (Image credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images)

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Trump Appears to Confuse Coronavirus With Ebola

During an appearance in India this week, noted reality TV star and U.S. President Donald Trump appeared to confuse the COVID-19-causing coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 with Ebola, a completely separate deadly disease. The gaffe was notable, of course, because Trump is arguably the leader of the free world — but also because in years past, he was sharply critical of the previous administration's efforts to

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Trump under pressure over US coronavirus readiness

President to make statement as Democrats demand funds to deal with outbreak

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Trump White House Resists Calls To Appoint A Coronavirus Czar

Epidemic experts and Democratic politicians fault coordination of the response to the coronavirus outbreak and say what's needed is a czar. The White House disagrees. (Image credit: Susan Walsh/AP)

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Uncertainty in a Time of Coronavirus

Why communicating public health risk during an epidemic is so challenging — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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US official warns public to prepare for coronavirus outbreak

People told to brace for potentially 'severe' disruptions as Democrats question readiness

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Using social media to understand the vaccine debate in China

Vaccine acceptance is a crucial public health issue, which has been exacerbated by the use of social media to spread content expressing vaccine hesitancy. Studies have shown that social media can provide new information regarding the dynamics of vaccine communication online, potentially affecting real-world vaccine behaviors. A team of United States-based researchers observed an example of this in

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What are the best coronavirus treatments?

Here's a list of promising drugs being tried on people infected with the virus.

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What Coronavirus Emergency Measures Could U.S. Communities Take?

Health security expert Caitlin Rivers talks about what schools, businesses and individuals can do to minimize the impact — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What COVID-19's 'inevitable' spread in the United States actually means

The CDC is warning Americans to prepare for outbreaks. (DepositPhoto/) The novel coronavirus will likely spread across U.S. communities, according to a recent update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It is not a question of "if" but "when" the COVID-19 virus escalates within our borders, Nancy Messonnier, the CDC's director of the National Center for Immunization and Resp

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What is coronavirus and what should I do if I have symptoms?

What are the symptoms caused by the Covid-19 virus from Wuhan in China, how does it spread from person to person, and when should you call a doctor? Find all our coronavirus coverage here Coronavirus: WHO expert warns world 'not ready' for pandemic Plans to shut schools and curb travel in UK if coronavirus spreads It is caused by a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered

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When it comes to coronavirus, we shouldn't let our feelings trump the facts | Ann Bostrom and Nicole Errett

Before you start stockpiling face masks, be aware that perverse perceptions of risk may help Covid-19 to spread Our friend and fellow disaster researcher was recently asked to self-quarantine for two weeks after returning from south-east Asia. Although he hadn't travelled to China, he had taken a plane home with others who were returning from Beijing. A few days before his voluntary quarantine was

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Why coronavirus could help save China's endangered species

The novel coronavirus outbreak in China may end up saving one of the world's most trafficked animals after Beijing announced a total ban on the sale and consumption of the pangolin.

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Why coronavirus could help save China's endangered species

The novel coronavirus outbreak in China may end up saving one of the world's most trafficked animals after Beijing announced a total ban on the sale and consumption of the pangolin.

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Why coronavirus is pushing up ginger and garlic prices

Acute labour shortages and transport bottlenecks force up costs of produce from China

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Why Iran's coronavirus outbreak is dangerous for the Middle East

Disease starts to spread to neighbouring states that are not equipped to cope with crisis

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Xi Jinping has buried the truth about coronavirus | Ma Jian

The reaction to the outbreak has revealed the unreconstructed despotism of the Chinese state Over the past 70 years, the Chinese Communist party has subjected its country to a succession of manmade catastrophes, from the Great Famine , the Cultural Revolution and the Tiananmen Square massacre , to the forceful suppression of rights in Hong Kong and Tibet, and the mass internment of Uighurs in Xinj

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Chinese Hospitals Deploy AI to Help Diagnose Covid-19

Software that reads CT lung scans had been used primarily to detect cancer. Now it's retooled to look for signs of pneumonia caused by coronavirus.

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'A completely new culture of doing research.' Coronavirus outbreak changes how scientists communicate

Preprint servers and journals are working overtime to keep up with a "firehose" of data

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At Spanish Hotel Under Coronavirus Lockdown, Meals With Masks

The authorities announced on Wednesday that three more people had tested positive in the country.

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Bali doctor: 'If there's a patient I'll be infected'

Warning that Indonesian island that has yet to report a case is hugely underprepared

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Brace for more virus cases, warns UK health secretary

Hancock says government 'taking necessary measures to minimise risk to public'

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C.D.C. Officials Warn of Coronavirus Outbreaks in the U.S.

Clusters of infection are likely in American communities, health officials said. Some lawmakers questioned whether the nation is prepared.

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HKUST scientists shed light on COVID-19 vaccine development

A team HKUST scientists has recently identified a set of potential vaccine targets for SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, to guide experimental efforts towards vaccine development against novel pneumonia (COVID-19).

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How Museums Can Help the Public Make Sense of Pandemics

We can't let fear overrun science, says Sabrina Sholts, the Smithsonian's curator of biological anthropology

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Investors dump bank stocks as profit squeeze worsens

Tumbling bond yields threaten to further crimp net interest margins

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Junk bond spreads surge as investors consider virus risks

Risk premium on high-yield debt has increased by more than at any time since the Brexit vote

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No benefit found in using broad-spectrum antibiotics as initial pneumonia treatment

Doctors who use drugs that target antibiotic-resistant bacteria as a first-line defense against pneumonia should probably reconsider this approach, according to a new study of more than 88,000 veterans hospitalized with the disease. The study, conducted by University of Utah Health and VA Salt Lake City Health Care System researchers, found that pneumonia patients given these medications in the fi

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Nouriel Roubini: Markets are too complacent about virus

Assumption after assumption about the impact of the outbreak has been proven wrong

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Podcast Extra: 'There is lots of anxiety': a scientist's view from South Korea

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00565-9 Nick Howe speaks to chemist Bartosz Grzybowski about his experience with the coronavirus outbreak in South Korea.

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The Perma-Viral World of the At-Home Nose Job

Nonsurgical cosmetic methods, like nose and face shapers, are all over social media as users chase the perfect selfie—but these rituals are nothing new.

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Wall Street banks plan to separate Tokyo teams on virus fears

Staff to be split into groups to prevent physical contact as anxiety mounts over outbreak

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WHO must learn from the IMF to stop pandemics

A global group is needed to gather outbreak data and stress test public health authorities

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Climate Change May Make The Snapping Shrimp Snap Louder

Tiny snapping shrimp are among of the loudest animals in the ocean. And climate change could be making them louder, which affects a lot of other sea life.

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Climate change: Why are tomato prices in Africa increasing?

The price of tomatoes have skyrocketed in East Africa in recent weeks after floods ruined crops.

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Freshwater flowing into the North Pacific plays key role in North America's climate

Massive freshwater river flows stemming from glacier-fed flooding at the end of the last ice age surged across eastern Washington to the Columbia River and out to the North Pacific Ocean, where they triggered climate changes throughout the northern hemisphere, new research published today in Science Advances shows.

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Sea level fingerprinting of the Bering Strait flooding history detects the source of the Younger Dryas climate event

During the Last Glacial Maximum, expansive continental ice sheets lowered globally averaged sea level ~130 m, exposing a land bridge at the Bering Strait. During the subsequent deglaciation, sea level rose rapidly and ultimately flooded the Bering Strait, linking the Arctic and Pacific Oceans. Observational records of the Bering Strait flooding have suggested two apparently contradictory scenario

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Tropical nations worst hit by climate-related fish shifts

Policymakers will need to step up to the challenges caused by significant shifts in fish species distributions caused by climate change.

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Asian inland wildfires driven by glacial-interglacial climate change [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Wildfire can influence climate directly and indirectly, but little is known about the relationships between wildfire and climate during the Quaternary, especially how wildfire patterns varied over glacial–interglacial cycles. Here, we present a high-resolution soot record from the Chinese Loess Plateau; this is a record of large-scale, high-intensity fires over…

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Cannibalism on rise among polar bears, say Russian scientists

Cases of polar bears killing and eating each other are on the rise in the Arctic as melting ice and human activity erode their habitat, a Russian scientist said Wednesday.

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Comparing greenhouse gas footprints of online versus traditional shopping

When consumers are trying to decide between traditional and online shopping, many factors come into play, such as price, quality, convenience and timeframe. Now, thanks to new research reported in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology, eco-conscious consumers could have another consideration: greenhouse gas emissions. In the study, researchers estimated that shopping at brick-and-mortar stores f

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Jet Altitude Changes Cut Climate-Changing Contrails

Increasing or decreasing the altitude of aircraft by a few thousand feet to avoid thin layers of humidity could make a major reduction to contrails' contribution to climate change.

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Seeds in Tibet face impacts from climate change

Seeds offer a level of resilience to the harmful effects of climate change in ecosystems across the globe. When seeds are dropped into the soil, often becoming dormant for many years until they are ready to grow into plants, they become part of the natural storage of seeds in "soil seed banks." These banks have been thought to better withstand extreme conditions than can the sprouted vegetation th

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Tax rule for industry rewards carbon capture

When it comes to encouraging manufacturers to reduce their carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, a carrot might be more effective than a stick. That's the approach taken by a recent U.S. tax code rule that offers credits to companies that capture and then store or use CO2. The rule will likely spur innovations in carbon capture technology, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), t

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The climate crisis: towards zero carbon

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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The role of Northeast Pacific meltwater events in deglacial climate change

Columbia River megafloods occurred repeatedly during the last deglaciation, but the impacts of this fresh water on Pacific hydrography are largely unknown. To reconstruct changes in ocean circulation during this period, we used a numerical model to simulate the flow trajectory of Columbia River megafloods and compiled records of sea surface temperature, paleo-salinity, and deep-water radiocarbon

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Tropical nations worst hit by climate-related fish shifts

Policymakers will need to step up to the challenges caused by significant shifts in fish species distributions caused by climate change.

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Abnormally Warm Years Caused a Sea Change in Coastal Alaska Ecosystems

While the changes are not yet permanent, they provide a glimpse into a possible future — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Algal photophysiology drives darkening and melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet [Ecology]

Blooms of Zygnematophycean "glacier algae" lower the bare ice albedo of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), amplifying summer energy absorption at the ice surface and enhancing meltwater runoff from the largest cryospheric contributor to contemporary sea-level rise. Here, we provide a step change in current understanding of algal-driven ice sheet…

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Carbon pricing proven to reduce emissions, so why are we avoiding it?

Opposition leader Anthony Albanese sought to claim the climate policy high ground last week with his commitment to a net-zero emissions target by 2050.

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Caves face new unknown after unprecedented bushfires

Caves are easily forgotten when fire rips through the bush, but despite their robustness the long-term impact of frequent, unprecedented fire seasons presents a new challenge for subsurface geology.

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How everyone decided trees will save the planet – and why they won't

Everyone seems to agree trees are a major solution to climate change, but there is a danger that mass reforestation could see us to continue pumping carbon into the atmosphere

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Ice front blocking of ocean heat transport to an Antarctic ice shelf

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2014-5 The front of the Getz Ice Shelf in West Antarctica creates an abrupt topographic step that deflects ocean currents, suppressing 70% of the heat delivery to the ice sheet.

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Input of terrestrial organic matter linked to deglaciation increased mercury transport to the Svalbard fjords

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60261-6

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Nitrogen pollution interacts with heat stress to increase coral bleaching across the seascape [Ecology]

Climate change is increasing the frequency and magnitude of temperature anomalies that cause coral bleaching, leading to widespread mortality of stony corals that can fundamentally alter reef structure and function. However, bleaching often is spatially variable for a given heat stress event, and drivers of this heterogeneity are not well…

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Outdoor heaters: Paris campaigners want them banned

A campaign is underway in Paris to ban heaters due to concerns about their electricity use.

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Shrinking sea ice is creating an ecological trap for polar bears

The decision of each individual bear to stay on the ice or to move to land appears to be linked to the energetic cost or benefit of either option, and the potential of having to swim to reach land.

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Study analyzes impact of switch from nuclear power to coal, suggests directions for policy

A new study used data from the United States to analyze the costs and benefits of electricity production from coal-fired versus nuclear sources. The study's authors conclude that policymakers should look at nuclear power as a low-carbon electricity source, but that utilities will need to have incentives to do so.

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Video: Toward zero carbon with David Attenborough and Jane Goodall

Sir David Attenborough, Dr. Jane Goodall DBE and leading Cambridge University researchers talk about the urgency of climate crisis—and some of the solutions that will take us towards zero carbon.

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Nye beviser afslører: Mennesker overlevede et af historiens største vulkanudbrud

Tidligere troede forskere, at mennesker uden for Afrika nærmest blev udryddet af udbruddet.

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Sjældent syndrom: Kvinde bryggede alkohol i sin blære

En kombination af diabetes og en gærsvamp fik kvinde til at tisse alkohol.

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'Hidden Brain': How 'Egocentric Bias' Can Lead Us Astray

Asking a stranger for help can be stressful. But research shows that people are more likely to say yes than you may think. Researchers are studying our understated ability to influence others.

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If You Want a Hangover Cure, Trust Science, Not Superstition

Futurism fans: To create this content, a non-editorial team worked with an affiliate partner. We may collect a small commission on items purchased through this page. This post does not necessarily reflect the views or the endorsement of the Futurism.com editorial staff. Hangovers suck. This is not a controversial statement. You're probably well aware of this fact, as well as the corollary that ha

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Gmail Is Catching More Malicious Attachments With Deep Learning

Users of Gmail get 300 billion attachments each week. To separate legitimate documents from harmful ones, Google turned to AI—and it's working.

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A faster, easier way to build diamond

With the right amount of pressure and surprisingly little heat, a substance found in fossil fuels can transform into pure diamond.

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Abandoned cropland helps make Europe cooler

As nations prepare to mitigate climate change, decision makers need to understand how land use fits into the climate equation. A new study looked at land use changes over two decades and found a major shift from cropland to forests. That change made western Europe cooler.

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Amazon opens its first cashierless grocery store

submitted by /u/tacologic [link] [comments]

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Ancient meteorite site on Earth could reveal new clues about Mars' past

Scientists have devised new analytical tools to break down the enigmatic history of Mars' atmosphere—and whether life was once possible there.

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Are cats the 'canary in the coal mine' for wildfire effects on human health?

Cats who suffered burns and smoke inhalation in recent California wildfires also had a high incidence of heart problems, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.

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Big data could yield big discoveries in archaeology, scholar says

Centuries of archaeological research on the Inca Empire has netted a veritable library of knowledge. But new digital and data-driven projects led by Brown University scholars are proving that there is much more to discover about pre-colonial life in the Andes.

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Bilingual mash ups: Counterintuitive findings from sociolinguistics

A new study exposes the fallacy of relying on pronunciation as a measure of linguistic proficiency. The study, 'Revisiting phonetic integration in bilingual borrowing', by Shana Poplack, Suzanne Robillard, Nathalie Dion (all from the University of Ottawa), and John. C. Paolillo (University of Indiana Bloomington) will be published in March 2020 issue of the scholarly journal Language.

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Billions lost as illicit fisheries trade hurting nations who can afford it least

More than eight million to 14 million tonnes of unreported fish catches are traded illicitly every year, costing the legitimate market between $9 billion and $17 billion in trade each year, according to new UBC research.

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Biodiversity increases the efficiency of energy use in grasslands

Plants obtain their energy from the sun. Other beings rely on eating to survive. Yet how does the energy flow inside ecosystems function and are there differences between ecosystems with many species in comparison to those with few species? Researchers have now examined these questions using a holistic approach by evaluating data gathered through a large-scale biodiversity experiment.

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Bone or cartilage? Presence of fatty acids determines skeletal stem cell development

In the event of a bone fracture, fatty acids in our blood signal to stem cells that they have to develop into bone-forming cells. If there are no blood vessels nearby, the stem cells end up forming cartilage. The finding that specific nutrients directly influence the development of stem cells opens new avenues for stem cell research. Biomedical scientists from KU Leuven and Harvard University publ

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Breaking down stubborn molecules in the ocean

Seawater is more than just saltwater. The ocean is a veritable soup of chemicals.

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Britt Glaunsinger (UCB, HHMI) 2: KSHV: Herpesviral Nucleases Impact Cellular RNA

https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/kshv Britt Glaunsinger provides an overview of virology and KSHV. She describes how the study of viruses has guided the understanding of many fundamental cellular processes, from gene expression to cancer. Dr. Britt Glaunsinger provides an overview of virology, and describes how the study of viruses has guided the understanding of many fundamental cellular pr

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Cellular metabolism regulates the fate decision between pathogenic and regulatory T cells

Preclinical research shows a pivotal role for cellular metabolism to regulate the fate decision of naïve CD4 T cells as they differentiate into either destructive Th17 cells that mediate chronic inflammation or regulatory Treg T cells, a decision that occurs very early in the activation of CD4 T cells. This opens a possibility that manipulating the cellular metabolism of T cells may provide a ther

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Chemists learn how to detect phenols in smoked food samples using vitamin B4

They propose to extract these phenols by use of choline chloride, otherwise known as vitamin B4. Environmentally safe, quick and inexpensive, this method can be used in analytical laboratories at factories, where it is necessary to determine the concentration of these alcohols in prepared foods.

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Cold sintering produces capacitor material at record low temperatures

Barium titanate is an important electroceramic material used in trillions of capacitors each year and found in most electronics. Penn State researchers have produced the material at record low temperatures, and the discovery could lead to more energy efficient manufacturing.

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Complex local conditions keep fields of dunes from going active all at once

Sand dunes, like many ecosystems, have more than one comfort zone. Variations in moisture, especially, can shift them from active, blowing waves of dry sand to rolling mounds with soils held down by grass and low shrubs.

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Crowdfunding: Entrepreneurs should resist the urge to promise to save the Earth

Entrepreneurs seeking funds on business-oriented crowdfunding platforms should avoid over-emphasising the social or environmental benefits of their start-ups or products if they are to maximise potential investment, a new study from the University of Bath and Polytechnic University of Milan shows.

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CT scanning wheat grains for stress tolerance

Scientists have developed a computed tomography (CT) scanning method for screening large samples of wheat for drought and heat tolerance.

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Deaf moths evolved noise-cancelling scales to evade predators

Some species of deaf moths can absorb as much as 85 per cent of the incoming sound energy from predatory bats—who use echolocation to detect them. The findings, published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface today, reveal the moths, who are unable to hear the ultrasonic calls of bats, have evolved this clever defensive strategy to help it survive.

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Digging into the far side of the moon: Chang'E-4 probes 40 meters into lunar surface

A little over a year after landing, China's spacecraft Chang'E-4 is continuing to unveil secrets from the far side of the Moon. The latest study, published on Feb. 26 in Science Advances, reveals what lurks below the surface.

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Discovery of entirely new class of RNA caps in bacteria

The group of Dr. Hana Cahová of the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS, in collaboration with scientists from the Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, has discovered an entirely new class of dinucleoside polyphosphate 5'RNA caps in bacteria and described the function of alarmones and their mechanism of function. The discovery was recently published in the journal Nature Co

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Do girls read better than boys? If so, gender stereotypes may be to blame

A new longitudinal study of fifth and sixth graders in Germany examined the relation between classmates' gender stereotypes and individual students' reading outcomes to shed light on how these stereotypes contribute to the gender gap in reading. The study concluded that girls experienced positive effects and boys experienced negative effects on their reading-related outcomes, specifically, their c

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Drinks with added sugars linked to lipid imbalance, which increases CVD risk

Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages daily was linked to lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), ('good' cholesterol), and higher triglyceride levels, both of which can increase cardiovascular disease risk. Drinking up to 12 ounces of 100% fruit juice per day was not associated with adverse changes in blood cholesterol or triglyceride levels.

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Electrolyte supplements don't prevent illness in athletes, study finds

Electrolyte supplements popular with endurance runners can't be relied on to keep essential sodium levels in balance, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators.

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'Electronic nose' could smell breath to warn about higher risk of oesophageal cancer

Current diagnostic method for Barrett's oesophagus relies on invasive and costly endoscopy An electronic device that "sniffs" breath may offer a new way to identify people with a condition that can lead to cancer of the oesophagus, researchers have revealed. Recent figures suggest there are about 9,000 new cases of oesophageal cancer, or cancer of the food pipe, every year in the UK. Continue rea

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Explained: Why water droplets 'bounce off the walls'

University of Warwick researchers can now explain why some water droplets bounce like a beach ball off surfaces, without ever actually touching them. Now the design and engineering of future droplet technologies can be made more precise and efficient.

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Fur-friendly 'wearable for pets' developed at Imperial

Imperial College London researchers have invented a new health tracking sensor for pets and people that monitors vital signs through fur or clothing.

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Global species loss could be halved

Extinction risk could decrease by more than 50% if at least 30% of land were to be conserved across the tropics, a new study reveals.

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Hazardous waste or edible food?

According to new research, more drive and novel and creative solutions are needed in retailing to tackle bread waste. Grocery stores could reduce bread waste by making the most of technology, marketing methods and engagement.

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Helpful interactions can keep societies stable

University of Pennsylvania biologists have challenged old notions that communities with mutualistic interactions–where the presence of one species benefits another–are unstable. Their model, instead, shows that such interactions can make communities even more stable in some scenarios.

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How big is the neutron?

The size of neutrons cannot be measured directly: it can only be determined from experiments involving other particles. While such calculations have so far been made in a very indirect way using old measurements with heavy atoms, a team at the Institute of Theoretical Physics at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has taken a different approach. By combining their very accurate calculations with recent

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How resident microbes restructure body chemistry

A comparison of normal and germ-free mice revealed that as much as 70% of a mouse's gut chemistry is determined by its gut microbiome. Even in distant organs, such as the uterus or the brain, approximately 20% of molecules were different in the mice with gut microbes.

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Instrument may enable mail-in testing to detect heavy metals in water

MIT researchers have developed an approach called SEPSTAT, for solid-phase extraction, preservation, storage, transportation, and analysis of trace contaminants. The method is based on a small, user-friendly device the team developed, which absorbs trace contaminants in water and preserves them in a dry state so the samples can be easily dropped in the mail and shipped to a laboratory for further

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Isotope movement holds key to the power of fusion reactions

Controlling the uniformity of hydrogen isotope density ratio in fusion plasma is a problem for realizing fusion energy. The researchers have reached a key understanding of the process to make the hydrogen isotope ratio uniform using the Large Helical Device at the National Institute for Fusion Science. The uniformity is determined by isotope movement under the influence of plasma turbulence. This

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Japan Inches Forward with Plans to Host Next Big Particle Collider

If built, the International Linear Collider would investigate some of the biggest mysteries in physics on the smallest of scales — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Job insecurity negatively affects your personality: Study

Drawing on Cybernetic Big Five Theory, this study proposes that chronic job insecurity is associated with an increase in neuroticism and decreases in agreeableness and conscientiousness.

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Mathematician identifies new tricks for the old arch in our foot

Walking and running subjects our feet to forces in excess of body weight. The longitudinal arch of the feet was thought to be the reason the feet do not deform under such load. However, researchers from the University of Warwick, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University in Japan and Yale University have illustrated that the transverse arch may be more important for this stif

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Melting properties determine the biological functions of the cuticular hydrocarbon layer of ants

As social insects, ants are particularly dependent on optimizing their communication in order to ward off enemies and to recognize individuals from their own colony. They must also protect themselves against desiccation. Their bodies are covered with wax-like substances known as cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) that serve both purposes—communication and protection against desiccation.

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MicroRNA regulates process vital to placenta growth in early pregnancy

A study by University of South Florida Health (USF Health) researchers discovered how a very large human non-protein coding gene regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) — a process that contributes to placental implantation during early pregnancy, as well as cancer progression and spread. EMT plays a key role in proper placenta growth, critical to the health of the mother and her gro

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MOF co-catalyst allows selectivity of branched aldehydes of up to 90%

Heterogeneous catalysts are often preferred because of their robustness and lower operating costs, but homogenous catalysts still dominate when high selectivity is needed — finding superior heterogeneous catalysts has been a challenge. Work from NCCR MARVEL shows how MOF micropores can enhance selectivity to levels that cannot be achieved with existing catalysts. The easy experimental protocol an

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Mosaic evolution painted lorikeets a rainbow of color

A new study examines how color evolved in one of the flashiest groups of parrots — Australasian lorikeets — finding that different plumage patches on the birds evolved independently. The study helps explain why it's possible for the birds' faces and front sides to display a dazzling variety of colors — from vibrant ultraviolet blue only visible to other birds to deep crimson and black — while

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Motley crew: Rust and light a possible answer to the conundrum of hydrogen fuel production

Production of hydrogen fuel is a key goal towards the development of sustainable energy practices, but this process does not have feasible techniques yet. A team of Japanese scientists from Tokyo University of Science, led by Professor Ken-ichi Katsumata, have identified a novel technique of using rust and light to speed up hydrogen production from organic waste solution, a finding that can revolu

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Nanosize device 'uncloaks' cancer cells in mice and reveals them to the immune system

Scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have designed and successfully tested an experimental, super small package able to deliver molecular signals that tag implanted human cancer cells in mice and make them visible for destruction by the animals' immune systems. The new method was developed, say the researchers, to deliver an immune system 'uncloaking' device directly to cancer cells.

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New bile discovery will rewrite textbooks

Forget what you know about bile because that's about to change, thanks to a new discovery made by Michigan State University and published in the current issue of Nature.

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New CRISPR base-editing technology slows ALS progression in mice

With a new CRISPR gene-editing methodology, scientists from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign inactivated one of the genes responsible for an inherited form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis — a debilitating and fatal neurological disease for which there is no cure. The novel treatment slowed disease progression, improved muscle function and extended lifespan in mice with an aggressiv

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New functional indicators to detect human activity impacts in temporary rivers

Functional metrics in ecology — indicators based on the biological features of the organisms, in this case, water invertebrates — could help researchers to detect the impacts of human origins in temporary rivers.

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New patented invention stabilizes, rotates satellites

Many satellites are in space to take photos. But a vibrating satellite, like a camera in shaky hands, can't get a sharp image. Pointing it at a precise location to take a photo or perform another task, is another important function requiring accuracy. Vedant, an aerospace engineering doctoral student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was developing a way to eliminate vibrations on

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New research sheds light on the unique 'call' of Ross Sea killer whales

New Curtin University-led research has found that the smallest type of killer whale has 28 different complex calls, comprising a combination of burst-pulse sounds and whistles, which they use to communicate with family members about the changing landscape and habitat.

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Overlooked arch in the foot is key to its evolution and function

long-overlooked part of the human foot is key to how the foot works, how it evolved, and how we walk and run, a Yale-led team of researchers said.

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Parasitic worms have armies, and produce more soldiers when needed

In estuaries around the world, tiny trematode worms take over the bodies of aquatic snails. These parasitic flatworms invade the snail's body and use its systems to support their colony, sometimes for over a decade, "driving them around like cars," according to senior author Ryan Hechinger, professor of marine sciences at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Dieg

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Perovskite solar cells made with peppermint oil and walnut aroma food additives, preventing lead leakage

Engineers have developed eco-friendly-solvent processable hole transport polymers by using peppermint oil and walnut aroma food additives and the polymer can prevent lead leakage.

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Poor cleaning can jeopardize sterilization of medical tools

Vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP) failed to completely sterilize surgical tools 76% of the time when the tools were soiled with salts or blood and not cleaned prior to sterilization, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

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Pregnancy Anxiety? Here's How to Keep Calm and Carry On

Pregnancy is a time of overwhelming emotions—some anxiety is normal! Use these four indispensable tips to keep calm so you can enjoy this magical time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Radio waves detect particle showers in a block of plastic

A cheap technique could detect neutrinos in polar ice, eventually allowing researchers to expand the energy reach of IceCube without breaking the bank.

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Regioselective magnetization enabled chiral semiconducting heteronanorods

Researchers demonstrated a regioselective magnetization strategy, achieving a library of semiconducting heteronanorods with chiroptical activities.

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Researchers develop technique to create nanomaterials which may help detect cancer earlier

For the first time, a team of scientists at the University of Central Florida has created functional nanomaterials with hollow interiors that can be used to create highly sensitive biosensors for early cancer detection.

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Researchers make asthma breakthrough

Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have made a breakthrough that may eventually lead to improved therapeutic options for people living with asthma. The researchers have uncovered a critical role for a protein (Caspase-11), which had previously never been implicated in the disease, and which may offer a promising target for drug designers.

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Researchers turn bacterial cell into biological computer

Researchers at the Technion have created a biological computer, constructed within a bacterial cell and capable of monitoring different substances in the environment. Currently, the computer identifies and reports on toxic and other materials. Next up: the ability to warn about hemorrhaging in the human body.

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Scientists create virus-resistant tomato plants

Researchers of Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV) and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) have used tools that regulate gene expression in order to produce tomato plants that are resistant to the spotted wilt virus (TSWV), thus proving the usefulness of this type of strategy to generate crops that are resistant to viral infections. The results of this project have been published in T

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Scientists develop algorithm for researching evolutionary history of species with whole-genome duplications

An international team of scientists from ITMO University and George Washington University (U.S.) created an algorithm for studying the evolutionary history of species with whole-genome duplications, chiefly yeast and plants.

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Scientists develop enzyme produced from agricultural waste for use as laundry detergent

An international team of researchers has developed an enzyme produced from agricultural waste that could be used as an important additive in laundry detergents.By using an enzyme produced from a by-product of mustard seeds, they hope to develop a low-cost naturally derived version of lipase, the second largest commercially produced enzyme, which is used in various industries for the production of

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Scientists discover dust from Middle East cools the Red Sea

Researchers at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) have discovered dust from the Middle East has a positive cooling effect over the land and the Red Sea.

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Scientists discover new clue behind age-related diseases and food spoilage

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have made a surprising discovery that could help explain our risk for developing chronic diseases or cancers as we get older, and how our food decomposes over time.

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Seagulls favor food humans have handled

Seagulls favour food that has been handled by humans, new research shows.

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Sex-specific traits of the immune system explain men's susceptibility to obesity

Melbourne researchers have uncovered important differences between the male and female immune system which may explain why men are more susceptible to obesity and metabolism-related associated diseases, such as heart disease, stroke and diabetes. It has long been known that men are more likely than women to develop unhealthy obesity and related metabolic diseases, while women are more prone to cer

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Simple self-charging battery offers power solutions for devices

A new type of battery combines negative capacitance and negative resistance within the same cell, allowing the cell to self-charge without losing energy, which has important implications for long-term storage and improved output power for batteries. Researchers report making their very simple battery with two different metals, as electrodes and a lithium or sodium glass electrolyte between them.

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Small farmers sink or swim in globalization's tsunami

From a synthesis of 12 cases, researchers found when smallholder farmers are connected to faraway systems, the key is to empower them to higher agency and more livelihood opportunities.

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Stabilizing freeze-dried cellular machinery unlocks cell-free biotechnology

A low-cost approach improves cell-free biotechnology's utility for bio-manufacturing and portability for field applications.

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Study reveals similarities between bee brains and human brains

In a discovery that could open new avenues for understanding of the brain, researchers have found similarities between the brain activity of honey bees and humans.

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Super-urinators among the mangroves: Excretory gifts from estuary's busiest fish promote ecosystem health

A new University of Michigan-led study of individually radio-tracked tropical fish in a Bahamian mangrove estuary highlights the importance of highly active individuals in maintaining ecosystem health.

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Surveillance data confirm multiyear predictions of rotavirus dynamics in New York City

Prediction skill is a key test of models for epidemic dynamics. However, future validation of models against out-of-sample data is rare, partly because of a lack of timely surveillance data. We address this gap by analyzing the response of rotavirus dynamics to infant vaccination. Syndromic surveillance of emergency department visits for diarrhea in New York City reveals a marked decline in diarr

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Sweat sensor detects stress levels; May find use in space exploration

A researcher has developed a sweat sensor capable of monitoring levels of cortisol in the body.

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The do's and don'ts of monitoring many wildlife species at once

A new analysis of 92 studies from 27 countries conducted by ecologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggests that many recent multi-species studies of wildlife communities often incorrectly use the analytical tools and methods available. Technology such as trail cameras and drones have 'revolutionized wildlife monitoring studies' in recent years, says organismic and evolutionary biol

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The force is strong in neutron stars

Physicists at MIT and elsewhere have for the first time characterized the strong nuclear force, and the interactions between protons and neutrons, at extremely short distances.

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Turbulent times revealed on Asteroid 4 Vesta

Planetary scientists at Curtin University have shed some light on the tumultuous early days of the largely preserved protoplanet Asteroid 4 Vesta, the second largest asteroid in our Solar System.

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Using light to put a twist on electrons

Method with polarized light can create and measure nonsymmetrical states in a layered material.

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Vertical fibers in the suckerfish's suction cup-like fin help it hitchhike

As the hitchhikers of the marine world, the remora fish is well known for getting free rides by gripping onto hosts with its suction disc, a highly modified dorsal fin on its head. Now, work investigating the suction disc—appearing February 26 in the journal Matter—reveals that one of the secrets to the fish's strong grip lies within the unique architecture of the lip of the disc.

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Weight-based bullying linked to increased adolescent alcohol, marijuana use

Adolescents who are bullied about their weight or body shape may be more likely to use alcohol or marijuana than those who are not bullied, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Wildness in urban parks important for human well-being

A new study led by the University of Washington has found that not all forms of nature are created equal when considering benefits to people's well-being. Experiencing wildness, specifically, is particularly important for physical and mental health.

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Women firefighters face high exposure to toxic PFAS chemicals

San Francisco's women firefighters are exposed to higher levels of certain toxic PFAS chemicals than women working in downtown San Francisco offices, shows a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of California, San Francisco, and Silent Spring Institute.

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New compound could improve photodynamic therapy for cancer

Researchers at the University of Sheffield have synthesized a new compound which could improve the success rate of photodynamic therapy when treating cancer.

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DNA-PKcs has KU-dependent function in rRNA processing and haematopoiesis

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2041-2 The catalytic subunit of DNA-PK autophosphorylates and contributes to ribosome biogenesis and haematopoiesis by binding to the U3 small nucleolar RNA.

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German Court Overturns Ban on Assisted Suicide

The decision came after a group of doctors, patients and proponents sued, arguing that a 2015 law infringed on their constitutional right to make decisions about their own lives.

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Intensive blood pressure control can extend life up to 3 years

Investigators from the Brigham describe how aggressively lowering blood pressure levels can extend a person's life expectancy.

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International group of scientists found new regulators of blood supply to the brain

There are approximately as many neuroglia class cells known as astrocytes in the brain as there are neurons, but the function of these cells has long remained a mystery to scientists.

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New study allows brain and artificial neurons to link up over the web

Research on novel nanoelectronics devices led by the University of Southampton enabled brain neurons and artificial neurons to communicate with each other over the Internet.

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Nuclear war could be devastating for the U.S., even if no one shoots back

The White House's 2021 budget calls for US$28.9 billion for the Pentagon for nuclear weapons and a 20% increase to $19.8 billion for the National Nuclear Security Administration.

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Omega-3 fatty acids may prevent breast implant complications, like capsular contracture

For women receiving breast implants during reconstructive or cosmetic breast surgery, scarring around the implant – called capsular contracture – is a common, costly, and painful complication. The anti-inflammatory effects of omega-3 fatty acids, found in fish oil, might help to avoid abnormal capsule formation suggests an experimental study in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

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Portable 'electronic nose' can accurately pick up esophageal cancer precursor

A portable 'electronic nose' can accurately pick up the precursor condition to food pipe (esophageal) cancer, known as Barrett's esophagus, indicates a proof of principle study, published online in the journal Gut.

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Possible new treatment strategy for fatty liver disease

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a molecular pathway that when silenced could restore the normal function of immune cells in people with fatty liver disease. The findings could lead to new strategies for treating the condition, which is a major health risk for people with obesity. The study is published in the scientific journal Science Translational Medicine.

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Rates of ADHD diagnosis in veterans are rising, reports VA study in Medical Care

Rates of diagnosed attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in veterans receiving care in the VA health system more than doubled during the past decade, reports a study in the March issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Red panda genes suggest there are actually two different species

Genetic analysis suggests that the Himalayan and Chinese red pandas are two different species that diverged about 200,000 years ago

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Researchers identify novel anti-aging targets

A recent study published in Nature has reported two conserved epigenetic regulators as novel anti-aging targets. The research, by scientists from Dr. CAI Shiqing's Lab at the Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, Institute of Neuroscience of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and Dr. JIANG Lubing's team at Institut Pasteur of Shanghai of CAS, identified conserved

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Researchers uncover hidden antibiotic potential of cannabis

The research team found that CBG had antibacterial activity against drug-resistant MRSA. It prevented the ability of that bacteria to form biofilms, which are communities of microorganisms that attach to each other and to surfaces; and it destroyed preformed biofilms and cells resistant to antibiotics. CBG achieved this by targeting the cell membrane of the bacteria. These findings in the laborato

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The Lancet Respiratory Medicine: New therapy could help relieve persistent cough

A new treatment – called gefapixant – may reduce the frequency of coughing, including in patients who have suffered from a chronic cough for more than 15 years, according to results from a phase 2b clinical trial which lasted 12 weeks and included 253 people, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal.

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The Next Generation of Batteries Could Be Built by Viruses

Angela Belcher found a way to turn nature's zombies into a tiny assembly line. But creating a new power cell might be just the beginning.

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The scientists studying facial expressions

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00504-8 New research changes how scientists see expressions

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This long-overlooked part of our foot may be key to walking upright

Feature is not present in gorillas or chimpanzees

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Thousands of Denisovan tools reveal their Stone Age technologies

A cache of Denisovan tools shows how these extinct humans moved from using sharp stone flakes 150,000 years ago to stone blades and chisels around 60,000 years ago

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Two conserved epigenetic regulators prevent healthy ageing

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2037-y Two epigenetic regulators—identified in an RNA interference screen in Caenhorhabditis elegans, and conserved in mammals—diminish mitochondrial function and accelerate the age-related deterioration of behaviour.

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Widowhood accelerates cognitive decline among those at risk for Alzheimer's disease

A new study finds that widowhood can have another profound effect: It may accelerate cognitive decline.

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Oil and gas companies invest in legislators that vote against the environment [Environmental Sciences]

Do campaign contributions from oil and gas companies influence legislators to vote against the environment, or do these companies invest in legislators that have a proven antienvironmental voting record? Using 28 y of campaign contribution data, we find that evidence consistently supports the investment hypothesis: The more a given member…

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Gold nanoparticles detect signals from cancer cells

A novel blood test that uses gold nanoparticles to detect cancer has also been shown to identify signals released by cancer cells. The technology could enable earlier diagnosis and better treatment.

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Intraplate volcanism originating from upwelling hydrous mantle transition zone

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2045-y The widespread intraplate volcanism in northeast China and the unusual 'petit-spot' volcanoes offshore Japan could have resulted from the interaction of the subducting Pacific slab with a hydrous mantle transition zone.

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Functional Cellular Phenotyping in the Tumor Microenvironment

Download this infographic from IsoPlexis to learn about how single cell proteomics help phenotype immune cells in the tumor microenvironment!

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Sex-specific adipose tissue imprinting of regulatory T cells

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2040-3 Visceral adipose tissue contains populations of regulatory T cells that exhibit sexual dimorphism, determined by the surrounding niche, and differ between male and female mice in terms of cell number, phenotype, transcriptional landscape and chromatin accessibility.

5h

Each Mediterranean island has its own genetic pattern

A Team around Anthropologist Ron Pinhasi from the University of Vienna — together with researchers from the University of Florence and Harvard University — found out that prehistoric migration from Africa, Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean islands took place long before the era of the Mediterranean seafaring civilizations. For their analysis they used the DNA of prehistoric individuals from S

7h

Women firefighters face high exposure to toxic PFAS chemicals

San Francisco's women firefighters are exposed to higher levels of certain toxic PFAS chemicals than women working in downtown San Francisco offices, shows a new study. The study represents one of the first published results from the Women Firefighter Biomonitoring Collaborative, a long-term investigation into breast cancer risks faced by women firefighters.

8h

Mike Solomon obituary

My friend Mike Solomon, who has died aged 52 of cancer, was a clinical psychologist at the Tavistock clinic in London, working with children and young people with social, emotional and mental health problems. He thrived on building relationships and was often to be found having a clinical "session" with young people on a football pitch or at a bus stop. Continue reading…

9h

Co-appearance of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in a Ca2RuO4 nanofilm crystal

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60313-x Co-appearance of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in a Ca 2 RuO 4 nanofilm crystal

11h

Roberts Individualized Medical Genetics Center outlines centralized genetic testing model

In a special report published today in the journal Pediatrics, Roberts Individualized Medical Genetics Center researchers, physicians, and genetic and financial counselors describe the success of the model, their plans to build on that success for the future, and the important lessons learned from their first four years in operation.

16h

Designing heterotropically activated allosteric conformational switches using supercharging [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Heterotropic allosteric activation of protein function, in which binding of one ligand thermodynamically activates the binding of another, different ligand or substrate, is a fundamental control mechanism in metabolism and as such has been a long-aspired capability in protein design. Here we show that greatly increasing the magnitude of a…

21h

How to design gender bias out of your workplace | Sara Sanford

Equity expert Sara Sanford offers a certified playbook that helps companies go beyond good intentions, using a data-driven standard to actively counter unconscious bias and foster gender equity — by changing how workplaces operate, not just how people think.

1d

"Daddy, we're afraid of you" – Life in Stu Aaronson's lab

"Aaronson may have finally realized the need to modify his behavior when his young children confronted him one day and complained, "Daddy, we're afraid of you". After he told us this story he added that perhaps he was being too harsh at work as well."

8h

'Alleged' No Longer

"They are creating a universe in which they're stripping adult women of common sense, autonomy, and responsibility," Donna Rotunno, one of Harvey Weinstein's defense attorneys, said during the closing arguments of her client's criminal trial. She was taking aim, most directly, at the case's prosecution. But she was also suggesting, in the cosmic sweep of her accusation, a broader indictment: of t

1d

'Attachment anxiety' can affect your finances

People with high attachment anxiety and people with high attachment avoidance both reported low life satisfaction and low relationship satisfaction in a new study. Those with attachment anxiety also reported low financial satisfaction, the researchers found. The study also shows that those with high attachment anxiety and those with high attachment avoidance engaged in more irresponsible financia

9h

17h

3 ways to uproot a culture of corruption | Wanjira Mathai

Corruption is a constant threat in Kenya, says social entrepreneur Wanjira Mathai — and to stop it there (or anywhere else), we need to intervene early. Following the legacy of her mother, political activist and Nobel Prize recipient Wangari Maathai, Mathai shares three strategies to uproot a culture of corruption by teaching children and young people about leadership, purpose and integrity.

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9h

5 of the best books about prediction

Predictions of any importance are never only about saying what will happen. Right or wrong, they also shape the course of events.

9h

A 5-step plan to improve gender diversity in media

Public representation of science in the media still struggles to reflect the true diversity of those who work in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM). According to a 2019 report from the Women's Leadership Institute Australia, women are quoted as sources in just 33% of science news stories.

7h

6h

A brief history of the future

This publication has been predicting what comes next for 120 years. Here's what some of those predictions have looked like through the decades.

9h

A celestial hourglass on show

Gemini captures CVMP1 in all its glory.

3h

A cnidarian parasite of salmon (Myxozoa: Henneguya) lacks a mitochondrial genome [Evolution]

Although aerobic respiration is a hallmark of eukaryotes, a few unicellular lineages, growing in hypoxic environments, have secondarily lost this ability. In the absence of oxygen, the mitochondria of these organisms have lost all or parts of their genomes and evolved into mitochondria-related organelles (MROs). There has been debate regarding…

21h

A company's good deeds can make consumers think its products are safer

Companies like to highlight when they do good things for society, such as making charitable donations, becoming more environmentally friendly or improving the diversity of their workforce. Broadly, these behaviors come under the umbrella of corporate social responsibility. Companies do them to increase customer loyalty and, ultimately, earn more revenue.

7h

A Meeting in Orbit Demonstrates a Space Junk Solution

Two satellites docked together high above Earth on Tuesday, successfully extending the life of one that was running out of fuel.

3h

A nacre-inspired separator coating for impact-tolerant lithium batteries

Recently, a research team from University of Science and Technology of China proposed a nacre-inspired coating on the separator to improve the safety of lithium battery under external impact. The study was published in Advanced Materials. They developed an alkaline-solution-induced etching method in the aragonite platelets to dissolve the protein matrix along with some parts of amorphous calcium c

1d

A new set of targets to protect the natural world

Science and scientists are converging around the knowledge that our planet, with us in the driver's seat, is moving into the Anthropocene. This is a new geological epoch in which humanity's actions are changing the face of the earth and how planetary systems—such as global nitrogen and phosphorus cycles – work.

7h

A new vista in psychiatric treatment: Using individualized functional connectivity to track symptoms [Commentaries]

In PNAS, Sylvester et al. (1) assess the functional connectivity of the human amygdala with well-established brain networks using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This focus on the amygdala was chosen because this region has been often implicated in psychiatric conditions. Better understanding of its connectivity and functions may therefore…

21h

A possible new way to cool computer chips

A team of researchers at Stanford University has developed a theoretical way to cool down heated objects. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their study of heat radiation and how it might be boosted to cool down a desired object.

7h

A Safety Board Faults Tesla and Regulators in a Fatal 2018 Crash

The National Transportation Safety Board says the automaker should restrict use of its Autopilot feature and better detect when drivers are paying attention.

21h

A tactile robot finger with no blind spots

Researchers at Columbia Engineering announced today that they have introduced a new type of robotic finger with a sense of touch. Their finger can localize touch with very high precision–<1mm–over a large, multicurved surface, much like its human counterpart.

9h

A tale of two arches

Scientists learn more about why our feet bend like they do.

3h

A Vision of AI for Joyful Education

How we can avert the dangers and maximize the benefits of this powerful but still emerging technology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

A.I. reveals which workers are most likely to quit their jobs

A new study analyzes mountains of data to see which industries have the highest level of employee volatility. Volatility isn't always a bad thing, but it is always good to know about. Moving to new jobs within the same industry is often a route to higher wages. Have you ever felt like its time to look for another job but weren't quite sure what prompted it? Conversely, have you ever worried that

21h

Aboriginal Australians hunted kangaroos with dingoes a century ago

As recently as 110 years ago, Aboriginal Australians used dingoes to help hunt kangaroos even though the canines are feral and difficult to train

12h

Actinide 2-metallabiphenylenes that satisfy Hückel's rule

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2004-7 The synthesis of uranium- and thorium-containing metallabiphenylenes demonstrates the ability of the actinides to stabilize aromatic/antiaromatic structures where transition metals have failed.

5h

ADDF statement on the USPSTF Evidence Report on screening for cognitive impairment

The latest US Preventive Services Task Force evidence report on screening for cognitive impairment in older adults raises many questions, but provides few answers for healthcare providers, patients, and families.

5h

Adequate folate levels linked to lower cardiovascular mortality risk in RA patients

Decreased folate levels in the bloodstream have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, shedding light on why those patients are more susceptible to heart and vascular disease, according to research published today in JAMA Network Open by experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

5h

Adults don't need tetanus, diphtheria boosters if fully vaccinated as children

Adults do not need tetanus or diphtheria booster shots if they've already completed their childhood vaccination series against these rare, but debilitating diseases, new research indicates. The study found no significant difference in disease rates between countries that require adults to receive tetanus and diphtheria booster shots and those that don't.

1d

Aerogels for solar devices and windows

In recent decades, the search for high-performance thermal insulation for buildings has prompted manufacturers to turn to aerogels. Invented in the 1930s, these remarkable materials are translucent, ultraporous, lighter than a marshmallow, strong enough to support a brick, and an unparalleled barrier to heat flow, making them ideal for keeping heat inside on a cold winter day and outside when summ

9h

Age at menopause not linked to conventional cardiovascular disease risk factors

The age at which a woman's periods stop, and the menopause starts, doesn't seem to be linked to the development of the risk factors typically associated with cardiovascular disease, suggests research published online in the journal Heart.

22h

AI antibiotics, wild-animal ban and the state of India's birds

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00506-6 The latest science news, in brief.

8h

Airlines freeze hiring as virus damps profit hopes

KLM and Lufthansa take emergency steps to counter impact on revenues

11min

ALS mystery illuminated by blue light

The first optogenetic ALS animal model is developed using zebrafish, in which the key symptoms of ALS, including TDP-43 aggregation, are reproducible in the intact neuromuscular system by external light illumination. This model helps to understand when and how healthy motor neurons begin to become abnormal and pathological in ALS.

7h

Alterations in chromatin at antigen receptor loci define lineage progression during B lymphopoiesis [Immunology and Inflammation]

Developing lymphocytes diversify their antigen receptor (AgR) loci by variable (diversity) joining (V[D]J) recombination. Here, using the micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-based chromatin accessibility (MACC) assay with low-cell count input, we profile both small-scale (kilobase) and large-scale (megabase) changes in chromatin accessibility and nucleosome occupancy in primary cells during lymphoid deve

21h

15h

America's 'Great Wealth Transfer': How to pass on values and purpose

Approximately $68 trillion will pass from boomers to millennials over the next few decades in what's known as the Great Wealth Transfer. 90% of family wealth is gone by the time the third generation comes around, primarily due to familial conflict. Social capital advisor Richard Tafel suggests 4 steps families should follow so they transfer wealth in a way that does the most amount of social good

2h

Ammunition x Gantri Lamp Collection Illuminates 3D Printing's Benefits

The lamp maker Gantri partnered with the Silicon Valley design firm Ammunition to produce a new line of greener lighting products.

7h

Antioxidant precursor molecule could improve brain function in patients with MS

The naturally occurring molecule N-acetylcysteine (NAC) shows benefit in a clinical trial for multiple sclerosis.

4h

Anti-psychotic medication linked to adverse change in brain structure

In a first-of-its-kind study using advanced brain imaging techniques, a commonly used anti-psychotic medication was associated with potentially adverse changes in brain structure. This study was the first in humans to evaluate the effects of this type of medication on the brain using a gold-standard design: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. The study could have an immediate imp

5h

App tells you who's collecting your data and why

A new app called IoT Assistant informs users about what Internet of Things technologies are around them and what data they're collecting, researchers report. People navigating through the digital landscape of the internet today are bombarded with notices about how their data is collected. But in the physical world where Internet of Things technologies increasingly track our activities–few, if any

1d

Artificial and Biological Neurons Just Talked Over the Internet

For the first time, scientists have engineered and switched on a working neural net that allows biological and silicon-based artificial brain cells to communicate back and forth. Researchers in Switzerland, Italy, and the U.K. connected a series of neurons: two high-tech artificial neurons and one biological neuron cultured from a mouse's brain, that were able to communicate back and forth over t

1h

7h

Assessing the reliability of a clothing-based forensic identification [Computer Sciences]

A 2009 report by the National Academy of Sciences was highly critical of many forensic practices. This report concluded that significant changes and advances were required to ensure the reliability across the forensic sciences. We examine the reliability of one such forensic technique used for identification based on purported distinct…

21h

Astronomers: Our Planet Might Have Another Moon, Except It's Tiny

Mini-Moon The Earth might have a second Moon — albeit a tiny and temporary one. "Earth has a new temporarily captured object/Possible mini-moon called 2020 CD3," wrote Kacper Wierzchos, astronomer and self-described "comet hunter" at the Catalina Sky Survey, in a Tuesday tweet . "On the night of Feb. 15, my Catalina Sky Survey teammate Teddy Pruyne and I found a 20th magnitude object." Captured!

6h

Author Correction: A transgenic approach for controlling Lygus in cotton

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14789-w

11h

Author Correction: Characterization of Sex-Based Dna Methylation Signatures in the Airways During Early Life

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60913-7

22h

Author Correction: Interactions of Cisplatin and Daunorubicin at the Chromatin Level

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60515-3

22h

Author Correction: Shear stress induces endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition via the transcription factor Snail

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60955-x

22h

22h

22h

Author Correction: Systematic evaluation and optimization of the experimental steps in RNA G-quadruplex structure sequencing

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60961-z

22h

22h

Author Correction: Ultra-small microorganisms in the polyextreme conditions of the Dallol volcano, Northern Afar, Ethiopia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60960-0

22h

Automated structure discovery in atomic force microscopy

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) with molecule-functionalized tips has emerged as the primary experimental technique for probing the atomic structure of organic molecules on surfaces. Most experiments have been limited to nearly planar aromatic molecules due to difficulties with interpretation of highly distorted AFM images originating from nonplanar molecules. Here, we develop a deep learning infra

3h

Baby Yodas and other cool, weird stuff we saw at Toy Fair 2020

All hail Baby Yoda, king of the toys. (Stan Horaczek /) Toy Fair happens every year in New York City. The big manufacturers pack their luggage full of fun stuff and lug it to the Big Apple and display it at the Javits Center on the west side of Manhattan. It's aimed predominantly at buyers and suppliers hoping that the items can actually make it onto store shelves, but the press gets to take a lo

59min

Big data skal forudsige potentielle selvmord

PLUS. Millioner af patientjournaler og en relativt simpel big data-model gør det muligt at udpege personer, der er i risiko for at begå selvmord.

10h

Bioinspired underwater locomotion of light-driven liquid crystal gels [Applied Physical Sciences]

Soft-bodied aquatic invertebrates, such as sea slugs and snails, are capable of diverse locomotion modes under water. Recapitulation of such multimodal aquatic locomotion in small-scale soft robots is challenging, due to difficulties in precise spatiotemporal control of deformations and inefficient underwater actuation of existing stimuli-responsive materials. Solving this challenge and…

21h

Blood test can predict clinical response to immunotherapy in metastatic NSCLC

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with higher measures of tumor mutations that show up in a blood test generally have a better clinical response to PD-1-based immunotherapy treatments than patients with a lower measure of mutations.

6h

Blood-stage malaria parasites manipulate host innate immune responses through the induction of sFGL2

Malaria parasites suppress host immune responses to facilitate their survival, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we found that blood-stage malaria parasites predominantly induced CD4 + Foxp3 + CD25 + regulatory T cells to release soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 (sFGL2), which substantially enhanced the infection. This was attributed to the capacity of sFGL2 to inhibit macropha

3h

Bottlebrush polymers in the melt and polyelectrolytes in solution share common structural features [Chemistry]

Uncharged bottlebrush polymer melts and highly charged polyelectrolytes in solution exhibit correlation peaks in scattering measurements and simulations. Given the striking superficial similarities of these scattering features, there may be a deeper structural interrelationship in these chemically different classes of materials. Correspondingly, we constructed a library of isotopically labeled bot

21h

Broken 'rules' lead to protein clumps in diseases like ALS

New research uncovers the underlying rules that, when broken, contribute to neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS. Clumps of proteins inside cells are a common thread in many neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig's disease. These clumps, or solid aggregates of proteins, appear to be the result of an abnormality in the process known as liquid-liqu

5h

Budget cut threatens novel social science research program at Department of Defense

Research on understanding friends and foes runs counter to current DOD emphasis on advanced weapons

1h

Building ultrasensitive and ultrathin phototransistors and photonic synapses using hybrid superstructures

Organic-inorganic halide perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) form an attractive class of materials for optoelectronic applications. Their charge transport properties are, however, inferior compared to materials such as graphene. Conversely, graphene contains a charge generation efficiency that is too low for applications in optoelectronics. In a new report, Basudev Pradhan and a research team at the Na

7h

Böjbart batteri följer kroppens konturer

Forskare vid Stanford university, USA, har tagit fram ett litiumjonbatteri som kan driva bärbar elektronik i mindre skala – samtidigt som det sträcks ut med 70 procent och viks dubbelt. Lösningen bygger på ett nytt, elastiskt, ledande polymer, kallat SLIC, supramolecular lithium ion conductor. Till skillnad från andra böjbara batterier där elektrolyten (den del som leder joner mellan anod och kato

9h

Capillary transfer of soft films [Engineering]

Existing transfer technologies in the construction of film-based electronics and devices are deeply established in the framework of native solid substrates. Here, we report a capillary approach that enables a fast, robust, and reliable transfer of soft films from liquid in a defect-free manner. This capillary transfer is underpinned by…

21h

Carnival 2020 in Brazil

Over the past two nights in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, thousands of spectators jammed into Sambadromes to watch the annual spectacle of samba-school floats, dancers, and extravagant costumes during Carnival. Over the past couple of weeks, even more people took part in the many blocos , or street parties, dancing and drinking into the wee hours of the night. Collected below are images of Carniv

1d

Cases of poisoning: Liquids containing cannabidiols for e-cigarettes can be manipulated

The health risks of e-cigarettes have come into focus after the deaths of several 'vapers' due to lung injury in the USA recently. These health risks were discussed in press reports on eight young people who were poisoned in Bremerhaven in October 2019. Patients suffered from convulsive seizures, impaired consciousness and memory, and heart palpitations.

5h

Cats burned in California wildfires also had heart problems

Cats who suffered burns and smoke inhalation in recent California wildfires also had a high incidence of heart problems, a new study shows. Researchers studied 51 cats referred for treatment after the 2017 Tubbs Fire in Santa Rosa and the 2018 Camp Fire in Paradise. Echocardiograms, or heart ultrasounds, showed the cats had significant cardiovascular effects, including a much higher incidence of

39min

16h

Celestial hourglass

The latest image from the international Gemini Observatory showcases the striking planetary nebula CVMP 1. This object is the result of the death throes of a giant star and is a glorious but relatively short-lived astronomical spectacle. As the progenitor star of this planetary nebula slowly cools, this celestial hourglass will run out of time and will slowly fade from view over many thousands of

1h

China's missile force is growing at an unprecedented rate

Vehicles with long-range DF-26 missiles during a military parade in Beijing, China, in September 2015. (Ge jinfh/) China's long-range missiles play a central role in the country's military plans . And, in the event of armed conflict between that nation and the US, they're the weapon the American military worries the most about. Despite their pivotal role in Chinese war-fighting strategy, the serv

1d

China's Moon Rover Takes a Deeper Look at the Far Side

Radar data from the Chang'e-4 mission shows multiple debris layers under the rover, recording eons of lunar history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Chronic virus infection drives CD8 T cell-mediated thymic destruction and impaired negative selection [Immunology and Inflammation]

Chronic infection provokes alterations in inflammatory and suppressive pathways that potentially affect the function and integrity of multiple tissues, impacting both ongoing immune control and restorative immune therapies. Here we demonstrate that chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection rapidly triggers severe thymic depletion, mediated by CD8 T cell-intrinsic type I interferon…

21h

Cockroaches preserved in amber are the world's oldest cave dwellers

Nature, Published online: 25 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00534-2 Insects showing adaptations to cavernous life scuttled the Earth 99 million years ago.

22h

Cognitive impairment after intensive care linked to long-lasting inflammation

People who have been treated in intensive care commonly suffer from residual cognitive impairment, but the reason for this is unknown. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden now link cognitive impairment with lasting inflammation and a potential treatment target. The results are presented in the scientific journal Intensive Care Medicine.

14h

Community support groups vital to African American women with breast cancer

Shelley White-Means, Ph.D., a professor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, is the principal investigator of a paper published this month in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health that found breast cancer support groups play a major role in helping underserved African-American women at risk for or diagnosed with breast cancer in Memphis.

1d

Comparing PFAS exposures in female firefighters and office workers

Firefighters have higher rates of some cancers than the general population, which might not be surprising given the many potential carcinogens they encounter while battling blazes. However, previous studies of chemical exposures in this occupation have focused almost exclusively on men. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have compared poly- and perfluorinated sub

8h

Competition and predators may not make species adapt, after all

Competition and predation may not be the driving force behind adaptation that scientists thought, according to new research. Species adapt to their local climates, but how often they adapt to their local communities remains a mystery. To find answers, researchers examined over 125 studies testing local adaptation in over 100 species of plants and animals. "Local adaptation occurs when a populatio

1d

Complex pattern of ancient immigration from Africa, Asia and Europe

Anthropologists have found out that prehistoric migration from Africa, Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean islands took place long before the era of the Mediterranean seafaring civilizations. For their analysis they used the DNA of prehistoric individuals from Sicily, Sardinia and the Balearic Islands.

6h

Congo Red

Many roots of organic chemistry, and of medicinal chemistry in particular, often originate in what might seem like an unlikely place: the dyestuff industry of the late 19th century. I had already known this to some degree, but writing the historical vignettes in The Chemistry Book really brought it home to me. And if you go further back, dyes and pigments in general have been a huge driving force

7h

Connectedness to nature makes children happier

A new study has shown that connectedness to nature makes children more likely to perform sustainable behaviors, which in turn gives them greater levels of happiness. In light of these findings and the current environmental issues facing our planet, the research team highlight the need for initiatives and education that promotes contact with nature — for the good of the planet and for children's w

16h

Critical transitions in Chinese dunes during the past 12,000 years

Dune systems can have alternative stable states that coexist under certain environmental conditions: a vegetated, stabilized state and a bare active state. This behavior implies the possibility of abrupt transitions from one state to another in response to gradual environmental change. Here, we synthesize stratigraphic records covering 12,000 years of dynamics of this system at 144 localities acr

3h

Danske datacentre raser over klimaminister: Det ville være helt sort at opgive overskudsvarme

PLUS. Det er uambitiøst, når klimaminister Dan Jørgensen siger, at Danmarks CO2-regnskab ikke vil blive forbedret ved bedre udnyttelse af overskudsvarme fra datacentre. Sådan lyder kritikken fra Datacenterindustrien, som især ærgrer sig over nye afgiftsregler for brug af overskudsvarme.

5h

Danske kirker har vindmølle-veto – og de bruger den

PLUS. Kirken kan stoppe vindmølleprojekter som følge af en særret i planloven. Uhørt i et moderne samfund, mener Dansk Energi.

17h

11h

Diabetes drug reduces complications of long-term steroid therapy

A drug used to treat type 2 diabetes could offer a simple and cheap solution to reduce dangerous side effects of steroid treatment, new research from Queen Mary University of London suggests.

22h

Dictionary learning in Fourier-transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14633-1 Aperiodic structure imaging suffers limitations when utilizing Fourier analysis. The authors report an algorithm that quantitatively overcomes these limitations based on nonconvex optimization, demonstrated by studying aperiodic structures via the phase sensitive interference in STM images.

11h

Dinoflagellates with relic endosymbiont nuclei as models for elucidating organellogenesis [Evolution]

Nucleomorphs are relic endosymbiont nuclei so far found only in two algal groups, cryptophytes and chlorarachniophytes, which have been studied to model the evolutionary process of integrating an endosymbiont alga into a host-governed plastid (organellogenesis). However, past studies suggest that DNA transfer from the endosymbiont to host nuclei had already…

21h

Division of labor and growth during electrical cooperation in multicellular cable bacteria [Microbiology]

Multicellularity is a key evolutionary innovation, leading to coordinated activity and resource sharing among cells, which generally occurs via the physical exchange of chemical compounds. However, filamentous cable bacteria display a unique metabolism in which redox transformations in distant cells are coupled via long-distance electron transport rather than an exchange…

21h

DNA-repair enzyme turns to translation

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00424-7 A key DNA-repair enzyme has a surprising role during the early steps in the assembly of ribosomes — the molecular machines that translate the genetic code into protein.

5h

Docking gives telecoms satellite new lease of life

A shepherding spacecraft grabs an ageing telecoms satellite to help extend its mission life.

45min

Doctors need to change the way they treat obesity

A more nuanced billing code could encourage doctors to take a more nuanced approach. (DepositPhoto/) We now know that obesity, a chronic disease that affects almost half of the United States population and contributes to millions of deaths worldwide, isn't just about how much you weigh . A huge variety of factors , from physical and mental health to genetics and upbringing, all contribute to the

1d

Down on the Farm That Harvests Metal From Plants

Hyper-accumulating plants thrive in metallic soil that kills other vegetation, and botanists are testing the potential of phytomining.

5h

Dramatic dietary shift maintains sequestered toxins in chemically defended snakes [Evolution]

Unlike other snakes, most species of Rhabdophis possess glands in their dorsal skin, sometimes limited to the neck, known as nucho-dorsal and nuchal glands, respectively. Those glands contain powerful cardiotonic steroids known as bufadienolides, which can be deployed as a defense against predators. Bufadienolides otherwise occur only in toads (Bufonidae)…

21h

Dynamics of life expectancy and life span equality [Social Sciences]

As people live longer, ages at death are becoming more similar. This dual advance over the last two centuries, a central aim of public health policies, is a major achievement of modern civilization. Some recent exceptions to the joint rise of life expectancy and life span equality, however, make it…

21h

Earth has acquired a brand new moon that's about the size of a car

Astronomers have spotted an asteroid that has been captured by Earth's gravity, making it a temporary mini-moon. It will probably fly away again in April

5h

Eat or be eaten

Plants obtain their energy from the sun. Other beings rely on eating to survive. Yet how does the energy flow inside ecosystems function and are there differences between ecosystems with many species in comparison to those with few species? Researchers have now examined these questions using a holistic approach by evaluating data gathered through a large-scale biodiversity experiment.

4h

Economists and scientists: solve big societal problems by working together

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00532-4 Economics and natural-science disciplines are reuniting. It's about time.

7h

Editor's letter: How to predict what's coming in 2030 and beyond

An introduction to our March/April 2020 special issue on prediction

9h

Elderly patients also benefit from kidney transplantation

So far, kidney transplantation has generally not been offered to elderly patients (>75 years) because of the perioperative risks. Nor has it been clearly established whether transplanted patients in this age benefit significantly. In a new study published in NDT, the graft survival proved to be excellent, and nearly all patients remained dialysis-free. Is it time to rethink established common prac

7h

Energy metabolism of the equine cumulus oocyte complex during in vitro maturation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60624-z

11h

Engineers ensure quantum experiments get off to the right start

The quantum mechanical properties of electrons are beginning to open the door to a new class of sensors and computers with abilities far beyond what their counterparts based in classical physics can accomplish. Quantum states are notoriously difficult to read or write, however, and to make things worse, uncertainty about those states' starting conditions can make experiments more laborious or even

7h

England off track to meet government's 2030 smoke-free target

England will fail to be smoke-free by 2030 if current smoking trends continue, according to a report released today from Cancer Research UK.

21h

Epigenetic therapy inhibits metastases by disrupting premetastatic niches

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2054-x In mouse models of pulmonary metastasis, adjuvant epigenetic therapy targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cells disrupts the premetastatic microenvironment after resection of primary tumours and inhibits the dissemination of residual tumour cells.

5h

E-scooters are a disaster for cities – but we must embrace them

Electric scooters are a nightmare. Rented by the minute, they clog up pavements and are an ungainly eyesore, but we still need them, says Donna Lu

3h

Estimation and model selection in general spatial dynamic panel data models [Statistics]

Commonly used methods for estimating parameters of a spatial dynamic panel data model include the two-stage least squares, quasi-maximum likelihood, and generalized moments. In this paper, we present an approach that uses the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a spatial weight matrix to directly construct consistent least-squares estimators of parameters of…

21h

Evaluation of a concerted vs. sequential oxygen activation mechanism in {alpha}-ketoglutarate-dependent nonheme ferrous enzymes [Biochemistry]

Determining the requirements for efficient oxygen (O2) activation is key to understanding how enzymes maintain efficacy and mitigate unproductive, often detrimental reactivity. For the α-ketoglutarate (αKG)–dependent nonheme iron enzymes, both a concerted mechanism (both cofactor and substrate binding prior to reaction with O2) and a sequential mechanism (cofactor binding and…

21h

Examining enlargement of the aorta among older endurance athletes

Researchers in this observational study evaluated dimensions of the aorta in 442 older competitive runners and rowers (ages 50 to 75) to examine the association between long-term endurance exercise and enlargement of the artery.

5h

Examining the Dead Sea Scrolls | Expedition Unknown

Josh Gates travels to the Holy Land to dig in with an archaeologist who has recently discovered new Dead Sea Scrolls. Stream Full Episodes of Expedition Unknown: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/expedition-unknown/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagra

1h

Experts Warn That Some Marathoners May Be Pushing Themselves Too Hard

Review study examines why people are suffering heart attacks during high intensity and endurance exercises such as marathons and triathlons. runningheartattk1.jpg Image credits: Composite image by Abigail Malate . Human Wednesday, February 26, 2020 – 08:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — In the ancient Greek legend, the messenger Pheidippides ran from the battlefield of Marathon to At

7h

Exploring long-range cooperativity in the 20S proteasome core particle from Thermoplasma acidophilum using methyl-TROSY-based NMR [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The 20S core particle (CP) proteasome is a molecular assembly catalyzing the degradation of misfolded proteins or proteins no longer required for function. It is composed of four stacked heptameric rings that form a barrel-like structure, sequestering proteolytic sites inside its lumen. Proteasome function is regulated by gates derived from…

21h

Fatigue-resistant adhesion of hydrogels

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14871-3 Fatigue-resistant adhesion is of interest for a range of applications, but has been limited in synthetic hydrogels. Here, the authors report on a synthetic hydrogel with ordered nanocrystalline domains resulting in high fatigue-resistant adhesion and demonstrate the coating of different surfaces.

11h

First Results From the Moon's Far Side

Based on data from China's Yutu-2 rover, our satellite is deeply covered in fluffy moon dust across its surface.

2h

First shots with Fujifilm's X-T4 Mirrorless camera

The Fujifilm X-T4 is X-built around a trans CMOS 4 sensor and X-Processor 4 for fast AF and a wide dynamic range. (Jeanette D. Moses/) Fujifilm just announced the arrival of the X-T4, a camera with a 26.1 megapixel back-side illuminated CMOS sensor, a larger battery than its predecessors, a redesigned body, and an overhauled in-body image stabilization system. The mechanical shutter can shoot 15

7h

Five essential writing tips backed by science

In "The Science of Storytelling," journalist Will Storr investigates the science behind great storytelling. While good plots are important, Storr writes that great stories revolve around complex characters. As in life, readers are drawn to flawed characters, yet many writers become too attached to their protagonists. We are all hallucinating. No one dropped LSD into the water supply—they didn't h

1d

Five forces that will shape the future

These are the big trends of the coming decades that need to be considered for any new technologies to be successful.

9h

Footprints of natural selection at the mannose-6-phosphate isomerase locus in barnacles [Evolution]

The mannose-6-phosphate isomerase (Mpi) locus in Semibalanus balanoides has been studied as a candidate gene for balancing selection for more than two decades. Previous work has shown that Mpi allozyme genotypes (fast and slow) have different frequencies across Atlantic intertidal zones due to selection on postsettlement survival (i.e., allele zonation)….

21h

Former NASA Scientist Absolutely Shreds Planet Emojis

Grudge Match A planetary scientist who used to work for NASA says he's determined which "ringed planet" emoji is the best. James O'Donoghue, now working for Japan's space agency JAXA, published his definitive ranking on Twitter on Wednesday morning. In it, he called Twitter's attempt at Saturn "the most offensive" — while Whatsapp's emoji took the coveted top spot. I'm a planetary scientist with

4h

Forskere løser gammel gåde om biodiversitet

Biodiversitet og artsrigdom bestemmes i høj grad af evolutionære tilpasninger, viser ny forskning….

12h

5h

Game of Thrones honoured in new classification of pterosaur

Targaryendraco wiedenrothi has been renamed after House of Targaryen in George RR Martin's fantasy saga George RR Martin is celebrating after a palaeontologist, who named a new genus of pterosaur after the dragons of House Targaryen, agreed with him that dragons should have two, rather than four, legs. The fossilised bones of Targaryendraco wiedenrothi , which lived 130m years ago, were discovere

9h

Gemini South telescope captures exquisite planetary nebula

The latest image from the international Gemini Observatory showcases the striking planetary nebula CVMP 1. This object is the result of the death throes of a giant star and is a glorious but relatively short-lived astronomical spectacle. As the progenitor star of this planetary nebula slowly cools, this celestial hourglass will run out of time and will slowly fade from view over many thousands of

7h

Gene catalog comprising community of microbes in vaginal microbiome

Researchers have created the first catalogue of genes that comprise the community of microbes, which inhabit the human vagina. The catalogue, called human vaginal non-redundant gene catalog (VIRGO), was recently released as a public resource that can be used by researchers to facilitate a more in-depth understanding of the role of vaginal microorganisms in women's health and to potentially develop

38min

Ghostly traces of massive ancient river revealed

Using zircon crystals, researchers have discovered the route of a massive ancient river that could help find new reservoirs of fossil fuels and suggest how modern rivers might change over time.

7h

Glass slides that stand to revolutionize fluorescence microscopy

EPFL scientists have developed a new type of microscope slide that can boost the amount of light in fluorescence microscopy by a factor of up to 25. These new slides can both amplify and direct light, making them ideal for applications ranging from early-stage diagnosis to the rapid archiving of pathology samples.

6h

Global analysis of LARP1 translation targets reveals tunable and dynamic features of 5' TOP motifs [Cell Biology]

Terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) motifs are sequences at the 5′ ends of mRNAs that link their translation to the mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) nutrient-sensing signaling pathway. They are commonly regarded as discrete elements that reside on ∼100 mRNAs that mostly encode translation factors. However, the full spectrum of TOP sequences and…

21h

Global chemical effects of the microbiome include new bile-acid conjugations

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2047-9 Metabolomics data from germ-free and specific-pathogen-free mice reveal effects of the microbiome on host chemistry, identifying conjugations of bile acids that are also enriched in patients with inflammatory bowel disease or cystic fibrosis.

5h

Grid diagrams as tools to investigate knot spaces and topoisomerase-mediated simplification of DNA topology

Grid diagrams with their relatively simple mathematical formalism provide a convenient way to generate and model projections of various knots. It has been an open question whether these 2D diagrams can be used to model a complex 3D process such as the topoisomerase-mediated preferential unknotting of DNA molecules. We model here topoisomerase-mediated passages of double-stranded DNA segments thro

3h

Gynna lavskrikan med planerad skogsgallring

När skogen gallras blottas lavskrikans bon för nötskrikor som plundrar boet på både ägg och ungar. Genom att anpassa gallringens intensitet går det att skydda fågeln, menar forskare som analyserat häckningsframgången i förhållande till undervegetation runt boet och dess avstånd till hus. Är det rätt att begränsa skogsbruk för att skydda lavskrikan? Frågan har under de senaste åren engagerat markä

11h

Hawai'i's Last Dunes Are Home To Species Found Nowhere Else on the Planet

A nature preserve on Moloka'i reveals rare life forms—some ancient and others just newly established

5h

Heat and pressure morph fossil fuel molecule into pure diamonds

With careful tuning of heat and pressure, it's possible to produce pure diamonds from a type of hydrogen and carbon molecule found in crude oil and natural gas, a new study shows. "What's exciting about this paper is it shows a way of cheating the thermodynamics of what's typically required for diamond formation," says Rodney Ewing, professor of nuclear security at Stanford University and a coaut

7h

Heatwave exposure linked to increased risk of preterm birth in California

A new study found that exposure to heatwaves during the last week of pregnancy was strongly linked to an increased risk of preterm delivery — the hotter the temperature or the longer the heatwave, the greater the risk.

1d

Helicopter money is here

Hong Kong, Macau and Singapore offer residents handouts.

13h

Help find the location of newly discovered black holes in the LOFAR Radio Galaxy Zoo project

Scientists are asking for the public's help to find the origin of hundreds of thousands of galaxies that have been discovered by the largest radio telescope ever built: LOFAR. Where do these mysterious objects that extend for thousands of light-years come from? A new citizen science project, LOFAR Radio Galaxy Zoo, gives anyone with a computer the exciting possibility to join the quest to find out

7h

Hero ION Hydrogen Fuel Cell Concept Bike

submitted by /u/chopchopped [link] [comments]

19h

High-energy-electron scattering probes the strong nuclear interaction at close range

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00469-8 The dense soup of matter in the core of neutron stars is hard to model, but particle-accelerator experiments in which energetic electrons scatter off atomic nuclei could help to explore this high-density regime.

5h

HIV-1 uncoats in the nucleus near sites of integration [Microbiology]

HIV-1 capsid core disassembly (uncoating) must occur before integration of viral genomic DNA into the host chromosomes, yet remarkably, the timing and cellular location of uncoating is unknown. Previous studies have proposed that intact viral cores are too large to fit through nuclear pores and uncoating occurs in the cytoplasm…

21h

Hjertelæge dømt for millionsvindel »af særlig grov beskaffenhed«

Hjertelæge får to år og seks måneders fængsel for millionsvindel med forskningsmidler, lyder dommen fra Københavns Byret. Godt de fem sager med hjertelæger nu er afsluttet, siger Rigshospitalet.

9h

How AI-powered devices are remodeling the Consumer Electronics Industry

Artificial Intelligence is an amalgam of key technologies including machine learning, deep learning, computer vision, natural language processing (NLP) and strong AI. As per Global Market Insights, projected revenue for the Consumer Electronics market will be USD 1.5 Trillion by 2024. Artificial Intelligence (AI) & Consumer Electronics (CE) Industr y With the emergence of new groundbreaking tec

7h

How archaeologists can dig deeper with big data

Big data can provide archaeologists with a sweeping, big-picture view of the subjects they study on the ground, new research shows. Centuries of archaeological research on the Inca Empire has netted a veritable library of knowledge. But new digital and data-driven projects are proving that there is much more to discover about precolonial life in the Andes. "Some questions are really hard to answe

8h

How Big Is the Milky Way?

Our home galaxy is bigger than previously thought.

22h

How does toleration fit into a pluralistic society?

While pluralism is considered a condition, toleration is the response to it. To recognize and accept a diverse range of perspectives on ethical views is to exhibit tolerance. Singapore Management University professor Chandran Kukathas points to toleration as a cornerstone of the classical liberal tradition. In fact, liberal thought arises from the reality that people disagree substantially on any

11h

How low can you go? Lower than ever before

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made the most sensitive measurements to date of how quickly electric charge moves in silicon, a gauge of its performance as a semiconductor.

2h

How machine learning is eating software

submitted by /u/JustKeepSwimmingJKS [link] [comments]

21h

How satellite mega-constellations will change the way we use space

And wherever humans go, they'll be taking satellite constellations with them to moon and Mars.

9h

How Self-Driving Car Makers Measure Their Own Progress

New reports track how often humans need to take control of autonomous vehicles being tested. That's a lousy way to assess the nascent industry.

1h

How technology has changed what it's like to be deaf | Rebecca Knill

"Complete silence is very addictive," says Rebecca Knill, a writer who has cochlear implants that enable her to hear. In this funny, insightful talk, she explores the evolution of assistive listening technology, the outdated way people still respond to deafness and how we can shift our cultural understanding of ability to build a more inclusive world. "Technology has come so far," Knill says. "Our

5h

How to decipher the news to find the facts

Nine months to go till the November presidential election. How do you wade through the political rhetoric and potential biases and falsehoods from various information outlets to get to the real facts?

7h

How your romantic attachment style affects your finances, well-being

Attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance can both have negative consequences for well-being due, at least in part, to financial reasons, researchers found.

9h

Hydrogel cross-linking-programmed release of nitric oxide regulates source-dependent angiogenic behaviors of human mesenchymal stem cell

Angiogenesis is stimulated by nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells (ECs). Although proangiogenic actions of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been extensively studied, the mechanistic role of NO in this action remains obscure. Here, we used a gelatin hydrogel that releases NO upon crosslinking by a transglutaminase reaction ("NO gel"). Then, the source-specific behaviors of b

3h

I'll have what she's having

Seagulls specifically want your food, study suggests.

3h

If DNA is like software, can we just fix the code?

In a race to cure his daughter, a Google programmer enters the world of hyper-personalized drugs.

9h

Illicit trade in marine fish catch and its effects on ecosystems and people worldwide

Illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing is widespread; it is therefore likely that illicit trade in marine fish catch is also common worldwide. We combine ecological-economic databases to estimate the magnitude of illicit trade in marine fish catch and its impacts on people. Globally, between 8 and 14 million metric tons of unreported catches are potentially traded illicitly yearly, suggesti

3h

Image of the Day: Meiosis Researcher, Olympic Hopeful

Olivia Ballew, a graduate student at Indiana University, is currently writing her dissertation while preparing to compete in the upcoming Olympic marathon trials.

9h

Impact of the Sub-Resting Membrane Potential on Accurate Inference in Spiking Neural Networks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60572-8

11h

In developed nations, satisfaction with democracy is at a 25-year low

Dissatisfaction with democracy in developed nations is at a record high. Since 1995, the University of Cambridge's Centre for the Future of Democracy has gauged people's views on democracy. Their most recent report , spanning 154 nations, reveals some of the highest levels of discontent since records began. Dissatisfaction with democracy is at its highest since records began. United States and Br

1h

In no mood for catching a falling knife

Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets

1d

Individual behavior drives ecosystem function and the impacts of harvest

Current approaches for biodiversity conservation and management focus on sustaining high levels of diversity among species to maintain ecosystem function. We show that the diversity among individuals within a single population drives function at the ecosystem scale. Specifically, nutrient supply from individual fish differs from the population average >80% of the time, and accounting for this ind

3h

Infographic: Which 3-D Printed Tissues are Closest to the Clinic?

Skin is much easier to create using 3-D printing than intestines.

1h

Inside the race to build the best quantum computer on Earth

IBM thinks quantum supremacy is not the milestone we should care about.

10h

Insulin signaling suppressed by decoys

The discovery of an insulin 'decoy' molecule shakes up understanding of insulin signaling, with implications for diabetes, longevity and aging research.

1d

Interferon lambda promotes immune dysregulation and tissue inflammation in TLR7-induced lupus [Immunology and Inflammation]

Type III IFN lambdas (IFN-λ) have recently been described as important mediators of immune responses at barrier surfaces. However, their role in autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a condition characterized by aberrant type I IFN signaling, has not been determined. Here, we identify a nonredundant role for…

21h

Intrinsically disordered protein RBM14 plays a role in generation of RNA:DNA hybrids at double-strand break sites [Cell Biology]

Accumulating evidence suggests participation of RNA-binding proteins with intrinsically disordered domains (IDPs) in the DNA damage response (DDR). These IDPs form liquid compartments at DNA damage sites in a poly(ADP ribose) (PAR)-dependent manner. However, it is greatly unknown how the IDPs are involved in DDR. We have shown previously that…

21h

3h

Japanske forskere: Vand har to forskellige strukturer

PLUS. Ved hjælp af røntgen har japanske forskere undersøgt vand og fundet to forskellige strukturer af flydende vand. Dansk DTU-forsker er enig i, at den viden kan have betydning for levende organismer.

11h

Joint profiling of chromatin accessibility and CAR-T integration site analysis at population and single-cell levels [Immunology and Inflammation]

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T immunotherapy has yielded impressive results in several B cell malignancies, establishing itself as a powerful means to redirect the natural properties of T lymphocytes. In this strategy, the T cell genome is modified by the integration of lentiviral vectors encoding CAR that direct tumor cell killing….

21h

Journal founded by Hans Eysenck issues expressions of concern for his papers, despite calls by university to retract

Bucking the advice of university investigators, a journal founded by Hans Eysenck has issued expressions of concern — not retractions — for three articles by the deceased psychologist whose work has been dogged by controversy since the 1980s. The move comes barely a week after other journals opted to retract 13 papers by Eysenck, who … Continue reading

10h

Journal maps intersection of immigration and aging

A new special issue of the journal The Gerontologist from The Gerontological Society of America explores how contemporary trends in immigration, migration, and refugee movement affect how people age and how societies care for aging people.

4h

Judge Rules Unreported Clinical Trial Data Must Be Made Public

The sponsors of upwards of 1,000 clinical trials may be forced to publish data that have gone unpublished over a 10-year period.

6min

Juul Wants to Age-Lock Its Vapes

Cloud Nein The year is 2023. You go to take a drag of your Juul — but your phone's Bluetooth won't connect to the vape, meaning it won't dispense that sweet, sweet nicotine fix. It sounds too silly to be real, but The Wall Street Journal is reporting this week that Juul's going to pitch the FDA on just such a system: a Bluetooth-enabled vape that won't let you puff until you've connected it to an

6h

KAT6A syndrome: Advances on the genetic bases and clinical picture of a rare disease

A research team has described five new cases of a rare disease — known as KAT6A syndrome — of which there are only eighty dominant cases worldwide. This neurological and developmental disorder, caused by alterations in the lysine acetyltransferase 6A gene (KAT6A), involves intellectual disability, language impairment, low muscle tone, cardiovascular malformation and eye defects, among other affe

6h

KIER developed separator that reduced gas crossover for water electrolyzer

Dr. Won-chul Cho of Hydrogen Research Department of the Korea Institute of Energy Research has developed a separator membrane that significantly reduces gas crossover while exhibiting high performance comparable to the commercial separator for alkaline water electrolyzer. The research has been published in the International Journal of Energy Research, the world's leading authority on nuclear power

7h

Late-life costs of raising sons in bighorn sheep [Commentaries]

Senescence, the physiological decline associated with aging, is pervasive in nature. The age at onset and rate of senescent decline vary widely among species, among populations of the same species, and even among individuals within the same population (1). Understanding the reasons for this variability is of great importance for…

21h

Lava flows tell story of biodiversity loss

Researchers uncover human impact on the forests of Réunion.

3h

Learning to learn from data: Using deep adversarial learning to construct optimal statistical procedures

Traditionally, statistical procedures have been derived via analytic calculations whose validity often relies on sample size growing to infinity. We use tools from deep learning to develop a new approach, adversarial Monte Carlo meta-learning, for constructing optimal statistical procedures. Statistical problems are framed as two-player games in which Nature adversarially selects a distribution t

3h

Leatherworking tips from a modern-day cowgirl

Why have a boring, flat leather belt when you can have one that looks like weathered wood? (Courtesy of Aprille Tomlinson/) The iconic American cowboy's style invokes a feeling of ruggedness and free spirit, so it's no surprise the functional fashion of the wild, wild West is once again trendy in mainstream fashion. Distressed boot-cut jeans, a cowboy hat, and a pair high-end boots make wearers f

4h

Left over life to kill

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00549-9 A shot at redemption.

8h

LG V60 ThinQ Hands On: 8K Video, 5G, and a Second Screen

The phone goes head-to-head with Samsung on new features, but it's still not very compelling.

6h

Lights, camera, action… the super-fast world of droplet dynamics

Cameras shooting up to 25,000 frames a second have been used to capture the moment two droplets of liquid come together and mix — and it is opening up research into new applications for 3D printing.

1d

Lights\! Camera\! Meeting\! Videoconferencing Gets a Makeover

Companies like Zoom and Microsoft are trying to make the remote connections more real—and fun. Trouble is, humans are awkward.

9h

Light-shrinking device enables detection of ultra-tiny substances

Engineers at the University of California San Diego and the University of California Berkeley have created light-based technology that can detect biological substances with a molecular mass more than two orders of magnitude smaller than previously possible. The advance was made possible by building a device that shrinks light while exploiting mathematical singularities known as exceptional points

8h

Lipid availability determines fate of skeletal progenitor cells via SOX9

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2050-1 Lipid starvation results in skeletal progenitors favouring commitment to chondrogenic over osteogenic fate, a process mediated by FOXO transcription factors and SOX9.

5h

Little beam on a microscope makes laser-induced graphene

Scientists are using a very small visible beam to burn laser-induced graphene, a foamy form of carbon, into microscopic patterns. The labs of Rice University chemist James Tour, which discovered the original method to turn a common polymer into graphene in 2014, and Tennessee/Oak Ridge National Laboratory materials scientist Philip Rack revealed they can now watch the conductive material form as

1d

'Low' socioeconomic status is the biggest barrier to STEM participation

A new study has found that socioeconomic status (SES) has the strongest impact on whether secondary school students study the STEM sciences.

19min

Læge: Regioner svigter arbejdet i Medicinrådet – drop industrisponsorerede aktiviteter

Lægerne i Region Syddanmark bærer den tungeste byrde i Medicinrådet. Det er urimeligt, mener ledende overlæge, som retter en kritik mod de øvrige regioner og Medicinrådet.

7h

Massively parallel variant characterization identifies NUDT15 alleles associated with thiopurine toxicity [Genetics]

As a prototype of genomics-guided precision medicine, individualized thiopurine dosing based on pharmacogenetics is a highly effective way to mitigate hematopoietic toxicity of this class of drugs. Recently, NUDT15 deficiency was identified as a genetic cause of thiopurine toxicity, and NUDT15-informed preemptive dose reduction was quickly adopted in clinical settings….

21h

Matematik visar hur livets huvudgrupper uppstår i evolutionen

En ny matematisk modell visar på mångfalden i livets utvecklingshistoria. Den visar hur nutida organismgrupper uppstår genom en så kallad födelse- och dödsprocess, dessutom ger den ett svar på Darwins "förhatliga gåta" om blomväxternas ursprung. På vilket sätt många av de stora organismgrupperna har uppstått tycks vara höljt i dunkel. Ett berömt exempel är blomväxternas ursprung, som Darwin kalla

8h

Medication treatments led to 80% lower risk of fatal overdose for patients with opioid use disorder

Patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) receiving treatment with opioid agonists (medications such as methadone or buprenorphine) had an 80 percent lower risk of dying from an opioid overdose compared to patients in treatment without the use of medications.

1d

Metabolic health and weight management key to minimizing diabetes risk

Increased fat distribution during menopause has long been shown to increase insulin resistance and the risk of diabetes. A new study based on data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) shows that being metabolically unhealthy increases diabetes risk, even in women of normal weight. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

16h

Metallic glasses rejuvenated to harden under strain

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00468-9 Metallic glasses are much stronger than conventional metals, but form certain instabilities under stress that lead to fracture. A process known as rejuvenation has been shown to solve this problem.

5h

Metal-organic frameworks can separate gases despite the presence of water

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising materials for inexpensive and less energy-intensive gas separation even in the presence of impurities such as water.

7h

Method with polarized light can create and measure nonsymmetrical states in a layered material

Some molecules, including most of the ones in living organisms, have shapes that can exist in two different mirror-image versions. The right- and left-handed versions can sometimes have different properties, such that only one of them carries out the molecule's functions. Now, a team of physicists has found that a similarly asymmetrical pattern can be induced and measured at will in certain exotic

3h

Mid-life weight gain linked to faster decline in lung capacity in older age

Mid-life weight gain is linked to an acceleration in the natural decline in lung capacity that comes with ageing, reveals a 20-year study published online in the journal Thorax.

22h

Millions of people's food supply depends on super-urinating fish

The mangrove-lined estuary on Abaco Island in the Bahamas. (Craig Layman/) For the mangrove forests that line the coast of Abaco Island in the Bahamas, fish pee is a precious resource. While fish such as cubera and gray snappers roam the mangroves in search of a meal, they excrete "fish pee" through their gills which, among other substances, contains the valuable nutrient nitrogen. However, it tu

1h

'Mini' MRI Outperforms 3-D Mammograms In Detecting Cancer In Women With Dense Breasts

A new study published in JAMA compares the effectiveness of abbreviated MRI and 3-D mammography to detect breast cancer in women with dense breasts. It finds the mini MRI is more effective.

1d

7h

Momentum-resolved superconducting energy gaps of Sr2RuO4 from quasiparticle interference imaging [Physics]

Sr2RuO4 has long been the focus of intense research interest because of conjectures that it is a correlated topological superconductor. It is the momentum space (k-space) structure of the superconducting energy gap Δi(k) on each band i that encodes its unknown superconducting order parameter. However, because the energy scales are…

21h

Moral distress of physicians who care for older adults

Researchers report that about four of 10 doctors caring for older adult patients who require a surrogate decision-maker experienced moral distress.

1d

More Resignations at MeTooSTEM

The embattled organization is left with only one member of the leadership—the group's founder, BethAnn McLaughlin, who is accused of bullying.

1d

Mortality decreased with further treatment for opioid use disorder after detox

A new study shows that people with opioid use disorder who enter inpatient medically managed withdrawal treatment (detox) do not usually receive further treatment, including medication for opioid use disorder or additional inpatient treatment. Those who did receive further treatment with medication (methadone, buprenorphine or naltrexone) or residential treatment were more likely to survive to 12

1d

Moving beyond the West vs. the rest: Understanding variation within Asian groups and its societal consequences [Commentaries]

After decades of focusing almost exclusively on Western populations, psychology and other social sciences have at last begun to diversify their samples. Massive efforts have been made to compare cultures around the globe on basic psychological processes, and researchers have amassed much evidence for differences between "the West and the…

21h

Multi-omics characterization of molecular features of gastric cancer correlated with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy

Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a common treatment for patients with gastric cancer. Although its benefits have been demonstrated, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is underutilized in gastric cancer management, because of the lack of biomarkers for patient selection and a limited understanding of resistance mechanisms. Here, we performed whole-genome, whole-exome, and RNA sequencing on 84 clinical samples (i

3h

Mysterious faded star Betelgeuse has started to brighten again

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00561-z 'Orion's shoulder' had reached unprecedented dimness in mid-February, leaving astronomers befuddled.

3h

Mystery surrounding dinosaur footprints on a cave ceiling in Central Queensland solved

The mystery surrounding dinosaur footprints on a cave ceiling in Central Queensland has been solved after more than a half a century.

6h

Nanoscale precipitates as sustainable dislocation sources for enhanced ductility and high strength [Engineering]

Traditionally, precipitates in a material are thought to serve as obstacles to dislocation glide and cause hardening of the material. This conventional wisdom, however, fails to explain recent discoveries of ultrahigh-strength and large-ductility materials with a high density of nanoscale precipitates, as obstacles to dislocation glide often lead to high…

21h

Nanoscale triboelectrification gated transistor

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14909-6 Though tribotronics, e.g., semiconductor electronics that utilize triboelectricity, is a promising technology, current devices have limited application in micro/nano electronics. Here, the authors report a triboelectrification-gated transistor with triboelectric modulation at the nanoscale.

11h

NASA: Boeing Skipped Crucial Software Test of Starliner Spacecraft

Missed Test NASA has learned that Boeing did not perform a "full, end-to-end integrated test" of its astronaut-ferrying Starliner spacecraft with the rocket that's supposed to launch it into orbit, the United Launch Alliance's Atlas V, the Orlando Sentinel reports . Members of NASA's safety advisory panel told journalists that such a test is needed to ensure that all software systems respond to e

1h

Neonicotinoid and sulfoximine pesticides differentially impair insect escape behavior and motion detection [Neuroscience]

Insect nervous systems offer unique advantages for studying interactions between sensory systems and behavior, given their complexity with high tractability. By examining the neural coding of salient environmental stimuli and resulting behavioral output in the context of environmental stressors, we gain an understanding of the effects of these stressors on…

21h

Neural circuitry linking mating and egg laying in Drosophila females

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2055-9 Neuron-tracing and labelling experiments in Drosophila females reveal the neural circuitry that coordinates mating and egg laying, and the role of sex peptide from male seminal fluid in triggering these neurons.

4h

New Tool Generates Every Possible Melody for Public Domain Use

That new song you heard the other day might not really be new, according to a pair of programmer-musicians. Damien Riehl and Noah Rubin created an algorithm to generate every possible melody, and they copyrighted it. This isn't a scheme to sue people, though. Quite the opposite, in fact. Riehl and Rubin have released the contents of their universal melody hard drive into the public domain in hope

7h

New Wrinkle Added to Cosmology's Hubble Crisis

The big news in cosmology for several years has been the mounting evidence that the universe is expanding faster than expected. When cosmologists extrapolate data from the early universe to predict what the cosmos should be like now, they predict a relatively slow cosmic expansion rate. When they directly measure the speed at which astronomical objects are hurtling away from us, they find that sp

6h

Ni nye muligheder for at slå sig ned som praktiserende læge i Hovedstaden

Region Hovedstaden har udpeget placeringen af ni nye kapaciteter, der »snarest muligt« sendes i opslag. Dermed får praktiserende læger endnu flere muligheder for at nedsætte sig i hovedstadsområdet.

11h

Nitric oxide disrupts bacterial cytokinesis by poisoning purine metabolism

Cytostasis is the most salient manifestation of the potent antimicrobial activity of nitric oxide (NO), yet the mechanism by which NO disrupts bacterial cell division is unknown. Here, we show that in respiring Escherichia coli, Salmonella , and Bacillus subtilis , NO arrests the first step in division, namely, the GTP-dependent assembly of the bacterial tubulin homolog FtsZ into a cytokinetic ri

3h

Nitrogen isotope ratios trace high-pH conditions in a terrestrial Mars analog site

High-pH alkaline lakes are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth and prime targets in the search for life on Mars; however, a robust proxy for such settings does not yet exist. Nitrogen isotope fractionation resulting from NH 3 volatilization at high pH has the potential to fill this gap. To validate this idea, we analyzed samples from the Nördlinger Ries, a Miocene impact crater lake th

3h

Olie og naturgas bliver til rene syntetiske diamanter

PLUS. Uden brug af katalysatorer fremstiller forskere fra Stanford University nu rene, syntetiske diamanter med et lavt energiforbrug. Der er stadig bump på vejen før diamanter bliver det nye supermateriale til halvledere, glas og medicin.

7h

On the Road to 3-D Printed Organs

Researchers can print cells and biomaterials that make up human tissues, but there's still a long way to go before fully functional organs can be made to order.

1h

Oncotarget: Both BRCA1-wild type and -mutant triple-negative breast cancers show

Oncotarget Volume 11 Issue 8 features Figure 8, 'MLN4924 treatment induces DNA damage by stabilizing CDT1 and accumulates the cells in S phase which are enhanced by MLN4924/cisplatin co-treatment,' by Misra, et al.

4h

One year into 'soda tax,' researchers find law did not affect sugary-beverage consumption

One year into Philadelphia's 1.5-cents-per-ounce 'soda tax,' new findings show that the law had minimal to no influence on what Philadelphians are drinking. The results were published this month in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health from researchers at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health.

4h

Open up research about Tutankhamun's tomb

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00531-5 A controversy over the possible presence of rooms around the tomb needs findings to be published in the open literature.

12h

Opening of smaller toxin pores by lipid micelle formation [Letters (Online Only)]

While pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are a large class of molecular weapons employed by organisms across the animal kingdom (1), notably, pathogenic bacteria, many mechanistic steps of pore formation in target membranes are unknown. In PNAS, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, Vӧgele et al. (2) observed how central lipids corresponding to…

21h

Optimization of culture conditions for differentiation of melon based on artificial neural network and genetic algorithm

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60278-x

11h

Our galaxy's huge black hole may have created organic molecules

The enormous black hole at the centre of the Milky Way was active millions of years ago, and its intense X-rays may have formed some molecules necessary for life

15h

Pathogenic POGZ mutation causes impaired cortical development and reversible autism-like phenotypes

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14697-z De novo mutations significantly contribute to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Here, the authors demonstrate that ASD-associated de novo mutations in the POGZ gene, one of a high-confidence ASD gene, lead to ASD-related impaired neuronal development and disrupted mature cortical network function.

11h

Pathway paradigms revealed from the genetics of inflammatory bowel disease

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2025-2 This Review examines inflammatory bowel disease in the context of human genetics studies that help to identify pathways that regulate homeostasis of the mucosal immune system and discusses future prospects for disease-subtype classification and therapeutic intervention.

5h

Peripheral T cell expansion predicts tumour infiltration and clinical response

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2056-8 Large-scale single-cell sequencing of RNA and T cell receptors in samples from patients with cancer shows clonotypic expansion of effector-like T cells not only in tumour tissue but also in normal adjacent tissues and peripheral blood, which associates with clinical response to cancer immunotherapy.

4h

Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler latest thoughts

submitted by /u/remotemass [link] [comments]

23h

Philadelphia Nonprofit Opening Nation's First Supervised Injection Site Next Week

After a two-year legal saga, Safehouse says it will open next week, allowing users to administer illegal drugs under supervision. Federal officials say they will try to stop the site from opening. (Image credit: Natalie Piserchio for NPR)

4h

Photoperiod and temperature separately regulate nymphal development through JH and insulin/TOR signaling pathways in an insect [Physiology]

Insects living in the temperate zone enter a physiological state of arrested or slowed development to overcome an adverse season, such as winter. Developmental arrest, called diapause, occurs at a species-specific developmental stage, and embryonic and pupal diapauses have been extensively studied in mostly holometabolous insects. Some other insects overwinter…

21h

Pinching a glass reveals key properties of its soft spots [Physics]

It is now well established that glasses feature quasilocalized nonphononic excitations—coined "soft spots"—, which follow a universal ω4 density of states in the limit of low frequencies ω. All glass-specific properties, such as the dependence on the preparation protocol or composition, are encapsulated in the nonuniversal prefactor of the universal…

21h

Podcast: Mapping fruit flies' neural circuitry, and perfecting the properties of metallic glass

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00566-8 Hear the latest science updates, brought to you by Benjamin Thompson and Nick Howe.

5h

Podcast: The Google-IBM "quantum supremacy" feud

In the first episode of our new podcast, Deep Tech, we dig into the story behind two little words that could change the world.

9h

Potential new heartburn drug studied at VUMC

An investigational drug that binds bile acids in the stomach can reduce the severity of heartburn symptoms in patients with treatment-resistant gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) when combined with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), a new study suggests.

4h

Predictions for 2030 by people shaping the world

At the World Economic Forum in Davos, the elite of the elite gather to hatch plans for the future of the planet. I asked some of this year's participants to tell me one thing they think will happen by 2030 that most people don't realize.

9h

Predominant regional biophysical cooling from recent land cover changes in Europe

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14890-0 Land cover change contributes to regional climate trends. Here, the authors use high-resolution land cover maps and state-of-the-art climate modelling to assess land cover change effects across Europe over 1992-2015, showing widespread cooling after agricultural abandonment but also different, region-specifi

11h

Prepare for pain, hope for relief

Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets

26min

11h

Probing the core of the strong nuclear interaction

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2021-6 High-energy electron scattering that can isolate pairs of nucleons in high-momentum configurations reveals a transition to spin-independent scalar forces at small separation distances, supporting the use of point-like nucleon models to describe dense nuclear systems.

5h

Quantifying snowfall from orographic cloud seeding [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Climate change and population growth have increased demand for water in arid regions. For over half a century, cloud seeding has been evaluated as a technology to increase water supply; statistical approaches have compared seeded to nonseeded events through precipitation gauge analyses. Here, a physically based approach to quantify snowfall…

21h

Radiative absorption enhancements by black carbon controlled by particle-to-particle heterogeneity in composition [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, leading to a strong but uncertain warming effect on climate. A key challenge in modeling and quantifying BC's radiative effect on climate is predicting enhancements in light absorption that result from internal mixing between BC and other aerosol components. Modeling and laboratory studies show…

21h

Rats are New Yorkers, too! Genome study reveals how rodents conquered the Big Apple

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00501-x Changes to genes involved in behaviour, diet and mobility might have helped urban rats.

4h

Red squirrels sniff out danger better than greys

A native predator of the red squirrel seems to be an unlikely ally in its battle with its grey rival.

21h

Reply to Desikan et al.: Micelle formation among various mechanisms of toxin pore formation [Letters (Online Only)]

Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are a diverse class of membrane-active proteins employed primarily by bacteria for unregulated perforation of lipid membranes (1). Based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (2), electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM) structures (3), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments (4), we recently identified two distinct pathways for lipid efflux from…

21h

Representation of distinct reward variables for self and other in primate lateral hypothalamus [Neuroscience]

The lateral hypothalamus (LH) has long been implicated in maintaining behavioral homeostasis essential for the survival of an individual. However, recent evidence suggests its more widespread roles in behavioral coordination, extending to the social domain. The neuronal and circuit mechanisms behind the LH processing of social information are unknown. Here,…

21h

Research suggests adults – not just teens – like electronic cigarette flavors

On February 6, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began to enforce a previously-issued policy on unauthorized flavored cartridge-based e-cigarette products with the goal of addressing the current epidemic of youth use of e-cigarettes. A new study by researchers at Penn State finds that adults enjoy sweet e-cigarette flavors just as much as teens, suggesting that the policy may have conseque

4h

Researcher: Passing Star Could Yeet Earth Out of Solar System

Booted While it's extremely unlikely, there is a chance that incoming stars that whip past the Earth could fling it out of the solar system, argues astrophycisist Paul Sutter on Space.com — the same scientist, you'll recall, who released instructions for building your own DIY wormhole last year. The apocalyptic result, according to Sutter: Our planet is hurtled "into the depths of interstellar sp

4h

Researchers connect microbes in the twilight zone of the ocean with the breakdown of tough organic molecules

Seawater is more than just saltwater. The ocean is a veritable soup of chemicals.

3h

Researchers develop gene catalog comprising community of microbes in vaginal microbio

University of Maryland School of Medicine's (UMSOM) Institute for Genome Sciences (IGS) researchers have created the first catalogue of genes that comprise the community of microbes, which inhabit the human vagina. The catalogue, called human vaginal non-redundant gene catalog (VIRGO), was recently released as a public resource that can be used by researchers to facilitate a more in-depth understa

1h

Researchers overcome the space between protons and neutrons to study heart of matter

Nuclear physicists have entered a new era for probing the strongest force in the universe at its very heart with a novel method of accessing the space between protons and neutrons in dense environments. The research, which was carried out at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, has been published in the journal Nature and opens the door for more precision stud

5h

Researchers report more accurate measurement of neutrons

A research team from Bochum has determined the size of neutrons in a more direct way than ever before, thus correcting previous assumptions.

7h

Response outcomes gate the impact of expectations on perceptual decisions

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14824-w The authors use a combination of perceptual decision making in rats and computational modeling to explore the interplay of priors and sensory cues. They find that rats can learn to either alternate or repeat their actions based on reward likelihood and the influence of bias on their actions disappears after

11h

Revving up immune system may help treat eczema

Studying eczema, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that boosting the number of natural killer cells in the blood is a possible treatment strategy for the skin condition and also may help with related health problems, such as asthma.

2h

Robotic finger with a highly precise sense of touch over a complex, multicurved surface

Researchers have introduced a new type of robotic finger with a sense of touch. Their finger can localize touch with very high precision –<1mm– over a large, multicurved surface, much like its human counterpart.

2h

Robots that teach autistic kids social skills could help them develop

In recent years, advancements in socially-assistive robots have opened up a promising new way for more affordable and personalized care.

1h

Rockets Find First X-rays from Outside Our Galaxy

Originally published in April 1966 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

RotoVR Interactive Chair

submitted by /u/RotoVR [link] [comments]

3h

Safeguarding intestine cells against enteropathogenic Escherichia coli by intracellular protein reaction, a preventive antibacterial mechanism [Chemistry]

A critical problem in the fight against bacterial infection is the rising rates of resistance and the lack of new antibiotics. The discovery of new targets or new antibacterial mechanisms is a potential solution but is becoming more difficult. Here we report an antibacterial mechanism that safeguards intestine cells from…

21h

Scarves to warm you up in-season and between seasons

Beat the cold. (Karen Cantú Q via Unsplash/) It's easy to forget to put on a scarf before you go outside, but then you walk into the cold and the regret hits you like an avalanche. The right neck blanket will help keep you warm, whether you're opting for a down jacket or a light bomber. Of course, you'll want to consider material, style, and length based on the conditions and event you're donning

22h

Scientists discover new compound which could improve photodynamic therapy for cancer

Researchers at the University of Sheffield have synthesized a new compound which could improve the success rate of photodynamic therapy when treating cancer.

6h

Scientists 'film' a quantum measurement

Measuring a quantum system causes it to change — one of the strange but fundamental aspects of quantum mechanics. Researchers at Stockholm University have now been able to demonstrate how this change happens. The results are published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

7h

Scientists make most sensitive measurements to date of silicon's conductivity

Silicon, the best-known semiconductor, is ubiquitous in electronic devices including cellphones, laptops and the electronics in cars. Now, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made the most sensitive measurements to date of how quickly electric charge moves in silicon, a gauge of its performance as a semiconductor. Using a novel method, they have discovered

1h

Seagulls are more likely to pick up food that humans have handled

Seagulls are known for aggressively attempting to swipe people's food, and it seems that when given the choice between identical meals, they favour the one handled by humans

21h

Seeing starch: Novel technique enables gentle observation of biofuel materials

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a new method to peer deep into the nanostructure of biomaterials without damaging the sample. This novel technique can confirm structural features in starch, a carbohydrate important in biofuel production.

1d

Separation chemistry: A step toward greener metal recycling processes

Liquid-to-liquid extraction is the basic process used in hydrometallurgy for recycling metals and decontaminating solvents (to recover molecules that can be re-used or to decontaminate them). Until now, the "recipes" used in chemical processes have been based on operating feedback and theories that are only partly understood. No physical and chemical predictive models have been available to optimi

7h

Should Robots Have a Face?

As automation comes to retail industries, companies are giving machines more humanlike features in order to make them liked, not feared.

4h

Should Scientists Use the Phrase "Quantum Supremacy"? – Facts So Romantic

For someone outside quantum computing, who has encountered "supremacy" mainly in the context of political or current affairs, its meaning can't help but be loaded. Image by BeeBright / Shutterstock Forget for a moment that you know the meaning of "quantum supremacy," the idea of a quantum computer outdoing its conventional counterpart. What does the phrase instantly bring to mind? Perhaps the ide

1d

Silicon's exact conductivity for future solar cell, semiconductor applications

Researchers have made the most sensitive measurements to date of how quickly electric charge moves in silicon, a gauge of its performance as a semiconductor.

1h

Skeptical Science New Research for Week #8, 2020

BAM S survey of 2018 extreme weather The Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society has published a collection of articles examining unusually extreme weather events of 2018 and connections of those to climate change. These investigations are listed separately below but thanks to the generosity of AMS appear free for public access as a single PDF, Explaining Extreme Weather Events of 2018 fr

5h

Skin-specific antibodies neutralizing mycolactone toxin during the spontaneous healing of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection

Buruli ulcer, a neglected tropical infectious disease, is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans . Without treatment, its lesions can progress to chronic skin ulcers, but spontaneous healing is observed in 5% of cases, suggesting the possible establishment of a host strategy counteracting the effects of M. ulcerans . We reveal here a skin-specific local humoral signature of the spontaneous healing proc

3h

Slow, steady increase in exercise intensity is best for heart health

For the vast majority of people, the benefits of physical exercise outweigh the risks. However, for those who have inadequate training or who have underlying heart problems that may not have been detected, the risks of heart issues from extreme exercise, such as participation in marathons and triathlons, are increased.

11h

Small precipitates make big difference in mitigating strength-ductility tradeoff

Researchers from the Institute of Mechanics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, teaming up with scientists from Singapore and the US, have found that nanoscale precipitates provide a unique sustainable dislocation source at sufficiently high stress.

7h

Sodium Ion Conductivity in Superionic IL-Impregnated Metal-Organic Frameworks: Enhancing Stability Through Structural Disorder

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60198-w

11h

SpaceX Gets Approval to Build Starship in LA

SpaceX can move forward with its plans to build rockets in Los Angeles following a unanimous vote by the LA City Council . The 12-0 vote paves the way for Elon Musk's spaceflight company to use a large tract of land at the Port of Los Angeles to conduct research and build components for the upcoming Starship rocket. This spacecraft could eventually take humans to the moon and Mars. Residents of L

5h

Speldesign visar vägen för hur vi vill leva

Speldesign har absolut en plats i stadsplanering visar ny forskning vid BTH. Genom att spela och leka i staden möjliggörs rörelseutrymme, som ställer frågor om hur människor använder publika platser och till vad. Annika Olofsdotter Bergströms forskning handlar om hur människan intra-agerar med omgivningen, det vill säga om relationen mellan människan och platsen, föremål, väder, erfarenheter och

8h

Spending time in nature reduces stress, research finds

New research from an interdisciplinary Cornell team has found that as little as 10 minutes in a natural setting can help college students feel happier and lessen the effects of both physical and mental stress.

1d

Spontaneous gyrotropic electronic order in a transition-metal dichalcogenide

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2011-8 Optical chiral induction and spontaneous gyrotropic electronic order are realized in the transition-metal chalcogenide 1T-TiSe2 by using illumination with mid-infrared circularly polarized light and simultaneous cooling below the critical temperature.

5h

Stanford research maps a faster, easier way to build diamond

With the right amount of pressure and surprisingly little heat, a substance found in fossil fuels can transform into pure diamond.

1d

STAT3 signaling in myeloid cells promotes pathogenic myelin-specific T cell differentiation and autoimmune demyelination [Immunology and Inflammation]

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Dysregulation of STAT3, a transcription factor pivotal to various cellular processes including Th17 cell differentiation, has been implicated in MS. Here, we report that STAT3 is activated in infiltrating monocytic cells near active MS lesions and…

21h

Stem cell transplants in utero offers TX for metabolic disorders that often end pregnancy

Administering stem cell or enzyme therapy in utero may be a path to alleviating some congenital diseases that often result in losing a pregnancy, according to a new study in mice by UC San Francisco researchers, who showed that stem cells can enter the fetal brain during prenatal development and make up for cells that fail to make an essential protein.

2h

Still a fan of the golden tan?

Social media smarts could make you less susceptible to skin cancer as new research shows that media literacy skills can help change people's attitudes about what is believed to be the 'tanned ideal.'

7h

Strain-hardening and suppression of shear-banding in rejuvenated bulk metallic glass

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2016-3 Bulk metallic glasses can acquire the ability to strain-harden through a mechanical rejuvenation treatment at room temperature that retains their non-crystalline structure.

5h

Streptonigrin at low concentration promotes heterochromatin formation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60469-6

11h

Stretchable, wearable coils may make MRI, other medical tests easier on patients

The Purdue team created an adaptable, wearable and stretchable fabric embroidered with conductive threads that provides excellent signal-to-noise ratio for enhanced MRI scanning.

16h

Stretchy coils make MRIs and mammograms more comfortable

New wearable radio-frequency coils could make medical imaging tests like MRIs and mammograms more comfortable, researchers report. Researchers took technology used in the defense and aerospace industries to create their new method for some medical imaging. Anyone who has had a mammogram or an MRI knows how uncomfortable and awkward the tests can be. That's largely because they often use rigid rad

2h

Structural framework for tumors also provides immune protection

Aggressive colorectal cancers set up an interactive network of checkpoints to keep the immune system at bay, scientists report.

16h

Structure and mechanism of the ER-based glucosyltransferase ALG6

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2044-z Analyses reveal a previously undescribed transmembrane protein fold in the endoplasmic reticulum-based glucosyltransferase ALG6 and provide a structural basis for understanding the glucose transfer mechanism.

4h

Study finds key mechanism for how typhoid bacteria infects

A new study has uncovered key details for how the Salmonella bacteria that causes typhoid fever identifies a host's immune cells and delivers toxins that disrupt the immune system and allow the pathogen to spread.

1d

Study finds long-term endurance exercise is associated with enlarged aorta

Study finds high percentage of long term endurance athletes had aortas larger than the upper limit of clinical normality.

5h

Study finds picking up a pingpong paddle may benefit people with Parkinson's

Pingpong may hold promise as a possible form of physical therapy for Parkinson's disease. People with Parkinson's who participated in a pingpong exercise program once a week for six months showed improvement in their Parkinson's symptoms, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to

1d

Study identifies a transition in the strong nuclear force that illuminates the structure of a neutron star's core

Most ordinary matter is held together by an invisible subatomic glue known as the strong nuclear force—one of the four fundamental forces in nature, along with gravity, electromagnetism, and the weak force. The strong nuclear force is responsible for the push and pull between protons and neutrons in an atom's nucleus, which keeps an atom from collapsing in on itself.

6h

Study reveals potential new treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have uncovered a potentially more beneficial treatment regimen for patients with metastatic melanoma.

2h

Study: Boomers Smoking Weed at Unprecedented Rates

From the Department of Sociological Nonshockers comes a study proclaiming that America's baby boomers are, in fact, blazing up, bogarting the blunt, inhaling indica, bonging the bud, smoking the stickyicky — however you say it, the conclusion is clear: adults over the age of 65 are consuming marijuana at steadily increasing rates. The study , published Monday in medical journal JAMA , comes via r

1d

Study: Restricting where and how social security payments can be spent is 'disabling'

Restricting where and how social security payments can be spent does more harm than good, according to the first large, independent study into Compulsory Income Management (CIM) policies in Australia.

8h

Sugary drinks a sour choice for adults trying to maintain normal cholesterol levels

Adults who drank sugary beverages daily had an increased risk of developing abnormal blood cholesterol and triglycerides compared to those who did not, according to new findings from a prospective study by researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University.

11h

Suited up: Testing how microgravity affects our ability to grab and manipulate objects in space

When it comes to grasping an object, our eyes, ears and hands are intimately connected. Our brain draws information from different senses, such as sight, sound and touch, to coordinate hand movements.

9h

Supporting worker sleep is good for business

A long-haul truck driver fell asleep during his shift in Sunbury, Pennsylvania, on Jan. 13. Heading north on Route 147, he drifted into the eastbound shoulder for almost 375 feet, struck the side of the road and flipped his rig. Thankfully, the driver only suffered a minor injury and nobody else was harmed.

6h

Surveillance after surgery does not improve outcomes for patients with glioblastoma

A retrospective study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care showed patients who underwent surveillance imaging after surgery for brain tumor resection did not have better outcomes than patients who did not have imaging and returned when they felt symptoms of recurrence.

8h

Suspected state buying fails to lift Asia stocks

Region's shares fall for third day on pandemic fears despite 'national team' purchases

17h

SWOG study shows genetic effects of pre-surgical chemo in breast cancer

Results from one of the first studies to determine the effects of pre-surgical, or neoadjuvant, chemotherapy on the breast cancer genome offer up two key insights. One is a before treatment finding that can help predict which patients would most benefit from pre-surgical chemo, and the other an after treatment finding which sheds light on how cancer cells survive chemotherapy. Findings appear in C

2h

Targeting stromal cells may help overcome treatment resistance in glioblastoma

The deadly brain cancer glioblastoma (GBM) is often resistant to chemotherapy and radiation, but new research shows targeting stromal cells — the cells that serve as the connective tissue of the organs — may be an effective way of overcoming that resistance.

2h

Team develops separator that reduces gas crossover for water electrolyzer

Dr. Won-chul Cho of the Hydrogen Research Department of the Korea Institute of Energy Research (President Jong-nam Kim) has developed a separator membrane that significantly reduces gas crossover while exhibiting high performance comparable to the commercial separator used with alkaline water electrolyzer process. The research has been published in the International Journal of Energy Research, the

5h

8h

The aging skin microenvironment dictates stem cell behavior [Developmental Biology]

Aging manifests with architectural alteration and functional decline of multiple organs throughout an organism. In mammals, aged skin is accompanied by a marked reduction in hair cycling and appearance of bald patches, leading researchers to propose that hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) are either lost, differentiate, or change to an…

21h

The archaeology of Armageddon

Nature, Published online: 26 February 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00510-w After a century of digging, archaeologists are still tantalized by the secrets of the 7,000-year-old city of Megiddo. By Andrew Robinson.

12h

The Archean atmosphere

The atmosphere of the Archean eon—one-third of Earth's history—is important for understanding the evolution of our planet and Earth-like exoplanets. New geological proxies combined with models constrain atmospheric composition. They imply surface O 2 levels –6 times present, N 2 levels that were similar to today or possibly a few times lower, and CO 2 and CH 4 levels ranging ~10 to 2500 and 10 2

3h

The best preoperative definition of cancer-related malnutrition depends on cancer type

The best approach for surgeons to identify malnourished cancer patients before they have a cancer operation may be specifically related to the type of cancer.

4h

The Chart That Reveals Your Kid's Adult Height

"He's going to be really tall!" exclaims your mother-in-law, watching your 2-year-old run in circles around the room. "How would you know?" you reply, attempting to protect him from the glass table. "Height at 2, multiplied by two. Everyone knows that! He'll be well over 6 feet." The 2 x 2 rule, popular on the internet and at playgrounds, feels like a classic old wives' tale. Of course, old wives

9h

The Disappearing Songs of Hawaii's Endangered Native Birds

New research finds that different species of honeycreepers on the Hawaiian island of Kauai are singing the same songs, with less complex vocal signals, due to the decreasing size of their populations. The repercussions could affect the birds' abilities to mate and communicate, imperiling generations to come.

12h

The Enemy of Poor Americans

I n June 1968 , the Supreme Court issued a 9–0 ruling giving back Sylvester Smith and her four young children their welfare benefits, and striking down the "man in the house" rule. At the time, Alabama was one of a number of states, many in the South, that removed families from the welfare rolls if the mother was having sexual relations with a man, even if he was not living with her and was not s

9h

The eugenics debate isn't over – but we should be wary of people who claim it can fix social problems

Andrew Sabisky, a UK government adviser, recently resigned over comments supporting eugenics. Around the same time, the evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins—best known for his book The Selfish Gene—provoked controversy when tweeting that while eugenics is morally deplorable, it "would work."

6h

The first quantum orienteering by quantum entangling measurements enhancement

The CAS key lab of quantum information, led by Prof. Guo Guangcan, Li Chuanfeng, Xiang Guoyong and collaborators, reports enhancing the performance of quantum orienteering with entangling measurements via photonic quantum walks. These results were published online by Physical Review Letters on February 13th.

9h

The habenular G-protein-coupled receptor 151 regulates synaptic plasticity and nicotine intake [Neuroscience]

The habenula, an ancient small brain area in the epithalamus, densely expresses nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is critical for nicotine intake and aversion. As such, identification of strategies to manipulate habenular activity may yield approaches to treat nicotine addiction. Here we show that GPR151, an orphan G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) highly…

21h

The Hard Drive With 68 Billion Melodies

In an era when millions of songwriters upload music to the internet—and just about any song can find itself plucked from obscurity by TikTok teens —it seems inevitable that the same melodies end up in different songs. There have been a number of high-profile music copyright-infringement cases, including a multimillion-dollar decision against Katy Perry for her song " Dark Horse ." A jury found th

3h

The life-long psychological effects your first love has on you, according to science

Biological researcher Helen Fisher's 2005 fMRI study on couples in love proved that romantic love is primarily a motivation system that can be similar to what we experience during addiction. Cognitive scientists at MIT explain that we experience peak processing and memory power at around age 18. We experience a lot of firsts (such as our first love) at a time when our brains are still developing

1h

The Loudest Debate Yet

W ell , that was loud. The seven Democrats vying for the party's presidential nomination shouted their way through the 10th debate tonight in Charleston, South Carolina, ahead of Saturday's primary. They interrupted one another, bickered with one another, and bitterly accused one another of all manner of political and moral failings. "I'm not out of time!" former Vice President Joe Biden snapped

18h

The Moons farside shallow subsurface structure unveiled by ChangE-4 Lunar Penetrating Radar

On 3 January 2019, China's Chang'E-4 (CE-4) successfully landed on the eastern floor of Von Kármán crater within the South Pole–Aitken Basin, becoming the first spacecraft in history to land on the Moon's farside. Here, we report the observations made by the Lunar Penetrating Radar (LPR) onboard the Yutu-2 rover during the first two lunar days. We found a signal penetration at the CE-4 landing si

3h

The Most Unadaptable Book in Fiction

There are a few moments, reading Joan Didion's 1996 novel, The Last Thing He Wanted , when it's possible to sense why someone saw cinematic potential in this exceptionally interior and evasive story. This is a tale about gunrunning in tropical climes, about beachside murders and political corruption. But its author also wants to deconstruct the prototypical elements of storytelling, such as chara

2h

9h

The Peter Pan Story Has Lost Its Magic

What is it about Peter Pan ? The essential themes of J. M. Barrie's 1904 "fairy play" have been repeated throughout pop culture so many times, in so many forms, that they've essentially become modern myth. A magical getaway from a staid reality to a world of adventure, centered around a hero blessed with eternal youth—it's easy to see the appeal in that elemental mix of excitement and danger. But

5h

The professionals who predict the future for a living

Everywhere from business to medicine to the climate, forecasting the future is a complex and absolutely critical job. So how do you do it—and what comes next?

9h

7h

The Secret to Enjoying Nature Is … Your Phone

I was spending way too much time staring at outdoorsy influencers on Instagram. So I downloaded the iNaturalist app—and stepped outside myself.

10h

The Sixty Trillion Dollar Man

Bernie Sanders faced more pointed attacks last night over his potential vulnerabilities than he ever has at a debate. But the blustery and disorderly session once again failed to fully explore what could be the Vermont senator's greatest general-election weakness: the massive size and scope of his spending and tax proposals, which, depending on the estimate, would cost $50 trillion to $60 trillio

6h

The Top 10 Breakthrough Technologies For 2020

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

1h

Thermonuclear X-ray bursts and dips detected from the X-ray binary 4U 1323-62

Using the AstroSat satellite, astronomers have investigated a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) known as 4U 1323-62, reporting the detection of thermonuclear X-ray bursts and dips from the source. The discovery was presented in a paper published February 19 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

7h

These Are the Pentagon's New Ethics "Principles" for AI in Warfare

"Ethical Use" On Monday, the Pentagon announced the official adoption of a series of new principles for ethical use of artificial intelligence in warfare, the Associated Press reports . The principles were formed out of a commission with the (darkly Newspeak-y) name the Defense Innovation Board, which released its recommendations (title: " AI Principles: Recommendations on the Ethical Use of Arti

1d

This Clever Robotic Finger Feels With Light

The nerves in human fingertips are great at sensing things. For robots, learning to touch is more complicated.

10h

Timing of fungal spore release dictates survival during atmospheric transport [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Fungi disperse spores to move across landscapes and spore liberation takes different patterns. Many species release spores intermittently; others release spores at specific times of day. Despite intriguing evidence of periodicity, why (and if) the timing of spore release would matter to a fungus remains an open question. Here we…

21h