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nyheder2020januar09

Biological scientists identify pathways that extend lifespan by 500%

Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, Calif., and Nanjing University in China, have identified synergistic cellular pathways for longevity that amplify lifespan fivefold in C. elegans, a nematode worm used as a model in aging research.

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IoT gør dit eget Wifi usikkert: »Opfør dig, som om du altid er på et offentligt hotspot«

De mange IoT-enheder, der i stigende grad tages i brug både privat og af virksomheder, gør lokal infrastruktur – og især wifi – til en risikabel internetkilde.

11h

Baby and adult brains 'sync up' during play, finds Princeton Baby Lab

A team of Princeton researchers has conducted the first study of how baby and adult brains interact during natural play, and they found measurable connections in their neural activity. In other words, baby and adult brain activity rose and fell together as they shared toys and eye contact. The research was conducted at the Princeton Baby Lab, where University researchers study how babies learn to

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Large 'herbivores of the sea' help keep coral reefs healthy

Selective fishing can disrupt the delicate balance maintained between corals and algae in embattled Caribbean coral reefs. Removing large parrotfish, which graze on algae like large land mammals graze on grasses, can allow the algae to overtake the corals, with potentially dire consequences for reef health. New experimental research suggests that maintaining a healthy size distribution of parrotfi

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Fossil fuel political giving outdistances renewables 13 to one

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Karin Kirk Corporations, special interest groups, and individuals inject billions of dollars into the American political system every year. Much of the financial support in politics is concealed from public view, as some rules – and loopholes – allow "dark money" and undisclosed donors to remain behind a wall. But some of those contributions can

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Volcanoes on Venus Might Still be Smoking

Planetary science experiments on Earth suggest that the sun's second planet might have ongoing volcanic activity.

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Spacewatch: SpaceX launches 60 more satellites into Starlink constellation

Launch by Elon Musk's company brings number of deployed Starlink satellites to 180 Elon Musk's SpaceX began the year with the launch of 60 more satellites in its Starlink constellation . Designed to supply internet access across the entire world , the company plans on launching nearly 12,000 satellites by the mid 2020s. Monday's launch, which took place at 21.19 EST (0219 GMT on 7 January) was th

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CES 2020: Nissan Ariya EV Runs 300 Miles, Arrives End of 2020

CES 2020 Las Vegas LAS VEGAS – Nissan at CES 2020 took the wraps off a successor, or more likely big brother, to the best-selling, now recently slow-selling Nissan Leaf EV. It's called the Nissan Ariya Concept. It gets up to 300 miles of range and is a crossover/hatchback where the Leaf is a sedan. Think of the Ariya (pronounced like the musical term) as being a more sculpted, more current Nissan

10min

Standards would boost efficiency of LED lighting in greenhouses

LED lighting can enhance plant growth in greenhouses, but standards are necessary to determine the optimal intensity and colors of light, according to a new study. The findings could improve the energy efficiency of horticultural lighting products. Many lighting companies market their LED (light-emitting diode) products with claims of delivering an optimal "light recipe" that often consists of a

18min

Wave of "Stellar Nurseries" May Be Our Galaxy's Biggest Structure

Ride the Wave Astronomers have discovered that the Milky Way is home to an unbroken stream of gas, dust, and young stars 9,000 light-years long — and not only is it the largest gaseous structure in our galaxy, but it's also essentially right next door to our own solar system. "The [S]un lies only 500 light-years from the [Radcliffe] Wave at its closest point," researcher João Alves said in a pres

21min

Machine learning shapes microwaves for a computer's eyes

To improve object identification and speed in fields where both are critical — such as autonomous vehicles, security screening and motion sensing — engineers have developed a method to identify objects using microwaves that improves accuracy while reducing the associated computing time and power requirements. This machine-learning approach cuts out the middleman, skipping the step of creating an

24min

Plants' 'organic' wounds improve produce

Scientists found benefits of insect leaf-wounding in fruit and vegetable production. Stress responses created in the fruits and vegetables initiated an increase in antioxidant compounds prior to harvest, making them healthier for human consumption.

28min

Bug attacks make organic fruits and veg healthier

Stress responses due to insect leaf-wounding in organic produce initiates an increase in antioxidant compounds prior to harvest, making fruits and vegetables healthier for human consumption, researchers report. "Many studies in the past supported this idea, but many others showed no differences," says principal investigator Luis Cisneros-Zevallos, a horticulture and food scientist at Texas A&M Un

33min

Increasing Minimum Wage by $1 Linked to Drop in Suicide Rates

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania found that increasing the minimum wage by a single dollar is linked to a drop in suicide rates of between 3.4 and 5.9 percent in the United States, Inverse reports . Their goal was to prove that social welfare policies such as raising the minimum wage could have a positive effect on the health of a nation's population. The effect was most pronounced d

36min

Florida joins U.S. government in probing foreign ties of researchers

Firings at Moffitt Cancer Center trigger investigation by state legislators

39min

Explaining link between emotion and addictive substance use

What drives a person to smoke cigarettes? What role do emotions play in this addictive behavior? Why do some smokers puff more often and more deeply or relapse many years after they've quit? If policy makers had those answers, how could they strengthen the fight against the global smoking epidemic? A new report by researchers offers a key insight: sadness plays an especially strong role in trigger

43min

New closed-loop system offers promise as novel treatment for post-bariatric hypoglycemia

Post-bariatric hypoglycemia is a profoundly life-altering condition for patients. Having unpredictable hypoglycemia that people can't detect is really an unsafe situation. Researchers have developed a closed-loop system that automatically provides patients with an appropriate, as-needed dose of liquid glucagon to treat this condition.

43min

Large 'herbivores of the sea' help keep coral reefs healthy

Selective fishing can disrupt the delicate balance maintained between corals and algae in embattled Caribbean coral reefs.

45min

Fastest chemical reaction in ionized water observed

An international team of researchers have, for the first time, glimpsed the ultrafast process of proton transfer following ionization of liquid water, shedding light on how radical cations separate from their electron partners, neutralize and subsequently drift about creating damage.

45min

Cancer: Giving entire course of radiation treatment in less than a second is feasible

Cancer patients may one day be able to get their entire course of radiation therapy in less than a second rather than coming in for treatment over the course of several weeks, and researchers have taken the first steps toward making it a reality.

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If you were writing a science fiction piece now in 2020, how far in the future is something like a Blade Runner, Dredd or Star Trek? (Expanded below)

20th century science fiction (and the Simpsons) often used our time as a date to set their world in but realistically not that much has changed if you were to compare pictures between then and now. People still go to work 9-5, people still drive cars, people still wear suits. Blade runner predicting November 2019 would have flying cars and giant pyramids obviously hasn't come true yet, but if you

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China has developed the world's first mobile quantum satellite station

China has connected the world's first portable ground station for quantum communication to the Mozi satellite, and has plans to launch more quantum satellites soon

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Teapots to boost your brewing and soothe your soul

It's tea time. (Jorge Garcia via Unsplash/) There's little more comforting than steeping a your tea the old-fashioned way: in a teapot large enough to allow leaves to expand and develop their full taste. A good vessel will also let you pour into dainty, delicate cups and enjoy a proper afternoon tea session with meditative attention and old-fashioned charm. Get your own, and make tea time a littl

56min

How do fruit flies see in color? Study uncovers human-like brain circuit at work

Scientists have identified a brain circuit that drives fruit flies' ability to see in color — and found that it bears a striking resemblance to the circuitry behind our own capacity for color vision. This research will not only fuel new investigations into how color vision works in flies and humans, but could also spur efforts to develop algorithms that help computers see in color.

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In fighting gut infections, nervous system is key, Yale-Harvard team finds

The peaceful and delicate co-existence of friendly gut bacteria and the immune system relies on highly coordinated information exchange between immune system cells and certain cells lining the intestine. Scientists have discovered that, in response to bacterial invaders, nerve cells within the intestine — and not immune cells or cells lining the intestinal wall — release infection-fighting cytok

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Cancer: Giving entire course of radiation treatment in less than a second is feasible

Cancer patients may one day be able to get their entire course of radiation therapy in less than a second rather than coming in for treatment over the course of several weeks, and researchers have taken the first steps toward making it a reality.

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Harvard researchers help explain link between emotion and addictive substance use

What drives a person to smoke cigarettes? What role do emotions play in this addictive behavior? Why do some smokers puff more often and more deeply or relapse many years after they've quit? If policy makers had those answers, how could they strengthen the fight against the global smoking epidemic?A new report by researchers based at Harvard University offers a key insight: sadness plays an especi

1h

Overdose rates higher & opioid addiction care scarcer, in Medicaid work requirement states

Low-income people with addiction, especially those with addiction to opioids, may find it hard to access the kind of care they need to recover no matter where they live, a new study suggests. But treatment for opioid problems is especially scarce in states that may drop people from Medicaid health insurance rolls — unless they can show that they're working, in school, have a disability or are med

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Humans have been recording sound since before they could play it back

The phonautograph and the wax cylinder were both invented in the 1800s, an era of great audio achievement. (James Gilleard/) Making noise is easy, but saving it is hard. Humanity's first big innovation in file sharing came along around 3,400 years ago, when ancient Mesopotamians ­experimented with a written notation for melodies they'd previously only shared out loud. It wasn't until the mid-19th

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High Tech Real Estate Platforms Let Average Investors Cash In Like Never Before

Every year around this time, millions of people resolve to finally take concrete steps to improve their finances and plan for their financial future. And actually following through on these resolutions used to be a painstaking process. It meant contacting a financial adviser, going in for meetings, and doing hours and hours of research. But luckily that's not the case any more. These days, innova

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A healthy sex life can help minimize depression and anxiety symptoms

The physiological responses our bodies have to sex can minimize the symptoms of anxiety and depression. Deficiencies in nitric oxide are associated with irritability, depression, anxiety, insomnia, and less energy. Having sex increases your body's nitric oxide levels. Sex also increases epinephrine, oxytocin, dopamine and serotonin, all of which are linked to mood, behavior, and well-being. None

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Canadian universities mourn researchers who died in Iran plane crash

Nature, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00048-x Victims include 10 people linked to the University of Alberta and five at the University of Windsor.

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Toward a smarter way of recharging the aquifer

Researchers have solved a mystery: how did arsenic show up in aquifer water that had been triple purified? Dissolved organic compounds.

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Land-use 'mosaic' is best for productivity and stability

A mix of different land-covers including grassland, forest, urban areas, and water bodies improves the function and stability of a landscape, irrespective of the plant species diversity, region, and climate, researchers report. It is well-established that biodiverse ecosystems generally function better than monocultures, but, to date, biodiversity research has primarily focused on the number of p

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Scientists urge China to quickly share data on virus linked to pneumonia outbreak

Chinese researchers say a novel coronavirus likely sickened 59 people in Wuhan

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The best label makers for getting organized

Label your life. (Amazon/) There's something gratifying about looking at a cabinet full of neatly labeled spice jars. Or folders neatly marked up with printed labels. Or perfume samples with the right names taped on. For the ultimate in organization, professionalism, and craftiness, get your own label maker. Your life could become so much more satisfying. A desktop label maker with lots of custom

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New study suggests 21-gene recurrence score may help in radiation decision-making

A new study shows that a test physicians commonly used to guide chemotherapy treatment for post-breast cancer surgery patients may also help them decide whether radiation therapy may be of benefit.

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Experts: No, porn isn't a public health crisis

While 17 US states have introduced nonbinding resolutions declaring pornography a public health crisis, researchers say it doesn't meet the definition. Existing evidence suggests pornography may negatively affect some individuals, but it does not qualify as a public health crisis, and calling it one could cause harm, they write in an editorial in the American Journal of Public Health . "The movem

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Fastest chemical reaction in ionized water observed

An international team of researchers have, for the first time, glimpsed the ultrafast process of proton transfer following ionization of liquid water, shedding light on how radical cations separate from their electron partners, neutralize and subsequently drift about creating damage.

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New way that immune cells detect infections and cancers

Researchers have determined the molecular basis for how an important component of the immune system, called gamma-delta T cells, detects infections and cancers.

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Mathematicians put famous Battle of Britain 'what if' scenarios to the test

Mathematicians have developed a new model to explore what the impact of changes to Luftwaffe tactics would actually have been. Their approach uses statistical modelling to calculate how the Battle might have played out if history had followed one of several alternative courses.

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Toward a smarter way of recharging the aquifer

Researchers have solved a mystery: how did arsenic show up in aquifer water that had been triple purified? Dissolved organic compounds.

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African grey parrots spontaneously 'lend a wing'

People and other great apes are known for their willingness to help others in need, even strangers. Now, researchers have shown for the first time that some birds — and specifically African grey parrots — are similarly helpful.

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Kangaroo mother care reduces infant mortality

When newborn babies with low birth weight are held close to their mother's bodies throughout the day, their chance of survival increases substantially.

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Food textures affect perceptions of healthiness

New research has demonstrated how food producers could change the surface texture of products to change people's perceptions and promote healthy eating.

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Team's fabricated corneal tissue allows closer look at how eyes heal

Researchers have demonstrated a technique in the lab for fabricating tiny strands of collagen called fibrils to facilitate further research on the eye's repair process.

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Feds Are Content to Let Cars Drive, and Regulate, Themselves

A new Transportation Department policy on self-driving cars is long on boosting the industry and short on ensuring its safety.

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Fish Steals Bioluminescence from Prey

Rather than making its own light, a shallow-water marine fish gets all the tools that it needs for bioluminescence production from eating tiny, glowing crustaceans.

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NASA May Allow Crewed Boeing Starliner Flight After Failed Test

Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft made its maiden voyage late last year, but the Orbital Flight Test (OFT) didn't go as planned. The spacecraft was unable to reach the correct orbit and came back to Earth early. It looked like a major setback for Boeing at the time, but there's still hope it will be able to proceed with the planned launch schedule. NASA and Boeing are evaluating the data from

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Amazon Takes a Swipe at PayPal's $4 Billion Acquisition

The retail giant warned holiday shoppers that Honey, a popular browser extension, was a "security risk." Honey denies the claim.

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Thinking about past generations could help us tackle climate change

Rhetoric around climate change often calls on us to think of future generations: if we don't suffer the effects, then our children and our children's children will. For some, this sense of obligation could be motivating. But for others, the distant time frame may be a barrier to truly grappling with the issue. Now, a new study in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin suggests one method to g

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An out-of-the-box attack on diabetes

A protein newly identified as important in type 1 diabetes can delay onset of the disease in diabetic mice, providing a new target for prevention and treatment in people.

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Researchers discover new building blocks of catalyst zeolite nanopores

Zeolites crystals, used among other things for refining petroleum to gasoline and biomass into biofuels, are the most-used catalysts by weight on the planet, and discovering mechanisms of how they form has been of intense interest to the chemical industry and related researchers, say chemists. They hope their advance on a new way to understand zeolite structure and vibrations leads to new, tailor-

1h

Growing strained crystals could improve performance of perovskite electronics

A new method could enable researchers to build more efficient, longer lasting perovskite solar cells and LEDs. By growing thin perovskite films on different substrates, engineers invented a way of fabricating perovskite single crystals with precisely deformed, or strained, structures.

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SpaceX Launches More Starlink Satellites as Astronomers Continue to Voice Concerns

The third and most recent launch includes one experimentally darkened satellite. Astronomers have yet to see whether it's an effective solution.

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Moths' flight data helps drones navigate complex environments

The flight navigation strategy of moths can be used to develop programs that help drones to navigate unfamiliar environments, report researchers.

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Heated pet beds that bring extra comfort to furry friends

Safe and snuggly. ( Chris Leipelt via Unsplash/) To make sure your short-hair cat Fred and small dog Potato stay warm and toasty as they dream, consider a heated pet bed. Bring reassuring warmth and familiarity to elderly and sick pets, or lure your pet off of your too-small bed into a new sleeping spot. Just be sure to keep electrical cords away from sharp teeth, and check with a vet about wheth

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Scientists Extend Lifespan of Worms by 500 Percent

With a typical lifespan of just three to four weeks, there's a chance you have milk in your fridge older than the average C. elegans worm. But now, in a study published in the journal Cell Reports in July, an international team of researchers has found a way to make the worms live a full five times longer . That would be equivalent to a human reaching their 400th birthday — and the scientists thi

1h

Animals Rescued From Australia's Bushfires

The horrific wildfires that have been burning across Australia for months now have taken a severe toll on the animals that called the scorched lands home. Estimates of the number of animals killed by the fires range from hundreds of millions to more than 1 billion . Volunteers and crews from Australia's National Parks and Wildlife Service have been doing what they can to help some of the kangaroo

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We're Just Discovering the Price of Killing Soleimani

No American paid a price for President Donald Trump's decision to kill Iran's Qassem Soleimani. But it looks like 176 other people did, including 63 Canadian citizens and many more Iranian nationals en route to Canada. As of mid-day today, a horrible new chapter of the story has been posted for all to see. Iran retaliated for the killing by firing a barrage of weapons at bases inside Iraq. That b

1h

How Negativity Can Kill a Relationship

There's an elegant symmetry to traditional wedding vows: for better or for worse. But love is not symmetrical, and most of us don't realize how lopsided it can be. The worse matters far more than the better in marriage or any other relationship. That's how the brain works. Our thoughts and feelings are skewed by what researchers call the negativity effect, which is our tendency to respond more st

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Acidic environment could boost power of harmful pathogens

New findings suggest lower pH in the digestive tract may make some bacterial pathogens even more dangerous.

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Moths' flight data helps drones navigate complex environments

The flight navigation strategy of moths can be used to develop programs that help drones to navigate unfamiliar environments, report researchers.

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'Flash and freeze' reveals dynamics of nerve connections

How do the physical parts of a neuron enable it to process and communicate information? Relating structure to function is a long-standing goal in neuroscience.

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Common chemical disrupts reproductive biology

Experiments in worms reveal the molecular damage caused by DEHP, a chemical commonly used to make plastics flexible. DEHP interferes with proper cell division during egg formation, leads to excessive DNA breakage, alters chromosome appearance. Abnormalities help explain known link between DEHP and human birth defects, male infertility. If replicated in further research, the insights can help infor

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Combining Multiple Antibiotics May Make Bacteria More Likely to Develop Resistance

Once pathogens become tolerant of one drug, they are more likely to become resilient against others, a clinical study finds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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25% of kids with autism haven't received a diagnosis

One-fourth of children younger than age 8 with autism spectrum disorder—most of them black or Hispanic—have not received a diagnosis, which is critical for improving their quality of life, researchers report. The findings show that despite growing awareness about autism, it remains under-diagnosed, particularly in black and Hispanic children, says coauthor Walter Zahorodny, an associate professor

2h

Do LEDs Cause Orange Presidents?

It's true that different light sources can alter colors. But Trump's science is off on this one.

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DDR DIY: How to build your own dance game with a Raspberry Pi

With a Raspberry Pi and some basic sewing skills, you can build your own dance game. (Andy Clark/) Those who lived through the 1990s may remember the craze of dance games in the amusement arcades. People would throw themselves around a miniature stage trying to time the movement of their feet to the arrows scrolling up the screen. From a distance, it might even look like they were dancing. To rel

2h

Body Temperatures Today are Lower Than They Were Two Centuries Ago

A new study argues that our bodies have cooled off appreciably since the 1800s.

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Combining Multiple Antibiotics May Make Bacteria More Likely to Develop Resistance

Once pathogens become tolerant of one drug, they are more likely to become resilient against others, a clinical study finds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Combining Multiple Antibiotics May Make Bacteria More Likely to Develop Resistance

Once pathogens become tolerant of one drug, they are more likely to become resilient against others, a clinical study finds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists have discovered five new species of songbird in Indonesia

Five species of songbird and five subspecies have been discovered by scientists for the first time in mountainous areas of Indonesia

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Ancient humans were weirdly slow to cross from mainland Asia to Java

Homo erectus probably only arrived on Indonesia about 1.3 million years ago, even though they were widespread in Asia hundreds of thousands of years earlier

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An Influential Female Astronomer Is Getting Her Due

In too many early accounts of women working in fields dominated by men, the story includes a bathroom. Specifically, that there wasn't one for them to use. For Vera Rubin, this particular predicament came in the mid-1960s, when she was invited to the Palomar Observatory, a telescope facility in California. The mountaintop observatory, as well as its living quarters, were not open to women; if you

2h

New Coronavirus Identified in Central China Pneumonia Outbreak

The virus, which has sickened at least 59 people, does not appear to transmit easily between humans.

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China's Sars-like illness worries health experts

China's viral pneumonia outbreak may have jumped species barrier, raising fears of pandemic The finding that the outbreak of viral pneumonia in China that has struck 59 people may be caused by a coronavirus , the family of viruses behind Sars, which spread to 37 countries in 2003, causing global panic and killing more than 750 people, means that health authorities will be watching closely. China

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Scientists observe ultrafast chemistry in water caused by ionizing radiation

An international research team jointly led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Germany's Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) has for the first time observed the ultrafast formation and then breakdown of the water ion that is created when water is exposed to ionizing radiation.

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Researchers decipher a new way that immune cells detect infections and cancers

Melbourne researchers have determined the molecular basis for how an important component of the immune system, called gamma-delta T cells, detects infections and cancers.

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Preparing for the hydrogen economy

In a world first, University of Sydney researchers have found evidence of how hydrogen causes embrittlement of steels.

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Scientists observe ultrafast birth of radicals

An international team of researchers have, for the first time, glimpsed the ultrafast process of proton transfer following ionization of liquid water, shedding light on how radical cations separate from their electron partners, neutralize and subsequently drift about creating damage.

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Break point

Experiments in worms reveal the molecular damage caused by DEHP, a chemical commonly used to make plastics flexible. DEHP interferes with proper cell division during egg formation, leads to excessive DNA breakage, alters chromosome appearance. Abnormalities help explain known link between DEHP and human birth defects, male infertility. If replicated in further research, the insights can help infor

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Mars: Water could disappear faster than expected

The small red planet is losing water more quickly than what theory as well as past observations would suggest. An international research team has just revealed that water vapor is accumulating in large quantities and unexpected proportions at an altitude of over 80 km in the Martian atmosphere. The capacity of water to escape would greatly increase during certain seasons.

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Moths' flight data helps drones navigate complex environments

The flight navigation strategy of moths can be used to develop programs that help drones to navigate unfamiliar environments, report Ioannis Paschalidis at Boston University, Thomas Daniel at University of Washington, and colleagues, in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology.

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Scientists transform a BBQ lighter into a high-tech lab device

Researchers have devised a straightforward technique for building a laboratory device known as an electroporator — which applies a jolt of electricity to temporarily open cell walls — from inexpensive components, including a piezoelectric crystal taken from a butane lighter.

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Early humans arrived in Southeast Asia later than previously believed

New dates from the World Heritage archeological site at Sangiran on the island of Java suggest that that the first appearance of Homo erectus occurred more recently than previously thought, researchers report.

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Martian water vapor varies with the seasons

The potential for Mars' water to be lost into space is greater during the planet's warm and stormy seasons, according to a new study.

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Collection of new bird species discovered on small Wallacean islands

Hidden away on a trio of tiny and under-explored Wallacean islands off the eastern Indonesian coast, researchers discovered 10 new species and subspecies of songbirds, according to a new study, bringing a long-overlooked pocket of local biodiversity to light.

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Antibiotic tolerance reduces the ability to prevent resistance under drug combination therapies

Antimicrobial tolerance can promote the evolution of antimicrobial resistance even under combination drug treatments widely used and expected to prevent it from occurring, a new study finds.

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Acidic environment could boost power of harmful pathogens

New findings published in PLOS Pathogens suggest lower pH in the digestive tract may make some bacterial pathogens even more dangerous.

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Common plasticizer disrupts C. elegans egg production

A new study published Jan. 9 in PLOS Genetics by Mónica Colaiácovo of Harvard Medical School and colleagues reports that the most commonly used plasticizer, diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), leads to fertility problems by causing an excess number of breaks in the DNA during egg production, and then interfering with the repair systems that fixes the breaks.

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Finding new species

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Stick to science

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News at a glance

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Need for speed

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Retraction

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Dermal sheath contraction powers stem cell niche relocation during hair cycle regression

Tissue homeostasis requires the balance of growth by cell production and regression through cell loss. In the hair cycle, during follicle regression, the niche traverses the skin through an unknown mechanism to reach the stem cell reservoir and trigger new growth. Here, we identify the dermal sheath that lines the follicle as the key driver of tissue regression and niche relocation through the sm

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A lost world in Wallacea: Description of a montane archipelagic avifauna

Birds are the best-known animal class, with only about five or six new species descriptions per year since 1999. Integrating genomic and phenotypic research with arduous fieldwork in remote regions, we describe five new songbird species and five new subspecies from a small area near Sulawesi, Indonesia, all collected in a single 6-week expedition. Two factors contributed to the description of thi

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Observation of hydrogen trapping at dislocations, grain boundaries, and precipitates

Hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength steel is an obstacle for using these steels in sustainable energy production. Hydrogen embrittlement involves hydrogen-defect interactions at multiple-length scales. However, the challenge of measuring the precise location of hydrogen atoms limits our understanding. Thermal desorption spectroscopy can identify hydrogen retention or trapping, but data cannot

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Observation of an isomerizing double-well quantum system in the condensed phase

Molecular isomerization fundamentally involves quantum states bound within a potential energy function with multiple minima. For isolated gas-phase molecules, eigenstates well above the isomerization saddle points have been characterized. However, to observe the quantum nature of isomerization, systems in which transitions between the eigenstates occur—such as condensed-phase systems—must be stud

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Observation of the fastest chemical processes in the radiolysis of water

Elementary processes associated with ionization of liquid water provide a framework for understanding radiation-matter interactions in chemistry and biology. Although numerous studies have been conducted on the dynamics of the hydrated electron, its partner arising from ionization of liquid water, H 2 O + , remains elusive. We used tunable femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from an x-ray free electron

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A terrestrial gamma-ray flash and ionospheric ultraviolet emissions powered by lightning

Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are transient gamma-ray emissions from thunderstorms, generated by electrons accelerated to relativistic energies in electric fields. Elves are ultraviolet and optical emissions excited in the lower ionosphere by electromagnetic waves radiated from lightning current pulses. We observed a TGF and an associated elve using the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monito

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Time-resolved observation of spin-charge deconfinement in fermionic Hubbard chains

Elementary particles carry several quantum numbers, such as charge and spin. However, in an ensemble of strongly interacting particles, the emerging degrees of freedom can fundamentally differ from those of the individual constituents. For example, one-dimensional systems are described by independent quasiparticles carrying either spin (spinon) or charge (holon). Here, we report on the dynamical

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Nearly quantized conductance plateau of vortex zero mode in an iron-based superconductor

Majorana zero modes (MZMs) are spatially localized, zero-energy fractional quasiparticles with non-Abelian braiding statistics that hold promise for topological quantum computing. Owing to the particle-antiparticle equivalence, MZMs exhibit quantized conductance at low temperature. By using variable-tunnel–coupled scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we studied tunneling conductance of vortex bound s

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Hydrophobic zeolite modification for in situ peroxide formation in methane oxidation to methanol

Selective partial oxidation of methane to methanol suffers from low efficiency. Here, we report a heterogeneous catalyst system for enhanced methanol productivity in methane oxidation by in situ generated hydrogen peroxide at mild temperature (70°C). The catalyst was synthesized by fixation of AuPd alloy nanoparticles within aluminosilicate zeolite crystals, followed by modification of the extern

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Programmed cell death along the midline axis patterns ipsilaterality in gastrulation

Bilateral symmetry is the predominant body plan in the animal kingdom. Cells on the left and right sides remain compartmentalized on their ipsilateral side throughout life, but with occasional variation, as evidenced by gynandromorphs and human disorders. How this evolutionarily conserved body plan is programmed remains a fundamental yet unanswered question. Here, we show that germ-layer patterni

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Effect of tolerance on the evolution of antibiotic resistance under drug combinations

Drug combinations are widely used in clinical practice to prevent the evolution of resistance. However, little is known about the effect of tolerance, a different mode of survival, on the efficacy of drug combinations for preventing the evolution of resistance. In this work, we monitored Staphylococcus aureus strains evolving in patients under treatment. We detected the rapid emergence of toleran

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Glucose-dependent control of leucine metabolism by leucyl-tRNA synthetase 1

Despite the importance of glucose and amino acids for energy metabolism, interactions between the two nutrients are not well understood. We provide evidence for a role of leucyl-tRNA synthetase 1 (LARS1) in glucose-dependent control of leucine usage. Upon glucose starvation, LARS1 was phosphorylated by Unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase 1 (ULK1) at the residues crucial for leucine binding. T

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Age control of the first appearance datum for Javanese Homo erectus in the Sangiran area

The chronology of the World Heritage Site of Sangiran in Indonesia is crucial for the understanding of human dispersals and settlement in Asia in the Early Pleistocene (before 780,000 years ago). It has been controversial, however, especially regarding the timing of the earliest hominin migration into the Sangiran region. We use a method of combining fission-track and uranium-lead dating and pres

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New Products

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A refreshing change

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Java Man not so old after all

First human species out of Africa reached Asia later than thought.

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Bushfires push threatened species closer to extinction

Six Australian experts analyse the impact of the nation's season in hell.

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The Hubble Constant is constantly perplexing

Astronomers suggest an entirely different way of measuring it.

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Five cordless vacuums that help keep your home spotless

Enjoy cord freedom. (DepositPhotos/) For everyone out there who wants a clean home with minimal fuss, a decent cordless vacuum is a must. Preserve your vision of a robot vacuums as a conveyance for cats in shark costumes , and clean your home however you want, whenever you want. These cordless models, suitable for a wide range of budgets, get the job done efficiently. That way you can get back to

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More light than heat helps turn greenhouse gases into a valuable product

Nature, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00027-2 A doctored catalyst produces a versatile industrial chemical without energy-intensive heating.

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Iranian Hackers Have Been 'Password-Spraying' the US Grid

A state-sponsored group called Magnallium has been probing American electric utilities for the past year.

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Trove of New Bird Species Found on Remote Indonesian Islands

Researchers found 10 new species and subspecies of songbirds off the coast of Sulawesi, with distinct songs and genetics from known birds.

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Growing strained crystals could improve performance of perovskite electronics

A new method could enable researchers to build more efficient, longer lasting perovskite solar cells and LEDs. By growing thin perovskite films on different substrates, UC San Diego engineers invented a way of fabricating perovskite single crystals with precisely deformed, or strained, structures.

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Moths' flight data helps drones navigate complex environments

The flight navigation strategy of moths can be used to develop programs that help drones to navigate unfamiliar environments, report Ioannis Paschalidis at Boston University, Thomas Daniel at University of Washington, and colleagues, in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology.

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Scientists transform a BBQ lighter into a high-tech lab device

Researchers have devised a straightforward technique for building a laboratory device known as an electroporator—which applies a jolt of electricity to temporarily open cell walls—from inexpensive components, including a piezoelectric crystal taken from a butane lighter.

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Acidic environment could boost power of harmful pathogens

When food we've swallowed reaches our stomachs, it finds an acidic environment. The low pH in the stomach helps to begin digestion—and has been thought to kill the bacteria that hides in food that otherwise could harm our bodies.

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Moths' flight data helps drones navigate complex environments

The flight navigation strategy of moths can be used to develop programs that help drones to navigate unfamiliar environments, report Ioannis Paschalidis at Boston University, Thomas Daniel at University of Washington, and colleagues, in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology.

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Scientists transform a BBQ lighter into a high-tech lab device

Researchers have devised a straightforward technique for building a laboratory device known as an electroporator—which applies a jolt of electricity to temporarily open cell walls—from inexpensive components, including a piezoelectric crystal taken from a butane lighter.

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Acidic environment could boost power of harmful pathogens

When food we've swallowed reaches our stomachs, it finds an acidic environment. The low pH in the stomach helps to begin digestion—and has been thought to kill the bacteria that hides in food that otherwise could harm our bodies.

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Water could disappear from Mars faster than expected

Mars is losing water more quickly than theory and observations would suggest. The gradual disappearance of water (H2O) occurs in the upper atmosphere of Mars as sunlight and chemistry disassociate water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen atoms that the weak gravity cannot prevent from escaping into space.

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Scientists observe ultrafast birth of radicals

An international team led by Argonne has visualized the elusive, ultrafast proton transfer process following the ionization of water.

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Ice, permafrost and Siberian caves

Cold scientists find clues to a puzzling relationship.

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Tea drinkers may well live longer

Chinese research suggests it's a habit worth having.

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Physicists Are Still Probing Einstein's General Relativity for Flaws — Now On Cosmic Scales

Einstein's equations have held up remarkably well for over a century. But they leave tantalizing gaps in our knowledge.

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Less-than-perfect kidneys can be successfully used for transplants, study shows

A new study provides the strongest evidence to date that hundreds of deceased donor kidneys, discarded each year after being deemed not suitable under current medical criteria, can be transplanted safely and effectively.

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One-fourth of children with autism are undiagnosed

One-fourth of children under age 8 with autism spectrum disorder — most of them black or Hispanic — are not being diagnosed, which is critical for improving quality of life.

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Parents aren't powerless when it comes to sleep-deprived teenagers

Teenagers in the US simply don't get enough shut eye. The consequences of this sleep deprivation epidemic are extensive and include increasing rates of anxiety and depression among adolescents, as well as suicidal thoughts and actions. Researchers found that a simple and timeworn solution yields solid results: a clear bedtime that parents consistently enforce.

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'Bilingual' molecule connects two basic codes for life

The nucleic acids of DNA encode genetic information, while the amino acids of proteins contain the code to turn that information into structures and functions. Together, they provide the two fundamental codes underlying all of life.

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Slideshow: Scads of Microbes Now Stored at Scripps

Take a peek at one of the biggest collections of bacteria and fungi in the world.

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Scripps Acquires Pfizer's Massive Microbial Library

The East Coast campus of the research institute received shipments of freeze-dried or frozen samples of more than 210,000 microbial strains, which scientists plan to mine for potentially useful natural products.

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The Most Unmissable TV Shows of 2020

2019 brought about the end of some TV titans ( Game of Thrones , The Big Bang Theory ), long-running hits ( Elementary , Suits , Veep ), once-hot comedies ( Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt , Jane the Virgin, Transparent ), critical darlings ( Fleabag , Crazy Ex-Girlfriend , You're the Worst , Baskets ), and everything in between (the entire Marvel-Netflix universe, Legion , Ballers ). And yet there is

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Researchers discover new building blocks of catalyst zeolite nanopores

Zeolites crystals, used among other things for refining petroleum to gasoline and biomass into biofuels, are the most-used catalysts by weight on the planet, and discovering mechanisms of how they form has been of intense interest to the chemical industry and related researchers, say chemist Scott Auerbach et al. at UMass Amherst. They hope their advance on a new way to understand zeolite structur

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A library to do deep learning with spiking neural networks

submitted by /u/caprica [link] [comments]

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How self-esteem benefits international college students

Self-esteem predicts how well international students socialize with domestic students at American universities, research finds. The study doesn't link self-esteem with how well they socialize with other international students. "Self-esteem affords confidence," says Wendy Quinton, a clinical associate professor of psychology at the University at Buffalo. "So people higher in self-esteem have more

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Cuttlefish perceive depth—and they wore 3D glasses to prove it

Ready for the movies. (R. Feord/) 3D movies are a love-hate experience. You absolutely adore the feeling of something plummeting out of your screen so close you think you can nearly touch it, or the whole thing completely freaks you out. Either way—the only way it works is being able to use both of our eyes at the same time to capture the image and perceive its illusory depth. But as a new study

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NASA's Super-Muscular Mice Return to Earth From Space

Mighty Mice On Tuesday, a SpaceX Dragon capsule splashed down in the Pacific Ocean, bringing with it 3,800 pounds of cargo from the International Space Station. That cargo delivery included 40 mice , eight of which scientists genetically engineered to be extremely muscular — and now that they're back on Earth, the "mighty mice" may yield insights that could help human astronauts stay healthy in s

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Panasonic's VR glasses support HDR and look pretty steampunk

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Biologists identify pathways that extend lifespan by 500%

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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A Huge Scientific Effort Is Studying Notre Dame's Ashes

Researchers are making use of an unprecedented opportunity to study the cathedral's innards — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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MRI scanners built for two push limits of neuroimaging

Two-person setup could offer new view of the social brain—provided people are willing to get cozy

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BPA replacement, BPS, hinders heart function, study reveals

BPA's counterpart replacement BPS can hinder heart function within minutes of a single exposure, according to a new study.

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Bandage material helps stop bleeding without adhering to the wound

Researchers have developed a new kind of bandage that helps blood to clot and doesn't stick to the wound. This marks the first time that scientists have combined both properties in one material.

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Could FLASH radiation treat cancer in less than 1 second?

FLASH radiotherapy could one day give cancer patients their entire course of radiation therapy in less than a second. In a report in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, and Physics , the researchers detail how they used proton radiation to generate the dosage needed to theoretically give a cancer patient their entire course of radiotherapy in one rapid treatment. In this stu

3h

What the Iran Clash Taught Us About Trump

F or now , President Donald Trump seems to have sidestepped an all-out war with Iran, opting instead for an uneasy standoff. The question is whether it will hold. Since the launch of his campaign, Trump's foreign-policy vision has never gone much deeper than simple sloganeering: No endless wars! America first! Following the targeted killing of Qassem Soleimani and the resulting tension with Iran,

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Ny model for knuders stabilitet

PLUS. De bedste knob kan findes ved at kombinere optomekaniske eksperimenter med matematisk knudeteori og simulationer.

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Parrots give each other gifts without promise of reward

Nature, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00019-2 African grey parrots show a type of insightful generosity recorded in only humans, orangutans and a few other species.

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For Self-Driving Cars, Lidar Amps Up at CES 2020

LAS VEGAS – If self-driving cars are failing to live up to their initial hype, it isn't for lack of investment in lidar, which is broadly agreed to be a key sensor technology needed for their eventual success. With Bosch's recent announcement that it's making lidar sensors for autonomous cars, it seems like the list of auto-related companies not making lidars is shorter than the list of ones that

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WHO Says Mysterious Illness in China Likely Being Caused By New Virus

The virus behind an outbreak that has sickened at least 59 people in Wuhan is thought to be a ​type of coronavirus, the family that includes SARS and MERS — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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WHO Says Mysterious Illness in China Likely Being Caused By New Virus

The virus behind an outbreak that has sickened at least 59 people in Wuhan is thought to be a ​type of coronavirus, the family that includes SARS and MERS — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Smart mirrors for people who love beauty and skincare

Mirror, mirror. (Jamie Street via Unsplash/) If you're a fan of online beauty tutorials and glean inspiration from makeup artists, you know that getting the perfect look takes skill—and a lot of time. These smart makeup mirrors give you the lighting and magnification you crave, while keeping you entertained with your favorite podcasts and playlists. Alexa, how do I look? (Amazon/) Yes, it's one o

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Amazon Employees Were Watching Ring Footage For Fun

Sneaking Peeks On at least four separate occasions, Ring employees have abused their power by watching video footage from unknowing customers' cameras. The Amazon-owned security camera and doorbell company recently made news after a slew of creeps hacked into users' cameras and spied on them, revealing the company's flimsy cybersecurity . As if that wasn't bad enough, Motherboard now reports that

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Persistent genital arousal disorder — PAIN Reports® presents update on rare neurological disorder

Imagine living with unwanted sexual arousals, occurring unexpectedly and repeatedly, unrelated to any sexual desire or pleasure. That's the situation for women with a rare and disabling condition called persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD), according to a case series in PAIN Reports®, the official open-access journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). The journal

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Trump announces sweeping changes to key environmental law

US President Donald Trump's administration announced Thursday sweeping changes to an environmental law that would speed up the construction of highways, airports and pipelines.

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SpaceX Starlink satellites could be 'existential threat' to astronomy

Huge constellations of satellites like SpaceX's Starlink could make ground-based astronomy impossible, and we're running out of time to deal with the problem

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Total tumor removal may extend survival for patients with deadly glioma

For adult patients with brainstem high-grade gliomas, surgically removing the entire tumor may add months or potentially years of survival beyond that offered by radiation and chemotherapy, according to a new study. The researchers point out that survival for these gliomas—one of the rarest and deadliest forms of brain cancer—has remained poor, with a median length of eight months after diagnosis

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These Two Stars Will Collide in a Spectacular Explosion

Star Collision Two stars that make up the binary system called V Sagittae, are going to collide in an enormous explosion that'll briefly become the brightest stellar object in Earth's sky, according to astronomers . And it could happen by the year 2083, give or take 16 years. "The fate of V Sagittae is inevitable," said researcher Bradley Schaefer at Louisiana State University during the American

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Harnessing biology and technology to develop new depression treatments — update from Harvard Review

New research into the biology of depression, along with new and evolving technologies, provides the basis for developing the next generation of treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD), according to the special January/February issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Product distribution restraints are not equal, research shows

Sometimes, there's the "price" and then there's the price.

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New study shows dominance of local air pollution sources in Delhi

The University of Surrey has revealed results from a new, comprehensive study that suggests that activities such as construction and vehicle traffic contribute significantly to the Delhi National Capital Region's high concentrations of harmful air pollutants and gases.

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Molecular factories: The combination between nature and chemistry is functional

Researchers at the University of Basel have succeeded in developing molecular factories that mimic nature. To achieve this they loaded artificial organelles inside micrometer-sized natural blisters (vesicles) produced by cells. These molecular factories remain intact even after injection into an animal model and demonstrate no toxicity, as the team report in the scientific journal Advanced Science

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A new method to study lithium dendrites could lead to better, safer batteries

Lithium ion batteries often grow needle-like structures between electrodes that can short out the batteries and sometimes cause fires. Now, an international team of researchers has found a way to grow and observe these structures to understand ways to stop or prevent their appearance.

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Molecular factories: The combination between nature and chemistry is functional

Researchers at the University of Basel have succeeded in developing molecular factories that mimic nature. To achieve this they loaded artificial organelles inside micrometer-sized natural blisters (vesicles) produced by cells. These molecular factories remain intact even after injection into an animal model and demonstrate no toxicity, as the team report in the scientific journal Advanced Science

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NASA-NOAA satellite tracks Tropical Storm Blake's remnants spreading

The South Interior area of the state of Western Australia is under warnings for heavy rainfall and gusty winds as the remnants of Tropical Storm Blake move on a southeasterly path through the state. Imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an image of the storm's clouds.

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Toward a smarter way of recharging the aquifer

To replenish groundwater, many municipalities inject reclaimed water into depleted aquifers. The injected water has been purified by secondary wastewater treatment, and, in some cases, the water has been treated through tertiary processes and can be clean enough to drink directly.

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Mathematicians put famous Battle of Britain 'what if' scenarios to the test

Mathematicians have used a statistical technique to interrogate some of the big "what if" questions in the Second World War battle for Britain's skies.

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A conversation could be the answer to successful rehabilitation of prisoners

Researchers have found people on the brink of release from a prison sentence have lost any sense of being connected to the outside world and, as a result, become prejudiced towards wider society.

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'Bilingual' molecule connects two basic codes for life

The nucleic acids of DNA encode genetic information, while the amino acids of proteins contain the code to turn that information into structures and functions. Together, they provide the two fundamental codes underlying all of life.

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Copper-based nanomaterials can kill cancer cells in mice

An interdisciplinary team of scientists from KU Leuven, the University of Bremen, the Leibniz Institute of Materials Engineering, and the University of Ioannina has succeeded in killing tumour cells in mice using nano-sized copper compounds together with immunotherapy. After the therapy, the cancer did not return.

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Can we inherit family trauma?

The epigenetics behind "generational trauma" The 23 and Me craze has officially reached my family. Both of my parents were born in Poland, so the results haven't been too surprising, but as we watched the site track generations of family history from a single spit sample, new questions came up. So when my sisters and […]

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Daily briefing: Russian Academy of Sciences recommends retraction of 2,528 papers

Nature, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00044-1 Independent commission tackles plagiarism and self-plagiarism. Plus: SpaceX tests a black satellite in response to fears it is ruining astronomy and scientists explore the parts of Notre-Dame exposed by fire.

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Vector-borne causes of fever in cats demand year-round preventive therapy

Increased body temperature is the single-most commonly noted abnormal finding for the medical practitioner. While it may be a sign of something relatively innocuous, it can also be an indication of underlying critical illness. In cats, an elevated body temperature equates to a reading in excess of 39.2°C or 102.5°F and, as in humans, it can arise as a result of two major mechanisms: hyperthermia a

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Prosocial and tolerant parrots help others to obtain food

Parrots are considered extraordinarily clever animals. Alex, the famous Harvard-based African grey parrot, communicated with a vocabulary of more than 500 human words, could answer questions and classify objects spontaneously. Scientists from the Max-Planck-Institute for Ornithology based at the research station outpost for parrot comparative cognition in the Loro Parque in Tenerife, Spain, have s

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'Bilingual' molecule connects two basic codes for life

The nucleic acids of DNA encode genetic information, while the amino acids of proteins contain the code to turn that information into structures and functions. Together, they provide the two fundamental codes underlying all of life.

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The Fitness Trend That Is a Mirror

I'm standing in the center of a store on Fifth Avenue, in Manhattan, looking into a full-length mirror. The store is called Mirror. It sells only mirrors. Actually, only this one type of mirror. Mirror looks just like any other mirror, until it powers on. Suddenly, my reflection is not alone. It's joined by an enthusiastic woman in yellow leggings and a yellow sports bra, superimposed on the mirr

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Radio Atlantic: 'He Doesn't Understand War'

Ruben Gallego is an Iraq War veteran, a three-term congressman, and a member of the House Armed Services Committee. Despite all that, he's as confused as most Americans about what's happening with Iran. America isn't at war, he told me in an interview Wednesday morning, but that "doesn't mean that we're not in conflict … and we don't know how long it's going to take." As we spoke, Gallego was pre

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The Boys Who Wear Shorts All Winter

CHARLES REX ARBOGAST / AP IMAGES Lindsey Miller first took note of the boys who refused to wear long pants when she was in grade school. At her elementary school in Maryland, a few particular boys made a habit of wearing shorts to school all winter, even though January temperatures in the mid-Atlantic state routinely drop below freezing. And it was always boys, she told me, never female students—

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How successful are retailer-themed super saver events?

Researchers from the University of Amsterdam and Tilburg University published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that assesses Retailer-Themed Super Saver Events and the effects they have on consumers.

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Vector-borne causes of fever in cats demand year-round preventive therapy

Increased body temperature is the single-most commonly noted abnormal finding for the medical practitioner. While it may be a sign of something relatively innocuous, it can also be an indication of underlying critical illness. In cats, an elevated body temperature equates to a reading in excess of 39.2°C or 102.5°F and, as in humans, it can arise as a result of two major mechanisms: hyperthermia a

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Prosocial and tolerant parrots help others to obtain food

Parrots are considered extraordinarily clever animals. Alex, the famous Harvard-based African grey parrot, communicated with a vocabulary of more than 500 human words, could answer questions and classify objects spontaneously. Scientists from the Max-Planck-Institute for Ornithology based at the research station outpost for parrot comparative cognition in the Loro Parque in Tenerife, Spain, have s

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One-fourth of children with autism are undiagnosed

One-fourth of children under age 8 with autism spectrum disorder — most of them black or Hispanic — are not being diagnosed, which is critical for improving quality of life.

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New closed-loop system offers promise as novel treatment for post-bariatric hypoglycemia

Post-bariatric hypoglycemia is a profoundly life-altering condition for patients. Having unpredictable hypoglycemia that people can't detect is really an unsafe situation. Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed a closed-loop system that automatically provides patients with an appropriate, as-needed dose of liquid

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Decoding hidden brain chatter to advance neuroprostheses

Scientists eavesdropped on neurons and discovered a stable signal driving common movement skills like typing sneakers. They were able to preserve and reconstruct these patterns in what is a major advance for neuroprostheses for paralyzed patients.

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Missing protein in brain causes behaviors mirroring autism

Scientists at Rutgers University-Newark have discovered that when a key protein needed to generate new brain cells during prenatal and early childhood development is missing, part of the brain goes haywire — causing an imbalance in its circuitry that can lead to long-term cognitive and movement behaviors characteristic of autism spectrum disorder.

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First genomic study of puberty yields insights into development and cancer

In the first-ever genome-scale analysis of the puberty process in humans, researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) outline distinct and critical changes to stem cells in males during adolescence.

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Lack of insurance cause of survivorship gap in minorities with cancer, study shows

Nearly half of the disparity in later-stage diagnosis was mediated by being uninsured or underinsured, according to a new study conducted at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Boston Medical Center/Boston University School of Medicine.

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Metabolic syndrome associated with increased risk of blood clot recurrence

People with metabolic syndrome — a set of conditions including obesity, impaired glucose metabolism, elevated levels of fats and cholesterol in the blood, and high blood pressure – are more likely to experience recurrent blood clots, according to a new study published today in Blood Advances. Among patients diagnosed with a type of blood clot known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), those who also ha

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2 ways sewage plants can remove more medicine from water

A study of seven wastewater treatment plants in the Eastern United States reveals a mixed record when it comes to removing medicines such as antibiotics and antidepressants. The research points to two treatment methods—granular activated carbon and ozonation—as being particularly promising. Each technique reduced the concentration of a number of pharmaceuticals, including certain antidepressants

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The weirdest, wildest, and coolest images from CES 2020

Friendly robots are everywhere at CES. (Stan Horaczek /) This year's CES was massive. With roughly 4,400 companies showing off products and nearly 200,000 people there to see them, deciding what to spend time on can seem impossible. But, we've been on the ground since the beginning of the week and have gathered some of the most important trends, themes, and products into a handy gallery. Check it

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Department of Energy picks New York over Virginia for site of new particle collider

$2.6 billion Electron-Ion Collider would probe the structure of the proton

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Study tracks the universality of music's impact

Over 2,500 people from the U.S. and China listened to the same music and were similarly affected by it. The study identifies a specific set of feelings that music can evoke. Further research can use these findings to figure out how music does this. None "Music is a universal language, but we don't always pay enough attention to what it's saying and how it's being understood," says neuroscience do

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Man Cited for Flossing Teeth While Autopilot Drove Tesla 84 MPH

Gum Control Police have caught yet another driver abusing Tesla's Autopilot system — but this time, it was in the name of dental hygiene . On Wednesday, Sergeant Kerry Schmidt of Ontario Provincial Police tweeted that an officer had charged a 58-year-old man with careless driving. The explanation? He was flossing his teeth using both hands while his Autopilot-enabled Model S was driving 135 kilom

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Less severe cases of diarrheal illness can still lead to child mortality, research shows

Diarrheal diseases are a leading cause of death for young children, accounting for nine percent of all deaths worldwide in children under 5 years of age, with most occurring in children under two years of age. Now, researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) found that even milder cases of diarrheal diseases can lead to death in young children.

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Parents aren't powerless when it comes to sleep-deprived teenagers

Teenagers in the US simply don't get enough shut eye. The consequences of this sleep deprivation epidemic are extensive and include increasing rates of anxiety and depression among adolescents, as well as suicidal thoughts and actions. Researchers at the University of Rochester found that a simple and timeworn solution yields solid results: a clear bedtime that parents consistently enforce.

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NASA-NOAA satellite tracks Tropical Storm Blake's remnants spreading

The South Interior area of the state of Western Australia is under warnings for heavy rainfall and gusty winds as the remnants of Tropical Storm Blake move on a southeasterly path through the state. Imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an image of the storm's clouds.

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BPA replacement hinders heart function, study reveals

BPA's counterpart replacement BPS can hinder heart function within minutes of a single exposure, according to a new University of Guelph study.

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Toward a smarter way of recharging the aquifer

Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis have solved a mystery: how did arsenic show up in aquifer water that had been triple purified? Dissolved organic compounds.

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An Idea From Physics Helps AI See in Higher Dimensions

Computers can now drive cars, beat world champions at board games like chess and Go, and even write prose. The revolution in artificial intelligence stems in large part from the power of one particular kind of artificial neural network, whose design is inspired by the connected layers of neurons in the mammalian visual cortex. These "convolutional neural networks" (CNNs) have proved surprisingly

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Virtual reality, real injuries: How to reduce physical risk in VR

Carpal tunnel, stiff shoulders, eye-strain headaches — these are all well-known side effects of prolonged computer use. But what happens when you step away from the desktop and into virtual reality? A recent study assessed how some common virtual reality movements contribute to muscle strain and discomfort. It's an effort to ensure future user safety in this fast-growing technology that's used no

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The Virus Buried in a 100-Year-Old Lung

This lung specimen from 1912 had been sitting in the basement of the Berlin Museum of Medical History at the Charité. (Düx etal / bioRxiv) Sometime in late 2018, Sébastien Calvignac-Spencer descended into the basement of a Berlin medical history museum, a place so teeming with old medical specimens that each organ gets its own storage room. He headed for the lungs. Among the 400 or 500 jarred spe

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Another Astronomer Says the Big Bang Might Not Have Happened

Challenger Approaches The idea that the Big Bang didn't happen — at least not the way most scientists assume — is gaining traction in academic circles. Eric Lerner, founder of Lawrenceville Plasma Physics, has been arguing against the notion of the Big Bang for decades, having written a book on the subject in 1992. Now, Inverse reports , Lerner's latest research finds that there's a discrepancy b

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Deforestation is changing animal communication

Deforestation is changing the way monkeys communicate in their natural habitat, according to a new study. This study offers the first evidence in animal communication scholarship of differences in vocal behaviors in response to different types of forest edge areas.

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Contaminating a fake rubber hand could help people overcome OCD, study suggests

The famous, but bizarre, 'rubber hand illusion' could help people who suffer from obsessive compulsive disorder overcome their condition without the often unbearable stress of exposure therapy, suggests new research.

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Trump Administration Moves to Limit Climate Reviews for Federal Projects

The changes would underestimate the true contributions to global warming of fossil fuel infrastructure and other projects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Product distribution restraints are not equal research shows

Online shoppers may be pleasantly surprised to find the price of their chosen item has dropped once they've moved to the checkout phase of their purchase. It could be because they are the beneficiary of something called a Minimum Advertised Price restraint, or MAP.

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A new method to study lithium dendrites could lead to better, safer batteries

Lithium ion batteries often grow needle-like structures between electrodes that can short out the batteries and sometimes cause fires. Now, an international team of researchers has found a way to grow and observe these structures to understand ways to stop or prevent their appearance.

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BU researchers: Pornography is not a 'public health crisis'

Researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) have written an editorial in the American Journal of Public Health special February issue arguing against the claim that pornography is a public health crisis, and explaining why such a claim actually endangers the health of the public.

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Common genetic defect in prostate cancer inspires path to new anti-cancer drugs

Researchers found that, in prostate cancer, a mutation leading to the loss of one allele of a tumor suppressor gene known as PPP2R2A is enough to worsen a tumor caused by other mutations.They found patients whose prostate tumors carry one copy of PPP2R2A don't survive as long as those whose tumors have two copies, and that in cells deficient in PPP2R2A, reconstitution of the PP2A protein encoded b

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Mathematicians put famous Battle of Britain 'what if' scenarios to the test

Mathematicians from the University of York have developed a new model to explore what the impact of changes to Luftwaffe tactics would actually have been. Their approach uses statistical modelling to calculate how the Battle might have played out if history had followed one of several alternative courses.

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UCF study: Judo may help health, social interactions of children with autism

Judo may be just the right sport to increase the physical activity level among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and holds promise for reducing sedentary behavior, which is linked to obesity and diabetes, according to a new study from the University of Central Florida in Orlando.

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'Bilingual' molecule connects two basic codes for life

'Much like a translator enables communication between two people from different regions of the world, we envision that our bilingual molecule will enable us to mediate new forms of communications between nucleic acids and proteins in the cellular environment,' says Jennifer Heemstra, associate professor of chemistry at Emory University.

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New study shows 'organic' wounds improve produce

Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists found benefits of insect leaf-wounding in fruit and vegetable production. Stress responses created in the fruits and vegetables initiated an increase in antioxidant compounds prior to harvest, making them healthier for human consumption.

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A conversation could be the answer to successful rehabilitation of prisoners

Researchers have found people on the brink of release from a prison sentence have lost any sense of being connected to the outside world and, as a result, become prejudiced towards wider society. A simple conversation could help.

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Study reveals insights on hidden sexual-arousal disorder

Results indicate that persistent genital arousal disorder can be caused by altered firing of nerves that carry sensations from the genitalia or by damage to the lowest parts of the spinal cord.

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African grey parrots are smart enough to help a bird in need

African grey parrots are the first bird to pass a test that requires them to understand when another animal needs help and to provide it, something chimps and gorillas have failed to do

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Infographic: How Does Nature Influence Human Health?

Time spent in natural environments is linked to improved physical and mental health, but researchers are only now beginning to dig into the mechanisms.

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Christian Bale Might Be Joining *Thor: Love and Thunder*

Also, artificial intelligence could bring your next favorite movie to the big screen.

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AI diagnostiserar prostatacancer lika bra som specialister

Artificiell intelligens är lika bra på att identifiera prostatacancer och och bedöma allvarlighetsgrad, som ledande specialister (uropatologer). AI har potentialen att lösa flaskhalsar i dagens prostatacancerdiagnostik genom att ge säkrare diagnoser och bättre klinisk handläggning. Forskare vid Karolinska Institutet och Tammerfors universitet i Finland har utvecklat en metod baserat på artificiel

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Parrots Will Share Currency to Help Their Pals Purchase Food

Animals often share food, but these birds understand that metal rings can be exchanged for treats, and they share the rings with no promise of reward

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Polly Share A Cracker? Parrots Can Practice Acts Of Kindness, Study Finds

Researchers found that African grey parrots voluntarily helped a partner get a food reward by giving the other bird a valuable metal token that could be exchanged for a walnut. (Image credit: Henry Lok/EyeEm/Getty Images)

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New study shows dominance of local air pollution sources in Delhi

The University of Surrey has revealed results from a new, comprehensive study that suggests that activities such as construction and vehicle traffic contribute significantly to the Delhi National Capital Region's high concentrations of harmful air pollutants and gases.

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Molecular factories: The combination between nature and chemistry is functional

Researchers at the University of Basel have succeeded in developing molecular factories that mimic nature. To achieve this they loaded artificial organelles inside micrometer-sized natural blisters (vesicles) produced by cells. These molecular factories remain intact even after injection into an animal model and demonstrate no toxicity, as the team report in the scientific journal Advanced Science

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Food textures affect perceptions of healthiness

New research has demonstrated how food producers could change the surface texture of products to change people's perceptions and promote healthy eating.

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Kangaroo mother care reduces infant mortality

When newborn babies with low birth weight are held close to their mother's bodies throughout the day, their chance of survival increases substantially.

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From as young as 4, children see males as more powerful than females

As early as 4 years old, children associate power and masculinity, even in countries considered to be more egalitarian like Norway. This is what scientists at the Institut des Sciences Cognitives Marc Jeannerod (CNRS/UCBL1) report, in collaboration with the universities of Oslo (Norway), Lausanne and Neuchâtel (Switzerland), in a study published on Jan. 7, 2020, in Sex Roles. They also show that i

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Wake up dormant dopaminergic neurons to reverse Parkinson's disease

Researchers have discovered a new mechanism for PD pathology. The study found that the movement abnormalities of PD begin in the earlier stage when dopaminergic neurons, though being alive, cannot synthesize dopamine (in a dormant state).

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Prosocial and tolerant parrots help others to obtain food

African grey parrots spontaneously help conspecifics without obvious benefits to themselves.

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An out-of-the-box attack on diabetes

A protein newly identified as important in type 1 diabetes can delay onset of the disease in diabetic mice, providing a new target for prevention and treatment in people, according to research led by scientists at the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Indiana University School of Medicine.

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'Flash and freeze' reveals dynamics of nerve connections

How do the physical parts of a neuron enable it to process and communicate information? Relating structure to function is a long-standing goal in neuroscience. In the latest issue of the journal Neuron, the group of Peter Jonas, professor at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), reports a novel method to achieve this objective.

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In fighting gut infections, nervous system is key, Yale-Harvard team finds

The peaceful and delicate co-existence of friendly gut bacteria and the immune system relies on highly coordinated information exchange between immune system cells and certain cells lining the intestine. Scaientists at Yale and Harvard medical schools have discovered that, in response to bacterial invaders, nerve cells within the intestine — and not immune cells or cells lining the intestinal wal

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An international study discovers a new origin of lymphatic vessels in the heart

A study published today in Development Cell opens the way to future research into the mechanism of lymphatic vessel formation in this new niche and the functional diversity of cardiac lymphatics.

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How do fruit flies see in color? Columbia study uncovers human-like brain circuit at work

Columbia scientists have identified a brain circuit that drives fruit flies' ability to see in color — and found that it bears a striking resemblance to the circuitry behind our own capacity for color vision. This research will not only fuel new investigations into how color vision works in flies and humans, but could also spur efforts to develop algorithms that help computers see in color.

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African grey parrots spontaneously 'lend a wing'

People and other great apes are known for their willingness to help others in need, even strangers. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Jan. 9 have shown for the first time that some birds — and specifically African grey parrots — are similarly helpful.

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Parrots Show Off Selfless Behavior

A series of experiments demonstrated that African grey parrots had something like social intelligence in addition to their cleverness.

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Amazon threatens to fire employees for campaigning against climate change

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Tech's Top Trends at CES 2020

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Australia's government needs to take drastic action to prevent future fires—and so do the rest of us

Firefighters are spread thin. (DepositPhoto/) As bushfires rage across Australia , scientists are speaking out about what it will take to recover from this year's catastrophic fire season and prepare for the future. "We need national and international efforts to halt climate change," says Stephen Kearney, a PhD student at the University of Queensland and the Australian Mammal Society's communicat

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A new kind of hearing test looks at the eyes

Our eyes involuntarily dilate in response to sound, which means they offer a potential new way to test hearing. In 1998, University of Oregon researcher Avinash Singh Bala was working with barn owls in an Institute of Neuroscience lab when the birds' eyes caught his attention. The usual research done in the lab, led by Terry Takahashi, focuses on how barn owls process sounds, with the idea that s

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New Trump rule would allow government to ignore climate impacts of major projects

Proposal aims to unravel years of work by Obama administration

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Mysterious illness outbreak in China seems to be caused by a new virus

It isn't SARS or MERS, but a potentially new virus has infected 59 people in China – seven of whom are critically ill – with suspected cases reported in South Korea and Hong Kong

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Panasonic's VR Glasses Are Unlike Any You've Seen Before

Steampunk VR Virtual reality headsets might soon become far less cumbersome. At this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Japanese electronics corporation Panasonic showed off a VR glasses prototype that looks like something out of a 90s steampunk movie, The Verge reports . The glasses feature some impressive specs: high resolution micro OLED panels for each eye and support for HDR— hig

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Wireless over-ear headphones with extra long battery life

For longer listening. (Ross Sneddon via Unsplash/) Wireless headphones are convenient until the batteries die. Then they are useless. It's easy to forget the practical importance of a long battery life, especially when we are focusing instead on factors like sound quality, size, and appearance. Those, of course, are also excellent considerations, but you'll hate any pair of headphones that keeps

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These parrots are the first birds observed showing kindness to others

When another African gray parrot needs help, its partner "lends a wing"

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How Cities Became Childless

The American city was once a great place to start a family. Today's cities, however, are decidedly not for children—or for families who want children. In a new episode of The Idea File , the writer Derek Thompson explains how urban living became so inhospitable to families and details the consequences of this major shift in the demographics of the American metropolis. "You have high-paying jobs c

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Democrats' Future Is Moving Beyond the Rust Belt

For Democrats, the Sun Belt imperative is growing more urgent. While most in the party are preoccupied with winning back the three Rust Belt states that tipped the 2016 election to Donald Trump, both people and political power are continuing to migrate inexorably from that region to the younger and more diverse states in the Southeast and Southwest. This sustained population shift reinforces the

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Feathered friends: study shows 'selfless' parrots helping peers

African grey parrots help other birds get food despite no benefit to themselves, a behaviour only previously seen in apes African grey parrots help their peers complete tasks despite no immediate benefit to themselves, researchers have found, in the first study to show that birds display such apparently "selfless" behaviour. While other prosocial behaviours have been seen in birds, the team say h

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AAFP releases updated feline retrovirus guidelines to the veterinary community

On Thursday, January 9, The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) releases updated Feline Retrovirus Testing and Management Guidelines to the veterinary community, which will be published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. In publishing these Guidelines, the AAFP aims to provide the most current information about feline retrovirus infections to veterinary practitioners so

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The claw disease tyloma is primarily genetic in cows

Scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Georg August University Göttingen have succeeded in proving that a claw disease in cows is primarily genetic. Until now, the occurrence of interdigital hyperplasia has mostly been attributed to poor hygiene conditions in the barn. However, a team led by Professor Hermann Swalve discovered a farm in which the disease occurred frequen

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Randomness opens the gates to the land of attophotography

One of the last obstacles hindering the photography and filming of processes occurring on a scale of attoseconds, i.e. billionths of a billionth of a second, has disappeared. The key to its removal lies in the random nature of the processes responsible for the formation of X-ray laser pulses.

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Selfless African grey parrots get by with a little help from friends

Acting selflessly to help others in need was long thought to be a trait confined to mammals, in particular humans and great apes.

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How do fruit flies see in color? Study uncovers human-like brain circuit at work

Columbia scientists have identified a brain circuit that drives fruit flies' ability to see in color—and found that it bears a striking resemblance to the circuitry behind our own capacity for color vision. These findings shed light on the fundamental, yet mysterious, process by which information about light waves is transmitted from the eye to the brain. This research will not only fuel new inves

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Researchers test hearing by looking at dilation of people's eyes

Neuroscientists have shown that a person's hearing can be assessed by measuring dilation of the pupils in eyes, a method that is as sensitive as traditional methods of testing hearing.

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The Vikings erected a runestone out of fear of climate catastrophe

Several passages on the Rök stone — the world's most famous Viking Age runic monument — suggest that the inscription is about battles and for over a hundred years, researchers have been trying to connect the inscription with heroic deeds in war. Now, thanks to an interdisciplinary research project, a new interpretation of the inscription is being presented. The study shows that the inscription d

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AAFP releases updated feline retrovirus guidelines to the veterinary community

On Thursday, January 9, The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) releases updated Feline Retrovirus Testing and Management Guidelines to the veterinary community, which will be published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. In publishing these Guidelines, the AAFP aims to provide the most current information about feline retrovirus infections to veterinary practitioners so

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The claw disease tyloma is primarily genetic in cows

Scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Georg August University Göttingen have succeeded in proving that a claw disease in cows is primarily genetic. Until now, the occurrence of interdigital hyperplasia has mostly been attributed to poor hygiene conditions in the barn. However, a team led by Professor Hermann Swalve discovered a farm in which the disease occurred frequen

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African grey parrots spontaneously 'lend a wing'

People and other great apes are known for their willingness to help others in need, even strangers. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on January 9 have shown for the first time that some birds—and specifically African grey parrots—are similarly helpful.

5h

How do fruit flies see in color? Study uncovers human-like brain circuit at work

Columbia scientists have identified a brain circuit that drives fruit flies' ability to see in color—and found that it bears a striking resemblance to the circuitry behind our own capacity for color vision. These findings shed light on the fundamental, yet mysterious, process by which information about light waves is transmitted from the eye to the brain. This research will not only fuel new inves

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What a digital government looks like | Anna Piperal

What if you never had to fill out paperwork again? In Estonia, this is a reality: citizens conduct nearly all public services online, from starting a business to voting from their laptops, thanks to the nation's ambitious post-Soviet digital transformation known as "e-Estonia." One of the program's experts, Anna Piperal, explains the key design principles that power the country's "e-government" —

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Addressing the emotional toll of pediatric chronic conditions

Report led by experts at Cincinnati Children's, published online Jan. 9 in Pediatrics, calls upon pediatricians to increase efforts to support emotional health of parents of children with chronic conditions.

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Copper-based nanomaterials can kill cancer cells in mice

An interdisciplinary team of scientists from KU Leuven, the University of Bremen, the Leibniz Institute of Materials Engineering, and the University of Ioannina has succeeded in killing tumor cells in mice using nano-sized copper compounds together with immunotherapy. After the therapy, the cancer did not return.

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Earlier falls predict subsequent fractures in postmenopausal women

The risk of fracture in postmenopausal women can be predicted by history of falls, according to new findings from the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study (OSTPRE) at the University of Eastern Finland. Published in Osteoporosis International, the study is the first to follow up on the association between history of falls and subsequent fractures.

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Stellar heavy metals can trace history of galaxies

Astronomers have cataloged signs of nine heavy metals in the infrared light from supergiant and giant stars. New observations based on this catalog will help researchers to understand how events like binary neutron star mergers have affected the chemical composition and evolution of our own Milky Way galaxy and other galaxies.

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Discovery of gene that modifies the severity of inherited kidney disease

Scientists have developed a new way to understand complex genetic diseases and have identified a gene that modifies the severity of inherited kidney disease, paving the way for personalized treatments.

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Rejuvenating the brain

The older we get the more our brains will find it difficult to learn and remember new things. The research group led by Professor Federico Calegari used a method to stimulate the small pool of neural stem cells that reside in the brain in order to increase their number and the number of neurons generated by those stem cells. Additional neurons could survive and form new contacts with neighboring c

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How successful are retailer-themed super saver events?

Retailer-Themed Super Saver Events (ReTSS) yield different outcomes than regular sales promotions. ReTSS produce a substantial increase in retailer visits and purchases during the events, especially among nonprimary customers and hard-discount shoppers.

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Vector-borne causes of fever in cats demand year-round preventive therapy

Increased body temperature is the single-most commonly noted abnormal finding for the medical practitioner. While it may be a sign of something relatively innocuous, it can also be an indication of underlying critical illness.

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Game-changing suitcase organizers for your next trip

A more organized way to travel. ( Brandless via Unsplash/) Savvy travelers know the secret to stress-free packing: cubes. These simple yet somehow innovative squares act as drawers in the dresser that is your carry-on, meaning you won't be rifling through your suitcase to find the right shirt at 4 a.m. when you arrive at your hotel. Storage cubes also keep the funk of your dirty clothes from stin

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Illuminating the world of nanoparticles

Scientists have developed a light-based device that can act as a biosensor, detecting biological substances in materials; for example, harmful pathogens in food samples.

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New Zealand was once a land of giants

Monster parrots and penguins roamed the islands

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The sex of researchers affects the language of research papers

Male-authored articles are more self-promoting

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Might there soon be a supernova near Earth?

A giant star called Betelgeuse is behaving strangely

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New way to pluck water from desert air

Where desalination is impossible, adsorption may be the answer

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Dung beetles prefer human faeces to those of wild animals

A long-established experimental procedure turns out to be biased

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Peering into the genome of brain tumor

Scientists have created a machine learning method for classifying the mutations of glioma brain tumors based on MR images alone. Thus far, classification has only been possible by tissue sampling during surgery. The new method is noninvasive, may remove the need for a tissue sample and help accelerate delivery of treatment for patients.

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Illuminating the world of nanoparticles

Scientists have developed a light-based device that can act as a biosensor, detecting biological substances in materials; for example, harmful pathogens in food samples.

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A 'pivotal' moment for understanding whale evolution

We could be getting closer to understanding how feeding behaviors in whales and dolphins have evolved over time.

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How bacterial evolution of antibiotic arsenals is providing new drug blueprints

Scientists have taken their cue from nature to provide new options for drug designers seeking to hold back the global threat of antimicrobial resistance. The scientists have blueprinted how two antibiotics produced by bacteria function against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to pinpoint potential new drug targets.

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Scientists recommend a customized regional climate model over Southeast Asia

Southeast Asia has experienced impacts of climate change in recent decades, including rising temperatures and increasing extreme events. Reliable climate change information in the future is very important for assessing the impacts and implementing adaptation measures, thus lowering the risks from climate change over the region. Due to the complex topography and numerous islands in the region, appl

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Nanomaterial fabric destroys nerve agents in battlefield-relevant conditions

Northwestern University scientists have successfully combined a nanomaterial effective at destroying toxic nerve agents with textile fibers. This new composite material one day could be integrated into protective suits and face masks for use by people facing hazardous conditions, such as chemical warfare.

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Greening at high latitudes may inhibit the expansion of midlatitude deserts

Desertification has always been a serious challenge for human beings, especially in arid and semi-arid regions. Projections from CMIP5 support the expansion of arid and semi-arid regions with increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Interestingly, besides inducing a stronger greenhouse effect, increasing carbon dioxide is also leading to global vegetation greening, especially in high latitudes, b

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Illuminating the world of nanoparticles

Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have developed a light-based device that can act as a biosensor, detecting biological substances in materials; for example, harmful pathogens in food samples.

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Heavy D Races Lamborghini with an Electric Mini Bike!| Diesel Brothers

The shop's resident mad scientist, Sam, pitches Heavy D on a crazy new build: an electric mini drag bike! Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DieselB

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Why Are America's Black-Footed Ferrets Disappearing?

Despite some success, the species remains threatened in the U.S. West. Biologists are trying to understand why — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sensing protein wellbeing

The folding state of the proteins in live cells often reflect the cell's general health. Australian scientists have developed a molecular probe that senses the state of the proteome — the entire set of the proteins — by measuring the polarity of the protein environment. The fluorescence signal of the probe quantifies unfolding and its chameleon-like color shift maps the cellular regions of enhan

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Improved functioning of diverse landscape mosaics

It is well-established that biodiverse ecosystems generally function better than monocultures. Ecologists at the University of Zurich have now shown that the same is true on a larger scale: Having a mix of different land-covers including grassland, forest, urban areas and water bodies improves the functioning and stability of a landscape — irrespective of the plant species diversity, region and c

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Bandage material helps stop bleeding without adhering to the wound

Researchers from ETH Zurich and the National University of Singapore have developed a new kind of bandage that helps blood to clot and doesn't stick to the wound. This marks the first time that scientists have combined both properties in one material.

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Scientists use ancient marine fossils to unravel long-standing climate puzzle

Cardiff University scientists have shed new light on the Earth's climate behavior during the last known period of global warming over 14 million years ago.

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Prostate cancer can now be diagnosed better using artificial intelligence

Researchers at Radboud university medical center have developed a 'deep learning' system that is better than most pathologists at determining the aggressiveness of prostate cancer. The AI system, which uses tissue samples to arrive at its diagnosis, taught itself to identify prostate cancer based on data from over 1200 patients. The Radboud team is now working with researchers from the Karolinska

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The claw disease tyloma is primarily genetic in cows

Scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Georg August University Göttingen have succeeded in proving that a claw disease in cows is primarily genetic. Until now, the occurrence of interdigital hyperplasia has mostly been attributed to poor hygiene conditions in the barn. However, a team led by Professor Hermann Swalve discovered a farm in which the disease occurred frequen

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Unlimited potential: Researchers found new ways to generate totipotent-like cells

Totipotency is set to become a key tool for research and future medical applications. Finding efficient ways to generate totipotent-like cells is therefore crucial. In a new study, a group of researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München found that totipotent-like cells can be induced by manipulating the availability of metabolites in pluripotent cells. These findings open up new possibilities for cell

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Choosing new 'umbrella' species in Australia could save many others

"Umbrella" species are animals selected for protection because doing so protects other species in the habitat. However, there may be a better, more efficient way of picking umbrella species: ignoring shared habitats and focusing instead on shared threats. Using this new methodology, researchers discovered that seven times as many species could be protected using the same budget. None Across the w

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​The '85% Rule': Why a dose of failure optimizes learning

A recent study examined the rates at which machine-learning algorithms learned to recognize images of tumors. The results showed that learning was optimized when the algorithms guessed incorrectly about 15 percent of the time. The researchers suggested that their findings apply to human and animal learning, too. None In learning, most people intuitively recognize that a bit of a challenge is a go

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Second-guessing yourself leads to worse decisions, study finds

A recent study examined the accuracy of predictions of soccer matches on a popular betting website. The users were allowed to revise their bets up until the match started. Surprisingly, the results revealed that the revised bets were much more likely to be incorrect. None Imagine you were asked to predict the score of an upcoming match between your favorite sports team and its rival. Now, imagine

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Male sperm count is declining globally. Exercise helps.

A new study, published in Human Reproduction , found that exercise helps increase sperm motility. 746 healthy young men were studied over a six-month period; the more exercise they got, the better their sperm. Globally, sperm counts have gone down by over 50 percent over the last half-century. None For generations (and likely much longer), the blame for an inability to conceive fell on a woman's

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The one book you need to understand alt-right trolls

The New Yorker 's Adam Marantz spent three years embedded with leading alt-right voices. His book, Antisocial , carries you deep inside the mindset and motivation behind online trolling. To get back on track, Marantz believes we need a "new moral vocabulary." Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopia

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North Atlantic Current could stop within the next century

The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, or AMOC, delivers warm water from the Gulf of Mexico to Europe, stabilizing its climate. Increasing rainfall and glacial meltwater could seriously disrupt the current, which has been slowing down for the past 150 years. Not all of the effects of an AMOC shutdown are clear, but it is likely that Europe will begin to see far colder winters should the

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Nuclear-powered Mars rover to search for old life, prepare for human life

NASA recently unveiled the final details of the Mars 2020 rover mission. As yet unnamed, the Mars 2020 rover will launch in July of that same year. It's primary mission will be to search the planet for signs of microbial life. However, the rover also contains instrumentation that will enable it to prepare for future human life, including a device to produce oxygen from Mars' CO2 atmosphere. None

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The Next DARPA X-Plane Won't Maneuver like Any Plane Before It

The challenge is to build an airplane without moving control surfaces — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Next DARPA X-Plane Won't Maneuver like Any Plane Before It

The challenge is to build an airplane without moving control surfaces — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Diabetes drug could treat recurrent miscarriage

A drug designed to treat diabetes could treat recurrent miscarriage, the results of a pilot clinical trial suggest. The drug increases the amount of stem cells in the lining of the uterus, improving conditions to support pregnancy. Recurrent miscarriage refers to the loss of two or more consecutive pregnancies. The likelihood of a successful pregnancy goes down with additional miscarriage. Previo

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Making The Large Rings Catalytically

Designing useful catalysts is one of the most challenging frontiers in chemistry, and it stretches across the whole field. Inorganic, synthetic organic, analytical, computational – you name it, and there's a challenge there to pitch in on. The rewards are substantial. Without catalytic reactions, the modern world economy would come to a halt – you can start with what has to be done to petroleum t

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Psoriasis: Towards a novel therapeutic approach

Researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and the Department of Dermatology of the Erasme hospital uncover the importance of VEGFA signaling in the epidermis to mediate psoriasis development.

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Randomness opens the gates to the land of attophotography

One of the last obstacles hindering the photography and filming of processes occurring on a scale of attoseconds, i.e. billionths of a billionth of a second, has disappeared. The key to its removal lies in the random nature of the processes responsible for the formation of X-ray laser pulses.

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Nuclear radiologists 'outsmart' prostate cancer with an apparently ineffective drug

Patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer often have few treatment options. One approach that is available involves destroying prostate cancer cells by introducing a radioactive molecule into tumor cells via a protein called PMSA. Nuclear radiologists in Saarland have now discovered that far more PSMA molecules can be produced on the surface of the tumor cell if patients are given a drug t

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The Vikings erected a runestone out of fear of a climate catastrophe

Several passages on the Rök stone — the world's most famous Viking Age runic monument — suggest that the inscription is about battles and for over a hundred years, researchers have been trying to connect the inscription with heroic deeds in war. Now, thanks to an interdisciplinary research project, a new interpretation of the inscription is being presented. The study shows that the inscription d

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Peering into the genome of brain tumor

Scientists at Osaka University have created a machine learning method for classifying the mutations of glioma brain tumors based on MR images alone. Thus far, classification has only been possible by tissue sampling during surgery. The new method is noninvasive, may remove the need for a tissue sample and help accelerate delivery of treatment for patients.

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AAFP releases updated feline retrovirus guidelines to the veterinary community

On Thursday, January 9, the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) will release updated Feline Retrovirus Testing and Management Guidelines to the veterinary community, which will be published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery.

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Scientists recommend a customized regional climate model over Southeast Asia

It's difficult to model and reproduce the present climate over Southeast Asia. Scientists test and recommend a customized regional climate model over the region.

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Foldbar elektronik, arvtageren til OLED og hurtigere WiFi: Her er højdepunkterne fra årets elektronikfest

PLUS. Geniale opfindelser, salgsgas og forbrugsfest forenes hvert år til forbrugerelektronikkens nytårsbrag CES i Las Vegas. Vi har håndplukket nogle højdepunkter og leder efter alt det, der manglede.

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Bandage speeds blood clotting and doesn't stick

A new kind of bandage helps blood clot without sticking to wounds, researchers report. The new work marks the first time that scientists have combined both properties in one material. "We did not actually plan this, but that is just how science works sometimes: you start researching one thing and end up somewhere else," says Dimos Poulikakos, professor and chair of thermodynamics at ETH Zurich. S

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A Rogues' Gallery of the Five Category 5 Storms of 2019

The two Atlantic Category 5 hurricanes and three Northwest Pacific Category 5 super typhoons of 2019 set records — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Standout Tech Trends From CES 2020

Sensor-laden underwear. A toilet-paper-transporting robot. Headwear, wristwear, and bedside gadgets guaranteed to improve your sleep. These are just a few of the weirdest, wildest pieces of technology on display at this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Vegas. The massive annual convention never fails to unveil concepts that leave us incredulous, prototypes that help us imagine a fantastic futu

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'Bilingual molecule' combines two coding languages of life

Researchers have found a way to combine the two main coding languages that underlie all of life into a single "bilingual" molecule. The nucleic acids of DNA encode genetic information, while the amino acids of proteins contain the code to turn that information into structures and functions. Together, they provide the two fundamental codes for life. The new synthesized molecule could become a powe

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A 'pivotal' moment for understanding whale evolution

We could be getting closer to understanding how feeding behaviors in whales and dolphins have evolved over time.

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Greening at high latitudes may inhibit the expansion of midlatitude deserts

Besides inducing a stronger greenhouse effect, increasing carbon dioxide is also leading to global vegetation greening, especially in high latitudes, by the fertilization effect. A new study finds high-latitude vegetation greening may inhibit the expansion of midlatitude deserts.

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VR is not suited to visual memory?!

Toyohashi university of technology researcher and a research team at Tokyo Denki University have found that virtual reality (VR) may interfere with visual memory. In recent years, there has been high expectation that VR will be used effectively not only in multimedia and entertainment, but also in educational settings. However, in order to benefit society, IT needs to take human characteristics in

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A breath of fresh air for longer-running batteries

DGIST researchers are improving the performance of lithium-air batteries, bringing us closer to electric cars that can use oxygen to run longer before they need to recharge. In their latest study, published in the journal Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, they describe how they fabricated an electrode using nickel cobalt sulfide nanoflakes on a sulfur-doped graphene, leading to a long-life batte

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Illuminating the world of nanoparticles

Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have developed a light-based device that can act as a biosensor, detecting biological substances in materials; for example, harmful pathogens in food samples.

6h

Just a Fainting Spell? Or Is Betelgeuse About to Blow?

A familiar star in the constellation Orion has dimmed noticeably since October. Astronomers wonder if its explosive finale is imminent.

6h

Model shows Welsh language in no danger of extinction but te reo Māori is on its way out

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in New Zealand has developed a mathematical model that can be used to predict whether a language is at risk of disappearing. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes their model and how it can be used.

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WHOI underwater robot takes first-known automated sample from ocean

WHOI's robot, Nereid Under Ice (NUI), samples a patch of sediment from the mineral-rich floor of Kolumbo volcano off Santorini Island, Greece. This is the first known automated sample taken by a robot in the ocean.

6h

Coordination by remote control

Protein filament systems within cells are subject to constant reorganization, which is in part mediated by the actions of motor proteins. LMU researchers have now shown that motor-driven movements can propagate through such networks.

6h

Ancient Romans may have used Chinese medicine to treat coeliac disease

A woman who died in Italy 2000 years ago may have had coeliac disease, and her dental plaque suggests she sought relief in ginseng and turmeric imported from China

6h

The US election isn't the only reason 2020 is huge for the planet

The US election 2020 is one of three crucial events this year that will establish long-term global action on climate change and biodiversity, writes Graham Lawton

6h

Nanomaterial fabric destroys nerve agents in battlefield-relevant conditions

Northwestern University scientists have successfully combined a nanomaterial effective at destroying toxic nerve agents with textile fibers. This new composite material one day could be integrated into protective suits and face masks for use by humans facing hazardous conditions, such as chemical warfare. The material, a zirconium-based metal-organic framework, degrades in minutes some of the most

7h

Oregon researchers test hearing by looking at dilation of people's eyes

University of Oregon neuroscientists have shown that a person's hearing can be assessed by measuring dilation of the pupils in eyes, a method that is as sensitive as traditional methods of testing hearing.

7h

A breath of fresh air for longer-running batteries

DGIST researchers are improving the performance of lithium-air batteries, bringing us closer to electric cars that can use oxygen to run longer before they need to recharge. In their latest study, published in the journal Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, they describe how they fabricated an electrode using nickel cobalt sulphide nanoflakes on a sulfur-doped graphene, leading to a long-life batt

7h

Coordination by remote control

Protein filament systems within cells are subject to constant reorganization, which is in part mediated by the actions of motor proteins. LMU researchers have now shown that motor-driven movements can propagate through such networks.

7h

A way to increase structural stability in strained halide perovskites

A team of researchers from the U.S., Saudi Arabia and Australia has structurally stabilized halide perovskites when under strain. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their approach and their hopes that their work will lead to more efficient photovoltaics.

7h

New study of rural India highlights the role of the mother-in-law in restricting women's social networks

In communities around the world where access to information might be restricted for any number of reasons—the United Nations estimates that half the world's population is not connected to the internet—in-person social networks can be a key source of connection and knowledge-sharing. But when access to these offline social circles is also restricted, the way it can be for women in strict patriarcha

7h

Scottish rocks prove 'boring billion' wasn't so boring after all

Scottish rocks have provided evidence of a previously unknown ice age that has shed new light on the evolution of the planet.

7h

As wildfires get worse, smoke spreads, stokes health worries

First came the flames, a raging firestorm propelled by 50-mile-per-hour winds gusts that incinerated Kelsey Norton's house and killed 85 people in her community.

7h

Extreme conditions created a 'perfect storm' for catastrophic fires

A Western Sydney University Research Fellow has described the specific set of environmental conditions that led to Australia's bushfire emergency.

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Here's what we can do to keep bushfire smoke out of our buildings

In early December 2019, a Sheffield Shield cricket match between NSW and Queensland was played in bushfire smoke so thick that the ball was at times invisible to the spectators.

7h

Scientists use ancient marine fossils to unravel longstanding climate puzzle

Cardiff University scientists have shed new light on the Earth's climate behavior during the last known period of global warming over 14 million years ago.

7h

Improved functioning of diverse landscape mosaics

It is well-established that biodiverse ecosystems generally function better than monocultures. Ecologists at the University of Zurich have now shown that the same is true on a larger scale: Having a mix of different land-covers including grassland, forest, urban areas and water bodies improves the functioning and stability of a landscape—irrespective of the plant species diversity, region and clim

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Improved functioning of diverse landscape mosaics

It is well-established that biodiverse ecosystems generally function better than monocultures. Ecologists at the University of Zurich have now shown that the same is true on a larger scale: Having a mix of different land-covers including grassland, forest, urban areas and water bodies improves the functioning and stability of a landscape—irrespective of the plant species diversity, region and clim

7h

New research reveals connection between drug treatments and antimicrobial resistance in cattle disease

A new study from Kansas State University on the treatment of non-responding cases of bovine respiratory disease, known as BRD, conducted by Hans Coetzee and his collaborators from Iowa State University, sheds light on the relationship between drug treatments and the emergence of antimicrobial resistance.

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From as young as 4, children see males as more powerful than females

As early as four years old, children associate power and masculinity, even in countries considered to be more egalitarian like Norway. This is what scientists at the Institut des Sciences Cognitives Marc Jeannerod (CNRS/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1) report, in collaboration with the Universities of Oslo (Norway), Lausanne and Neuchâtel (Switzerland), in a study published on 7 January 2020 in S

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Molecular probe maps misfolded proteome state in live cells

The folding state of the proteins in live cells often reflect the cell's general health. Australian scientists have developed a molecular probe that senses the state of the proteome—the entire set of the proteins—by measuring the polarity of the protein environment. The fluorescence signal of the probe quantifies unfolding and its chameleon-like color shift maps the cellular regions of enhanced mi

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Connection found between Arctic Oscillation and increased risk of fire in Siberia

A team of researchers from the U.K., South Korea and Japan has found evidence that in positive phase years, the Arctic Oscillation can boost late winter temperatures in Siberia, resulting in more forest fires in the spring. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes studying a 20-year global weather period and their findings.

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Doctors come together to save eyesight of 3-year-old gorilla

Animal care specialists at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park were concerned when they noticed cloudiness in the left eye of Leslie, a three-year-old female western lowland gorilla. Closer inspection confirmed the lens had changed and the left eye was shifting haphazardly, prompting Leslie to favor use of her right eye.

7h

How pure is your patchouli?

Indonesian patchouli oil represents a significant share of the world market, supplying some 90 percent to the perfume industry as a common fixative agent for scents. Some 1400 tonnes are produced annually. New markets for this product may open up in medicine, given the efficacy of this substance in certain contexts for cancer chemotherapy. As such, there is an increasing need to look at its distil

7h

Stellar heavy metals can trace history of galaxies

Astronomers have cataloged signs of nine heavy metals in the infrared light from supergiant and giant stars. New observations based on this catalog will help researchers to understand how events like binary neutron star mergers have affected the chemical composition and evolution of our own Milky Way Galaxy and other galaxies.

7h

Japanese Company Thinks Seniors Will Love Its Faceless Robot Baby

Face Off Robot baby Hiro-chan isn't exactly high tech. The battery-powered bot makes sad sounds when you leave it alone and happy sounds when you pick it up and hug it. That's it. But according to Vstone, the Japanese robotics company behind Hiro-chan, that's all it needs to be able to do to produce a "healing effect" in seniors in nursing homes — an effect apparently amplified by the robot baby'

7h

New research reveals connection between drug treatments and antimicrobial resistance in cattle disease

A new study from Kansas State University on the treatment of non-responding cases of bovine respiratory disease, known as BRD, conducted by Hans Coetzee and his collaborators from Iowa State University, sheds light on the relationship between drug treatments and the emergence of antimicrobial resistance.

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Doctors come together to save eyesight of 3-year-old gorilla

Animal care specialists at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park were concerned when they noticed cloudiness in the left eye of Leslie, a three-year-old female western lowland gorilla. Closer inspection confirmed the lens had changed and the left eye was shifting haphazardly, prompting Leslie to favor use of her right eye.

7h

Trump Moves to Exempt Big Projects From Environmental Review

The White House, hoping to speed infrastructure projects like pipelines, will formally introduce changes to a half century-old landmark environmental law.

7h

Molecular probe maps misfolded proteome state in live cells

The folding state of the proteins in live cells often reflect the cell's general health. Australian scientists have developed a molecular probe that senses the state of the proteome—the entire set of the proteins—by measuring the polarity of the protein environment. The fluorescence signal of the probe quantifies unfolding and its chameleon-like color shift maps the cellular regions of enhanced mi

7h

What if storing carbon dioxide would also allow us to heat our homes?

Recognized by the scientific community as the main cause of global warming, CO2 levels in the atmosphere continue to soar, as confirmed by the November 2019 report of the World Meteorological Organization.

7h

If the pines disappear, can it still be called Big Pine Key?

More than 30 percent of the trees on Big Pine Key died in the months following Hurricane Irma.

7h

Homelessness an issue for one in three prisoners

A stable home situation is important for the successful return to society of prisoners. So what is their home situation like? And what effect does it have on reoffending? Ph.D. defense on 16 January 2020.

7h

If the pines disappear, can it still be called Big Pine Key?

More than 30 percent of the trees on Big Pine Key died in the months following Hurricane Irma.

7h

Most Distant Galaxy Cluster Ever Found Helps Show How the Universe First Lit Up

Scientists gain a new glimpse into a billions-of-years-old event in the universe that allowed light to shine freely.

7h

Don't Buy an 8K TV

If you've paid any attention to CES hype this year, you've probably spotted some news on 8K TVs. Samsung debuted a bezel-less display that's 99 percent screen, LG launched no fewer than eight 8K panels, and Sony showed its own 8K device. In addition, there's been a fight between LG and Samsung over which company offers "real" 8K. LG's devices are certified by the Consumer Technology Association,

7h

In 60 Years, a Star Will Explode and Become Incredibly Bright in the Sky

In about 60 years, the people of Earth are in for a rather spectacular stellar show. As we near the end of the 21st century, astronomers predict a distant star called V Sagittae will flare up, becoming one of the brightest objects in the sky . It may even end up brighter than the planet Venus as seen from Earth. The effect will be temporary, but V Sagittae will get plenty of attention during that

7h

PROSA i skarp kritik af regeringens nye sikkerhedspakke

Regeringens forslag til en sikkerhedspakke, hvor politiet får redskaberne til massiv overvågning af borgerne, møder stor kritik fra it-fagforeningen.

7h

Iran Tensions Increase Social Media Surveillance at the US Border

Customs and Border Protection agents reportedly grilled Iranian Americans on their social media activity. It's the latest in a disturbing trend in government monitoring.

7h

Underwater Entertains but Doesn't Have Much Depth

A deep-sea-diver movie is a close cousin to the greatest cinematic subgenre of all—the astronaut movie. The aesthetics are basically identical: Both rely on character actors decked out in chunky exploration suits, fumbling their way through postindustrial corridors while contending with loudly bleeping alerts from stern computer voices. Most important, both are set in harsh environments whose dan

7h

Ebikes might soon speed past electric cars in sales

Madison, Wisconsin, converted its entire bike share fleet to ebikes in June. (Courtesy Madison BCycle/) This story originally featured on Cycle Volta . Worldwide, more than 130 million ebikes will be sold from 2020 to 2023, representing a value of $20 billion, according to a new report from the Technology, Media, and Telecommunications practice at Deloitte . The consulting and advisory firm also

7h

Do dietary supplements affect the survival of cancer patients?

Do dietary supplements offer advantages or risks to breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy?

7h

The Science of Losing Battles

New research illuminates why most dieters regain lost weight. It's even more complicated than we thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Vaping ups risk of self-reported COPD

People who use e-cigarettes have a higher risk of self-reported chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study. The risk held true even for those people who had never smoked tobacco, researchers say, adding that the findings cast doubt on claims from e-cigarette companies that vaping is a safe alternative to smoking. People who vaped had a 47% greater risk of self-reported

7h

Debat: Når videnskabelig usikkerhed bliver en dårlig undskyldning

PLUS. Hvis vi tror på, at menneske­skabte klimaforandringer er reelle, kan vi blive nødt til at ofre det, vi anser for det gode liv. Derfor kan det være fristende ikke at lytte til forskningen.

7h

The psychology behind the placebo effect just got stranger

Placebo drugs can relieve pain, particularly if people taking them are told how they work. Now it seems you don't need detailed explanations to get the benefits

7h

Illusion involving fake poo and rubber hand tested on people with OCD

The "rubber hand illusion", where people come to believe an artificial hand is their own, could help people with obsessive compulsive disorder face their fears

7h

New ways to generate totipotent-like cells

Totipotency is set to become a key tool for research and future medical applications. Finding efficient ways to generate totipotent-like cells is therefore crucial. In a new study, a group of researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München found that totipotent-like cells can be induced by manipulating the availability of metabolites in pluripotent cells. These findings open up new possibilities for cell

8h

Hubble detects smallest known dark matter clumps

When searching for dark matter, astronomers must go on a sort of "ghost hunt." That's because dark matter is an invisible substance that cannot be seen directly. Yet it makes up the bulk of the universe's mass and forms the scaffolding upon which galaxies are built. Dark matter is the gravitational "glue" that holds galaxies as well as galaxy clusters together. Astronomers can detect its presence

8h

Puerto Rico, Devastated by Earthquakes, Needs Our Help

A life is lost, homes are damaged and destroyed, and an iconic Puerto Rican landform is no more. Here are what happened and how you can help — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

American Self-Criticism Borders on Narcissism

Those who said there will be war may not have realized there already was war. This doesn't mean killing Iranian General Qassem Soleimani was good. It almost certainly wasn't. Iran quickly retaliated by targeting two American military bases in Iraq and may find new ways to escalate, but Iran had already been escalating. The regime of the Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad, with its Iranian patrons, l

8h

New ways to generate totipotent-like cells

Totipotency is set to become a key tool for research and future medical applications. Finding efficient ways to generate totipotent-like cells is therefore crucial. In a new study, a group of researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München found that totipotent-like cells can be induced by manipulating the availability of metabolites in pluripotent cells. These findings open up new possibilities for cell

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Why AI is the new electricity

submitted by /u/alinrauta [link] [comments]

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Nasa Moon rocket core leaves for testing

The first core stage for Nasa's "mega-rocket", the SLS, has left its factory in New Orleans.

8h

Surgery may add months or years of survival for adults with rare and deadly brain cancers

For adult patients with brainstem high-grade gliomas — one of the rarest and deadliest forms of brain cancer — surgically removing the entire tumor may add many months or potentially years of survival beyond that offered by radiation and chemotherapy, according to results of a medical records study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

8h

När nordpolen blir sydpol

Då och då försvagas jordens magnetfält och de magnetiska polerna byter plats. Senast hände det för 780 000 år sedan. Snart är det dags igen för en polomkastning. Men det sker inte över en natt, så vi lär hinna rusta oss, menar forskare. Människans hem är jorden, med bara atmosfären som en mycket tunn hinna mot rymdens ogästvänliga miljö. Men det finns något som skyddar både oss och atmosfären – j

8h

Sömnbrist kan öka ämnen kopplade till Alzheimers

Efter en natts vakenhet uppvisade en liten grupp unga, friska män högre blodnivåer av proteinet tau än då de sovit som vanligt. Tau utgör en markör för Alzheimers sjukdom och resultaten kan tyda på att återkommande sömnbrist skulle kunna leda till negativa effekter på hjärnhälsan. Tau är ett protein som finns i nervceller som kan bilda klumpar. Hos individer med Alzheimers sjukdom ansamlas dessa

8h

Brake dust air pollution may have same harmful effects on immune cells as diesel exhaust

Metal particles from the abrasion of brake pads—up to a fifth of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution at roadsides—may cause inflammation and reduce the ability of immune cells to kill bacteria a new study has found, similarly to particles derived from diesel exhaust.

8h

Bandage material helps stop bleeding without adhering to the wound

Researchers from ETH Zurich and the National University of Singapore have developed a new kind of bandage that helps blood to clot and doesn't stick to the wound. This marks the first time that scientists have combined both properties in one material.

8h

Scientists learn how to increase corn crop yields

NSF-funded scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory are figuring out how to pack more kernels onto a corn cob. One way to boost the productivity of a plant, they say, is to redirect some of its resources away from maintaining an overprepared immune system and into enhanced seed production. Now, a team led by CSHL scientist David Jackson has found a gene that could help tweak that balance.

8h

Image of the Day: Molting Mantis

Watch an insect shed its exoskeleton and stretch its new wings.

8h

NASA TV coverage set for three spacewalks in January

Four astronauts will venture outside the International Space Station for three spacewalks in January to complete battery upgrades and finalize repairs to an invaluable cosmic ray detector.

8h

Too pretty for construction? Uncovering gender bias in hiring for 'masculine' jobs

While appearances should not matter when applying for a job, unfortunately, they do. Studies show that attractiveness positively benefits both men and women job candidates, garnering attractive individuals more job offers, higher salaries and incomes, and better reviews.

8h

Ancient iron-sulfur-based mechanism monitors electron flow in photosynthesis

A delicate balance of electrons flowing through the photosynthetic machinery is essential to a plant's ability to turn sunlight into energy and its survival. Understanding the factors that regulate this balance is key for plant breeders who may want to improve light energy conversion in crop plants for increased yield.

8h

Microbubble findings could reduce chemical, water use in food processing

Cleaning and sanitizing food processing equipment requires using chemicals and copious amounts of water for rinsing those chemicals away. It's possible—if it can be done correctly—that creating microscopic bubbles in water could reduce or eliminate the need for those chemicals.

8h

A new tool for 'weighing' unseen planets

A new instrument funded by NASA and the National Science Foundation called NEID (pronounced "NOO-id"; sounds like "fluid") will help scientists measure the masses of planets outside our solar system—exoplanets—by observing the gravitational pull they exert on their parent stars. That information can help reveal a planet's composition, one critical aspect in determining its potential habitability.

8h

Goldilocks stars are best places to look for life

To date astronomers have discovered over 4,000 planets orbiting other stars. Statistically, there should be over 100 billion planets in our Milky Way galaxy. They come in a wide range of sizes and characteristics, largely unimagined before exoplanets were first discovered in the mid-1990s. The biggest motivation for perusing these worlds is to find "Genesis II," a planet where life has arisen and

8h

Cosmic magnifying glasses yield independent measure of universe's expansion

People use the phrAse "holy cow" to express excitement. Playing with that phrase, researchers from an international collaboration developed an acronym—H0LiCOW—for their project's name that expresses the excitement over their Hubble Space Telescope measurements of the universe's expansion rate.

8h

Why romaine lettuce keeps getting recalled

Foodborne illness outbreaks from fresh produce have increased globally in recent years. Once a kitchen staple, the ubiquitous romaine lettuce now often conjures fear and disgust. Since 2017, contaminated romaine has sparked four major E. coli outbreaks throughout the US. Last month, the CDC reported 138 people in 25 states infected with romaine-triggered E. coli bacteria. If you're considering sw

8h

Milton Prabu's outsourced art gallery

"now we have equipped with our own photo microscopy, we didn't depend on the out sourcing fellows to take the photography our slides". – Dr Milton Prabu.

8h

Scientists learn how to increase corn crop yields

NSF-funded scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory are figuring out how to pack more kernels onto a corn cob. One way to boost the productivity of a plant, they say, is to redirect some of its resources away from maintaining an overprepared immune system and into enhanced seed production. Now, a team led by CSHL scientist David Jackson has found a gene that could help tweak that balance.

8h

Ancient iron-sulfur-based mechanism monitors electron flow in photosynthesis

A delicate balance of electrons flowing through the photosynthetic machinery is essential to a plant's ability to turn sunlight into energy and its survival. Understanding the factors that regulate this balance is key for plant breeders who may want to improve light energy conversion in crop plants for increased yield.

8h

From a by-product of the biodiesel industry to sustainable production of a valuable chemical

Although governments, academia and organizations all around the world have been emphasizing the crisis concerning the use of fossil fuels for many years, demand has constantly been on the increase. Now, that supply is seriously dwindling, and researchers have focused on finding alternative fuels that are cleaner and have the potential for sustainable production.

8h

Researchers simulate quantum computer with up to 61 quantum bits using a supercomputer with data compression

When trying to debug quantum hardware and software with a quantum simulator, every quantum bit (qubit) counts. Every simulated qubit closer to physical machine sizes halves the gap in computing power between the simulation and the physical hardware. However, the memory requirement of full-state simulation grows exponentially with the number of simulated qubits, and this limits the size of simulati

8h

SpaceX Starlink mega-constellation: 'Limited time' to fix brightness issue

Astronomers say the coming interference from satellite mega-constellations needs rapid solutions.

8h

Twenty People Needed to Make a Pin

Originally published in January 1856 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Facebook-direktør i lækket notat: Vi var ansvarlige for Trump-sejr i 2016

Facebook må ikke snyde på vægten i forhold til at gøre det sværere for Trump at vinde det kommende præsidentvalg, mener direktør.

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Foreløbig redegørelse fra Iran: Der er data på sorte bokse fra styrtet 737

Iran har inviteret USA, Canada, Sverige og Ukraine til at deltage i efterforskningen. Ukrainske repræsentanter er allerede ankommet til Teheran.

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The Best of CES 2020

WIRED reporters saw (and touched) hundreds of gadgets at this year's consumer electronics expo. These are the biggest standouts.

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Natural Gas Use Is Rising: Is that Good News or Bad News for the Climate?

It's a little of both for now, but in the long run, it's bad — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Natural Gas Use Is Rising: Is that Good News or Bad News for the Climate?

It's a little of both for now, but in the long run, it's bad — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat

The golf course in Jersey City, N.J., says it needs the land to compete for tournaments. A birder counters, "It's really just an obscenity."

9h

A sudden Eureka moment can trick you into believing something false

Experiencing a sudden realisation – a Eureka moment – might lead you to believe that a false statement is true

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Regnefejl i forsvaret: Nu skal naboer have mere kompensation for F35-støj

PLUS. Borgerhenvendelser har ført til, at fire boliger ved F-35-flyvestationen flyttes til den såkaldte røde zone og har krav på højere kompensation eller ekspropriation.

9h

A Drone's-Eye View of the Quick and the Dead

New machine-learning technique can distinguish living bodies from deceased ones — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Lessons for a Young Scientist – Issue 79: Catalysts

I sometimes worry that many who would enjoy a scientific career are put off by a narrow and outdated conception of what's involved. The word "scientist" still conjures up an unworldly image of an Einstein lookalike (male and elderly) or else a youthful geek. There's still too little racial and gender diversity among scientists. But there's a huge variety in the intellectual and social styles of w

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Why We Love How-to Videos – Issue 79: Catalysts

An insistent pattern has quietly taken hold in my household. I will order some consumer product online. The product will arrive. I will open the package, extract the thing from its protective wrappings, and retrieve the instruction manual. I will examine the product briefly, then begin to read the instruction manual. And then I will go to YouTube. There, I will find, almost invariably, that someo

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How Inequality Imperils Cooperation – Issue 79: Catalysts

Last year news came that Indian billionaire Gautam Adani was set to exploit Australian coal reserves. The deal, The New York Times reported , was the result of a successful campaign by the Adani Group, a vast conglomerate with diverse interests, to capture the hearts and minds of Queenslanders, who occupy Australia's second-largest state. It's a project that will, in the short term, help power de

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Brandvæsen vurderer: Ingen elbil-batterier ramt af Stavanger-brand

PLUS. »Med den viden, vi har om batteribrande, hælder vi mod en teori om, at der ikke gik ild i nogen batteripakker,« siger vicebrandinspektør.

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What are the psychological effects of consuming violence online?

"The internet is an exciting and a dangerous place," says journalist and documentarian Sebastian Junger. He argues that because of thousands of years of evolution, our bodies react to seeing decapitations on screens as if they were happening in front of or to us. According to Junger, the internet is too new for us to really understand the long-term effects it will have on our lives. Tribe: On Hom

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Two retractions prove fresh is best

To the list of best practices in experimental research, here's another item to add: Always use fresh cheesecloth when separating biomasses. We'll explain. A group of researchers at Kansas State University have retracted their 2018 paper, titled "Corn stover pretreatment by metal oxides for improving lignin removal and reducing sugar degradation and water usage," in … Continue reading

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How to Stop a War

This story was updated on January 9, 2020 at 8:30am. Following the U.S. drone strike that killed Qassem Soleimani last week, and the Iranian air strikes on an Iraqi base housing U.S. troops earlier this week, the conflict between the United States and Iran appears to be teetering on a knife's edge. The president did not request or receive authorization from Congress before taking the strike, and

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Trials Are for Evidence

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is in the midst of discussions about the shape and scope of the forthcoming impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. His most recent public offer is to adopt the same rules for Trump's impeachment as those used in President Bill Clinton's. He says he has the votes to impose that process on the Senate, even if Democratic senators object. On the surface, t

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Harry and Meghan Might Not Like the Price of Financial Independence

When Prince Harry and his American wife, the former Meghan Markle, distanced themselves yesterday from the British royal family, they announced the move on Instagram—where, as of last night, they had 10.2 million followers. Under a photo of the smiling couple holding hands was a statement full of gilded bombshells: The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are (somewhat) stepping down from their official du

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A New Nuclear Era Is Coming

Iranian missile attacks on U.S. forces in Iraq. Deadly chaos in Iran. A sudden halt of the fight against the Islamic State. Utter confusion over whether U.S. troops will remain in Iraq, and even whether the United States still respects the laws of war. The fallout from the Trump administration's killing of Qassem Soleimani has been swift and serious. But one potential knock-on effect may not come

10h

Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat

The golf course in Jersey City, N.J., says it needs the land to compete for tournaments. A birder counters, "It's really just an obscenity."

10h

Some of Australia's Smallest Species Could Be Lost to Wildfires

Velvet worms, trapdoor spiders: Scientists worry about the fate of the nation's many remarkable, overlooked endemic creatures.

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Evolving parsec-scale radio structure in the most distant blazar known

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14093-2 High redshift blazars are efficient probes of supermassive black holes and their environment in the early Universe. Here the authors show measurements of polarised emission and proper motion in the blazar J0906+6930 (redshift of 5.47) characterised by a nascent jet embedded in and interacting with a dense med

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Convergent and divergent selection drive plumage evolution in woodpeckers

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14006-3

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Astrocytes monitor cerebral perfusion and control systemic circulation to maintain brain blood flow

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13956-y The brain receives 20% of cardiac output, but in accord with the current knowledge lacks a specialized sensor of its own blood flow. Here, the authors show that brain astrocytes detect drops in perfusion and trigger compensatory increases in arterial pressure and heart rate to preserve brain blood flow and ox

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Realistic in silico generation and augmentation of single-cell RNA-seq data using generative adversarial networks

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14018-z Low sample numbers often limit the robustness of analyses in biomedical research. Here, the authors introduce a method to generate realistic scRNA-seq data using GANs that learn gene expression dependencies from complex samples, and show that augmenting spare cell populations improves downstream analyses.

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ASCOT identifies key regulators of neuronal subtype-specific splicing

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14020-5 The increasing amount of raw RNA-seq data calls for new computational methods to mine information. Here, the authors present ASCOT, a computational resource to identify splice variants in RNA-seq data, and apply it to splicing patterns in neurons and unique splicing patterns in rod photoreceptors.

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Zinc-finger protein CNBP alters the 3-D structure of lncRNA Braveheart in solution

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13942-4 Many RNA systems possess highly ordered 3-D structures that are essential to their function. Here the authors demonstrate that the long non-coding RNA Braveheart possesses a flexible but defined 3-D structure which is remodeled upon binding the protein CNBP.

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Author Correction: Split intein-mediated selection of cells containing two plasmids using a single antibiotic

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13716-y

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Color-tunable single-fluorophore supramolecular system with assembly-encoded emission

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13994-6 Regulating fluorescent properties of small molecules in a controlled manner has been a fundamental research goal but realizing multi-color emission from a single fluorophore remains challenging. Here the authros demonstrate that combined pyrene fluorophore and acylhydrazone units show multi-color switchable f

11h

Smoking HIV out of dormancy

A new mechanism uncovered by a Norwegian research group could improve the chances of developing a cure for HIV by forcing the virus out of dormancy so that it can be killed.

11h

Getting to the heart of heart beats: Cardiac thin filament structure and function revealed

Osaka University team uses advanced electron cryomicroscopy and image analysis to reveal the structure of vital muscle thin filaments in the heart with the highest resolution ever. This work is important for understanding the mechanisms underlying cardiac muscle contractions and may lead to treatment for mutation-caused diseases such as cardiomyopathy and cardiac hypertrophy.

11h

Ultrasound can make stronger 3D-printed alloys

A study just published in Nature Communications shows high frequency sound waves can have a significant impact on the inner micro-structure of 3D printed alloys, making them more consistent and stronger than those printed conventionally.

11h

How bacterial evolution of antibiotic arsenals is providing new drug blueprints

Scientists have taken their cue from nature to provide new options for drug designers seeking to hold back the global threat of antimicrobial resistance. The scientists have blueprinted how two antibiotics produced by bacteria function against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to pinpoint potential new drug targets.

11h

Modelling photovoltaic soiling losses through optical characterization

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56868-z

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Association between leucocyte telomere length and cardiovascular disease in a large general population in the United States

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57050-1

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T-type, but not L-type, voltage-gated calcium channels are dispensable for lymphatic pacemaking and spontaneous contractions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56953-3

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The potential of neurofilaments analysis using dry-blood and plasma spots

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54310-y

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Dynamics and stability in prebiotic information integration: an RNA World model from first principles

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56986-8

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Establishment of sperm cryopreservation and in vitro fertilisation protocols for rats

Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57090-7

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Sex tech is slowly making a comeback at CES. About time.

The world's biggest tech show still has a long way to go in accepting that sex—and women—exist.

11h

Ultrasound can make stronger 3-D-printed alloys

Researchers have used sound vibrations to shake metal alloy grains into tighter formation during 3-D printing.

11h

How bacterial evolution of antibiotic arsenals is providing new drug blueprints

Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have discovered that two very different species of bacteria have evolved distinct, powerful antibiotic arsenals for use in the war against their bacterial neighbours [Thursday 9th January, 2020]. By blueprinting precisely how the antibiotics function against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the scientists have provided new options for drug

11h

For Babies Born Into Addiction, Punishing the Mother Is No Cure

It's easy to become enraged by the thought of a newborn spending her first days of life enduring the torment of opioid withdrawal. But that rage shouldn't fuel policy. The science suggests that maternal connection and bonding during a baby's first days is best for both the mother and the child.

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How bacterial evolution of antibiotic arsenals is providing new drug blueprints

Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have discovered that two very different species of bacteria have evolved distinct, powerful antibiotic arsenals for use in the war against their bacterial neighbours [Thursday 9th January, 2020]. By blueprinting precisely how the antibiotics function against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the scientists have provided new options for drug

11h

Picnic – AI powered pizza making robot

submitted by /u/DronaldDumb [link] [comments]

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Supercharging tomorrow: Australia first to test new lithium batteries

submitted by /u/FortuitousAdroit [link] [comments]

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Nordmand vil redde liv med torpedoredningsbåde

Den nuværende udrustning med redningsbåde på store passagerskibe er for ringe. Med redningsbåde udformet som torpedoer kan flere reddes ved havari, mener skibsbygger.

11h

Recurrent miscarriage: Diabetes drug could lead to new treatment

A drug designed to tackle diabetes could also be repurposed as the first treatment to prevent miscarriage by targeting the lining of the womb itself, according to a clinical trial led by the University of Warwick.

11h

Australia bushfires flare as heatwave brings renewed misery

Bushfires flared in southern Australia on Thursday as a heatwave expected to bring renewed misery set in, and officials warned some areas are "just at the beginning" of the devastating crisis.

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China says pneumonia outbreak linked to coronavirus

State media says Sars-type virus likely cause as concern grows ahead of lunar new year holidays

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Climate change threatens Afghanistan's crumbling heritage

After bearing the brunt of jihadist dynamite and looting by thieves, the archaeological treasures of Afghanistan's Bamiyan province are facing a new and possibly more daunting threat: climate change.

12h

Peptid minskade epileptiska anfall i mänsklig hjärnvävnad

Forskare vid Lunds universitets Epilepsicentrum har med hjälp av en neuropeptid lyckats minska anfallsliknande aktivitet i vävnad från patienter med läkemedelsresistent epilepsi.

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Moon river: Rocket part ferried on the mighty Mississippi

With a brass band playing and a parade of workers sporting Mardi Gras beads, a huge component of a new rocket system was wheeled slowly from a New Orleans spacecraft factory on Wednesday to a barge that will float it up the Mississippi River for testing.

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An Olympic First: Cardboard beds for Tokyo Athletes Village

Tokyo Olympic athletes beware—particularly larger ones.

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New study reveals the origin of complex malaria infections

New technology employing single cell genome sequencing of the parasite that causes malaria has yielded some surprising results and helps pave the way for possible new intervention strategies for this deadly infectious disease, according to Texas Biomedical Research Institute Assistant Professor Ian Cheeseman, Ph.D. Dr. Cheeseman was Principal Investigator of a three-year study published in the Jan

12h

Of ants and men: Ant behavior might mirror political polarization

Could the division of labor in an anthill be driven by the same social dynamics governing the gap between liberals and conservatives? That was the surprising question tackled by Princeton biologists Chris Tokita and Corina Tarnita.

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New study reveals the origin of complex malaria infections

New technology employing single cell genome sequencing of the parasite that causes malaria has yielded some surprising results and helps pave the way for possible new intervention strategies for this deadly infectious disease, according to Texas Biomedical Research Institute Assistant Professor Ian Cheeseman, Ph.D. Dr. Cheeseman was Principal Investigator of a three-year study published in the Jan

12h

Of ants and men: Ant behavior might mirror political polarization

Could the division of labor in an anthill be driven by the same social dynamics governing the gap between liberals and conservatives? That was the surprising question tackled by Princeton biologists Chris Tokita and Corina Tarnita.

12h

Researchers take exploration of key 'building block' particles into space

As part of SpaceX's CRS-19 resupply mission to the International Space Station (ISS) launched Dec. 5, researchers from NASA, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and New York University (NYU) are set to begin a new scientific investigation to explore how a group of microscopic particles considered key "building blocks" for materials and products here on Earth, known as colloidal particles, be

13h

Biological scientists identify pathways that extend lifespan by 500%

Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, Calif., and Nanjing University in China, have identified synergistic cellular pathways for longevity that amplify lifespan fivefold in C. elegans, a nematode worm used as a model in aging research.

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Pathways to changing the minds of climate deniers

Want to sway the opinion of climate deniers? Start by acknowledging and respecting people's beliefs. That's one of four suggestions a Stanford researcher unearthed in a review of the psychology behind why some people reject climate change despite knowledge or access to the facts.

13h

Affirmative action policies increased minority enrollment at Brazilian universities

Affirmative action policies (AAP) such as quota systems based on racial or socio-economic criteria are often recommended as a way to increase enrollment of underrepresented students in higher education. But those policies can be controversial and their results are sometimes questioned.

13h

Shark and ray vision comes into focus

Vision is a crucial sense for most animals, and vertebrates have evolved a highly adaptable set of opsin genes that generate light-sensitive pigments to decode the retinal image. These opsins include a rod opsin to help see in low light, and four classes of cone opsins to see in bright light and detect colors across the visible light spectrum.

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'Resurrection ecology' of 600-year-old water fleas used to understand pollution adaptation

One of the leading threats to lakes since the rise of agriculture are runoffs from fertilizer, in the form of high phosphorus levels. These can trigger devastating events like eutrophication, where deadly algal blooms thrive on phosphorus, and in the process, outcompete and choke off vital nutrients from the rest of the lake.

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Study finds deforestation is changing animal communication

Deforestation is changing the way monkeys communicate in their natural habitat, according to a new study.

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Shark and ray vision comes into focus

Vision is a crucial sense for most animals, and vertebrates have evolved a highly adaptable set of opsin genes that generate light-sensitive pigments to decode the retinal image. These opsins include a rod opsin to help see in low light, and four classes of cone opsins to see in bright light and detect colors across the visible light spectrum.

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'Resurrection ecology' of 600-year-old water fleas used to understand pollution adaptation

One of the leading threats to lakes since the rise of agriculture are runoffs from fertilizer, in the form of high phosphorus levels. These can trigger devastating events like eutrophication, where deadly algal blooms thrive on phosphorus, and in the process, outcompete and choke off vital nutrients from the rest of the lake.

13h

Study finds deforestation is changing animal communication

Deforestation is changing the way monkeys communicate in their natural habitat, according to a new study.

13h

NEID exoplanet instrument sees first light

The new NEID instrument, now installed at the 3.5-meter WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Southern Arizona, USA, has made its first observations. The NSF-NASA funded instrument is designed to measure the motion of nearby stars with extreme precision—roughly three times better than the previous generation of state-of-the-art instruments—allowing us to detect, determine the mass of

13h

Inga förändrade beteenden hos fiskar i korallrev på grund av havsförsurning

Tidigare studier har hävdat att havsförsurning förändrar beteenden hos fiskar på korallrev, så att de lockas av lukten av rovfisk och tappar förmågan att hitta hem. Nu visar en större studie, att havsförsurning inte alls påverkar beteendet hos korallrevsfiskar. Dessutom visar forskarna att de äldre resultaten är så extrema att de i princip är statistiskt omöjliga att få fram. Det är viktigt att p

13h

Harry and Meghan Won't Play the Game

The unofficial motto of the Queen Mother was simple: "Never complain, never explain." It was an attitude influenced by her aristocratic upbringing—in which a "stiff upper lip" was highly prized—and the sense that the royal family must retain its mystery to survive. It is a motto that Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan Markle, have comprehensively rejected. The couple's announcement that they will

13h

Penn shows giving entire course of radiation treatment in less than a second is feasible

Cancer patients may one day be able to get their entire course of radiation therapy in less than a second rather than coming in for treatment over the course of several weeks, and researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania have taken the first steps toward making it a reality.

14h

Half of British women 'have poor sexual health'

Research highlights need to reverse cuts to NHS sexual health services, experts say Almost half of women in Britain have poor sexual health – almost three times the rate in men – researchers have said. Women's sexual problems have been found to be more varied than those experienced by men. Nearly a third of all women were found to experience difficulties rooted in a lack of interest in sex – a pr

14h

Fake humans are getting business models to fuel their growth.

submitted by /u/gideonro [link] [comments]

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Efficient network navigation with partial information

We propose a information theoretical framework to capture transition and information costs of network navigation models. Based on the minimum description length principle and the Markov decision process, we demonstrate that efficient global navigation can be achieved with only partial information. Additionally, we derived a scalable algorithm for optimal solutions under certain conditions. The pro

15h

The Costs of China's Belt and Road Expansion

When I returned to Xigang after five years, I couldn't recognize it. What had been a small but generally well-maintained beach town had become a sprawling mess of a city; construction, mud, and piles of garbage were seemingly everywhere. The Han Chinese with whom I spoke trumpeted the new opportunities that Beijing was bringing to the local Gaomian ethnic minority in this frontier outpost. The Ga

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Dna fra barnebarn løser mystisk sag om lig i grotte

Genteknologi afslører, at det var liget af en øksemorder, der blev fundet i 1979.

15h

Illusion involving fake poo and rubber hand could help people with OCD

The "rubber hand illusion", where people come to believe an artificial hand is their own, could help people with obsessive compulsive disorder face their fears

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Team's fabricated corneal tissue allows closer look at how eyes heal

University of Texas at Dallas researchers have demonstrated a technique in the lab for fabricating tiny strands of collagen called fibrils to facilitate further research on the eye's repair process. The method was detailed in a new study published in the December issue of the journal Biomedical Microdevices. The study was funded in part by a $1.8 million, five-year National Institutes of Health gr

16h

Gene network helps to turn white fat into beneficial calorie-burning fat

1.9 billion people in the world are overweight. Of these, 650 million people are obese, which increases the risk of secondary diseases such as cancer. Professor Martin Klingenspor and his team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) examine how our fat metabolism affects our health. In cooperation with the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), the team has uncovered a network of gen

16h

'Resurrection ecology' of 600-year-old water fleas used to understand pollution adaptation

By taking advantage of the unique genomic model organism of tiny waterfleas, or Daphnia, an international team of researchers has now analyzed Daphnia from a phosphorus-rich Minnesota lake — and compared it to revived, 600-year-old Daphnia dormant eggs found in the bottom sediments — to better understand how these creatures cope with a dramatic environmental change.

16h

Study finds deforestation is changing animal communication

Deforestation is changing the way monkeys communicate in their natural habitat, according to a new study.This study, led by an anthropologist at the University of Waterloo, offers the first evidence in animal communication scholarship of differences in vocal behaviours in response to different types of forest edge areas.

16h

Shark and ray vision comes into focus

Until now, little has been known about the evolution of vision in cartilaginous fishes, particularly sharks and their genetic cousins, the rays. In a new study, it has been shown that all cartilaginous fishes, similar to the marine mammals, have lost the SWS1 and SWS2 opsin genes. Sharks and rays do contain both rod and cone photoreceptors; however rays possess two cone opsin genes whereas sharks

16h

Contaminating a fake rubber hand could help people overcome OCD, study suggests

The famous, but bizarre, 'rubber hand illusion' could help people who suffer from obsessive compulsive disorder overcome their condition without the often unbearable stress of exposure therapy, suggests new research.

16h

Breast density notification laws not effective for all women

A new Yale study suggests that state-mandated notifications on mammogram reports intended to inform women of the health risks related to breast density are not worded effectively.

16h

Tea drinkers live longer

Drinking tea at least three times a week is linked with a longer and healthier life, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

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Fagfolk advarer: Kemiske stoffer i vandmiljøet bliver »nærmest ignoreret«

PLUS. EU kræver god kemisk tilstand i vandmiljøet i 2027, og ifølge Miljøstyrelsen er Danmark godt på vej. Kritikere mener dog, at vi er meget langt fra målet, og nu rejses sagen politisk.

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Implantable artificial kidney achieves preclinical milestone

submitted by /u/croatoan182 [link] [comments]

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China Identifies New Virus Causing Pneumonialike Illness

The new coronavirus doesn't appear to be readily spread by humans, but researchers caution that more study is needed.

18h

Could pancreatitis be a stress hormone deficiency?

Researchers find that humans and mice with pancreatitis are deficient in a stress hormone called FGF21.

19h

Bioderivatization as a concept for renewable production of chemicals that are toxic or poorly soluble in the liquid phase [Applied Biological Sciences]

Bio-based production technologies may complement or replace petroleum-based production of chemicals, but they face a number of technical challenges, including product toxicity and/or water insolubility. Plants and microorganisms naturally biosynthesize chemicals that often are converted into derivatives with reduced toxicity or enhanced solubility. Inspired by this principle, we propose a…

19h

Life-history models reconstruct mammalian evolution [Commentaries]

While ecologists sometimes bemoan the complexities of the discipline, several of the overarching patterns of nature can be boiled down to surprisingly simple terms. One of the most intriguing of these is Damuth's law (1) that population density is scaled with body mass raised to the power of −3/4 irrespective…

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Designing cyclic competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) analogs with pan-group quorum-sensing inhibition activity in Streptococcus pneumoniae [Chemistry]

Streptococcus pneumoniae is an opportunistic human pathogen that utilizes the competence regulon, a quorum-sensing circuitry, to acquire antibiotic resistance genes and initiate its attack on the human host. Interception of the competence regulon can therefore be utilized to study S. pneumoniae cell−cell communication and behavioral changes, as well as attenuate…

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Muscle force is modulated by internal pressure [Commentaries]

Fluid pressure is generated in muscle during normal activity (1). This "intramuscular pressure" is correlated with the development of force during muscle contraction, but it is rarely considered in models of muscle function and its implications for muscle performance in vivo are unknown. Sleboda and Roberts (2) show that intramuscular…

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Channelization cascade in landscape evolution [Environmental Sciences]

The hierarchy of channel networks in landscapes displays features that are characteristic of nonequilibrium complex systems. Here we show that a sequence of increasingly complex ridge and valley networks is produced by a system of partial differential equations coupling landscape evolution dynamics with a specific catchment area equation. By means…

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Expansion, in vivo-ex vivo cycling, and genetic manipulation of primary human hepatocytes [Medical Sciences]

Primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) are an essential tool for modeling drug metabolism and liver disease. However, variable plating efficiencies, short lifespan in culture, and resistance to genetic manipulation have limited their use. Here, we show that the pyrrolizidine alkaloid retrorsine improves PHH repopulation of chimeric mice on average 10-fold and…

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A cell atlas of the adult Drosophila midgut [Cell Biology]

Studies of the adult Drosophila midgut have led to many insights in our understanding of cell-type diversity, stem cell regeneration, tissue homeostasis, and cell fate decision. Advances in single-cell RNA sequencing provide opportunities to identify new cell types and molecular features. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to characterize the transcriptome…

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A unified machine-learning protocol for asymmetric catalysis as a proof of concept demonstration using asymmetric hydrogenation [Chemistry]

Design of asymmetric catalysts generally involves time- and resource-intensive heuristic endeavors. In view of the steady increase in interest toward efficient catalytic asymmetric reactions and the rapid growth in the field of machine learning (ML) in recent years, we envisaged dovetailing these two important domains. We selected a set of…

19h

New York State Investigates Christian Health Cost-Sharing Affiliate

Subpoenas have been issued to a company that solicits memberships for a health insurance alternative that offers no guarantees for covering medical bills.

19h

Skeptical Science New Research for Week #1, 2020

Supply Side How are we doing with CO2 emissions? It's an important question, increasingly posed to a mixed bag of CO2 contributors who may or may not provide accurate reportage. Liu et al present a new, additional means of measurement based on satellite observations of nitrogen dioxide co-emitted from coal-fired power plants, in A methodology to constrain carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired

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Doubling down: Researchers investigate compound climate risks

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Daniel Grossman It was a grim day in Moscow on July 25, 2010. The English-language Moscow Times reported that the Russian capital had broken the 1936 temperature record for July: 98 degrees Fahrenheit. That month, the city, where air conditioning was (and still is) rare, was an average of 32 degrees Fahrenheit hotter than a normal July. Plumes of

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Ancient Viking Runestone Warned of 'Extremely Ominous' Climate Crisis, Scholars Say

The longest runic inscription in the world isn't what we thought.

19h

UK meteorite hunt thwarted by equipment damage

Scientists' quest to find Antarctica's "missing" space rocks is beaten into submission by hard ice.

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Plastic packaging ban 'could harm environment'

Stopping plastic packaging could lead to higher carbon alternatives, a Parliamentary report says.

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SpaceX tests black satellite to reduce 'megaconstellation' threat to astronomy

Nature, Published online: 09 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00041-4 Latest launch includes 'DarkSat' prototype to reduce reflection from fleets of broadband Internet satellites.

20h

Virtual reality, real injuries: How to reduce physical risk in VR

Carpal tunnel, stiff shoulders, eye-strain headaches — these are all well-known side effects of prolonged computer use. But what happens when you step away from the desktop and into virtual reality? A recent study assessed how some common virtual reality movements contribute to muscle strain and discomfort. It's an effort to ensure future user safety in this fast-growing technology that's used no

20h

Sony's Concept Car Puts Entertainment in the Driver's Seat

The Vision-S showcases big screens, sensors, and a supremely comfortable ride.

20h

China pneumonia outbreak may be caused by Sars-type virus: WHO

World Health Organization says a new coronavirus, the family linked to Sars and Mers, may be behind Wuhan cases A cluster of more than 50 pneumonia cases in the central Chinese city of Wuhan may be due to a newly emerging member of the family of viruses that caused the deadly Sars and Mers outbreaks, according to the World Health Organization. While the UN health agency said it needed more compre

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