Search Posts

nyheder2020januar14

The Ocean Is Warming at a Rate of 5 Atom Bombs Per Second, Scientists Warn

"It's about five Hiroshima bombs of heat, every second, day and night, 365 days a year."

53min

Analyzing DNA in soil could be an effective way of tracking animals

It's hard to protect something you can't find. A new Stanford study reveals sampling soil for animals' left-behind DNA can provide valuable information for conservation efforts—with significantly less cost and time—than currently used methods, such as camera traps.

26min

Animals reduce the symmetry of their markings to improve camouflage

Some forms of camouflage have evolved in animals to exploit a loophole in the way predators perceive their symmetrical markings. The University of Bristol findings, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B today, describe how animals have evolved to mitigate this defensive disadvantage in their coloration.

4min

What keeps couples together

In mammals, pair bonds are very rare, one of the few exceptions being red titi monkeys. Researchers from the German Primate Center have now investigated how pair relationships work in titi monkeys. Their results support the 'male-services hypothesis': Males provide a useful service by taking more care of the offspring and defending the territory against intruders, while females are more involved i

4min

Having less sex linked to earlier menopause

Women who engage in sexual activity weekly or monthly have a lower risk of entering menopause early relative to those who report having some form of sex less than monthly, according to a new UCL study.

4min

Miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy may trigger long-term post-traumatic stress

One in six women experience long-term post-traumatic stress following miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy.

4min

Analyzing DNA in soil could be an effective way of tracking animals

Genetic material left behind by animals can provide critical clues to aid conservation and research. New Stanford research shows studying DNA in soil samples can be more effective, efficient and affordable than traditional tracking methods, such as camera traps, for assessing biodiversity.

4min

Miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy may trigger PTSD and depression

Around one in six women who experience early pregnancy loss have symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety or depression nine months later

8min

Having more sex makes early menopause less likely, research finds

Study of nearly 3,000 women suggests body may 'choose' not to invest in ovulation Women who have sex more often are less likely to have an early menopause, according to research that raises the intriguing possibility that lifestyle factors could play a more significant role than previously thought in determining when the menopause occurs. The study, based on data collected from nearly 3,000 women

11min

Scientists cite parasite factor in beard attractiveness debate

Scientists say women who are more repulsed by lice are less likely to find beards attractive Prince Harry sports one, Justin Trudeau has recently grown one , and Brian Blessed's is almost its own being. But are beards attractive? As the old adage goes: "Depends on the man, depends on the beard." Now researchers have found there might be another factor: whether a potential partner fears there migh

11min

Reconnecting with nature triggers eco-actions

People with access to green spaces are more likely to be more environmentally friendly, study finds.

13min

Animals reduce the symmetry of their markings to improve camouflage

Some forms of camouflage have evolved in animals to exploit a loophole in the way predators perceive their symmetrical markings. The University of Bristol findings, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B today, describe how animals have evolved to mitigate this defensive disadvantage in their colouration.

14min

Animals reduce the symmetry of their markings to improve camouflage

Some forms of camouflage have evolved in animals to exploit a loophole in the way predators perceive their symmetrical markings. The University of Bristol findings, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B today, describe how animals have evolved to mitigate this defensive disadvantage in their colouration.

14min

Paleontologists Dig Into a Giant Sloth Boneyard

Ancient drought, and unfortunate bathroom habits, may have doomed some Ice Age sloths. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18min

Lab workers suffer long hours, bullying and stress

Wellcome study reveals 'shocking portrait of research environment'

26min

What keeps couples together

In mammals, pair bonds are very rare, one of the few exceptions being the red titi monkeys of South America. These relatively small tree dwellers live in pairs or small family groups and are characterized by the fact that the males take intensive care of their offspring. A team of researchers from the German Primate Center—Leibniz Institute for Primate Research has now investigated how pair relati

26min

Aston Martin's $189,000 DBX SUV Conquers the Arabian Desert

The luxury brand wants its first SUV to be a multi-terrain all-star, and that means leaving the pavement behind.

26min

What keeps couples together

In mammals, pair bonds are very rare, one of the few exceptions being the red titi monkeys of South America. These relatively small tree dwellers live in pairs or small family groups and are characterized by the fact that the males take intensive care of their offspring. A team of researchers from the German Primate Center—Leibniz Institute for Primate Research has now investigated how pair relati

31min

Analyzing DNA in soil could be an effective way of tracking animals

It's hard to protect something you can't find. A new Stanford study reveals sampling soil for animals' left-behind DNA can provide valuable information for conservation efforts—with significantly less cost and time—than currently used methods, such as camera traps.

31min

HIV 'hotspots' not necessarily major drivers of new infections

Areas of high HIV prevalence, known as 'hotspots,' do not necessarily fuel the epidemic in the wider population, say researchers.

47min

New parasitoid wasp species discovered in the Amazon — can manipulate host's behavior

A research group studying the diversity of parasitoid insects around the world. Parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera) are one of the most species rich animal taxa on Earth, but their tropical diversity is still poorly known. The group discovered 15 new, sizable species that parasitize spiders in the lowland rainforests of the Amazon and the cloud forests of the Andes.

1h

Skin cancer suppressor found

A promising route to develop new treatments for skin cancer has been identified by the UK's University of Bath scientists, who have found a molecule that suppresses melanoma tumour growth.

1h

1h

1h

Author Correction: Comparisons of different indices of low muscle mass in relationship with cardiometabolic disorder

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57828-8

1h

Author Correction: Aeolian transport of viable microbial life across the Atacama Desert, Chile: Implications for Mars

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57444-6

1h

1h

Author Correction: Lithospheric mantle buoyancy: the role of tectonic convergence and mantle composition

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57833-x

1h

1h

Author Correction: Elevated numbers of PD-L1 expressing B cells are associated with the development of AIDS-NHL

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57442-8

1h

Publisher Correction: Nanomagnetic encoding of shape-morphing micromachines

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1888-6

1h

Publisher Correction: TGF-β orchestrates fibrogenic and developmental EMTs via the RAS effector RREB1

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1956-y

1h

In mice, alcohol dependence results in brain-wide remodeling of functional architecture

Using novel imaging technologies, researchers produce first whole-brain atlas at single-cell resolution, revealing how alcohol addiction and abstinence remodel neural physiology and function in mice.

1h

Resale ticket markets benefit sports teams and fans

New research reveals that the resale ticket market also appeals to sports fans who normally buy season tickets.

1h

1h

1h

1h

Climate at mercy of politics in 2020, experts warn

submitted by /u/MayonaiseRemover [link] [comments]

1h

Cuba found to be the most sustainably developed country in the world

submitted by /u/MayonaiseRemover [link] [comments]

1h

1h

1h

1h

An emotionally intelligent AI could support astronauts on a trip to Mars

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

1h

1h

1h

1h

Clothes last longer and shed fewer microfibers in quicker, cooler washing cycles

First research into impact of wash cycle times shows that shorter, cooler washes: help clothes keep their color and last longer, when compared to warmer, longer cycles; release significantly fewer microfibers into wastewater; significantly reduce color transfer, a major cause of lights and whites becoming duller.

1h

Burnout linked with irregular heartbeat

Feeling excessively tired, devoid of energy, demoralized, and irritable? You may have burnout, a syndrome associated with a potentially deadly heart rhythm disturbance.

1h

Mathematicians divided over faculty hiring practices that require proof of efforts to promote diversity

Hundreds choose sides, with each position counting numerical data to support their view

1h

Betty Pat Gatliff, Whose Forensic Art Solved Crimes, Dies at 89

She used clay to reconstruct the faces of the missing and murdered, in the hope of helping police departments learn who they were.

1h

An Alarming Windows Bug, a Triumph for Tesla, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

1h

Clothes last longer and shed fewer microfibers in quicker, cooler washing cycles

First research into impact of wash cycle times shows that shorter, cooler washes: help clothes keep their color and last longer, when compared to warmer, longer cycles; release significantly fewer microfibers into wastewater; significantly reduce color transfer, a major cause of lights and whites becoming duller.

1h

Windows 10 Has a Security Flaw So Severe the NSA Disclosed It

In a shift toward transparency, the National Security Agency announced a bug that could have left over 900 million PCs vulnerable to attack.

1h

Hotel star ratings are useless. Here's how to read reviews the right way.

Good reading comprehension may lead to sunny, relaxing, poolside vacations. (anyaberkut via Depositphotos/) Start planning a vacation or business trip today, and you're probably going to do most of it yourself. Flights, lodging, rental cars, theme park tickets —everything's easily available online. And an enormous amount of that work, particularly when it comes to choosing a hotel, involves sifti

1h

Infectious disease defenses among ancient hominid contributions to adaptation of modern humans

In a new study published in the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, scientists Alexandre Gouy and Laurent Excoffier have developed new computational tools to better analyze human genome datasets, and found more evidence of a legacy of ancient hominid adaptation, particularly to help fight off infectious diseases like malaria.

2h

A 97-Year-Old Philosopher Faces His Own Mortality

In his 1996 book about death, Herbert Fingarette argued that fearing one's own demise was irrational. When you die, he wrote, "there is nothing." Why should we fear the absence of being when we won't be there ourselves to suffer it? Twenty years later, facing his own mortality, the philosopher realized that he'd been wrong. Death began to frighten him, and he couldn't think himself out of it. Fin

2h

Boeing 777 Dumps Fuel on California Schoolchildren

A Cruel Joke Seventeen children and nine adults are being treated for minor injuries today after an aircraft approaching LAX dumped jet fuel over an elementary school playground in Cudahy, California, The Los Angeles Times reports — a canny metaphor, perhaps, for a next generation being handed a planet ravaged by fossil fuel-induced climate change. "All minor injuries with no transports to local

2h

The wisdom of crowds: What smart cities can learn from a dead ox and live fish

In 1906, Francis Galton was at a country fair where attendees had the opportunity to guess the weight of a dead ox. Galton took the guesses of 787 fair-goers and found that the average guess was only one pound off of the correct weight — even when individual guesses were off base.

2h

UC Davis scientists provide novel strategies for parasitic weed control

Parasitic weeds are among the world's most economically damaging agricultural pests. They use an organ called the haustorium to build connections with host plants and draw nutrients from them. While the majority of research on parasitic plant biology and control of root parasitic weeds has been heavily focused on seed germination, scientists at UC Davis focused on the development of haustorium and

2h

Resale ticket markets benefit sports teams and fans

New research co-authored by Yanwen Wang, an assistant professor in the UBC Sauder School of Business, reveals that the resale ticket market also appeals to sports fans who normally buy season tickets.

2h

Who's liable? The AV or the human driver?

Researchers have developed a joint fault-based liability rule that can be used to regulate both self-driving car manufacturers and human drivers. They propose a game-theoretic model that describes the strategic interactions among the law maker, the self-driving car manufacturer, the self-driving car, and human drivers, and examine how, as the market penetration of AVs increases, the liability rule

2h

Ginkgo's Extreme Longevity Credited to Immune System

Genes related to the immune system stay active throughout the tree's life.

2h

In mice, alcohol dependence results in brain-wide remodeling of functional architecture

Using novel imaging technologies, researchers produce first whole-brain atlas at single-cell resolution, revealing how alcohol addiction and abstinence remodel neural physiology and function in mice.

2h

Massive and malodorous – world's biggest flower found

A 111cm-wide Rafflesia was recently discovered but these giants are in danger The largest single flower ever recorded was found recently in Sumatra, Indonesia, measuring a reported 111cm (3.64ft) across. This was a specimen of Rafflesia tuan-mudae and beat the previous largest flower record of 107cm for Rafflesia arnoldii , also in Sumatra. Rafflesia is not only a giant flower, but it has no leav

2h

Unlock CBD's Full Potential With These Cutting-Edge Topicals

According to Gallup , 14 percent of U.S. adults say they use CBD wellness products on a regular basis. Though scientific research on CBD is still in the early stages, anecdotal evidence suggests it is capable of providing effective and gentle relief from things like pain, inflammation, insomnia, stress, and anxiety. The only problem is that most people take their CBD orally, which is not the most

2h

Scientists Keep Human Livers Alive In Machine For a Week

A team of researchers from the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland say they've invented a machine that can increase the length of time a human liver can be kept alive outside body from just a few hours to an entire week. The breakthrough could make a much larger number of donor livers available to a wider variety of patients in need of a transplant. The machine even appears to heal damaged

2h

World on alert for potential spread of new SARS-like virus found in China

Pneumonia outbreak in Wuhan appears to subside, but many questions remain about routes and extent of transmission

2h

Fisker Ocean: Can This Electric SUV Really Come in Cheaper Than Tesla Model 3?

News about the Fisker Ocean continues to build. The performance specs are yet to come, while financing numbers all sound good. Really good on the cost part: $37,499 before tax credits, $29,999 after the $7,500 federal tax credit, or $379 for a lease. That's less than a Tesla Model 3. But the Model 3 is shipping. At this point, Fisker is talking about 2021 production and delivery of first cars in

3h

Deep-sea mining's impact on microbes

The essential roles that microbes play in deep-sea ecosystems are at risk from the potential environmental impacts of mining, a new article reports. The study reviews what is known about microbes in these environments and assesses how mining could impact their important environmental roles.

3h

Hyperactive immune system gene causes schizophrenia-like changes in mice

Excessive activity of an immune system gene previously linked to schizophrenia reproduces neural and behavioral aspects of the disease in mice, according to a new study. The finding provides mechanistic support for the importance of the gene in the development of schizophrenia, and may offer a new avenue for therapy development.

3h

More federal funding needed to increase Americans' active transportation habits

The federal government has allocated only about 2 percent of its transportation funds to encourage walking and cycling, not nearly enough to make a significant difference, according to new research.

3h

Racial disparities in heart failure explained

Researchers have uncovered evidence that the higher prevalence of 'malignant' enlargement of the heart among blacks contributes to the higher incidence of heart failure in this population.

3h

Including irregular time intervals improves animal movement studies

Studies of animal movement and behavior — including those addressing disease spread and animal conservation — should monitor animals at both regular and irregular time points to improve understanding of animal movement behavior, according to a new study by statisticians.

3h

Researchers unlock secrets of cell division, define role for protein elevated in cancer

Researchers at Princeton University have successfully recreated a key process involved in cell division in a test tube, uncovering the vital role played by a protein that is elevated in over 25% of all cancers.

3h

Who's liable? The AV or the human driver?

Researchers at Columbia Engineering and Columbia Law School have developed a joint fault-based liability rule that can be used to regulate both self-driving car manufacturers and human drivers. They propose a game-theoretic model that describes the strategic interactions among the law maker, the self-driving car manufacturer, the self-driving car, and human drivers, and examine how, as the market

3h

How guest worker visas could transform the US immigration system | David J. Bier

The United States can create a more humane immigration system; in fact, it's been done before, says policy analyst David J. Bier. Pointing to the historical success of the US guest worker program, which allows foreign workers to legally enter and work in the country, Bier shows why expanding the program to Central Americans could alleviate the border crisis and provide new opportunities for immigr

3h

Ældre end Jorden: Forskere finder syv milliarder år gammelt materiale i meteorit, der ramte Australien

Meteoritten indeholder stjernestøv, som fløj rundt i rummet, før solsystemet opstod.

3h

Danske CO2-giganter øger udslip, men slipper for at betale klima-afgifter

Regeringens støttepartier kræver, at største CO2-udledere også skal betale.

3h

Galactic collision helped shape the Milky Way 11.5B years ago

Researchers have pinpointed an early galactic merger that helped shape the Milky Way. The merger—a collision, actually—happened 11.5 billion years ago. That's when a small galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus slammed into what then existed of the Milky Way, Earth's home galaxy, which is about 13.5 billion years old. "We know today that the Milky Way was formed by the merger of many small galaxies . This

3h

How Viruses Secretly Control the Planet

Bacteria help drive Earth's chemical cycles and climate. Viruses drive the bacteria. ocean-viruses_top-crop-3.jpg In this microscope image, microbes in ocean water are revealed by fluorescent dye staining their DNA. The larger green dots are mostly bacteria and archaea. The tiny dots are viruses. Image credits: Jed Fuhrman Rights information: This image may only be reproduced with this Inside Sc

3h

Brazil to open new Antarctic research base

Brazil will open a new research base in Antarctica this week, officials said Tuesday, eight years after a fire destroyed its original scientific outpost.

3h

Including irregular time intervals improves animal movement studies

Studies of animal movement and behavior–including those addressing disease spread and animal conservation–should monitor animals at both regular and irregular time points to improve understanding of animal movement behavior, according to a new study by Penn State statisticians. The study is the first to provide guidance about sampling regimes for this type of biological research.

3h

From smoke going round the world to aerosol levels, NASA observes Australia's bushfires

NASA scientists using data from its NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite, has traced the movement of the smoke coming off the Australian fires across the globe showing that it has circumnavigated the Earth. In an image created from data gathered by the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Nadir Mapper on Suomi NPP, a black circle shows the smoke which had been traced from its origins coming back to th

3h

Street network patterns reveal worrying worldwide trend towards urban sprawl

New research from McGill University and the University of California, Santa Cruz has found that the local streets of the world's cities are becoming less connected, a global trend that is driving urban sprawl and discouraging the use of public transportation.

3h

Study weighs deep-sea mining's impact on microbes

The essential roles that microbes play in deep-sea ecosystems are at risk from the potential environmental impacts of mining, a new paper in Limnology and Oceanography reports. The study reviews what is known about microbes in these environments and assesses how mining could impact their important environmental roles.

3h

More federal funding needed to increase Americans' active transportation habits

The federal government has allocated only about 2 percent of its transportation funds to encourage walking and cycling, not nearly enough to make a significant difference, according to Ralph Buehler, associate professor and chair of the urban affairs and planning program in the Virginia Tech School of Public and International Affairs.

3h

Bacteria Helped Plants Evolve to Live on Land

Soil bacteria may have taken residence in early algae species, gifting the algae with the ability to withstand drier conditions on land. Annie Sneed reports.

3h

If Russia Hacked Burisma, Brace for the Leaks to Follow

The Kremlin likely hacked the oil giant. Its next play: selectively release—and even forge—documents. Did the US learn enough from 2016 to ignore them?

3h

Researchers: Grindr and Tinder Are Selling Your Personal Data

Data for Sale A new report has found that some of the world's most popular dating platforms, including Grindr, OkCupid, and Tinder , have been covertly selling their Android app users' sensitive data to third-party companies. This information may include a user's sexual orientation, history of drug use, and even their precise real-time location — an invasive revenue model, according to the report

3h

Scientists Detect Epic Neutron Star Collision

The Humanity! Astronomers at the LIGO observatory have — for the second time ever — detected the cosmic ripples given off by a brutal collision between two distant neutron stars. LIGO scientists actually picked up the gravitational waves given off by the merger back in April, but weren't able to confirm their source until recently, according to a press release . The merger is unusual in that the

3h

Cloning Scientist Sentenced to 12 Years in Prison

More than five years after his arrest, Li Ning of China Agricultural University is convicted of stealing nearly $5 million of grant money.

3h

Researchers trace galactic history in ancient grains of alien sand

Dust grains like these from the Egg Nebula may have survived the formation of the solar system, and made their way to Chicago relatively intact. (NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA/) If the cosmos has one skill, it's alchemy: the ability to transform one substance into another. Stars create larger atoms from smaller ones, and expel metals and dust when they die. Gravity sculpts that

3h

Racial disparities in heart failure explained

Researchers at UT Southwestern have uncovered evidence that the higher prevalence of 'malignant' enlargement of the heart among blacks contributes to the higher incidence of heart failure in this population.

4h

Scientists Find an Explanation for Powerful Gamma-Ray Bursts: Binary Stars

A new study shows that being in a binary star system can keep a massive star spinning fast enough to produce such powerful explosions.

4h

The Parasite That Infects Mouse Brains and Makes Them More Curious

Before it reaches humans, T. gondii infects cats. And to get to cats, it first manipulates rodents.

4h

How to Watch NASA's Upcoming Spacewalks to Fix the ISS

The next three spacewalks will complete fixes to the space station's solar panels and Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer particle detector.

4h

Colloidal quantum dot laser diodes are just around the corner

Los Alamos scientists have incorporated meticulously engineered colloidal quantum dots into a new type of light emitting diodes (LEDs) containing an integrated optical resonator, which allows them to function as lasers. These novel, dual-function devices clear the path towards versatile, manufacturing-friendly laser diodes. The technology can potentially revolutionize numerous fields from photonic

4h

Will Taal Volcano Explosively Erupt? Here's What Scientists Are Watching

The seismic rumblings of the Philippines' second most active volcano hold clues to what it might do — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Will Taal Volcano Explosively Erupt? Here's What Scientists Are Watching

The seismic rumblings of the Philippines' second most active volcano hold clues to what it might do — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Practical, stylish rain boots to get you through the wet season

No more wet socks and prune feet. ( Brandy S via Unsplash/) A worthwhile pair of waterproof boots will keep your feet warm and dry in a downpour—and when you're doing muddy yard work immediately afterward. Some of our favorite boots are perfect for a chic city dweller, while others provide heavy-duty coverage befitting even the most dedicated gardener. Heavy-duty, flexible, and comfortable boots

4h

Researchers develop tool to identify molecular receptors in worms

Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) have developed a tool to identify molecular receptors in worms that are involved in sensing pheromones related to mating, an advance that could speed up neuroscience research into pheromones by eliminating months of work.

4h

Not so fast: Some batteries can be pushed too far

Intentional defects in batteries have given Rice University scientists a window into the hazards of pushing lithium-ion cells too far.

4h

NASA snow-chasers set to fly into East Coast winter storms

When giant white swirls of clouds cover the weather map with a winter storm warning, one question looms in the minds of people in its path: How much snow will it bring? With snow threatening access to roads, work, and school, snowfall is one of the most consequential winter weather phenomenon on the U.S. East Coast. It's also one of the most difficult to predict.

4h

A tool to democratize nanopore research

A nanopore is a tiny hole in a thin membrane with a diameter of around a billionth of a meter, or about the width of a single DNA molecule. The potential applications of these nanopores are so diverse—from medicine to information technology (IT)—that they could have a major impact on our daily lives. Now a team of researchers at the University of Ottawa is democratizing entry into the field of nan

4h

Robotic gripping mechanism mimics how sea anemones catch prey

Most robotic gripping mechanisms to date have relied on humanlike fingers or appendages, which sometimes struggle to provide the fine touch, flexibility or cost-effectiveness needed in some circumstances to hold onto objects. Recent work looks to provide a path forward for gripping robots from an unlikely source—the doughnut-shaped sea anemone.

4h

Galactic gamma-ray sources reveal birthplaces of high-energy particles

Nine sources of extremely high-energy gamma rays comprise a new catalog compiled by researchers with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory. All produce gamma rays with energies over 56 trillion electron volts (TeV) and three emit gamma rays extending to 100 TeV and beyond, making these the highest-energy sources ever observed in our galaxy. The catalog helps to explain whe

4h

3D printing of body parts is coming fast – but regulations are not ready

In the last few years, the use of 3D printing has exploded in medicine. Engineers and medical professionals now routinely 3D print prosthetic hands and surgical tools . But 3D printing has only just begun to transform the field. Today, a quickly emerging set of technologies known as bioprinting is poised to push the boundaries further. Bioprinting uses 3D printers and techniques to fabricate the

4h

Memory boost with just one look

HRL Laboratories, LLC, researchers have published results showing that targeted transcranial electrical stimulation during slow-wave sleep can improve metamemories of specific episodes by 20% after only one viewing of the episode, compared to controls. The same technology may offer a non-invasive treatment to mitigate bad memories that might cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Metamemory

4h

More federal funding needed to increase Americans' active transportation habits

'In general, women will only cycle if they think the entire ride will be safe,' said Buehler. 'If they perceive that there will be any danger at all along the way they will resist.'

4h

Scientists hope to defeat infections after discovering bacterial espionage

University of Tartu scientists hope to create a solution for chronic infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment, after having discovered mechanisms for listening in on sleeping bacteria.

4h

The Case for a Light Hand With AI and a Hard Line on China

In a WIRED Q&A, the US chief technology officer warns against overregulating tech, underestimating the Chinese, and losing America's lead in quantum computing.

4h

Tesla Is Now Worth More Than Ford and GM—Combined

Its stock has soared past $500 per share. That's a hopeful sign that the company might finally be executing smoothly.

4h

Hydrogen alarm for remote hydrogen leak detection

Hydrogen is considered as one of the promising alternative energy sources. Nevertheless, its application as an energy carrier is complicated due to its highly explosive nature when mixed with oxygen. These dangerous situations may arise, for example, in case of hydrogen leaks from the tank where it is stored.

4h

Researchers develop tool to identify molecular receptors in worms

Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) have developed a tool to identify molecular receptors in worms that are involved in sensing pheromones related to mating, an advance that could speed up neuroscience research into pheromones by eliminating months of work.

4h

Scientists hope to defeat infections after discovering bacterial espionage

University of Tartu scientists hope to create a solution for chronic infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment, after having discovered mechanisms for listening in on sleeping bacteria.

4h

Hot gas feeds spiral arms of the Milky Way

An international research team, with significant participation of astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), has gained important insights into the origin of the material in the spiral arms of the Milky Way, from which new stars are ultimately formed. By analysing properties of the galactic magnetic field, they were able to show that the dilute so-called warm ionized medium (W

4h

Bacteria Helped Plants Evolve to Live on Land

Soil bacteria may have taken residence in early algae species, gifting the algae with the ability to withstand drier conditions on land. Annie Sneed reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Bacteria Helped Plants Evolve to Live on Land

Soil bacteria may have taken residence in early algae species, gifting the algae with the ability to withstand drier conditions on land. Annie Sneed reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

New front emerges in battle to build giant telescope in Hawaii

TMT opponents try to win over other astronomers in priority-setting decadal survey

4h

The best keyboards for people who want to learn to play piano

Keys to begin your musical journey. (Clark Young via Unsplash/) There's a reason that piano is such a popular instrument for beginners, and it's got everything to do with those unmistakable black and white keys. With a repeating pattern and simple playing mechanic, piano endows players with the distinct feeling that infinite possibilities are right at your fingertips. You don't need to lug a behe

4h

How long will you have to wait before these CES technologies become real?

Lenovo's ThinkPad X1 has a folding display and will actually ship this year. (Stan Horaczek /) In many ways, the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is a hopeful way to start off the year. Tech companies show up in the desert with their latest and greatest inventions, innovations, and PowerPoint presentations in tow. Unfortunately, those promises don't always translate readily into real

4h

Brain model offers new insights into damage caused by stroke and other injuries

A UB researcher has developed a computer model of the human brain that more realistically simulates actual patterns of brain impairment than existing methods. The novel advancement creates a digital simulation environment that could help stroke victims and patients with other brain injuries by serving as a testing ground for hypotheses about specific neurological damage.

4h

Care for opioid use disorder is scarce in these states

Treatment for opioid problems is especially scarce in US states with Medicaid work requirements, a new study suggests. Medicaid work requirements allow states to drop people from their Medicaid health insurance rolls unless they can show that they're working, in school, have a disability, or are medically frail or receiving treatment for substance use disorder. The study also shows that states wi

4h

Former UMass post-doc faked data, says federal watchdog

The U.S. Office of Research Integrity has found a former post-doc at the University of Massachusetts Medical School guilty of misconduct stemming from falsification of data. The finding comes more than two years after a retraction referred to an investigation at U Mass. The ORI said Ozgur Tataroglu, who worked as a neurobiologist at the … Continue reading

5h

Artificial muscle sheets transform stem cells into bone

Specifically programmed materials can, under specific conditions, encourage stem cells to transform into bone cells. To do this, scientists implemented a so-called shape-memory polymer in stem cell research.

5h

Hyperactive immune system gene causes schizophrenia-like changes in mice

Excessive activity of an immune system gene previously linked to schizophrenia reproduces neural and behavioral aspects of the disease in mice, according to a new study publishing on January 14 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Ashley Comer and Alberto Cruz-Martín of Boston University and colleagues. The finding provides mechanistic support for the importance of the gene in the developmen

5h

Experts: To ease tensions, the U.S. and Iran must soften their rhetoric

For hostilities between the United States and Iran to de-escalate, both sides must move away from the rhetoric that binds them to escalatory action, two experts at Stanford University say. Here, Abbas Milani , director of Iranian studies, and Lisa Blaydes , a professor of political science and director of the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies, discuss US relations with Iran following events that

5h

Potential new treatment for preventing post traumatic stress disorder

Scientists have discovered the first biomarker unique to PTSD patients and they have created a peptide shown in a preclinical trial to treat and even prevent PTSD.

5h

Long-term memory performance depends upon gating system

Why do we remember some experiences for our entire lives but quickly forget others? The brain is constantly deciding which events are important enough for long-term storage. A new study sheds light on one element of that process.

5h

Genetic anomaly associated with poor response to common asthma treatment

A new study has uncovered a genetic anomaly associated with poor response to a common asthma treatment. The findings showed that asthmatic patients with the gene variant are less likely to respond to glucocorticoids and often develop severe asthma.

5h

Slippers that make your life instantly cozier

No more cold feet. ( Dima Pechurin via Unsplash/) There are some objects that quickly, miraculously make you feel more comforted: candles, a fuzzy blanket, a cup of tea, a good book, and, crucially, a pair of soft slippers. Below, some of our favorite slippers to tuck into after a long day out in the world. A cushy memory foam sole and a design suitable for a quick jaunt outdoors. (Amazon/) These

5h

Keep your baby close with these snug and secure carriers

Comfortable carriers for both you and your child. (Jens Johnsson via Unsplash/) Sometimes a stroller isn't always the best option for transporting your kid, especially if you're trying to catch a subway or go on a scenic hike with the whole family. If you'd rather keep your hands free and your baby on your person, carriers and wraps are a great alternative. But with so many out there to choose fr

5h

Study weighs deep-sea mining's impact on microbes

The essential roles that microbes play in deep-sea ecosystems are at risk from the potential environmental impacts of mining, a new paper in Limnology and Oceanography reports. The study reviews what is known about microbes in these environments and assesses how mining could impact their important environmental roles.

5h

The wisdom of crowds: What smart cities can learn from a dead ox and live fish

Antonie J. Jetter, associate professor of Engineering and Technology Management at Portland State University, studied the wisdom of crowds theory. Jetter found diverse crowds of local natural resource stakeholders can collectively produce complex environmental models very similar to those of trained experts. "I am excited about the possibilities for other complex systems," Jetter said.

5h

Generation and manipulation of spin currents for advanced electronic devices

ICN2 researchers, in the framework of the Graphene Flagship, at the UAB campus, demonstrate that spin currents can be generated and manipulated in graphene-based heterostructures at room temperature. The results of this study, published in Nature Materials, provide relevant information on the fundamental physics of the phenomena involved and open the door to new applications, such as the developme

5h

Astronomers Just Found (Another) Potentially Habitable Exoplanet. What Happens Next?

NASA's TESS spacecraft identified the unusual world around a red dwarf — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Street network patterns reveal worrying worldwide trend towards urban sprawl

New research has found that the local streets of the world's cities are becoming less connected, a global trend that is driving urban sprawl and discouraging the use of public transportation.

5h

Watch scientists use electricity to herd skin cells, like sheep

New technique could advance stem cell therapies, wound healing

5h

Street network patterns reveal worrying worldwide trend towards urban sprawl

New research from McGill University and the University of California, Santa Cruz has found that the local streets of the world's cities are becoming less connected, a global trend that is driving urban sprawl and discouraging the use of public transportation.

5h

Winners of the 2019 Ocean Art Underwater Photo Contest

The judging for the eighth annual Ocean Art Underwater Photo Contest , organized by the Underwater Photography Guide, has wrapped up, and the winning images and photographers have been announced. Greg Lecoeur took Best in Show with his image of a crabeater seal in Antarctica. The contest organizers have shared with us some of the winners and honorable mentions below, from the 16 categories of und

5h

Bushfire Smoke Causes Player To Forfeit Her Qualifying Match For Australian Open

Slovenia's Dalila Jakupovic was trying to make the first round of the tournament set to open next week. She had trouble breathing and later told reporters, "I was really scared that I would collapse." (Image credit: Daniel Pockett/Getty Images)

5h

A mysterious cluster of deaths amongst Amish children has finally been solved

The Amish eschew most cars, but that doesn't mean they avoid technology entirely. (Randy Fath/Unsplash/) In 2004, two Amish children—siblings, in fact—died while playing. They weren't doing anything particularly dangerous, just normal recreation, but somehow they both passed away suddenly. When their autopsies came back negative for any known underlying cause of death, the local Medical Examiner'

5h

Not so fast: Some batteries can be pushed too far

Fast charge and discharge of some lithium-ion batteries with intentional defects degrades their performance and endurance, according to engineers.

6h

Blood-clotting protein and blood platelets promote immune evasion, cancer progression

A new study reveals how a clotting protein and blood platelets can promote cancer progression and suppress immune responses to cancer.

6h

New strategy for treating advanced, progressing bile duct cancer

A new study shows how resistance to a promising targeted drug develops in patients with a rare, lethal cancer of the bile ducts called cholangiocarcinoma.

6h

'Swiss cheese' bones could be cause of unexplained low back pain

In experiments with genetically engineered and old mice, researchers say they have added to evidence that the vast majority of low back pain in people may be rooted in an overgrowth of pain-sensing nerves into spinal cartilaginous tissue.

6h

A controlled phage therapy can target drug-resistant bacteria while sidestepping potential unintended consequences

The fight against drug-resistant pathogens remains an intense one. While the Centers for Disease Control's (CDC) 2019 'biggest threats' report reveals an overall decrease in drug-resistant microbe-related deaths as compared to its previous report (2013) the agency also cautions that new forms of drug-resistant pathogens are still emerging.

6h

Ten Celestial Events You Don't Want to Miss in 2020

Whether you are a telescope enthusiast or just want to step outside to enjoy the night sky, these are the phenomena to look out for this year

6h

The NSA found a dangerous flaw in Windows and told Microsoft to fix it

The secretive security agency identified the vulnerability and is taking public credit as part of an effort to "build trust."

6h

Hjernen kan slet ikke følge med: Det sker i kroppen, når teenage-stemmen knækker

Det tager nogle måneder, før hjernen lærer at styre den dybere stemme, siger forsker.

6h

Gadgets for Life on a Miserable Planet

Everywhere I turned, there were signs that I didn't totally understand. "Can textiles empower mothers to share their personal experience of pregnancy?" one big, blue banner asked, fighting for attention among hundreds of others in a cavernous exhibition hall. "Shop with your DNA," implored another. Just around the corner, in lofted lights, a company promised that its products are "where sleep tec

6h

Why Normal People Want to Work in Silicon Valley

"It was easy to get me to want something," the New Yorker columnist Anna Wiener confesses in her tech-industry memoir, Uncanny Valley , out today. She left publishing for her first tech job, at a New York ebook start-up, in 2013, and almost immediately fell for the industry's charms. She moved to California to work at a mysterious data-analytics company, then an open-source software platform that

6h

In Russia's Far North, a Lone Group of Neanderthals May Have Been the Last of Their Kind

Near the Arctic Circle, a group of Neanderthals may have persisted for thousands of years after the rest of their species disappeared.

6h

Smart molecule can seek-and-destroy glioblastoma

An intelligent molecule could significantly extend the lives of patients with glioblastoma, research finds. Glioblastoma is an incurable and devastating brain cancer that affects people of all ages, regardless of their lifestyle. The molecule, called ZR2002, which can be administered orally and is capable of penetrating the blood-brain barrier, could delay the multiplication of glioblastoma stem

6h

Exosomes promote remarkable recovery in stroke

Scientists present brain-imaging data for a new stroke treatment that supported full recovery in swine, modeled with the same pattern of neurodegeneration as seen in humans with severe stroke.

6h

Colloidal quantum dot laser diodes are just around the corner

Scientists have incorporated meticulously engineered colloidal quantum dots into a new type of light emitting diodes (LEDs) containing an integrated optical resonator, which allows them to function as lasers. These novel, dual-function devices clear the path towards versatile, manufacturing-friendly laser diodes. The technology can potentially revolutionize numerous fields from photonics and optoe

6h

Galactic gamma-ray sources reveal birthplaces of high-energy particles

Nine sources of extremely high-energy gamma rays comprise a new catalog compiled by researchers with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory. All produce gamma rays with energies over 56 trillion electron volts (TeV) and three emit gamma rays extending to 100 TeV and beyond, making these the highest-energy sources ever observed in our galaxy. The catalog helps to explain whe

6h

Your microbiome reveals more about your health than your genes do

The microbes that live inside you say more than your genes do about your likelihood of developing health conditions ranging from asthma to cancer and schizophrenia

6h

How the fight over a Hawaii mega-telescope could change astronomy

Nature, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00076-7 Thirty Meter Telescope controversy is forcing scientists to grapple with how their research affects Indigenous peoples.

6h

Biologists extend worm lifespan by 500% in surprising discovery on aging

The experiment was conducted on C. elegans, a nematode species often used in research on aging. Humans evolved with the same cellular pathways, suggesting that the findings might help inform anti-aging therapies for humans. The new study focuses on the role that mitochondria play in the aging process. None A new study shows that altering two cellular pathways in a species of roundworm can extend

6h

Colloidal quantum dot laser diodes are just around the corner

Los Alamos scientists have incorporated meticulously engineered colloidal quantum dots into a new type of light emitting diodes (LEDs) containing an integrated optical resonator, which allows them to function as lasers. These novel, dual-function devices clear the path towards versatile, manufacturing-friendly laser diodes. The technology can potentially revolutionize numerous fields from photonic

6h

The targeted LHRH analog AEZS-108 alters expression of genes related to angiogenesis and development

In the present study, the research team investigated AEZS-108 induced cytotoxicity and the altered mRNA expression profile of regulatory factors related to angiogenesis and metastasis in LHRH receptor-positive OCM3 cells.

6h

From smoke going round the world to aerosol levels, NASA observes Australia's bushfires

NASA scientists using data from its NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite, has traced the movement of the smoke coming off the Australian fires across the globe showing that it has circumnavigated the Earth.

6h

When Female Athletes Take the Spotlight on TV

This story contains spoilers through Episode 3 of USA's Dare Me and through Season 1 of Netflix's Spinning Out . "There's something dangerous about the boredom of teenage girls," observes one such teenage girl in the opening minutes of the USA drama Dare Me . It's a grim statement, the type that belongs in a ruminative noir. But Dare Me isn't about hard-boiled detectives; it's about high-school c

6h

Siblings of children with intellectual disabilities score high on empathy and closeness

A new study finds that relationships between children and their siblings with intellectual disabilities are more positive than those between typically developing siblings.

6h

Researchers develop tool to identify molecular receptors in worms

Researchers have developed a laboratory tool that could speed up basic research for scientists working with the nematode C. elegans by tagging molecular receptors that are involved in sensing pheromones.

6h

New strategy in the fight against antibiotic resistance

Bioscience engineers have developed a new antibacterial strategy that weakens bacteria by preventing them from cooperating. Unlike with antibiotics, there is no resistance to this strategy.

6h

'Marshmallow test' redux: Children show better self-control when they depend on each other

The researchers say their experiments are the first to show that children are more willing to delay gratification for cooperative reasons than for individual goals.

6h

A general-purpose protein design framework based on mining sequence-structure relationships in known protein structures [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Current state-of-the-art approaches to computational protein design (CPD) aim to capture the determinants of structure from physical principles. While this has led to many successful designs, it does have strong limitations associated with inaccuracies in physical modeling, such that a reliable general solution to CPD has yet to be found….

6h

Corazonin signaling integrates energy homeostasis and lunar phase to regulate aspects of growth and sexual maturation in Platynereis [Developmental Biology]

The molecular mechanisms by which animals integrate external stimuli with internal energy balance to regulate major developmental and reproductive events still remain enigmatic. We investigated this aspect in the marine bristleworm, Platynereis dumerilii, a species where sexual maturation is tightly regulated by both metabolic state and lunar cycle. Our specific…

6h

Intratumoral injection of the seasonal flu shot converts immunologically cold tumors to hot and serves as an immunotherapy for cancer [Immunology and Inflammation]

Reprogramming the tumor microenvironment to increase immune-mediated responses is currently of intense interest. Patients with immune-infiltrated "hot" tumors demonstrate higher treatment response rates and improved survival. However, only the minority of tumors are hot, and a limited proportion of patients benefit from immunotherapies. Innovative approaches that make tumors hot can…

6h

Rescue of tomato spotted wilt virus entirely from complementary DNA clones [Microbiology]

Negative-stranded/ambisense RNA viruses (NSVs) include not only dangerous pathogens of medical importance but also serious plant pathogens of agronomic importance. Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is one of the most important plant NSVs, infecting more than 1,000 plant species, and poses major threats to global food security. The segmented negative-stranded/ambisense…

6h

High-yield monolayer graphene grids for near-atomic resolution cryoelectron microscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has become one of the most powerful techniques to reveal the atomic structures and working mechanisms of biological macromolecules. New designs of the cryo-EM grids—aimed at preserving thin, uniform vitrified ice and improving protein adsorption—have been considered a promising approach to achieving higher resolution with the…

6h

Proteome-wide observation of the phenomenon of life on the edge of solubility [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

To function effectively proteins must avoid aberrant aggregation, and hence they are expected to be expressed at concentrations safely below their solubility limits. By analyzing proteome-wide mass spectrometry data of Caenorhabditis elegans, however, we show that the levels of about three-quarters of the nearly 4,000 proteins analyzed in adult animals…

6h

The functionally relevant site for paxilline inhibition of BK channels [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The tremorgenic fungal alkaloid paxilline (PAX) is a commonly used specific inhibitor of the large-conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-dependent BK-type K+ channel. PAX inhibits BK channels by selective interaction with closed states. BK inhibition by PAX is best characterized by the idea that PAX gains access to the channel through the…

6h

Structure and regulation of human epithelial cell transforming 2 protein [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Epithelial cell transforming 2 (Ect2) protein activates Rho GTPases and controls cytokinesis and many other cellular processes. Dysregulation of Ect2 is associated with various cancers. Here, we report the crystal structure of human Ect2 and complementary mechanistic analyses. The data show the C-terminal PH domain of Ect2 folds back and…

6h

Munc13-1 MUN domain and Munc18-1 cooperatively chaperone SNARE assembly through a tetrameric complex [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Munc13-1 is a large multifunctional protein essential for synaptic vesicle fusion and neurotransmitter release. Its dysfunction has been linked to many neurological disorders. Evidence suggests that the MUN domain of Munc13-1 collaborates with Munc18-1 to initiate SNARE assembly, thereby priming vesicles for fast calcium-triggered vesicle fusion. The underlying molecular mechanism,…

6h

Crystal structure of human LDB1 in complex with SSBP2 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The Lim domain binding proteins (LDB1 and LDB2 in human and Chip in Drosophila) play critical roles in cell fate decisions through partnership with multiple Lim-homeobox and Lim-only proteins in diverse developmental systems including cardiogenesis, neurogenesis, and hematopoiesis. In mammalian erythroid cells, LDB1 dimerization supports long-range connections between enhancers and…

6h

Structure of the cell-binding component of the Clostridium difficile binary toxin reveals a di-heptamer macromolecular assembly [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Targeting Clostridium difficile infection is challenging because treatment options are limited, and high recurrence rates are common. One reason for this is that hypervirulent C. difficile strains often have a binary toxin termed the C. difficile toxin, in addition to the enterotoxins TsdA and TsdB. The C. difficile toxin has…

6h

Direct visualization of degradation microcompartments at the ER membrane [Cell Biology]

To promote the biochemical reactions of life, cells can compartmentalize molecular interaction partners together within separated non–membrane-bound regions. It is unknown whether this strategy is used to facilitate protein degradation at specific locations within the cell. Leveraging in situ cryo-electron tomography to image the native molecular landscape of the unicellular…

6h

Multivalent interaction of ESCO2 with the replication machinery is required for sister chromatid cohesion in vertebrates [Cell Biology]

The tethering together of sister chromatids by the cohesin complex ensures their accurate alignment and segregation during cell division. In vertebrates, sister chromatid cohesion requires the activity of the ESCO2 acetyltransferase, which modifies the Smc3 subunit of cohesin. It was shown recently that ESCO2 promotes cohesion through interaction with the…

6h

The formation of the thumb requires direct modulation of Gli3 transcription by Hoxa13 [Developmental Biology]

In the tetrapod limb, the digits (fingers or toes) are the elements most subject to morphological diversification in response to functional adaptations. However, despite their functional importance, the mechanisms controlling digit morphology remain poorly understood. Here we have focused on understanding the special morphology of the thumb (digit 1), the…

6h

Biotic and anthropogenic forces rival climatic/abiotic factors in determining global plant population growth and fitness [Ecology]

Multiple, simultaneous environmental changes, in climatic/abiotic factors, interacting species, and direct human influences, are impacting natural populations and thus biodiversity, ecosystem services, and evolutionary trajectories. Determining whether the magnitudes of the population impacts of abiotic, biotic, and anthropogenic drivers differ, accounting for their direct effects and effects medi

6h

The frequency of cortical microstimulation shapes artificial touch [Engineering]

Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the somatosensory cortex evokes vivid tactile sensations and can be used to convey sensory feedback from brain-controlled bionic hands. Changes in ICMS frequency lead to changes in the resulting sensation, but the discriminability of frequency has only been investigated over a narrow range of low frequencies….

6h

Mouse genetics reveals Barttin as a genetic modifier of Joubert syndrome [Genetics]

Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity and the lack of sufficiently large patient cohorts pose a significant challenge to understanding genetic associations in rare disease. Here we identify Bsnd (alias Barttin) as a genetic modifier of cystic kidney disease in Joubert syndrome, using a Cep290-deficient mouse model to recapitulate the phenotypic variability…

6h

CCR2 inhibition reduces tumor myeloid cells and unmasks a checkpoint inhibitor effect to slow progression of resistant murine gliomas [Medical Sciences]

Immunotherapy directed at the PD-L1/PD-1 axis has produced treatment advances in various human cancers. Unfortunately, progress has not extended to glioblastoma (GBM), with phase III clinical trials assessing anti-PD-1 monotherapy failing to show efficacy in newly diagnosed and recurrent tumors. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a subset of immunosuppressive myeloid derived…

6h

The circadian clock protein REVERB{alpha} inhibits pulmonary fibrosis development [Medical Sciences]

Pulmonary inflammatory responses lie under circadian control; however, the importance of circadian mechanisms in the underlying fibrotic phenotype is not understood. Here, we identify a striking change to these mechanisms resulting in a gain of amplitude and lack of synchrony within pulmonary fibrotic tissue. These changes result from an infiltration…

6h

Successive passaging of a plant-associated microbiome reveals robust habitat and host genotype-dependent selection [Microbiology]

There is increasing interest in the plant microbiome as it relates to both plant health and agricultural sustainability. One key unanswered question is whether we can select for a plant microbiome that is robust after colonization of target hosts. We used a successive passaging experiment to address this question by…

6h

The Mycobacterium marinum ESX-1 system mediates phagosomal permeabilization and type I interferon production via separable mechanisms [Microbiology]

Following mycobacterial entry into macrophages the ESX-1 type VII secretion system promotes phagosomal permeabilization and type I IFN production, key features of tuberculosis pathogenesis. The current model states that the secreted substrate ESAT-6 is required for membrane permeabilization and that a subsequent passive leakage of extracellular bacterial DNA into the…

6h

Energy conservation involving 2 respiratory circuits [Microbiology]

Chemiosmosis and substrate-level phosphorylation are the 2 mechanisms employed to form the biological energy currency adenosine triphosphate (ATP). During chemiosmosis, a transmembrane electrochemical ion gradient is harnessed by a rotary ATP synthase to phosphorylate adenosine diphosphate to ATP. In microorganisms, this ion gradient is usually composed of H+, but it…

6h

Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent bifunctional enzyme catalyzed biosynthesis of indolizidine alkaloids in fungi [Microbiology]

Indolizidine alkaloids such as anticancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine are exceptionally attractive due to their widespread occurrence, prominent bioactivity, complex structure, and sophisticated involvement in the chemical defense for the producing organisms. However, the versatility of the indolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis remains incompletely addressed since the knowledge about such biosy

6h

Variable functional connectivity architecture of the preterm human brain: Impact of developmental cortical expansion and maturation [Neuroscience]

Functional connectivity (FC) is known to be individually unique and to reflect cognitive variability. Although FC can serve as a valuable correlate and potential predictor of (patho-) physiological nervous function in high-risk constellations, such as preterm birth, templates for individualized FC analysis are lacking, and knowledge about the capacity of…

6h

Mechanistic insights into the interactions of dynein regulator Ndel1 with neuronal ankyrins and implications in polarity maintenance [Neuroscience]

Ankyrin-G (AnkG), a highly enriched scaffold protein in the axon initial segment (AIS) of neurons, functions to maintain axonal polarity and the integrity of the AIS. At the AIS, AnkG regulates selective intracellular cargo trafficking between soma and axons via interaction with the dynein regulator protein Ndel1, but the molecular…

6h

Behavioral evidence for geomagnetic imprinting and transgenerational inheritance in fruit flies [Physiology]

Certain long-distance migratory animals, such as salmon and sea turtles, are thought to imprint on the magnetic field of their natal area and to use this information to help them return as adults. Despite a growing body of indirect support for such imprinting, direct experimental evidence thereof remains elusive. Here,…

6h

Combinatorial interactions of the LEC1 transcription factor specify diverse developmental programs during soybean seed development [Plant Biology]

The LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) transcription factor is a central regulator of seed development, because it controls diverse biological programs during seed development, such as embryo morphogenesis, photosynthesis, and seed maturation. To understand how LEC1 regulates different gene sets during development, we explored the possibility that LEC1 acts in combination with…

6h

Correction for Yu et al., Wildfire prevention through prophylactic treatment of high-risk landscapes using viscoelastic retardant fluids [Correction]

APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Wildfire prevention through prophylactic treatment of high-risk landscapes using viscoelastic retardant fluids," by Anthony C. Yu, Hector Lopez Hernandez, Andrew H. Kim, Lyndsay M. Stapleton, Ruben J. Brand, Eric T. Mellor, Cameron P. Bauer, Gregory D. McCurdy, Albert J. Wolff III, Doreen Chan, Craig S….

6h

Correction for Zhang et al., Elevated signature of a gene module coexpressed with CDC20 marks genomic instability in glioma [Correction]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Elevated signature of a gene module coexpressed with CDC20 marks genomic instability in glioma," by Yunqiu Zhang, Jiuyi Li, Kaikai Yi, Jing Feng, Zhengmin Cong, Zheng Wang, Yanfei Wei, Fan Wu, Wen Cheng, Ayaz Ali Samo, Paolo Salomoni, Qiong Yang, Yu Huang, Chunsheng Kang, Tao Jiang,…

6h

Correction for Heeger and Mackey, Oscillatory recurrent gated neural integrator circuits (ORGaNICs), a unifying theoretical framework for neural dynamics [Correction]

NEUROSCIENCE, PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for "Oscillatory recurrent gated neural integrator circuits (ORGaNICs), a unifying theoretical framework for neural dynamics," by David J. Heeger and Wayne E. Mackey, which was first published October 21, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1911633116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 22783–22794). The authors note that, on page…

6h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Chimpanzees and sound-induced rhythmic movement Male chimpanzee making a rhythmic display at the enclosure in the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Japan. Music influences rhythmic movement in humans, suggesting a link between the brain's auditory and motor areas. Understanding chimpanzees' predisposition to process music could shed light on the evolutionary…

6h

Mixed growth curve data do not suffice to fully characterize the dynamics of mixed cultures [Biological Sciences]

In PNAS, Ram et al. (1) present an approach to decipher competition in mixed cultures of biotechnological interest. The approach—devoted to those cases in which competitive behavior depends on cellular densities—is intended to characterize mixed-culture individual dynamics by fitting the mixed-culture optical density (OD) data to a nonlinear competition Lotka–Volterra…

6h

Reply to Balsa-Canto et al.: Growth models are applicable to growth data, not to stationary-phase data [Biological Sciences]

We are glad to see interest in our computational approach for predicting microbial growth in a mixed culture from growth curve data (1). Balsa-Canto et al. (2) provide experimental and numerical results to conclude that growth curve data are insufficient to predict the dynamics in mixed cultures. We believe that…

6h

A consideration of within-host human cytomegalovirus genetic variation [Biological Sciences]

In Cudini et al. (1), the authors suggest that earlier work has argued high levels of intrahost variation in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) to be the result of exceptionally fast mutation rates (on par with RNA viruses), citing our recent review (2) as evidence. In reality, ref. 2 noted that levels…

6h

Reply to Jensen and Kowalik: Consideration of mixed infections is central to understanding HCMV intrahost diversity [Biological Sciences]

Jensen and Kowalik (1) have reported that intrahost variation in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) approaches levels similar to those of hepatitis C virus, with fast mutation rates mooted as one explanation (2). While we discuss that HCMV mutation rates were postulated as an explanation for high diversity, the focus of our…

6h

QnAs with H. Michael Shepard and Dennis J. Slamon [QnAs]

On September 10, 2019, the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation announced that H. Michael Shepard of San Diego-based Biooncology Consultants, Dennis J. Slamon of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and Axel Ullrich of the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany had been awarded the 2019 Lasker–DeBakey…

6h

Profile of James Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz: 2019 Nobel Laureates in Physics [Profiles]

Mankind has long been fascinated by the mysteries of our Universe: How old and how big is the Universe? How did the Universe begin and how is it evolving? What is the composition of the Universe and the nature of its dark matter and dark energy? What is our Earth's…

6h

Wild chimpanzees scaffold youngsters' learning in a high-tech community [Anthropology]

Across human history, the spiraling complexities of our technologies have been accompanied by a progressive elaboration in the schooling necessary to instill the skills that increasingly technological societies require. Among peoples who still subsist by foraging for wild foodstuffs using a toolkit that can be carried on one's back, there…

6h

Evolutionarily conserved peptides coordinate lunar phase and metabolism [Developmental Biology]

The family of peptides controlling metabolism and reproduction in vertebrate and invertebrate animals has deep evolutionary roots. In vertebrates, the primary peptide controlling sexual differentiation and reproduction is gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a decapeptide with "relatives" extending to the alpha factor, a tridecapeptide mating pheromone of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (1). Th

6h

Leaf-derived bacterial communities adapt to the local environment [Microbiology]

Plants host a diverse community of microbes known as the microbiota. A number of studies have used culture-independent sequencing methods to describe the composition of these communities (1–3). While the microbiota originates from the broader environment in which the plant is growing, it is composed of only a subset of…

6h

Deterministic actin waves as generators of cell polarization cues [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Dendritic cells "patrol" the human body to detect pathogens. In their search, dendritic cells perform a random walk by amoeboid migration. The efficiency of pathogen detection depends on the properties of the random walk. It is not known how the dendritic cells control these properties. Here, we quantify dendritic cell…

6h

Neurons differentiate magnitude and location of mechanical stimuli [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Neuronal activity can be modulated by mechanical stimuli. To study this phenomenon quantitatively, we mechanically stimulated rat cortical neurons by shear stress and local indentation. Neurons show 2 distinct responses, classified as transient and sustained. Transient responses display fast kinetics, similar to spontaneous neuronal activity, whereas sustained responses last several…

6h

A portrait of wellbore leakage in northeastern British Columbia, Canada [Environmental Sciences]

Oil and gas well leakage is of public concern primarily due to the perceived risks of aquifer contamination and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study examined well leakage data from the British Columbia Oil and Gas Commission (BC OGC) to identify leakage pathways and initially quantify incident rates of leakage…

6h

Quantifying the flux as the driving force for nonequilibrium dynamics and thermodynamics in non-Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics [Physics]

The driving force for active physical and biological systems is determined by both the underlying landscape and nonequilibrium curl flux. While landscape can be experimentally quantified from the histograms of the collected real-time trajectories of the observables, quantifying the experimental flux remains challenging. In this work, we studied the single-molecule…

6h

Teaching varies with task complexity in wild chimpanzees [Anthropology]

Cumulative culture is a transformative force in human evolution, but the social underpinnings of this capacity are debated. Identifying social influences on how chimpanzees acquire tool tasks of differing complexity may help illuminate the evolutionary origins of technology in our own lineage. Humans routinely transfer tools to novices to scaffold…

6h

A rapid and label-free platform for virus capture and identification from clinical samples [Applied Biological Sciences]

Emerging and reemerging viruses are responsible for a number of recent epidemic outbreaks. A crucial step in predicting and controlling outbreaks is the timely and accurate characterization of emerging virus strains. We present a portable microfluidic platform containing carbon nanotube arrays with differential filtration porosity for the rapid enrichment and…

6h

Multielemental single-atom-thick A layers in nanolaminated V2(Sn, A) C (A = Fe, Co, Ni, Mn) for tailoring magnetic properties [Applied Physical Sciences]

Tailoring of individual single–atom-thick layers in nanolaminated materials offers atomic-level control over material properties. Nonetheless, multielement alloying in individual atomic layers in nanolaminates is largely unexplored. Here, we report 15 inherently nanolaminated V2(AxSn1-x)C (A = Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, and combinations thereof, with x ∼ 1/3) MAX phases synthesized by…

6h

Structure of the cytochrome aa3-600 heme-copper menaquinol oxidase bound to inhibitor HQNO shows TM0 is part of the quinol binding site [Biochemistry]

Virtually all proton-pumping terminal respiratory oxygen reductases are members of the heme-copper oxidoreductase superfamily. Most of these enzymes use reduced cytochrome c as a source of electrons, but a group of enzymes have evolved to directly oxidize membrane-bound quinols, usually menaquinol or ubiquinol. All of the quinol oxidases have an…

6h

The proton electrochemical gradient induces a kinetic asymmetry in the symport cycle of LacY [Biochemistry]

LacY catalyzes accumulation of galactosides against a concentration gradient by coupling galactoside and H+ transport (i.e., symport). While alternating access of sugar- and H+-binding sites to either side of the membrane is driven by binding and dissociation of sugar, the electrochemical H+ gradient (∆μ∼H+) functions kinetically by decreasing the Km…

6h

Substrate selectivity by the exonuclease Rrp6p [Biochemistry]

The exoribonuclease Rrp6p is critical for RNA decay in the nucleus. While Rrp6p acts on a large range of diverse substrates, it does not indiscriminately degrade all RNAs. How Rrp6p accomplishes this task is not understood. Here, we measure Rrp6p–RNA binding and degradation kinetics in vitro at single-nucleotide resolution and…

6h

Spatiotemporal regulation of NADP(H) phosphatase Nocturnin and its role in oxidative stress response [Biochemistry]

An intimate link exists between circadian clocks and metabolism with nearly every metabolic pathway in the mammalian liver under circadian control. Circadian regulation of metabolism is largely driven by rhythmic transcriptional activation of clock-controlled genes. Among these output genes, Nocturnin (Noct) has one of the highest amplitude rhythms at the…

6h

Revisiting the tumorigenesis timeline with a data-driven generative model [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cancer is driven by the sequential accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The timing of these events is not well understood. Moreover, it is currently unknown why the same driver gene change appears as an early event in some cancer types and as a…

6h

Switching sides—Reengineered primary charge separation in the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

We report 90% yield of electron transfer (ET) from the singlet excited state P* of the primary electron-donor P (a bacteriochlorophyll dimer) to the B-side bacteriopheophytin (HB) in the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC). Starting from a platform Rhodobacter sphaeroides RC bearing several amino acid changes, an Arg in place…

6h

Hybrid histidine kinase activation by cyclic di-GMP-mediated domain liberation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cytosolic hybrid histidine kinases (HHKs) constitute major signaling nodes that control various biological processes, but their input signals and how these are processed are largely unknown. In Caulobacter crescentus, the HHK ShkA is essential for accurate timing of the G1-S cell cycle transition and is regulated by the corresponding increase…

6h

Does repeat synthesis in materials chemistry obey a power law? [Chemistry]

Finding examples where experimental measurements have been repeated is a powerful strategy for assessing reproducibility of scientific data. Here, we collect quantitative data to assess how often synthesis of a newly reported material is repeated in the scientific literature. We present a simple power-law model for the frequency of repeat…

6h

Science and Culture: How a conference focused on algorithms balances serious math with computational whimsy [Computer Sciences]

In 1998, a few dozen computer scientists and mathematicians gathered at a picturesque seaside resort on the Tuscan island of Elba off the west coast of Italy. They were there to attend a scientific gathering unlike any other. Computer scientist Erik Demaine and his collaborators proved, mathematically, that it's possible…

6h

Multimodal transcriptional control of pattern formation in embryonic development [Developmental Biology]

Predicting how interactions between transcription factors and regulatory DNA sequence dictate rates of transcription and, ultimately, drive developmental outcomes remains an open challenge in physical biology. Using stripe 2 of the even-skipped gene in Drosophila embryos as a case study, we dissect the regulatory forces underpinning a key step along…

6h

A carbonate-rich lake solution to the phosphate problem of the origin of life [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Phosphate is central to the origin of life because it is a key component of nucleotides in genetic molecules, phospholipid cell membranes, and energy transfer molecules such as adenosine triphosphate. To incorporate phosphate into biomolecules, prebiotic experiments commonly use molar phosphate concentrations to overcome phosphate's poor reactivity with organics in…

6h

Middle Holocene expansion of Pacific Deep Water into the Southern Ocean [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The Southern Ocean is a key region for the overturning and mixing of water masses within the global ocean circulation system. Because Southern Ocean dynamics are influenced by the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds (SWW), changes in the westerly wind forcing could significantly affect the circulation and mixing of water masses…

6h

Sensitivity of self-reported noncognitive skills to survey administration conditions [Economic Sciences]

Noncognitive skills (e.g., persistence and self-control) are typically measured using self-reported questionnaires in which respondents rate their own skills. In many applications—including program evaluation and school accountability systems—such reports are assumed to measure only the skill of interest. However, self-reports might also capture other dimensions aside from the skill, such…

6h

Shape-controlled single-crystal growth of InP at low temperatures down to 220 {degrees}C [Engineering]

III–V compound semiconductors are widely used for electronic and optoelectronic applications. However, interfacing III–Vs with other materials has been fundamentally limited by the high growth temperatures and lattice-match requirements of traditional deposition processes. Recently, we developed the templated liquid-phase (TLP) crystal growth method for enabling direct growth of shape-controlled s

6h

Hazard from Himalayan glacier lake outburst floods [Environmental Sciences]

Sustained glacier melt in the Himalayas has gradually spawned more than 5,000 glacier lakes that are dammed by potentially unstable moraines. When such dams break, glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs) can cause catastrophic societal and geomorphic impacts. We present a robust probabilistic estimate of average GLOFs return periods in the…

6h

Rhythmic swaying induced by sound in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Music and dance are universal across human culture and have an ancient history. One characteristic of music is its strong influence on movement. For example, an auditory beat induces rhythmic movement with positive emotions in humans from early developmental stages. In this study, we investigated if sound induced spontaneous rhythmic…

6h

Sadness, but not all negative emotions, heightens addictive substance use [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Do negative feelings in general trigger addictive behavior, or do specific emotions play a stronger role? Testing these alternative accounts of emotion and decision making, we drew on the Appraisal Tendency Framework to predict that sadness, specifically, rather than negative mood, generally, would 1) increase craving, impatience, and actual addictive…

6h

Altruistic behaviors relieve physical pain [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Engaging in altruistic behaviors is costly, but it contributes to the health and well-being of the performer of such behaviors. The present research offers a take on how this paradox can be understood. Across 2 pilot studies and 3 experiments, we showed a pain-relieving effect of performing altruistic behaviors. Acting…

6h

Reward does not facilitate visual perceptual learning until sleep occurs [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

A growing body of evidence indicates that visual perceptual learning (VPL) is enhanced by reward provided during training. Another line of studies has shown that sleep following training also plays a role in facilitating VPL, an effect known as the offline performance gain of VPL. However, whether the effects of…

6h

Reply to Barber: Marginal evidence for taro production in northern New Zealand between 1200 and 1500 CE [Letters (Online Only)]

We welcome Barber's (1) comments and are grateful for the opportunity to respond. Our study of wetland taro (Colocasia esculenta) gardens during the initial colonization period (ICP) (1200 to 1500 CE) in New Zealand did not overlook the evidence from the Aupouri Peninsula (2–4). We agree that gardens were probably…

6h

Global trends toward urban street-network sprawl [Sustainability Science]

We present a global time series of street-network sprawl—that is, sprawl as measured through the local connectivity of the street network. Using high-resolution data from OpenStreetMap and a satellite-derived time series of urbanization, we compute and validate changes over time in multidimensional street connectivity measures based on graph-theoretic and geographic…

6h

Apex structures enhance water drainage on leaves [Applied Biological Sciences]

The rapid removal of rain droplets at the leaf apex is critical for leaves to avoid damage under rainfall conditions, but the general water drainage principle remains unclear. We demonstrate that the apex structure enhances water drainage on the leaf by employing a curvature-controlled mechanism that is based on shaping…

6h

Predicting research trends with semantic and neural networks with an application in quantum physics [Physics]

The vast and growing number of publications in all disciplines of science cannot be comprehended by a single human researcher. As a consequence, researchers have to specialize in narrow subdisciplines, which makes it challenging to uncover scientific connections beyond the own field of research. Thus, access to structured knowledge from…

6h

Predicting high-risk opioid prescriptions before they are given [Economic Sciences]

Misuse of prescription opioids is a leading cause of premature death in the United States. We use state government administrative data and machine learning methods to examine whether the risk of future opioid dependence, abuse, or poisoning can be predicted in advance of an initial opioid prescription. Our models accurately…

6h

Brain-wide functional architecture remodeling by alcohol dependence and abstinence [Neuroscience]

Alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence are key factors in the development of alcohol use disorder, which is a pervasive societal problem with substantial economic, medical, and psychiatric consequences. Although our understanding of the neurocircuitry that underlies alcohol use has improved, novel brain regions that are involved in alcohol use and…

6h

Shoot meristem maintenance and immune response signaling converge at the G protein {beta} subunit [Commentaries]

The shoot apical meristem (SAM) harbors a set of pluripotent stem cells that divide continuously to provide cells for the development of all aboveground plant parts (1). A concoction of hormonal and peptide signals and transcription factors, along with mechanical cues, play a role in stem cell maintenance, which requires…

6h

CTCF mediates chromatin looping via N-terminal domain-dependent cohesin retention [Cell Biology]

The DNA-binding protein CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and the cohesin complex function together to shape chromatin architecture in mammalian cells, but the molecular details of this process remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a 79-aa region within the CTCF N terminus is essential for cohesin positioning at CTCF binding sites and…

6h

Enhancing transport by shaping barriers [Commentaries]

Many molecular processes of great importance in both nature and technology speed up strongly if temperature is increased. Examples include chemical reactions, biomolecular rearrangements, the diffusion of atoms in solids, and the storage of information on magnetic recording media. In 1889, the Swedish physicist and chemist Svante Arrhenius was the…

6h

Exosomes promote remarkable recovery in stroke

Scientists present brain-imaging data for a new stroke treatment that supported full recovery in swine, modeled with the same pattern of neurodegeneration as seen in humans with severe stroke.

6h

Not so fast: Some batteries can be pushed too far

Fast charge and discharge of some lithium-ion batteries with intentional defects degrades their performance and endurance, according to Rice University engineers.

6h

University of Ottawa tool to democratize nanopore research

A team of researchers at the University of Ottawa is democratizing entry into the field of nanopore research by offering up a unique tool to accelerate the development of new applications and discoveries. The innovative T.-Cossa Lab came up with the idea to provide the research community with the protocols, hardware designs, and software required to fabricate solid-state nanopores in a fast, low c

6h

Democrats Should Be Worried About the Latino Vote

The first warning sign of the new year came three days into 2020. Speaking at a rally of conservative evangelicals in South Florida, President Donald Trump riffed on the targeted killing of Iran's Qassem Soleimani before the thousands assembled in the King Jesus International Ministry megachurch, outside of Miami. That night, the president captured headlines for declaring that " God is on our sid

6h

The Problem With the Oscars' Idea of a 'Good Movie'

"Who will be interested in a story of domestic struggles and joys? It doesn't have any real importance," says Jo March (played by Saoirse Ronan) in a scene near the end of 2019's Little Women, fearing that no one will want to read the book she's writing about her family. "Maybe we don't see those things as important because people don't write about them," her sister Amy (Florence Pugh) replies. T

6h

Scientists: Ocean Warming at the Rate of Five A-Bombs per Second

After analyzing data from the 1950s through 2019, an international team of scientists determined that the average temperature of the world's oceans in 2019 was 0.075 degrees Celsius (.135 degrees Fahrenheit) higher than the 1981–2010 average. That might not seem like a significant amount of warming, but given the massive volume of the oceans, an increase even that small would require a staggering

6h

Wildfires Could Transform Amazon from Carbon Sink to Source

Rising temperatures and increased deforestation increase the risks for CO2-emitting fires — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Do Carbon Offsets Really Work? It Depends on the Details

The market for offsets is booming as companies seek to burnish their green credentials. But only some investments make a difference.

7h

Calling The Shots In The Year Of The Nurse And Midwife

How do we honor some less-acknowledged medical professionals and clear up some misconceptions about what they do? (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

7h

What to do when your OS becomes obsolete—and how to save money in the process

RIP, Windows 7. (radub85 via Deposit Photos/) Windows 7 is the latest operating system to reach " end-of-life ," or EOL, and become officially obsolete. This means no more updates, no more features, and no more security patches. Nothing. And it's that last point that's most important to you as a user, because running "dead" software can put your devices and data at risk. If a security exploit is

7h

An emotionally intelligent AI could support astronauts on a trip to Mars

A digital assistant that recognized emotions and responded to astronauts with empathy might vastly improve space missions that take months or years.

7h

Study suggests new strategy for treating advanced, progressing bile duct cancer

A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) shows how resistance to a promising targeted drug develops in patients with a rare, lethal cancer of the bile ducts called cholangiocarcinoma.

7h

Study: Blood-clotting protein and blood platelets promote immune evasion, cancer progression

A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) reveals how a clotting protein and blood platelets can promote cancer progression and suppress immune responses to cancer.

7h

Impaired driving — even once the high wears off

McLean researchers have discovered that recreational marijuana use affects driving ability even when users are not intoxicated. Cannabis users had more accidents, drove at higher speeds, and drove through more red lights than non-users.

7h

The Atlantic expands publication of short stories, with launch of Fiction section

The Atlantic's archives are teeming with the bylines of some of the greatest literary writers of the past two centuries—Virginia Woolf, Mark Twain, James Baldwin, Edith Wharton, Chinua Achebe, Joyce Carol Oates, Raymond Carver, John Updike—many of whom made their debuts in the magazine. Continuing in this tradition, The Atlantic is today launching a new Fiction section, which marks a commitment t

7h

Daily briefing: Grains of stardust are the oldest material ever found on Earth

Nature, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00092-7 Meteor material is almost 3 billion years older than our Sun. Plus: animal-cloning researcher sentenced to 12 years in prison for embezzling research funding and three document-sharing tools for scientists.

7h

All of Us Have a Role to Play in Keeping the EPA Accountable

The film Dark Waters highlights the importance of an involved public in environmental protection — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Final images from Cassini spacecraft

Researchers are busy analysing some of the final data sent back from the Cassini spacecraft which has been in orbit around Saturn for more than 13 years until the end of its mission in September 2017.

7h

Robotic gripping mechanism mimics how sea anemones catch prey

Researchers in China demonstrated a robotic gripping mechanism that mimics how a sea anemone catches its prey. The bionic torus captures and releases objects by crimping its skin. The grasper not only is relatively cheap and easy to produce but also can grab a variety of objects of different sizes, shapes, weights and materials. They discuss their work in this week's Applied Physics Letters.

7h

Galactic gamma-ray sources reveal birthplaces of high-energy particles

Nine sources of extremely high-energy gamma rays comprise a new catalog compiled by researchers with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory. All produce gamma rays with energies over 56 trillion electron volts (TeV) and three emit gamma rays extending to 100 TeV and beyond, making these the highest-energy sources ever observed in our galaxy. The catalog helps to explain whe

7h

Reduced inhaler use is safe for infants with bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis, a lung infection that is one of the most common reasons for hospitalizations in young children, is most prevalent during the winter months and is usually treated with albuterol delivered via inhalers, despite evidence showing no benefit in most patients. A multidisciplinary team of researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) redesigned the hospital's standard treatme

7h

All of Us Have a Role to Play in Keeping the EPA Accountable

The film Dark Waters highlights the importance of an involved public in environmental protection — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

NASA-NOAA satellite imagery reveals a weaker Tropical Cyclone Claudia

Tropical Storm Claudia now has two factors against it: wind shear and dry air. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with an image of the storm on January 14 as it continued to weaken and move further away from Western Australia.

7h

New E. coli-infecting bacteriophage introduced in PHAGE

A new coliphage—a bacteriophage that infects and can destroy Escherichia coli—is presented and characterized in PHAGE: Therapy, Applications, and Research.

7h

Plant genomes reveal the basis for adaptation to contrasting climates

It is an open question how we can ensure that our crop plants remain productive in a changing climate. Plants are confronted with similar climate adaptation challenges when colonising new regions, as climate conditions can change quickly across latitudes and landscapes. Despite the relevance of the question, there is very limited basic scientific insight into how plants tackle this challenge and a

7h

The 'Jeopardy!: Greatest of All Time' Tournament Is a Singular Event

There's never been anything like the 'Jeopardy!' GOAT tournament. There never will be again.

7h

Life cycle assessment pinpoints 'sustainability hotspots' in bio-chemical production

Black chemicals from oil pollute. Green ones from biomass don't. Or is it really so simple? Not necessarily, as demonstrated in two newly published articles about life cycle assessments (LCAs) in Nature Sustainability and GCB Bioenergy.

7h

New E. coli-infecting bacteriophage introduced in PHAGE

A new coliphage—a bacteriophage that infects and can destroy Escherichia coli—is presented and characterized in PHAGE: Therapy, Applications, and Research.

7h

Plant genomes reveal the basis for adaptation to contrasting climates

It is an open question how we can ensure that our crop plants remain productive in a changing climate. Plants are confronted with similar climate adaptation challenges when colonising new regions, as climate conditions can change quickly across latitudes and landscapes. Despite the relevance of the question, there is very limited basic scientific insight into how plants tackle this challenge and a

7h

Life cycle assessment pinpoints 'sustainability hotspots' in bio-chemical production

Black chemicals from oil pollute. Green ones from biomass don't. Or is it really so simple? Not necessarily, as demonstrated in two newly published articles about life cycle assessments (LCAs) in Nature Sustainability and GCB Bioenergy.

7h

New Tesla Merch Pokes Fun at Cybertruck Unveil Fail

Shattered Glass Tesla is dead set on having the last laugh. The Elon Musk-led electric car company is now selling a T-shirt, spotted by Electrek , featuring the window that accidentally shattered during the company's Cybertruck unveiling in November. After Musk bragged that the Cybertruck's windows were virtually bulletproof on stage during the announcement, chief designer Franz von Holzhausen lo

7h

Hidden Computational Power Found in the Arms of Neurons

The information-processing capabilities of the brain are often reported to reside in the trillions of connections that wire its neurons together. But over the past few decades, mounting research has quietly shifted some of the attention to individual neurons, which seem to shoulder much more computational responsibility than once seemed imaginable. The latest in a long line of evidence comes from

7h

Unfruitful: Eating more produce will not cure, stop prostate cancer

University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that patients with prostate cancer assigned to eat seven or more servings of vegetables and fruits daily saw no extra protection from the increased consumption of micronutrients, running contrary to current thought.

7h

NASA-NOAA satellite imagery reveals a weaker Tropical Cyclone Claudia

Tropical Storm Claudia now has two factors against it: wind shear and dry air. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with an image of the storm on January 14 as it continued to weaken and move further away from Western Australia.

7h

Final images from Cassini spacecraft

Researchers are busy analysing some of the final data sent back from the Cassini spacecraft which has been in orbit around Saturn for more than 13 years until the end of its mission in September 2017. For the last leg of its journey, Cassini was put on a particularly daring orbit passing between Saturn and its rings which brought it closer to Saturn than ever before, allowing scientists to obtain

7h

'Coolsculpting' inventors develop new non-surgical method for targeting fat

Researchers are developing a new form 'Coolsculpting' technology that can selectively reduce fat almost anywhere in the body using a safe, injectable ice solution or 'slurry.'

7h

Researchers develop tool to identify molecular receptors in worms

Worcester Polytechnic Institute researchers have developed a laboratory tool that could speed up basic research for scientists working with the nematode C. elegans by tagging molecular receptors that are involved in sensing pheromones. The process was published in the Royal Society of Chemistry's Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry journal.

7h

Let's All Read More Fiction

Editor's Note: Read Lauren Groff's new short story, "Birdie," and an interview with Groff about her writing process. In 1858, a year after the founding of The Atlantic , 26-year-old Louisa May Alcott's literary confidence was growing. "I even think of trying the 'Atlantic,'" she wrote in her journal. "There's ambition for you!" The magazine "of Literature, Art, and Politics" had staked out an ent

7h

A Conversation With Lauren Groff About Her Writing Process

Editor's Note: Read Lauren Groff's latest short story, " Birdie ," and learn more about The Atlantic 's new fiction initiative . To mark the publication of "Birdie," Lauren Groff's third story in The Atlantic , she and Ross Andersen, an editor at The Atlantic , discussed, over email, what it's like to write about sex after #MeToo, how fiction can be used to reexamine relationships, and how Groff

7h

Birdie

Editor's Note: Read an interview with Lauren Groff about her writing process, and learn more about The Atlantic' s new fiction initiative. The Atlantic The women were drinking peach schnapps, telling stories about the worst things they'd ever done. They had already skimmed through the missing years in haste, as though the past were gruesome, the two decades of lost friendship something untouchabl

7h

Paralyzed Man Runs Marathon In Robotic Exoskeleton

On Saturday, a man named Adam Gorlitsky broke the world record time for completing a marathon while wearing an assistive robotic exoskeleton . Though he hasn't yet submitted his results to Guinness, CNN reports that Gorlitsky — who is paralyzed from the waist down — completed the Charleston Marathon after walking for 33 hours, 50 minutes, and 23 seconds straight. That put him just shy of a three-

7h

Brain parasite may strip away rodents' fear of predators—not just of cats

Toxoplasma gondii may have more general effects on mouse behavior than previously thought

7h

The hunt for the 'angel particle' continues

In 2017, researchers believed they had found evidence for the so-called "angel particle"; that is, a Majorana fermion. Majorana fermions differ from regular fermions in that they are their own antiparticles. New research shows that the previous finding was due to an error in the scientists' experimental device. Thus, it's back to the drawing board in the search for the Majorana fermion. None A th

8h

Flame retardants and pesticides overtake heavy metals as biggest contributors to IQ loss

Adverse outcomes from childhood exposures to lead and mercury are on the decline in the United States, likely due to decades of restrictions on the use of heavy metals, a new study finds.

8h

Reducing the risk of blood clots in artificial heart valves

People with mechanical heart valves need blood thinners on a daily basis, because they have a higher risk of blood clots and stroke. Researchers now identified the root cause of blood turbulence leading to clotting. Design optimization could greatly reduce the risk of clotting and enable these patients to live without life-long medication.

8h

School indoor air quality cannot be reliably assessed based on pupils' symptoms

The association between indoor air quality of the school building and the pupils' symptoms was so weak that it is not possible to reliably assess the quality of the indoor air based on the amount of reported symptoms.

8h

X-rays and gravitational waves will combine to illuminate massive black hole collisions

A new study has found that collisions of supermassive black holes may be simultaneously observable in both gravitational waves and X-rays at the beginning of the next decade.

8h

Historical housing disparities linked with dangerous climate impacts

Extreme heat kills more people in the United States than any other type of hazardous weather and will likely become even deadlier due to climate change. However, extreme heat does not affect all people equally.

8h

Egg trading between hermaphroditic fish: Why would you give when you can just take?

The sex life of hermaphroditic animals is determined by one fundamental question: Who assumes the female role and produces the costly eggs? Hamlets avoid this dilemma by engaging in reciprocal egg trading. Scientists have now used microeconomic models to analyze the circumstances required for this complex system of trading to work.

8h

Physicists prove that 2D and 3D liquids are fundamentally different

A 50-year-old puzzle in statistical mechanics has been solved by an international team of researchers who have proved that two-dimensional (2D) liquids have fundamentally different dynamical properties to three-dimensional (3D) liquids.

8h

A solid vaccine for liquid tumors

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a deadly blood cancer that kills most of its victims within five years. Chemotherapy has been the standard treatment for over 40 years, and while it often causes the cancer to go into remission, nearly half of patients experience disease relapse. Scientists at the Wyss Institute and Harvard SEAS have developed an injectable, biomaterial-based vaccine that, when comb

8h

New E. coli-infecting bacteriophage introduced in PHAGE

A new coliphage — a bacteriophage that infects and can destroy Escherichia coli — is presented and characterized in PHAGE: Therapy, Applications, and Research, a new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers launching in early 2020.

8h

New small molecule to treat Alzheimer's disease and Dravet syndrome

Gladstone researchers, in collaboration with Genentech, a member of the Roche group, have shown therapeutic efficacy of a new experimental drug in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease and a rare genetic form of epilepsy known as Dravet syndrome.

8h

Opening up DNA to delete disease

Protein editorial assistants are clearing the way for cut-and-paste DNA editors, like CRISPR, to access previously inaccessible genes of interest. Opening up these areas of the genetic code is critical to improving CRISPR efficiency and moving toward futuristic, genetic-based assaults on disease. The DNA-binding editorial assistants were devised by a US-based team of bioengineers, who describe the

8h

Gut bacteria could guard against Parkinson's, study finds

A common bacteria that boosts digestive health can slow — and even reverse — build-up of a protein associated with Parkinson's, new research suggests.

8h

A simple twist of cell fate

U-M researchers are shedding new light on the ways in which two omnipresent proteins — p53 and WRD5 — can influence the fate of stem cells during development, with exciting implications for research and health.

8h

Did increasing vegetable consumption reduce the risk of prostate cancer progression?

This randomized clinical trial among more than 400 men with early-stage prostate cancer looked at whether a telephone-based program encouraging increased vegetable consumption would decrease cancer progression over two years. The authors report no significant decrease in the risk of prostate cancer progression among men in the intervention program compared with those who received only written info

8h

Examining changes to FDA approval, regulation of pharmaceuticals over 4 decades

Publicly available and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) data were used in this observational study to describe the number and types of prescription drugs approved from 1983 to 2018 and how the approval process and regulation of drugs changed during this period. Approvals of new generic drugs and biologics increased over this time, as the median annual number of generic drugs approved was 284 fro

8h

Cat parasite reduces general anxiety in infected mice, not just fear of feline predators

The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii is known to cause infected rodents to lose their fear of feline predators, which makes them easier to catch. Predators then spread the parasites through their feces. But this so-called fatal feline attraction theory is flawed, suggests a study publishing Jan. 14 in the journal Cell Reports. Rather than exhibiting a loss of feline-specific fear, infected rodents s

8h

What we're learning about the reproductive microbiome

Most research has focused on the oral, skin, and gut microbiomes, but bacteria, viruses, and fungi living within our reproductive systems may also affect sperm quality, fertilization, embryo implantation, and other aspects of conception and reproduction. Yet, according to a review published Jan. 14 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, little is known about the reproductive microbiome.

8h

The Iran Plane Crash Is the Big Story

The downing of Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 and the deaths of all 176 people on board— newlyweds flying home from their wedding, graduate students charting ambitious careers, whole families returning from visiting relatives—have come to be portrayed as a tragic asterisk tacked onto the dramatic tale of how Donald Trump and Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei nearly went to

8h

8h

Brazil's largest city, Sao Paulo, bans single-use plastics from businesses

submitted by /u/arroz_com_feijao [link] [comments]

8h

8h

How good has the prognosis for stroke and heart disease become compared to 20 years ago ? And what about now ?

Have there been any new tech to improve to prognosis of these ? Like cryonics ? submitted by /u/Mewto1k [link] [comments]

8h

Anti-cholesterol injection.

submitted by /u/trakk2 [link] [comments]

8h

8h

8h

8h

8h

EU to unveil trillion-euro 'Green Deal' financial plan

submitted by /u/nonyobobisnes [link] [comments]

8h

Climate change increases the risk of wildfires confirms new review

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

8h

8h

Scientists have built the world's first living, self-healing robots

submitted by /u/SpektrumKid [link] [comments]

8h

8h

Skulls rewrite pre-Columbus history of people in the Caribbean

Using the equivalent of facial recognition technology, researchers have analyzed the skulls of early Caribbean inhabitants and uncovered some unexpected findings. One surprising finding was that the Caribs invaded Jamaica, Hispaniola, and the Bahamas, overturning half a century of assumptions that they never made it farther north than Guadeloupe. Experts have long dismissed Christopher Columbus'

8h

Not so hot: US data suggest human bodies are cooling down

Nature, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00074-9 Normal body temperatures are a fraction of a degree colder than they were in the nineteenth century.

8h

Pensionerede ingeniører: Det værste ved arbejdslivet var de dårlige chefer

PLUS. Efter 40 år på arbejds­markedet er dommen enslydende fra 12 vidt forskellige faggrupper: Dårlig ledelse er det værste. Mange faggrupper dukker sig, men ingeniørerne finder en ny chef, viser undersøgelse.

8h

People's Body Systems Age at Different Rates

Individuals have an "ageotype" that's specific to one organ system, which could be targeted in order to extend healthy life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Imagine a world without hunger, then make it happen with systems thinking

Nature, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00086-5 Feeding the world involves tackling all aspects of the food system.

8h

Protect India's universities

Nature, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00085-6 The government and state authorities must step in and stop violent attacks on academic campuses.

8h

No need to dig too deep to find gold!

Why are some porphyry deposits rich in copper while others contain gold? A researcher investigated how the metals are accumulated over the time duration of a mineralizing event and discover that the depth of the deposits influences the quantity of metals produced and that over 95% of the gold is lost to the atmosphere. The deeper a deposit is, the more copper there will be, while gold-rich deposit

8h

Silica particles may lead to new treatments for obesity and diabetes

Engineered ingestible molecular traps created from mesoporous silica particles (MSPs) introduced to the gut can have an effect on food efficiency and metabolic risk factors. The results from studies on mice demonstrate the potential to reduce the energy uptake into the body and could lead to new treatments for obesity and diabetes.

8h

Watching complex molecules at work

A new method of infrared spectroscopy developed at BESSY II makes single-measurement observation and analysis of very fast as well as irreversible reaction mechanisms in molecules feasible for the first time. Previously, thousands of such reactions have had to be run and measured for this purpose. The research team has now used the new device to investigate how rhodopsin molecules change after act

8h

Silica particles may lead to new treatments for obesity and diabetes

Engineered ingestible molecular traps created from mesoporous silica particles (MSPs) introduced to the gut can have an effect on food efficiency and metabolic risk factors. The results from studies on mice demonstrate the potential to reduce the energy uptake into the body and could lead to new treatments for obesity and diabetes.

8h

Watching complex molecules at work

A new method of infrared spectroscopy developed at BESSY II makes single-measurement observation and analysis of very fast as well as irreversible reaction mechanisms in molecules feasible for the first time. Previously, thousands of such reactions have had to be run and measured for this purpose. The research team has now used the new device to investigate how rhodopsin molecules change after act

8h

What we're learning about the reproductive microbiome

Most research has focused on the oral, skin, and gut microbiomes, but bacteria, viruses, and fungi living within our reproductive systems may also affect sperm quality, fertilization, embryo implantation, and other aspects of conception and reproduction. Yet, according to a review published January 14 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, little is known about the reproductive microbiome.

8h

Custom-built molecules enable editing of genes previously obscured by DNA's innately protective structure

Protein editorial assistants are clearing the way for cut-and-paste DNA editors, like CRISPR, to access previously inaccessible genes of interest. Opening up these areas of the genetic code is critical to improving CRISPR efficiency and moving toward futuristic, genetic-based assaults on disease.

8h

A simple twist of cell fate

How do a couple of universally expressed proteins in stem cells and developing embryos influence an individual cell's ultimate fate—whether it ultimately becomes, for example, a retinal cell, a heart muscle cell, or a stomach lining cell?

8h

Cat parasite reduces general anxiety in infected mice, not just fear of feline predators

The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii is known to cause infected rodents to lose their fear of feline predators, which makes the mice easier to catch. Predators then spread the parasites through their feces. But this so-called fatal feline attraction theory is flawed, suggests a study publishing January 14 in the journal Cell Reports. Rather than exhibiting a loss of feline-specific fear, infected ro

8h

The perks of being a pirate | Tom Nash

In this deeply charming and humorous talk, DJ and self-professed pirate Tom Nash meditates on how facing adversity due to disability invited patience, ambition and pragmatism into his life in enlightening, unexpected ways. "We all have unique weaknesses," he says. "If we're honest about what they are, we can learn how to best take advantage of them."

8h

What we're learning about the reproductive microbiome

Most research has focused on the oral, skin, and gut microbiomes, but bacteria, viruses, and fungi living within our reproductive systems may also affect sperm quality, fertilization, embryo implantation, and other aspects of conception and reproduction. Yet, according to a review published January 14 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, little is known about the reproductive microbiome.

8h

Custom-built molecules enable editing of genes previously obscured by DNA's innately protective structure

Protein editorial assistants are clearing the way for cut-and-paste DNA editors, like CRISPR, to access previously inaccessible genes of interest. Opening up these areas of the genetic code is critical to improving CRISPR efficiency and moving toward futuristic, genetic-based assaults on disease.

8h

A simple twist of cell fate

How do a couple of universally expressed proteins in stem cells and developing embryos influence an individual cell's ultimate fate—whether it ultimately becomes, for example, a retinal cell, a heart muscle cell, or a stomach lining cell?

8h

Cat parasite reduces general anxiety in infected mice, not just fear of feline predators

The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii is known to cause infected rodents to lose their fear of feline predators, which makes the mice easier to catch. Predators then spread the parasites through their feces. But this so-called fatal feline attraction theory is flawed, suggests a study publishing January 14 in the journal Cell Reports. Rather than exhibiting a loss of feline-specific fear, infected ro

8h

Researchers discover new strategy in the fight against antibiotic resistance

Bioscience engineers from KU Leuven in Belgium have developed a new antibacterial strategy that weakens bacteria by preventing them from cooperating. Unlike with antibiotics, there is no resistance to this strategy, because the non-resistant bacteria outnumber resistant ones. The findings are published in Nature Communications.

8h

Världens äldsta material hittat i meteorit

Sju miljarder år gammalt stjärnstoft fångat i en meteorit har visat sig vara världens äldsta material, enligt en ny studie finansierad av Nasa. Stjärnstoftet är äldre än både solen och planeten Jorden och avslöjar en babyboom-period i stjärnornas uppkomst.

8h

Two cancer-causing genes work together to promote metastasis

Cancer-promoting genes MYC and TWIST1 co-opt immune system cells to enable cancer cells to spread, but blocking a key step in this process can help prevent the disease from developing.

8h

Siblings of children with intellectual disabilities score high on empathy and closeness

A new Tel Aviv University and University of Haifa study finds that relationships between children and their siblings with intellectual disabilities are more positive than those between typically developing siblings.

8h

Intestine-chip populated with organoids demonstrates superior function vs. organoids alone

Emulate, Inc. published a study in the peer-reviewed journal eLife demonstrating superior human-relevant intestine function of the Duodenum Intestine-Chip populated with organoids, compared to organoids alone. The Intestine-Chip produced a nearly identical global transcriptomic profile compared to human intestine duodenum tissue which resulted in significantly more accurate physiological function

8h

A quicker answer on cancer, with waits cut from 84 days to 6

A rapid diagnosis center has cut waiting times for patients with non-specific symptoms who may have cancer from 84 days to six, a new study by Swansea University researchers and NHS colleagues has shown. It also costs less than current usual care if used at more than 80% of capacity.

8h

Chronic inflammation may turn skin-protecting antibody into a tumor promoter

One of the skin's defenses against environmental assault can help tumors to grow when skin is exposed to chronic inflammation, finds a study in mice published today in eLife.

8h

Researchers discover new strategy in the fight against antibiotic resistance

Bioscience engineers from KU Leuven in Belgium have developed a new antibacterial strategy that weakens bacteria by preventing them from cooperating. Unlike with antibiotics, there is no resistance to this strategy, because the non-resistant bacteria outnumber resistant ones. The findings are published in Nature Communications.

8h

Truly Secure Voting Is on the Way

Unfortunately, it won't be here by 2020 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

America's Favorite Poison

Occasionally, Elizabeth Bruenig unleashes a tweet for which she knows she's sure to get dragged: She admits that she doesn't drink. Bruenig, a columnist at The New York Times with a sizable social-media following, told me that it usually begins with her tweeting something mildly inflammatory and totally unrelated to alcohol—e.g., The Star Wars prequels are actually good. Someone will accuse her o

8h

Sand mining is threatening lives along the Mekong River

It's a resource used in global construction and mined from rivers and coasts across the world. Now new research has shown sand mining is causing river beds to lower, leading to riverbank instability and increasing the likelihood of dangerous river bank collapse, damaging infrastructure and housing and putting lives at risk.

8h

Fluorescerande molekyl hittar cancer

Ett forskarteam vid Umeå universitet har hittat en läkemedelsliknande molekyl som kan användas i cancerceller för att detektera en viss typ av fyrsträngad DNA-struktur, som kallas parallella G-quadruplex DNA-strukturer, G4-DNA. Fyrsträngat DNA associeras med uppkomsten av cancer och utveckling av nya cancerläkemedel. DNA-molekylerna i människans arvsmassa är uppbyggda av byggstenarna cytosin, gua

8h

Watching complex molecules at work

Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy in the sub-millisecond range is an important method for studying the relationship between function and structure in biological molecules. However, the method only works if the reaction can be repeated many thousands of times. This is not the case for a large number of biological processes, though, because they often are based on very rapid and irreversible react

8h

Research: Climate Change Is Indeed Making Wildfires Worse

Climate Culprit A team of researchers from the University of East Anglia in the UK say that an analysis of 57 peer-reviewed papers corroborates that climate change is indeed making wildfires worse globally. The timing is apt, because Australia is experiencing one of the worst wildfire crises in its recorded history, with more than 10 million hectares of the country burned down — fires so devastat

8h

Cannabinoids improve symptoms in mice with endometriosis

Initial results from treating endometriosis in mice with cannabinoids suggest they can alleviate some symptoms of the disease, according to a new study in the open-access journal eLife.

8h

Life Cycle Assessment pinpoints 'sustainability hotspots' in bio-chemical production

New research concerning Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) reveals challenges and opportunities in bio-chemical production. Particularly, it shows that the industry needs to assess a production method's environmental performance at an early stage of development.

8h

'Marshmallow test' redux: Children show better self-control when they depend on each other

The researchers say their experiments are the first to show that children are more willing to delay gratification for cooperative reasons than for individual goals.

8h

Researchers discover new strategy in the fight against antibiotic resistance

Bioscience engineers from KU Leuven in Belgium have developed a new antibacterial strategy that weakens bacteria by preventing them from cooperating. Unlike with antibiotics, there is no resistance to this strategy.

8h

Skin cancer suppressor found by Bath scientists

A promising route to develop new treatments for skin cancer has been identified by the UK's University of Bath scientists, who have found a molecule that suppresses melanoma tumour growth.

8h

New parasitoid wasp species discovered in the Amazon — can manipulate host's behavior

A research group from the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku studies the diversity of parasitoid insects around the world. Parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera) are one of the most species rich animal taxa on Earth, but their tropical diversity is still poorly known. In the latest study, the group discovered 15 new, sizable species that parasitize spiders in the lowland rainforests of the Amazo

8h

Large study of genetic differences reveals several new targets for variety of diseases

A large, multicenter study led by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) compared the genomic data of more than 100,000 people of European ancestry and discovered how relatively rare, albeit recurrent, genetic variations can influence a variety of common diseases. In addition, existing drugs could be repurposed to target these conditions now that the genetic underpinnings of the

8h

Neither fishing tales nor sailor's yarn

An international team led by Robert Arlinghaus from the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries and the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin have developed a method for combining the empirical knowledge of fishery stakeholders in such a way that the result corresponds to the best scientific understanding. This is of particular interest when human and financial resources are insuffic

8h

Conversational difficulties with father affect adolescent health

Conversational difficulties with father after a divorce affects the children's health negatively.

8h

Scientists hope to defeat infections after discovering bacterial espionage

University of Tartu scientists hope create a solution for chronic infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment after having discovered mechanisms for listening in on sleeping bacteria.

8h

Program decreases stress among parents in low-income diverse populations

Low-income parents reported lower perceived parenting stress and better overall outcomes when parents participated in Parenting Journey, a community-delivered curriculum designed to increase resilience and support nurturing family relationships.

8h

Greenhouse gases from oil and gas projected to continue to increase

The fracking boom across the country has resulted in greenhouse gas emissions steadily climbing each year since the United States has become the largest producer of oil and gas in the world.

8h

House passes legislation to address PFAS chemical contamination

The U.S. House on passed Friday a sweeping package of measures that would establish federal regulations for toxic, persistent chemicals known as PFAS and compel cleanup of contaminated areas.

8h

Baltimore to say bye to plastic bags at checkout, starting early next year

Mayor Bernard C. "Jack" Young signed a bill Monday that bans retailers' use of plastic bags, saying he was proud Baltimore is "leading the way in creating cleaner neighborhoods and waterways."

8h

These toxic chemicals steal IQ points from American kids

Exposure to lead, mercury, and other toxic chemicals, especially flame retardants and pesticides resulted in more than a million cases of intellectual disability in the United States between 2001 and 2016, research finds. Furthermore, as the target of significantly fewer restrictions, researchers say, flame retardants and pesticides now represent the bulk of that cognitive loss. Adverse outcomes

8h

Ansigtsgenkendelse til telefonlås er ikke nødvendigvis sikkert

»Det er ikke af sikkerhedsårsager, man benytter sig af dette.«

9h

Scientists seek urgent action on impacts of climate change on reptiles and amphibians

World leaders in reptile and amphibian research say there is an urgent international need to acknowledge the evidence for global climate change and take immediate action to help save these vulnerable animals.

9h

Surprising beauty found in bacterial cultures

Microbial communities inhabit every ecosystem on Earth, from soil to rivers to the human gut. While monoclonal cultures often exist in labs, in the real world, many different microbial species inhabit the same space. Researchers at University of California San Diego have discovered that when certain microbes pair up, stunning floral patterns emerge.

9h

Slow light to speed up LiDAR sensors development

Quicker is not always better, especially when it comes to a 3-D sensor in advanced technology. With applications in autonomous vehicles, robots and drones, security systems and more, researchers are striving for a 3-D sensor that is compact and easy to use.

9h

Scientists seek urgent action on impacts of climate change on reptiles and amphibians

World leaders in reptile and amphibian research say there is an urgent international need to acknowledge the evidence for global climate change and take immediate action to help save these vulnerable animals.

9h

Surprising beauty found in bacterial cultures

Microbial communities inhabit every ecosystem on Earth, from soil to rivers to the human gut. While monoclonal cultures often exist in labs, in the real world, many different microbial species inhabit the same space. Researchers at University of California San Diego have discovered that when certain microbes pair up, stunning floral patterns emerge.

9h

New route for tackling drug resistance in skin cancer cells

Researchers have found that melanoma cells fight anti-cancer drugs by changing their internal skeleton (cytoskeleton) — opening up a new therapeutic route for combating skin and other cancers that develop resistance to treatment.

9h

Connecting the dots in the sky could shed new light on dark matter

Astrophysicists have come a step closer to understanding the origin of a faint glow of gamma rays covering the night sky. They found that this light is brighter in regions that contain a lot of matter and dimmer where matter is sparser — a correlation that could help them narrow down the properties of exotic astrophysical objects and invisible dark matter.

9h

The advantage of changing sex in fish population recovery

Some fish species recover at different rates when fishing is eliminated inside MPAs. A new study explores how sex-changing fish species can actually recover faster than fixed-sex species.

9h

How nodules stay on top at the bottom of the sea

Rare metallic elements found in clumps on the deep-ocean floor mysteriously remain uncovered despite the shifting sands and sediment many leagues under the sea. Scientists now think they know why, and it could have important implications for mining these metals while preserving the strange fauna at the bottom of the ocean.

9h

San Francisco's Robot Restaurants Are Going out of Business

Kitchen Nightmares Given its close proximity to Silicon Valley, it's no surprise that San Francisco is one of the more tech-forward cities in the world. Case in point: in recent years, a number of restaurants run to varying degrees by robots have opened in San Fran. But according to a new Business Insider story , if you're hoping to enjoy a meal at one of the futuristic eateries, you better hurry

9h

'Cold Neptune' and two temperate super-Earths found orbiting nearby stars

A "cold Neptune" and two potentially habitable worlds are part of a cache of five newly discovered exoplanets and eight exoplanet candidates found orbiting nearby red dwarf stars, which are reported in The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series by a team led by Carnegie's Fabo Feng and Paul Butler.

9h

Molekylära fällor kan förebygga fetma

Mikrometerstora partiklar av porös kiseldioxid kan påverka hur snabbt mat bryts ned och tas upp i tarmen. Partiklarna minskar hur mycket maten bryts ned och hastigheten för det. Studierna på möss kan ge nya behandlingar för fetma och diabetes hos människor, hoppas forskarna. Hittills saknas effektiva behandlingar mot fetma som hindrar viktökning eller främjar viktminskning utan problematiska bive

9h

Tron på sig själv vägen tillbaka till arbete

Tro på sin förmåga att arbeta, gör att kvinnor med rygg – och nackbesvär hittar olika sätt att hantera sin smärta, säger Mamunur Rashid, forskare vid Högskolan i Gävle som följt 200 smärtpatienter, och deras kamp för att komma tillbaka i arbete. Över hela västvärlden, särskilt i Sverige, ser forskarna att kvinnor är överrepresenterade när det gäller sjukskrivning för värk i nacke-, skuldror och r

9h

Krav på mätbar kunskap gör det svårare att undervisa i bild

När fokus ligger på mätbar kunskap och individuell prestation kommer bildämnet i kläm. Det gör att den traditionella synen på bildberättande, och val av material, reproduceras av både lärare och elever. Det visar forskning vid Umeå universitet. Studien undersöker vilka normer och värderingar som skapas och reproduceras i grundskolans bildundervisning och hur dessa påverkar elevers möjligheter att

9h

Brain blood flow sensor discovery could aid treatments for high blood pressure & dementia

A study led by researchers at UCL has discovered the mechanism that allows the brain to monitor its own blood supply, a finding in rats which may help to find new treatments for human conditions including hypertension (high blood pressure) and dementia.

9h

Silica particles may lead to new treatments for obesity and diabetes

Engineered ingestible molecular traps created from mesoporous silica particles (MSPs) introduced to the gut can have an effect on food efficiency and metabolic risk factors. The results from studies on mice, published in Nanomedicine, demonstrate the potential to reduce the energy uptake into the body and could lead to new treatments for obesity and diabetes.

9h

Hydrogen alarm for remote hydrogen leak detection

Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Chemistry and Technology of Prague proposed new sensors based on widely available optical fiber to ensure accurate detection of hydrogen molecules in the air. In the future, these systems can constitute a basis for a "hydrogen alarm" used to detect leaks of explosive hydrogen. They can work remotely, at a distance of hundreds of meters. I

9h

Sand mining is threatening lives along the Mekong River

It's a resource used in global construction and mined from rivers and coasts across the world.Now new research, undertaken as part of a project led by University of Southampton, has shown sand mining is causing river beds to lower, leading to riverbank instability and increasing the likelihood of dangerous river bank collapse, damaging infrastructure and housing and putting lives at risk.

9h

Voltage induced 'Super-fluid like' penetration effects in Liquid metals at room temperature

Researchers from the University of Wollongong, Australia, have made the startling discovery that a room-temperature liquid metals show a "superfluid-like" effect of passing through porous materials. The effect is made possible through the reduction of surface tension to a near-zero state by applying a voltage on the liquid metal in a solution. Their findings offer new opportunities for microfluidi

9h

Plant genomes reveal the basis for adaptation to contrasting climates

In the face of rapid climate change, it is important that plants can adapt quickly to new conditions to ensure their survival. Using field experiments and plant genome studies, an international research team has pinpointed areas of the genome that are affected during local adaptation to contrasting climates. This new insight into local adaptation represents an important first step towards future d

9h

Many older people's glasses of wrong power

Overall, Swedish 70-year-olds' eyesight is good, but many could see even better. Six in ten can improve their vision by getting eyeglasses or changing the power of the glasses they already have, according to a new study from the University of Gothenburg.

9h

X-rays and gravitational waves will combine to illuminate massive black hole collisions

A new study by a group of researchers at the University of Birmingham has found that collisions of supermassive black holes may be simultaneously observable in both gravitational waves and X-rays at the beginning of the next decade.

9h

No need to dig too deep to find gold!

Why are some porphyry deposits rich in copper while others contain gold? A researcher (UNIGE) investigated how the metals are accumulated over the time duration of a mineralizing event and discover that the depth of the deposits influences the quantity of metals produced and that over 95% of the gold is lost to the atmosphere. The deeper a deposit is, the more copper there will be, while gold-rich

9h

School indoor air quality cannot be reliably assessed based on pupils' symptoms

The association between indoor air quality of the school building and the pupils' symptoms was so weak that it is not possible to reliably assess the quality of the indoor air based on the amount of reported symptoms.

9h

Sugar changes the chemistry of your brain

The idea of food addiction is a very controversial topic among scientists. Researchers from Aarhus University have delved into this topic and examined what happens in the brains of pigs when they drink sugar water. The conclusion is clear: sugar influences brain reward circuitry in ways similar to those observed when addictive drugs are consumed. The results have just been published in the journal

9h

Room-temperature multiferroicity in 2D ultrathin-layers and diversified magnetoelectric couplings

The coexistence of vertical ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism with both Curie temperatures above room-temperature is predicted in ultrathin-layer CuCrS2 and CuCrSe2.A considerable net magnetization can be reversed upon a ferroelectric switching, where the change in spin-resolved band structure also renders efficient "magnetic reading + electrical writing". The thickness-different layers may even

9h

Clothes last longer and shed fewer microfibers in quicker, cooler washing cycles

First research into impact of wash cycle times shows that shorter, cooler washes: help clothes keep their color and last longer, when compared to warmer, longer cycles; release significantly fewer microfibers into wastewater; significantly reduce color transfer, a major cause of lights and whites becoming duller.

9h

New technology for pre-replenishing lithium for lithium ion supercapacitors

Li3N containing electrode is prepared by a commercially adoptable route, using DMF to homogenate the electrode slurry. The DMF molecular stabilizing mechanism is confirmed via experiment analysis and DFT simulation. The soft package lithium-ion capacitors (LIC250) with 12wt% Li3N addition in AC positive electrode exhibits excellent rate capability, cyclic stability and ultrahigh specific energy. I

9h

Watching complex molecules at work

A new method of infrared spectroscopy developed at BESSY II makes single-measurement observation and analysis of very fast as well as irreversible reaction mechanisms in molecules feasible for the first time. Previously, thousands of such reactions have had to be run and measured for this purpose. The research team has now used the new device to investigate how rhodopsin molecules change after act

9h

Cancer surgery: It depends on experience

Patients with colorectal cancer have a greater chance of survival if they are operated in hospitals with a high case load. This is because complications that can occur after surgery can be better managed there.

9h

Egg trading between hermaphroditic fish: Why would you give when you can just take?

The sex life of hermaphroditic animals is determined by one fundamental question: Who assumes the female role and produces the costly eggs? Hamlets avoid this dilemma by engaging in reciprocal egg trading. Scientists have now used microeconomic models to analyze the circumstances required for this complex system of trading to work. Their results have been published in The American Naturalist.

9h

Egg trading between hermaphroditic fish: Why would you give when you can just take?

The sex life of hermaphroditic animals is determined by one fundamental question: Who assumes the female role and produces the costly eggs? Hamlets avoid this dilemma by engaging in reciprocal egg trading. Scientists have now used microeconomic models to analyze the circumstances required for this complex system of trading to work. Their results have been published in The American Naturalist.

9h

Scientists Build "First Living Robots" From Frog Stem Cells

A team of researchers have built what they claim to be the first living robots. The "xenobots," they say, can move, pick up objects, and even heal themselves after being cut. The team is hoping the biological machines could one day be used to clean up microplastics in the ocean or even deliver drugs inside the human body, The Guardian reports . To build the robots, the team used living cells from

9h

Man versus machine: Can AI do science?

Scientists have shown that machines can beat theoretical physicists at their own game, solving complex problems just as accurately as scientists, but considerably faster.

9h

Man versus machine: Can AI do science?

Scientists have shown that machines can beat theoretical physicists at their own game, solving complex problems just as accurately as scientists, but considerably faster.

9h

Children's packed lunches lack nutritional quality

Fewer than two in every 100 packed lunches eaten by children in English primary schools meet nutritional standards, according to a major survey. Although the amount of sugary food in lunchboxes declined over 10 years it is still higher than recommended, and there has been a drop in essential vitamins and minerals. Researchers say the lack of fresh food is to blame.

9h

Some say we've seen bushfires worse than this before—but they're ignoring key facts

Every time a weather extreme occurs, some people quickly jump in to say we've been through it all before: that worse events have happened in the past, or it's just part of natural climate variability.

9h

Browsers Are Fixing the Internet's Most Annoying Problem

After years of invasive pop-ups asking for notification permission, Chrome and Firefox have finally taken action.

9h

Slow light to speed up LiDAR sensors development

Quicker is not always better, especially when it comes to a 3D sensor in advanced technology. With applications in autonomous vehicles, robots and drones, security systems and more, researchers are striving for a 3D sensor that is compact and easy to use. A team from Yokohama National University in Japan believes they have developed a method to obtain such a sensor by taking advantage of slow ligh

9h

Heart-function protein may help muscular dystrophy patients live longer

Rutgers-led discovery may help prevent muscular dystrophy-related heart disease, the leading cause of death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

9h

Collision helped make the Milky Way — and now we know when

Researchers have pinpointed an early galactic merger that helped shape the Milky Way. The merger — a collision, actually — happened 11.5 billion years ago. That's when a small galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus slammed into what then existed of the Milky Way, Earth's home galaxy, which is about 13.5 billion years old.

9h

The fallout from a false nuclear alarm

On Sunday at 7:23 a.m., residents of the Greater Toronto Area were abruptly awakened by an alert issued by Ontario's Emergency Alert Ready System stating: "An incident was reported at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station. There has been NO abnormal release of radioactivity from the station and emergency staff are responding to the situation."

9h

Scientists Discovered 'Mini-Computers' in Human Neurons—and That's Great News for AI

With just their input cables, human neurons can perform difficult logic calculations previously only seen in entire neural networks. To restate: human neurons are far more powerful devices than originally thought. And if deep learning algorithms—the AI method loosely based on the brain that's taken our world by storm—take note, they can be too. Those are unconventional, fighting words. For 70 yea

9h

7.500.000.000.000 kroner skal bruges på at gøre EU grøn

Der skal findes knap 2.000 milliarder kroner ekstra om året, hvis EU skal blive klimaneutral.

9h

Kæmpebøder på vej: CO2-udledninger løber løbsk for europæiske bilproducenter

Europæiske bilproducenter risikerer at skulle betale helt op til 126 mia. kroner i bøder, hvis de ikke når reduktionsmålene for 2021. Købernes sult efter store SUV'er og konsekvenserne af dieselskandalen er nu ved at ramme.

9h

Surprising beauty found in bacterial cultures

Researchers have discovered that when certain microbes pair up, stunning floral patterns emerge.

9h

Climate change increases the risk of wildfires confirms new review

Human-induced climate change promotes the conditions on which wildfires depend, increasing their likelihood — according to a review of research on global climate change and wildfire risk.

9h

Sparking change through research

Social scientists in Myanmar seeking to understand the factors that influence women's participation in politics and the economy are finding that, before they can study, first they must inform.

9h

Många äldre har fel glasögon

Svenska 70-åringar har överlag bra syn, men många skulle kunna se ännu bättre. Sex av tio kan förbättra seendet betydligt genom att skaffa glasögon eller byta styrka på de glasögon de redan har, enligt en studie från Göteborgs universitet. – Vi är väldigt friska och har god syn i Sverige, och att vara 70 innebär inte att man ska behöva se dåligt. Det är lätt att kolla upp synen hos en optiker som

9h

Betelgeuse: Star's weird dimming sparks rumors that its death is imminent

Every season has its characteristic star constellations in the night sky. Orion—one of the most recognizable—is distinctly visible on crisp, clear winter nights in the northern hemisphere. The constellation is easy to spot even in light-polluted cities, with its bright stars representing the shape of a person.

9h

Thanks to clouds, new climate simulations predict more warming than predecessors

A new study suggests global warming effect is underestimated, but climate scientists say more research is needed.

9h

No need to dig deep: New tool maximizes extraction of gold and porphyry copper

A UNIGE researcher has discovered the particularities of porphyry copper and gold deposits, providing mining companies with a new tool to maximize the extraction of these two metals.

9h

X-rays and gravitational waves combine to illuminate massive black hole collision

A new study by a group of researchers at the University of Birmingham has found that collisions of supermassive black holes may be simultaneously observable in both gravitational waves and X-rays at the beginning of the next decade.

9h

Microsoft Says New Tool Detects Pedophiles Grooming Kids Online

When a child sexual predator identifies a potential victim online, they don't always try to start a sexual relationship with them immediately. Instead, the predator might engage in a process called " grooming " — befriending and establishing trust with the potential victim so they can exploit that trust later. Now, Microsoft has created a tool that analyzes text-based chats for signs of grooming

9h

Getting to the heart of epinephrine use in pediatric cardiac arrest patients

The effectiveness of epinephrine treatment during resuscitation of adult patients with cardiac arrest is generally promising, but little is known about its effects in pediatric patients. Researchers led by Osaka University have shown that prehospital administration of epinephrine in children who suffer out of hospital cardiac arrest significantly improves the return of spontaneous circulation, whi

9h

Egg trading between hermaphroditic fish: Why would you give when you can just take?

The sex life of hermaphroditic animals is determined by one fundamental question: Who assumes the female role and produces the costly eggs? Hamlets avoid this dilemma by engaging in reciprocal egg trading. Scientists have now used microeconomic models to analyze the circumstances required for this complex system of trading to work. Their results have been published in The American Naturalist.

9h

Physicists prove that 2D and 3D liquids are fundamentally different

A 50-year-old puzzle in statistical mechanics has been solved by an international team of researchers who have proved that two-dimensional (2D) liquids have fundamentally different dynamical properties to three-dimensional (3D) liquids.

9h

Decoy molecule neutralizes a range of viruses

The molecule points the way toward treating viruses that cross from animals to humans.

9h

'Cold Neptune' and two temperate super-Earths found orbiting nearby stars

A 'cold Neptune' and two potentially habitable worlds are part of a cache of five newly discovered exoplanets and eight exoplanet candidates found orbiting nearby red dwarf stars. The two potentially habitable planets are among the nearest stars to our own Sun, making them prime targets for observations by next-generation space- and land-based telescopes.

9h

How to make it easier to turn plant waste into biofuels

Researchers have developed a new process that could make it much cheaper to produce biofuels such as ethanol from plant waste and reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Their approach, featuring an ammonia-salt based solvent that rapidly turns plant fibers into sugars needed to make ethanol, works well at close to room temperature, unlike conventional processes, according to a new study.

9h

Connector fungi offer new clues to fate of nitrogen in warming tundra

New research could have implications for researchers and computer models that predict where nitrogen and carbon go at both regional and global levels.

9h

Solving complex problems at the speed of light

Many of the most challenging optimization problems encountered in various disciplines of science and engineering, from biology and drug discovery to routing and scheduling can be reduced to NP-complete problems. Intuitively speaking, NP-complete problems are "hard to solve" because the number of operations that must be performed in order to find the solution grows exponentially with the problem si

9h

Microorganisms fed with toxic gas to produce biofuel

Today, various processes are used to convert organic waste into biogas. By combining two different processes, it is possible to obtain even more of valuable substances such as hydrogen and methane. The key is to make the most of the microorganisms that do the work.

9h

Parasitoid wasp species discovered in the Amazon can manipulate host's behavior

A research group from the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku studies the diversity of parasitoid insects around the world. Parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera) are one of the most species rich animal taxa on Earth, but their tropical diversity is still poorly known. In the latest study, the group discovered 15 new, sizable species that parasitize spiders in the lowland rainforests of the Amazo

9h

Collectively, environmental stakeholders are just as smart as scientific experts

Many species are threatened with extinction, fish stocks are overfished. How can the complex relationships between wildlife, natural ecosystems and humans in a large number of habitats be captured with reasonable effort? Researchers need sound data over long periods of time and complex mathematical models. Can environmental stakeholders produce a similar result? An international team led by Profes

9h

Silica particles may lead to new treatments for obesity and diabetes

Engineered ingestible molecular traps created from mesoporous silica particles (MSPs) introduced to the gut can have an effect on food efficiency and metabolic risk factors. The results from studies on mice, published in Nanomedicine, demonstrate the potential to reduce the energy uptake into the body and could lead to new treatments for obesity and diabetes.

9h

RNA provides clues to explain longevity of ginkgo trees

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and one in the U.S. has found that ginkgo biloba trees do not experience senescence. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their RNA analysis of Ginkgo biloba cambium and what they learned from it.

9h

The most sensitive torque measuring device ever built

A team of physicists at Purdue University has built the most sensitive torque measuring device ever. In their paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the team describes their new device and outline how it might be used.

9h

Introducing the February 2020 Issue

The mind's social maps, the mystery of aerodynamic lift, killer robots, and more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Microorganisms fed with toxic gas to produce biofuel

Today, various processes are used to convert organic waste into biogas. By combining two different processes, it is possible to obtain even more of valuable substances such as hydrogen and methane. The key is to make the most of the microorganisms that do the work.

9h

Parasitoid wasp species discovered in the Amazon can manipulate host's behavior

A research group from the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku studies the diversity of parasitoid insects around the world. Parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera) are one of the most species rich animal taxa on Earth, but their tropical diversity is still poorly known. In the latest study, the group discovered 15 new, sizable species that parasitize spiders in the lowland rainforests of the Amazo

9h

RNA provides clues to explain longevity of ginkgo trees

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and one in the U.S. has found that ginkgo biloba trees do not experience senescence. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their RNA analysis of Ginkgo biloba cambium and what they learned from it.

9h

New classes of topological crystalline insulators having surface rotation anomaly

In a new report on Science Advances, Chen Fang and Liang Fu from the Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics in China, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the U.S. Detailed the discovery of new types of quantum anomalies in two-dimensional systems with time-reversal symmetry (T) (conservation of entropy)

9h

Is that plant healthy? Using the waxy surface of leaves to monitor their health

We can't easily monitor the health of plants, by the time we see that they're sick it's usually too late to save that. That's an issue for your house plants, a field of wheat, orchards and plantations.

9h

Is that plant healthy? Using the waxy surface of leaves to monitor their health

We can't easily monitor the health of plants, by the time we see that they're sick it's usually too late to save that. That's an issue for your house plants, a field of wheat, orchards and plantations.

10h

Why Do Some Drugs Work When Tested On The Brains Of Mice and Fail on Humans ?

submitted by /u/smallpocketlibrary [link] [comments]

10h

10h

Ancient gut fossil is the oldest one yet

A 550-million-year-old fossilized digestive tract from the Nevada desert could be key to understanding the early history of animals on Earth. Over a half-billion years ago, life on Earth was comprised of simple ocean organisms unlike anything living in today's oceans. Then, beginning about 540 million years ago, animal structures changed dramatically. During this time, ancestors of many animal gr

10h

China Finally Boots Up Colossal Alien-Hunting Radio Telescope

Coming Online On Saturday, China officially debuted the gigantic, alien-hunting radio telescope that it's been testing and debugging ever since construction completed in 2016. The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) sets a new world record for the largest single-dish radio telescope with a diameter of half a kilometer, according to state-run news agency Xinhua . Now that

10h

Australia's bushfires could drive more than 700 animal species to extinction

The scale and speed of the current bushfire crisis has caught many people off-guard, including biodiversity scientists. People are scrambling to estimate the long-term effects. It is certain that many animal species will be pushed to the brink of extinction, but how many?

10h

Australia's bushfires could drive more than 700 animal species to extinction

The scale and speed of the current bushfire crisis has caught many people off-guard, including biodiversity scientists. People are scrambling to estimate the long-term effects. It is certain that many animal species will be pushed to the brink of extinction, but how many?

10h

Winter is an important driver for nitrous oxide emissions from boreal lakes

Boreal lakes emit greenhouse gases, but the magnitude of the emissions is still inadequately quantified. While the emissions of carbon dioxide and methane have been addressed earlier, those of nitrous oxide (N2O) have received little interest. A Finnish study published in Global Change Biology increases significantly the knowledge on the nitrous oxide emissions from boreal lakes. A joint project o

10h

Solving complex problems at the speed of light

Many of the most challenging optimization problems encountered in various disciplines of science and engineering, from biology and drug discovery to routing and scheduling can be reduced to NP-complete problems. Researchers developed an algorithm dedicated to solving the well-known NP-complete Ising problem with photonics hardware.

10h

Surprising beauty found in bacterial cultures

Researchers at University of California San Diego have discovered that when certain microbes pair up, stunning floral patterns emerge.

10h

'Cold Neptune' and two temperate super-Earths found orbiting nearby stars

A 'cold Neptune' and two potentially habitable worlds are part of a cache of five newly discovered exoplanets and eight exoplanet candidates found orbiting nearby red dwarf stars by a team led by Carnegie's Fabo Feng and Paul Butler. The two potentially habitable planets are among the nearest stars to our own Sun, making them prime targets for observations by next-generation space- and land-based

10h

Broad support needed to maximize impact of cars designed for kids with mobility issues

For families who use the modified ride-on cars to help young children with mobility issues develop self-guided exploration and socialization, researcher Sam Logan found that robust support is needed to ensure the cars actually get used, rather than being forgotten in a closet.

10h

10h

10h

Fibroblasts in urothelial bladder cancer define stroma phenotypes that are associated with clinical outcome

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-55013-0

10h

Passive water ascent in a tall, scalable synthetic tree

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57109-z

10h

On the trail of purple: Tracking ancient trade routes through purple dye

As part of a DFG-funded project, a German-Tunisian team co-directed by LMU archaeologist Stefan Ritter have surveyed the ancient city of Meninx on the island of Jerba and reconstructed its trading links in antiquity.

10h

Humiliating, painful, depressing: brutal realities of 'sofa surfing'

New research from national homelessness charity Crisis has unearthed shocking findings about the most common yet misunderstood form of homelessness—sofa surfing.

10h

Data from antipodal places: First use of CMB polarization to detect gravitational lensing from galaxy clusters

Galaxies. Amalgamations of stars, interstellar gas, dust, stellar debris and dark matter. They waltz through the cold universe, gravity nurturing their embrace. Occasionally, galaxies snowball into enormous galaxy clusters with masses averaging 100 trillion times that of our sun.

10h

Extinction Rebellion: 'Terror threat' is a wake-up call for how the state treats environmental activism

Extinction Rebellion was once criticized by other activists for "love bombing the cops", but now it has found itself labeled a terror threat. In a guide sent to teachers by counter-terrorism police, the non-violent group's logo and activities were described to help them spot students who may be involved.

10h

You can leave water out for wildlife without attracting mosquitoes if you take a few precautions

Australia is in for a long, hot summer. The recent bushfires have been devastating for communities and wildlife. Drought is also impacting many regions.

10h

New web tool will facilitate military, wind energy industry collaboration

A new web tool, Texas Early Notification Tool, TENT, has been designed for energy industry developers to screen for potential project sites and identify potential issues that should be evaluated by the military.

10h

Getting Around to Reporting Clinical Data, Real Soon Now

Science has an interesting report on the publication of clinical trial results. Some readers will recall similar efforts from 2015 and 2017/2018 in the US and Europe ; this is actually a follow-up by one of the same US authors. It should actually be a dull report, because the requirements for such disclosure are clear. The rules have been gradually tightened up over the years, most recently in 20

10h

Introducing the February 2020 Issue

The mind's social maps, the mystery of aerodynamic lift, killer robots, and more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Self-determination helps young adults with autism succeed

New research suggests setting personalized goals early in adolescence and providing opportunities to achieve those goals can improve independence for young people with autism. The independence that comes with growing up can be scary for any teenager, but for young adults with autism spectrum disorder and their caregivers, the transition from adolescence to adulthood can seem particularly daunting

10h

In Search of the Brain's Social Road Maps

Neural circuits that track our whereabouts in space and time may also play vital roles in determining how we relate to other people — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

It-problemer udfordrer igen intensiv behandlings data

Manglende data fra Landspatientregisteret er en stor hæmsko for Dansk Intensiv Databases årsrapport, siger databasens formand. Årsrapport viser fortsat problemer med SAPS 3-scoren og godt nyt inden for to indikatorer.

10h

You can leave water out for wildlife without attracting mosquitoes if you take a few precautions

Australia is in for a long, hot summer. The recent bushfires have been devastating for communities and wildlife. Drought is also impacting many regions.

10h

Detoxification enzyme discovery could be used to target major crop contaminant

Plants have evolved detoxification defence systems as protection against an array of environmental or pathogen-produced contaminants.

10h

Study points to global streams and rivers' contribution to climate change

A new study led by Auburn University researchers and published in the journal, Nature Climate Change, shows a four-fold increase in emissions of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide—a major contributor to climate warming—in global streams and rivers.

10h

Detoxification enzyme discovery could be used to target major crop contaminant

Plants have evolved detoxification defence systems as protection against an array of environmental or pathogen-produced contaminants.

10h

From the archive

Nature, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00040-5 How Nature reported the discovery of ancient human bones in Australia in 1970, and how the First World War revolutionized the production of maps of France.

10h

Physicists prove that 2-D and 3-D liquids are fundamentally different

A 50-year-old puzzle in statistical mechanics has been solved by an international team of researchers who have proved that two-dimensional (2-D) liquids have fundamentally different dynamical properties to three-dimensional (3-D) liquids.

10h

Entering the labor market in a recession can take years off your life, study finds

For millions of young people who came of age amid the financial crisis of 2007-08, entering the labor market starting on a career path in the depths of the Great Recession could have long-term health consequences.

10h

Quicker and cooler is best for clothes

Groundbreaking research into the impact washing machines have on clothes and the environment shows that shorter, cooler washes help clothes look better for longer and release fewer microfibers.

10h

AstroSat observations unveil properties of black hole binary MAXI J1820+070

Simultaneous spectral and temporal observations of the newly detected black hole X-ray binary (BHXB) MAXI J1820+070 using the AstroSat spacecraft, have delivered more insights into the properties of this source. Results of the study, presented in a paper published January 6 on arXiv.org, could be helpful in improving our understanding of black hole binaries in general.

10h

How Many Water Bottles Could a Filling Station Save?

Or, how long would it take to fill a swimming pool from a water fountain? Let's have fun with numbers\!

10h

Conversational AI Can Propel Social Stereotypes

Designers need to consider the ethics of gendering not just AI voices, but also their tone, speed, word choice, and other speech patterns.

10h

Worried About Swearing Too Much? Science Says You Shouldn't Be

People who swear like a sailor are more honest and more intelligent, studies show.

10h

Don't Fact-Check Scientific Judgment Calls

They're not meant to be taken as gospel truths — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

In Search of the Brain's Social Road Maps

Neural circuits that track our whereabouts in space and time may also play vital roles in determining how we relate to other people — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Schizophrenia study finds evidence of reduced links between brain cells

Pioneering research on living patients could pave way for new and better treatment A groundbreaking brain-scanning technique has uncovered evidence that suggests schizophrenia is linked to a loss of connections between brain cells. Scientists had previously suspected a breakdown in the connections between neurons played a role in the condition, based on postmortem studies. The latest research, th

10h

Getting to know your microbiome better

In recent years, our gut microbiome has expanded from the relative obscurity of a culture dish to become firmly established in popular culture.

10h

Getting to know your microbiome better

In recent years, our gut microbiome has expanded from the relative obscurity of a culture dish to become firmly established in popular culture.

10h

Five things to know about rats

For some people, just the sight of a rat's naked tail or beady eyes may be enough to cause them to shriek or get the shivers. But Cummings School program coordinator Virginia Shugrue was unfazed when her daughter, Elise, expressed an interest in getting pet rats a few years ago.

10h

Unsustainable sand mining is threatening lives along the Mekong River in Cambodia

It's a resource used in global construction and mined from rivers and coasts across the world. Now new research, as part of a project led by University of Southampton, has shown sand mining is causing river beds to lower, leading to riverbank instability and increasing the likelihood of dangerous river bank collapse, damaging infrastructure and housing and putting lives at risk.

10h

Amerikansk ekspert om dansk laboratoriemælk: En stor udfordring – og måske vejen til et stort gennembrud

PLUS. Et dansk projekt, der vil fremstille mælk i laboratoriet, er ifølge en amerikansk fødevareforsker det første af sin slags. Og forude venter samme udfordringer, som producenter af laboratoriekød bakser med.

10h

Data judo, the interconnected self, and the dystopia in Silicon Valley: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00054-z Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week's best science picks.

10h

Five things to know about rats

For some people, just the sight of a rat's naked tail or beady eyes may be enough to cause them to shriek or get the shivers. But Cummings School program coordinator Virginia Shugrue was unfazed when her daughter, Elise, expressed an interest in getting pet rats a few years ago.

10h

Malaria in the Amazon increases with deforestation

A study by NSF-funded scientists Andy MacDonald at UC Santa Barbara and Erin Mordecai at Stanford found a direct relationship between deforestation in the Amazon and the transmission of malaria by mosquitoes. Regions with a lot of deforestation saw many more cases of malaria. The increase in malaria was associated with a subsequent decrease in the rate of deforestation. The paper appears in the jo

10h

Haiti 'still in crisis' 10 years after earthquake

When a 7.0 earthquake reduced Haiti to rubble, sparking one of the biggest international aid efforts in history, some experts predicted it would take the country a decade to get back to its feet.

10h

Malaria in the Amazon increases with deforestation

A study by NSF-funded scientists Andy MacDonald at UC Santa Barbara and Erin Mordecai at Stanford found a direct relationship between deforestation in the Amazon and the transmission of malaria by mosquitoes. Regions with a lot of deforestation saw many more cases of malaria. The increase in malaria was associated with a subsequent decrease in the rate of deforestation. The paper appears in the jo

10h

A guide to the good, low-carbon life

For about the last 10 years, environmental law professor Karl Coplan has been trying to winnow down his direct carbon-dioxide emissions with the goal of reaching four tons per year—about 40 percent of the average American's. He has been successful, and has just published a book, "Live Sustainably Now," chronicling his efforts. Half treatise, half diary, it offers an entertaining guide for others.

10h

Sea urchins could prove to be Rhode Island's next climate-resilient crop

Atlantic purple sea urchins are common in coastal waters along the East Coast, and University of Rhode Island scientist Coleen Suckling thinks the Ocean State could become the home of a new industry to raise the spiny marine creatures for consumption in Japan and elsewhere around the world.

10h

Sea urchins could prove to be Rhode Island's next climate-resilient crop

Atlantic purple sea urchins are common in coastal waters along the East Coast, and University of Rhode Island scientist Coleen Suckling thinks the Ocean State could become the home of a new industry to raise the spiny marine creatures for consumption in Japan and elsewhere around the world.

10h

SpaceX Prepares to Sacrifice Falcon 9 in 'Dragon Fire' for Launch Abort Test

SpaceX is busily preparing for its final uncrewed flight test with the Falcon 9 and Dragon capsule before it sends the first astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS). In many of SpaceX's launches, the company does all it can to recover the Falcon 9 first stage for reuse, but it's going to sacrifice the rocket this time , SpaceX CEO and consummate showman Elon Musk described it as being

10h

How to—Carefully—Surmount the Electoral College

Twice this century—and we are only two decades in—the person who has won the White House has received fewer voters nationwide than his opponent. As a direct result, more and more people are interested not just in who should be president but also in how that person ought to be selected. One of the most significant reform proposals—what's known as the National Popular Vote (NPV) interstate-compact

11h

'Swiss cheese' bones could be cause of unexplained low back pain

In experiments with genetically engineered and old mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that the vast majority of low back pain in people may be rooted in an overgrowth of pain-sensing nerves into spinal cartilaginous tissue.

11h

Making future transport more climate friendly

The world's transportation network is constantly growing. "Green asphalt" and sustainable bus transportation will ease the environmental impact of future transport routes.

11h

Scientists bolt down the defenses against ambrosia beetles

Exotic ambrosia beetles are costly pests of ornamental and fruit trees nationwide—from front-yard plantings of Japanese maple and oak to commercially grown orchards of cherry, peach, plum and even avocado.

11h

Scientists bolt down the defenses against ambrosia beetles

Exotic ambrosia beetles are costly pests of ornamental and fruit trees nationwide—from front-yard plantings of Japanese maple and oak to commercially grown orchards of cherry, peach, plum and even avocado.

11h

Does Consciousness Pervade the Universe?

Philosopher Philip Goff answers questions about "panpsychism" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Communicating The Consensus

Science communication is an evolving art, backed by some interesting research. However, my overall take on the state of the research is that it is mostly telling us the various ways in which we fail, rather than how to succeed. The latest target if scicomm handwringing is "consensus messaging." How do we, and should we, communicate the scientific consensus to the public? This issue is probably mo

11h

'Which Character Are You?' Instagram Filters Are Radically Dumb

They're also incredibly comforting—a perfect visual representation of our collective apathy in the face of overstimulation and a glut of content.

11h

Our average body temperatures seem to be dropping

Cool as a cucumber, at least compared to your Great Grandpa. (DepositPhoto/) The next time you take your temperature , don't worry if it's not exactly what the doctor ordered—98.6 degrees Fahrenheit is just a number. That's the message of a host of new research that shows human temperature is malleable, unique, and anything but average. One new study from Stanford University researchers finds tha

11h

Vast avian database links form to function

Bird bodies provide clues to their role in ecosystems.

11h

Increasing concerns about crowded space

Astronomers even talking about an 'existential threat'.

11h

Insects experience the effects of gravity

And they have more control than humans, a new study suggests.

11h

Ocean warming an increasing problem

Hottest ever year ended the hottest ever decade.

11h

Liquid metal takes on bacteria

Australian researchers unveil a new approach to beating antibiotic resistance.

11h

Hvordan arbejder Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed?

Aktindsigt i tilssynssagen om brystundersøgelser på Ringsted Sygehus peger på, at arbejdsprocesserne hos Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed er uhensigtsmæssige i forhold til patientsikkerhed og udnyttelsen af sundhedsvæsnets ressourcer. Det skriver forfatteren, lektor Hans Okkels Birk.

11h

NIH extends reporting mandate to more clinical trials, but obscures their policing

Agency's approach to enforcement called "regulatory theater"

11h

Image of the Day: Chromatin Forest

The DNA-protein complex has branches that fold back on themselves.

11h

Connecting dots in the sky

Scientists match up maps of matter and light.

11h

Does Consciousness Pervade the Universe?

Philosopher Philip Goff answers questions about "panpsychism" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Most engineered nanoparticles enter tumours through cells, not between them

Researchers from U of T Engineering have discovered that an active, rather than passive, process dictates which nanoparticles enter solid tumors. The finding upends previous thinking in the field of cancer nanomedicine and points toward more effective nanotherapies.

11h

Magnetic storms originate closer to Earth than previously thought, threatening satellites

Beyond Earth's atmosphere are swirling clouds of energized particles—ions and electrons—that emanate from the sun. This "solar wind" buffets the magnetosphere, the magnetic force field that surrounds Earth.

11h

New quantum loop provides testbed for quantum communication technology

Scientists from Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago launched a new testbed for quantum communication experiments from Argonne last week.

11h

NASA's Mars 2020 rover closer to getting its name

NASA's Mars 2020 rover is one step closer to having its own name after 155 students across the U.S. were chosen as semifinalists in the "Name the Rover" essay contest. Just one will be selected to win the grand prize—the exciting honor of naming the rover and an invitation to see the spacecraft launch in July 2020 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

11h

Reliable and extremely fast quantum calculations with germanium transistors

Transistors based on germanium can perform calculations for future quantum computers. This discovery by the team of Menno Veldhorst is reported in Nature.

12h

Record-setting ocean warmth equivalent to 3.6 billion Hiroshima atom bomb explosions over 25 years

A new analysis shows the world's oceans were the warmest in 2019 than any other time in recorded human history, especially between the surface and a depth of 2,000 meters. The study, conducted by an international team of 14 scientists from 11 institutes across the world, also concludes that the past 10 years have been the warmest on record for global ocean temperatures, with the past five years ho

12h

How to verify that quantum chips are computing correctly

In a step toward practical quantum computing, researchers from MIT, Google, and elsewhere have designed a system that can verify when quantum chips have accurately performed complex computations that classical computers can't.

12h

Oceans were hottest on record in 2019

The world's oceans were the hottest in recorded history in 2019, scientists said on Tuesday, as manmade emissions warmed seas at an ever-increasing rate with potentially disastrous impacts on Earth's climate.

12h

More than 110 dead as severe weather hits Pakistan, Afghanistan

Avalanches, flooding and harsh winter weather has killed more than 110 people across Pakistan and Afghanistan in recent days, officials said Tuesday, as authorities struggled to reach people stranded by heavy snowfall.

12h

Makeshift koala hospital scrambles to save dozens injured in bushfires

Dozens of injured koalas arrive at the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park's makeshift animal hospital each day in cat carriers, washing baskets or clinging to wildlife carers.

12h

Makeshift koala hospital scrambles to save dozens injured in bushfires

Dozens of injured koalas arrive at the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park's makeshift animal hospital each day in cat carriers, washing baskets or clinging to wildlife carers.

12h

12h

The Bleak Future of Australian Wildlife

As temperatures rise, Australia becomes more monochrome. In the ocean, the reefs have been whitening. On land, the forests have been blackening. Successive heat waves have forced corals to expel their colorful, nutrient-providing algae; half of the Great Barrier Reef has died. A near-unprecedented drought and exceptional temperatures—December saw Australia's two hottest days on record— triggered

12h

Forældre på barsel koster ikke virksomheder dyrt

Myten om at danske virksomheder ofte bliver presset i knæ pga. udgifter i forbindelse med medarbejderes…

12h

Flames Extinguish Themselves in Zero Gravity

Originally published in November 2000 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

12h

Flere er anholdt efter at Iran erkender utilsigtet nedskydning af passagerfly

PLUS. Missilet dræbte begge piloter på stedet, vurderer Ukraine. Ifølge chefen for det iranske luftvåben var det kommunikationskoks, som medførte, at en officer affyrede antiluftskyts.

12h

Why Premature Claims of Life on Mars Hurt Science

Bogus beetles, nonexistent giant sculptures and other "discoveries" on the Red Planet distract us from the exciting research that's actually going on — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Female Surgeons Are Still Treated as Second-Class Citizens

The profession is rife with sexual harassment, bullying and discrimination—and that needs to change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

How to make it easier to turn plant waste into biofuels

Researchers have developed a new process that could make it much cheaper to produce biofuels such as ethanol from plant waste and reduce reliance on fossil fuels.

12h

Get Ready for More Phones With No Buttons

As we inch closer to phones with all-screen designs, physical buttons are on the chopping block.

12h

Now It's Really, Truly Time to Give Up Windows 7

After Tuesday, Microsoft will no longer issue security updates for the operating system, leaving users who don't upgrade vulnerable to malware.

12h

The Mandalorian Is the Only Smart Soldier in the Star Wars Galaxy

It took decades, but the galaxy finally has a tactical and operational genius.

12h

How to Watch the Last Democratic Debate Before the Iowa Caucuses

With just six candidates taking the stage, the DNC's seventh primary debate is the smallest one yet.

12h

There Is a Culture Industry That Gives Its Top Prizes to Women

Yesterday, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences produced yet another all-male slate for the Best Director category of the Oscars—and provoked yet another round of outrage that America's culture industry is incapable of recognizing the achievements of women. But there is, in fact, a major creative industry in which women are routinely awarded the top honors. It's called publishing. The

12h

Why Premature Claims of Life on Mars Hurt Science

Bogus beetles, nonexistent giant sculptures and other "discoveries" on the Red Planet distract us from the exciting research that's actually going on — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Female Surgeons Are Still Treated as Second-Class Citizens

The profession is rife with sexual harassment, bullying and discrimination—and that needs to change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Orderly desk, orderly mind

Nature, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00063-y Carla Shatz stays organized to help her spot ways in which brain circuits rewire themselves.

12h

Bilsalget slog rekorder i 2019: Danskerne vælger større og mere CO2-udledende biler

Den gennemsnitlige bil er blevet større og forurener mere, og denne udvikling truer den grønne omstilling. Salget af elbiler og plugin-hybridbiler stiger, men niveauet er stadig lavt.

12h

New Instrument Will Stretch Atoms into Giant Waves

Room-sized "atom waves" could help probe the quantum realm — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

How to make it easier to turn plant waste into biofuels

Researchers have developed a new process that could make it much cheaper to produce biofuels such as ethanol from plant waste and reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Their approach, featuring an ammonia-salt based solvent that rapidly turns plant fibers into sugars needed to make ethanol, works well at close to room temperature, unlike conventional processes, according to a Rutgers-led study in the j

13h

When a Promotion Leads to Divorce

For the ninth time in the past 10 years, no women have been nominated for an Academy Award for Best Director. The critically acclaimed adaptation of Little Women earned a nod for Best Picture. But the Oscars overlooked its director, Greta Gerwig, whose previous film, Lady Bird , earned the only Best Director entry for a woman out of the last 50 nominations in this category. The Academy's slight i

13h

Is love an addiction?

Studies have shown that romantic love, while often positive, activates basic brain regions that are also triggered by cocaine addiction. Stalking, clinical depression, and even suicides have been attributed to love addictions. For better or worse, everybody at some time in their life has been or will be addicted to love. Anatomy of Love: A Natural History of Mating, Marriage, and Why We Stray (Co

13h

Anesthesiologist joins the 100-retraction club

Until this year, only one researcher — Yoshitaka Fujii — had eclipsed the century mark for retractions. But Fujii can no longer claim dibs on being the only scientist to lose three digits worth of papers. Joachim Boldt, a fellow anesthesiologist fraudster, recently notched three more retractions, bringing his tally, by our count, to an … Continue reading

13h

Strange particles found in Antarctica cannot be explained by physics

A NASA science balloon picked up two high-energy particles and a new analysis reveals that they can't be explained by the standard model of particle physics

13h

Trods brand-advarsel: Entreprenør bygger trygt P-huse med stålkonstruktioner

PLUS. Efter kollapset parkeringshus i Norge er entreprenørvirksomheden NCC glade for de danske byggekrav til P-huse og deler ikke DTU-professors bekymring over byggerier med bærende stålkonstruktioner. Selv har NCC opført en sådan femetagers konstruktion så sent som i november 2019.

13h

Futures: Print lover mourns the loss of Nature's sci-fi stories

Nature, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00058-9 Futures: Print lover mourns the loss of Nature 's sci-fi stories

13h

Rooibos settlement omits other marginalized people

Nature, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00056-x

13h

Top priority for Sahel? A zero-carbon world

Nature, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00059-8

13h

Kurdistan: instability wrecks research and education

Nature, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00057-w

13h

A smart jumpsuit could track development in at-risk babies

A smart jumpsuit for babies can monitor their movement, and may be able to help spot any potential mobility issues early on

13h

Extreme genetic signatures of local adaptation during Lotus japonicus colonization of Japan

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14213-y Local adaptation contributes to plant colonization across extreme environmental gradients. Here, the authors reconstruct the colonization history of Lotus japonicus in Japan and identify extreme genetic signatures of local adaptation to a cold climate using genome resequencing and common garden experiments.

14h

Environmental DNA reveals seasonal shifts and potential interactions in a marine community

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14105-1 Increasingly, eDNA is being used to infer ecological interactions. Here the authors sample eDNA over 18 months in a marine environment and use co-occurrence network analyses to infer potential interactions among organisms from microbes to mammals, testing how they change over time in response to oceanographic

14h

Efficient electrochemical production of glucaric acid and H2 via glucose electrolysis

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14157-3 Renewable biomass conversion may afford high-value products from common materials, but catalysts usually require expensive metals and exhibit poor selectivities. Here, authors employ nickel-iron oxide and nitride electrocatalysts to produce H2 and to convert glucose to glucaric acid selectively.

14h

Attenuation of TCR-induced transcription by Bach2 controls regulatory T cell differentiation and homeostasis

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14112-2 The transcription factor Bach2 is critical for T cell differentiation, but how it functions in Treg cells is unclear. Here the authors use a Treg-specific mouse model to show that Bach2 controls homeostasis and function of Treg cells by limiting DNA accessibility and activity of IRF4 in response to TCR signal

14h

Cysteine-encoded chirality evolution in plasmonic rhombic dodecahedral gold nanoparticles

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14117-x Chirality of amino acids can be transferred to the high index plane of gold nanoparticles, resulting in chiral plasmonic nanoparticles called the 432 Helicoid series. Here, the authors present a 432 Helicoid IV and describe a systematic approach to modulate the chirality of single particles by controlling the

14h

Rare copy number variants in over 100,000 European ancestry subjects reveal multiple disease associations

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13624-1 Associations of copy number variations (CNVs) with complex traits are challenging to study because of their low frequency. Here, the authors analyse SNP array and array comparative genomic hybridization data of 100,028 individuals and report their associations with immune-related, cardiometabolic and neuropsy

14h

Digitally virtualized atoms for acoustic metamaterials

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14124-y Tuning the constitutive parameters of metamaterials in real time depends on the ability to modify the structure or external circuits attached to the metamaterials. Here, the authors propose virtualized metamaterials, allowing the tuning of acoustic parameters on-demand through software-defined frequency dispe

14h

Author Correction: FRQ-CK1 interaction determines the period of circadian rhythms in Neurospora

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13862-3

14h

New discovery on the activity and function of MAIT cells during acute HIV infection

In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers at Karolinska Institutet show that MAIT cells (mucosa-associated invariant T cells), part of the human immune system, respond with dynamic activity and reprogramming of gene expression during the initial phase of HIV infection. The study fills a knowledge gap, as previously there has been a lack of awareness of the function of MAIT cel

14h

New study finds evidence for reduced brain connections in schizophrenia

Advances in scanning have allowed researchers for the first time to show lower levels of a protein found in the connections between neurons in the living brains of people with schizophrenia.The researchers, who conducted the scans at the psychiatric imaging facility at the MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences, say these changes could underlie the cognitive difficulties seen in schizophrenia an

14h

Only 1 in 4 Medicare patients participate in cardiac rehabilitation

Only about 24% of Medicare patients who could receive outpatient cardiac rehabilitation participate in the program.Women, people ages 85 and older, non-white patients, and residents in the Southeastern US and Appalachia region ranked the lowest for participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs.

14h

An Action Plan for the Future of Media

From an author's point of view, the most important quality of any book is its done -ness. Once you accept that a book is as good as it is going to be, and as finished as you can stand to make it, the miasma lifts and you can move on—to the next writing project! From a reader's point of view, the most important qualities of a certain kind of non-fiction book are brevity, specificity, and humor. I'

14h

Temporal Network Pattern Identification by Community Modelling

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57123-1

14h

Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Removal from Natural Gas Under High Pressure and Temperature Conditions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57151-x Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO 2 Removal from Natural Gas Under High Pressure and Temperature Conditions

14h

Cryogenic Memory Architecture Integrating Spin Hall Effect based Magnetic Memory and Superconductive Cryotron Devices

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57137-9

14h

How Puberty, Pregnancy And Perimenopause Impact Women's Mental Health

NPR's Morning Edition explores the key reproductive shifts in women's lives — puberty, pregnancy and perimenopause — and how the changes during those times could impact mental and emotional health. (Image credit: smartboy10/Getty Images)

14h

How Bots Spread Mistruths About Cannabis on Twitter

In a recent analysis, we found that Twitter bot accounts are more likely to promote content that suggests cannabis could help with health concerns, even when these claims aren't backed up. Unfortunately, this isn't the first time bots have been found spreading health-related mistruths online.

14h

Meteorit indeholder interstellart materiale ældre end solsystemet

Ny måleteknik har vist, at støvkorn af siliciumcarbid i kendt meteorit kan være op til 10 mia. år gamle.

14h

Politikere om trivselsmålinger: Vi er nok gået for langt

Kort før årets trivselsmålinger skydes i gang, medgiver en socialdemokratisk ordfører og en KL-direktør, at data-begejstringen i det offentlige er gået for vidt.

15h

Studying Asian glaciers provides glimpse into future of extremes

Scientists may have solved a 25-year-old puzzle about the mysterious behaviour of certain glaciers in High Mountain Asia. In most of this region, they are shrinking; but in the northwest, they are growing.

15h

5,000 feral camels culled in drought-hit Australia

Helicopter-borne marksmen killed more than 5,000 camels in a five-day cull of feral herds that were threatening indigenous communities in drought-stricken areas of southern Australia, officials said Tuesday.

15h

Protect 30% of planet by 2030: UN Nature rescue plan

Thirty percent of Earth's surface across land and sea should become protected areas by 2030 to ensure the viability of ecosystems essential to human wellbeing, according to a UN plan released Monday.

15h

Analysis confirms that climate change is making wildfires worse

The extreme wildfires in Australia could become the new normal, as climate change is increasing the risk of weather conditions that lead to more severe fires

15h

Philippine volcano trembles more, spews lava half-mile high

A volcano near the Philippine capital spewed lava into the sky and trembled constantly Tuesday, possibly portending a bigger and more dangerous eruption, as tens of thousands of people fled villages darkened and blanketed by heavy ash.

15h

Rain offers Australian bushfire hope, but smoke hits tennis stars

Hopes of containing Australia's months-long bushfire crisis rose Tuesday with heavy rain forecast, but toxic smoke in Melbourne disrupted warm-up events for the year's first tennis Grand Slam.

15h

Connecting the dots in the sky could shed new light on dark matter

Astrophysicists have come a step closer to understanding the origin of a faint glow of gamma rays covering the night sky. They found that this light is brighter in regions that contain a lot of matter and dimmer where matter is sparser—a correlation that could help them narrow down the properties of exotic astrophysical objects and invisible dark matter.

15h

Controlled phage therapy can target drug-resistant bacteria while sidestepping potential unintended consequences

The fight against drug-resistant pathogens remains an intense one. While the Centers for Disease Control's (CDC) 2019 "biggest threats" report reveals an overall decrease in drug-resistant microbe-related deaths as compared to its previous report (2013) the agency also cautions that new forms of drug-resistant pathogens are still emerging.

15h

Controlled phage therapy can target drug-resistant bacteria while sidestepping potential unintended consequences

The fight against drug-resistant pathogens remains an intense one. While the Centers for Disease Control's (CDC) 2019 "biggest threats" report reveals an overall decrease in drug-resistant microbe-related deaths as compared to its previous report (2013) the agency also cautions that new forms of drug-resistant pathogens are still emerging.

15h

How nodules stay on top at the bottom of the sea

Boulder, Colo., USA: Rare metallic elements found in clumps on the deep-ocean floor mysteriously remain uncovered despite the shifting sands and sediment many leagues under the sea. Scientists now think they know why, and it could have important implications for mining these metals while preserving the strange fauna at the bottom of the ocean.

15h

EU to lay out trillion-euro 'Green Deal'

Going green can be a costly business, as the EU's executive body will make clear on Tuesday when it launches a one-trillion-euro plan to finance its goal of making the bloc carbon neutral by 2050.

15h

New climate models suggest Paris goals may be out of reach

New climate models show carbon dioxide is a more potent greenhouse gas than previously understood, a finding that could push the Paris treaty goals for capping global warming out of reach, scientists have told AFP.

15h

Volcano erupts on ecologically sensitive Galapagos island

A volcano erupted on an uninhabited island in the Galapagos, Ecuadorian authorities said, spewing lava on the ecologically sensitive environment.

15h

The advantage of changing sex in fish population recovery

Humans eat a lot of fish, in some areas of the world making up an essential part of our diet. Fishing can sometimes deplete fish populations to the point where the fish have difficulty reproducing and growing their numbers again. Establishing Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) that limit or eliminate fishing within their borders can help fish to replenish their populations. They can then be harvested w

16h

The advantage of changing sex in fish population recovery

Humans eat a lot of fish, in some areas of the world making up an essential part of our diet. Fishing can sometimes deplete fish populations to the point where the fish have difficulty reproducing and growing their numbers again. Establishing Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) that limit or eliminate fishing within their borders can help fish to replenish their populations. They can then be harvested w

16h