Search Posts

nyheder2020januar06

<>100%

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Over-hunting walruses contributed to the collapse of Norse Greenland, study suggests

Norse Greenlanders may have chased dwindling walrus herds ever farther north in an effort to maintain their economy, when the value of walrus ivory tanked after the introduction of elephant tusks into European markets in the 1200s.

7h

Future(s) Studies

36<>

Drone technology enables rapid planting of trees – up to 150x faster than traditional methods. Researchers hope to use swarms of drones to plant a target of 500 billion trees.

submitted by /u/SirT6 [link] [comments]

3h

Viden

1K

'Nej tak, jeg drikker ikke i januar': Nytter det noget, at du dropper druk i en måned?

Det hjælper ikke, at du stopper én ud af årets 12 måneder, siger ekspert.

9h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Dogs and wolves are both good at cooperating

A team of researchers have found that dogs and wolves are equally good at cooperating with partners to obtain a reward. When tested in same-species pairs, dogs and wolves proved equally successful and efficient at solving a given problem. This finding suggests that basic cooperation abilities were present in a common ancestor of dogs and wolves, and have not been lost in the domestication process.

now

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

<>

LD Motif Finder locates ancient hidden protein patterns

An iterative machine learning approach has identified elusive 800 million-year-old amino acid patterns that are responsible for facilitating protein interactions.

now

Phys.org

Why holidaying in a disaster zone isn't unreasonable

Holidaying in a disaster zone might seem strange, but "volunteer tourism" can actually help communities recover from natural disasters.

4min

Phys.org

Researchers use remote sensing to estimate nitrogen deposition in North China

Northern China, a hotspot of air pollution, has always been an area of great interest to study owing to the significant impacts on human health, the climate and ecosystems.

4min

Phys.org

Dogs and wolves are both good at cooperating

A team of researchers have found that dogs and wolves are equally good at cooperating with partners to obtain a reward. When tested in same-species pairs, dogs and wolves proved equally successful and efficient at solving a given problem. This finding suggests that basic cooperation abilities were present in a common ancestor of dogs and wolves, and have not been lost in the domestication process.

4min

Phys.org

LD Motif Finder locates ancient hidden protein patterns

An iterative machine learning approach has identified elusive 800 million-year-old amino acid patterns that are responsible for facilitating protein interactions.

4min

The Atlantic

Soleimani's Ultimate Revenge

The death of Qassem Soleimani is a sobering blow for the Iranian regime. Soleimani embodied everything the regime wanted to project about itself—influence, ruthlessness, agility, confidence. He kept Iran's enemies awake at night, and his theocratic masters sleeping soundly in a world of real and imagined threats at home and abroad. For years, Tehran's leadership talked fatalistically about Soleim

11min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Commercial weight management groups could support women to manage their weight after giving birth

Women who were overweight at the start of their pregnancy would welcome support after they have given birth in the form of commercial weight management groups, University of Warwick-led research has found.

16min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Boys who are bullied online may have more risky sex

Recent research suggests that adolescent boys who are cyber bullied pursue risky sexual behaviors more frequently than girls who are cyber bullied. Results may reflect a culture of toxic masculinity and highlight the need to pay special attention to male victims, who may be reluctant to self-identify, and therefore, at greater risk of negative health outcomes.

16min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Half of women with heart failure get the wrong treatment

As many as 50 per cent of women suffering from cardiac arrest are given insufficient treatment, because the heart failure was not caused by a heart attack.

16min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cancer drugs could potentially treat COPD, Sheffield research finds

New research has shown the potential for clinically available cancer treatments to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

16min

Phys.org

Volunteer tourism can aid disaster recovery

Holidaying in a disaster zone might seem crazy, but "volunteer tourism" can actually help communities recover from natural disasters, a new study finds. And it can offer a unique and rewarding experience for volunteers, if done carefully.

20min

Phys.org

21

Laser pulse creates frequency doubling in amorphous dielectric material

Researchers have demonstrated a new all-optical technique for creating robust second-order nonlinear effects in materials that don't normally support them. Using a laser pulse fired at an array of gold triangles on a titanium dioxide (TiO2) slab, the researchers created excited electrons that briefly doubled the frequency of a beam from a second laser as it bounced off the amorphous TiO2 slab.

20min

Quanta Magazine

22

Biodiversity Alters Strategies of Bacterial Evolution

In the closing paragraph of On the Origin of Species , Charles Darwin urged readers to "contemplate a tangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth." Those plants, birds, insects and worms, he continued, all evolved as they did because of the complex web of ecological fact

21min

Popular Science | RSS

Four powerful laptops for gamers and creative professionals

Laptops for gamers and designers. ( Avi Richards via /) For gamers and designers, laptops can be a lot more than a portable file cabinet. They can be mini-studios, and less gargantuan gaming centers. To get in touch with the creative side of the laptop, you might want to start with these offerings. Judge it not by size. (Amazon/) When you're talking about gaming or designing, it's all about the v

22min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hubble surveys gigantic galaxy

To kickstart the 30th anniversary year of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, Hubble has imaged a majestic spiral galaxy. Galaxy UGC 2885 may be the largest known in the local universe. It is 2.5 times wider than our Milky Way and contains 10 times as many stars.

31min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

LD Motif Finder locates ancient hidden protein patterns

A machine learning method has identified highly elusive amino acid sequences involved in cell morphogenesis and adhesion and in diseases like cancer.

31min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers use remote sensing to estimate nitrogen deposition in North China

A new study estimated the nitrogen deposition in northern China through a combination of remote sensing data and atmospheric chemical transport model simulations.

31min

The Atlantic

The NFL Is No Longer the Patriots'

Even before Saturday's AFC wild-card game against the Tennessee Titans, a sense of finality clung to the New England Patriots. The week prior, in the last game of the regular season, they had lost to the woeful Miami Dolphins, a result that dropped them out of the AFC's top two seeds and kept them from an opening-round playoff bye for the first time in a decade. In the days before the Titans game

33min

Ingeniøren

Coding Pirates får 380.000 kroner til nyt kode-eksperiment i København

Det er folkeoplysnings-udvalget i Københavns Kommune, der har fundet pengeposen frem. Til en start er der betalt et års husleje.

38min

Inside Science

The Inherent Tension of Trying to Make a Collision Sport Safe

A conversation with Kathleen Bachynski, the author of a new history of youth tackle football. FootballPicture.jpg Image credits: Melinda Nagy/Shutterstock Sports Monday, January 6, 2020 – 10:15 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — Kathleen Bachynski is an associate professor of public health at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Her new book, " No Game for Boys to Play ," explore

39min

Wired

88

The Golden Globes Mostly Shut Out Apple TV+ and Netflix

'The Morning Show' and 'The Irishman' were both overlooked during last night's awards ceremony.

43min

Popular Science | RSS

Four handheld power massagers for athletes and desk workers

Percussion can be soothing. (Hyperice /) It may be true that hustling can help you crush your goals. But sometimes, the "it" you're crushing in gym classes and workplaces is just, well, you. The next time you crawl out of the weight room or a particularly long day of meetings, be prepared with a tool that targets your tension. Power massagers are portable, can pay for themselves in just a few use

45min

Singularity Hub

What Needs to Happen to Get to the Flying Car Future

At this year's Consumer Electronics Show, one of the world's largest helicopter manufacturers will showcase what a city might look like with high-volume aerial transit options. Bell is showing off a connected city concept with miniature versions of its Nexus air taxi and APT cargo drone flying from building to building, as three layers of software and detect-and-avoid systems ensure their safe ar

45min

Ingeniøren

Nyt center skal lave søvnmålinger via øret

Millionbevilling til Aarhus Universitet skal sikre fortsat arbejde med søvnmålinger via en lille prop i øret.

45min

Wired

76

CES Liveblog Day 1: Flying Cars, Smart Fridges, and 5G Chips

The WIRED crew is in Las Vegas to bring you up-to-the-minute coverage of news from CES.

49min

Phys.org

Sublimation, not melting: Graphene surprises researchers again

Physicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the Institute for High Pressure Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences have used computer modeling to refine the melting curve of graphite that has been studied for over 100 years, with inconsistent findings. They also found that graphene "melting" is, in fact, sublimation. The results of the study are published in the journal

49min

Phys.org

New metabolic pathway discovered in rumen microbiome

Cows can adapt themselves to a fluctuating sodium content in their feed. How they do that was so far a secret. Researchers from Goethe University have now discovered a bacterium in the microbiome of the rumen which has a new type of cell respiration.

49min

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

New metabolic pathway discovered in rumen microbiome

Cows can adapt themselves to a fluctuating sodium content in their feed. How they do that was so far a secret. Researchers from Goethe University have now discovered a bacterium in the microbiome of the rumen which has a new type of cell respiration.

51min

Popular Science | RSS

Tech trends to expect at this year's Consumer Electronics Show

The Kohler Moxie showerhead has a built-in Bluetooth speaker with Alexa (Stan Horaczek/) Like with fashion and Instagram Story features that tell you what Disney character you are, the tech world is full of trends. The annual CES is a chance for tech companies from all around the world to bring their new products—or at least promises of new products—into the Nevada desert and show them off to the

54min

Popular Science | RSS

20<>

Handheld navigation systems that keep you on route when you lose cell service

Feel free to wander. (Drew Collins via Unsplash/) Portable navigation systems pinpoint location using a networks of satellites, so they can save you from becoming stranded even when you're in the wilderness, out of cell service range. Two systems exist: the Global Positioning System (GPS) is a satellite-based navigation system that includes 24 satellites. It's available worldwide and is funded by

54min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The turbulent life of two supermassive black holes caught in a galaxy crash

An international team of astronomers used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to create the most detailed image yet of the gas surrounding two supermassive black holes in a merging galaxy.

56min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antibodies gather and form a circle for defensive attack

Antibodies play a crucial role in our immune system by linking antigen recognition with complement activation for attacking foreign cells. Using high-speed atomic force microscopy, collaborative groups, including researchers at National Institutes of Natural Sciences and Nagoya City University, have successfully visualized the dynamic process of antigen-mediated interplay between antibodies and a

56min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dogs and wolves are both good at cooperating

A team of researchers have found that dogs and wolves are equally good at cooperating with partners to obtain a reward. When tested in same-species pairs, dogs and wolves proved equally successful and efficient at solving a given problem. This finding suggests that basic cooperation abilities were present in a common ancestor of dogs and wolves, and have not been lost in the domestication process.

56min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News<>

Sleep difficulties in children with Autism caused by shallower brain waves — Ben-Gurion U.

'For the first time, we found that children with more serious sleep issues showed brain activity that indicated more shallow and superficial sleep,' says BGU Prof. Ilan Dinstein, head of the National Autism Research Center of Israel and a member of BGU's Department of Psychology. 'We also found a clear relationship between the severity of sleep disturbances as reported by the parents and the reduc

56min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Power dressing

Sensors that are worn on the skin could soon be powered by our own body heat.

56min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Volunteer tourism can aid disaster recovery

Volunteer tourism can help communities recover from natural disasters, as well as offer a unique and rewarding experience for volunteers, a new study reveals.

56min

Phys.org

Reducing human-induced earthquake risk

Researchers at EPFL and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy have devised strategies for reducing the earthquake risk associated with geothermal energy, CO2 storage and other human activities happening deep underground.

57min

Phys.org

Dressing up racism as a compliment just doesn't add up

The narrative that "Asians are good at math" is pervasive in the United States. Young children are aware of it. College students' academic performance can be affected by it. And Asian American presidential candidate Andrew Yang has made his mathematical aptitude a feature of his campaign.

57min

Future(s) Studies

You can now buy your own personal robot postman (though he's not cheap)

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

1h

Future(s) Studies

JetBlue Airways Corp. said it will become the first large U.S. airline to offset emissions from all of its domestic flights, aiming to become carbon neutral by July as pressure grows on the industry from climate change activists.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

1h

Future(s) Studies

As Thailand faces water shortage and drought declared in 31 provinces, Thai Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha has made clear to his government that he will head the command center in tackling drought. The NWRC will be drawing up a 20-year water management plan

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

1h

Future(s) Studies

AI and Robotics are Driving the Stage With Better Solar Cells and Advanced Technologies

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

1h

Future(s) Studies

History of the two-day weekend offers lessons for today's calls for a four-day week

submitted by /u/thinkB4WeSpeak [link] [comments]

1h

Future(s) Studies

Autonomous cooking system takes the reins in the kitchen: At the appropriate times, it will take care of any chopping, mixing, blending, kneading, weighing, boiling, emulsifying, steaming, grinding, grating and whisking – not to mention cooking. The unit will even clean itself.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

1h

Futurity.org

Double whammy killed coral reefs off Texas coast

Researchers may have solved the mystery of what caused the death of the large and colorful reefs about 100 miles from the Galveston coast 30 years ago. Considered some of the healthiest coral reefs remaining in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, the large and colorful reefs at the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary grow on top of shallow, submerged banks in otherwise deep water. As repo

1h

Futurity.org

How politicians steal elections in Eastern Europe

Voters in Hungary and Romania face the threat of local government officials or employers punishing them for supporting the wrong candidate, according to a new book. Isabela Mares , professor of political science at Yale University, conducted an intensive multi-year investigation of political clientelism—illegal exchanges of goods and services for political support—in several Eastern European nati

1h

Phys.org

How to write better pet adoption ads

About 1.5 million dogs and cats are euthanized in shelters each year because they weren't adopted or had health problems that concerned potential owners.

1h

Phys.org

94

Constructive molecular configurations for surface-defect passivation of perovskite photovoltaics

Materials scientists aim to enable surface-trap-mediated nonradiative charge recombination to engineer highly efficient metal-halide perovskite photovoltaics (solar cells). Since unproductive charge recombination at surface defects can limit the efficiency of hybrid perovskite solar cells, scientists can passivate the defects (induce an acid-base chemical treatment) using small molecular binding.

1h

Phys.org

Oldest known city view of Venice discovered

A researcher from the University of St Andrews has unearthed the oldest known city view of Venice, dating from the 14th century.

1h

Phys.org<>

New technique can show link between prey and microplastics

Scientists have developed a new method to investigate links between top predator diets and the amount of microplastic they consume through their prey.

1h

Phys.org

Eggs from endangered sea turtle stolen from Thai beach

A community in southern Thailand has offered a reward for catching whoever stole dozens of unhatched eggs of an endangered turtle species.

1h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Laser pulse creates frequency doubling in amorphous dielectric material

Researchers have demonstrated a new all-optical technique for creating robust second-order nonlinear effects in materials that don't normally support them. Using a laser pulse fired at an array of gold triangles on a titanium dioxide (TiO2) slab, the researchers created excited electrons that briefly doubled the frequency of a beam from a second laser as it bounced off the amorphous TiO2 slab.

1h

The Atlantic

500+

Trump Can't Handle a War of Choice

America's leaders would be unwise to start any war knowing that the country's troops were undertrained or its weapons understocked. Just as surely, they would be unwise to allow a war of choice under President Donald Trump, who is too polarizing and commands too little respect from critics to lead such an effort effectively. Trump supporters and critics disagree about many things. But both factio

1h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Eggs from endangered sea turtle stolen from Thai beach

A community in southern Thailand has offered a reward for catching whoever stole dozens of unhatched eggs of an endangered turtle species.

1h

Sciencemag

March of the Raman Images

Well, since I mentioned just the other day (and not for the first time) that determining drug concentrations and localization in cells is a major unsolved problem, I should probably talk about this new paper (a collaboration between groups in Edinburgh and Glasgow, nice to see since their cities are not always collaborative in all fields!) It highlights the technique of stimulated Raman scatterin

1h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Before you hit 'share' on that cute animal photo, consider the harm it can cause

Limbani the chimpanzee has about 650,000 Instagram followers. In recent months the account has featured viral photos and videos of the captive young ape playing the guitar, bouncing on a trampoline and wearing a giant banana costume.

1h

The Scientist RSS

Capturing RNA of All Sizes in a Single NGS Library Prep

High-quality next-generation RNA sequencing depends on the preparation of high-quality libraries containing the whole transcriptome.

1h

Ingeniøren

Teknologisk Institut: »Nogle tror stadig 3D-print er løsningen på alt«

PLUS. 3D-print er ikke for alle. Men for dem, der giver sig i kast med teknologien, er der flere ting at være opmærksom på for at komme i mål med prototypen eller det færdige produkt, lyder rådet fra Teknologisk Institut.

1h

Phys.org

Before you hit 'share' on that cute animal photo, consider the harm it can cause

Limbani the chimpanzee has about 650,000 Instagram followers. In recent months the account has featured viral photos and videos of the captive young ape playing the guitar, bouncing on a trampoline and wearing a giant banana costume.

1h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Epilepsy study shows link between brain activity and memory

A new Cedars-Sinai study reveals how memory and abnormal brain activity are linked in patients with epilepsy who often report problems with memory. The data show that abnormal electrical pulses from specific brain cells in these patients are associated with a temporary kind of memory disruption called transient cognitive impairment.

1h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers create nanoscale sensors to better see how high pressure affects materials

Researchers have developed new nanoscale technology to image and measure more of the stresses and strains on materials under high pressures.

1h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News<>

Aspirin appears to curb colorectal cancer recurrence and tumor growth, study finds

The benefits of a daily aspirin may extend beyond heart health to colorectal cancer treatment, say City of Hope researchers who have found aspirin appears to reduce tumor growth and inhibit recurrence of the disease. The trick now, researchers say, is to determine the right dosage of aspirin that can be used as a daily prophylactic without triggering dangerous side effects such as stomach and brai

1h

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

Researchers Create Particle Accelerator on a Chip

You've no doubt heard of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the massive particle accelerator straddling the border between France and Switzerland. The large size of this instrument allows scientists to do cutting-edge research, but particle accelerators could be useful in many fields if they weren't so huge. The age of room-sized (and larger) colliders may be coming to an end now that researchers f

1h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Drones effective tools for fruit farmers

People have used the phrase "drone on and on" for a long time. Webster's dictionary defines this figure of speech as "to speak for a long time in a dull voice without saying anything interesting."

1h

The Scientist RSS

Capturing RNA of All Sizes in a Single NGS Library Prep

[no content]

1h

Phys.org

40

Global warming found to give rise to earlier springs contributing to drier summers

An international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests global warming is giving rise to earlier springs in some parts of the world, which contributes to drier summers—at least in the northern hemisphere. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of satellite data over a 30-year period and what they learned from it.

1h

Phys.org

53<>

Making bio-coal from plant waste to mitigate climate change

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has found a way to produce bio-coal from plant waste. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their process and how the resulting product could be used.

1h

Phys.org

Drones effective tools for fruit farmers

People have used the phrase "drone on and on" for a long time. Webster's dictionary defines this figure of speech as "to speak for a long time in a dull voice without saying anything interesting."

1h

Phys.org

Hermit crabs' lesson on wealth inequality

Can hermit crabs teach us about a common global problem—wealth inequality? The answer is yes, according to a first-of-its-kind study published in the January issue of Physica A.

1h

Phys.org

Making sense of Australia's bushfire crisis means asking hard questions—and listening to the answers

Bushfires plunder lives and landscapes in myriad ways, but they often start the same way. A bright morning suddenly turns to night. Ash flutters down from the sky, propelled ahead of the roaring fire front. An awful red glow slinks over the horizon.

1h

Phys.org

Image: Hubble sights galaxy's celestial sequins

This smattering of celestial sequins is a spiral galaxy named NGC 4455, located in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair). This might sound like an odd name for a constellation—and in fact it is somewhat unusual. It's the only modern constellation to be named in honor of a real person from history: Queen Berenice II of Egypt.

1h

Futurity.org

Evidence in Java says humans and Homo erectus didn't overlap

New research says human fossils from central Java, which Dutch geologists excavated 90 years ago, are around 120,000 years old. "This tells us Homo erectus lived to Australia's north just before Homo sapiens arrived on the Australian continent 65,000 years ago," says Michael Westaway, professor in the University of Queensland's School of Social Science. "The dates we have now established provide

1h

Wired

84

One Free Press Coalition Spotlights Journalists Under Attack – January 2020

The Prime Minister of Malta will resign this month in connection with a reporter's murder investigation, and a Uyghur writer remains imprisoned in China.

1h

Phys.org

100+

Glitch detected in the pulsar PSR J0908−4913

Using the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (MOST), astronomers have detected a glitch in the radio pulsar PSR J0908−4913. The finding, detailed in a paper published December 18 on the arXiv preprint server, could be helpful in shedding more light on the properties and nature of this pulsar.

1h

Phys.org

Communities can combat racism, hate and extremism with education

Late one afternoon this past summer, after leaving my Winnipeg office, I came across a poster that read: "When the house of cards comes crashing down, we'll be ready. Will you join us?" In the background of this poster, the bridge that connects St. Boniface at the Forks was visible, while in the foreground, a masked soldier stood ominously with an assault rifle.

1h

Phys.org

Top UK bosses earn annual average wage in days: research

By the end of Monday Britain's highest-paid bosses will have already pocketed the amount of money the nation's average worker will earn over the entire year, according to new research.

1h

Phys.org

Understanding bushfire-triggered thunderstorms may save lives

Researchers say a better understanding of the dangerous yet surprisingly common phenomenon of wildfires triggering supercell thunderstorms could reduce risk to life and property.

1h

Phys.org

The bushfires are horrendous—but expect cyclones, floods and heatwaves, too

Public attention on the disastrous bushfire crisis in Australia will rightly continue for weeks to come. But as we direct resources to coping and recovery, we should not forget other weather and climate challenges looming this summer.

1h

Phys.org

As bushfire and holiday seasons converge, it may be time to say goodbye to the typical Australian summer holiday

For 40 years I have studied bushfires in Australia. It has been my life's work to try to better understand Australian landscapes and the interaction of humans and landscape fire.

2h

Phys.org

Biodiverse forests better at storing carbon for long periods, says study

As the effects of climate change are increasingly felt around the world, possible solutions—from reducing fossil fuel emissions to capturing carbon—have come to dominate policy discussions. Planting new forests and restoring existing ones have emerged as some of the best ways to capture CO2, since trees pull carbon out of the air during photosynthesis, then store it in their trunks and roots.

2h

The Scientist RSS

Vegetation Filters Harmful Particulates from Air–But How Much?

Studies on various roadside layouts and species tend to yield different results for plants' effectiveness at alleviating pollution.

2h

NeuroLogica Blog

88<>

Zeroing In on Memories

How do memories work? That has been a burning question for over a century, since Richard Semon introduced the term "Engram" in the early 20th century as the fundamental unit of memory in the brain. I should say, that is how long the question existed in its modern neuroscientific form. Thinking about the nature of memory goes back to the early Greek philosophers. In fact we have evidence that they

2h

Big Think<>

Study may explain how infections reduce autism symptoms

For many years, some parents have noticed that their autistic children's behavioral symptoms diminished when they had a fever. This phenomenon has been documented in at least two large-scale studies over the past 15 years, but it was unclear why fever would have such an effect. A new study from MIT and Harvard Medical School sheds light on the cellular mechanisms that may underlie this phenomenon

2h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

2017 San Diego wildfire increased pediatric ER visits for breathing problems

A small wildfire in San Diego County in 2017 resulted in a big uptick in children visiting the emergency room for breathing problems.

2h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Some genetic sequencing fail to analyze large segments of DNA

Children who undergo expansive genetic sequencing may not be getting the thorough DNA analysis their parents were expecting, say experts at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

2h

Futurity.org

Team maps the 'wasabi sensor'

Researchers have captured the shape, in unprecedented detail, of a biological structure in the mouth, nose, and throat that senses pungent, irritating chemicals. Their new map of "the wasabi sensor" appears in the journal Neuron . The sensor, called TRPA1, is from a family of transient receptor potential channels, or TRP, that have been studied intensively as drug targets for pain and inflammatio

2h

New on MIT Technology Review

200+

This NASA satellite image shows the extent of Australia's devastating wildfires

[no content]

2h

Phys.org

Student researchers make dismaying microplastics find in the Arctic Ocean

Aboard the Icebreaker Oden, a Swedish vessel on an Artic expedition, a multidisciplinary group of scientists, filmmakers and students, including three City College of New York undergraduates, made a dismaying discovery in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. "Microplastics, a lot of them," said Krystian Kopka, junior in CCNY's Grove School of Engineering.

2h

Phys.org

Making computers and smartphones more energy efficient with novel tiny structures

With enhanced properties such as greater strength, lighter weight, increased electrical conductivity and chemical reactivity, nanomaterials (NMs) are widely used in areas like ICT, energy and medicine. For example, nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires with different size, structure and chemical composition have been successfully synthesised for various applications in mechanical, electromechanical, e

2h

The Atlantic

200+

1776 Honors America's Diversity in a Way 1619 Does Not

America's original revolutionaries, along with Abraham Lincoln , Frederick Douglass , and Martin Luther King Jr ., all placed the universalist ideals of the Declaration of Independence at the center of this country's founding. But that paradigm is under vigorous challenge from The New York Times Magazine . Last summer, the magazine began publishing the 1619 Project, marking the 400th anniversary

2h

Popular Science | RSS

20

Ecological secrets hide between the notes of indigenous songs

The keeper of hundreds of Kwakwaka'wakw songs, Kwaksistalla Wathl'thla (Clan Chief Adam Dick), chanting at a feast (qui'las) with Mayanilh (Dr. Daisy Sewid-Smith). ((Bert Crowfoot), Author provided/) Since the beginning of time, music has been a way of communicating observations of and experiences about the world. For Indigenous Peoples who have lived within their traditional territories for gene

2h

Ingeniøren

Ny dansk radiokanal sender på mellembølge

PLUS. For første gang i otte år sendes der nu dansk radio på mellembølge. Radio208 sendes fra Ishøj på 1.440 kHz – samme frekvens som Radio Luxembourg.

2h

Wired

100+

The 10 Neatest Things We've Seen at CES So Far

Tech's biggest show is just getting started, and we've already gotten the chance to try some fun tech gadgets.

2h

Wired

72

Live Your Best Life—On and Off Your Phone—in 2020

A wave of new books offer different lessons on how to cope with an always-connected, information-deluged world.

2h

Nature

Twelve tips for engaging with biologists, as told by a physicist

Nature, Published online: 06 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03961-y The fastest way to become fluent in the language of a new scientific discipline is to embed yourself inside it and use it regularly, says Sarah Bohndiek.

2h

Nature

Thirteen tips for engaging with physicists, as told by a biologist

Nature, Published online: 06 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03960-z Working alongside physicists made me a better science communicator, says Ken Kosik, and helped me to clarify knowledge gaps in my own field.

2h

Scientific American

What CRISPR-Baby Prison Sentences Mean for Research

A Chinese court sent a strong signal by punishing He Jiankui and two colleagues — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Scientific American Content

What CRISPR-Baby Prison Sentences Mean for Research

A Chinese court sent a strong signal by punishing He Jiankui and two colleagues — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Ancient Cooking

Hunter-gatherers cooked and ate carb-rich rhizomes.

2h

Phys.org

Power dressing: Electricity-generating, stretchy, self-mending materials for wearables

Wearable electronics could be perpetually powered by stretchy, self-mending materials that use body heat to generate electricity. Three carefully curated organic compounds have been combined to develop a prototype thermoelectric material that is both stretchy and self-healing, can generate its own electricity, and is robust enough to withstand the stresses and strains of daily life.

2h

Science Magazine<>

Virus used in gene therapies may pose cancer risk, dog study hints

Delivered DNA integrates into host genome, stabilizing protein production but stirring fears of mutating cell growth genes

2h

Phys.org

Task force: Changes needed to increase African American physics and astronomy students

Due to long-term and systemic issues leading to the consistent exclusion of African Americans in physics and astronomy, a task force is recommending sweeping changes and calling for awareness into the number and experiences of African American students studying the fields.

3h

Phys.org

55

Astronomers spot distant galaxy group driving ancient cosmic makeover

An international team of astronomers funded in part by NASA has found the farthest galaxy group identified to date. Called EGS77, the trio of galaxies dates to a time when the universe was only 680 million years old, or less than 5% of its current age of 13.8 billion years.

3h

Phys.org

200+

The turbulent life of two supermassive black holes caught in a galaxy crash

An international team of astronomers used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to create the most detailed image yet of the gas surrounding two supermassive black holes in a merging galaxy.

3h

Phys.org

Bushfires have reshaped life on Earth before—they could do it again

The catastrophic bushfires raging across much of Australia have not only taken a huge human and economic toll, but also delivered heavy blows to biodiversity and ecosystem function.

3h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Bushfires have reshaped life on Earth before—they could do it again

The catastrophic bushfires raging across much of Australia have not only taken a huge human and economic toll, but also delivered heavy blows to biodiversity and ecosystem function.

3h

Phys.org

50

Flying observatory maps the Milky Way

A new panoramic image based on data captured by NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) shows the bustling center of our galaxy like it has never been seen before.

3h

Phys.org

43

Rethinking climate modelling to prepare for even hotter temperatures

Improper adoption of climate impact modeling could leave us ill prepared for even higher temperatures and more frequent heatwaves, according to new research.

3h

Phys.org

300+

New evidence shows that the key assumption made in the discovery of dark energy is in error

The most direct and strongest evidence for the accelerating universe with dark energy is provided by the distance measurements using type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) for the galaxies at high redshift. This result is based on the assumption that the corrected luminosity of SN Ia through the empirical standardization would not evolve with redshift.

3h

Phys.org

40

NASA's Hubble surveys gigantic galaxy

Galaxies are like snowflakes. Though the universe contains innumerable galaxies flung across time and space, no two ever look alike. One of the most photogenic is the huge spiral galaxy UGC 2885, located 232 million light-years away in the northern constellation, Perseus. It's a whopper even by galactic standards. The galaxy is 2.5 times wider than our Milky Way and contains 10 times as many stars

3h

Future(s) Studies

Stanford researchers have a 100% clean energy plan that would balance 2,000 GW of solar capacity and 2,300 GW of wind power with 3,300 GW of battery capacity and a large amount of flexible load

submitted by /u/cake_donut [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Warren Buffett Is Bailing On Coal

submitted by /u/Supersubie [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Alienated, Alone And Angry: What The Digital Revolution Really Did To Us – We were promised community, civics, and convenience. Instead, we found ourselves dislocated, distrustful, and disengaged

submitted by /u/-AMARYANA- [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Bosch's LCD Car Visor Only Blocks Your View of the Road Where the Sun Is In Your Eyes

submitted by /u/mvea

[link]

[comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

This walking package-delivery robot is now for sale – It's yours to take home for a six-figure sum

submitted by /u/mvea

[link]

[comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies<>

"4D materials" are designed to deform over time in response to changes in the environment, like humidity and temperature. MIT scientists successfully created flat structures that can transform into much more complicated structures than had previously been achieved, including a human face.

submitted by /u/mvea

[link]

[comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

U-Haul will no longer hire nicotine users in 21 states. "Nicotine products are addictive and pose a variety of serious health risks. This policy is a responsible step in fostering a culture of wellness at U-Haul."

submitted by /u/funbalanced [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Tesla will protect bicyclists from "dooring" in future OTA update, notes Elon Musk – enable the electric vehicle's cameras to help prevent unwanted accidents such as dooring. It may also use the car's sound system to warn occupants about the possible danger when opening their vehicle's doors.

submitted by /u/mvea

[link]

[comments]

3h

Phys.org

51

Astronomers detect first stars 'bubbling out' from the cosmic Dark Ages

Astronomers using the Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, a program of NSF's National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory, have identified several overlapping bubbles of hydrogen gas ionized by the stars in early galaxies, a mere 680 million years after the Big Bang. This is the earliest direct evidence from the period when the first generation of stars formed and began

3h

Phys.org

43

NASA's Great Observatories help astronomers build a 3-D visualization of exploded star

In the year 1054 AD, Chinese sky watchers witnessed the sudden appearance of a "new star" in the heavens, which they recorded as six times brighter than Venus, making it the brightest observed stellar event in recorded history. This "guest star," as they described it, was so bright that people saw it in the sky during the day for almost a month. Native Americans also recorded its mysterious appear

3h

Phys.org

27

Expert discusses clearest image known of a cluster of galaxies from 10 billion years ago

Using high-powered telescopes including NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, scientists from Canada, the United States and Denmark have captured the clearest image known of a cluster of galaxies from 10 billion years ago in a discovery that provides clues the universe was more evolved than previously thought.

3h

Phys.org

23

Simulated image demonstrates the power of NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope

Imagine a fleet of 100 Hubble Space Telescopes, deployed in a strategic space-invader-shaped array a million miles from Earth, scanning the universe at warp speed.

3h

Phys.org

100+<>

25-minute test could simplify initial diagnosis of urinary tract infections, fight antibiotic resistance

Biological Engineers at the University of Bath have developed a test that could help medics quickly diagnose urinary tract infections (UTIs), using a normal smartphone camera.

3h

Futurity.org

'Angel particle' discovery was probably a false alarm

A 2017 report of the discovery of a particular kind of Majorana fermion—the chiral Majorana fermion, referred to as the "angel particle"—is likely a false alarm, according to new research. Majorana fermions are enigmatic particles that act as their own antiparticle and were first hypothesized to exist in 1937. They are of immense interest to physicists because their unique properties could allow

3h

Phys.org

300+

Clusters of gold atoms form peculiar pyramidal shape

Freestanding clusters of 20 gold atoms take the shape of a pyramid, researchers have discovered. This is in contrast with most elements, which organize themselves by forming shells around one central atom. The team of researchers led by KU Leuven published their findings in Science Advances.

3h

The Atlantic

34

Two Titans of Journalism

The depths-of-winter holiday season always seems to bring more than its share of prominent deaths. Two I particularly noted and mourned these past few weeks, and that recent news makes more relevant, were of the writers Ward Just, on December 19, and Bill Greider, on Christmas Day. The two men had established very different reputations by the end of their lives: Ward Just in the literary world ,

3h

The Atlantic

91

Little Women's Real Feminist Problem

Not again , I thought. How did Greta Gerwig get herself mixed up in this? I was at a movie theater, realizing that the trailer unspooling before me was for yet another adaptation of Louisa May Alcott's Little Women . I loved the book as a child, but as an adult I've always found it cloying. Movie versions have tended to be even worse. The thought of doing the stations of the cross one more time—t

3h

The Atlantic

55

Dear Therapist: I Can't Stand My Sister-in-Law

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My husband's family is extremely close-knit, and my immediate family spends lots of time with them. I value raising my children in a warm extended-family environment, but I am finding it harder and harder to b

3h

Scientific American Blog Posts

35

Why the Spitzer Space Telescope Matters

The orbiting observatory is shutting down, but its glorious achievements have opened many paths for further exploration — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Scientific American Content

White Oak Works Best for Fighter Plane Propellors

Originally published in September 1919 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

New Scientist

27

Hagfish tie their bodies into complicated knots to escape tight spots

Hagfish literally tie themselves in knots to escape a tricky situation – and that includes tying their bodies into fiddly three-twist knots

3h

Wired

100+

Today's Cartoon: Browser History

A whole new meaning to open office plans.

3h

Wired

100+

The World Has a Plan to Rein in AI—but the US Doesn't Like It

US officials worry the proposal could unnecessarily slow development of artificial intelligence at American companies.

3h

Scientific American Content

35

Why the Spitzer Space Telescope Matters

The orbiting observatory is shutting down, but its glorious achievements have opened many paths for further exploration — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Scientific American: Mind & Brain

57<>

Technique Takes Sleepers from Zzz to Aha!

Reactivating remembered problems during sleep can trigger solutions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Scientific American Content

55

Technique Takes Sleepers from Zzz to Aha!

Reactivating remembered problems during sleep can trigger solutions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

The Atlantic

100+

The Recurring Folly of 'If You See Something, Say Something'

Bill de Blasio warned New Yorkers on Friday that their city might be subject to retaliatory attacks from Iran. "I'm not saying this to be alarmist," the mayor said as he and his underlings ticked off—in a slightly alarming fashion—a series of defensive measures the city might take after the American air strike that killed the Iranian general Qassem Soleimani. Though the New York Police Department

4h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Older adults use online physician ratings, but view them cautiously, poll shows

Find a restaurant. Book a hotel. Choose a product to buy. Online ratings and reviews from other customers can help with making decisions on all of these, and their use has exploded in the past decade. But online ratings of physicians? A new poll suggests they don't yet hold as much sway with the Americans who use the most health care: people over age 50.

4h

Big Think<><>

Hive mind: The good, the bad, and the viral

The hive mind is a shared intelligence or consciousness between groups of people. It determines what we think is culturally acceptable, what we think is fashionable, and even what we think is true. We source most of our information and beliefs from other people and not from ourselves, says psychology professor Sarah Rose Cavanagh. The hive mind often comes under fire in the U.S. because it is a h

4h

Retraction Watch

53

Journal retracted at least 17 papers for self-citation, 14 with same first author

A medical journal in Italy has retracted at least 17 papers by researchers in that country who appear to have been caught in a citation scam. The journal says it also fired three editorial board members for "misconduct" in the matter. The retractions, from Acta Medica Mediterranea, occurred in 2017 and 2018, but we're just … Continue reading

4h

Ingeniøren

Adaptive fartpiloter kan øge trængslen

PLUS. Det er bekvemt, når moderne biler selv styrer speeder og bremse, men teknologien kan gøre ondt værre, viser nyt dansk studie.

4h

Ingeniøren

Ufærdigt it-system står i vejen for nye regler i folkeskolen

Nye fraværsregler i de danske folkeskoler betyder, at lærerne skal have mere fokus på registrering. Men it-understøttelsen er ikke klar endnu, og det afføder kritik fra skolelederne.

4h

Nature

Twisted timelines of a double dystopia

Nature, Published online: 06 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03957-8 The long-awaited novel from science-fiction giant William Gibson forces us to think about what future we wish for. By Liesbeth Venema

5h

NYT > Science

300+

To Save Lebanon's Birds, a Conservationist Invokes Tradition

Lebanon is a byway for migratory birds. This scientist devised a clever plan to protect them from hunting.

5h

NYT > Science

500+

The Coolest Architecture on Earth Is in Antarctica

Who said a polar research base had to be ugly? Gradually, designers are rethinking how to build for the world's harshest environment.

5h

New Scientist

Our Veganuary study is just the latest self-experiment

When you want to investigate the impact of giving up alcohol or meat and dairy, you sometimes need to become a lab rat. New Scientist staff are always happy to oblige

5h

Ingeniøren

Mars-rejsernes næste udfordring? Astronaut på ISS fik blodprop i halspulsåren

Forsøg på ISS afslørede en blodprop i halsen på en astronaut, som efterfølgende måtte afhjælpes med hjælp fra Jorden og rumstationens medicinskab.

5h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Sensory innervation in porous endplates by Netrin-1 from osteoclasts mediates PGE2-induced spinal hypersensitivity in mice

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13970-0

5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fast action and the right resources are key to treating fulminant myocarditis

Fulminant myocarditis develops quickly and can prove fatal without early recognition and advanced medical therapy.A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association details the resources needed to diagnose and treat fulminant myocarditis successfully.

5h

Future(s) Studies

Russia announces plan to 'use the advantages' of climate change. The government will calculate the risks of Russian products becoming uncompetitive and failing to meet new climate-related standards, as well as prepare new educational materials to teach climate change in schools.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

5h

Future(s) Studies

What is AI Algorithm? Difference Between a Regular Algorithm and AI Algorithm

submitted by /u/Albertchristopher [link] [comments]

5h

Future(s) Studies

The Tech Trends That Created Tesla Model 3 Aren't Over — Disruption Around The Corner

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

5h

Future(s) Studies<>

Denmark Passes Magic 50% In Renewable Electricity Generation Milestone

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

5h

Future(s) Studies

Nearly 500 Million Animals Have Been Lost in Australia's Wildfires

submitted by /u/exolearn [link] [comments]

5h

Ingeniøren

Se de mest spektakulære X-fly gennem tiderne

PLUS. Fra Chuck Yeager til eksperimentelle scramjets. X-programmet har i 72 år dannet grundlag for nogle af verdenshistoriens mest spektakulære flydesigns. Se et udpluk her.

5h

Undark Magazine

60

In India, Indigenous Tribes Clash With the Government Over Trees

As part of an ambitious pledge to reduce carbon emissions, the Indian government now requires any project involving forest clearing to be coupled with a plan to create a new forest somewhere else. As land is appropriated across the country, indigenous communities say their rights are being ignored.

5h

New Scientist

Peak oil demand could arrive much sooner than expected, says oil firm

The world's appetite for oil could peak within five years according to one of Europe's biggest oil and gas firms, much earlier than most rival oil companies expect

6h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Indonesian arrested selling Sumatran tiger skin

An Indonesian caught trying to sell the skin of a critically endangered Sumatran tiger has been arrested, police said Monday, highlighting the problem of animal trafficking in the Southeast Asian country.

6h

Phys.org

Indonesian arrested selling Sumatran tiger skin

An Indonesian caught trying to sell the skin of a critically endangered Sumatran tiger has been arrested, police said Monday, highlighting the problem of animal trafficking in the Southeast Asian country.

6h

Ingeniøren

23

72 år efter det første overlydsfly: Nyt X-fly bliver uden udsyn for piloten

17 år efter, at Concorden blev pensioneret, er Nasa i færd med at samle det næste supersoniske fly, X-59, der skal bane vej for ekstremt hurtige passagerfly.

6h

Phys.org

200+

Over-hunting walruses contributed to the collapse of Norse Greenland, study suggests

The mysterious disappearance of Greenland's Norse colonies sometime in the 15th century may have been down to the overexploitation of walrus populations for their tusks, according to a study of medieval artefacts from across Europe.

6h

Science-Based Medicine<><>

30

More evidence that acupuncture doesn't work for chronic pain

Acupuncture is a theatrical placebo whose real history has been retconned beyond recognition. A new systematic review of systematic reviews of acupuncture for chronic pain highlights that conclusion and catalogues the many weaknesses in the design of acupuncture clinical trials.

7h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Counting whales from space pitched as key to saving them

An aquarium and an engineering firm in Massachusetts are partnering on a project to better protect whales by monitoring them from space.

7h

Phys.org

Troops deployed across fire-hit Australia after horror weekend

Reserve troops were deployed to fire-ravaged regions across three Australian states on Monday after a torrid weekend that turned swathes of land into smouldering, blackened hellscapes.

7h

Phys.org

Counting whales from space pitched as key to saving them

An aquarium and an engineering firm in Massachusetts are partnering on a project to better protect whales by monitoring them from space.

7h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Illegal hunting and bushmeat trade threatens biodiversity and wildlife of Angola

Hunting wild animals has been practised by humans for millions of years; however, the extraction of wildlife for subsistence and commercialisation has become a major biodiversity threat in recent decades. Meanwhile, over-exploitation is reported to be the second most important driver of change and biodiversity loss globally.

8h

Phys.org

Illegal hunting and bushmeat trade threatens biodiversity and wildlife of Angola

Hunting wild animals has been practised by humans for millions of years; however, the extraction of wildlife for subsistence and commercialisation has become a major biodiversity threat in recent decades. Meanwhile, over-exploitation is reported to be the second most important driver of change and biodiversity loss globally.

8h

Phys.org

500+

Astronomers find wandering massive black holes in dwarf galaxies

Astronomers seeking to learn about the mechanisms that formed massive black holes in the early history of the Universe have gained important new clues with the discovery of 13 such black holes in dwarf galaxies less than a billion light-years from Earth.

8h

Science | The Guardian

62<>

The Great Pretender by Susannah Cahalan review – psychologist in the dock

This inquiry into a 1970s experiment that shook the world of psychiatry makes for a compelling read There are precious few biological tests for mental disorders, so diagnosis still rests on the observation of symptoms. Susannah Cahalan's first book, Brain on Fire , described her first-hand experience of how catastrophically wayward such diagnosis can be. Cahalan was working as a reporter at the Ne

8h

Future(s) Studies<>

Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) achieved a technological breakthrough for solar cells previously thought impossible.

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

8h

Future(s) Studies

Really cool article and video about the development of photo realistic digital humans using AI: developed by NEON. The future is here.

submitted by /u/TheMightyEmu1466 [link] [comments]

8h

Future(s) Studies

Lanai undergoes agricultural transformation using hydroponic greenhouses…first commercial harvest from pioneering hydroponic greenhouse farm on Lanai developed by technology billionaire Larry Ellison and envisioned for expansion to serve state and potential replication beyond Hawaii.

submitted by /u/honolulu_oahu_mod [link] [comments]

8h

Future(s) Studies

This New Product Could Rebuild Teeth and Cure Cavities – Parentology

submitted by /u/SpektrumKid [link] [comments]

8h

Future(s) Studies

Does anyone have any further news on this? (Peptide-based biogenic dental product may cure cavities)

submitted by /u/SpektrumKid [link] [comments]

8h

Future(s) Studies

Around 400,000 kids were born on 1 Jan 2020. Some of them are going to live well past the end of 21st Century and some even towards the first quarter of 22nd century! Its just mind boggling!

It's hard to fathom that the development our generation was lucky enough to witness in our lifetime. These kids will be reading it in history and science books. While much of the exponential development that is yet to come these kids will be lucky enough to witness in their lifetime submitted by /u/4site91 [link]

[comments]

8h

The Atlantic

500+

Populism Is Morphing in Insidious Ways

One would be hard-pressed to find a region of the world that populism didn't touch in the 2010s. The decade brought us the election of Donald Trump in the United States and the Brexit vote in Britain. It witnessed the rise of the Alternative for Germany—the first far-right party to enter the country's national parliament in decades—as well as the ascent of populist parties in countries such as Au

9h

The Atlantic

200+

A Chaotic Golden Globes for a Chaotic Moment

It was very 2020, somehow, that the most notable reaction GIF of the 77th Golden Globes was Tom Hanks responding to a joke about ISIS . The three-hour-plus ceremony, the kickoff to awards season, was characterized by escapist highs and rude reality checks. For every Hanks tear or tipsy Olivia Colman, there was a dig at Silicon Valley sweatshops or a plea for people watching to pay attention to th

10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sublimation, not melting: Graphene surprises researchers again

Physicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the Institute for High Pressure Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences have used computer modeling to refine the melting curve of graphite that has been studied for over 100 years, with inconsistent findings. They also found that graphene 'melting' is in fact sublimation.

10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

54

Illegal hunting and bushmeat trade threatens biodiversity and wildlife of Angola

Hunting and bushmeat trade negatively impact wildlife worldwide with serious implications for biodiversity conservation. The current situation in Angola shows a concerning increase in bushmeat trade along main roads. In a recent publication in the open-access journal Nature Conservation, an international group of scientists presented data gathered on a roundtrip around five main Angolan cities. It

10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Families of children with autism face physical, mental and social burdens

Families of children with autism face high physical, mental and emotional burdens, are sometimes ridiculed and even accused of child abuse, according to a Rutgers study.

10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new link between fear, imitation, and antisocial behavior in children

Research from Rebecca Waller of the University of Pennsylvania and Nicholas Wagner of Boston University found that children who were fearless, lacked social connection, and didn't participate in 'arbitrary imitation' — copying acts that had no inherent function — were more likely to develop antisocial behavior.

10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

23

Insufficient home care the biggest challenge to overcome after release from hospital

Ontario patients and caregivers reported not enough home care to meet the need, that home care support was not in place when patients arrived home from the hospital, and that they had to advocate for themselves to get enough home care.

10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

30

Cannabis edibles present novel health risks

With the recent legalization of cannabis edibles in Canada, physicians and the public must be aware of the novel risks of cannabis edibles, argue authors in a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New frailty index may help determine adverse outcomes in older patients after hospital discharge

A new frailty index shows promise in determining how acute illness affects functional ability in older patients admitted to hospital, according to a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) co-led by researchers from Dalhousie University, Canada, and University College London (UCL), United Kingdom.

10h

Skeptical Science

2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #1

Story of the Week… Editorial of the Week… El Niño/La Niña Update… Toon of the Week… Coming Soon on SkS… Climate Feedback Claim Reviews… SkS Week in Review… Poster of the Week… Story of the Week… The signal of human-caused climate change has emerged in everyday weather, study finds Satellite image showing weather on Jan. 2, 2019. (NOAA) For the first time, scientists have detecte

11h

Ingeniøren

Færøsk migrering med kultursammenstød og timestamp-problemer

Proof of Concept for mainframe-migrering virkede, men hvordan går det på Færøerne, da hele skattesystemet skal konverteres til en Windows-platform?

11h

Ingeniøren<>

Eksperter om genanvendt havplast: »Greenwashing« og »dybt urealistisk«

PLUS. Flere og flere firmaer slår sig op på produkter lavet med genanvendt plastaffald fra havet. Tre eksperter mener dog, at effekten på affaldsmængderne er tvivlsom.

11h

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

Recent Discoveries Have Overhauled Our Picture of Where Humans Came From, And When

"There is no Garden of Eden in Africa."

12h

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

Australia's Bushfires Are Horrifying, But Researchers Think There's More to Come

Summer has barely started.

12h

Future(s) Studies

Azeem Azhar: Preparing for 2030

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

13h

60-Second Science

Science News Briefs from Around the Globe

A few brief reports about international science and technology from Indonesia to Spain, including one from Brazil about the highest voltage electric eel ever discovered.

13h

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

These 6 Simple Exercises Can Cut Body Weight, Even if You're Predisposed to Obesity

Jogging, but not cycling.

13h

ScienceAlert – Latest

300+

Intriguing New Research Indicates Volcanoes Might Still Be Active on Venus

Earth may not be the only volcanically active planet.

13h

ScienceAlert – Latest

4K

Scientists Uncover a Never-Before-Seen Type of Signal Occurring in The Human Brain

Our brains could be more powerful than we thought.

13h

Scientific American Blog Posts

40

Ten Years?! TEN. YEARS. A Decade of Geoblogging in Review

What a difference a decade makes! — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Robotic trunk support assists those with spinal cord injury

A Columbia Engineering team has invented a robotic device — the Trunk-Support Trainer (TruST) — that can be used to assist and train people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to sit more stably by improving their trunk control, and thus gain an expanded active sitting workspace without falling over or using their hands to balance. The study is the first to measure and define the sitting workspace

14h

Scientific American

Science News Briefs from Around the Globe

A few brief reports about international science and technology from Indonesia to Spain, including one from Brazil about the highest voltage electric eel ever discovered. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

Scientific American Content

Science News Briefs from Around the Globe

A few brief reports about international science and technology from Indonesia to Spain, including one from Brazil about the highest voltage electric eel ever discovered. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

The Atlantic

7K

An Extraordinarily Dangerous Moment

O n a November night in 2013, Barack Obama delivered a statement about an interim nuclear deal that had just been reached, freezing Iran's program in place. When he was done, I walked with him back to the entrance of his residence, watched by the stoic portraits of former presidents. "Congratulations," I said. "You just made sure that we won't have a war with Iran during your presidency." "That's

15h

ScienceAlert – Latest

5K

A Mystery Virus Has Infected Dozens in China. Officials Have Ruled Out SARS

No one's sure how it's spreading.

15h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Complex Innovative Trials: New guideline adoption could get medicines to patients faster

Complex Innovative Design (CID) trials could be transformed for the better, following the publication of recommendations in the British Journal of Cancer.

15h

ScienceAlert – Latest

16K

Terrifying Images Show The Overwhelming Scale of Australia's Bushfires From Space

There's no end in sight.

16h

Future(s) Studies

Test tube DNA computer calculates the square root of 900

submitted by /u/chicompj [link] [comments]

16h

Future(s) Studies

Fukushima unveils plans to become renewable energy hub – Japan aims to power region, scene of 2011 meltdown, with 100% renewable energy by 2040

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

16h

Future(s) Studies

Cutting battery industry's reliance on cobalt will be an uphill task – Electric cars and consumer electronics use mineral mined in exploitative conditions in Congo. Global demand for cobalt in 2029 will be 300,000 tonnes compared with an estimated 70,000 tonnes used in 2019.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

16h hertilhertil

Future(s) Studies

"Zombie" Solar Energy Storage System From 1980s Revived By Science

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

16h

Future(s) Studies

Societies change their minds faster than people do: Generational replacement is what shifts public opinion – will the 2020's be when the Baby Boomer generations values die off?

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

16h

Future(s) Studies

Microbes from humics lakes can produce beneficial fatty acids, omega-3 and omega-6, from microplastics, reports a new study using carbon isotope labelling to follow the fate of polyethylene in the food chain.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

16h

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply