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nyheder2020januar07

NASA planet hunter finds Earth-size habitable-zone world

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has discovered its first Earth-size planet in its star's habitable zone, the range of distances where conditions may be just right to allow the presence of liquid water on the surface.

15h

Våde marker sviner som 500.000 biler i tomgang

Det kan blive bøvlet og dyrt at forvandle marker med klimaproblemer til natur.

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Wireless reader allows for tiny under-the-skin health microsensor

Sub-millimeter microsensors tiny enough to inject under the skin could monitor your health in the future thanks to a new, super-sensitive wireless reader. The advance is a step toward making tiny under-the-skin implants that continuously measure a person's blood glucose, heart rate, and other physiological conditions a reality. Technology limitations have largely hampered current efforts to make

4min

Cobra 'venom-ome' reveals deadly serpent's secrets

Nature, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00011-w Sequencing of the Indian cobra's genome offers hope of accessible antivenoms.

6min

CES 2020 Liveblog (Tuesday): Photos and News of All the CES Gadget Madness

Updated all day Tuesday. The WIRED crew is in Las Vegas to bring you up-to-the-minute coverage of news from the first full day of CES 2020.

11min

New compounds block master regulator of cancer growth, metastasis

Scientists have developed new drug compounds that thwart the pro-cancer activity of FOXM1, a transcription factor that regulates the activity of dozens of genes. The new compounds suppress tumor growth in human cells and in mouse models of several types of human breast cancer.

13min

Immune cell discovery opens door to new powerful cancer therapies

Scientists at UCL have identified how a subset of immune cells are activated to kill cancerous cells, a finding in mice which could hold the key to new powerful therapies against cancer.

13min

Ultrasound selectively damages cancer cells when tuned to correct frequencies

Doctors have used focused ultrasound to destroy tumors without invasive surgery for some time. However, the therapeutic ultrasound used in clinics today indiscriminately damages cancer and healthy cells alike. Researchers have now developed a low-intensity ultrasound approach that exploits the properties of tumor cells to target them and provide a safer option. Their findings are a new step in onc

13min

Cesarean delivery rates in China

This study assessed changes between 2008 and 2018 in the rate of cesarean deliveries in China.

13min

Trial examines effect of folic acid, zinc supplementation in male partners of couples seeking infertility treatment

This randomized clinical trial examined the effects of daily folic acid and zinc supplementation in men on semen quality and live births among 2,300 couples planning infertility treatment.

13min

Pooled data used to examine powder use by women in genital area, ovarian cancer risk

Researchers pooled data from four large study groups with 250,000 women to estimate the association between using body powder in the genital area and risk of ovarian cancer.

13min

Stanford researchers recommend 5 practices to improve doctor-patient relationships

Stanford researchers say they have identified five practices that doctors can implement to achieve more meaningful interactions with patients.

13min

From the mouths of babes: Lessons in humility

A poem written by Alexandra M. Sims, M.D., FAAP, will be published Jan. 7, 2020, in JAMA, as part of its series of works by artists and physicians that explore the meaning of healing and illness.

13min

Facebook Bans All Deepfakes

Ban Hammer Facebook announced Monday that it's planning to ban and remove all deepfakes uploaded to its platform. Facebook's vice president of global policy management Monika Bickert wrote in the post that the social network was banning "both deepfakes and all types of manipulated media." Facebook is hoping to address the issue by "partnering with academia, government and industry" and even "expo

15min

»Beskidt, farligt og skadeligt«: Forskere advarer om jagten på metaller og sjældne jordarter til grønne teknologier

Forskere advarer mod overforbrug af metaller og sjældne jordarter fra lande med dårlige arbejdsforhold. I takt med, at der skal fremstilles flere og flere elbiler, vindmøller og solcelleanlæg kan det blive nødvendigt at hente metallerne på havbunden.

16min

The fire 'time bomb' is finally detonating on the world

Forestry management is a complicated, controversial, and region-specific art, especially as the stakes become higher as human-driven climate crises worsen. Victor Steffensen set his last controlled fire in New South Wales last September. That's when he realized that disaster was imminent. "I knew that they were going to lose all that country," he says. "It is a time bomb that has been waiting to

20min

War is an Ecological Catastrophe

In times of war, otherwise atrocious crimes against nature become routine. The U.S. Department of Defense is one of the largest consumers of fossil fuels in the world. By polluting the earth to prepare for war, the Pentagon prepares a world in which war becomes more likely. None The 20s came in roaring with two explosive headlines: Reports of Australia's inferno and the speculation that the Unite

21min

Two stars colliding in 2083 will outshine all the others in the sky

Two stars in the constellation Sagitta are predicted to smash together in the year 2083, producing an explosion that will outshine every star in the sky

26min

Salty drinking water may take a toll on education

Salt consumption may have a negative effect on children's education, researchers report. The study monitored young children's academic progress in eight coastal districts of Bangladesh and discovered that children who live in households with higher levels of salt in their water supplies were less likely to succeed in their studies. Specifically, 7 to 12-year-old children were 6.7% more prone to r

26min

Severe childhood deprivation has longstanding impacts on brain size in adulthood

Researchers have shown that the brains of young adult Romanian adoptees who were institutionalized as children are around 8.6% smaller than the brains of English adoptees who have not suffered this form of deprivation.

26min

Ooh là là! Music evokes 13 key emotions: Scientists have mapped them

Scientists surveyed more than 2,500 people in the United States and China about their emotional responses to music and found that, across cultures and genres, the audio samples triggered 13 key emotions.

26min

The Future of Politics Is Robots Shouting at One Another

Presidential-campaign season is officially, officially , upon us now, which means it's time to confront the weird and insidious ways in which technology is warping politics. One of the biggest threats on the horizon: Artificial personas are coming, and they're poised to take over political debate. The risk arises from two separate threads coming together: artificial-intelligence-driven text gener

27min

BU finds Medicaid expansion improves access to postpartum care

A new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher finds that new mothers in a state that expanded Medicaid (Colorado) were more likely to keep Medicaid coverage and access postpartum care than those in a similar state that had not yet expanded Medicaid (Utah). The study, published in the journal Health Affairs, found that this was especially true for new mothers who

27min

Correcting vaccine misinformation is a difficult process, study shows

Researchers found that vaccine misinformation in Danish media outlets from 2013-2016 led to HPV vaccinations dropping by 50.4%. An information campaign geared toward concerned parents helped increase vaccine uptake again, but uptake is still below the level before misinformation began, showing how difficult it is to undo the damages misinformation causes.

27min

Ultrasound selectively damages cancer cells when tuned to correct frequencies

Doctors have used focused ultrasound to destroy tumors without invasive surgery for some time. However, the therapeutic ultrasound used in clinics today indiscriminately damages cancer and healthy cells alike.

29min

Continents of the Underworld Come Into Focus

Decades ago, scientists first harnessed the echoes of earthquakes to make a map of Earth's deep interior. They didn't just find the onion layers you might remember from a grade school textbook — core and mantle covered by a cracked crust. Instead, they saw the vague outlines of two vast anomalies, unknown forms staring back from the abyss. Over the years, better maps kept showing the same bloblik

30min

The urgent case for antibiotic-free animals | Leon Marchal

The UN predicts that antimicrobial resistance will be our biggest killer by 2050. "That should really scare the hell out of all of us," says bioprocess engineer Leon Marchal. He's working on an urgently needed solution: transforming the massive, global animal feed industry. Learn why the overuse of antibiotics in animal products, from livestock feed to everyday pet treats, has skyrocketed worldwid

30min

Four held for lion body part trafficking in S.Africa

South African police have arrested four people for allegedly trying to sell lion paws, just days after eight mutilated lion carcasses were discovered at a private game farm.

41min

Poplar genetically modified not to harm air quality grow as well as non-modified trees

Field trials in Oregon and Arizona show that poplar trees, which emit trace amounts of the gas isoprene, can be genetically modified not to harm air quality while leaving their growth potential unchanged.

41min

How does fire behave in microgravity? NASA study aims to find out

In the Confined Combustion project, astronauts aboard the ISS have been igniting fires in controlled spaces in order to study how flames spread in low-gravity spaces. Past research has shown that flames spread differently in space. The new project aims to reveal more about how flames spread when ignited in various containers, and on various objects. The results could help scientists learn more ab

43min

The US just released ten principles that it hopes will make AI safer

All future AI regulations will need to clear the checklist.

44min

International team starts on drilling expedition

The Earth's Cenozoic Era began 66 million years ago with a bang—and with the last mass extinction event on Earth until now. The meteorite impact that marked the end of the Cretaceous Period and the beginning of the Cenozoic Era was followed by a number of dramatic global events, including a heat pulse 56 million years ago. Only after this remarkable boundary did mammals develop the diversity that

46min

Scientists make breakthrough in ion-conducting composite membranes

Chinese researchers under the direction of Profs. Li Xianfeng and Zhang Huamin from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed an ultrathin ion-conducting membrane with high selectivity and conductivity that can boost the power of flow batteries. The study was published in Nature Communications.

46min

Four held for lion body part trafficking in S.Africa

South African police have arrested four people for allegedly trying to sell lion paws, just days after eight mutilated lion carcasses were discovered at a private game farm.

47min

How Long Will Australia Be Livable?

When tiny flakes of white ash started falling like warm snow from a sky sullen with smoke, we left. We had lived for weeks with the threat of two huge bushfires hanging over our small Australian town, advancing inexorably toward us from the north and the south. My hometown of Blackheath, perched at the top of the Blue Mountains, surrounded by stunning but drought-parched Australian wilderness, wa

47min

Air pollution in childhood linked to schizophrenia

Children who grow up in areas with heavy air pollution have a higher risk of developing schizophrenia. This is the conclusion of a new study from the Danish psychiatry project, iPSYCH.

50min

Smart algorithm finds possible future treatment for childhood cancer

Using a computer algorithm, scientists at Uppsala University have identified a promising new treatment for neuroblastoma. This form of cancer in children, which occurs in specialised nerve cells in the sympathetic nervous system, may be life-threatening. In the long term the discovery, described in the latest issue of the scientific journal Nature Communications, may result in a new form of treatm

50min

Magnitude of Great Lisbon Earthquake may have been lower than previous estimates

The magnitude of the Great Lisbon Earthquake event, a historic and devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck Portugal on All Saints' Day in 1755, may not be as high as previously estimated.

50min

Computerized training improves selective attention of soccer players

Researchers of the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Malaga (UMA) have demonstrated how computerized training -through a specific software- can improve the attentional capacity of athletes, particularly, soccer players.

50min

Take heart: Pitt study reveals how relaxin targets cardiovascular disease

As a healthy heart ages, it becomes more susceptible to cardiovascular diseases. Though researchers have discovered that relaxin, an insulin-like hormone, suppresses atrial fibrillation (AF), inflammation, and fibrosis in aged rats, the underlying mechanisms of these benefits are still unknown. In a recent Scientific Reports paper, University of Pittsburgh researchers discuss how relaxin interacts

50min

Fast radio burst observations deepen astronomical mystery

Observations with the 8-meter Gemini North telescope, a program of the NSF's National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory, have allowed astronomers to pinpoint the location of a Fast Radio Burst in a nearby galaxy — making it the closest known example to Earth and only the second repeating burst source to have its location pinpointed in the sky.

50min

New production method for carbon nanotubes gets green light

A new method of producing carbon nanotubes — tiny molecules with incredible physical properties used in touchscreen displays, 5G networks and flexible electronics — has been given the green light by researchers, meaning work in this crucial field can continue.

50min

Researchers develop universal flu vaccine that protects against 6 influenza viruses in mice

A novel nanoparticle vaccine that combines two major influenza proteins is effective in providing broad, long-lasting protection against influenza virus in mice, showing promise as a universal flu vaccine, according to a study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.

50min

'Census' in the zebrafish's brain

The zebrafish is a master of regeneration: If brain cells are lost due to injury or disease, it can simply reproduce them—contrary to humans, where this only happens in the fetal stage. However, the zebrafish is evolutionarily related to humans and, thus, possesses the same brain cell types as humans. Can a hidden regeneration potential also be activated in humans? Are therapies for stroke, cranio

53min

'Census' in the zebrafish's brain

The zebrafish is a master of regeneration: If brain cells are lost due to injury or disease, it can simply reproduce them—contrary to humans, where this only happens in the fetal stage. However, the zebrafish is evolutionarily related to humans and, thus, possesses the same brain cell types as humans. Can a hidden regeneration potential also be activated in humans? Are therapies for stroke, cranio

53min

The growing pains of orphan chimpanzees

The prolonged periods of juvenility and nutritional dependence that are characteristic of human development are thought to facilitate brain and somatic growth in children, as well as provide opportunities to learn and accumulate skills required for a productive adult life. In chimpanzees, the benefits of continuing to associate with mothers after becoming nutritionally independent are less well un

59min

Abandoning pastures reduces the biodiversity of mountain streams

The abandonment of high-altitude mountain pastures and the climatic changes that are causing woodland boundaries to extend ever higher, may potentially result in the reduction of the number and variety of invertebrates living in mountain streams. Eurac Research ecologists have compared 15 streams and found that in streams running through extensive meadows with grazing animals—regardless of elevati

59min

The growing pains of orphan chimpanzees

The prolonged periods of juvenility and nutritional dependence that are characteristic of human development are thought to facilitate brain and somatic growth in children, as well as provide opportunities to learn and accumulate skills required for a productive adult life. In chimpanzees, the benefits of continuing to associate with mothers after becoming nutritionally independent are less well un

59min

Attosecond control of an atomic electron cloud

Researchers at SAGA Light Source, the University of Toyama, Hiroshima University and the Institute for Molecular Science have demonstrated a method to control the shape and orientation of an electron cloud in an atom by tuning the attosecond spacing in a double pulse of synchrotron radiation.

59min

Abandoning pastures reduces the biodiversity of mountain streams

The abandonment of high-altitude mountain pastures and the climatic changes that are causing woodland boundaries to extend ever higher, may potentially result in the reduction of the number and variety of invertebrates living in mountain streams. Eurac Research ecologists have compared 15 streams and found that in streams running through extensive meadows with grazing animals—regardless of elevati

59min

Gen-X Women Are Caught in a Generational Tug-of-War

On a recent Saturday afternoon, I stood with my 13-year-old son in a long line stretching over the West Side Highway, cars careening below us. He was waiting to take an entrance exam for a specialized high school, a sacred moment, and yet I kept glancing at my phone to check the time. I had to meet my mother to tour an apartment because my childhood home in the East Village had burned down the we

1h

How to Find a Disappearing Planet

In the past quarter century, astronomers have found a smorgasbord of worlds beyond our own: icy exoplanets and fiery exoplanets, planets the size of the moon and planets bigger than Jupiter. Some have surfaces that resemble toffee ; others are like cotton candy . This cosmic candy store now carries more than 4,000 worlds, and the inventory is only expanding. The pace of discovery is so fast that

1h

Indian cobra genome could lead to better anti-venom

Researchers report the sequencing and assembly of a high-quality genome for the India cobra. Every year, accidental contact with snakes leads to over 100,000 deaths worldwide. India alone accounts for 2.8 million snakebite cases annually, and of these, about 50,000 are fatal . These cases are primarily attributed to four culprits—the Indian cobra, common krait, Russell's viper, and saw scaled vip

1h

Smart ytbeläggning kan möta klimatutmaningar

Billigare bränsleceller. Bromsskivor med längre livslängd. Miljövänligare bilar och jetflygplan. Ytskikt som skapas genom så kallad termisk sprutning kan göra stor skillnad för att öka hållbarheten och minska klimatpåverkan. Forskare vid Högskolan Väst använder suspensioner för att göra termisk sprutning ännu effektivare. Forskare och företag jobbar på högtryck världen över för att hitta klimatsm

1h

Datorn föreslog helt ny behandlingsidé mot barncancer

Neuroblastom är en nervcancer hos barn, och kan vara livshotande. Med hjälp av en datoralgoritm har forskare i Uppsala identifierat en ny lovande behandling mot sjukdomen. Den nya behandlingen bygger på att stimulera ett receptorprotein i nervsystemet som heter CNR2. Att just detta protein skulle kunna användas för behandling gjordes med en mycket ovanlig metod. Istället för att använda tradition

1h

Kosten påverkar hur pigga spermierna är

Spermierna påverkas av vad man äter, och förändringarna märks snabbt. Detta enligt en ny studie av forskare vid Linköpings universitet, där unga friska män fick en sockerrik kost. Studien, som publiceras i PLOS Biology, ger nya insikter om spermiernas funktion och skulle på sikt kunna bidra till ny diagnostik för att mäta spermiekvalitet. – Vi ser att kosten påverkar hur rörliga spermierna är och

1h

Affordable Care Act led to fewer disruptions in care

Among low-income adults enrolled in Medicaid, disruptions in coverage, or churning, decreased following the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

1h

'Census' in the zebrafish's brain

Dresden scientists have succeeded in determining the number and type of newly formed neurons in zebrafish; practically conducting a 'census' in their brains. Following an injury, zebrafish form new neurons and integrate them into the nervous system, which is the reason for their brain regeneration ability. The study was conducted as a collaboration project 'made in Dresden': Center for Regenerativ

1h

New method gives robust transistors

A new method to fit together layers of semiconductors as thin as a few nanometers has resulted in not only a scientific discovery but also a new type of transistor for high-power electronic devices. The result, published in Applied Physics Letters, has aroused huge interest.The achievement is the result of a close collaboration between scientists at Linköping University and SweGaN, a spin-off comp

1h

Brain tumour research could help future precision medicine

New research on brain tumours could improve patient diagnosis and treatment options as part of a precision medicine approach. Brain tumours are the leading cause of cancer deaths in children and adults under the age of 40, with 16,000* people in the UK diagnosed with a brain tumour each year.

1h

NASA's TESS mission uncovers its 1st world with two stars

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite has found its first circumbinary planet, a world orbiting two stars. Called TOI 1338 b, the planet lies 1,300 light-years away and is 6.9 times larger than Earth.

1h

Scientists make breakthrough in ion-conducting composite membranes

Chinese researchers under the direction of Professors LI Xianfeng and ZHANG Huamin from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed an ultrathin ion-conducting membrane with high selectivity and conductivity that can boost the power of flow batteries.

1h

New study finds blood clots more likely in children who receive PICCs

A new study provides convincing evidence that the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) to administer medicine and draw blood in children is associated with a significantly increased risk of blood clots (known as venous thromboembolism or VTE) compared with central venous catheters (CVCs) placed directly into the neck or chest.

1h

Why the future of farming is female

Professor Sally Shortall, Duke of Northumberland Chair of Rural Economy at Newcastle University, explains why women are key to the survival of the farming industry.

1h

Can tea cut depression symptoms in older people?

There's an association between consistent and frequent tea-drinking and significantly fewer depression symptoms in Chinese older adults, according to new research. Depression is one of the most common mental disorders for the elderly, with "major depressive disorder" now affecting about 7% of adults over the age of 60 worldwide. A growing body of research has explored risk factors for elderly dep

1h

How Scientists Squeezed a Particle Accelerator Onto a Tiny Silicon Chip

Particle accelerators have helped us unravel some of the universe' s biggest mysteries, but they're huge, expensive, and inaccessible to most researchers. A new particle accelerator on a chip could soon change that. The world's biggest particle accelerators can be miles long and require megawatts of power to run. Even devices used to generate particle beams for medical therapies can be the size o

1h

The trick that could inject new life into an old tuberculosis vaccine

Nature, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00003-w The BCG vaccine is nearing its centenary. A new delivery method could protect more people from one of the world's biggest killers.

1h

Rural water wells in High Plains Aquifer show large increase in nitrate levels

Kansas private well owners should test water quality annually, according to a recent Kansas State University study that revealed nitrate levels in shallow wells above U.S. Environment Protection Act standards.

1h

Rains bring very temporary relief to Australia's fires

NASA satellite data continues to provide a look at the smoke and aerosols generated by the massive fires in Australia. Although rain fell on parts of the fire-ravaged areas in New South Wales and Victoria, Australia (and in some areas the rain was torrential), officials are already warning residents that the fires (and resultant smoke and aerosols) will return to their former state with a vengeanc

1h

Tiny pharmaceuticals in the environment

Fear is a bad counselor. In the comic book series "Asterix," the Gaul chief Vitalstatistix may be afraid that the sky may fall on his head. In the real world, however, risks should be assessed with a clear mind. To ensure that risk assessments are not carried out emotionally but lead to appropriate decisions, scientists use models to analyze the hazard potential of substances or technologies. Empa

1h

New method produces robust transistors

A new method to fit together layers of semiconductors as thin as a few nanometers has resulted in not only a scientific discovery but also a new type of transistor for high-power electronic devices. The result, published in Applied Physics Letters, has aroused huge interest.

1h

Binary star V Sagittae will explode as a very bright 'nova' by century's end

The faint star V Sagittae, V Sge, in the constellation Sagitta, is barely visible, even in mid-sized telescopes. However, around the year 2083, this innocent star will explode, becoming as bright as Sirius, the brightest star visible in the night sky. During this time of eruption, V Sge will be the most luminous star in the Milky Way galaxy. This prediction was presented for the first time at the

1h

Can the flu shot help fight cancer?

Physicians and scientists have found that injecting tumors with influenza vaccines, including some FDA-approved seasonal flu shots, turns cold tumors to hot, a discovery that could lead to an immunotherapy to treat cancer.

1h

Study of veterans details genetic basis for anxiety, links anxiety and depression

A massive genomewide analysis of approximately 200,000 military veterans has identified six genetic variants linked to anxiety.

1h

Impossible Foods unveiled its new plant-based pork replacement. Here's what it tastes like.

Maybe next year, we'll get Impossible Fish. (Stan Horaczek /) At last year's CES, Impossible Foods interrupted the flow of really big TVs and AI-powered gadgets to introduce the second iteration of its impressively convincing, plant-based ground beef. This year, Impossible has taken aim at replacing pork with plant materials—and we got an early chance to taste it here at the show. Like the Imposs

1h

Why is Puerto Rico Being Struck by Earthquakes?

Multiple large earthquakes have hit Puerto Rico over the past week, all thanks to the geologically-active Caribbean Plate.

1h

Abandoning pastures reduces the biodiversity of mountain streams

The abandonment of high-altitude mountain pastures and the climatic changes that are causing woodland boundaries to extend ever higher, may potentially result in the reduction of the number and variety of invertebrates living in mountain streams. Eurac Research ecologists have compared 15 streams and found that in streams running through extensive meadows with grazing animals — regardless of elev

1h

The growing pains of orphan chimpanzees

Using long-term behavioral and hormonal data from wild chimpanzees in the Taï Forest, Côte d'Ivoire, researchers from the Taï Chimpanzee Project at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, have revealed that mothers may be shaping pre-adult growth and offspring muscle mass even without direct provisioning. We compared growth of young chimpanzees with a mother until adulthood compare

1h

Need to control blood sugar? There's a drink for that, says UBC prof

With more people with diabetes and pre-diabetes looking for novel strategies to help control blood sugar, new research from UBC's Okanagan campus suggests that ketone monoester drinks–a popular new food supplement–may help do exactly that.

1h

Indeterminist physics for an open world

Classical physics is characterized by the equations describing the world. Yet our day-to-day experience is struck by this deterministic vision of the world. A physicist (UNIGE) has been analyzing the classical mathematical language used in modern physics. He has thrown light on a contradiction between the equations that explained the phenomena and the finite world. He suggests making changes to th

1h

Utilizing relativistic effects for laser fusion: A new approach for clean power

Researchers at Osaka University studied a new approach for laser nuclear fusion utilizing relativistic phenomena of intense laser light. By irradiating the ultra-intense laser light directly onto the fusion fuel, the researchers examined signs of heating of fusion fuel. This work may lead to widespread, clean fusion power.

1h

Attosecond control of an atomic electron cloud

Researchers at SAGA Light Source, the University of Toyama, Hiroshima University and the Institute for Molecular Science have demonstrated a method to control the shape and orientation of an electron cloud in an atom by tuning the attosecond spacing in a double pulse of synchrotron radiation.

1h

Glowing material remembers where it was pressed

Materials which can emit light after they are pressed or deformed can be applied for the monitoring of structural integrity of, for instance, bridges and wind turbines. Researchers from Ghent University in Belgium have now added a new functionality to those so-called mechanoluminescent materials. These materials now remember where the deformation occurred as these regions light up by emitting gree

1h

Scientists discover the mechanism of DNA high-order structure formation

A team of KAIST molecular biologists have uncovered how one particular mechanism uses energy to ensure proper histone placement onto DNA to form chromatin.

1h

Gender pay gap identified at some US science agencies

Nature, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00023-6 Several organizations bypassed a mandatory pay-scale system, and hired more men for highly skilled positions.

1h

The conservation of cultural heritage in the face of climate catastrophe

Cultural heritage can be destroyed. It can decay. Once it is gone, it is gone forever, sadly. Writing in the International Journal of Global Warming, Portuguese researchers discuss the potential impact of climate change on cultural heritage and how we might lose artifacts as extreme weather has a worsening impact on our world.

1h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvornår skal jeg holde varmepumpen og min radiator slukket?

Et par læsere vil gerne vide, om man skal slukke varmepumpen om sommeren og radiatoren under udluftning. Det svarer Teknologisk Institut på.

1h

Sir Hans Kornberg obituary

Biochemist who built on the work of Hans Krebs to make key discoveries concerning metabolic cycles Hans Kornberg became a biochemist just at the point, in the mid-20th century, when methods became available to explore how organisms convert food and oxygen into energy and tissue – the combustion engine of life. He was one of the pioneers who identified key participants in such metabolic reactions a

1h

Out-of-pocket costs of having a baby can be 'staggering'

One of the most expensive parts of having a baby may involve the birth itself, a new study suggests. Despite an Affordable Care Act mandate that requires large, employer-based health plans (used by about 50% of women in the US) to cover maternity care, many families still shoulder a big brunt of the costs. As reported in Health Affairs , average out-of-pocket health care spending for maternity ca

1h

Scientists accurately measure the probability of electron capture by the neon-20 isotope nuclei for the first time

A large international team of researchers has empirically measured the probability of electron capture by the neon-20 isotope (20Ne) for the first time. The team has published two papers in the journal Physical Review C describing their achievement and explaining how their experiments pertain to the decay of intermediate-sized stars.

1h

Trinidad's guppy-filled streams provide natural lab for genetic rescue research

Trinidadian guppies, ubiquitous in freshwater aquariums around the world, are no bigger than your thumb. But for Sarah Fitzpatrick, assistant professor in Michigan State University's Department of Integrative Biology and W.K. Kellogg Biological Station, or KBS, faculty member, these small fish came up big.

1h

Trinidad's guppy-filled streams provide natural lab for genetic rescue research

Trinidadian guppies, ubiquitous in freshwater aquariums around the world, are no bigger than your thumb. But for Sarah Fitzpatrick, assistant professor in Michigan State University's Department of Integrative Biology and W.K. Kellogg Biological Station, or KBS, faculty member, these small fish came up big.

1h

An artificial neural connection allows a new cortical site to control hand movements

Restoration of lost motor function after stroke is typically accomplished after strenuous rehabilitation therapy lasting for over months. However, new research published by a group led by Yukio Nishimura, the project leader of the Neural Prosthesis Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science showed that an artificial neural connection (ANC) successfully allowed a new cortical site, pr

1h

NASA planet hunter finds its 1st Earth-size habitable-zone world

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has discovered its first Earth-size planet in its star's habitable zone, the range of distances where conditions may be just right to allow the presence of liquid water on the surface.

1h

New 'umbrella' species would massively improve conservation

The protection of Australia's threatened species could be improved by a factor of seven, if more efficient 'umbrella' species were prioritised for protection, according to University of Queensland research.

1h

Can the flu shot help fight cancer?

Physicians and scientists at Rush University Medical Center have found that injecting tumors with influenza vaccines, including some FDA-approved seasonal flu shots, turns cold tumors to hot, a discovery that could lead to an immunotherapy to treat cancer. The study results were published December 30th in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

1h

Surprise! TESS shows ancient north star undergoes eclipses

NASA's TESS satellite has shown that the bright star Alpha Draconis and its fainter, previously known companion actually undergo mutual eclipses: a complete surprise.

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Massive Attack touring Europe by train

submitted by /u/GruttePier1 [link] [comments]

1h

Don't like spiders? Here are 10 reasons to change your mind

Australia is famous for its supposedly scary spiders. While the sight of a spider may cause some people to shudder, they are a vital part of nature. Hostile reactions are harming conservation efforts—especially when people kill spiders unnecessarily.

1h

Indian cobra genome sequenced in search for new antivenom

A large international team of researchers affiliated with corporate and academic institutions has sequenced the genome of the Indian cobra. In their paper published in the journal Nature Genetics, the group describes their goal of using the sequenced genome to develop an antivenom.

1h

Don't like spiders? Here are 10 reasons to change your mind

Australia is famous for its supposedly scary spiders. While the sight of a spider may cause some people to shudder, they are a vital part of nature. Hostile reactions are harming conservation efforts—especially when people kill spiders unnecessarily.

1h

Indian cobra genome sequenced in search for new antivenom

A large international team of researchers affiliated with corporate and academic institutions has sequenced the genome of the Indian cobra. In their paper published in the journal Nature Genetics, the group describes their goal of using the sequenced genome to develop an antivenom.

1h

Koalas are the face of Australian tourism. What now after the fires?

In 1936, The Evening News in Rockhampton wrote: "The time has arrived when Australians must decide whether or not they will accept responsibility for the perpetuation of the koala […]"

2h

Bushfire hazard reduction: Here's a controlled burn idea worth trying

The current bushfire crisis provides compelling evidence of the dangers posed by extremely dry landscapes and hot, windy conditions.

2h

Researchers struggle to engineer plants that cope with climate change

A new study published by biologists at LMU demonstrates that there are no simple or universal solutions to the problem of engineering plants to enable them to cope with the challenges posed by climate change.

2h

How the first people got to the Caribbean 5,800 years ago

A new look at archaeological data clarifies the migrations routes that the first settlers of the Caribbean took thousands of years ago. Published in the journal Science Advances , the study reports evidence that the first Caribbean islanders traveled directly from South America to the northern Caribbean beginning about 5,800 years ago, initially settling Cuba, Hispaniola , and Puerto Rico in the

2h

All of Us

DNA-based medicine needs more diversity to avoid harmful bias. One big research project is fixing that — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Significant underreporting in safety data found on Nursing Home Compare website

The website Nursing Home Compare, is a go-to resource for many families researching nursing home options for their loved ones, however, a University of Chicago researcher has found that the data used by Nursing Home Compare to report patient safety related to falls may be highly inaccurate.

2h

Binary star V Sagittae will explode as a very bright 'nova' by century's end

The faint star V Sagittae, V Sge, in the constellation Sagitta, is barely visible, even in mid-sized telescopes. However, around the year 2083, this innocent star will explode, becoming as bright as Sirius, the brightest star visible in the night sky. During this time of eruption, V Sge will be the most luminous star in the Milky Way galaxy.This prediction was presented for the first time at the 2

2h

Koalas are the face of Australian tourism. What now after the fires?

In 1936, The Evening News in Rockhampton wrote: "The time has arrived when Australians must decide whether or not they will accept responsibility for the perpetuation of the koala […]"

2h

Researchers struggle to engineer plants that cope with climate change

A new study published by biologists at LMU demonstrates that there are no simple or universal solutions to the problem of engineering plants to enable them to cope with the challenges posed by climate change.

2h

A lazy fix 20 years ago means the Y2K bug is taking down computers now

The millennium bug is back with a vengeance, after programmers in the 1990s simply pushed the problem back by 20 years

2h

Australia: A proper disaster plan is worth paying for

Australia is in the midst of inconceivably bad bushfires. The death toll is rising, thousands of buildings have been destroyed and whole communities displaced. This scale is like nothing before, and our national response must be like nothing that has come before.

2h

Personal Data Is Valuable. Give Pricing Power to the People

Winning back trust in the digital economy depends on giving people much more control of the usage, ownership, and value of their information.

2h

Can Citizen Science Help Find the Sasquatch?

Though the Sasquatch probably doesn't exist, a new book posits that Citizen Scientists may be best positioned to find it.

2h

From the archive

Nature, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03947-w How Nature reported the establishment of a wildlife sanctuary in the Pacific Ocean in 1920, and a wry analysis of whether procreation causes heart attacks.

2h

US Website Defaced With Pro-Iran Propaganda, Bloody Trump Face

Blood Rush Experts warned that the United States' assassination of Iran's top military general Qassim Soleimani would lead to an increase in cyberattacks against America — and now it seems that either those attacks have already begun, or that other hackers are using pro-Iranian imagery to muddy the waters. On Saturday, hackers claiming to represent the Islamic Republic of Iran placed an image of

2h

The Renewable rather than Roaring Twenties: A sustainability decade

With the Trump Administration trying to drive science out of environmental decision making and climate change out of environmental impact statements, it is easy to be pessimistic about our ability to preserve our planet. Fires from Australia to California, droughts and floods and the devastating impact of extreme weather only serves to increase our sense of fear and foreboding. People willfully re

2h

All of Us

DNA-based medicine needs more diversity to avoid harmful bias. One big research project is fixing that — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Evading Chemotherapy, Bacteria-Style

One of the key advantages bacteria have (versus our strategies to outwit them) is their fast turnover. Bacterial generations come along so quickly that advantageous mutations can spread through a population much faster than we can deal with the changes. And it gets worse: there are many bacterial species that actually increase their mutation rates under stress. This "adaptive mutability" mechanis

2h

The story of a wave: From wind-blown ripples to breaking on the beach

It's a cliché, but Aussies love the beach. And little wonder: with 36,000 kilometers of coastline, Australia is blessed with some of the best beaches in the world.

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Regioner vil være med til at klimasikre åer og kyster

PLUS. Danske Regioner vil gerne koordinere klimaindsats for kommunerne ved åer og kyster. Eksperter er delvist positive. KL siger dog nej tak.

2h

Don't delay treatment after a concussion. Here's why

Early clinical treatment may significantly reduce recovery time following a concussion, a new study shows. The findings, in JAMA Neurology , suggest delays in seeking treatment can lead to unnecessarily longer recovery. "Our study emphasizes the importance of seeking appropriate, specialized care early on," says senior author Anthony Kontos, research director at the University of Pittsburgh's Spo

2h

Treat nonviolent drug offenses as public health issue, paper recommends

Drug use among people arrested for nonviolent drug offenses should be treated primarily as a public health issue, according to drug policy experts at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy and the Texas Criminal Justice Coalition.

2h

Mysticism and the Mind-Body Problem: Other Views

Participants in a freewheeling exploration of nonmaterialist, mystical accounts of reality critique a journalist's critique — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

When the past catches up on you: Land use impacts biodiversity in the long term

Ghosts of land use past haunt current biodiversity in farmland ecosystems, according to a new study led by a researcher from the German Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre. The study on farmlands in southwestern France shows that changes from grassland to cropland that happened as long as 20 years ago result in the animal community on-site today exhibiting a lower diversity of mob

2h

When the past catches up on you: Land use impacts biodiversity in the long term

Ghosts of land use past haunt current biodiversity in farmland ecosystems, according to a new study led by a researcher from the German Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre. The study on farmlands in southwestern France shows that changes from grassland to cropland that happened as long as 20 years ago result in the animal community on-site today exhibiting a lower diversity of mob

2h

Building sustainability into traditional Chinese medicine trade on the new Silk Roads

Promoted as a 21st century version of the ancient Silk Roads, China's Belt & Road Initiative (BRI) aims to improve global connectivity and change the shape of international trade. The multi-billion-dollar project will link China with countries in Southeast and Central Asia, East Africa, Europe and beyond, building a network that will include almost two thirds of the world's population.

2h

Using relativistic effects for laser fusion: A new approach for clean power

A team of researchers at Osaka University has investigated a new method for generating nuclear fusion power, showing that the relativistic effect of ultra-intense laser light improves upon current "fast ignition" methods in laser-fusion research to heat the fuel long enough to generate electrical power. These findings could provide a spark for laser fusion, ushering in a new era of carbonless ener

2h

Activists use shocking social media imagery to inspire action in the fight against plastic pollution

New research into the fight against plastic pollution, published by the Academy of Management Journal, reveals the influencing power of social media as activists use emotions to convert viewers and enact change.

2h

Government call for science 'weirdos' prompts caution from researchers

Nature, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00012-9 The UK Prime Minister's adviser Dominic Cummings wants scientific approaches to inform government — but researchers worry his view is simplistic.

2h

Class time can affect which college majors student pick

For many students, deciding on a college major may hinge on the time of day they take a specific class, according to new research. Researchers found that fatigue during an introductory class, either from time of day (7:30 AM) or back-to-back classes, can deter a student from pursing that subject as a major. In their study , Kareem Haggag, an assistant professor at the Dietrich College of Humaniti

2h

Scientists use satellite-mounted laser to map global ocean migration

During WWII, naval oceanographers discovered a reflective layer that rose and fell across their sonar screens once each day. Further research revealed that it comprised swarms of fish and tiny sea creatures called zooplankton migrating toward the ocean surface as the sun set to feed under cover of darkness, then swimming back to the inky depths at dawn to escape their own predators during daylight

3h

Scientists use satellite-mounted laser to map global ocean migration

During WWII, naval oceanographers discovered a reflective layer that rose and fell across their sonar screens once each day. Further research revealed that it comprised swarms of fish and tiny sea creatures called zooplankton migrating toward the ocean surface as the sun set to feed under cover of darkness, then swimming back to the inky depths at dawn to escape their own predators during daylight

3h

Evidence linking ‘vaping’ to increased odds of asthma and COPD

Using data from a large federal government telephone survey of adults, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that inhaling heated tobacco vapor through e-cigarettes was linked to increased odds of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), conditions long demonstrated to be caused by smoking traditional, combustible cigarettes.

3h

Hobbyist DNA services may be open to genetic hacking

Online services that allow users to upload their genetic information, research genealogy and find lost relatives may be vulnerable to a sort of genetic hacking that exposes users' genetic information, according to two geneticists at UC Davis.

3h

When college students post about depression on Facebook

When college students post about feelings of depression on Facebook, their friends are unlikely to encourage them to seek help, a small study suggests.In fact, in this study, none of the 33 participating students said their friends told them they should reach out to a mental health professional to discuss their problems.

3h

Fossilized seashells show signs of ocean acidification before dinosaur-annihilating asteroid

New evidence gleaned from Antarctic seashells confirms that Earth was already unstable before the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs.

3h

Interactive map shows the 13 emotions music makes us feel

Researchers have surveyed more than 2,500 people in the United States and China about their emotional responses to these and thousands of other songs from genres including rock, folk, jazz, classical, marching band, experimental, and heavy metal. The upshot? The subjective experience of music across cultures can be mapped within at least 13 overarching feelings: Amusement, joy, eroticism, beauty,

3h

Servant leadership is good for business—and women are better at it

For decades, studies have shown men are more likely than women to be perceived as good leaders—even when they do or say the same things. But when it comes to servant leadership, women have the advantage, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.

3h

Carbon Efficiency of Electric Cars

Arguments about which technology is the most energy and carbon efficient over their entire lifetime are good ones to have. This is where the conversation should be focusing, not rehashing questions that are not currently scientifically controversial. But the debate about life cycle efficiency is complex, and often gets abused or misunderstood. We face these questions from biofuels to solar, wind

3h

Image of the Day: Repairing Hearts

A growth factor treatment helps improve cardiac functioning after heart attack in pigs.

3h

Please Stop Sending Terrifying Alerts to My Cell Phone

Amber, Blue, Silver, Camo: Is it really a good idea to push so many alarming messages to the public?

3h

Mandalorian vs. TIE Fighter: Who Would Win?

If a spaceship is moving at 262 miles per hour, will a bounty hunter with a grappling hook survive the acceleration?

3h

The Other Swing Voter

We needed some air. The room's high ceilings had been stuffed with roping hugs and raining tears, with eyes and smiles wider than the television announcing the impossible, with raised arms and shouts of "Thank ya, Jeesus-aaa!" The storefront office of the Black United Front was full in so many ways. We seemed to feel it all at once on the evening of November 4, 2008. And hear it. We poured out on

3h

Track Australia's raging bushfires with these official sources

A firefighting helicopter tackles a bushfire in Victoria's East Gippsland region, Australia. (State Government of Victoria/) Amanda Gearing is a journalist, author, and broadcaster at Queensland University of Technology. This article originally featured on The Conversation . As I write this, fires are consuming huge swathes of Australia and conditions are expected to worsen. The situation is attr

3h

James Webb Space Telescope on Track for March 2021 Launch, NASA Says

Despite numerous setbacks, the $9.7-billion observatory is still on schedule to revolutionize our view of the universe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Can gun violence be traced back to socioeconomic root causes?

Life expectancy in the U.S. has dropped as a result of gun violence, says Daniel Kim, an associate professor of health sciences at Northeastern.

3h

Pathways of disease spillover among domestic and wild sheep and goats in the western United States

A new large-scale genetic study has determined that domestic sheep and goats are the source of bronchopneumonia in bighorn sheep and mountain goats in the western United States, according to a research team led by Pauline Kamath, University of Maine assistant professor of animal health.

3h

Researcher studies near-surface wind effects on landscape evolution

The accurate characterization of near-surface winds is critical to understanding past and modern climate. Dust lifted by these winds has the potential to modify surface and atmospheric conditions, according to a University of Wyoming researcher who was part of a study on the subject.

3h

How fast the planet warms will be crucial for livability

The world is warming … and fast. The global average temperature has already risen by more than 1°C as a result of greenhouse gas emissions from human activity, and most of that warming has come in just the last 50 years.

3h

Pathways of disease spillover among domestic and wild sheep and goats in the western United States

A new large-scale genetic study has determined that domestic sheep and goats are the source of bronchopneumonia in bighorn sheep and mountain goats in the western United States, according to a research team led by Pauline Kamath, University of Maine assistant professor of animal health.

3h

Video: Kom med på rundtur i Østersøens flydende svejsefabrik

Lyden af metal, der vrider sig og lugten af røg fra svejseudstyr findes overalt på skibet Solitaire, der lægger fremtidens gasledning, Nord Stream 2, fra Rusland til Tyskland. Tag med på rundtur i det 300 meter lange skib.

3h

New 'umbrella' species would massively improve conservation

The protection of Australia's threatened species could be improved by a factor of seven, if more efficient 'umbrella' species were prioritized for protection, according to University of Queensland research.

3h

Rape-kit testing shows that rapists also commit other serious, invasive crimes, according to new research

Larry McGowan is a sexual-assault offender, identified through the DNA testing of thousands of rape kits in Cleveland. He's been linked to raping six women—killing one of them—during a 15-year span and is serving a 25-years-to-life sentence.

3h

Magnitude 6.5 earthquake hits off Puerto Rico: USGS

A strong earthquake struck south of Puerto Rico early Tuesday, the US Geological Survey said, the latest in a series of tremors that have shaken the island since December 28.

3h

New 'umbrella' species would massively improve conservation

The protection of Australia's threatened species could be improved by a factor of seven, if more efficient 'umbrella' species were prioritized for protection, according to University of Queensland research.

3h

Rising carbon prices led to drop in German emissions in 2019

Germany's greenhouse gas emissions fell sharply last year, putting the country's 2020 climate goal within reach again.

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Drinking water under threat: Water contamination risks this bushfire season

Regional and metropolitan areas around NSW are facing water quality concerns in the face of the bushfire crisis.

4h

Tools to reverse implicit negative prejudice in children

Miao Qian, a postdoctoral research fellow with the Inequality in America Initiative, studies the development of implicit racial biases in children to understand better how and when unconscious prejudices and stereotypes form in the brain. Qian, who received a Ph.D. in developmental psychology and education from the University of Toronto, envisions a future in which children are able to "unlearn" u

4h

Keeping dark matter detectors clean and accurate

A research team at South Dakota School of Mines & Technology has built an air purifier that has reduced the radon in the air to about 50 times lower than typical outdoor air. The team is helping to ensure success for one of the world's most sensitive dark matter experiments—LZ. Dark matter has never been directly observed. But it is believed to make up 85% of all the matter in the universe. The my

4h

Cutting through fog with laser focus

Research from The University of Queensland aimed at controlling light in scattering materials, such as fog or biological tissues, will benefit future biomedical imaging and telecommunications.

4h

Binary star V Sagittae to explode as very bright nova by century's end

Currently, the faint star V Sagittae, V Sge, in the constellation Sagitta, is barely visible, even in mid-sized telescopes. However, around the year 2083, this innocent star will explode, becoming as bright as Sirius, the brightest star visible in the night sky. During this time of eruption, V Sge will be the most luminous star in the Milky Way galaxy. This prediction is being presented for the fi

4h

LIGO-Virgo gravitational wave network catches another neutron star collision

On April 25, 2019, the LIGO Livingston Observatory picked up what appeared to be gravitational ripples from a collision of two neutron stars. LIGO Livingston is part of a gravitational-wave network that includes LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory), funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the European Virgo detector. Now, a new study confirms that this event

4h

America's Coal Consumption Entered Free Fall in 2019

Here's the good news, such as it is, for the climate: American coal consumption plunged last year, reaching its lowest level since 1975, as electrical utilities switched to cheaper natural gas and renewables. Over the past decade and a half, coal's collapse has saved tens of thousands of lives nationwide, according to new research, and cut national greenhouse-gas emissions by more than 10 percent

4h

Navigational secrets of the desert ant

Nature, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03956-9 A sumptuous book explores how the insect finds its way. By William A. Foster

4h

Ghost worms mostly unchanged since the age of dinosaurs

It is well known that the size, shape and structure of organisms can evolve at different speeds, ranging from fast-evolving adaptive radiations to living fossils such as cichlids or coelacanths, respectively.

4h

Surprise! TESS shows Alpha Draconis undergoes eclipses

Astronomers using data from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) have shown that Alpha Draconis, a well-studied star visible to the naked eye, and its fainter companion star regularly eclipse each other. While astronomers previously knew this was a binary system, the mutual eclipses came as a complete surprise.

4h

Indeterminist physics for an open world

Classical physics is characterized by the precision of its equations describing the evolution of the world as determined by the initial conditions of the Big Bang—meaning there is no room for chance. Yet our day-to-day experience and intuition are struck by this deterministic vision of the world: has everything really been written in advance? Is randomness nothing more than an illusion? A physicis

4h

Ghost worms mostly unchanged since the age of dinosaurs

It is well known that the size, shape and structure of organisms can evolve at different speeds, ranging from fast-evolving adaptive radiations to living fossils such as cichlids or coelacanths, respectively.

4h

Återkommande smärta orsak till lägre skolbetyg

Skolbarn med återkommande smärtproblem går ut grundskolan med lägre betyg och sämre självkänsla än andra barn. Det visas i en ny avhandling vid Umeå universitet. – Resultaten understryker att det är viktigt att tidigt sätta in åtgärder mot återkommande smärta för att förebygga negativa konsekvenser för barnens fortsatta liv, säger Susanne Ragnarsson, doktorand vid Umeå universitet. I sin avhandli

4h

Falken ser bytet tydligt i över 350 km/h

Hög synskärpa, men också förmåga att snabbt kunna uppfatta olika synintryck. De två faktorerna är avgörande när pilgrimsfalken störtar ner på sitt byte i hastigheter som lätt matchar en Formel 1-bil. Rovfåglars synskärpa är väl undersökt och visar att en del stora örnar och gamar har dubbelt så skarp syn som människor. Däremot har forskare fram tills nu aldrig studerat synsinnets hastighet hos ro

4h

Hard Water Is Better for Your Heart

Originally published in June 1969 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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When Opioids Backfire

Our most powerful painkillers can actually make some patients more sensitive to pain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Doctors scramble to identify mysterious illness emerging in China

The cause of a pneumonia that has affected at least 59 people in Wuhan City, Hubei Province of China, remains unknown, but authorities have ruled out SARS, MERS and bird flu

4h

Crossfit wins $4 million sanction in lawsuit stemming from now-retracted paper

A Federal court in California has ruled in favor of the popular training program CrossFit in its lawsuit against a nonprofit group — a competitor in fitness training — awarding the workout company nearly $4 million in sanctions. Why are you reading about this case on Retraction Watch, you might ask? Well, at the heart … Continue reading

4h

10 More Extraordinary Gadgets We've Spotted at CES

Today we saw some tech products for parents, health monitors, and new inventions for the smart home.

4h

Here's What Directing a Star Wars Movie Is Really Like

The second unit director for 'The Rise of Skywalker,' Victoria Mahoney, opens up about bringing the Force from secretive sound stage to screen.

4h

Soleimani Was Failing

Hard to say he didn't deserve it. Qassem Soleimani was responsible for 11 recent attacks on U.S. facilities in Iraq even before the one that killed a U.S. contractor; Iranian attacks on neutral, civilian shipping in the Gulf; the attack on Aramco facilities in Saudi Arabia; IEDs that killed hundreds of American soldiers in Iraq. He was the architect of Iran's strategy of mobilizing militias to de

4h

Pelosi and McConnell Are Playing High-Stakes Poker

We are now entering the third week of the staring contest between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell over when the House of Representatives will deliver its articles of impeachment to the Senate, and under what circumstances. It's time for some game theory . The standoff stems from McConnell's proposal for how to proceed with the impeachment trial of President D

4h

When Opioids Backfire

Our most powerful painkillers can actually make some patients more sensitive to pain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Can Exercise Explain the Health Benefits of Natural Environments?

Researchers found that people who spend more time outdoors also spend more time being active and socializing, but it probably doesn't account for all of the health boost associated with green spaces.

4h

Venomous Menace: Snakebite Treatments Are Failing in India

The most widely used antivenom is not effective against the venom of several common snakes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Venomous Menace: Snakebite Treatments Are Failing in India

The most widely used antivenom is not effective against the venom of several common snakes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nu kommer DAB-kravet: Til december skal nye biler sælges med digital radio

PLUS. Alle nye biler, der sælges efter 21. december i år, skal have en DAB-radio installeret. Det slår klima-, energi og forsyningsminister Dan Jørgensen fast i kølvandet på nye EU-regler. I dag har kun hver tredje nye bil DAB-radio.

5h

Nyt Nasa-teleskop finder sin første jordlignende planet

Nasas Tess-rumteleskop har i sin jagt på exoplaneter opdaget en planet, som foreløbig opfylder betingelserne for liv som på Jorden.

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Trees and doodlebugs emit methane – the question is, how?

Trees and insects may play a significant role in the emission of methane—a potent greenhouse gas—and improving our understanding of exactly how this happens could help in targeting more effective ways to fight global warming.

5h

Små saker som gör matten uppenbar för de yngsta eleverna

Hur förstår en sjuåring relationerna mellan tals delar och helhet? Och hur ser matte-undervisningen ut för de yngsta eleverna. Genom att analysera lärares olika sätt att undervisa om samma sak, går det att vaska fram olika lärandemöjligheter, menar Anna-Lena Ekdahl, doktorand vid Jönköping university. Anna-Lena Ekdahls avhandling handlar om undervisningen där relationer mellan tals delar och helh

5h

Check for publication integrity before misconduct

Nature, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03959-6 A tool that focuses on papers — not researcher behaviour — can help readers, editors and institutions assess which publications to trust.

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The birds and the bats: Evolving to fly may have had big effect on gut microbiome

UC San Diego researchers studied nearly 900 vertebrate species and found that bats have unusual gut microbiomes that more closely resemble those of birds than other mammals, raising questions about how evolutionary pressures change the gut microbiome.

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Birds and bats have strange gut microbiomes — probably because they can fly

Gut bacteria help us fight disease and digest food, but not all animals rely on their microbiomes the way we do. A new study comparing the guts of mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians shows that birds and bats have unusual microbiomes — probably because they both can fly.

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William Shatner: Empathy must be taught

Empathy is defined as the act of recognizing, understanding, and being sensitive to the feelings and experiences of others. Sharing a story about young elephants at a nature preserve, William Shatner argues that empathy is a learned skill, not an inherited trait. "That has to be learned, and I don't think it's any different from a boy to a girl. You have to walk in the shoes to experience what th

5h

Gravitational waves: Cosmic vibrations sensed from unusual star merger

Laser labs pick up a signal emanating from the collision of two dense, dead stars.

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Sundhedsøkonomer svarer Kjeld Møller Pedersen: Dækningen af effektiviseringskravet er vigtig

Dagens Medicin og en navngiven kilde får kritik i et debatindlæg, der handler om dækningen af effektiviseringskravet. De to professorer i sundhedsøkonomi Jes Søgaard og Jakob Kjellberg slår fast, at dækningen er vigtig.

5h

The World Paid Attention to the Wrong Iraqi Protests

Baghdad's Tahrir Square has been the center of ongoing protests since last October, but on New Year's Eve it looked like any other public celebration venue—with music, dancing, food and drinks, and fireworks at midnight as the assembled crowd cheered. But that was not the event that received attention around the world. Several hours earlier across the Tigris River, which separates Tahrir Square f

5h

Suicide Is Not an Act of Cowardice

David Foster Wallace, who took his own life in 2008, was a courageous man. He was a university professor, a prolific writer of essays and novels, and a MacArthur Foundation Fellow, but none of those things made him notably brave. What made him brave was that he accomplished what he did while fighting a major depressive disorder, and survived it until he was 46. He achieved even as he struggled to

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Birds and bats have strange gut microbiomes—probably because they can fly

At a time when kombucha is commonplace on cafe menus and "probiotic-fortified" has become the newest health buzzword, our guts have never been more relevant. With good reason, humans have begun paying more attention to the bacteria living in our guts—our microbiomes. The microbiome helps fight disease and aid digestion, playing a pivotal role in many creatures' wellbeing, from canines to primates

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Birds and bats have strange gut microbiomes—probably because they can fly

At a time when kombucha is commonplace on cafe menus and "probiotic-fortified" has become the newest health buzzword, our guts have never been more relevant. With good reason, humans have begun paying more attention to the bacteria living in our guts—our microbiomes. The microbiome helps fight disease and aid digestion, playing a pivotal role in many creatures' wellbeing, from canines to primates

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New Year's resolution: one meeting-free week a quarter

Nature, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03953-y Protect time for deep thinking — it is crucial for productivity in a world of constant interaction, urges Heidi Rehm.

5h

Facebook bandlyser brugen af deepfakes

Manipulerende og vildledende indhold er ikke længere velkomment på platformen.

5h

Vi har altid haft dårlig samvittighed over vores læsevaner

Litteraturforsker Tina Lupton har sammenlignet læsevaner i 1700-tallet med moderne læsevaner…

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Kjeld Møller Pedersen om effektiviseringskravet: Selvfølgelig er det opgjort forskelligt

Professor i sundhedsøkonomi Kjeld Møller Pedersen kritiserer dækningen af effektiviseringskravet for at være ufuldstændig og baseret på uholdbare præmisser om, hvordan kravene kom til verden. Læs debatindlægget samt modsvaret fra Dagens Medicin her.

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Mercury's outer layers may have been stripped off by a young Venus

Mercury is mostly iron, which may be because a series of close encounters with a young Venus billions of years ago stripped away its rocky outer layers

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Siah2 control of T-regulatory cells limits anti-tumor immunity

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13826-7 The ubiquitin ligase Siah2 has been implicated in immune responses. Here, the authors show that Siah2 null immune cells have an increased inflammatory response to inoculated melanoma cells, along with a reduced number of infiltrating immunosuppressive regulatory T cells, resulting in inhibition of tumour grow

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Different ways to transport ammonia in human and Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD+ synthetases

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13845-4 M. tuberculosis NAD+ synthetase (tbNadE) is of interest as a drug target. Here the authors present the actively trapped Homo sapiens NAD+ synthetase (hsNadE) and tbNadE structures and show key differences in the synthetase active site and in structural elements possibly involved in the allosteric regulation o

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Single-dose bNAb cocktail or abbreviated ART post-exposure regimens achieve tight SHIV control without adaptive immunity

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13972-y Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) are being evaluated for HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) in the setting of vertical transmission. Here, using a macaque model of perinatal SHIV infection, the authors show that PEP for infant macaques within 30–48 h of SHIV exposure is highly effective using either b

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Single-cell analysis based dissection of clonality in myelofibrosis

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13892-x Myelofibrosis is a myeloproliferative neoplasm. Here, the authors show the clonal evolution of myelofibrosis during JAK inhibitor therapy, revealing how the treatment results in an increase in clonal complexity and a gain of RAS pathway mutations.

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Fungal community assembly in drought-stressed sorghum shows stochasticity, selection, and universal ecological dynamics

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13913-9 Fungal community assembly on crop plants is thought to be driven by deterministic selection exerted by the host. Here Gao et al. use a sorghum system to show that stochastic forces act on fungal community assembly in leaves and roots early in host development and when sorghum is drought stressed.

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Velocity and density characteristics of subducted oceanic crust and the origin of lower-mantle heterogeneities

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13720-2 Seismology is a powerful tool to investigate Earth's interior. Here, the authors combine numerical approaches with experimental results from previous studies to show a depth dependent behaviour of seismic waves in subducted oceanic crust in Earth's mantle. The work challenges the currently accepted model of d

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Mechanisms of triplet energy transfer across the inorganic nanocrystal/organic molecule interface

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13951-3 Though literature reports models describing triplet energy transfer between inorganic semiconductors and organic molecules, a unified mechanism for this process is still lacking. Here, the authors report triplet energy transfer mechanism at lead halide perovskite nanocrystal/polyacene interfaces.

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Constitutively bound CTCF sites maintain 3D chromatin architecture and long-range epigenetically regulated domains

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13753-7 The architectural protein CTCF is a mediator of chromatin conformation, but how CTCF binding to DNA is regulated remains poorly understood. Here the authors find that there is a shared subset of CTCF-bound sites resistant to protein depletion in different cell lines, which are enriched at domain boundaries an

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Improved kinetic behaviour of Mg(NH2)2-2LiH doped with nanostructured K-modified-LixTiyOz for hydrogen storage

Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55770-y Improved kinetic behaviour of Mg(NH 2 ) 2 -2LiH doped with nanostructured K-modified-Li x Ti y O z for hydrogen storage

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Single dose of antibodies can knock out HIV in newborns

A single dose of an antibody-based treatment can prevent HIV transmission from mother to baby, new nonhuman primate research suggests for the first time. The findings are being published in the journal Nature Communications. This is the first time a single dose of broadly neutralizing antibodies given after viral exposure has been found to prevent infection in nonhuman primate newborns.

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Study reveals a new approach to enhancing response to immunotherapy in melanoma

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys have identified a new way to boost the immune system's ability to fight cancer. The study used a mouse model to identify the importance of the Siah2 protein in the control of immune cells called T regulatory cells (Tregs), which limit the effectiveness of currently used immunotherapies. The research, which offers a new avenue to pursue immunotherapy in cases wh

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Social media sows consensus in disturbance ecology

Nature, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00006-7

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Census: on paper, by governments, is still best

Nature, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00004-9

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Sahel: governments must boost basic services

Nature, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00007-6

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The Amazon: biofuels plan will drive deforestation

Nature, Published online: 07 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00005-8

6h

The Real Power of Bloomberg's Money

When people think about the political relevance of Michael Bloomberg's money, they tend to think about how his massive spending helps his campaigns: the record $261 million he spent on his three successful mayoral runs, the billions he could end up spending on his quest for the presidency. What people often miss is that Bloomberg actually spent more of his own money boosting his policy efforts in

6h

To Minimize Impact on Climate, Reduce Air Travel

Some have argued that flying less isn't an impactful way to reduce carbon emissions. But previous figures have underestimated its importance. By flying less often for both pleasure and business, especially in the academic sector, we could set an important example for the rest of the world.

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Engineers design on-skin electronic device providing a personal air conditioner without needing electricity U/Missouri

https://techxplore.com/news/2020-01-on-skin-electronic-device-personal-air.html Our own personal chill-out submitted by /u/Mitchhumanist [link] [comments]

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Robotterne kommer – kan de forstå os, og kan vi forstå dem?

PLUS. Vi interagerer i stigende grad med robotter og kunstig intelligens. En forsker og en forfatter har bud på, hvad det kommer til at betyde.

6h

Famous black hole has jet pushing cosmic speed limit

The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration released the first image of a black hole with observations of the massive, dark object at the center of Messier 87, or M87, last April. This black hole has a mass of about 6.5 billion times that of the sun and is located about 55 million light years from Earth. The black hole has been called M87* by astronomers and has recently been given the Hawaiian name

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NASA planet hunter finds its first earth-size habitable-zone world

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has discovered its first Earth-size planet in its star's habitable zone, the range of distances where conditions may be just right to allow the presence of liquid water on the surface. Scientists confirmed the find, called TOI 700 d, using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and have modeled the planet's potential environments to help inform future ob

6h

Fotos: 430 arbejdere lægger fremtidens gasrør i Østersøen

Med en besætning på 429 mand – og en kvinde – bevæger skibet Solitaire sig gennem Østersøen og lægger rørene til Nord Stream 2. Her arbejder alt fra ingeniører, til smede, kokke og data-analytikere i døgndrift.

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TESS mission uncovers its first world with two stars

In 2019, when Wolf Cukier finished his junior year at Scarsdale High School in New York, he joined NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, as a summer intern. His job was to examine variations in star brightness captured by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) and uploaded to the Planet Hunters TESS citizen science project.

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India suffers hottest decade on record

The last decade was India's hottest on record with the national weather office calling the impact of global warming "unmistakable" and extreme weather killing more than 1,500 people last year.

8h

The Superpowers of Super-Thin Materials

In materials science, 2-D is the new 3-D.

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Australia firefighters race to contain blazes as heatwave looms

Firefighters raced to contain massive bushfires in southeastern Australia Tuesday, taking advantage of a brief drop in temperatures and some much-needed rainfall before another heatwave strikes later this week.

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Quake in west Indonesia causes minor damage, no injuries

A strong earthquake hit off the west Indonesian coast in the Indian Ocean on Tuesday, slightly damaging several buildings but causing no injuries, officials said.

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SpaceX launches third batch of Starlink satellites

SpaceX on Monday launched its third batch of 60 mini-satellites into orbit, part of its plans to build a giant constellation of thousands of spacecraft that will form a global broadband internet system.

8h

The Parasympathetic State

The claims for an essential oil mixture, Vibrant Blue Parasympathetic, are devoid of science. They are a mixture of pseudoscience, misrepresentation, lies, and imagination.

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NASA contractor settles whistleblower complaint for $375,000

A NASA contractor on Monday agreed to pay $375,000 in order to settle a whistleblower complaint that accused the company of falsely certifying that ground support equipment for a rocket launch system followed the space agency's requirements.

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Nasa opdager jordlignende planet, som kan indeholde vand

Nasa-teleskopet Tess har fundet en exoplanet, der måske indeholder vand i flydende form.

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Hyundai vil hjælpe Uber med at indføre flyvende biler

I 2023 forventer kørselstjenesten Uber at kunne levere flyvende biler, der ikke bliver hindret af trafikken.

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Packaging initiatives designed to reduce food waste

submitted by /u/thinkB4WeSpeak [link] [comments]

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Artifacts hint at life along WWII escape route in Croatia

Researchers plan to excavate a trail that World War II refugees once trod. Thousands of people fleeing war and poverty in the Middle East, Central Asia, and Africa now use the trail. In the foothills of Croatia's Dinaric Alps, only a dozen miles inland from the tourist-trafficked Adriatic coast, evidence of the destruction wrought by World War II still remains. Vines grow over the foundations of

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Fearless kids may develop more callous traits

Two new papers may provide new insight into a set of behaviors known as callous-unemotional traits. The researchers found that young children who exhibited less fear and desire for social connection and who engaged less frequently in a copycat behavior called arbitrary imitation developed more callous-unemotional (CU) traits, which are known to lead to antisocial behavior later. A link between an

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To prep for future heat, sort out climate modeling

Improper adoption of climate impact modeling could leave us ill prepared for even higher temperatures and more frequent heatwaves, according to new research. Researchers compared two major climate modeling methods: transient climate, where the global temperatures are consistently rising over the next 80 years, and equilibrium climate, where the temperatures rise and reach a steady equilibrium ove

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China mystery illness: travellers checked as officials fear lunar new year could spread bug

Pneumonia-like illness in Wuhan is unclear in origin, with officials racing to contain outbreak before people travel for new year China has been battling what may be a new strain of pneumonia after 59 people contracted a mysterious respiratory illness in central China, prompting fears of another Sars outbreak. Health officials are worried about the upcoming Spring Festival in late January, when C

9h

Astronomers Just Detected a Second, Epic Neutron Star Collision

We didn't think they could get this massive.

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Million Veteran Program study sheds light on genetic basis of anxiety

In the largest genetic study on anxiety to date, VA researchers found new evidence on the underlying biological causes of the disorder. The study used VA Million Veteran Program data to identify regions on the human genome related to anxiety risk.

10h

Archaeologists find graves of high-status Romans in Somerset

Discovery of unusual cemetery in Somerton offers clues as to standing of those buried there The resting places of more than 50 adults and children have been found in an unusual Roman cemetery unearthed during building work for a new school in Somerset. Archaeologists say the discovery at Somerton, near Glastonbury, sheds significant light on life and death in the south-west of Britain after the R

10h

Sløv tarm og fed lever: Sådan får du din krop i topform efter en hård december

Hvis du skruer ned for alkoholen i januar, kan du slippe af med den fedtlever, du (måske) har opbygget i december.

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NCI-MATCH: T-DM1 shows promising activity in salivary gland cancer

A discovery from NCI-MATCH, the largest precision medicine cancer trial, relates to patients with salivary gland cancer treated with ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), a drug already FDA-approved for certain types of breast cancer. Two of the three NCI-MATCH patients with this rare disease saw their tumors shrink by at least 30% with T-DM1 treatment and the benefit lasted two years for one patient

11h

Study of veterans details genetic basis for anxiety, links anxiety and depression

A massive genomewide analysis of approximately 200,000 military veterans has identified six genetic variants linked to anxiety, researchers from Yale and colleagues at other institutions report Jan. 7, 2019 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

11h

Young adults using both e-cigarettes and combustible cigarettes at significantly higher risk of stroke

People are looking at e-cigarettes as a 'healthy' alternative to cigarettes and we currently have an epidemic of e-cigarettes use. However, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, young adults who smoke cigarettes plus use e-cigarettes are nearly two times more likely to have a stroke compared to current cigarette-only smokers and nearly thre

11h

Federal data undercounts fatal overdose deaths caused by specific drugs

The number of drug overdose deaths is severely undercounted by the federal government. Over a 10-year period, one-in-three overdose deaths caused by opioids were not reported by the CDC.

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Children frequently receive unnecessary medical care regardless of insurance type

Children with public insurance are slightly more likely to receive medical services that they don't need than those with private insurance, a new study finds.

11h

White House Favors a Light Touch in Regulating AI

US chief technology officer Michael Kratsios lists "principles" for government oversight, but analysts question whether they are too vague to do any good.

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Her lægger Nord Stream 2 rørene til en fossil fremtid

PLUS. Dybhavsrørlægningsskibet Solitaire er et minisamfund på 429 mand og én kvinde, som i Østersøen har arbejdet på rørlægningen af Europas nye gasledning fra Rusland. Ingeniøren var på besøg, før arbejdet blev sat på stand-by af Trumps sanktioner.

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Nye krav til kodeord møder kritik: »I virkeligheden er det ikke sikkerhed. Det ligner bare sikkerhed.«

Krav til store og små bogstaver og tal vil højne sikkerheden blandt adgangskoder til Uni-Login ifølge Styrelsen for IT og Læring. Men sikkerhedsekspert anbefaler i stedet såkaldte nonsens-sætninger, der er nemme at huske for brugeren, men som ikke giver mening for andre.

12h

Crispr puts first human in-body gene editing to test

Companies will seek to restore sight and cure liver condition by using technology like a drug

12h

Science hails Johnson's post-Brexit bid to boost R&D

Pledge to lift spending and set up innovation hub welcomed by academics and industry

12h

Traffic Cameras Show Why the Yankees Should Suffer Fewer Injuries in 2020

The 2019 New York Yankees' record number of injuries led to a change in training staff that will almost certainly correlate with, but not necessarily cause, a lower injury rate this coming season.

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NASA Planet Hunter Finds Earth-Size Habitable-Zone World

submitted by /u/Ichirosato [link] [comments]

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SpaceX sends 60 more Starlink satellites into orbit

The California company's latest mission makes it the world's largest commercial satellite operator.

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Traffic Cameras Show Why the Yankees Should Suffer Fewer Injuries in 2020

The 2019 New York Yankees' record number of injuries led to a change in training staff that will almost certainly correlate with, but not necessarily cause, a lower injury rate this coming season…. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

The Climate Crisis Is Now Detectable in Every Single Day of Weather Across The Planet

We've always said weather is not climate. But in 2012, that changed.

14h

Bluetooth's New LE Audio Is Here to Fix Your Headphones

Bluetooth's new low-energy audio capabilities will save your battery and let you stream to multiple sources at once.

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Four dish drying racks for every type of kitchen

Passive drying. (Amazon/) Dish racks: you need one (whether you've got a dishwasher or not) to keep wet dishes upright and your countertops puddle-free. They come in lots of designs and price points, so your ideal dish rack will depend on the size of your kitchen, your counter space, where you'd like to set up your drying station, how much you'll have to dry, personal style, and budget. Below, so

15h

Intel Maps Out a Foldable, AI-Infused PC Future

The company's latest chips—and the bending gadgets they power—are learning to think for themselves.

15h

How Close Is Iran to a Nuclear Weapon? Here's What We Know

Iran is no longer abiding by many of the restrictions in the landmark 2015 nuclear deal, but that doesn't mean it's about to build a bomb, either.

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: It's Beginning to Look Like 2003

It's Monday, January 6. In today's newsletter: A crash landing into 2020. Plus: Reactions to this new study on economic distress and opioids abuse complicate the narrative of America's opioids epidemic. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » Iranians burn U.S. and Israeli flags as they gather to mourn the death of Qassem Soleimani. (NAZANIN TABATABAEE / WANA VIA REUTERS January 2020 will be defined by three I's

16h

Watch Australia's Wildfires Spawn Massive Smoky Thunderclouds

Researchers have been watching Australia's fires produce pyrocumulonimbus clouds. Here's why the phenomenon is so dangerous.

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Home security cameras that offer peace of mind (and perhaps the occasional raccoon footage)

Keep an eye out. (Miłosz Klinowski via Unsplash/) Camera technology is getting smaller, cheaper, and more intuitive to set up and use, meaning peace of mind around has become simpler to achieve. So why not? Here are some easy-to-install, effective home security cameras that will help you sleep a little better at night, or at least provide you with some funny video of raccoons trying to jack your

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10 tricks to master your Google Nest Hub

Why look out the window to learn about the weather when your Google Nest Hub can tell you without you asking? (Google /) If you've invested in a Google smart display, you're going to want to know how to make the best use of it. What sets the Google Nest apart from standard smart speakers is its attached screen, which means you've got more features and tricks to play around with. Take advantage of

17h

Byton Pushes M-Byte EV as First Smart Device on Wheels

LAS VEGAS – Byton kicked off the automotive part of CES 2020 with a reintroduction of its M-Byte electric SUV, providing details on production and sales plans, news of a developer program (you know, like it's a $50,000 phone), and the names of partners who will provide streaming video and minute-by-minute weather updates. CEO Daniel Kirchert said Byton has already produced several dozen M-Byte pr

17h

Health care paperwork cost US $812 billion in 2017, 4 times more per capita than Canada

Compared to Canada, the US spends four times more on health care administration ($551 vs. $2,479 per person), mostly due to the surging overhead of private insurers. Health care bureaucracy cost Americans $812 billion in 2017, representing more than one-third of total expenditures for doctor visits, hospitals, long-term care, and health insurance. Cutting U.S. administrative costs to Canadian leve

18h

ACP issues guideline for testosterone treatment in adult men with age-related low testosterone

Physicians should prescribe testosterone for men with age-related low testosterone only to treat sexual dysfunction, the American College of Physicians (ACP) says in a new evidence-based clinical practice guideline. The evidence shows that men with age-related low testosterone may experience slight improvements in sexual and erectile function. The guideline is published in Annals of Internal Medic

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American College of Physicians issues guideline for testosterone treatment in adult men

Physicians should prescribe testosterone for men with age-related low testosterone only to treat sexual dysfunction, the American College of Physicians says in a new evidence-based clinical practice guideline published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

18h

Processed foods highly correlated with obesity epidemic in the US

A review article highlights the correlation between highly processed foods and increased prevalence of obesity in the United States.

18h

Finding a new way to fight late-stage sepsis

Researchers have developed a way to prop up a struggling immune system to enable its fight against sepsis, a deadly condition resulting from the body's extreme reaction to infection.

18h

Researchers united on international road map to insect recovery

It's no secret that many insects are struggling worldwide. But we could fix these insects' problems, according to more than 70 scientists from 21 countries.

18h

Polluted wastewater in the forecast? Try a solar umbrella

Evaporation ponds, commonly used in many industries to manage wastewater, can occupy a large footprint and often pose risks to birds and other wildlife, yet they're an economical way to deal with contaminated water. Now researchers have demonstrated a way to double the rate of evaporation by using solar energy and taking advantage of water's inherent properties, potentially reducing their environm

18h

Scientists develop new method to detect oxygen on exoplanets

Scientists have developed a new method for detecting oxygen in exoplanet atmospheres that may accelerate the search for life. The new technique detects the signal that oxygen molecules produce when they collide. This signal could help scientists distinguish between planets with and without life.

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This Galaxy Has A Massive Ring of Gas Circling It

The ring is more than three times as far across as the Milky Way.

18h

Training for a Marathon is Good for Your Blood Vessels

Arteries around the heart could regain some of their stretchiness as first time marathoners train.

18h

Boeing Finds Even More Issues With Its Troubled 737 Max Plane

Grounded Aerospace giant Boeing is investigating whether the wiring responsible for controlling the tail of the 737 Max commercial airplane — the same model involved in two deadly crashes in 2018 and 2019 — could result in a wreck, the New York Times reported on Sunday. Before this round of bad news, Boeing grounded hundreds of 737 Max airplanes worldwide in March after two accidents resulted in

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Samsung's Artificial Humans Look Eerily, Well, Human

Artificial Humans Since mid-December, Samsung has been teasing "artificial humans" through a project called NEON, promising to reveal details at the 2020 Consumer Electronics Show. Well, CES is still a day away, but newly leaked videos and a tweet from NEON's project leader provide a sneak peek at the project — and suggest that it might just live up to Samsung's hype. Clone Wars On Saturday, Redd

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Neat CES Gadgets, a Deadly Cobra's Genome, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

18h

Shutdown of coal-fired plants in US saves lives and improves crop yields

The decommissioning of coal-fired power plants in the continental United States has reduced nearby pollution and its negative impacts on human health and crop yields, according to a new study.

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Gene therapy shown to offer long-term benefits for people with Haemophilia A

A breakthrough gene therapy treatment for Haemophilia A has been shown to offer long-term benefits that have already transformed the lives of 13 men in the UK.

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Plasticizers may contribute to motor control problems in girls

Scientists have uncovered a link between prenatal exposure to phthalates — a ubiquitous group of plasticizers and odor-enhancing chemicals — and deficits in motor function in girls. Phthalates are widely used in consumer products from plastic toys to household building materials to shampoos and are thought to disrupt endocrine function, and possibly interfere with brain development in utero.

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Gravitational wave mystery could be a sign of a new kind of black hole

A neutron star has produced gravitational waves after colliding with an unknown object – it could be the smallest black hole or biggest neutron star ever found

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JetBlue says to go carbon neutral by July 2020

The no-frills US air carrier JetBlue will go carbon neutral for all domestic flights starting the summer of this year, the company announced Monday.

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Maximizing bike-share ridership: New research says it's all about location

The popularity of bike-share systems has grown in popularity thanks to the younger, more environmentally conscious generation. While they have garnered considerable attention in cities from Paris to Washington, D.C., their promise of urban transformation is far from being fully realized.

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America's Self-Sabotage in the Middle East

The Trump administration is still celebrating the death of Qassem Soleimani, the Iranian military commander the president called "the number-one terrorist anywhere in the world." But in a single hectic weekend after the killing, virtually all of America's other goals in the Middle East took a significant hit. The U.S. wants to stop Iran from going nuclear; Iran said it would ditch the last restri

19h

The High Cost of Having a Baby in America

For women in many developed countries, having the baby—not paying for it—is the hard part. Giving birth in Finland, for example, will set you back a little less than $60 . But in the U.S., the average new mother with insurance will pay more than $4,500 for her labor and delivery, a new study in Health Affairs has found. For the study, researchers at the University of Michigan looked at 657,061 Am

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Biomarker predicts which patients with heart failure have a higher risk of dying

A UCLA-led study revealed a new way to predict which patients with 'stable' heart failure — those who have heart injury but do not require hospitalization — have a higher risk of dying within one to three years.

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Study links Medicaid expansion and recipients' health status

In Southern states that expanded their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act, adults experienced lower rates of decline in both physical and mental health, according to research published this month in the journal Health Affairs.

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Patients with VA coverage less likely than other insured Americans to skip medication

Veterans' Administration patients were less likely than other insured Americans to skip medications due to cost. Although VA enrollees were older, sicker, and poorer than other Americans, fewer (6.1%) reported that costs caused them to go without medication, compared to 10.9% of non-VA patients. The VA keeps drug costs low through regulations, negotiations with drug companies, and a national formu

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Having a baby may cost some families $4,500 out-of-pocket

One of the most expensive parts of having a baby may involve the birth itself, a new Michigan Medicine study suggests.

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In a nearby galaxy, a fast radio burst unravels more questions than answers

For more than a decade, astronomers across the globe have wrestled with the perplexities of fast radio bursts—intense, unexplained cosmic flashes of energy, light years away, that pop for mere milliseconds.

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Shutdown of coal-fired plants in US saves lives and improves crop yields

The decommissioning of coal-fired power plants in the continental United States has reduced nearby pollution and its negative impacts on human health and crop yields, according to a new University of California San Diego study.

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Genes controlling mycorrhizal colonization discovered in soybean

Like most plants, soybeans pair up with soil fungi in a symbiotic mycorrhizal relationship. In exchange for a bit of sugar, the fungus acts as an extension of the root system to pull in more phosphorus, nitrogen, micronutrients, and water than the plant could on its own.

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NASA finds heavy rain potential in Tropical Cyclone Blake

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a near visible image and analyzed the cloud top temperatures in Tropical Cyclone Blake, located along the northern coast of Western Australia. Tropical Cyclone Blake is just north of Broome, a coastal town in the Kimberley region of Western Australia.

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Genes controlling mycorrhizal colonization discovered in soybean

Like most plants, soybeans pair up with soil fungi in a symbiotic mycorrhizal relationship. In exchange for a bit of sugar, the fungus acts as an extension of the root system to pull in more phosphorus, nitrogen, micronutrients, and water than the plant could on its own.

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Specifying irrigation needs for container-grown plants

A study at the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences examined the efficiency of irrigation schedules used for container-grown plants to determine if they could be improved with specific daily adjustments.

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Sea levels in Bangladesh could rise twice as much as predicted

Even if the world takes ambitious action on climate change, Bangladesh faces twice as much sea level rise as previously thought because of land subsidence

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New battery could double the range of electric vehicles

submitted by /u/FreedomBoners [link] [comments]

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This new method could fast-track the discovery of alien life

submitted by /u/ngt_ [link] [comments]

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What fossils will modern-day civilization leave behind?

Science chats with two experts about what future paleontologists—or perhaps even visiting aliens—might find

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Quest to use CRISPR against disease gains ground

Nature, Published online: 06 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03919-0 As the first clinical-trial results trickle in, researchers look ahead to more sophisticated medical applications for genome editing.

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Technique is almost 86 percent effective in preventing maternal death from hemorrhaging

A simple, inexpensive uterine balloon tamponade (UBT), is almost 86 percent effective in preventing maternal death from bleeding.

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Astronomers spot distant galaxy group driving ancient cosmic makeover

Astronomers have found the farthest galaxy group identified to date. Called EGS77, the trio of galaxies dates to a time when the universe was only 680 million years old, or less than 5% of its current age of 13.8 billion years.

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Genes controlling mycorrhizal colonization discovered in soybean

Like most plants, soybeans pair up with soil fungi in a symbiotic mycorrhizal relationship. In exchange for a bit of sugar, the fungus acts as an extension of the root system to pull in more phosphorus, nitrogen, micronutrients, and water than the plant could on its own.

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Protecting two key regions in Belize could save threatened jaguar, say scientists

Scientists studying one of the largest populations of jaguars in Central Belize have identified several wildlife corridors that should be protected to help the species survival. The study provide a new insight into where conservation efforts should be concentrated.

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Australia's historic bushfires could impact the world's biodiversity forever

Bushfires are normal in Australia, but this season hasn't been normal at all. (DepositPhoto/) The bushfires in Australia are so widespread they can be seen from space. On the ground, haunting images of burned wildlife and decimated forests have made it clear that in addition to threatening human life and safety, these fires pose a serious threat to biodiversity. But that conservation problem goes

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The Fires in Australia Are Turning Distant Glaciers Brown

Dust and Ashes The wildfires currently raging in Australia have already killed more than half a billion animals and at least 20 people . And now we know that more than 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles) away from the blazes lies another potential victim: New Zealand's glaciers. Photos and videos shared on social media show how ash from Australia's fires have turned New Zealand's glaciers a hazy shade

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NASA's Hubble surveys gigantic galaxy

A Hubble Space Telescope photograph showcases the majestic spiral galaxy UGC 2885, located 232 million light-years away in the northern constellation Perseus.

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Maximizing bike-share ridership: New research says it's all about location

The popularity of bike-share systems has grown in popularity thanks to the younger, more environmentally conscious generation. While they have garnered considerable attention in cities from Paris to Washington, D.C., their promise of urban transformation is far from being fully realized.

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A fast radio burst tracked down to a nearby galaxy

Astronomers have pinpointed the location of a repeating fast radio burst. The breakthrough is only the second time that scientists have determined the precise location of a repeating source of these millisecond bursts of radio waves from space.

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Ooh là là! Music evokes 13 key emotions. Scientists have mapped them

UC Berkeley scientists surveyed more than 2,500 people in the United States and China about their emotional responses to music and found that, across cultures and genres, the audio samples triggered 13 key emotions.

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NASA finds heavy rain potential in Tropical Cyclone Blake

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a near visible image and analyzed the cloud top temperatures in Tropical Cyclone Blake, located along the northern coast of Western Australia. Tropical Cyclone Blake is just north of Broome, a coastal town in the Kimberley region of Western Australia.

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New study unravels the complexity of childhood obesity

In a new study led by the University of Notre Dame, researchers examined how various psychological characteristics of children struggling with their weight, such as loneliness, anxiety and shyness, combined with similar characteristics of their parents or guardians and family dynamics affect outcomes of nutritional intervention.

20h

Scientists find new way to sustainably make chemicals by copying nature's tricks

Researchers have copied the way organisms produce toxic chemicals without harming themselves, paving the way for greener chemical and fuel production.

20h

A better estimate of water-level rise in the Ganges delta

For the first time, scientists have provided reliable regional estimates of land subsidence and water-level rise in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta. Depending on the region of the delta, water-level rise could reach 85 to 140 cm by 2100. The work, published in PNAS by researchers from the CNRS, IRD, BRGM, La Rochelle Université, Université des Antilles and Bangladesh University of Engineering

20h

Researchers suggest a pathway to reverse the genetic defect of Friedreich's ataxia

Scientists have identified a molecular mechanism that could reverse the genetic defect responsible for Friedreich's ataxia, a neurodegenerative disease that leaves its victims with difficulty walking, a loss of sensation in the arms and legs and impaired speech. The researchers discovered that the genetic anomaly that causes the disease — the multiple repetition of a three letter DNA sequence —

20h

Poplar genetically modified not to harm air quality grow as well as non-modified trees

Field trials in Oregon and Arizona show that poplar trees, which emit trace amounts of the gas isoprene, can be genetically modified not to harm air quality while leaving their growth potential unchanged.

20h

Severe childhood deprivation has longstanding impacts on brain size in adulthood

Researchers from King's College London have shown that the brains of young adult Romanian adoptees who were institutionalized as children are around 8.6% smaller than the brains of English adoptees who have not suffered this form of deprivation.

20h

Collaborative conservation approach for endangered reef fish yields dramatic results

A new study from researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego has documented a successful recovery effort among Nassau Grouper populations in the Cayman Islands thanks to an approach involving government agencies, academic researchers, and nonprofit organizations.

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Adolescents' view of family social standing correlates with mental health, life outcomes

Young people's view of their family's social status was more strongly associated with their mental health and readiness for future education and work than how much money, education or occupational prestige their parents have, according to new research led by the University of California, Irvine. By 18, youths who rated their family as having a higher place in society had fewer difficulties negotia

20h

Poplars genetically modified not to harm air quality grow as well as non-modified trees

Field trials in the Northwest and Southwest show that poplar trees can be genetically modified to reduce negative impacts on air quality while leaving their growth potential virtually unchanged.

20h

Severe childhood deprivation reduces brain size, study finds

Brain scans of Romanian orphans adopted in UK show early neglect left its mark Children who experience severe deprivation early in life have smaller brains in adulthood, researchers have found. The findings are based on scans of young adults who were adopted as children into UK families from Romania's orphanages that rose under the regime of the dictator Nicolae Ceauşescu. Continue reading…

20h

Is a Sad Song Sad For Everyone?

Researchers explore how different cultures respond to the same music — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Check Out the 3D Wreckage From This Exploded Star

3D Exploded Star A team of astronomers from the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), Caltech and Harvard have combined data from three different NASA observatories — the Chandra X-ray Observatory as well as the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes — to create a 3-D visualization of the Crab Nebula, the remains of a star that exploded in a supernova thousands of light years away. The team is

20h

Watch SpaceX Launch Its Next Huge Batch of Starlink Satellites

A Falcon 9 rocket is expected to lift off tonight carrying dozens of internet-beaming satellites. Here's how they'll work.

20h

Ricky Gervais Almost Got It Right on Hollywood Hypocrisy

Here's a strong line from Ricky Gervais's monologue at last night's Golden Globes : "Apple roared into the TV game with The Morning Show , a superb drama about the importance of dignity and doing the right thing, made by a company that runs sweatshops in China." Simple, sharp, speaking truth to power, and nailing an obvious hypocrisy: check, check, check, check. But then Gervais went on to tear i

20h

Ghost worms mostly unchanged since the age of dinosaurs

How can two species look almost exactly the same despite evolving separately for 140 million years? A new study sheds light on a group of sand-dwelling worm species that have hardly changed in appearance since the age of dinosaurs, making them one of the most extreme cases known of slow morphological evolution, also called stasis.

20h

Is a Sad Song Sad For Everyone?

Researchers explore how different cultures respond to the same music — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Collaborative conservation approach for endangered reef fish yields dramatic results

A new study from researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego has documented a successful recovery effort among Nassau Grouper populations in the Cayman Islands thanks to an approach involving government agencies, academic researchers, and nonprofit organizations.

20h

Scientists find new way to sustainably make chemicals by copying nature's tricks

Researchers have copied the way organisms produce toxic chemicals without harming themselves, paving the way for greener chemical and fuel production.

20h

Collaborative conservation approach for endangered reef fish yields dramatic results

A new study from researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego has documented a successful recovery effort among Nassau Grouper populations in the Cayman Islands thanks to an approach involving government agencies, academic researchers, and nonprofit organizations.

20h

Poplars genetically modified not to harm air quality grow as well as non-modified trees

Field trials in the Northwest and Southwest show that poplar trees can be genetically modified to reduce negative impacts on air quality while leaving their growth potential virtually unchanged, says an Oregon State University researcher who collaborated on the study.

20h

A better estimate of water-level rise in the Ganges delta

For the first time, scientists have provided reliable regional estimates of land subsidence and water-level rise in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta. Depending on the region of the delta, water-level rise could reach 85 to 140 cm by 2100. The work, published in PNAS on 6 January 2020 by researchers from the CNRS, IRD, BRGM, La Rochelle Université, Université des Antilles and Bangladesh Universi

20h

Space X, Newly Formed Oxygen, Yeast 2.0, and Gene Editing

A month's worth of cool science stories summed up. Space X, Newly Formed Oxygen, Yeast 2.0, and Gene Editing Video of Space X, Newly Formed Oxygen, Yeast 2.0, and Gene Editing Space Monday, January 6, 2020 – 15:00 Alistair Jennings, Contributor (Inside Science) — On this monthly science recap, Alistair Jennings from Inside Science sums up some of the most interesting science that's coming our w

20h

Is a Sad Song Sad For Everyone?

Researchers explore how different cultures respond to the same music — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New Research Suggests Venus Still Has Active Volcanoes

While exploring the solar system, we've found evidence of volcanic activity on numerous planets and moons. However, Earth remains the only place in the solar system we know for certain is geologically active. Scientists have wondered if Venus might be active as well, but it's hard to know with its soupy, acidic atmosphere. A new simulation of Venus suggests that the planet does indeed have active

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'Wearable AC' could keep you cool without electricity

An on-skin electronic device could one day provide personal, "wearable air conditioning" without needing electricity, researchers report. The device includes numerous human health care applications such as the ability to monitor blood pressure, electrical activity of the heart, and the level of skin hydration. It could offer a way to keep soldiers cool on the battlefield and prevent heat stroke o

20h

Lenovo Flaunts Its Foldable PC, The ThinkPad X1 Fold

It's a sign of the coming flood of devices with OLED screens that bend.

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Unidentified drones are everywhere. The FAA has a plan.

Both commercial and recreational drone operators will be required to comply with the upcoming Part 89 identification and tracking rule. (Pixabay/) This story originally featured on Flying Magazine . Unmanned aerial vehicles—drones, as we all like to call them—have dramatically affected the world over the last decade with their ability to handle tasks considered either too dangerous or too mundane

20h

Exploring the 'dark side' of a single-crystal complex oxide thin film

A new study offers a nanoscopic view of complex oxides, which have great potential for advanced microelectronics.

20h

Dogs and wolves are both good at cooperating

A team of researchers have found that dogs and wolves are equally good at cooperating with partners to obtain a reward. When tested in same-species pairs, dogs and wolves proved equally successful and efficient at solving a given problem. This finding suggests that basic cooperation abilities were present in a common ancestor of dogs and wolves, and have not been lost in the domestication process.

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Moving domain walls induce losses in superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid systems

Physicist have shown that the motion of domain walls can be detected by monitoring voltage generated in superconducting devices. This finding can facilitate magnetic racetrack memory applications.

20h

Here's How an Iranian Cyberattack Could Affect You

Almost immediately after the United States killed Iran's top military general Qassim Suleimani, the Middle Eastern nation vowed to carry out " crushing revenge " for the slaying. The internet took that to mean World War III was imminent — but it might not be a physical battle that the average American needs to worry about so much as a cyber one. On Friday, cybersecurity fellow for the Carnegie En

21h

Cause of Viral Pneumonia Outbreak in China Unknown

Health authorities have ruled out the usual suspects, leading to fears that a novel virus is causing the infections in Hubei Province.

21h

Gaze Into These Hyperrealistic Masks and See a Troubling Future

Uncanny silicone masks used to be a Hollywood plot device. Now they're in the real world—and they're fooling a whole lot of people.

21h

Progesterone from an unexpected source may affect miscarriage risk

Progesterone signaling is key to a healthy pregnancy. An Austrian team's research suggests a link between recurrent miscarriage and disrupted progesterone synthesis.

21h

Shutdown of coal-fired plants in US saves lives and improves crop yields

The decommissioning of coal-fired power plants in the continental United States has reduced nearby pollution and its negative impacts on human health and crop yields, according to a new University of California San Diego study.

21h

New research may lead to increased use of available hearts for transplant

A new study provides hope that the number of children dying on the transplantation list while waiting for a new heart could potentially be reduced dramatically. The study, published online in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery, demonstrates that many of the donor hearts deemed 'high-risk' can be transplanted with the same survival rates as 'low-risk' donor hearts.

21h

Story tips: Weather days, grid balance and scaling reactors

Story Tips: Weather days, grid balance and scaling reactors.

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Vaping lung injury symptoms have been reported online for at least seven years

A team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside, used automated computer methods to mine a large online discussion forum for electronic cigarette users and found this group reported numerous adverse health effects for at least seven years. The research shows health problems associated with e-cigarettes existed well before summer 2019 when vaping-associated pulmonary illness, or VA

21h

Genes controlling mycorrhizal colonization discovered in soybean

Like most plants, soybeans pair up with soil fungi in a symbiotic mycorrhizal relationship. In exchange for a bit of sugar, the fungus acts as an extension of the root system to pull in more phosphorus, nitrogen, micronutrients, and water than the plant could on its own.

21h

Want to turn back time? Try running a marathon

The new year means it's time to set resolutions for 2020 and new research from the Journal of the American College of Cardiology suggests running a marathon for the first time could have several health benefits. The study found that for first-time marathon runners, training and completion of the marathon was associated with reductions in blood pressure and aortic stiffening in healthy participants

21h

Bruce McEwen, Stress Hormone Researcher, Dies

The Rockefeller University neuroendocrinologist made landmark discoveries on how hormones affect brain structure.

21h

Step toward 'ink' development for 3-D printing a bioprosthetic ovary

For the first time, scientists identified and mapped the location of structural proteins in a pig ovary. Ongoing development of an 'ink' with these proteins will be used for 3-D printing an artificial (or bio-prosthetic) ovary that could be implanted and allow a woman to have a child.

21h

JUUL delivers substantially more nicotine than previous generation e-cigs and cigarettes

JUUL delivers substantially more nicotine to the blood per puff than cigarettes or previous-generation e-cigarettes (e-cigs) and impairs blood vessel function comparable to cigarette smoke, according to a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

21h

Grower citizen science project uses collaboration to improve soil health

The Grower Citizen Science Project is a collaboration between soil scientists and growers in the southern High Plains of Texas. Growers have collected soil samples, measured carbon dioxide fluxes, and shared yield data with scientists. Scientists have installed soil moisture and temperature sensors and analyzed nutrients, soil microbial communities, and other data and then shared their findings wi

21h

Cumulative overweight pregnancies increase risk of maternal midlife obesity

Not only is excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) associated with increased long-term maternal weight, but a new study has shown that there is a cumulative effect of excessive GWG over multiple pregnancies.

21h

Nanoscale sensors to better see how high pressure affects materials

Researchers have developed new nanoscale technology to image and measure more of the stresses and strains on materials under high pressures.

21h

Insufficient home care the biggest challenge to overcome after release from hospital

Ontario patients and caregivers reported not enough home care to meet the need, that home care support was not in place when patients arrived home from the hospital, and that they had to advocate for themselves to get enough home care.

21h

Some genetic sequencing fail to analyze large segments of DNA

Children who undergo expansive genetic sequencing may not be getting the thorough DNA analysis their parents were expecting, say experts.

21h

Cancer drugs could potentially treat COPD

New research has shown the potential for clinically available cancer treatments to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

21h

Half of women with heart failure get the wrong treatment

As many as 50 per cent of women suffering from cardiac arrest are given insufficient treatment, because the heart failure was not caused by a heart attack.

21h

Robotic trunk support assists those with spinal cord injury

An engineering team has invented a robotic device — the Trunk-Support Trainer (TruST) — that can be used to assist and train people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to sit more stably by improving their trunk control, and thus gain an expanded active sitting workspace without falling over or using their hands to balance. The study is the first to measure and define the sitting workspace of patie

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Urgent new 'roadmap to recovery' could reverse insect apocalypse

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Fisker shows off its new $37,499 electric crossover, due in 2022

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Team pinpoints the galactic origins of closest fast radio burst

Astronomers have pinpointed the location of a repeating fast radio burst first detected by Canada's CHIME telescope in British Columbia in 2018. The breakthrough is only the second time that scientists have determined the precise location of a repeating source of these millisecond bursts of radio waves from space. In results in Nature , the European VLBI Network (EVN) used eight telescopes spanni

21h

The Guardian view on philanthropy and the bushfires: a reason to hope | Editorial

In an ideal world it would not be left to film stars to point to the science underlying the climate emergency "You are in no position to lecture the public about anything," Golden Globes host Ricky Gervais told his audience in a pointedly irreverent opening speech on Sunday. By the evening's end, following statements about the bushfires from actors including Russell Crowe and Cate Blanchett, he ha

21h

Benefits of integrating cover crop with broiler litter in no-till dryland cotton systems

Although most cotton is grown in floodplain soils in the Mississippi Delta region, a large amount of cotton is also grown under no-till systems on upland soils that are vulnerable to erosion and have reduced organic matter. There are much lower levels of cotton residue in these systems, which limits the effectiveness of the no-till approach to improve soil health.

21h

Jaguars could prevent a not-so-great American biotic exchange

In eastern Panama, canid species from North and South America are occurring together for the first time. Urban and agricultural development and deforestation along the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor might be generating a new passageway for these invasive species adapted to human disturbance.

21h

Australia's Bushfire Catastrophe in Photos

Months of catastrophic bushfires in Australia have now burned 19.8 million acres , destroyed hundreds of homes, injured or killed millions of animals, and left two dozen people dead. Although cooler conditions prevailed today in some areas, the relief may be temporary—a forecast of strong winds and higher temperatures threatens to bring fires to the more-populated Sydney suburbs. Australia's gove

21h

NASA's top observatories teamed up to capture an imploding star in captivating 3D

This new multiwavelength image of the Crab Nebula combines X-ray light from the Chandra X-ray Observatory (in blue) with visible light from the Hubble Space Telescope (in yellow) and infrared light seen by the Spitzer Space Telescope (in red). (NASA, ESA, J. DePasquale (STScI), and R. Hurt (Caltech/IPAC)/) In the National Basketball Association, teams really only succeed if they have a "big three

21h

Facebook Revamps Its Privacy Checkup Feature in Time for CES

Forget Portal. This year, Facebook is marketing itself as a privacy crusader.

21h

The immune cells inside tumours hint at a new way to treat cancers

A type of immune cell has been found inside tumours that helps our bodies mount attacks against cancer. Boosting these cells may lead to a new kind of treatment

21h

Tiny sensors check strain of materials under pressure

New nanoscale technology can image and measure more of the stresses and strains on materials under pressure. As the researchers report in Science , that matters because, "Pressure alters the physical, chemical, and electronic properties of matter." Understanding those changes could lead to new materials or new phases of matter for use in all kinds of technologies and applications, says coauthor V

22h

A Strange Disease Is Sweeping China

A mysterious, unidentified virus hit dozens of people in the Chinese city Wuhan last month, and the potential epidemic has the government on high alert. Chinese officials were initially concerned that the virus was a resurgence of SARS, which killed hundreds of people in 2002 and 2003, CNN reports . On Sunday, Wuhan authorities ruled out the possibility and suggested the virus was a new type of p

22h

It's 2003 All Over Again

The U.S. stands on the brink of an unpredictable war in the Middle East. The president, fairly untutored in foreign affairs, ran for office promising to pull back from American commitments overseas. But the vice president and a powerful Cabinet secretary, seeing a chance to follow through on their deep-rooted ideological commitments, have pushed him to take military action in a moment of opportun

22h

The Most Important Scientific Problems Have Yet to Be Solved

If certain areas of science appear to be quite mature, others are in the process of development, and yet others remain to be born — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Animal life thriving around Fukushima

Nearly a decade after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, researchers have found that wildlife populations are abundant in areas void of human life.

22h

Step toward 'ink' development for 3-D printing a bioprosthetic ovary

For the first time, scientists identified and mapped the location of structural proteins in a pig ovary. Ongoing development of an 'ink' with these proteins will be used for 3-D printing an artificial (or bio-prosthetic) ovary that could be implanted and allow a woman to have a child.

22h

Astronomers find wandering massive black holes in dwarf galaxies

Studies with the VLA indicate that roughly half of the massive black holes in dwarf galaxies are not in the centers of those galaxies. This gives astronomers new insights into the conditions in which similar black holes formed and grew in the early history of the universe.

22h

Specifying irrigation needs for container-grown plants

Open-field production of 524,000 irrigated acres of horticultural plants in the United States used 205 billion gallons of water in a recent year. Fifty percent of this water was pumped from groundwater sources. These figures are concerning because water resources for irrigation are becoming increasingly limited — technologies to conserve water are needed. The goal of efficient irrigation is to su

22h

Astronomers spot distant galaxy group driving ancient cosmic makeover

An international team of astronomers funded in part by NASA has found the farthest galaxy group identified to date. Called EGS77, the trio of galaxies dates to a time when the universe was only 680 million years old, or less than 5% of its current age of 13.8 billion years.

22h

Maximizing bike-share ridership: New research says it's all about location

The popularity of bike-share systems has grown in popularity thanks to the younger, more environmentally conscious generation. While they have garnered considerable attention in cities from Paris to Washington, D.C., their promise of urban transformation is far from being fully realized.

22h

A fast radio burst tracked down to a nearby galaxy

Astronomers in Europe, working with members of Canada's CHIME Fast Radio Burst collaboration, have pinpointed the location of a repeating fast radio burst (FRB) first detected by the CHIME telescope in British Columbia in 2018. The breakthrough is only the second time that scientists have determined the precise location of a repeating source of these millisecond bursts of radio waves from space.

22h

Study suggests antiretroviral therapy does not restore disease immunity

A study led by researchers from SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University and Oregon Health & Science University, published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, showed that, despite successful antiretroviral therapy (ART), antigen specific memory to vaccinations that occurred before HIV infection did not recover, even after immune reconstitution. Additionally, a previously unrealized decline in

22h

Blood pressure control for people aged 80 and older: What's the right target?

In their analysis of blood pressure data, researchers focused on people aged 80 and older who had reported heart disease events (such as heart attacks or strokes), changes in kidney function, cognitive impairment, quality of life, or death. The researchers also explored whether impairments in cognitive or physical function had any effect on intensive blood pressure control. They published their re

22h

Nerve stimulation may benefit women with fibromyalgia

Published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a treatment involving electrical nerve stimulation helped women with fibromyalgia in a recent clinical trial.

22h

In a nearby galaxy, a fast radio burst unravels more questions than answers

For more than a decade, astronomers have wrestled with the perplexities of fast radio bursts. Despite the hundreds of records of these enigmatic sources, researchers have only pinpointed the precise location of four such bursts. Now there's a fifth, detected by a team of international scientists that includes West Virginia University researchers. The finding, which relied on eight telescopes spann

22h

Wearable AC

One day, soldiers could cool down on the military battlefield — preventing heat stroke or exhaustion — by using 'wearable air conditioning,' an on-skin device designed by engineers at the University of Missouri. The device, which provides approximately 11 degrees Fahrenheit of cooling to the human body, includes numerous human health care applications such as the ability to monitor blood pressur

22h

As Fires Rage, Australia Pushes to Emit More Carbon

Critics say a loophole in carbon accounting undermines the Paris Agreement to limit global warming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

E.P.A. Aims to Reduce Truck Pollution, and Avert Tougher State Controls

The E.P.A. opened an effort to cut pollution from trucks, an anomaly for an administration known for regulatory rollbacks but a move that would also pre-empt state rules.

22h

Forensic chemist detects marijuana-use based on sweat test

Forensic chemist Jan Halámek is proving that our own perspiration not only gives away how drunk we are—but if we are high, too.

22h

Exploring the 'dark side' of a single-crystal complex oxide thin film

Analysis from a team led by Argonne researchers reveals never-before-seen details about a type of thin film being explored for advanced microelectronics.

22h

Study shows animal life thriving around Fukushima

Nearly a decade after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, researchers from the University of Georgia have found that wildlife populations are abundant in areas void of human life.

22h

The Most Important Scientific Problems Have Yet to Be Solved

If certain areas of science appear to be quite mature, others are in the process of development, and yet others remain to be born — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Fukushima Plans to Power Region With 100% Renewable Energy

In 2011, the Daiichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima experienced one of the worst meltdowns in history — a disaster the area is still reckoning with today. But the Japanese prefecture of almost two million residents wants to leave the disaster behind and come out strong, without relying on nuclear energy for power. Its local government has vowed to supply the region with 100 percent renewable po

22h

Study shows animal life thriving around Fukushima

Nearly a decade after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, researchers from the University of Georgia have found that wildlife populations are abundant in areas void of human life.

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Sight loss research needs urgent investment | Letter

Leading ophthalmologists call on the new government to develop a national plan to fight blindness and address the critical lack of funding As leading ophthalmologists and researchers we are joining the eye research charity Fight for Sight to call for urgent action on blindness in 2020 to address the research funding gap. We know that serious sight loss doesn't discriminate – it can affect anyone a

22h

Study finds 80% of medical students feel low sense of personal achievement

Researchers surveyed 385 first- through fourth-year medical students to assess their levels of burnout. They found only 2.3% of participants reported high levels of emotional exhaustion, while 17% reported high levels of depersonalization, a form of clinical detachment. Both of those dimensions of burnout are associated with higher perceived stress, poorer sleep quality and higher smartphone addic

22h

NASA's Hubble surveys gigantic galaxy

This majestic spiral galaxy might earn the nickname the 'Godzilla galaxy' because it may be the largest known in the local universe. The galaxy, UGC 2885, is 2.5 times wider than our Milky Way and contains 10 times as many stars.

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New study suggests cautions about antipsychotic medications for hospitalized older adults

Delirium (sudden confusion or a rapid change in mental state) affects 15-26% of hospitalized older adults. Antipsychotic medicines are among the few therapeutic options to ease delirium and protect patients and caregivers — but they also come with risks of their own. To learn more about the effect of antipsychotic medicines on older hospitalized patients, a research team studied information from

22h

Formation of a huge underwater volcano offshore the Comoros

A new submarine volcano was formed off the island of Mayotte in the Indian Ocean in 2018. This was shown by an oceanographic campaign in May 2019. Now an international team led by the scientist Simone Cesca from the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ has illuminated the processes deep inside the Earth before and during the formation of the new volcano. The study was published in the journa

22h

Biodiverse forests better at storing carbon for long periods, says study

A new study has found that diverse natural forests with a mix of tree species are more reliable and stable at absorbing and storing carbon than plantations dominated by just a few tree species, both over time and across diverse conditions. Scientists already understand that natural forests are better at sequestering carbon than more uniform, short-rotation plantations whose trees are harvested reg

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Expert: Suleimani killing moves the US and Iran closer to war

On Friday morning, January 3, the United States killed Major General Qassim Suleimani, a top Iranian commander, and several Iran-backed militia leaders, with a drone strike to their convoy at Baghdad International Airport. The strike capped a week of escalating tensions between the US and Iran, with pro-Iranian militia members in Iraq marching on the US embassy in Baghdad, burning an entry buildi

22h

Occupational therapy improves life for people with dementia

Occupational therapy at home may improve a range of important outcomes for people with dementia and their family and other caregivers, a new study shows. "Occupational therapy aims to enable people to participate in the things they need to do, like having a shower or cleaning the house, or things they want to do, such as going out to dinner or doing some gardening," says Sally Bennett, associate

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There's only one way to make bushfires less powerful: Take out the stuff that burns

As monstrous blazes overwhelm Australia's south-east, the need for a national bushfire policy has never been more urgent. Active land management such as hazard-reduction burning and forest thinning must lie at the core of any such policy.

22h

Nobel prize winner demonstrates the best way to apologize

Unfortunately there aren't Nobel prizes for good apologies – but Dr Frances Arnold's words should be an example to all of us A Nobel prize winner has issued a humble apology when a recent paper of hers was retracted. In a remarkable display of humility, Dr Frances Arnold, who won the Nobel prize in chemistry in 2018, came forward herself to let her followers know that a 2019 paper of hers had bee

22h

Step toward 'ink' development for 3-D printing a bioprosthetic ovary

For the first time, scientists identified and mapped the location of structural proteins in a pig ovary. Ongoing development of an 'ink' with these proteins will be used for 3-D printing an artificial (or bio-prosthetic) ovary that could be implanted and allow a woman to have a child. Findings were recently published in Scientific Reports.

22h

Study shows animal life thriving around Fukushima

Nearly a decade after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, researchers from the University of Georgia have found that wildlife populations are abundant in areas void of human life.

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Simulated image demonstrates the power of NASA's wide field infrared survey telescope

Imagine a fleet of 100 Hubble Space Telescopes, deployed in a strategic space-invader-shaped array a million miles from Earth, scanning the universe at warp speed. With NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, scheduled for launch in the mid-2020s, this vision will (effectively) become reality.

22h

Exploring the 'dark side' of a single-crystal complex oxide thin film

A new study offers a nanoscopic view of complex oxides, which have great potential for advanced microelectronics.

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Gene therapy shown to offer long-term benefits for people with Haemophilia A

A breakthrough gene therapy treatment for Haemophilia A has been shown to offer long-term benefits that have already transformed the lives of 13 men in the UK.

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Regifting is good, actually

Yes, it is a great gift. The fact that someone gave it to someone else before you doesn't take away from that. (Syda_Productions via Deposit Photos/) There is a box in the closet near my front door. There's a lot of other stuff, too, but on the top shelf, there is a box. It's the reason I never turn up empty-handed to a graduation or housewarming party. It's also making the planet a bit more gree

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New research looks at neutron star blasts

X-ray bursts are highly energetic releases of radiation from the surfaces of neutron stars, triggered by the explosive burning of material accumulated on the surface. It's the same type of burning that happens in the cores of ordinary stars like the sun, but in this case, happening on the surface. Thus, unlike the sun, where it takes hundreds of thousands of years for this radiation to escape—and

22h

Cause of Wuhan's Mysterious Pneumonia Cases Still Unknown, Chinese Officials Say

The virus has sickened 59 people so far but does not appear to be transmitting among humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

The Concession to Climate Change I Will Not Make

Our first child was born at the end of August. I am not a young parent; I was born in 1974, and in the span of this one generation, global carbon levels rose by nearly twice as much as in all of human history before. I teach environmental law, so naturally people get around to asking whether my wife and I struggled with what it means to bring a child onto this troubled planet, and whether it is a

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Plasticizers may contribute to motor control problems in girls

Scientists at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) have uncovered a link between prenatal exposure to phthalates–a ubiquitous group of plasticizers and odor-enhancing chemicals–and deficits in motor function in girls. Phthalates are widely used in consumer products from plastic toys to household building materials to shampoos and are thought to disrupt endocrine functi

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Embracing challenge: combining marathon training with graduate studies

Nature, Published online: 06 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00013-8 Preparing for three races in three years at university showed Kathryn Wierenga parallels between running and PhD work.

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Daily briefing: Betelgeuse is going dim, exciting astronomers

Nature, Published online: 06 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00017-4 What's behind the fading of one of the sky's brightest stars? Plus: cooling materials send heat into space and don't be squeamish about drinking recycled wastewater.

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Protecting two key regions in Belize could save threatened jaguar, say scientists

Scientists studying one of the largest populations of jaguars in Central Belize have identified several wildlife corridors that should be protected to help the species survival. The study, led by the American Museum of Natural History and the University of Bristol and published in BMC Genetics, provide a new insight into where conservation efforts should be concentrated.

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A.I. Comes to the Operating Room

Images made by lasers and read by computers can help speed up the diagnosis of brain tumors during surgery.

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Magic crystals and Nobel Science rules

As one Nobelist retracted her Science paper, another Nobelist has stealthily corrected his. The correction opens new dimensions of probabilities and is indeed best kept hidden.

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Protecting two key regions in Belize could save threatened jaguar, say scientists

Scientists studying one of the largest populations of jaguars in Central Belize have identified several wildlife corridors that should be protected to help the species survival. The study, led by the American Museum of Natural History and the University of Bristol and published in BMC Genetics, provide a new insight into where conservation efforts should be concentrated.

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Moving domain walls induce losses in superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid systems

Physicists have shown that the motion of domain walls can be detected by monitoring voltage generated in superconducting devices. This finding can facilitate magnetic racetrack memory applications. The result was published in Physical Review Letters. The international research group included researchers from the University of Jyväskylä.

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A climate-change solution: remove carbon dioxide from the air

submitted by /u/NathalieWorld [link] [comments]

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Infographic: How a City Health Department Uses Social Media

Foodborne illnesses are consistently underreported. Social media may help.

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Can Social Media Inform Public Health Efforts?

Scientists are using social media to track diseases and understand how people respond to them.

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Infographic: How HealthMap Tracks Disease

A group of epidemiologists and computer scientists built a system to mine various online sources for keywords suggesting disease outbreaks.

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Ancient wine measuring table unearthed in Jerusalem

Israeli archaeologists unveiled an ancient table Monday used to measure wine and olive oil, which they said helps prove a market once stood at the site in occupied east Jerusalem.

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Salting down the cost of protein polymer drugs

Protein is big business. Not only does it make up a significant portion of every living thing—it's also a $150 billion per-year industry. Whether for food, medicine, or manufacturing, nearly all sectors have a need for proteins to create their products. But in the case of pharmaceuticals, the need for proteins also comes with a big cost, one that pharmaceutical manufacturers desperately need to fi

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Over-hunting walruses contributed to the collapse of Norse Greenland, study suggests

Norse Greenlanders may have chased dwindling walrus herds ever farther north in an effort to maintain their economy, when the value of walrus ivory tanked after the introduction of elephant tusks into European markets in the 1200s.

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How a New Wave of Orbiting Sentinels Is Changing Climate Science

Advanced remote-sensing satellite technology is compiling a granular record of Earth's hardest-to-reach regions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Golden Globes Sends a Message With Its Snub of The Irishman

Last night's Golden Globes looked like a prime opportunity for Netflix to kick off its best awards season yet in the lead-up to the Oscars. After all, the streaming service produced The Irishman , Martin Scorsese's sensational crime drama, which was poised to do well in a race filled with nostalgic works from filmmaking legends. The movie's chief rival for cinema's top prize—the Best Picture Osca

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Harvey Weinstein Haunted the Golden Globes

The Golden Globe Awards of early 2018 had a distinctly funereal feel. Nearly everyone in attendance at the ceremony, the first of the awards-show season, wore black—a fashion statement of an extremely literal strain, meant to acknowledge the news that had torn through Hollywood that fall. The revelations about Harvey Weinstein, initially reported by The New York Times and The New Yorker , had imp

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Protecting two key regions in Belize could save threatened jaguar, say scientists

Scientists studying one of the largest populations of jaguars in Central Belize have identified several wildlife corridors that should be protected to help the species survival. The study, led by the American Museum of Natural History and the University of Bristol and published in BMC Genetics, provide a new insight into where conservation efforts should be concentrated.

23h

Dog Study Revives Concerns About Virus Used for Gene Therapy

Canines treated with an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector showed evidence that the therapeutic DNA held within the virus can integrate into the host genome, risking the activation of oncogenes.

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The next big space telescope could spot Earth-like oxygen levels on exoplanets

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope could exploit an unnoticed feature to tell us whether there are Earth-like oxygen levels on distant worlds.

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Processed foods highly correlated with obesity epidemic in the US

A review article from the George Washington University highlights the correlation between highly processed foods and increased prevalence of obesity in the United States.

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Moving domain walls induce losses in superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid systems

Physicist have shown that the motion of domain walls can be detected by monitoring voltage generated in superconducting devices. This finding can facilitate magnetic racetrack memory applications. The result was published in Physical Review Letters -publication. The international research group included researcher from the University of Jyväskylä.

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Mysterious radio signal from space seems to have suddenly vanished

Strange blasts from space called fast radio bursts continue to puzzle astronomers with their odd behaviour, as they seem to come from a variety of galaxies

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Elon Musk: Teslas Might Prevent Riders From Dooring Bicyclists

Child Locks Tesla may implement a feature that keeps drivers from swinging their doors open as a cyclist is about to pass them — a reckless and dangerous phenomenon known as "dooring." CEO Elon Musk said that Tesla could launch a software update that keeps the car doors sealed shut if external cameras spot a cyclist approaching, according to Teslarati . If it does, it could serve as a major impro

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Amerikansk militær forbereder sig på et atomangreb i rummet

En hel serie af eksperimenter skal beskytte satellitter mod en eventuel sprængning af en nordkoreansk atombombe i rummet.

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Researchers united on international road map to insect recovery

It's no secret that many insects are struggling worldwide. But we could fix these insects' problems, according to more than 70 scientists from 21 countries. Their road map to insect conservation and recovery is published in Nature Ecology & Evolution this week. From urgent 'no-regret' solutions to long-term global comparisons.

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Polluted wastewater in the forecast? Try a solar umbrella

Evaporation ponds, commonly used in many industries to manage wastewater, can occupy a large footprint and often pose risks to birds and other wildlife, yet they're an economical way to deal with contaminated water. Now researchers at Berkeley Lab have demonstrated a way to double the rate of evaporation by using solar energy and taking advantage of water's inherent properties, potentially reducin

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False negatives: Delayed Zika effects in babies who appeared normal at birth

Colombian infants exposed to Zika virus in the womb showed neurodevelopmental delays as toddlers, despite having 'normal' brain imaging and head circumference at birth, a finding that underscores the importance of long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up for Zika-exposed infants, according to a cohort study published online Jan. 6, 2020, in JAMA Pediatrics.

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New imaging system and artificial intelligence algorithm accurately identify brain tumors

Study finds novel method of optical imaging combined with artificial intelligence accurately diagnoses brain tumors in real time.

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Antarctic waters: Warmer with more acidity and less oxygen

The increased freshwater from melting Antarctic ice sheets plus increased wind has reduced the amount of oxygen in the Southern Ocean and made it more acidic and warmer, according to new research led by University of Arizona geoscientists.

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Don't wait to get concussion care; early treatment may mean faster recovery

Early clinical treatment may significantly reduce recovery time following a concussion, according to new research led by the University of Pittsburgh Sports Medicine Concussion Program. The results, published today in JAMA Neurology, suggest delays in seeking treatment can lead to unnecessarily longer recovery.

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Young women still may be getting unnecessary pelvic exams

Pelvic examinations and cervical cancer screenings are no longer recommended for most females under age 21 during routine health visits, but a new study has found that millions of young women are unnecessarily undergoing the tests, which can lead to false-positive testing, over-treatment, anxiety and needless cost.

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Formation of a huge underwater volcano offshore the Comoros

A submarine volcano was formed off the island of Mayotte in the Indian Ocean in 2018. Now an international team led by Simone Cesca from German GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ is illuminating the processes before and during the eruption. It is as if the researchers had deciphered a new type of signal from the Earth's interior indicating a dramatic movement of molten rocks. The researchers reconstructed t

1d

Finding a new way to fight late-stage sepsis

Researchers have developed a way to prop up a struggling immune system to enable its fight against sepsis, a deadly condition resulting from the body's extreme reaction to infection.

1d

Cell 'hands' to unlock doors in health research, drug design, and bioengineering

A previously overlooked cell membrane protein could help to further cancer research, drug design, and bioengineering, according to new research.

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Scientists develop new method to detect oxygen on exoplanets

Scientists have developed a new method for detecting oxygen in exoplanet atmospheres that may accelerate the search for life. UC Riverside helped develop the new technique, which will use NASA's James Webb Space Telescope to detect a strong signal that oxygen molecules produce when they collide. This signal could help scientists distinguish between living and nonliving planets.

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Algorithm helps detect brain cancer during surgery

Researchers believe model could provide reliable, real-time information.

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Data suggest water is common but scarce in exoplanets

Astronomers study chemical patterns in extra-terrestrial worlds.

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The story of magma near Mayotte

Researchers track the creation of giant underwater volcano.

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When their world is ablaze, how do predators respond?

As Australia battles devastating bushfires, five Australian researchers look at some of the long-term implications for ecosystems.

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A repeating fast radio burst source localized to a nearby spiral galaxy

Nature, Published online: 06 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1866-z Only one repeating fast radio burst has been localized, to an irregular dwarf galaxy; now another is found to come from a star-forming region of a nearby spiral galaxy.

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Not all fast radio bursts are created equal

Nature, Published online: 06 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03894-6 Astronomical signals called fast radio bursts remain enigmatic, but a key discovery has now been made. A second repeating fast radio burst has been traced to its host galaxy, and its home bears little resemblance to that of the first.

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The structural basis for cohesin–CTCF-anchored loops

Nature, Published online: 06 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1910-z

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Cell 'hands' to unlock doors in health research, drug design, and bioengineering

The protein, called syndecan-4, combines with fellow cell membrane proteins, called integrins, to form protruding 'hands' that sense the environment outside the cell.

1d

Scientists Figured Out the Indian Cobra's Genome—at Last

With the genetic recipe for the snake's lethal venom in hand, researchers will have an easier time producing an antidote.

1d

NASA's SLS moon rocket readies for next pit stop on way to Kennedy Space Center

The next rocket NASA wants to send to the moon is about to leave the house it was built in for a new home, but isn't quite ready for Kennedy Space Center.

1d

Researchers united on international road map to insect recovery

It's no secret that many insects are struggling worldwide. But we could fix these insects' problems, according to more than 70 scientists from 21 countries. Their road map to insect conservation and recovery is published in Nature Ecology & Evolution this week. From urgent 'no-regret' solutions to long-term global comparisons.

1d

Cell 'hands' to unlock doors in health research, drug design, and bioengineering

The protein, called syndecan-4, combines with fellow cell membrane proteins, called integrins, to form protruding 'hands' that sense the environment outside the cell.

1d

Formation of a huge underwater volcano offshore the Comoros

A new submarine volcano was formed off the island of Mayotte in the Indian Ocean in 2018. This was shown by an oceanographic campaign in May 2019. Now, an international team led by the scientist Simone Cesca from the German GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ is illuminating the processes deep inside the Earth before and during the formation of the new volcano. It is akin to detecting a new type of signal fr

1d

Antarctic waters: Warmer with more acidity and less oxygen

The increased freshwater from melting Antarctic ice sheets plus increased wind has reduced the amount of oxygen in the Southern Ocean and made it more acidic and warmer, according to new research led by University of Arizona geoscientists.

1d

Scientists develop new method to detect oxygen on exoplanets

Scientists have developed a new method for detecting oxygen in exoplanet atmospheres that may accelerate the search for life.

1d

Polluted wastewater in the forecast? Try a solar umbrella

Evaporation ponds, which are commonly used in many industries to manage wastewater, can span acres, occupying a large footprint and often posing risks to birds and other wildlife. Yet they're an economical way to deal with contaminated water because they take advantage of natural evaporation under sunlight to reduce large volumes of dirty water to much smaller volumes of solid waste.

1d

Finding a new way to fight late-stage sepsis by boosting cells' antibacterial properties

Researchers have developed a way to prop up a struggling immune system to enable its fight against sepsis, a deadly condition resulting from the body's extreme reaction to infection.

1d

Mindfulness makes it easier to forget your fears

Mindfulness has previously been shown to help people handle negative emotions and is used as a treatment for anxiety related psychological disorders, but the underlying biological mechanisms are not fully understood. In a new study, published in Scientific Reports, researchers at University of Southern Denmark among other universities show that brief daily mindfulness training delivered through th

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Removing body clock gene protects mice against pneumonia

This is the first time a clock gene has been found to affect resistance to bacterial pneumonia, a fatal disease responsible for 5% of all deaths in the UK each year.

1d

Brain scans can flag kids at risk for later depression

Early brain scans can predict whether a child is susceptible to mental health or attention problems down the road, according to new research. "We found a signature of brain function in childhood that helps to predict changes in mood symptoms over four years, and another one that helps to predict changes in attention," says senior author Silvia Bunge, a professor of psychology and a member of the

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This Clever Car Add-On Uses AI to Block Out Just The Sun

Sun Blind German engineering company Bosch has come up with a clever new automotive sun visor that uses an LCD panel and artificial intelligence to block out only the Sun in the driver's vision. The idea is to give them an unobstructed view of the road ahead when the sun is low in the sky. Each year, thousands of car accidents are related to sun glare, according to the National Highway Traffic Sa

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The search for dark matter — and what we've found so far | Risa Wechsler

Roughly 85 percent of mass in the universe is "dark matter" — mysterious material that can't be directly observed but has an immense influence on the cosmos. What exactly is this strange stuff, and what does it have to do with our existence? Astrophysicist Risa Wechsler explores why dark matter may be the key to understanding how the universe formed — and shares how physicists in labs around the

1d

Researchers united on international road map to insect recovery

It's no secret that many insects are struggling worldwide. But we could fix these insects' problems, according to more than 70 scientists from 21 countries. Their road map to insect conservation and recovery is published in Nature Ecology & Evolution this week. From urgent 'no-regret' solutions to long-term global comparisons.

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Chimps share tools when tasks gets tough

Study sheds light on evolution of technology.

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Red brittle star 'sees' without eyes

Scientists describe a clever new mechanism for vision.

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