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nyheder2020januar08

Early childhood deprivation is associated with alterations in adult brain structure despite subsequent environmental enrichment [Neuroscience]

Early childhood deprivation is associated with higher rates of neurodevelopmental and mental disorders in adulthood. The impact of childhood deprivation on the adult brain and the extent to which structural changes underpin these effects are currently unknown. To investigate these questions, we utilized MRI data collected from young adults who…

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»Verdens mest effektive« lithium-svovl-batteri skal femdoble batteritid

Det er lykkedes australske forskere at udvikle en metode, der forhindrer lithium-svovl-batterier i at nedbryde under opladning.

14h

Twitter Wants to Let Users Limit Who Replies. Here's Why

In an interview with WIRED editor-in-chief Nick Thompson, Twitter product lead Kayvon Beykpour detailed experimental features that could reshape the platform.

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How Tweets Could Prevent War, an App Store Dilemma, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Healthy habits extend disease-free life 'by up to a decade'

Lifestyle keeps cardiovascular disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes at bay, research finds Healthy habits such as drinking in moderation, staying slim and exercising for at least 30 minutes a day could extend people's disease-free life by up to a decade, research suggests. Experts found that people who led a healthy lifestyle could expect to enjoy many more years of good health than those who smok

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Four air mattresses for any kind of guest

Like sleeping on air. (Vladislav Muslakov via Unsplash/) A reliable air mattress or two can turn even studio apartments into a comfortable place to host traveling friends and family. They're also a fantastic solution when you've just moved into a new home without furniture, or as a refuge when your partner is sick in bed and coughing the night away. These inflatable slumber rafts won't replace th

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AI can be used to detect and grade prostate cancer

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Tampere University in Finland have developed a method based on artificial intelligence for histopathological diagnosis and grading of prostate cancer. The AI-system has the potential to solve one of the bottlenecks in today's prostate cancer histopathology by providing more accurate diagnosis and better treatment decisions. The study, presented in

16min

New York State Investigates Christian Health Cost Sharing Affiliate

Subpoenas have been issued to a company that solicits memberships for a health insurance alternative that offers no guarantees for covering medical bills.

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Astronomers Spot New Stars That Signal Upcoming Galactic Collision

Scientists have long suspected that the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are on a collision course with our Milky Way galaxy, and it may be running ahead of schedule. While analyzing objects at the edge of the galaxy, astronomers noted an unexpected cluster of young stars. Upon closer examination, these celestial objects may be harbingers of an impending collision between the Milky Way and the M

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Solar-powered ovens for your next meal outdoors

Let the sun shine. (Jake Givens via Unsplash/) Solar cookers use reflective surfaces to enhance sunlight, creating an off-the-grid appliance hot enough to bake, sear, and grill your dinner. Solar cookers don't require wood, coal, gas, or electricity, making them convenient (and cool) for a warm-weather trip to the great outdoors. Below, some of the best options out there. Roast a turkey in this a

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Marijuana detected in homicide victims nearly doubles

Researchers assessed the time trends in alcohol and marijuana detected in homicide victims and found that the prevalence of marijuana almost doubled, increasing from 22 percent in 2004 to 42 percent in 2016. Alternately, the prevalence of alcohol declined slightly from 40 percent in 2004 to 35 percent in 2016.

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Genetic testing provides insights to sudden unexplained deaths in Amish community

Using an exome molecular autopsy, researchers conducted genetic testing of four siblings who each died suddenly during exercise.

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Debunking previous studies that say tropical fish are behaving oddly

Biologists help debunk previous studies that say tropical fish are behaving oddly as oceans gets more acidic due to climate change.

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New auto-inflammatory disease called CRIA syndrome

Over the last 20 years, three families have been unsuspectingly linked by an unknown illness. Researchers have now identified the cause of the illness, a new disease called CRIA syndrome.

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Sex Tech Companies Are Having More Fun Than the Rest of Us at CES

Sexual health and wellness companies were allowed to exhibit their wares for the first time this year.

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SARS legacy haunts race to identify mystery illness in China

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00020-9 Few details have been released about a respiratory infection that has affected 60 people.

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Outbreak science: Infectious disease research leads to outbreak predictions

Infectious diseases have a substantially growing impact on the health of communities around the world and pressure to both predict and prevent such diseases is ever-growing. A professor has developed a simple approach to accurately predict disease outbreaks by combining novel statistical techniques and a large dataset on pathogen biogeography.

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New mathematical model shows how diversity speeds consensus

Scientific literature abounds with examples of ways in which member diversity can benefit a group — whether spider colonies' ability to forage or an industrial company's financial performance. Now, a newly published mathematical framework substantiates the seemingly counterintuitive observations made by prior scholars: interaction among dissimilar individuals can speed consensus.

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This Giant Box is a Waste Water Treatment Plant For Your Home

Waterwall A Dutch startup called Hydraloop has developed a $4,000, wardrobe-sized device that can clean, sterilize, and reuse household water — think of it as a home waste water treatment plant.. Electrek reports that the company just won Best of Innovation in Sustainability, Eco-Design, and Smart Energy at this year's CES in Las Vegas. Clean Machine The idea is to reduce water consumption at hom

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Everything you need to know before playing on that frozen pond

Winter ice should never be taken lightly. (USFWS/) This story was originally featured on Outdoor Life . Falling through thin ice is a wintertime hazard that claims many lives each year. Before you head out for ice fishing, trapping, or any other activity on frozen bodies of water, make sure you plan ahead for this kind of winter crisis and make sure you know exactly what to do if it happens to yo

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In health care, does 'hotspotting' make patients better?

The new health care practice of 'hotspotting' — in which providers identify very high-cost patients and attempt to reduce their medical spending while improving care — has virtually no impact on patient outcomes, according to a new study led by MIT economists.

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These Patients Are Hard to Treat

A study examined a popular approach that coordinated care for the most expensive patients, and found that the project did not reduce hospital admissions.

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'Earth' Review: Humanity Is Digging Its Own Grave

In this sobering documentary, Nikolaus Geyrhalter looks at how humans are changing the planet one backhoe at a time.

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Astronomers Prepare a Mission Concept to Explore the Ice Giant Planets

NASA scientists imagined some innovative technologies that could enhance a future mission to Uranus or Neptune

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Persistence of gut microbial strains in twins, living apart after cohabitating for decades

Using a genomics strain-tracking bioinformatics tool, researchers investigated whether shared bacterial strains remain stable and resilient to changes in diet or environment after adult twins — who had lived together for decades — began to live apart. The study analyzed two metagenomic sequencing databases from pairs of twins — one for children who were still living together and the other from

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Pathways to changing the minds of climate deniers

By reviewing the psychology behind climate change rejection, a researcher suggests four approaches that can sway climate deniers and help overcome obstacles to implementing solutions.

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'She' goes missing from presidential language

Researchers have found that although a significant percentage of the American public believed the winner of the November 2016 presidential election would be a woman, people rarely used the pronoun 'she' when referring to the next president before the election.

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Helping land managers take risk-analysis approach to new wildfire reality

New digital tools will enable land managers to better adapt to the new reality of large wildfires through analytics that guide planning and suppression across jurisdictional boundaries that fires typically don't adhere to.

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Climate change: Arctic ice melt makes permafrost vulnerable

A new study shows that the absence of Arctic sea ice is linked to the melting of permafrost.

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Our Best Shot At Finding Alien Life Might Be Around This Type of Star

K dwarfs are relatively safe and long-lived, making them potentially ideal stellar neighborhoods for life.

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Abnormal neuron activity manifests as parental neglect

The malleability of the brain decreases with age, but scientists have identified certain life experiences that allow the adult brain to rewire. In female mice, hearing the distress cries of mouse pups presents a rewiring opportunity. Whether the mouse learns to respond to the cries depends on agene, Mecp2, that influences neurons in the auditory cortex called parvalbumin.

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Pathways that extend lifespan by 500% identified

Scientists have identified synergistic cellular pathways for longevity that amplify lifespan fivefold in C. elegans, a nematode worm used as a model in aging research. The increase in lifespan would be the equivalent of a human living for 400 or 500 years, according to one of the scientists.

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How do corals make the most of their symbiotic algae?

Corals depend on their symbiotic relationships with the algae that they host. But how do they keep algal population growth in check? The answer to this fundamental question could help reefs survive in a changing climate. New work indicates how sea anemones, which are closely related to coral, control the size of the algal populations that reside within their tissue.

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How US sewage plants can remove medicines from wastewater

A study of seven wastewater treatment plants in the Eastern United States points to two treatment methods — granular activated carbon and ozonation — as particularly promising. Each technique reduced the concentration of a number of pharmaceuticals, including certain antidepressants and antibiotics, in water by more than 95%, the scientists' analysis found.

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Two More US Sites Hacked With Pro-Iran Propaganda

Under Attack Hackers have defaced two more United States websites with pro-Iranian propaganda, according to Motherboard . While the hacks affect little more than the sites' appearances, tensions are running high between Iran and the U.S. due to the American assassination of Iran's top military general Qassim Soleimani and Iran's subsequent attack on military bases in Iraq — and the cyberattacks s

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Brazilian scientists unveil chemotherapy resistance mechanism related to p53 mutation

Brazilian study uncovered an anticancer chemotherapy resistance mechanism related to amyloid aggregation of mutant p53. The research was conducted in cells derived from glioblastoma, a super aggressive brain tumor, and in living cells. The results open up new opportunities for the development of more effective therapies against cancer.

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How the US Knew Iranian Missiles Were Coming Before They Hit

The US has operated an extensive network of missile warning systems for over half a century, but next-generation missiles will put it to the test.

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One bad night's sleep may increase Alzheimer's protein in your body

It only takes one sleepless night to raise levels of a protein linked with Alzheimer's disease in young men's blood, but the long-term effects are unclear

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What Is Known About Iran's Nuclear Capabilities

How much time might it take for Iran to develop a nuclear weapon and a delivery system to launch it? Here are some scenarios for what could happen.

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Of ants and men: Ant behavior might mirror political polarization

Division of labor and political polarization may be driven by the same processes, say computational biologists. They found that two forces — "social influence," the tendency of individuals to become similar to those they interact with, and "interaction bias," which leads us to interact with others who are already like us — are both necessary for division of labor and polarized social network

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New study reveals the origin of complex malaria infections

New technology employing single cell genome sequencing of the parasite that causes malaria has yielded some surprising results and helps pave the way for possible new intervention strategies for this deadly infectious disease.

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Affirmative action policies increased minority enrollment at Brazilian universities

Affirmative action policies (AAP) such as quota systems based on racial or socio-economic criteria are often recommended as a way to increase enrollment of underrepresented students in higher education. But those policies can be controversial and their results are sometimes questioned. A new study from the University of Illinois looks at comprehensive data from Brazilian universities to understand

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New Phytopathology journal focus issue emphasizes virological advances

Given the importance of and rapid research progress in plant virology in recent years, Phytopathology emphasized virological advances in its Fundamental Aspects of Plant Viruses focus issue, which is available now.

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FSU study aids fight against HIV, hepatitis B

A discovery by Florida State University College of Medicine researchers is expected to open the door for new and more potent treatment options for many of the more than 36 million people worldwide infected with the HIV virus and for others chronically ill with hepatitis B.

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Shifting clinic culture to address the opioid epidemic

At a family medicine clinic in the Boston area, a team led by faculty from Tufts University School of Medicine conducted a five-year case study where they found medical facilities can help physicians to treat chronic pain in a way that will deter opioid misuse, while creating better processes to identify and treat patients who develop an opioid use disorder.

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Penn study paves way for new vaccines to protect infants against infections

A new Penn Medicine study puts researchers within closer reach of vaccines that can protect infants against infections by overcoming a mother's antibodies, which are known to shut down immune defenses initiated by conventional vaccines. That hurdle largely explains why vaccinations for infectious diseases like influenza and measles not given until six to 12 months of age. Findings from the preclin

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MDI biological scientists identify pathways that extend lifespan by 500%

Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, Calif., and Nanjing University in China, have identified synergistic cellular pathways for longevity that amplify lifespan fivefold in C. elegans, a nematode worm used as a model in aging research. The increase in lifespan would be the equivalent of a human living

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An often-made claim that e-cigarettes are '95% safer' is not valid

The frequently cited claim that e-cigarettes are '95% less risky' or '95% less harmful' than combustible cigarettes is outdated, misleading and invalid — and should no longer be made in discussions on the dangers of vaping, according to an editorial published today in the American Journal of Public Health by six leading experts on e-cigarettes and public health.

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Study finds losing a night of sleep may increase blood levels of Alzheimer's biomarker

A preliminary study by researchers at Uppsala University has found that when young, healthy men were deprived of just one night of sleep, they had higher levels of tau — a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease — in their blood than when they had a full, uninterrupted night of rest. The study is published in the medical journal Neurology.

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To get your teens to sleep more, set a bedtime

A clear bedtime that parents consistently stick with can get teens to sleep more, according to a new study. "Greater enforcement of parent-set bedtimes for teenagers aged 14-to-17 are associated with longer sleep duration," says lead author Jack Peltz, an assistant professor of psychology at Daemen College who conducted the study as part of a research appointment in the psychiatry department at t

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Peter Kirstein, Father of the European Internet, Is Dead at 86

He was crucial to the spread of the protocols that underpin today's internet (and gave Queen Elizabeth her own email address).

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Can an AI be an inventor? Not yet.

But some campaigners are pushing for the rules to change.

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Facebook's Id Is Showing

Was Facebook responsible for the election of Donald Trump in 2016? Trump's campaign says yes. Most of his opposition says yes. And now a ranking executive at Facebook, Andrew Bosworth, says yes. "I think the answer is yes, but not for the reasons anyone thinks," Bosworth wrote in an internal "Thoughts for 2020" post that leaked yesterday, and that he subsequently posted in full . "He didn't get e

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Australia's Infernal Wildfires Have a Name: PyroCbs.

submitted by /u/allocater [link] [comments]

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'Reverse microwave oven' quickly cools drink cans

submitted by /u/SubParNoir [link] [comments]

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Synesthesia, An Inspiring Condition For AI Researchers

submitted by /u/funmamarunmama [link] [comments]

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Of ants and men: Ant behavior might mirror political polarization

Division of labor and political polarization may be driven by the same processes, say Princeton University computational biologists Chris Tokita and Corina Tarnita. They found that two forces — "social influence," the tendency of individuals to become similar to those they interact with, and "interaction bias," which leads us to interact with others who are already like us — are both necessary f

2h

New study reveals the origin of complex malaria infections

New technology employing single cell genome sequencing of the parasite that causes malaria has yielded some surprising results and helps pave the way for possible new intervention strategies for this deadly infectious disease, according to Texas Biomedical Research Institute Assistant Professor Ian Cheeseman, Ph.D.

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Samsung's fancy new fridge prototype promises to grow your food for you

The pods full of plants could have playful designs in addition to the QR codes that tell the fridge what plants it includes. (Stan Horaczek /) From across a room here at the Consumer Electronic Show , Samsung's Bespoke Plant fridge looks like a typical high-end refrigerator. Walk up to the door, however, and a proximity sensor triggers it to become transparent, revealing a series of plants growin

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How to criticize, from a critic

Criticism is about more than likes and dislikes. NY Times film critic A.O. Scott warns against the "emptiness" of certain adjectives when it comes to giving constructive and meaningful criticism. Pulling from nearly two decades of experience, Scott's book shows why criticism matters and how we are all critics. Better Living Through Criticism: How to Think About Art, Pleasure, Beauty, and Truth Li

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New MPMI focus issue seeks to improve management of virus-induced disease in crops

The January focus issue of the Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions journal includes four reviews and several research articles covering a variety of current topics examining the cell biology of virus-plant and virus-vector interactions, including cellular RNA hubs, plasmodesmal functioning, tripartite interactions, mechanisms of host defense suppression, and biotechnological approaches to induce

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Marijuana detected in homicide victims nearly doubles

Researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health assessed the time trends in alcohol and marijuana detected in homicide victims and found that the prevalence of marijuana almost doubled, increasing from 22 percent in 2004 to 42 percent in 2016. Alternately, the prevalence of alcohol declined slightly from 40 percent in 2004 to 35 percent in 2016.

3h

The Slow March Toward the First Same-Sex Couple to Have a Baby

New advances in stem cell technology are paving the way for same-sex couples to have a baby that's entirely their own.

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A mysterious virus is sickening people in China

Around 70 percent of the new infectious diseases that have emerged in the past three decades are zoonotic, meaning that they can be transmitted between animals and people. An unidentified virus has caused pneumonia in around 59 people in the city of Wuhan in China, CNN reported on January 7 . Not much is known about the mysterious virus. The first cases appeared in December, and some of the affli

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E-Scooter Accidents Are Increasing — And Head Injuries Are the Most Common

Researchers say helmet usage would keep more riders out of the emergency room.

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Japanese Billionaire Giving Out $9 Million in Basic Income Trial

Back on Top In September 2018, Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa made a " significant deposit " toward a ticket to the Moon aboard a SpaceX rocket. By May 2019, the fashion tycoon was claiming that he was broke. And now, he apparently has so much money that he can give away $9 million to his Twitter followers — all so he can test the theory that a basic income could increase recipients' happine

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How Iran Can Still Use Cyber and Drone Technology to Attack the U.S.

Cyberattacks and missile launches have already happened — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Netflix's 'The Circle' Is the Best TV Show About the Internet

A reality show about people alone in their rooms trying to be cool online—could anything be more cursed?

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Researchers solve protein structure associated with inherited retinal diseases

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have reported the first structural model for a key enzyme, and its activating protein, that can play a role in some genetically inherited eye diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and night blindness.

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How Iran Can Still Use Cyber and Drone Technology to Attack the U.S.

Cyberattacks and missile launches have already happened — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers solve protein structure associated with inherited retinal diseases

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have reported the first structural model for a key enzyme, and its activating protein, that can play a role in some genetically inherited eye diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and night blindness.

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Alcohol-Related Deaths in US Doubled in Past Two Decades: Study

White women had the highest increase in death rate.

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This drug could save their lives, but less than 2% of them get it

Only a tiny minority of people at risk for an opioid overdose actually are prescribed a drug that could save their lives, a new study suggests. And the odds of having a dose of the rescue drug were very low among some of the most at-risk groups, including those who had already survived a previous opioid overdose.

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Pathways to changing the minds of climate deniers

By reviewing the psychology behind climate change rejection, a Stanford researcher suggests four approaches that can sway climate deniers and help overcome obstacles to implementing solutions.

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Persistence of gut microbial strains in twins, living apart after cohabitating for decades

Using a genomics strain-tracking bioinformatics tool, researchers investigated whether shared bacterial strains remain stable and resilient to changes in diet or environment after adult twins — who had lived together for decades — began to live apart. The study analyzed two metagenomic sequencing databases from pairs of twins — one for children who were still living together and the other from

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How does your body respond to feelings of moral outrage? It depends on your politics

USC study finds that liberals and conservatives feel moral violations in different areas of their bodies, interpret them as distinct complex feelings and make different moral and political judgments.

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Scientists Velcroed 3-D Glasses to Cuttlefish to Study Their Depth Perception

The results of the eye-popping study suggest cuttlefish see the world in surprisingly human ways

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Catalytic protocells get zingy

Artificial cells capable of oxygen gas production and chemical signalling have been prepared using a combination of synthetic and biological catalysts.

3h

Next generation wound gel treats and prevents infections

Researchers have developed a new hydrogel based on the body's natural peptide defense. It has been shown to prevent and treat infections in wounds. The formulation kills multi-resistant bacteria, something that is increasing in importance with antibiotic resistance growing globally.

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Fish switch: Identity of mystery invader in Florida waters corrected after 20 years

Sometimes scientists make mistakes. Case in point is the chanchita, a South American freshwater fish that has been swimming in Florida's waters for at least two decades, all the while identified by experts as another invader, the black acara.

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Virus surfaces help engineers study vaccine and gene therapy applications

An isoelectric point is a common way to characterize viruses. However, it's not easy. To improve manufacturing for vaccines and gene therapy, a team uses surface charge to determine the isoelectric point of different viruses. Specifically, they use a single-particle method with atomic force microscopy (AFM).

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100 million years in amber: Researchers discover oldest fossilized slime mold

Most people associate the idea of creatures trapped in amber with insects or spiders, which are preserved lifelike in fossil tree resin. An international research team of paleontologists and biologists has now discovered the oldest slime mold identified to date. The fossil is about 100 million years old and is exquisitely preserved in amber from Myanmar.

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Less-than-perfect donor kidneys are safe for transplant

Hundreds of deceased donor kidneys, discarded each year after being deemed not suitable under current medical criteria, can be transplanted safely and effectively, according to new research. Based on their findings, the researchers strongly recommend that harvested kidneys with acute kidney injury (AKI) no longer be rejected outright. Accepting those kidneys could bolster efforts to reduce the dr

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How many of our comets come from alien solar systems?

A new simulation suggests at least a few of the dirty snowballs are interstellar visitors

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Boeing 737 Glitch Shuts Down Cockpit Screens on Certain Runways

Blank Stare A bug in Boeing's 737 NG airplanes' software caused all six of the main screens inside the cockpits to go blank during landing procedures at specific airports, The Register reports . The Register spotted the glitch in an airworthiness directive , issued by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on December 27. "All six display units (DUs) blanked with a selected instrument approach

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Research will help land managers take risk-analysis approach to new wildfire reality

New digital tools developed by Oregon State University will enable land managers to better adapt to the new reality of large wildfires through analytics that guide planning and suppression across jurisdictional boundaries that fires typically don't adhere to.

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Study: How US sewage plants can remove medicines from wastewater

A study of seven wastewater treatment plants in the Eastern United States reveals a mixed record when it comes to removing medicines such as antibiotics and antidepressants.

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'She' goes missing from presidential language

Throughout most of 2016, a significant percentage of the American public believed that the winner of the November 2016 presidential election would be a woman—Hillary Clinton.

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Neurons' energy organelle protected from damage linked to ALS, Alzheimer's

Mitochondrial damage is increasingly recognized as a key factor underlying neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and ALS. A new screening platform has identified a set of drug-like compounds that may protect them.

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Can sea star movement inspire better robots?

What researchers have learned about how a sea star accomplishes movement synchronization, given that it has no brain and a completely decentralized nervous system, might help us design more efficient robotics systems

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UNH researchers solve protein structure associated with inherited retinal diseases

UNH Researchers have reported the first structural model for a key enzyme, and its activating protein, that can play a role in some genetically inherited eye diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and night blindness.

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Trump's love of fast food could sway American diets

People who pay more attention to media coverage about President Donald Trump's diet are more likely to view fast food as a socially acceptable meal option, according to a new study. They also are more likely to eat fast food in the near future, according to the study's author Jessica Myrick, associate professor of media studies at Penn State's Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications. While

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Quantum weirdness rewrites rules about heat in empty space

Heat energy can leap across a few hundred nanometers of a vacuum, thanks to a quantum mechanical phenomenon called the Casimir interaction, researchers report. If you use a vacuum-insulated thermos to help keep your coffee hot, you may know it's a good insulator because heat energy has a hard time moving through empty space. Vibrations of atoms or molecules, which carry thermal energy, simply can

3h

How a Fish Steals Its Ability to Glow

Many organisms have evolved bioluminescence, but the golden sweeper's lights comes from the glowing shrimp in its diet.

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What Did Dinosaurs Smell Like?

Smell was certainly an important part of dinosaur life. What do we know about it? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pretrial publicity hinders prosecutors' ability to prove guilt

Media coverage is more likely to influence jurors to vote for acquittal than for conviction. This new finding challenges arguments that pretrial publicity is of greater concern to defendants due to their Sixth Amendment right to a fair trial.

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NASA-NOAA satellite catches Tropical Cyclone Blake and western Australia fires

Tropical cyclone Blake made landfall in the Kimberley coast of Western Australia and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an image that showed its center inland with the storm extending to the southern part of the state where fires raged.

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Wildfires Are Obliterating Australia's Iconic Ecosystems

Australia's bushfires aren't just unprecedented—they're catastrophic. The continent's ecosystems could be forever changed.

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New "secure" voting machines are still vulnerable—because of voters

A major study shows that people rarely notice if their vote gets changed by hackers—even when using technology meant to protect the ballot.

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CES 2020 Limo for One: BMW Renders the i3 Into an Urban Suite

LAS VEGAS – Take a BMW i3 electric vehicle, reconfigure it so there's room for just one passenger with NBA-length legs, and you've got the BMW i3 Urban Suite Concept. As in a suite in a hip, boutique city hotel. The car uses medium-blue fabrics, nicely grained woods without a hint of high-gloss varnish, a drop-down infotainment screen, and a sliding ottoman for the passenger's legs. It works beca

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Study: Early intervention of hyperkalemia cuts mortality in half

In a new study published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Adam Singer, MD, et al reported that quickly correcting high potassium levels, a condition known as hyperkalemia, in emergency department patients cut mortality in that population by half.

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'She' goes missing from presidential language

MIT researchers have found that although a significant percentage of the American public believed the winner of the November 2016 presidential election would be a woman, people rarely used the pronoun 'she' when referring to the next president before the election.

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Research will help land managers take risk-analysis approach to new wildfire reality

New digital tools will enable land managers to better adapt to the new reality of large wildfires through analytics that guide planning and suppression across jurisdictional boundaries that fires typically don't adhere to.

4h

Could pancreatitis be a stress hormone deficiency?

UT Southwestern researchers find that humans and mice with pancreatitis are deficient in a stress hormone called FGF21.

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Pretrial publicity hinders prosecutors' ability to prove guilt

Study finds media coverage is more likely to influence jurors to vote for acquittal than for conviction.

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Evolving landscape added fuel to Gobi Desert's high-speed winds

A new study finds that the dark, rocky landscape of the Hami basin in the Gobi Desert helped to make it one of the windiest places in China.

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A molecular switch for stomach disease

A research team has revealed a new mechanism which controls the causes of infection with H. pylori, triggering the development of stomach diseases. It is hoped that these findings will lead in time to new therapies.

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Findings on education, malnutrition 'deeply disturbing'

For the first time, researchers have mapped years of education and child malnutrition across all low- and middle-income countries at the level of individual districts. The findings include precision maps illuminating disparities within countries and regions often obscured by national-level analyses.

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Fish species benefit from marine protection to varying extents

Marine protected areas reduce fish mortality by limiting harvesting and reducing habitat destruction. They are often designed and implemented to promote biodiversity conservation and sustainable fisheries. New research shows these conservation efforts lead not only to an increase in the total number of fishes (individuals) in general. Protected areas in the northern Mediterranean Sea also harbor a

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Hundreds of novel viruses discovered in insects

New viruses which cause diseases often come from animals. Well-known examples of this are the Zika virus transmitted by mosquitoes, bird flu viruses, as well as the MERS virus which is associated with camels. In order to identify new viral diseases quickly and prevent possible epidemics, scientists are targeting their search at viruses in animals. In a current study, they have now discovered hundr

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Catalytic protocells get zingy

Artificial cells capable of oxygen gas production and chemical signalling have been prepared using a combination of synthetic and biological catalysts.

4h

Next generation wound gel treats and prevents infections

Researchers have developed a new hydrogel based on the body's natural peptide defense. It has been shown to prevent and treat infections in wounds. The formulation kills multi-resistant bacteria, something that is increasing in importance with antibiotic resistance growing globally.

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Nanoparticles deliver 'suicide gene' therapy to pediatric brain tumors growing in mice

Researchers report that a type of biodegradable, lab-engineered nanoparticle they fashioned can successfully deliver a "suicide gene" to pediatric brain tumor cells implanted in the brains of mice. The poly(beta-amino ester) nanoparticles, known as PBAEs, were part of a treatment that also used a drug to kill the cells and prolong the test animals' survival.

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How do corals make the most of their symbiotic algae?

Corals depend on their symbiotic relationships with the algae that they host. But how do they keep algal population growth in check? The answer to this fundamental question could help reefs survive in a changing climate.

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In the face of extreme climate events, ASU professor to link network of groups developing nature-based solutions

Extreme climate events are severely affecting communities in the U.S. and around the world. The examples are plenty. Australia is currently burning on a scale never seen before—14.5 million acres scorched, half a billion animals killed and hundreds of thousands of people displaced. Hundreds of fires are still burning out of control.

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New research shows live chats can increase sales by nearly 16%

Live chat tools allow for communication between sellers and buyers. They are popular instruments for e-commerce sites that don't have the advantage of face-to-face communication that brick-and-mortar stores do. New research in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research says these live chats can actually increase sales and boost profits.

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How do corals make the most of their symbiotic algae?

Corals depend on their symbiotic relationships with the algae that they host. But how do they keep algal population growth in check? The answer to this fundamental question could help reefs survive in a changing climate.

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In the face of extreme climate events, ASU professor to link network of groups developing nature-based solutions

Extreme climate events are severely affecting communities in the U.S. and around the world. The examples are plenty. Australia is currently burning on a scale never seen before—14.5 million acres scorched, half a billion animals killed and hundreds of thousands of people displaced. Hundreds of fires are still burning out of control.

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Cuttlefish wearing 3D glasses prove they sense depth just like us

Cuttlefish eyes move independently, making it difficult to compare images from each eye and sense depth. Surprisingly, they still sense distance the same way we do

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Viking runestone may allude to extreme winter, study says

Ninth-century Rök stone may deal with fear of cold climate crisis in Scandinavia One of the world's most famous runestones is now believed to have been erected by Vikings fearing a repeat of a previous cold climate crisis in Scandinavia, a study has concluded. The Rök stone, raised in the ninth century near Lake Vättern in south central Sweden, bears the longest runic inscription in the world, wi

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Cuttlefish given 3D glasses to determine how they judge distance – video

A team of researchers have strapped a pair of 3D glasses to an unsuspecting cuttlefish and set it loose in an underwater movie theatre to work out how the marine molluscs know how far away their prey is before launching an explosive, tentacled attack Continue reading…

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The New Pope's Old Magic

This post contains minor spoilers for The New Pope. The pope: so hot right now. When Pope Francis swatted away a grabby congregant in St. Peter's Square on New Year's Eve, his look of annoyance gave the Vatican a viral moment on the secular internet. That flap felt like something out of Netflix's The Two Popes , a peppery portrayal of recent history starring Anthony Hopkins as Benedict XVI and Jo

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NASA-NOAA satellite catches Tropical Cyclone Blake and western Australia fires

Tropical cyclone Blake made landfall in the Kimberley coast of Western Australia and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an image that showed its center inland with the storm extending to the southern part of the state where fires raged.

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AI for #MeToo: Training algorithms to spot online trolls

Machine learning could be a powerful tool for allowing social media platforms to spot online trolls.

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New research shows live chats can increase sales by nearly 16%

Live chat tools allow for communication between sellers and buyers. They are popular instruments for e-commerce sites that don't have the advantage of face-to-face communication that brick-and-mortar stores do. New research in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research says these live chats can actually increase sales and boost profits.

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Study: How US sewage plants can remove medicines from wastewater

A study of seven wastewater treatment plants in the Eastern United States points to two treatment methods — granular activated carbon and ozonation — as particularly promising. Each technique reduced the concentration of a number of pharmaceuticals, including certain antidepressants and antibiotics, in water by more than 95%, the scientists' analysis found.

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People view rationality and reasonableness as distinct principles of judgment

When it comes to making sound judgements, most people understand and distinguish that being rational is self-serving and being reasonable is fair and balanced, finds new research from the University of Waterloo. The study is the first systematic attempt to explore what people consider to be sound judgment and whether they understand rationality and reasonableness along the lines advocated by exper

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Cigarette smoke damages our mental health, too

The researchers found that students who smoked had rates of clinical depression that were twice to three times higher than did their non-smoking peers.

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Cuttlefish use depth perception similar to vertebrate vision when hunting prey

Cuttlefish viewing a movie of shrimp through 3D glasses properly positioned themselves to strike the 'prey,' suggesting these cephalopods hunt using a process called 'stereopsis' to calculate depth based on the distance between overlapping images perceived by their left and right eyes. While cuttlefish have been known to possess binocular vision, this is the first

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Scientists give cuttlefish 3D glasses and shrimp films for vision study

Researchers use 3D glasses, films and food to test whether cuttlefish use stereopsis to find prey There are some questions in science that can only be answered by strapping a pair of 3D glasses to an unsuspecting cuttlefish and setting it loose in an underwater movie theatre. That, at least, was the thinking of a team of researchers who set themselves the task of working out how the marine mollus

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Scientists improve yield predictions based on seedling data

A doctor diagnosing a 50-year-old patient based on a blood test taken during the patient's infancy would be unthinkable. Anecdotally speaking, however, that's what scientists have done with corn. Using plant RNA data from 2-week-old corn seedlings, plant biologists and computational mathematicians have shown that farmers and scientists can improve adult crop trait predictions with accuracy that ri

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Planet WASP-12b is on a death spiral, say scientists

Astrophysicists have shown that exoplanet WASP-12b, located 600 light-years away, is spiraling in toward certain destruction in about 3 million years.

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How universities may help bridge social divide between international, domestic students

Self-esteem is a valuable resource for undergraduate international students trying to socialize with their domestic counterparts at American universities, but new research suggests that while self-esteem predicts better socialization with domestic students, it is curiously unrelated to how international students socialize with other internationals.

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Sea-ice-free Arctic makes permafrost vulnerable to thawing

New research provides evidence from Siberian caves suggesting that summer sea ice in the Arctic Ocean plays an essential role in stabilizing permafrost and its large store of carbon.

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Complete filling of batches of nanopipettes

Researchers report an efficient method for filling a batch of nanopipettes with a pore opening below 10 nanometer. The method is based on the application of a temperature gradient to the nanopipette tips so that residual air bubbles are driven out.

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Nanoparticles deliver 'suicide gene' therapy to pediatric brain tumors growing in mice

Researchers report that a type of biodegradable, lab-engineered nanoparticle they fashioned can successfully deliver a "suicide gene" to pediatric brain tumor cells implanted in the brains of mice. The poly(beta-amino ester) nanoparticles, known as PBAEs, were part of a treatment that also used a drug to kill the cells and prolong the test animals' survival.

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Isaac Asimov, Scientist and Science Fiction Writer, Would Have Turned 100 This Year

He wrote almost 200 books and thousands of articles. Asimov_top.jpg Image credits: Zakeena (Image cropped by Inside Science) Rights information: CC BY 4.0 Culture Wednesday, January 8, 2020 – 11:30 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — When I was a kid I picked up a book called Foundation , written by Isaac Asimov. I had never heard of the author, but someone said the book was the best s

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Yes, This Cuttlefish Is Wearing 3-D Glasses

Scientists knew octopuses and squid don't have any depth perception, but they had a hunch their cuttlefish cousins might.

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Embracing flat Earth science denialism can help us overcome it

Our positive experiences with flat Earthers show how we can combat science denialism by embracing it, not spurning it, say David Westmoreland and Connor McCormick

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Early sociability fosters later exploratory tendency in wild immature orangutans

Exploration is essential for skill acquisition and strongly facilitates cognitive performance. In humans, it is widely known that exploration and later cognitive performance are highly dependent on early social inputs. Here, we aim to shed light on the evolutionary roots of this process by studying the effects of variation in opportunities for social learning on the exploratory tendency of immatu

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Multivariate patterning of human pluripotent cells under perfusion reveals critical roles of induced paracrine factors in kidney organoid development

Creating complex multicellular kidney organoids from pluripotent stem cells shows great promise. Further improvements in differentiation outcomes, patterning, and maturation of specific cell types are, however, intrinsically limited by standard tissue culture approaches. We describe a novel full factorial microbioreactor array–based methodology to achieve rapid interrogation and optimization of t

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Neuron-based high-content assay and screen for CNS active mitotherapeutics

Impaired mitochondrial dynamics and function are hallmarks of many neurological and psychiatric disorders, but direct screens for mitotherapeutics using neurons have not been reported. We developed a multiplexed and high-content screening assay using primary neurons and identified 67 small-molecule modulators of neuronal mitostasis (MnMs). Most MnMs that increased mitochondrial content, length, a

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Optimal temperature overshoot profile found by limiting global sea level rise as a lower-cost climate target

The global temperature targets of limiting surface warming to below 2.0°C or even to 1.5°C have been widely accepted through the Paris Agreement. However, limiting surface warming has previously been proven insufficient to control sea level rise (SLR). Here, we explore a sea level target that is closer to coastal planning and associated adaptation measures than a temperature target. We find that

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How colonial animals evolve

The evolution of modular colonial animals such as reef corals and bryozoans is enigmatic because of the ability for modules to proliferate asexually as whole colonies reproduce sexually. This reproductive duality creates an evolutionary tension between modules and colonies because selection operates at both levels. To understand how this evolutionary conflict is resolved, we compared the evolutio

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Extensive fires in southeastern Siberian permafrost linked to preceding Arctic Oscillation

Carbon release through boreal fires could considerably accelerate Arctic warming; however, boreal fire occurrence mechanisms and dynamics remain largely unknown. Here, we analyze fire activity and relevant large-scale atmospheric conditions over southeastern Siberia, which has the largest burned area fraction in the circumboreal and high-level carbon emissions due to high-density peatlands. It is

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Eastward shift and extension of ENSO-induced tropical precipitation anomalies under global warming

During El Niño events, increased precipitation occurs over the equatorial central eastern Pacific, corresponding to enhanced convective heating that modulates global climate by exciting atmospheric teleconnections. These precipitation anomalies are projected to shift and extend eastward in response to global warming. We show that this predicted change is caused by narrowing of the meridional span

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Kleptoprotein bioluminescence: Parapriacanthus fish obtain luciferase from ostracod prey

Through their diet, animals can obtain substances essential for imparting special characteristics, such as toxins in monarch butterflies and luminescent substances in jellyfishes. These substances are typically small molecules because they are less likely to be digested and may be hard for the consumer to biosynthesize. Here, we report that Parapriacanthus ransonneti , a bioluminescent fish, obta

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Epidermal autonomous VEGFA/Flt1/Nrp1 functions mediate psoriasis-like disease

Psoriasis is a common chronic skin disorder characterized by keratinocyte hyperproliferation with altered differentiation accompanied by inflammation and increased angiogenesis. It remains unclear whether the first events that initiate psoriasis development occur in keratinocytes or inflammatory cells. Here, using different psoriasis mouse models, we showed that conditional deletion of Flt1 or Nr

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Reduction of AMPA receptor activity on mature oligodendrocytes attenuates loss of myelinated axons in autoimmune neuroinflammation

Glutamate dysregulation occurs in multiple sclerosis (MS), but whether excitotoxic mechanisms in mature oligodendrocytes contribute to demyelination and axonal injury is unexplored. Although current treatments modulate the immune system, long-term disability ensues, highlighting the need for neuroprotection. Glutamate is elevated before T2-visible white matter lesions appear in MS. We previously

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Disordered chromatin packing regulates phenotypic plasticity

Three-dimensional supranucleosomal chromatin packing plays a profound role in modulating gene expression by regulating transcription reactions through mechanisms such as gene accessibility, binding affinities, and molecular diffusion. Here, we use a computational model that integrates disordered chromatin packing (CP) with local macromolecular crowding (MC) to study how physical factors, includin

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CTNNB1/{beta}-catenin dysfunction contributes to adiposity by regulating the cross-talk of mature adipocytes and preadipocytes

Overnutrition results in adiposity and chronic inflammation with expansion of white adipose tissue (WAT). However, genetic factors controlling fat mass and adiposity remain largely undetermined. We applied whole-exome sequencing in young obese subjects and identified rare gain-of-function mutations in CTNNB1/ β-catenin associated with increased obesity risk. Specific ablation of β-catenin in matu

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DNA-dependent protein kinase promotes DNA end processing by MRN and CtIP

The repair of DNA double-strand breaks occurs through nonhomologous end joining or homologous recombination in vertebrate cells—a choice that is thought to be decided by a competition between DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex but is not well understood. Using ensemble biochemistry and single-molecule approaches, here, we show that the MRN complex is depe

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Cuttlefish use stereopsis to strike at prey

The camera-type eyes of vertebrates and cephalopods exhibit remarkable convergence, but it is currently unknown whether the mechanisms for visual information processing in these brains, which exhibit wildly disparate architecture, are also shared. To investigate stereopsis in a cephalopod species, we affixed "anaglyph" glasses to cuttlefish and used a three-dimensional perception paradigm. We sho

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Folk standards of sound judgment: Rationality Versus Reasonableness

Normative theories of judgment either focus on rationality (decontextualized preference maximization) or reasonableness (pragmatic balance of preferences and socially conscious norms). Despite centuries of work on these concepts, a critical question appears overlooked: How do people's intuitions and behavior align with the concepts of rationality from game theory and reasonableness from legal sch

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Unveiling the tomato's evolution

It's more complex than previously thought.

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That's a surprise. Young stars found on the outskirts of the Milky Way

Astronomers suggest they formed from material from the Magellanic Clouds.

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We're going to see a lot more of V Sagittae. One day

Astronomers are excited by a tiny binary star.

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The advanced toolmakers of Olduvai Gorge

Early Stone Age implements were created fit for purpose.

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3-D movies reveal how cuttlefish determine distance when striking at prey

While cuttlefish wearing glasses is an unexpected sight, a University of Minnesota-led research team built an underwater theater and equipped the cephalopods with specialized 3-D glasses to investigate how cuttlefish determine the best distance to strike moving prey. Their research revealed cuttlefish use stereopsis to perceive depth when hunting a moving target.

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People view rationality and reasonableness as distinct principles of judgment

When it comes to making sound judgements, most people understand and distinguish that being rational is self-serving and being reasonable is fair and balanced, finds new research from the University of Waterloo.

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El Niño-Southern Oscillation heat engine shifts eastward under global warming

El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the strongest signal in interannual climate variation. El Niño increases the precipitation over the equatorial central-eastern Pacific, which releases more latent heat into the tropical atmosphere and thus drives variations of the global climate system like a heat engine. It has been reported that ENSO-induced precipitation anomalies will shift and extend eas

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What Scientists Learned by Putting 3-D Glasses on Cuttlefish

Some cuttlefish absolutely refuse to wear 3-D glasses. These relatives of squid and octopuses have blimplike bodies that end in a ring of eight arms topped by two prominent eyes. It's not hard to mount a pair of specs in front of those eyes, but a cuttlefish's arms are so dexterous that, if it's displeased with its new accoutrements, it can just yank them off. "And indeed, that happened a lot ,"

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3-D movies reveal how cuttlefish determine distance when striking at prey

While cuttlefish wearing glasses is an unexpected sight, a University of Minnesota-led research team built an underwater theater and equipped the cephalopods with specialized 3-D glasses to investigate how cuttlefish determine the best distance to strike moving prey. Their research revealed cuttlefish use stereopsis to perceive depth when hunting a moving target.

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Does ocean acidification affect coral reef fish behaviour?

Scientists repeat studies, but get different results.

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An in-depth look at cuttlefish hunting

The tricky part was getting them to wear glasses.

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How do corals make the most of their symbiotic algae?

Corals depend on their symbiotic relationships with the algae that they host. But how do they keep algal population growth in check? The answer to this fundamental question could help reefs survive in a changing climate. New work indicates how sea anemones, which are closely related to coral, control the size of the algal populations that reside within their tissue.

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If trees could talk: Using historic log structures to map migration of Europeans, Native Americans

Researchers are using tree-ring dating to determine not only when trees were cut down to build historic log buildings in the region but also what the forests were like before European immigrants arrived. This could help researchers shed light on when Native Americans abandoned the area and how their absence altered the landscape.

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Human body temperature has decreased in the United States

Since the early 19th century, the average human body temperature in the United States has dropped, according to a new study.

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Take heart: Study reveals how relaxin targets cardiovascular disease

As a healthy heart ages, it becomes more susceptible to cardiovascular diseases. Though researchers have discovered that relaxin, an insulin-like hormone, suppresses atrial fibrillation (AF), inflammation, and fibrosis in aged rats, the underlying mechanisms of these benefits are still unknown. Researchers discuss how relaxin interacts with the body's signaling processes to produce a fundamental m

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Method predicts crop traits from 'baby' corn

It's now possible to predict the traits of adult crops with two-week-old seedlings, report researchers, who say the method's accuracy rivals that of genetic approaches. "Traditional breeding methods take months to years, which can be saved if we can predict the desirable traits just from DNA and RNA without growing them, without having to measure the actual traits directly," says Shinhan Shiu, pr

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The Huge Australian Fires Could Change the Entire Earth's Climate

Widespread Effects The wildfires currently ravaging Australia are so massive that they're triggering widespread weather patterns and altering the environment around the world. While the fires were often treated as a local story relevant only to Australians, their repercussions will likely impact millions of people in other countries and continents, according to Inverse . As thunderstorm-like plum

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Trump Is No Closer to Solving America's Iran Problem

President Donald Trump's first formal remarks since the targeted killing of Iranian General Qassem Soleimani underscored the strange reality of the moment's crisis: After a chaotic and often terrifying week, it's not clear that anything has changed. "As long as I'm president of the United States, Iran will never be allowed to have a nuclear weapon," Trump said today before he'd even offered a "go

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Where Does Elizabeth Warren Actually Stand in the Race?

Sitting inside the cavernous Brooklyn auditorium where Senator Elizabeth Warren rallied before 3,000 cheering fans last night, you'd never have known that an Iranian retaliatory strike had brought the United States one step closer to another war in the Middle East. Nor would you have guessed that the candidate that these people had waited, in some cases, more than four hours to see, had recently

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Urban health scare: E-scooters show alarming spike in injuries

Electric scooters are increasingly part of the crowded urban landscape, but a new study has found a major surge of injuries related to scooters, particularly among young adults.

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Elon Musk: You'll Connect to Starlink With "UFO on a Stick"

No Training Required Stargazers have already mistaken SpaceX's Starlink satellites for alien spacecraft . Now, CEO Elon Musk says the devices used to connect to the micro-sats will look like UFOs , too. The Starlink Terminal will look like "a thin, flat, round UFO on a stick," Musk tweeted on Tuesday, noting that users will just need to plug in the device and point it at the sky to access SpaceX'

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Clinical Exome Sequencing Tests Are Frequently Incomplete: Study

A review of 36 individuals' sequencing results performed by three US labs finds thousands of genes that were never fully sequenced to industry standards.

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The 'Robot Tax' Debate Heats Up

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Virtual Incision raises $20 million for mini surgical robots

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Exogenesis: How Artificial Wombs Might Change Sex and Procreation

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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We save lives and crops every time a coal plant closes

coal smoking power plant against the sun (Deposit Photos/) Between 2005 and 2016, 334 coal-fired power plants in the U.S. shut down as natural gas increasingly fed the grid. While natural gas has its own problems as an energy source (and won't get us the emissions cuts we need to halt global warming), it does have an edge on coal when it comes to pollutants. A new study in Nature Sustainability p

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In vitro characterization of the human segmentation clock

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1885-9 Human presomitic mesoderm cells derived in vitro demonstrate oscillations of the segmentation clock, thus providing a window into an otherwise inaccessible stage of human development.

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Rapid non-uniform adaptation to conformation-specific KRAS(G12C) inhibition

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1884-x Populations of KRAS(G12C)-mutant cancer cells can rapidly bypass the effects of treatment with KRAS(G12C) inhibitors because a subset of cells escapes drug-induced quiescence by producing new KRAS(G12C) that is maintained in its active, drug-insensitive state.

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Strain engineering and epitaxial stabilization of halide perovskites

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1868-x A method of deposition of mixed-cation hybrid perovskite films as lattice-mismatched substrates for an α-FAPbI3 film is described, giving strains of up to 2.4 per cent while also stabilizing the metastable α-FAPbI3 phase for several hundred days.

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Proton-assisted growth of ultra-flat graphene films

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1870-3 A growth process in which protons decouple graphene from the underlying substrate greatly reduces the number of wrinkles that usually degrade large graphene films grown by chemical vapour deposition.

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Clonally expanded CD8 T cells patrol the cerebrospinal fluid in Alzheimer's disease

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1895-7 An integrated analysis of several cohorts shows that clonal, antigen-experienced T cells are found in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that the adaptive immune system has a role in age-related neurodegeneration.

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Coupling delay controls synchronized oscillation in the segmentation clock

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1882-z Monitoring cells of the mouse presomitic mesoderm using the Achilles reporter fused to HES7 sheds light on the mechanisms that underpin synchronous oscillations in the expression of clock genes between neighbouring cells.

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Activation of the GLP-1 receptor by a non-peptidic agonist

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1902-z The structure of GLP-1R and its G protein in complex with the small molecule TT-OAD2 sheds light on how the TT-OAD2 agonist can activate the receptor and provides insights into the development of therapeutic agents for metabolic disorders.

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A brief history of human disease genetics

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1879-7 This Review describes progress in the study of human genetics, in which rapid advances in technology, foundational genomic resources and analytical tools have contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for many rare and common diseases and to preventative and therapeutic strategies for many of these condi

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Microbiota-targeted maternal antibodies protect neonates from enteric infection

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1898-4 Neonatal mice are protected against infection with the enteric pathogen enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli by maternally derived natural antibodies as well as by maternal commensal microbiota that induce antibodies that recognize antigens expressed by Enterobacteriaceae.

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Palaeoclimate evidence of vulnerable permafrost during times of low sea ice

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1880-1 A reconstruction of permafrost dynamics using speleothems from a Siberian cave indicates that Siberian permafrost is robust to warming when Arctic sea ice is present, but vulnerable when it is absent.

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The emergence of transcriptional identity in somatosensory neurons

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1900-1 Neuronal targets mediate the emergence of somatosensory neuron subtypes by altering the expression of neuronal transcription factors.

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Nearest neighbours reveal fast and slow components of motor learning

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1892-x A new method for analysing change in high-dimensional data is based on nearest-neighbour statistics and is applied here to song dynamics during vocal learning in zebra finches, but could potentially be applied to other biological and artificial behaviours.

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Synthesis and properties of free-standing monolayer amorphous carbon

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1871-2 The synthesis of surprisingly stable, free-standing single layers of amorphous carbon and their analysis by atomic-resolution imaging could settle a debate about their atomic arrangement and offer unusual electronics applications.

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A structurally unstable semiconductor stabilized and enhanced by strain

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03918-1 Semiconductors known as halide perovskites have remarkable optoelectronic properties, but their structural instability limits practical applications. A solution has been found that involves squeezing the compounds' crystal lattices.

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Podcast: A look ahead at science in 2020

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00030-7 Hear the science updates, with Benjamin Thompson.

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Ocean acidification does not impair the behaviour of coral reef fishes

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1903-y In contrast to previous studies, analyses now show that ocean acidification does not perturb important behaviours—such as the avoidance of chemical cues from predators—of coral reef fishes.

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Single-chain heteropolymers transport protons selectively and rapidly

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1881-0 A random heteropolymer based on four monomers can facilitate proton transport across lipid bilayers almost as rapidly as natural ion channels and with high selectivity over other ions.

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An immune-cell signature marks the brain in Alzheimer's disease

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03892-8 A subpopulation of adaptive immune cells patrols the brain and cerebrospinal fluid in people who have Alzheimer's disease. This discovery should broaden our understanding of how the immune system can influence neurodegeneration.

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Mapping child growth failure across low- and middle-income countries

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1878-8 High-resolution subnational mapping of child growth failure indicators for 105 low- and middle-income countries between 2000 and 2017 shows that, despite considerable progress, substantial geographical inequalities still exist in some countries.

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TGF-β orchestrates fibrogenic and developmental EMTs via the RAS effector RREB1

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1897-5 RAS and TGF-β pathways regulate distinct modes of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition via RAS-responsive element binding protein 1.

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Outbreak science: Infectious disease research leads to outbreak predictions

Infectious diseases have a substantially growing impact on the health of communities around the world and pressure to both predict and prevent such diseases is ever-growing. LSU Assistant Professor of Biological Science Tad Dallas and colleagues developed a simple approach to accurately predict disease outbreaks by combining novel statistical techniques and a large dataset on pathogen biogeography

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Outbreak science: Infectious disease research leads to outbreak predictions

Infectious diseases have a substantially growing impact on the health of communities around the world and pressure to both predict and prevent such diseases is ever-growing. LSU Assistant Professor of Biological Science Tad Dallas and colleagues developed a simple approach to accurately predict disease outbreaks by combining novel statistical techniques and a large dataset on pathogen biogeography

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Outbreak science: Infectious disease research leads to outbreak predictions

Infectious diseases have a substantially growing impact on the health of communities around the world and pressure to both predict and prevent such diseases is ever-growing. LSU Assistant Professor of Biological Science Tad Dallas and colleagues developed a simple approach to accurately predict disease outbreaks by combining novel statistical techniques and a large dataset on pathogen biogeography

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Towards sustainability — from a by-product of the biodiesel industry to a valuable chemical

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and the National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) develop a cheap and efficient copper-based catalyst that can be used to convert glycerol, one of the main by-products of the biodiesel industry, into a valuable compound called dihydroxyacetone. In addition, this same process produces hydrogen molecules from water, an

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APS tip sheet: Spaghetti's impastable behavior

How noodles' mechanical properties control the way they soften.

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Experiments into amorphous carbon monolayer lend new evidence to physics debate

A new study into two-dimensional amorphous carbon is providing answers to long-standing questions regarding the atomic makeup of bulk amorphous materials, opening the door to exciting device possibilities in the future.

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NUS scientists create world's first monolayer amorphous film

Researchers from the National University of Singapore have synthesised the world's first one-atom-thick amorphous material. This breakthrough allows for direct imaging to reveal how atoms are arranged in amorphous materials, and could be of commercial value for batteries, semiconductors, membranes and many more applications.

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Cellular clock regulating human spine development

After decades of effort, scientists use induced pluripotent stem cells to model human spine development.Findings provide proof of existence of a segmentation clock in humans guiding spine formation.Work sets stage for better understanding of musculoskeletal and metabolic disorders, including congenital scoliosis, muscular dystrophy and type 2 diabetes.

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Findings on education, malnutrition 'deeply disturbing'

For the first time, researchers have mapped years of education and child malnutrition across all low- and middle-income countries at the level of individual districts. The findings include precision maps illuminating disparities within countries and regions often obscured by national-level analyses.

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Double-checking the science

Biologists help debunk previous studies that say tropical fish are behaving oddly as oceans gets more acidic due to climate change.

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Evidence of a human segmentation clock reveals how an embryo's vertebrae tick

To reproduce the molecular steps that lead to the proper formation of the human spine, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a model in a dish, allowing them to study just what makes our segmentation clock tick.

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Sea-ice-free Arctic makes permafrost vulnerable to thawing

New research, published today in Nature, led by scientists at the University of Oxford's Department of Earth Sciences, and at the Geological Survey of Israel, provides evidence from Siberian caves suggesting that summer sea ice in the Arctic Ocean plays an essential role in stabilising permafrost and its large store of carbon.

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A mother's bugs

Newborn mice derive protective antibodies from their mothers' microbiota.Antibodies derived from mothers' microbiota ward off both localized and widespread systemic infections by the bacterium E. coli. Study points to the role of maternal microbes in offspring protection and neonatal immunity. Findings can inform development of microbe-based therapies against infectious diarrhea in infants.

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Researchers Find Major Security Flaws in Popular App TikTok

An investigation by cybersecurity firm Check Point has uncovered major security flaws in popular video-sharing app TikTok. The firm made TikTok aware of the vulnerabilities on November 20, the New York Times reports , and by December 15, the company had addressed them all — but the prior existence of the issues could bolster claims that TikTok may threaten America's national security. According t

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Fast Radio Bursts from a Spiral Galaxy Challenge Theorists

Astronomers are struggling to explain the repeated, milliseconds-long chirps from a mysterious source — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fish switch: Identity of mystery invader in Florida waters corrected after 20 years

Sometimes scientists make mistakes. Case in point is the chanchita, a South American freshwater fish that has been swimming in Florida's waters for at least two decades, all the while identified by experts as another invader, the black acara.

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Gelatinous zooplankton makes an important contribution to marine carbon transport

Barely visible to the naked eye, gelatinous zooplankton is an important part of the marine ecosystem. In addition, the small organisms also transport large quantities of carbon into deeper layers of the ocean, thus making an important contribution to marine carbon transport.

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Skin-like sensors bring a human touch to wearable tech

Researchers have developed a super-stretchy, transparent and self-powering sensor that records the complex sensations of human skin. Dubbed artificial ionic skin — or AISkin for short — the researchers believe the innovative properties of AISkin could lead to future advancements in wearable electronics, personal health care and robotics.

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Politicians should study the theory of fear | Letters

When fearful, we turn to friends and family, to those in the caring professions and to our political leaders, writes Laurel Farrington Michele Gelfand's article ( Authoritarians thrive on fear. We need to help people feel safe , Journal, 3 January) describes through the lens of psychology the vicious spiral of how fear-based reasoning results in a craving for authoritarianism. Politicians would do

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Highlighting women's achievements makes them want to be the boss, research shows

Highlighting female achievements in the workplace makes capable women significantly more likely to want to be the boss, a study shows.

5h

How universities may help bridge social divide between international, domestic students

Self-esteem is a valuable resource for undergraduate international students trying to socialize with their domestic counterparts at American universities, but new research by a University at Buffalo psychologist suggests that while self-esteem predicts better socialization with domestic students, it is curiously unrelated to how international students socialize with other internationals.

5h

Fish switch: Identity of mystery invader in Florida waters corrected after 20 years

Sometimes scientists make mistakes. Case in point is the chanchita, a South American freshwater fish that has been swimming in Florida's waters for at least two decades, all the while identified by experts as another invader, the black acara.

5h

Gelatinous zooplankton makes an important contribution to marine carbon transport

They are small, almost transparent, similar to jellyfish, and they occur in the ocean in huge quantities. Cnidaria, Ctenophora and Urochordata belong to the gelatinous plankton communities that are omnipresent in the ocean and are among the primary food sources for more highly developed marine organisms. Thus, they have a very important function in the marine ecosystem. Another one is their contri

5h

Analysis challenges slew of studies claiming ocean acidification alters fish behavior

Three-year effort fails to replicate findings that spurred widespread concern

5h

Check Out This Incredibly Beautiful New Image of Our Home Galaxy

Closer Look NASA scientists recently captured the most detailed image of the Milky Way's center yet — and you can check it out, in all its glory, right here . The image sweeps across some 600 million lightyears of the galaxy's core, according to EarthSky . Glimpsing into the center of the Milky Way , NASA scientists found a very different number of stars than they expected — a discrepancy that co

5h

Daily briefing: Biologists, here's how to talk to physicists (and vice versa)

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00035-2 From equations to jokes, how to cross science's great divide. Plus, an exciting new exoplanet and a checklist for publication integrity.

5h

The huge scientific effort to study Notre-Dame's ashes

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00008-5 Last year's fire at Paris's beloved cathedral shocked the world. Now, researchers are making use of the unprecedented opportunity to study its innards.

5h

Experiments into amorphous carbon monolayer lend new evidence to physics debate

Plastic, glass and gels, also known as bulk amorphous materials, are everyday objects to all of us. But for researchers, these materials have long been scientific enigmas—specifically when it comes to their atomic makeup, which lacks the strict ordered structure of crystals found in most solids such as metals, diamonds and salts.

5h

The perfect tempo within the cells to develop vertebrae

Timing is everything when it comes to the embryonic development of pre-vertebrae divisions along the body of an embryo, according to researchers in Japan. A new live-imaging technique in mouse cells suggests a specific clock gene, Hes7, oscillates at a time delay to give rise to the vertebrae, spinal column and occipital bone in vertebrates. The research, published in the journal Nature, sheds lig

5h

Most meat eaters support veganism as 'ethical' and good for the environment

A recently published study that looked at public opinion on plant-based diets has found widespread support for the ethics and environmental benefits of veganism and vegetarianism among meat eaters, but finds that the barriers are practical matters of taste, price, and convenience.

5h

Findings on education, malnutrition 'deeply disturbing'

Despite progress toward global education targets, a new study reveals that 1 in 10 women ages 20-24 in low- and middle-income countries had zero years of schooling in 2017, and 1 in 6 had not completed primary school.

5h

Double-checking the science: Ocean acidification does not impair the behavior of coral reef fishes

Sometimes it helps to check the facts. You may be surprised what you find.

5h

Sea-ice-free Arctic makes permafrost vulnerable to thawing

Permafrost is ground that remains frozen throughout the year; it covers nearly a quarter of Northern Hemisphere land. The frozen state of permafrost enables it to store large amounts of carbon; about twice as much as in the atmosphere. The rate and extent of future thawing of permafrost, and consequent release of its carbon, is hard to predict from modern observations alone.

5h

Study Refutes Findings that Acidification Affects Fish Behavior

The new experiments use standardized methods and video recordings, but some researchers stand by earlier evidence that ocean pH influences coral reef fish's response to predator cues.

5h

The perfect tempo within the cells to develop vertebrae

Timing is everything when it comes to the embryonic development of pre-vertebrae divisions along the body of an embryo, according to researchers in Japan. A new live-imaging technique in mouse cells suggests a specific clock gene, Hes7, oscillates at a time delay to give rise to the vertebrae, spinal column and occipital bone in vertebrates. The research, published in the journal Nature, sheds lig

5h

Double-checking the science: Ocean acidification does not impair the behavior of coral reef fishes

Sometimes it helps to check the facts. You may be surprised what you find.

5h

How the rice blast fungus 'eats' its own cell wall to launch an attack

All living organisms respond and adapt to changes in their environment. These responses are sometimes so significant that they cause alterations in the internal metabolic cycles of the organism—a process called "metabolic switching." For example, rice blast fungus—a pathogenic fungal species that causes the "rice blast" infection in rice crops—switches to the "glyoxylate cycle" when the nutrient s

5h

Astronomers Fretting as SpaceX Ramps Up Starlink Launches

A few years ago, SpaceX started landing Falcon 9 rocket boosters so frequently that it stopped being a major event. Now, the same is starting to happen with the company's Starlink satellite launches. The launch of 60 new satellites this week has made SpaceX the single largest commercial satellite operator in the world, and it could soon have more satellites than all other operators combined. That

5h

Planet WASP-12b is on a death spiral, say Princeton scientists

A Princeton-led team of astrophysicists has shown that exoplanet WASP-12b, located 600 light-years away, is spiraling in toward certain destruction in about 3 million years. 'Ever since the discovery of the first 'hot Jupiter' in 1995 — a discovery that was recognized with this year's Nobel Prize in Physics — we have wondered how long such planets can survive,' said Prof. Joshua Winn.

5h

APS Tip Sheet: Improving quantum information processing

A new protocol compares the closeness of quantum states in information sent from different devices.

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APS Tip Sheet: Trudging until take-off

Allowing slower airplane passengers to board first decreases total boarding time.

5h

Researchers surprised by high levels of alcohol consumption among cancer survivors

New research in JNCCN — Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, using data from NHIS to examine self-reported drinking habits among people reporting a cancer diagnosis, finds 56.5% were current drinkers, 34.9% exceeded moderate drinking levels, and 21% engaged in binge drinking.

5h

Highlighting women's achievements makes them want to be the boss, research shows

Highlighting female achievements in the workplace makes capable women significantly more likely to want to be the boss, a study shows.

5h

How universities may help bridge social divide between international, domestic students

Self-esteem is a valuable resource for undergraduate international students trying to socialize with their domestic counterparts at American universities, but new research by a University at Buffalo psychologist suggests that while self-esteem predicts better socialization with domestic students, it is curiously unrelated to how international students socialize with other internationals.

5h

Plant-derived SVC112 hits cancer stem cells, leaves healthy cells alone

Study shows Colorado drug SVC112 stops production of proteins that cancer stem cells need to survive and grow.

5h

New mathematical model shows how diversity speeds consensus

Scientific literature abounds with examples of ways in which member diversity can benefit a group—whether spider colonies' ability to forage or an industrial company's financial performance. Now, a newly published mathematical framework substantiates the seemingly counterintuitive observations made by prior scholars: Interaction among dissimilar individuals can speed consensus.

5h

Milestone in Advanced Light Source upgrade project will bring in a new ring

An upgrade of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has passed an important milestone that will help to maintain the ALS' world-leading capabilities.

5h

How the rice blast fungus 'eats' its own cell wall to launch an attack

All living organisms respond and adapt to changes in their environment. These responses are sometimes so significant that they cause alterations in the internal metabolic cycles of the organism—a process called "metabolic switching." For example, rice blast fungus—a pathogenic fungal species that causes the "rice blast" infection in rice crops—switches to the "glyoxylate cycle" when the nutrient s

5h

Catalytic protocells get zingy

Artificial cells capable of oxygen gas production and chemical signalling have been prepared using a combination of synthetic and biological catalysts through an international collaboration between the University of Bristol and the University of Padua in Italy.

5h

Examining vaping particle size and deposition

E-cigarette use is rising, particularly among young adults and teens. Recent illnesses and deaths attributed to vaping have caused intense scrutiny of the chemicals in e-liquids and vapor, but little is known about the size of vaping particles and their deposition patterns in human airways. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Chemical Research in Toxicology have analyzed how e-cigarette particle si

5h

Report builds framework for 'digital political ethics' in 2020

With the 2020 elections looming and amid continuing concerns over social media's role in U.S. politics, four top universities have published a comprehensive new report recommending how candidates, tech platforms and regulators can ensure that digital political campaigns promote and protect fair elections.

5h

Egg-based flu vaccines: Not all they're cracked up to be?

Flu season is underway in the Northern Hemisphere, sickening millions of people and in rare cases, causing hospitalization or death. The best prevention is a flu shot, but it's not unusual for these vaccines to be less effective than intended. Some researchers suspect that the common practice of producing vaccines in chicken eggs could be partially to blame, according to an article in Chemical & E

5h

Catalytic protocells get zingy

Artificial cells capable of oxygen gas production and chemical signalling have been prepared using a combination of synthetic and biological catalysts through an international collaboration between the University of Bristol and the University of Padua in Italy.

5h

Bat poop may give researchers clues about historical changes to climate, vegetation

Whether it's ice, lake-bottom mud, or cave stalactites and stalagmites, if something piles up and accumulates over time, it can tell scientists about past climate conditions or surrounding landscapes and how they've changed.

6h

Scientists improve yield predictions based on seedling data

A doctor diagnosing a 50-year-old patient based on a blood test taken during the patient's infancy would be unthinkable.

6h

Scientists improve yield predictions based on seedling data

A doctor diagnosing a 50-year-old patient based on a blood test taken during the patient's infancy would be unthinkable.

6h

How rattlesnakes' scales help them sip rainwater from their bodies

During storms in the southwestern U.S., some rattlesnakes drink rain droplets from scales on their backs. This unusual behavior could help them survive in a desert environment with infrequent rain. Now, researchers have figured out how the nanotexture of scales from these snakes helps them use their bodies to harvest rain. They report their results in in ACS Omega.

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The calm of the deer

"Humans can have strong effects on the behaviour of wild animals and even influence their day and night rhythm," said conservation biologist Dr. Marco Heurich from the University of Freiburg. A team headed by Nadège C. Bonnot of the The French National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment (INRAE) has now investigated how the targeted reintroduction of lynx throughout Europe has

6h

Virus surfaces help engineers study vaccine and gene therapy applications

Viruses are not easy to characterize. But we need to because being able to quickly predict the surface charge of viruses opens up new possibilities for vaccine purification and making gene therapy treatments for eye diseases and muscular dystrophy.

6h

Fish species benefit from marine protection to varying extents

Marine protected areas reduce fish mortality by limiting harvesting and reducing habitat destruction. They are often designed and implemented to promote biodiversity conservation and sustainable fisheries. New research shows these conservation efforts lead not only to an increase in the total number of fishes (individuals) in general, but protected areas in the northern Mediterranean Sea also harb

6h

Virgin Galactic's next spaceship reaches build milestone

Virgin Galactic's next passenger spaceship has reached a major construction milestone, the company said Wednesday.

6h

How Simple Math Can Cover Even the Most Complex Holes

"Hey — I've got holes in some of my jeans. Can you patch them for me?" Your friend, who knows of your legendary skill with a needle and thread, is texting you for help. "Sure, that's easy," you reply. "How big are the holes?" "They're all weird shapes, but never wider than an inch. I'll be by later, so get things ready!" You go to your sewing kit and pull out some circular patches, each 1 inch in

6h

Why a researcher tracked his own poop for a year

Research on the gut microbiome is changing our understanding of the human body, but learning more about our gut bacteria can be a dirty job. When he was a student, Lawrence David's advisor presented him with an unusual project: to study his own feces for a full year. By accepting the challenge, Lawrence, assistant professor of molecular genetics and microbiology at Duke University, went on a jour

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Evolving landscape added fuel to Gobi Desert's high-speed winds

A new study finds that the dark, rocky landscape of the Hami basin in the Gobi Desert helped to make it one of the windiest places in China.

6h

Better science through peer review

The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.

6h

The Sneaky Genius of Facebook's New Preventative Health Tool

In April 2018, Facebook sent the Yale cardiologist and researcher Freddy Abnousi on a strictly confidential assignment to liaise with medical groups across the country on behalf of Building 8, Facebook's experimental research team. Building 8—which had originally been led by Regina Dugan, the former director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency—worked on long-term, moonshot projects ,

6h

Virus surfaces help engineers study vaccine and gene therapy applications

Viruses are not easy to characterize. But we need to because being able to quickly predict the surface charge of viruses opens up new possibilities for vaccine purification and making gene therapy treatments for eye diseases and muscular dystrophy.

6h

The calm of the deer

"Humans can have strong effects on the behaviour of wild animals and even influence their day and night rhythm," said conservation biologist Dr. Marco Heurich from the University of Freiburg. A team headed by Nadège C. Bonnot of the The French National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment (INRAE) has now investigated how the targeted reintroduction of lynx throughout Europe has

6h

Fish species benefit from marine protection to varying extents

Marine protected areas reduce fish mortality by limiting harvesting and reducing habitat destruction. They are often designed and implemented to promote biodiversity conservation and sustainable fisheries. New research shows these conservation efforts lead not only to an increase in the total number of fishes (individuals) in general, but protected areas in the northern Mediterranean Sea also harb

6h

WHO formally retracts opioid guidelines that came under fire

The World Health Organization has officially retracted its controversial guidelines on the use of opioid analgesics. The agency's move applies to two statements, issued in 2011 and 2012. Last June, WHO announced that it was "discontinuing" the guidelines in the wake of a critical report which said the documents were heavily tainted by commercial bias. … Continue reading

6h

Quibi Bets On a Future of Quick Clips and Tiny Screens

Entertainment startup Quibi has already won over industry A-listers with its vision for short-form mobile streaming. But will it catch on with viewers?

6h

Cosmic bubbles reveal the first stars

Astronomers have identified several overlapping bubbles of hydrogen gas ionized by the stars in early galaxies, a mere 680 million years after the Big Bang. This is the earliest direct evidence from the period when the first generation of stars formed and began reionizing the hydrogen gas that permeated the Universe.

6h

To Save Endangered Sharks, You Sometimes Need to Kill a Few

A unique partnership between scientists and commercial fishermen is yielding crucial information that is helping conserve shark populations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

What It's Like to Date After Middle Age

When Rhonda Lynn Way was in her 50s and on the dating scene for the first time since she was 21, she had no idea where to start. Her marriage of 33 years had recently ended, and she didn't know any single men her age in Longview, Texas, where she lives. She tried to use dating apps, but the experience felt bizarre and daunting. "You're thrust out into this cyberworld after the refuge of being in

6h

Virus surfaces help MTU engineers study vaccine and gene therapy applications

An isoelectric point is a common way to characterize viruses. However, it's not easy. To improve manufacturing for vaccines and gene therapy, a Michigan Tech team uses surface charge to determine the isoelectric point of different viruses. Specifically, they use a single-particle method with atomic force microscopy (AFM).

6h

How dying cells prevent dangerous immune reactions

Dying cells in the body can keep the immune system in check, thus preventing unwanted immune responses against the body's own tissues. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center have now identified a receptor on murine immune cells that activates this protective mechanism and can thus prevent dangerous autoimmune reactions in which the immune system attacks the patient's own body tissues.

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Bimonthly, fortnightly, and other complications: Here's how to talk about time

Wait, when were we supposed to meet? (Piotr Stryjewski via Deposit Photos/) So your friend wants to meet at "nine o'clock next Saturday." But when the hell is that? If it's Friday, do they mean "tomorrow"? Or do they mean "nine days from now"? And are you meeting at nine o'clock for a nice breakfast or a post-dinner drink? Face it: how most people talk about time is horrendously broken. Sometimes

6h

Fem dage uden opladning: Nyt superbatteri kan være på vej til din smartphone

Men det australske svovl-batteri er altså ikke lige på trapperne, vurderer dansk professor.

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Human body temp has dropped over time

The average human body temperature in the United States has decreased over the past 157 years, researchers report. "Our temperature's not what people think it is," says Julie Parsonnet, professor of medicine and of health research and policy at Stanford University and senior author of the paper in eLife . "What everybody grew up learning, which is that our normal temperature is 98.6, is wrong." G

6h

This Airline Is Testing Powered Exoskeletons For Luggage Workers

Airport Exosuit U.S. airline Delta is partnering with Utah-based exoskeleton company Sarcos Robotics to test whether its powered suits can help employees at lifting luggage and other repetitive tasks. "We owe it to the best airline employees on the planet to explore how emerging technology can make their jobs safer and easier," said Gareth Joyce, Delta's senior VP, in a statement . A video shows

6h

Trump's Chance to Take the High Road With Iran

It could have been much worse. It's a measure of this dangerous moment that many observers felt relief on Tuesday night after the Pentagon announced that there had been no American casualties following Iran's launch of 22 ballistic missiles at bases housing U.S. troops in Iraq. "It's been a very long time since U.S. forces have been directly struck by ballistic missiles," Ilan Goldenberg, a forme

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To Save Endangered Sharks, You Sometimes Need to Kill a Few

A unique partnership between scientists and commercial fishermen is yielding crucial information that is helping conserve shark populations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Did Donald Trump and Iran Use Twitter to Prevent a War?

Tweets from US president Donald Trump and Iranian foreign minister Javad Zarif Tuesday offered a fascinating glimpse at how world leaders can communicate more quickly and directly than ever in times of crisis.

6h

Fish switch: Identity of mystery invader in Florida waters corrected after 20 years

Sometimes scientists make mistakes. Case in point is the chanchita, a South American freshwater fish that has been swimming in Florida's waters for at least two decades, all the while identified by experts as another invader, the black acara.

6h

Next generation wound gel treats and prevents infections

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a new hydrogel based on the body's natural peptide defense. It has been shown to prevent and treat infections in wounds. The formulation kills multi-resistant bacteria, something that is increasing in importance with antibiotic resistance growing globally.

6h

Directly measuring function in tiny hearts

The amount of blood the heart pumps in one minute can be directly measured safely in newborns by monitoring changes in blood velocity after injecting saline, indicates the first clinical study of direct cardiac output measurement in newborns.

6h

Cystic fibrosis carriers are at increased risk for cystic fibrosis-related conditions

A University of Iowa study challenges the conventional wisdom that having just one mutated copy of the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene has no effects on a person's health. The findings show that CF 'carriers' are at increased risk for most of the conditions that affect people with CF.Although the individual-level risk is low, more than 10 million Americans are CF carriers, suggesting the amount of illne

6h

Are some antidepressants less risky for pregnant women?

About one in ten women in Québec will suffer from depression during pregnancy. Without treatment, the illness carries risks for both mother and child. Yet antidepressants are not without consequences for fetal development. The team of professor Cathy Vaillancourt at the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) is studying the effects of these drugs in order to identify the least harmf

7h

Skin-like sensors bring a human touch to wearable tech

University of Toronto Engineering researchers have developed a super-stretchy, transparent and self-powering sensor that records the complex sensations of human skin.Dubbed artificial ionic skin — or AISkin for short — the researchers believe the innovative properties of AISkin could lead to future advancements in wearable electronics, personal health care and robotics.

7h

Tiny, but effective

Barely visible to the naked eye, gelatinous zooplankton is an important part of the marine ecosystem. In addition, the small organisms also transport large quantities of carbon into deeper layers of the ocean, thus making an important contribution to marine carbon transport. This is underpinned by new studies by an international team of researchers recently published in the renowned journal Global

7h

How the rice blast fungus 'eats' its own cell wall to launch an attack

In response to environmental changes and nutrient starvation, cells are known to undergo extreme alterations. This includes switching from one type to another ('differentiation') and changes in metabolic pathways ('metabolic switching'). In a new study, a research team from Tokyo University of Science showed for the first time how rice blast fungus uses its own cell wall to survive in response to

7h

Brister i sjukvården bidragande orsak till självmord

Forskare har undersökt alla suicidfall som anmäldes enligt Lex Maria till Inspektionen för vård och omsorg (IVO) under 2015. Resultaten visar att brister i sjukvården har varit en bidragande faktor i 55 procent av fallen. I studien från Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping University och Lunds universitet anses att brister i vården bidragit till dödsfallet i 55 procent av de självmord som begicks under 2015

7h

Sårbehandling som tar kroppens egna mekanismer till hjälp

En nyutvecklad behandlande gel som utnyttjar kroppens naturliga mekanismer har visar sig vara effektiv både i att förebygga och behandla infektioner i sår, enligt Artur Schmidtchen, professor i dermatologi och venereologi vid Lunds universitet. Studien publiceras i Science Translational Medicine och forskarna tror att upptäckten kan leda till nya behandlingar för förbättrad sårläkning. – Förmågan

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Gravitational Waves Signal Second-Ever Neutron Star Merger Caught by LIGO

A new gravitational wave detection shows two neutron stars slamming together, likely forming a black hole.

7h

Parker's Million Dollar Pay Day! | Gold Rush

After splitting up his crew, Parker nets one million dollars worth of gold in just one week! Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discov

7h

Bell's sleek new electric air taxi design promises speeds of 150 mph and a 60-mile range

A rendering of the latest version of the Nexus air taxi concept from Bell. (Bell/) If you have a great deal of disposable income and need to get someplace very quickly, you might hop in a helicopter . But a new generation of flying machine, one that's less noisy and dramatic but potentially more affordable, is in development: a class of aircraft that generally do something like what helicopters d

7h

Teens with a higher sense of family status are healthier

An adolescent's sense of their own family's social and economic status is closely linked to that teen's physical and cognitive health, according to a study of British twins. In fact, the adolescent's perception of status was a more powerful predictor of their well-being and readiness for further education than their family's actual status. The study sample represented the full range of socioecono

7h

Law in War Isn't as Irrelevant as People Fear

President Donald Trump's claim last summer that the Constitution gives him "the right to do whatever I want as president" was promptly—and rightly—condemned as constitutional fantasy by prominent liberals and conservatives alike. That "ours is a government of limited powers" is as foundational a constitutional principle as they come. Yet watching the consequences of the president's decision makin

7h

The secret weapon that let dinosaurs take over the planet | Emma Schachner

We've all heard the theories on why the dinosaurs died — but how did they come to dominate the earth for so long in the first place? (Hint: it has nothing to do with their size, speed, spikes or fantastic feathers.) Travel back in time to 200 million years before their extinction with paleontologist Emma Schachner for a breath of fresh air on dinosaur history.

7h

Udskudt igen: Offentlige myndigheder bliver tidligst koblet på EFI-afløser i 2021

Skatteministeriet har længe arbejdet på at få både sine egne og andre offentlige myndigheders systemer koblet til EFI-afløseren PSRM. Håbet har været, at det kunne ske i år, men ifølge skatteministeren bliver det nu tidligst i 2021.

7h

Storbrand ved Stavanger Lufthavn: Brandchef efterlyser sprinkleranlæg

PLUS. Brandchef Nils-Erik Haagenrud var med til nattens slukning af voldsom brand i parkeringshus ved Stavanger Lufthavn. Ifølge ham bidrog manglen på sprinklere til, hvor voldsomt branden bredte sig. Elbilerne i huset var til gengæld ikke et problem.

7h

Catalytic protocells get zingy

Artificial cells capable of oxygen gas production and chemical signalling have been prepared using a combination of synthetic and biological catalysts through an international collaboration between the University of Bristol and the University of Padua in Italy.

7h

Examining vaping particle size and deposition

E-cigarette use is rising, particularly among young adults and teens. Recent illnesses and deaths attributed to vaping have caused intense scrutiny of the chemicals in e-liquids and vapor, but little is known about the size of vaping particles and their deposition patterns in human airways. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Chemical Research in Toxicology have analyzed how e-cigarette particle si

7h

Report builds framework for 'digital political ethics' in 2020

With the 2020 elections looming and amid continuing concerns over social media's role in US politics, four top universities have published a comprehensive new report recommending how candidates, tech platforms and regulators can ensure that digital political campaigns promote and protect fair elections.

7h

Egg-based flu vaccines: Not all they're cracked up to be?

Flu season is underway in the Northern Hemisphere, sickening millions of people and in rare cases, causing hospitalization or death. The best prevention is a flu shot, but it's not unusual for these vaccines to be less effective than intended. Some researchers suspect that the common practice of producing vaccines in chicken eggs could be partially to blame, according to an article in Chemical & E

7h

New mathematical model shows how diversity speeds consensus

Scientific literature abounds with examples of ways in which member diversity can benefit a group — whether spider colonies' ability to forage or an industrial company's financial performance. Now, a newly published mathematical framework substantiates the seemingly counterintuitive observations made by prior scholars: interaction among dissimilar individuals can speed consensus.

7h

Less-than-perfect kidneys can be successfully used for transplants, study shows

A new Johns Hopkins Medicine-led study provides the strongest evidence to date that hundreds of deceased donor kidneys, discarded each year after being deemed not suitable under current medical criteria, can be transplanted safely and effectively.

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Online patient tool is associated with increased likelihood of receiving kidney transplant

Patients with kidney failure who actively used an online patient portal to track the status of their health care improved their chances of getting a kidney transplant and shortened their wait times for an operation.

7h

Palliative care in hospitals linked to decrease in use of ICU; treatment intensity

A new study shows that implementing hospital-based palliative care services in New York State reduces treatment intensity at the end of life for hospitalized patients. Implementation of palliative care was associated with a 10% reduction in utilization of an intensive care unit for patients who died during their hospitalization. an absolute decrease in end-of-life ICU use of just 4% would translat

7h

Genetic testing provides insights to sudden unexplained deaths in Amish community

Using an exome molecular autopsy, Michael Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D., and his associates conducted genetic testing of four siblings who each died suddenly during exercise. Dr. Ackerman is a genetic cardiologist and director of the Windland Smith Rice Comprehensive Sudden Cardiac Death Program at Mayo Clinic. The findings are published in JAMA Cardiology. Dr. Ackerman is the senior author.

7h

Views of rural US adults on serious health, economic issues in their communities

Nationally representative surveys from 2018 and 2019 were used to examine the views of adults in the rural US on the serious health and economic problems facing their communities, including the cost and access to health care and addiction to opioids.

7h

Public opinion on proposals in California to prevent firearm violence

This survey study assessed public opinion in California (overall and by firearm ownership status) on two proposals to prevent firearm injuries: an amnesty program that would allow individuals to turn in ammunition magazines that hold more than 10 bullets, no questions asked; and a law that prevents someone from buying a gun for five years if they have had two or more driving under the influence of

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Are there shared genetic factors between weight and major psychiatric disorders?

Data from 1.3 million people were used to investigate genetic overlap between body mass index and major psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and a shorter life expectancy among people with major psychiatric disorders is mainly due to coexisting cardiovascular diseases.

7h

Electric scooter injuries, hospital admissions in US

Electric scooters are increasingly used as fast and convenient transportation in the United States. This observational study reports on injuries and hospital admissions related to electric scooters from 2014 to 2018 using national data.

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BMI over time beats genetics in predicting future obesity

Genetic testing as a determinant of future obesity is not as effective as tracking a patient's BMI over time, a new study finds.

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Despite effective therapy, US rate of breast conservation lower than other countries

Patients treated in Europe or Asia were 2.6 times as likely to undergo breast conserving therapy rather than a mastectomy compared to those treated in North America when adjusted for clinically significant factors.

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Urban health scare: E-scooters show alarming spike in injuries

Electric scooters are increasingly part of the crowded urban landscape, but a UC San Francisco study has found a major surge of injuries related to scooters, particularly among young adults.

7h

Tesla Is Now the Most Valuable Auto Company In US History

Surging Shares Elon Musk-led electric car company Tesla has had an incredible start to the decade. Shares surged at the beginning of 2020, making it the most valuable U.S. automaker of all time with a market capitalization of $81.39 billion, passing Ford Motor's 1999 record of $80.81 billion, The Wall Street Journal reports . Upward Trend And Tesla shares are still on the rise. Stocks rose to $46

7h

#ReleaseTheJJCut Brings Conspiracy Theories to Star Wars

Hollywood fandom theories are everywhere. Now, 'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker' has one of its own.

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The biggest gaseous structure in our galaxy is filled with baby star factories

The recently discovered entourage of gas clouds ripples above and below the disk of the Milky Way. (Alyssa Goodman / Harvard University/) Our galaxy swirls in mysterious, often puzzling ways. Starfish-like arms of dust and stars extending tens of thousands of light years spiral together as the entire disk pinwheels. Not that galactic cartographers can see that structure from their vantage point,

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Tesla Is the Most Valuable Car Company In America Ever

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A universal flu vaccine could be coming

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New ultrasound technique significantly improves brain performance

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Patient step counts predict lung cancer treatment outcomes, study finds

Numerous studies have shown that monitoring physical activity promotes better health — from reducing body mass index to watching for signs of hypertension, for example. A new study suggests step counters could play yet another role: predicting outcomes for people undergoing chemoradiation therapy for lung cancer.

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Two drugs used in combination prove to be effective against most aggressive asbestos cancer in mice

Currently, there are few effective treatments for malignant mesothelioma, although it has been decades since it was found that the major risk factor is exposure to asbestos. The drugs identified by CNIO researchers are being tested on other types of cancer, which can speed up clinical trials for mesothelioma. The authors identified molecular markers that could be used to determine which patients c

7h

Gut microbes may improve stroke recovery

New research shows that short chain fatty acids could help protect brain cells from damage caused by inflammation after a stroke.

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BU study finds celebrity disclosures increase discussion of miscarriage on twitter

A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study characterizes how Twitter users discuss miscarriage and preterm birth. Published in Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, the study finds that miscarriage disclosures by Michelle Obama and other public figures prompted spikes in discussion, and in other people sharing their own experiences of miscarriage. The study also gathered thousa

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Relation between physical violence and not having adequate check-ups during pregnancy

An international study led by the University of Granada has found that 9.8% of pregnant women in Andalusia fail to have sufficient check-ups during pregnancy — that is, the number of hospital antenatal appointments they attend is lower than recommended.

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Scientists improve yield predictions based on seedling data

A doctor diagnosing a 50-year-old patient based on a blood test taken during the patient's infancy would be unthinkable. Anecdotally speaking, however, that's what Michigan State University scientists have done with corn. Using plant RNA data from 2-week-old corn seedlings, Shinhan Shiu, professor of plant biology and computational mathematics, science and engineering, has shown that farmers and s

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Nanobubbles in nanodroplets

Freiburg researchers investigate ultrafast reaction of superfluid helium triggered by extreme ultraviolet laser pulses.

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Pneumonia outbreak stirs virus hunting debate

Is the $3bn Global Virome Project an expensive distraction or a wise investment?

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Dovne Y2K-rettelser giver nye Y2020-fejl

Snuptagsløsning på Y2K-fejl vender tilbage og sparker udviklere i bagdelen.

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Pancreatic cancer sends signal to call off immune attack

A key immune signal has a previously unknown role in turning off the immune system's attack on pancreatic cancer cells, a new study finds. The researchers found that pancreatic tumor cells make and release an immune signaling protein, interleukin-1β (IL-1β). This was shown to reduce anticancer immune responses, which promoted the growth of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma or PDA, a form of cancer

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How rattlesnakes' scales help them sip rainwater from their bodies (video)

During storms in the southwestern US, some rattlesnakes drink rain droplets from scales on their backs. This unusual behavior could help them survive in a desert environment with infrequent rain. Now, researchers have figured out how the nanotexture of scales from these snakes helps them use their bodies to harvest rain. They report their results in in ACS Omega.

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Identification of signature genes associated with therapeutic resistance to anti-VEGF therapy

To establish a molecular signature of this resistance in ovarian cancer, the authors developed preclinical tumor models of adaptive resistance to chronic anti-VEGF treatment.

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The calm of the deer

Researchers investigate how the behavior of the wild animals is altered under the influence of lynxes and humans.

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100 million years in amber: Researchers discover oldest fossilized slime mold

Most people associate the idea of creatures trapped in amber with insects or spiders, which are preserved lifelike in fossil tree resin. An international research team of palaeontologists and biologists from the Universities of Göttingen and Helsinki, and the American Museum of Natural History in New York has now discovered the oldest slime mould identified to date. The fossil is about 100 million

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A response key for survival of Mycoplasma genitalium in the urogenital tract uncovered

Metals (iron, zinc, nickel, cobalt, etc.) participate in numerous enzymatic reactions and are essential nutrients for bacteria. Inside our organism, but these metals are scarcely available, because they are bound to proteins which preserve and transport them to the cells and tissues where they will be used.

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The start of biological spring in Africa is linked to the quantity of hours of sunshine

Experts from the University of Seville have published a recent study in which they determine that the start of the increase in the verdure of vegetation (equivalent to the start of spring) in Africa is directly connected to the amount of hours of sunshine a day—that is to say, it would be the "photoperiod" which controls this process and not the arrival of the first rains, as was believed until no

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Wind and freshwater rob Southern Ocean of oxygen

Increased freshwater from melting Antarctic ice sheets plus increased wind have reduced the amount of oxygen in the Southern Ocean and made it warmer and more acidic, geoscientists report. Researchers found Southern Ocean waters had changed when they compared shipboard measurements taken from 1990 to 2004 with measurements taken using a fleet of microsensor-equipped robot floats from 2012 to 2019

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A response key for survival of Mycoplasma genitalium in the urogenital tract uncovered

Metals (iron, zinc, nickel, cobalt, etc.) participate in numerous enzymatic reactions and are essential nutrients for bacteria. Inside our organism, but these metals are scarcely available, because they are bound to proteins which preserve and transport them to the cells and tissues where they will be used.

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The start of biological spring in Africa is linked to the quantity of hours of sunshine

Experts from the University of Seville have published a recent study in which they determine that the start of the increase in the verdure of vegetation (equivalent to the start of spring) in Africa is directly connected to the amount of hours of sunshine a day—that is to say, it would be the "photoperiod" which controls this process and not the arrival of the first rains, as was believed until no

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Nanoparticles deliver 'suicide gene' therapy to pediatric brain tumors growing in mice

Johns Hopkins researchers report that a type of biodegradable, lab-engineered nanoparticle they fashioned can successfully deliver a "suicide gene" to pediatric brain tumor cells implanted in the brains of mice. The poly(beta-amino ester) nanoparticles, known as PBAEs, were part of a treatment that also used a drug to kill the cells and prolong the test animals' survival.

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If trees could talk: Using historic log structures to map migration of Europeans, Native Americans

Log cabins in West Virginia's Appalachian Mountains have a story to tell: when people leave, the forest takes over.

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Corals in murky water less affected by temperature stress, research finds

Persistent temperature stress events are degrading coral reefs worldwide, but a new study from Florida Institute of Technology has found that corals in naturally turbid waters are less affected by thermal stress than corals in clearer water.

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The Flu Season May Yet Turn Ugly, C.D.C. Warns

Almost as many people are falling ill as did two years ago, in what was a particularly severe flu season. But this season's virus is unusual, and it's too early to tell how dangerous.

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It would take Iran more than 4 months to develop nuclear weapons

The US assassination of Iranian general Qassem Soleimani has raised fears of nuclear conflict, but Iran has been on the road to building nuclear weapons for some time

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Americans Aren't Rallying to Trump

So that was not exactly the Cuban missile crisis. In apparent retaliation for the killing of Iran's top terror commander, Iran fired short-range ballistic missiles in the direction of military bases inside Iraq. The missiles inflicted no casualties on U.S. or allied forces. The truly horrible news seems instead to be an accident: the crash of a Ukrainian Airlines flight to Tehran, which killed al

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Scientists discover how TB puts the brakes on our immune engines

The scientists pinpointed a small mRNA molecule used by TB bacteria to shut down key engines that drive our immune response. However, they also found a protein signal that removes this mRNA molecule and kick-starts the engines back into gear, providing hope for improved therapies in the future.

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Most meat eaters support veganism as 'ethical' and good for the environment

A new survey of 1000 meat eaters finds support for the principles of veganism, but suggests most think it is inconvenient, expensive and a sacrifice in terms of taste.

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100 million years in amber: Researchers discover oldest fossilized slime mold

Most people associate the idea of creatures trapped in amber with insects or spiders, which are preserved lifelike in fossil tree resin. An international research team of paleontologists and biologists from the universities of Göttingen and Helsinki, and the American Museum of Natural History in New York has now discovered the oldest slime mold identified to date. The fossil is about 100 million y

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A response key for survival of Mycoplasma genitalium in the urogenital tract uncovered

A study led by an IBB-UAB research team has managed to identify the mechanisms by which the sexually transmitted bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium (Mge) can persist in conditions with very limited availability of metals, a circumstance it must face when infecting humans. The discovery will facilitate the development of therapeutic strategies that could block the metal uptake and transport systems of

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Hundreds of novel viruses discovered in insects

New viruses which cause diseases often come from animals. Well-known examples of this are the Zika virus transmitted by mosquitoes, bird flu viruses, as well as the MERS virus which is associated with camels. In order to identify new viral diseases quickly and prevent possible epidemics, DZIF scientists at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin are targeting their search at viruses in animals. In a

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Ethnic minority groups have higher risk of developing a physical disability

Men and women from a South Asian background are more likely to develop a physical disability and struggle with day-to-day physical activities throughout adulthood compared with their white British counterparts, new research published in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences reports.

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Physical activity and dietary behavior parallel each other from childhood to adulthood

Consumption of fruits and vegetables is higher and more frequent in individuals who are physically active when compared to their less-active peers. Persistent leisure-time physical activity from childhood to adulthood as well as increasing activity are associated with higher fruit and vegetable consumption.

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The start of biological spring in Africa is linked to the quantity of hours of sunshine

The start of the increase in the verdure of vegetation (equivalent to the start of spring) in Africa is directly connected to the amount of hours of sunshine a day, that is to say the it would be the 'photoperiod' which controls this process and not the arrival of the first rains, as was believed until now.

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Smartphone cameras can speed up urinary tract infection diagnosis

Biological Engineers at the University of Bath have developed a test that could help medics quickly diagnose urinary tract infections (UTIs), using a normal smartphone camera. Similar in principle to a pregnancy test, the process can identify the presence of harmful E. coli bacteria in a urine sample in just 25 minutes.

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Researchers discover a new auto-inflammatory disease called CRIA syndrome

Over the last 20 years, three families have been unsuspectingly linked by an unknown illness. Researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and other organizations have now identified the cause of the illness, a new disease called CRIA syndrome.

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Tool detects maize cooking in archaeological record

A new method can spot a specific way of cooking maize to boost its nutrition—nixtamalization—in the archaeological record. Two questions motivated the research: How did people interact with plants in the past? And how did they use food as an expression of their identities? "I am particularly interested in understanding the ways that this identity and the role of food production was negotiated as

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Does restorative justice help or harm victims?

Research from Royal Holloway has evaluated the effectiveness of restorative justice (RJ) in reducing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in victims and has concluded more evidence is needed to suggest RJ helps reduce PTSD in victims.

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The Top Biotech Trends We'll Be Watching in 2020

Last year left us with this piece of bombshell news: He Jiankui, the mastermind behind the CRISPR babies scandal, has been sentenced to three years in prison for violating Chinese laws on "scientific research and medical management." Two of his colleagues also face prison for genetically engineering human embryos that eventually became the world's first CRISPR' d babies . The story isn't over: at

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Ocean acidification is damaging shark scales

Sharks have unusual type of scales referred to as 'denticles.' A research group from South Africa and Germany that includes Jacqueline Dziergwa and Professor Dr. Christopher Bridges from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has examined the impact of climate change in the form of ocean acidification on these structures. The researchers uncovered damage to the denticles and have reported on t

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Fish species benefit from marine protection to varying extents

Marine protected areas reduce fish mortality by limiting harvesting and reducing habitat destruction. They are often designed and implemented to promote biodiversity conservation and sustainable fisheries. New research shows these conservation efforts lead not only to an increase in the total number of fishes (individuals) in general. Protected areas in the northern Mediterranean Sea also harbor a

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Researchers investigate ultrafast reaction of superfluid helium triggered by extreme ultraviolet laser pulses

A team headed by Professor Frank Stienkemeier at Freiburg's Institute of Physics and Dr. Marcel Mudrich, professor at the University of Aarhus in Denmark, has observed the ultrafast reaction of nanodroplets of helium after excitation with extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) using a free-electron laser in real time. The researchers have published their findings in the latest issue of Nature Communi

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Suffocating ozone—policies that stem emission of precursor chemicals save lives and crops

Nitrogen, volatile organic compounds and sunlight are the three ingredients that form the smog that regularly chokes people and plants, causing tens of thousands of respiratory-related deaths and nearly a billion dollars of crop loss each year. An international team of environment and atmospheric researchers led by Drexel University suggest that hundreds of lives and hundreds of millions of dollar

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Interview: En boreplatform i Congo hjalp Andreas Mogensen til at blive astronaut … men det anede han ikke dengang

PLUS. I valget af en gyngende olieboreplatform ud for Congo som sin første ingeniørarbejdsplads lod Andreas Mogensen sig styre af eventyrlyst. Husk, at der er mange veje til drømmejobbet, lyder hans råd.

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Labeling method tracks Salmonella bacteria in real time

A new chemical method called "host and pathogen temporal interaction profiling," or HAPTIP, can label and track a living Salmonella bacteria as it invades a host cell. When bacteria like Salmonella infect and sicken people, they hijack a person's cell proteins to develop a defense against an immune response. Understanding how that works and developing methods for defending against these bacteria

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The religious battle over birth control and the unpleasant motivation that fueled it

Concerns around sex and gender have divided American religious groups for more than a century, but sociologist Melissa Wilde wanted to understand which hot-button issue caused the first chasm.

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Researchers create 'artificial cartilage' that can repair itself

New hydrogel made from forestry and fishing waste could help replace petroleum-based products from contact lenses to pill capsules.

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Researcher helps fill in the family tree of the shy mountain beaver

The long-held notion that today's muskrat-sized mountain beavers are primitive and look like their ancestors is wrong, says the University of Oregon's Samantha Hopkins.

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Researcher helps fill in the family tree of the shy mountain beaver

The long-held notion that today's muskrat-sized mountain beavers are primitive and look like their ancestors is wrong, says the University of Oregon's Samantha Hopkins.

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A season in hell: Bushfires push at least 20 threatened species closer to extinction

Images of desperate, singed koalas in blackened landscapes have come to symbolize the damage to nature this bushfire season. Such imagery has catalyzed global concern, but the toll on biodiversity is much more pervasive.

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A season in hell: Bushfires push at least 20 threatened species closer to extinction

Images of desperate, singed koalas in blackened landscapes have come to symbolize the damage to nature this bushfire season. Such imagery has catalyzed global concern, but the toll on biodiversity is much more pervasive.

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Intrinsic quantized anomalous Hall effect in a moiré heterostructure

The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect can combine topology and magnetism to produce precisely quantized Hall resistance at zero magnetic field (an environment carefully screened from magnetic fields). In a recent report on Science, M. Serlin and an interdisciplinary research team in the Department of Physics, National Institute of Materials Science and the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics

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Big News in Cancer, Versus Big Talk About It

We have two very different stories about the progress of cancer therapy this morning. We'll start with the good part: the American Cancer Society says that death rates from the disease in the US dropped in the 2016-2017 period by their largest recorded percentage. This is unequivocally good news, and is attributed to advances in treatment – specifically, the advent of immunotherapies and of vario

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Human immune cells produced in a dish in world first

A Melbourne research team has reproduced and visualised the earliest developmental steps in human immune cell production in the laboratory and are now set to advance our understanding of childhood diseases like leukemia and autoimmune conditions.

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Developed a band-aid-like sensor to detect human body conditions in real-time

DGIST announced that Professor Hyuk-Jun Kwon in the Department of Information and Communication Engineering developed a 'patch-based health diagnosis sensor system' that is easily attached to skin with Professor Sunkook Kim's research team at Sungkyunkwan University. This sensor is attached to skin as if attaching band-aid and collects various health information in real-time by monitoring biosigna

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New clues to help explain how a 2,600-year-old brain survived to modern times

An international team of researchers has found a clue to explain how a 2,600-year-old brain could have survived until modern times in a mud pit. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes their study of the brain sample known as the Heslington brain and what they found.

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There's plenty we can do to make future fires less likely

One of the dominant ideas buzzing around the internet is that there's little we can do to escape the prospect of more frequent and worse bushfires—ever.

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The tricks animals use to survive Australia's bushfires

Have you ever wondered how our native wildlife manage to stay alive when an inferno is ripping through their homes, and afterwards when there is little to eat and nowhere to hide? The answer is adaptation and old-fashioned ingenuity.

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Newly Discovered Weed Compound Is 30 Times More Potent Than THC

As any weed connoisseur can tell you, all cannabis is not created equal. The plant contains chemical compounds called cannabinoids, and many believe that their differing levels in a particular cannabis strain or harvest can impact its effects on a user. Researchers have identified more than 60 cannabinoids, but only one of those — tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) — was believed to produce the "high" as

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The tricks animals use to survive Australia's bushfires

Have you ever wondered how our native wildlife manage to stay alive when an inferno is ripping through their homes, and afterwards when there is little to eat and nowhere to hide? The answer is adaptation and old-fashioned ingenuity.

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Unemployment pushes more men to take on female-dominated jobs

In the last few decades, many high-paying jobs that are mostly done by men—like manufacturing—have contracted or disappeared. At the same time, many jobs in fields dominated by women—like education and health care—have significantly increased.

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Chinese paddlefish declared extinct

A team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences in Wuhan, China has declared the Chinese paddlefish (Psephurus gladius) as extinct. In their paper published in the journal Science of The Total Environment, the group describes their study of the large fish and outline why they believe it has gone extinct.

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Chinese paddlefish declared extinct

A team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences in Wuhan, China has declared the Chinese paddlefish (Psephurus gladius) as extinct. In their paper published in the journal Science of The Total Environment, the group describes their study of the large fish and outline why they believe it has gone extinct.

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This $350 Breathing Mask Is Cashing in on Climate Change

Breathe In Startup Ao Air has announced a $350 air purification mask called the Atmos Faceware, an air-filtering gadget designed to protect its wearer against air pollution, including smoke from wildfires. In other words, The Verge argues , it's an attempt to cash in on climate change. While it makes sense to debut a gadget at the Consumer Electronics Show, Australia's unprecedented bushfires are

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Complete filling of batches of nanopipettes

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Analytical Chemistry an efficient method for filling a batch of nanopipettes with a pore opening below 10 nanometer. The method is based on the application of a temperature gradient to the nanopipette tips so that residual air bubbles are driven out.

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New metabolic pathway discovered in rumen microbiome

Cows can adapt themselves to a fluctuating sodium content in their feed. How they do that was so far a secret. Researchers from Goethe University have now discovered a bacterium in the microbiome of the rumen which has a new type of cell respiration.

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Just don't eat it: Play Doh, dry pasta show little gluten transfer when used for play

Parents who worry their child with celiac disease may be exposed to gluten at school might be able to strike two common school substances — Play Doh and dry, uncooked pasta — from the exposure risk list, as long as children don't consume them. A preliminary study from Children's National Hospital published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition found no significant gluten tra

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Children's Hospital Colorado uncovers largest US outbreak of neurologic disease to date

The Lancet Infectious Diseases recently published the results of an observational study conducted by researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado that led to a discovery of the largest outbreak of enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) in the United States.

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Nanoparticles deliver 'suicide gene' therapy to pediatric brain tumors growing in mice

Johns Hopkins researchers report that a type of biodegradable, lab-engineered nanoparticle they fashioned can successfully deliver a "suicide gene" to pediatric brain tumor cells implanted in the brains of mice. The poly(beta-amino ester) nanoparticles, known as PBAEs, were part of a treatment that also used a drug to kill the cells and prolong the test animals' survival.

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Pancreatic cancer cells secrete signal that sabotages immune attack on tumors

A key immune signal has a previously unknown role in turning off the immune system's attack on pancreatic cancer cells.

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Study shows protein inhibitor as potential treatment approach for common mutations found in non-Hodgkin lymphomas

. Findings may create immunotherapy options for lymphomas caused by CREBBP mutations.

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The use of fetal exome sequencing in prenatal diagnosis: A new ACMG Points to Consider

A new Points to Consider document from ACMG aims to assist referring physicians, laboratory geneticists, genetic counselors and other medical professionals in understanding the complexity and implications of exome sequencing in prenatal care. Published in ACMG's official journal Genetics in Medicine, the document, 'The Use of Fetal Exome Sequencing in Prenatal Diagnosis: A Points to Consider Docum

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Intervention for patients hospitalized with HIV improved reengagement and outcomes of care

Providing multidisciplinary team consults for HIV patients while they are hospitalized to help address social and medical barriers reduces future infection rates and boosts participation in follow-up care, results from a study on how to reengage patients show.

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Many in LA jails could be diverted into mental health treatment

The largest mental health facilities in the US are now county jails, with an estimated 15% of men and 31% of women who are incarcerated in jails nationally having a serious and persistent mental disorder. A new study finds that more than half of those in the mental health population of the Los Angeles County jails are candidates for diversion programs where they would receive treatment instead of

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Virtual reality, real injuries: OSU study shows how to reduce physical risk in VR

Carpal tunnel, stiff shoulders, eye-strain headaches — these are all well-known side effects of prolonged computer use. But what happens when you step away from the desktop and into virtual reality?A recent study assessed how some common virtual reality movements contribute to muscle strain and discomfort. It's an effort to ensure future user safety in this fast-growing technology that's used not

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Human body temperature has decreased in the United States, Stanford study finds

Since the early 19th century, the average human body temperature in the United States has dropped, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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If trees could talk: Using historic log structures to map migration of Europeans, Native Americans

Researchers at West Virginia University are using tree-ring dating to determine not only when trees were cut down to build historic log buildings in the region but also what the forests were like before European immigrants arrived. This could help researchers shed light on when Native Americans abandoned the area and how their absence altered the landscape.

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Indian authorities admit to flaws in tiger counts after criticism

The National Tiger Conservation of India (NTCA) has proposed a revamp of their tiger monitoring program, after strong criticism from both independent scientists and media.

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Black hole transient GRS 1716−249 investigated in hard and intermediate states

Astronomers have investigated a black hole transient known as GRS 1716−249 with NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The new study provides crucial insights into properties of the source in its hard and intermediate spectral states. Results of the research were published December 31 on arXiv.org.

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Here's a twist to an age-old classic: Lactose-free chocolate milk

A year ago, two Northeastern graduates set out to bring forth a revolution, specifically one flowing with chocolate.

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The Vikings erected a runestone out of fear of a climate catastrophe

Several passages on the Rök stone—the world's most famous Viking Age runic monument—suggest that the inscription is about battles and for over a hundred years, researchers have been trying to connect the inscription with heroic deeds in war. Now, thanks to an interdisciplinary research project, a new interpretation of the inscription is being presented. The study shows that the inscription deals w

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Indian authorities admit to flaws in tiger counts after criticism

The National Tiger Conservation of India (NTCA) has proposed a revamp of their tiger monitoring program, after strong criticism from both independent scientists and media.

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Focus on 'umbrella' species could save more Aussie animals

The Australian government could improve conservation of threatened species by a factor of seven if it prioritized more efficient "umbrella" species for protection, according to new research. Umbrella species are species those that, when preserved, indirectly protect many other plant and animal species. Michelle War, a PhD candidate at the University of Queensland, says different choices in Austra

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NASA's TESS Satellite Spots Its First Potentially Habitable Earth-Like Exoplanet

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has been scanning the sky for more than a year, and it's spotted numerous potential exoplanets. The latest discovery might be the most exciting yet, though. NASA reports that TESS has identified a planet about 100 light-years away that appears to be Earth-sized and in its star's habitable zone . The planet in question, TOI 700 d, is one of three

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Vikingar reste runsten av rädsla för klimatkatastrof

I över hundra år har forskare försökt koppla runorna på Rökstenen till krigiska bragder. När den i själva verket restes i oro för en ny "fimbulvinter" – en tre år lång vinter som förebådade världens undergång. Rökstenen, rest i Östergötland omkring år 800 efter vår tideräkning, är världens mest kända runsten från vikingatiden, men också en av de mest svårtolkade. Flera uttryck på Rökstenen antyde

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Mapping the body, speck by speck

PNNL chemists, biologists, and data analysts have teamed to create one of the most in-depth portraits ever taken of protein populations across tissue sections that are vanishingly small, each tinier than a speck of dust just visible on a computer screen.

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There Are Too Many Lidar Companies. They Can't All Survive

A few years ago, scores of startups promised to build the hardware that grants self-driving cars the gift of sight. Now comes the shakeout.

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CES 2020 WIRED Liveblog: Smart Vibrator, Robot Arms, and More from CES

The WIRED crew is roaming the CES 2020 show floor to find the coolest and strangest gadgets this year.

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'National pride is at stake.' Russia, China, United States race to build hypersonic weapons

Despite hype and technological hurdles, a hypersonic arms race is accelerating

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2019 second hottest year on record

The year 2019 was the second hottest ever recorded and a virtual tie with 2016, the warmest El Nino year, the European Union's climate monitor says in its round up of the hottest decade in history.

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Mapping the body, speck by speck

PNNL chemists, biologists, and data analysts have teamed to create one of the most in-depth portraits ever taken of protein populations across tissue sections that are vanishingly small, each tinier than a speck of dust just visible on a computer screen.

9h

Keeping adolescent girls safe from violence

Violence against women and children is a global epidemic that carries lifelong consequences for individuals, families, and communities. Adolescent girls are particularly at risk because they may not have access to supportive interventions, most of which are aimed at supporting either married adult females or younger children.

9h

New discovery will help fight lethal oilseed rape disease

Researchers at the University of Hertfordshire have found a way to improve the resilience of oilseed rape and reduce the estimated £100m annual loss to phoma stem canker, one of the most important winter diseases of oilseed rape in the UK.

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A neural network as an anchor point

Quantum mechanics is a well-established theory, but at a macroscopic level it leads to intractable contradictions. Now ETH physicists are proposing to resolve the problem with the aid of neural networks.

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Bright eyes makes better bactericide

An aqueous extract from the root of Catharanthus roseus, a plant commonly known as bright eyes, can be used as both a reducing agent as well as a capping agent for the synthesis of bactericidal silver nanoparticles, according to research published in the International Journal of Nanoparticles. Researchers from India and The Netherlands reveal details in the latest issue of the journal.

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Human immune cells produced in a dish in world first

One day the advance could lead to a patient's own skin cells being used to produce new cells for cancer immunotherapy or to test autoimmune disease interventions.

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Quantum Slits Open New Doors

An update to the classic "double-slit" experiment paves the way toward a novel strategy for quantum computing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New discovery will help fight lethal oilseed rape disease

Researchers at the University of Hertfordshire have found a way to improve the resilience of oilseed rape and reduce the estimated £100m annual loss to phoma stem canker, one of the most important winter diseases of oilseed rape in the UK.

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Human immune cells produced in a dish in world first

One day the advance could lead to a patient's own skin cells being used to produce new cells for cancer immunotherapy or to test autoimmune disease interventions.

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Four ways to reduce the carbon in your food basket

How does your food shop affect the planet? Well, think of it like this—consuming just one egg emits between 260 and 330g of CO₂ to the atmosphere. That's because before that egg can reach your plate, animal feed has to be produced and delivered to the hen that laid it. That hen then needs heating pumped into the shed it shares with the other hens on the farm, and their eggs have to be transported,

9h

Researchers create model of collaborative problem solving

If you want to get things done in the 21st century, collaboration is key.

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Connector fungi offer new clues to fate of nitrogen in warming tundra

Like a long-distance food delivery app with no apparent highway, fungi that associate with shallow-rooted shrubs in the tundra are accessing deep stores of nitrogen being released by thawing permafrost. The findings by Northern Arizona University researchers, announced this week in New Phytologist, could change scientists' understanding of who accesses nutrients from permafrost, and how.

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Chlorine could increase antimicrobial resistance

Conventional wastewater disinfection using chlorine could facilitate the spread of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria. Treating some types of wastewater with ultraviolet (UV) light instead could be part of the solution, according to a study at KAUST's Water Desalination and Reuse Center, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

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New study shows 'organic' wounds improve produce

Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists found benefits of insect leaf-wounding in fruit and vegetable production. Stress responses created in the fruits and vegetables initiated an increase in antioxidant compounds prior to harvest, making them healthier for human consumption.

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New study shows 'organic' wounds improve produce

Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists found benefits of insect leaf-wounding in fruit and vegetable production. Stress responses created in the fruits and vegetables initiated an increase in antioxidant compounds prior to harvest, making them healthier for human consumption.

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New version of fossil-recognition app now includes Cretaceous period

In 2015, when researchers at the University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute and Natural History Museum released the free Digital Atlas of Ancient Life app, they didn't know what kind of reception the smartphone-based field guide might receive.

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Planet WASP-12b is on a death spiral, say scientists

Earth is doomed—but not for 5 billion years. Our planet will be roasted as our sun expands and becomes a red giant, but the exoplanet WASP-12b, located 600 light-years away in the constellation Auriga, has less than a thousandth of that time left: a comparatively paltry 3 million years.

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Study finds salt nanoparticles are toxic to cancer cells

A new study at the University of Georgia has found a way to attack cancer cells that is potentially less harmful to the patient. Sodium chloride nanoparticles—more commonly known as salt—are toxic to cancer cells and offer the potential for therapies that have fewer negative side effects than current treatments.

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Scientists develop way to track salmonella infection in real time

When bacteria like salmonella infect and sicken people, they hijack a person's cell proteins to develop a defense against an immune response. Understanding how that works and developing methods for defending against these bacteria is difficult because scientists haven't been able to track the hundreds of proteins involved in real time.

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Phones are making people more, not less, social, researcher says

Smartphones are getting a bum rap. The common perception that as people become increasingly attached to their devices they are becoming less social is just wrong, according to Stanford communication scholar Gabriella Harari.

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Water drop antenna lens directs radio wave energy through its curved shape

This novel "water drop" antenna lens design for directing radio wave signals was developed by a pair of antenna engineers from ESA and Sweden's Royal Institute of Technology, KTH.

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Hver tredje dansker er villig til at dele sundhedsdata – men det er langtfra nok

Mange danskere er klar til at dele deres sundhedsoplysninger for at få bedre behandling, viser en undersøgelse fra Deloitte – men vi skal have endnu flere med, hvis transformationen af sundhedsvæsenet skal lykkes

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2019 was Australia's hottest and driest year on record

Amid Australia's devastating wildfires, the national Bureau of Meteorology has announced that 2019 was the country's hottest, driest year since records began

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Australian government report predicted severe wildfires 11 years ago

A 2008 report commissioned by the Australian government predicted that climate change would cause the fire season to start earlier and be more intense after about 2020

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Nursing home safety website under-reports falls

The data that the website Nursing Home Compare uses to report patient safety in relation to falls may be highly inaccurate, a new study shows. The website, which the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services sponsors, is a go-to resource for many families researching nursing home options for their loved ones. The number of falls that lead to injury is a critical category of concern for nursing hom

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Your phone isn't making you less social

The perception that as people become increasingly attached to their phones they become less social is just wrong, according to one expert. In fact, people turn to their smartphones and other electronic tools to be social, to get information, and to be entertained, says Gabriella Harari , an assistant professor of communication at Stanford University. "…people's phone use reflects who they are, th

10h

How many parasites can a bird carry?

A breakthrough by ecologists at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography has implications for multiple fields of biology.

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Researchers find that organisms grow more brain cells in predator-heavy environments

Research by Trinity College Professor of Biology Kent Dunlap and two of his former students was published last month in one of the world's oldest scientific journals, the London-based Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

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How many parasites can a bird carry?

A breakthrough by ecologists at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography has implications for multiple fields of biology.

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Researchers find that organisms grow more brain cells in predator-heavy environments

Research by Trinity College Professor of Biology Kent Dunlap and two of his former students was published last month in one of the world's oldest scientific journals, the London-based Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

10h

Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer

The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported.

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LED lighting in greenhouses helps but standards are needed

While LED lighting can enhance plant growth in greenhouses, standards are needed to determine the optimal intensity and colors of light, according to research that could help improve the energy efficiency of horticultural lighting products.

10h

Bacterial link in celiac disease

Researchers have discovered bacterial exposure is a potential environmental risk factor in developing celiac disease, a hereditary autoimmune-like condition that affects about one in 70 Australians.

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Drones effective tools for fruit farmers

Unmanned aerial vehicles provide reliable, accurate data to growers.

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First sighting of Larsonella pumilus fish in Japan

Researchers study Okinawan deep sea specimen's habitat and phylogenetic placement.

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Årets folkbildare och förvillare 2019

Föreningen Vetenskap och Folkbildning har för 33:a året i rad utsett Årets folkbildare och Årets förvillare. Christian Dahlström är Årets folkbildare 2019 Christian Dahlström, podcastare, frilansskribent och författare, tilldelas utmärkelsen för sin enträgna och utmärkta grävande journalistik. Framför allt premieras hans arbete i podcasten Sinnessjukt, där han med stort mod och grundligt journali

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Nano antennas for data transfer

For the first time, physicists have successfully converted electrical signals into photons and radiated them in specific directions using a low-footprint optical antenna that is only 800 nanometers in size.

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Mission til Jupiter-måne: Robot skal køre rundt på isens underside

I november kørte Nasa rundt med en robot på undersiden af isen ved Sydpolen. Testen skal bane vej for at undersøge liv på ismåner.

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A mathematical model to describe spaghetti noodle curling when cooked

Two mechanical engineers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a model to describe the curling action of a spaghetti noodle when it is boiled. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, Nathaniel Goldberg and Oliver O'Reilly describe their study of the popular pasta and what they learned about its behavior when it is cooked.

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Soft materials allow scientists to study earthquakes in the lab

Under constant stress, certain soft materials reorganize themselves in a manner very similar to how the Earth's crust is restructured during earthquakes, a new study by researchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Raman Research Institute (RRI) and ETH Zurich has found.

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Nano antennas for data transfer

Physicists from the University of Würzburg have converted electrical signals into photons and radiated them in specific directions using a low-footprint optical antenna that is only 800 nanometers in size.

10h

LED lighting in greenhouses helps but standards are needed

While LED lighting can enhance plant growth in greenhouses, standards are needed to determine the optimal intensity and colors of light, according to Rutgers research that could help improve the energy efficiency of horticultural lighting products.

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Exclusive: UN cybercrime chief warns against US and Iran cyberattacks

As US-Iran tensions rise following the assassination of an Iranian general and missile attacks on US troops, UN diplomat Neil Walsh warns cyberattacks can be just as impactful

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LED lighting in greenhouses helps but standards are needed

While LED lighting can enhance plant growth in greenhouses, standards are needed to determine the optimal intensity and colors of light, according to Rutgers research that could help improve the energy efficiency of horticultural lighting products.

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2019 Was Second Hottest Year on Record

2019 was a very hot year, with global average temperatures the second highest on record,by less than one-tenth of a degree Fahrenheit behind 2016.

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Cancer Death Rate in U.S. Sees Sharpest One-Year Drop

Breakthrough treatments for lung cancer and melanoma have driven down cancer mortality overall — and from 2016 to 2017 spurred the largest-ever decline.

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When Black Mirror's Arkangel technology becomes reality

submitted by /u/lonnib [link] [comments]

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Delta's Exoskeleton Crew Could Lift Your Luggage With Ease

submitted by /u/quantumcipher [link] [comments]

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This Implant Helps The Paralyzed Walk Again

submitted by /u/Danj_memes_ [link] [comments]

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The Harm of Antivaccine Misinformation

Anti-vaccine misinformation has a body count.

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Devastating fires, Iran nuclear tensions and pirate papers

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03954-x The latest science news, in brief.

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Ah-Nee-May-Tron-Ick

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03901-w The secrets of the past revealed.

10h

Alleged Spy App ToTok Puts Apple in a Bind

Apple and Google both banned ToTok after reports that it was a UAE government surveillance tool. After Google reinstated it, Apple has a hard choice to make.

10h

Such a Fun Age Satirizes the White Pursuit of Wokeness

"A comedy of good intentions" might seem an improbable description of a book that lays bare issues of race and class in contemporary America—but that's how Kiley Reid aptly sums up her debut novel , Such a Fun Age . As the book begins, there's certainly not much to laugh about: A young black woman in an upscale grocery store in Philadelphia is accused of kidnapping the white toddler she's babysit

10h

Image of the Day: Unusual ATP Synthase

A single-celled organism has an energy-producing enzyme with unique features.

10h

The Influence of Soil on Immune Health

Recent work in humans and mice highlights how exposure to environmental microbes helps protect against allergies and other inflammatory diseases.

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Infographic: How Does Nature Influence Human Health?

Time spent in natural environments is linked to improved physical and mental health, but researchers are only now beginning to dig into the mechanisms.

10h

Gravitational-Wave Discovery Hints at Another Spectacular Neutron-Star Crash

This new detection—the second of its kind—raises new questions about the nature of these mysterious objects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

The aviation industry has a plan to make planes green. It won't work

The aviation industry is finally waking up to the fact that it is painted as a major climate villain, but only slower growth can provide deep cuts in carbon emissions

11h

Virus Spread by Shrews Linked to Human Deaths from Mysterious Brain Infections

The pathogen has been newly identified in eight cases of encephalitis in Germany over the past 20 years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Virus Spread by Shrews Linked to Human Deaths from Mysterious Brain Infections

The pathogen has been newly identified in eight cases of encephalitis in Germany over the past 20 years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Stinky flower is more than a metre wide and the largest ever found

Indonesian officials may have found the world's largest flower – a member of the Rafflesia corpse flower genus – and it smells really, really bad

11h

Fishing Can Be Profitable for Emerging Economies, but …

People who live in developing nations don't just need income; they also need nourishment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer

The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported. The news comes from Cancer Statistics, 2020, the latest edition of the American Cancer Society's annual report on cancer rates and trends.

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Magnetic Storms Power Telephone Wires

Originally published in June 1869 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We're fighting fake news AI bots by using more AI. That's a mistake.

Facebook and others are battling complex disinformation with AI-driven defences. But this can only get us so far, argues an expert on high-tech propaganda.

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Iransk flystyrt stadig uden forklaring: Myndigheder peger på teknisk fejl

Ukraine International Airlines' Boeing 737-800 nåede kun at være i luften få minutter, inden det styrtede ned nær en forstad til Teheran. Flyselskabet melder endnu intet om årsagen til ulykken, der har kostet 176 menneskeliv. Myndighederne i Iran peger derimod på en teknisk fejl på motoren.

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8 More of the Smartest Things We've Seen This Week at CES 2020

Today we saw fitness wearables, a compact gaming PC, and an exo-suit that helps workers fight fatigue.

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The End of Brady

Decline comes for us all. Rome fell. The British empire receded. The Romanovs, the Hapsburgs—gone. And on a fog-enshrouded night last weekend in Foxborough, Massachusetts, the most impressive and enduring sports dynasty of the 21st century sputtered to its inevitable end, as the Patriots lost to the Tennessee Titans, 20–13 in a first-round playoff game. If this was Tom Brady's last game as a Patr

11h

The College Wealth Premium Has Collapsed

Is college worth it? As the cost of American higher education soars, inequality widens, and wages stagnate, millions of Millennials and Gen Zers have asked themselves that question. The answer, at least from economists, has remained a resounding yes . One study found that college graduates earn nearly twice as much as their peers without a college degree. But what if those earnings are no longer

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Fishing Can Be Profitable for Emerging Economies, but …

People who live in developing nations don't just need income; they also need nourishment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to age well, a culinary journey, and why you're not as gullible as you thought: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03958-7 Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week's best science picks.

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Something else is out of control in Australia: climate disaster denialism | Ketan Joshi

Myths about the bushfires grow online before finding their way into the rightwing press and the mouths of politicians The impacts of the climate crisis are now clearly manifesting in ways beyond rising temperatures. In Australia, the conditions for severe bushfires are occurring far more regularly (hot days, dry land and high winds). And the country is now suffering its most intense bushfire seaso

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Kommuner ønsker sig strammere miljøzoner i byerne

Kommunerne skal have mulighed for at indføre strammere krav til de mest forurenende og klimabelastende køretøjer – og gerne i flere byer end i dag, foreslår KL i nyt udspil. FDM forholder sig kritisk.

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Så vinner AI människors tillit

AI-forskningen går framåt med stormsteg, men ligger efter när det gäller hur väl systemen kan förklara det de gör. – Det är mycket mycket svårt att tolka det som händer inuti dagens deep learning-system, säger Mark Edmonds, forskare på institutionen för datavetenskap vid UCLA, Kalifornien.

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Russian journals retract more than 800 papers after 'bombshell' investigation

Academy commission's probe of domestic journals causes "conflict and tension"

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AI matches humans at diagnosing brain cancer from tumour biopsy images

Artificial intelligence can now diagnose some cancers from brain tumour biopsies with the same level of accuracy as humans

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Australia's Bushfires Have Likely Devastated Wildlife–and the Impact Will Only Get Worse

The large, intense fires have threatened more than 800 million animals in the state of New South Wales alone, according to one estimate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Australia's Bushfires Have Likely Devastated Wildlife–and the Impact Will Only Get Worse

The large, intense fires have threatened more than 800 million animals in the state of New South Wales alone, according to one estimate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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UR visar föreläsningarna från Hjärndagen 2019

"Fantastisk dag! Nästa år ska jag försöka få med min fru också. Väl värt pengarna och tågresan." Så sade en av de 550 åhörare som kom till Chinateatern i Stockholm den 15 november för Hjärndagen som Forskning & Framsteg arrangerade tillsammans med Moderns Psykologi.

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LED lighting in greenhouses helps but standards are needed

While LED lighting can enhance plant growth in greenhouses, standards are needed to determine the optimal intensity and colors of light, according to Rutgers research that could help improve the energy efficiency of horticultural lighting products.

12h

The Nationalism That Trump Can't See

Iran's missile attack last night on bases where American forces in Iraq are stationed offered the latest evidence that the Trump administration has done something extraordinary. By killing Qassem Soleimani, Iran's most powerful military leader, at a Baghdad airport, it has turned both Iranian and Iraqi nationalism against the United States. "Just a few weeks earlier," notes The New York Times , I

12h

How to criticize, from a critic

Criticism is about more than likes and dislikes. NY Times film critic A.O. Scott warns against the "emptiness" of certain adjectives when it comes to giving constructive and meaningful criticism. Pulling from nearly two decades of experience, Scott's book shows why criticism matters and how we are all critics. Better Living Through Criticism: How to Think About Art, Pleasure, Beauty, and Truth Be

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The quest to decipher how the body's cells sense touch

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03955-w From a painful pinch to a soft caress, scientists are zooming in on the pressure-sensitive proteins that allow cells to detect tension and pressure.

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The Gene Drive Dilemma: We Can Alter Entire Species, but Should We?

A new genetic engineering technology could help eliminate malaria and stave off extinctions — if humanity decides to unleash it.

12h

Rose McGowan's Hijacked Life

R ose McGowan's reputation precedes her, which is why escaping it, temporarily, was such a relief. For the past year she lived in London, until visa issues brought her back to New York, where we met in late December. "I'm perceived very differently here," the activist and former actor told me over tea in the bar of the Algonquin Hotel, while Christmas music played in the background. "Imagine, eve

13h

Sonos sagsøger Google for at bryde patent på trådløs teknologi

Google har brudt en række patenter i flere af it-gigantens produkter, hævder Sonos.

13h

Havglidere bruger bølger, vind eller opdrift til at komme frem i havet. Sådan virker de

PLUS. Forskere og militære enheder bruger autonome havglidere, der langsomt bevæger sig rundt i verdenshavene kun ved hjælp af havets energi. Teknisk Ukeblad har undersøgt teknologien nærmere.

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Forest management in southern China generates short term extensive carbon sequestration

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13798-8 Forest management may play an important role in climate change mitigation. Here, Tong et al. combine remote sensing and machine learning modelling to map forest cover dynamics in southern China during 2002–2017, showing effects on carbon sequestration that are extensive but of uncertain longevity and possible

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No-Go Decay mRNA cleavage in the ribosome exit tunnel produces 5′-OH ends phosphorylated by Trl1

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13991-9 In the No-Go decay mRNA surveillance pathway, mRNAs containing stalled ribosomes are cleaved by an endoribonuclease. Here the authors show the endonucleolytic cleavage on the artificial No-Go decay target mRNAs, revealing downstream decay process by Trl1 kinase and the 5′ to 3′ exonuclease Dxo1.

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Symbiont population control by host-symbiont metabolic interaction in Symbiodiniaceae-cnidarian associations

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13963-z The relationship between the coral animal and symbiotic algae is essential to coral health, and researchers are turning to Exaiptasia, a model cnidarian system, to study this relationship mechanistically. Here the authors find that endosymbiotic algae become limited by nitrogen at high population densities an

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Two dominant boreal conifers use contrasting mechanisms to reactivate photosynthesis in the spring

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13954-0 Boreal conifers regulate photosynthesis to maximize seasonal growth while limiting damage due to light and cold stress. Here Yang et al. show that two major conifer species achieve this via different means as Scots pine, but not Norway spruce, activates alternative electron sinks during spring.

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Neutrophil extracellular trap-associated RNA and LL37 enable self-amplifying inflammation in psoriasis

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13756-4 Antimicrobial peptide LL37 can bind nucleic acids and potentiate their sensing by endosomal TLRs. Here the authors show that LL37 binds to RNA from neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which amplifies inflammation and production of more LL37 and NETs via TLR8/13, suggesting that LL37 contribution to psorias

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Topological magneto-optical effects and their quantization in noncoplanar antiferromagnets

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13968-8 Magneto-optical effects in magnets are commonly attributed to the interplay between exchange splitting and spin-orbit coupling. Here, Feng et al. report a topological magneto-optical effect in non-coplanar antiferromagnets due to finite scalar spin chirality, without any reference to exchange splitting or spi

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Mechanistic insights into transcription factor cooperativity and its impact on protein-phenotype interactions

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13888-7 Although transcription factor (TF) cooperativity is widespread, a global mechanistic understanding of the role of TF cooperativity is still lacking. Here the authors introduce a statistical learning framework that provides structural insight into TF cooperativity and its functional consequences based on next

13h

What Do We Know About Iran's Missiles And Its Arsenal Of Weapons?

Iran attacked military bases used by U.S. and coalition forces in Iraq with ballistic missiles. Over the past 20 years, Iran has built up a powerful force that is difficult to defend against.

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Nano antennas for data transfer

For the first time, physicists from the University of Würzburg have successfully converted electrical signals into photons and radiated them in specific directions using a low-footprint optical antenna that is only 800 nanometers in size.

13h

Early humans revealed to have engineered optimized stone tools at Olduvai Gorge

Early Stone Age populations living between 1.8-1.2 million years ago engineered their stone tools in complex ways to make optimized cutting tools.

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Heart transplants from donors with hepatitis C may be safe and could help decrease organ shortage

One-year survival was 90% for adults with severe heart failure who received a heart transplant from a donor with hepatitis C, which was nearly identical to those who received a heart from donors who did not have hepatitis C (91%). Rates of organ rejection, stroke and kidney dialysis were similar between the two groups. More research is needed to assess longer-term results, however, increased use o

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BAT study examines how people use vapor and tobacco heating products

The way consumers use vapor and tobacco heating products (THPs) can affect the levels of harmful and potentially harmful constituents they are exposed to, and a new study has analysed how the use of these products compares with cigarette smoking.

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Vitamin D supplementation does not prevent the recurrence of Graves' disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55107-9

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Perceived stress and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in apparently healthy men and women

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57036-z

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The development of My Care Hub Mobile-Phone App to Support Self-Management in Australians with Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56411-0

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Architecture of The Human Ape1 Interactome Defines Novel Cancers Signatures

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56981-z

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Early humans revealed to have engineered optimized stone tools at Olduvai Gorge

Early Stone Age populations living between 1.8 – 1.2 million years ago engineered their stone tools in complex ways to make optimised cutting tools, according to a new study by University of Kent and UCL.

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TikTok Overhauls Community Guidelines to Ban 'Underage Delinquent Behavior'

The popular social video platform is explaining its content policies in much more detail.

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TikTok Bugs Could Have Allowed Account Takeovers

As the social media app continues to gain popularity, security researchers are taking a closer look under the hood.

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High time for hydrogen

submitted by /u/savuporo [link] [comments]

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The Race to Conserve America's Black-Footed Ferrets

Arizona's Aubrey Valley hosted some of the first ferrets reintroduced to the wild. But following what the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared a success, ferret numbers suddenly began to plummet. With more promising results seen of late, researchers are trying to understand how best they can help.

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In his element

Nature, Published online: 08 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03962-x Martyn Poliakoff's toys, puzzles and periodic-table-themed curios help him to lighten up and boost his creative thinking.

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Future patient care at risk unless health research protected and boosted

Health research faces a crisis that could impact on patient care, says a new report led by 10 prominent figures in the NHS and academia.

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Infektionssensorer i förband kan bli verklighet

Tråd- och batterilösa sensorer i sårförband som tidigt kan upptäckta sårinfektioner förväntas minska såväl mänskligt lidande som vårdkostnader. Forskare vid Malmö universitet ska i ett nytt projekt försöka förverkliga idén om en enkel metod att övervaka sår i hemmet.

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Newyddion gwych! Maths predicts that Welsh language is set to thrive

The Welsh language, spoken by around half a million people today, is expected to "thrive in the long term", based on a model looking at how proficiency in languages changes over time

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Neutrons 'break the ice' for exploring fundamental physics in frozen water

The ice we blend into our frozen drinks is a complicated compound, riddled with strange molecular inconsistencies scientists still struggle to understand. Exploring the physics behind the odd microstructure of water-ice may help us learn more about other seemingly unrelated advanced materials and their quantum states.

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Snipers to cull up to 10,000 camels in drought-stricken Australia

Snipers took to helicopters in Australia on Wednesday to begin a mass cull of up to 10,000 camels as drought drives big herds of the feral animals to search for water closer to remote towns, endangering indigenous communities.

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Aleutian volcano spews up ash cloud in two strong bursts

A volcano in Alaska's Aleutian Islands spewed ash into flight paths, prompting a warning to pilots by the National Weather Service.

15h

The Milky Way's impending galactic collision is already birthing new stars

The outskirts of the Milky Way are home to the galaxy's oldest stars. But astronomers have spotted something unexpected in this celestial retirement community: a flock of young stars.

15h

The effects of microplastics on organisms in coastal areas

Microplastics (plastic particles under 5 mm) are an abundant type of debris found in salt and freshwater environments. In a Limnology & Oceanography Letters study, researchers demonstrated the transfer of microplastics through the food chain between microscopic prey and larval fish that live in coastal ecosystems. They also found that microplastic ingestion interferes with normal growth in fish la

15h

Automobile law in Japan has improved air quality

A law passed in Japan in 1992 aimed to improve urban air quality by banning vehicles that violated certain emission standards from being registered in designated areas. A new study published in Contemporary Economic Policy provides evidence that the intervention reduced emissions, contributing to air quality improvements in metropolitan regions.

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Sjældent fund: mennesketænder blev brugt som smykker for 8.500 år siden

Arkæologer har under en udgravning i Tyrkiet fundet to 8.500 år gamle mennesketænder,…

15h

Astronomer: Nu ved vi, hvor mystiske radiosignaler fra rummet kommer fra

Signalerne stammer fra en galakse en halv milliard lysår fra Jorden. Hvad, der producerer dem, ved vi stadig ikke.

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Lab-grown food is about to destroy farming – and save the planet | George Monbiot

Scientists are replacing crops and livestock with food made from microbes and water. It may save humanity's bacon It sounds like a miracle, but no great technological leaps were required. In a commercial lab on the outskirts of Helsinki, I watched scientists turn water into food. Through a porthole in a metal tank, I could see a yellow froth churning. It's a primordial soup of bacteria, taken fro

17h

Boris Johnson's Impossible Choice

Before a single American or British soldier had officially crossed into Iraq in March 2003, U.S. President George W. Bush authorized an air strike that, if successful, would have killed Saddam Hussein. Two days earlier, Parliament had given its consent for Britain to join the American-led invasion. But the White House did not warn London that the president had ordered the attack. According to two

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Gigantic Wave of Star-Forming Gas Is Largest Known Structure of Its Kind in Milky Way

"It's been right in front of our eyes all the time, but we couldn't see it until now."

18h

A molecular switch for stomach disease

A research team from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has revealed a new mechanism which controls the causes of infection with H. pylori, triggering the development of stomach diseases. It is hoped that these findings will lead in time to new therapies.

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Bacterial link in celiac disease

Researchers have discovered bacterial exposure is a potential environmental risk factor in developing celiac disease, a hereditary autoimmune-like condition that affects about one in 70 Australians.

18h

Drones effective tools for fruit farmers

Unmanned aerial vehicles provide reliable, accurate data to growers.

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Automobile law in Japan has improved air quality

A law passed in Japan in 1992 aimed to improve urban air quality by banning vehicles that violated certain emission standards from being registered in designated areas. A new study published in Contemporary Economic Policy provides evidence that the intervention reduced emissions, contributing to air quality improvements in metropolitan regions.

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Antipsychotic medications linked to brain injuries in individuals with Alzheimer's disease

New findings published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society reveal that use of antipsychotic medications was associated with an increased risk of head injuries in a study of individuals with Alzheimer's disease.

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Overweight and obesity linked to higher cancer risks in large Danish study

Overweight and obesity were associated with higher risks of several common cancers in a 40-year, nationwide Danish study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Certain steps help lead to healthy pregnancies in women with rheumatoid arthritis

For women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), taking certain steps to ensure that they have a healthy pregnancy leads to a reduced risk of complicated birth or miscarriage, according to a study in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Study reveals long-term benefits of weight loss surgery in adults with obesity and diabetes

Researchers recently conducted the largest study to date, which is published in Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, to evaluate the effectiveness of weight loss surgery in a Chinese population of individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes.

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The effects of microplastics on organisms in coastal areas

Microplastics (plastic particles under 5 mm) are an abundant type of debris found in salt and freshwater environments. In a Limnology & Oceanography Letters study, researchers demonstrated the transfer of microplastics through the food chain between microscopic prey and larval fish that live in coastal ecosystems.

18h

Study examines the benefits of childbirth education classes during pregnancy

Participating in childbirth classes may help women have normal vaginal deliveries, according to a study published in the International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics.

18h

Study examines childhood weight and obesity in adolescence

A new Pediatric Obesity study reveals how excess weight at age 3 years was associated with a higher risk of being overweight or obese at age 15 years in a study of adolescents in Japan.

18h

Does inflammatory bowel disease carry certain risks during pregnancy?

Pregnant women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are more likely to undergo delivery by Caesarean section and face certain risks during pregnancy, according to an analysis published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics.

18h

Study reveals sex differences in the global burden of glaucoma

Worldwide, the burden of glaucoma — quantified as health loss — is higher in men than in women, according to a recent analysis published in Acta Ophthalmologica.

18h

Study examines opioid involvement in US drug overdoses

A recent analysis published in Addiction reveals how fatal overdoses involving stimulants (cocaine and other psychostimulants, primarily methamphetamine) have been increasing over the past few years.

18h

Alcohol-related deaths have increased in the United States

An analysis of death certificates published in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research suggests that the number of alcohol-related deaths doubled in the United States between 1999-2017.

18h

Lifestyle choices could slow familial frontotemporal dementia

A physically and mentally active lifestyle confers resilience to frontotemporal dementia (FTD), even in people whose genetic profile makes the eventual development of the disease virtually inevitable, according to new research by scientists at the UC San Francisco Memory and Aging Center.

18h

Danmark sakker bagud: Vi ignorerer nybyggeriets største klimabelastning

PLUS. Størstedelen af en ny bygnings klimapåvirkning stammer fra byggematerialerne, opførelsen og nedrivningen. Holland, Sverige og Finland stiller krav – danske politikere har overvejet sagen i fire år.

19h

Atlantic Puffins Spotted Using Tools

Scientists observed two Atlantic puffins using sticks to scratch themselves—the first known instance of seabirds using tools. Christopher Intagliata reports.

19h

Atlantic Puffins Spotted Using Tools

Scientists observed two Atlantic puffins using sticks to scratch themselves—the first known instance of seabirds using tools. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Atlantic Puffins Spotted Using Tools

Scientists observed two Atlantic puffins using sticks to scratch themselves—the first known instance of seabirds using tools. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Atlantic Puffins Spotted Using Tools

Scientists observed two Atlantic puffins using sticks to scratch themselves—the first known instance of seabirds using tools. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

20h

Facebook's Deepfake Ban Is a Solution to a Distant Problem

The platform has a plan to deal with tomorrow's disinformation. But what about today's?

22h