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nyheder2020januar15

Managing cannabis use in breastfeeding women

As more states legalize medicinal and recreational cannabis use and increasingly decriminalize cannabis, the risk to the growth and development of breastfeeding infants whose mothers use cannabis becomes a growing public health concern.

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4.000 arter i farezonen: Dansk biodiversitet er forværret

Knap 42 procent af dyre-, plante- og svampearter i den danske natur er i dag registreret som rødlistede og dermed i større eller mindre grad i risiko for at uddø. På den måde er biodiversitetens tilstand dårligere end for 10 år siden.

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New Study Says Essential Tremor Is Caused By Overactive Brain Waves

Scientists say abnormal brain wave activity is behind essential tremor, a movement disorder that causes involuntary trembling.

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Why Elizabeth Warren's Feeds Are Flooded With Snake Emoji

Remember the dust-up between Taylor Swift and Kanye West and Kim Kardashian West? It's like that, but politics.

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Scientists pioneer new generation of semiconductor neutron detector

In a new study, scientists have developed a new type of semiconductor neutron detector that boosts detection rates by reducing the number of steps involved in neutron capture and transduction.

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The key to lower suicide rates? Higher minimum wages

A new study found that a dollar increase in minimum wage correlated to nearly a six percent reduction in suicide rates among adults aged 18 to 64 with a high school degree or less education. Increasing the minimum wage was found to be most effective in the reduction of suicides when unemployment levels were the highest. According to the researchers' predictions, raising the minimum wage by just o

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Is Something in Your Diet Screwing With Your Stomach? Here's How an Elimination Diet Could Help

FODMAPs are a diverse group of hard-to-digest carbs. Here's how to find out which ones upset your stomach.

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Breakthrough gives insight into early complex life on Earth

Japanese team spent 12 years on the project after digging up deep-sea mud For the first 2 billion years, life on Earth comprised two microbial kingdoms – bacteria and archaea. They featured an innumerable and diverse variety of species, but, ultimately, life on Earth was not that exciting judged by today's standards. Then, the theory goes, a rogue archaeon gobbled up a bacterium to create an enti

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Scientists Create "Living Concrete" That Can Heal Itself

It's Alive! Scientists at the University of Colorado, Boulder have created what The New York Times calls a "living concrete," teeming with photosynthetic bacteria, that can grow itself and regenerate itself — much like a living organism. The concrete is a mixture of gelatin, sand, and cyanobacteria that cools similarly to Jell-O, the Times reports. The resulting structure was able to regenerate i

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This frog's signature chirp can be heavenly or hellish

The call is a nightmare, registering up to 90 decibels from 3 feet away. (Meredith Miotke/) In its native Puerto Rico, the coquí frog's eponymous croak is the stuff of lullabies. According to myths of the island's indigenous Taíno people, the tiny amphibians memorialize a goddess's lost lover by singing his name over and over: ko-kee, ko-kee . But in places without nostalgia for the nocturnal cri

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2019 Was The 2nd-Hottest Year On Record, According To NASA And NOAA

Last year's data collected by the agencies is the latest confirmation that the Earth is steadily getting hotter. The planet is now almost 1 degree Celsius warmer than it was in the mid-20th century. (Image credit: David Goldman/AP)

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New dinosaur discovered in China shows dinosaurs grew up differently from birds

A new species of feathered dinosaur has been discovered in China, and described by American and Chinese authors in The Anatomical Record. The one-of-a-kind specimen preserves feathers and bones that provide new information about how dinosaurs grew and how they differed from birds.

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With these neurons, extinguishing fear is its own reward

The same neurons responsible for encoding reward also form new memories to suppress fearful ones, according to new research by scientists at The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT.

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Texas abortion patients' more likely to attempt to end their pregnancy on their own

Seven percent of Texas abortion patients in the study reported trying to self-manage abortion before coming to a clinic for services.Women cited cost and long distance to clinics as reasons for choosing to self-manage abortion.

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Hospital readmission policy did not increase patients' mortality risk

The Obamacare program intended to reduce the risk of patients being readmitted after hospitalizations for heart attacks, heart failure, and pneumonia has not caused an increase in mortality risk for patients in emergency departments or observational units, according to a new report.

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Molecular understanding of drug interactions suggests pathway to better malaria treatments

Researchers have for the first time demonstrated what happens at the molecular level when two compounds known to inhibit crystal growth were combined, yielding new insights into malaria treatments and, more broadly, improving the process of drug development.

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3 ways video games will evolve in the 2020s

The video game industry will be worth an estimated $200 billion by 2022. The growth of the industry is helping to advance gaming technology, which will allow for new types of gaming experiences. Some gaming evolutions likely to occur in the 2020s include ubiquitous ray-tracing technology, smarter A.I. characters, and big-budget virtual reality attractions. None The video game industry is booming

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Bacteria-Filled Bricks Build Themselves

The microorganisms transform sand and gelatin into a living construction material — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bacteria-Filled Bricks Build Themselves

The microorganisms transform sand and gelatin into a living construction material — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Twitch Has Become a Haven for Live Sports Piracy

As the platform gains more mainstream popularity, illicit livestreams of soccer, boxing, and MMA matches have become trivial to find.

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Bacteria-Filled Bricks Build Themselves

The microorganisms transform sand and gelatin into a living construction material — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Blue light can help heal mild traumatic brain injury

Daily exposure to blue wavelength light each morning helps to re-entrain the circadian rhythm so that people get better, more regular sleep which was translated into improvements in cognitive function, reduced daytime sleepiness and actual brain repair.

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Irrigation keeps things cool in extreme heat

Expanding irrigation has dampened anthropogenic warming during hot days, with particularly strong effects over South Asia, researchers report. Large-scale irrigation is one of the land management practices with the largest effect on climate conditions—and especially hot extremes—in various places around the world. Yet how the climatic effects of irrigation compare to those of global warming is la

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3D pens that bring doodling into a new dimension

Create more with your pen. (Amazon/) Beginning in early childhood, we use drawing to bring our imaginary worlds to life. Unfortunately, no matter how many different colors of pencil and marker you use, the end results are still firmly confined to a flat surface. No longer: 3D doodle pens use gently heated and extruded plastic, turning a familiar device into something like a sculpting tool. Below,

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The Wrong Way to Solve the MLB's Sign-Stealing Scandal

Monday afternoon, the Major League Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred handed out the stiffest penalties for in-game misconduct in the sport's recent history. The guilty party was the Houston Astros, who during their 2017 championship season designed a system of stealing opposing teams' pitching signs and relaying them to their own hitters. Their means of gathering the data were modern (the team us

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To Craft Cutting Tools, Neanderthals Dove for Clam Shells on the Ocean Floor

Clam shell knives from a cave on the Italian coast suggest Neanderthals dove underwater for resources

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BU and Thai researchers find strengths and gaps in Thailand diabetes care

A new study by researchers from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and Chulalongkorn and Mahidol Universities in Bangkok identifies the strengths and weaknesses of diabetes care in Thailand's universal health system. Published in the journal PLOS ONE, the study found that the majority of Thai adults with diabetes were never diagnosed, but that most of those who were diagnosed did re

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First Mars samples are headed to Earth. What are the risks?

A mission to and from Mars aims to bring back signs or examples of life. Expect material direct from the Red Planet around 2031. A special lab to quarantine the samples is being designed. None With potentially habitable exoplanets continually being found, with water ice on the moon, and with verified military videos showing jaw-dropping who-knows-whats in our skies, it's seeming more and more lik

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A Second Planet Was Found by Closest Star to the Sun

Located just 4.2 light-years away, the star Proxima Centauri now has both an Earth-like world in its habitable zone and a more distant super-Earth.

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New Spotify Feature Will Generate a Playlist For Your Iguana

Secret Life of Pets Spotify is launching a playlist generator today that can line up some killer tunes for you and your hamster, bird, iguana, dog, or cat. The company created a "Pet Playlist" website where you can chose from a range of personality traits — whether you own an energetic iguana or apathetic hamster — to fine tune the algorithm. Pet Party Spotify determined that my year-old mutt wou

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Defects can boost battery cathodes but only to a point

The overabundance of intentional defects can cause battery cathodes to fail, engineers report. New simulations by Rice University materials scientist Ming Tang and graduate student Kaiqi show that too much stress in widely used lithium iron phosphate cathodes can open cracks and quickly degrade batteries. The work extends recent research that demonstrated how putting defects in particles that mak

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How to hand-cut salami like a pro

Perfect slices can be yours with these tried-and-true techniques. (Brian Klutch/) This article was originally featured on Saveur . In a perfect world, every salumi board you style would include paper-thin slivers fresh off your personal Berkel meat slicer. But if you're not ready to shell out five grand for one, these experts have a few ideas on how to hand-cut salumi like a pro: • Pick the right

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New Research: Cannabis Accelerates Growth of Common Tumors

A new study by researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that THC — the stuff in cannabis that makes you high — can accelerate the growth of tumors in patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. "We now have convincing scientific evidence that daily marijuana use can drive tumor growth in HPV-related head a

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World's First "Living Machine" Created Using Frog Cells and Artificial Intelligence

Scientists used computer algorithms to develop a programmable organism made of frog DNA — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Marine heatwave known as 'the blob' killed a million US seabirds

A million seabirds that died along the US west coast between 2015 and 2016 were likely the victims of an unprecedented marine heatwave in the Pacific called "the Blob"

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Researchers identify gene with functional role in aging of eye

Researchers say a gene known to be a biomarker of age plays a key role in age-associated functional and anatomical aging in mouse retinas, a finding that has direct relevance to age-related eye diseases.

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Glimpses of fatherhood found in non-pair-bonding chimps

Although they have no way of identifying their biological fathers, male chimpanzees form intimate bonds with them, a finding that questions the idea of fatherhood in some of humanity's closest relatives, according to a study of wild chimpanzees in Uganda.

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'The blob,' food supply squeeze to blame for largest seabird die-off

When nearly one million common murres died at sea and washed ashore from California to Alaska in 2015 and 2016, it was unprecedented — both for murres, and across all bird species worldwide. Scientists blame an unexpected squeeze on the ecosystem's food supply, brought on by a severe and long-lasting marine heat wave known as 'the blob.'

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Pachacamac Idol of ancient Peru was symbolically painted

The Pachacamac Idol of ancient Peru was a multicolored and emblematic sacred icon worshiped for almost 700 hundred years before Spanish conquest, according to a new study.

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Neanderthals went underwater for their tools

Neanderthals collected clam shells and volcanic rock from the beach and coastal waters of Italy during the Middle Paleolithic, according to a new study.

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BPA activates immune response in mice that passes down through generations

Some plastic food and beverage containers still contain bisphenol A (BPA), which can mimic the hormone estrogen. Although experts say that small amounts of BPA detected in foods are unlikely to cause problems, some people worry that constant low-level exposures could have health effects, especially for developing fetuses, infants and children. Now, researchers report that in mice, BPA activates an

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Why I'm Hosting The Joy of x Podcast

As a teenager in the 1970s, I used to love snuggling up in a big, soft velvet chair in my high school library. There, in its burnt-orange upholstery (I told you it was the '70s), I'd lose myself in the memoirs of great scientists. One of those autobiographies, Werner Heisenberg's Physics and Beyond: Encounters and Conversations , made an abiding impression on me. In it, he describes feeling hopel

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Trump Demands That Apple Give Government Access to iPhones

Open Sesame On Tuesday evening, Trump complained that Apple refuses to help law enforcement investigate violent and drug-related crimes. The previous day, Attorney General William Barr had criticized Apple for refusing to unlock the Pensacola Naval Air Station shooters' iPhones or provide a backdoor that would allow the government to do so directly, according to CBS News . Gatekeeping While Trump

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Glimpses of fatherhood found in non-pair-bonding chimps

Although they have no way of identifying their biological fathers, male chimpanzees form intimate bonds with them, a finding that questions the idea of fatherhood in some of humanity's closest relatives, according to a study of wild chimpanzees in Uganda.

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Taking the temperature of dark matter

Warm, cold, just right? Physicists at the University of California, Davis are taking the temperature of dark matter, the mysterious substance that makes up about a quarter of our universe.

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Glimpses of fatherhood found in non-pair-bonding chimps

Although they have no way of identifying their biological fathers, male chimpanzees form intimate bonds with them, a finding that questions the idea of fatherhood in some of humanity's closest relatives, according to a study of wild chimpanzees in Uganda.

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Plant pigment can significantly reduce blood pressure

A new paper in Nutrition Reviews finds that intake of the flavonoid quercetin can greatly reduce high blood pressure in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease.

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Study contests use of smoked cannabis in treatment of cocaine addiction

Researchers in Brazil evaluated cocaine and crack addicts undergoing rehabilitation for six months and observed a higher relapse rate and worse cognitive impairment among patients who smoked cannabis to try to mitigate their craving for cocaine.

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Overactive brain waves trigger essential tremor

The source of essential tremor — involuntary, rhythmic trembling — has been elusive, but a new study points to abnormal electrical activity in the base of the brain.

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Using voice analysis to track the wellness of patients with mental illness

A new study finds that an interactive voice application using artificial intelligence is as accurate at tracking the wellbeing of patients being treated for serious mental illness as their own physicians.

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Gut bacteria hold clues to improving mental health after spinal injury

In a new study, Karim Fouad and his team discovered that rats with spinal injuries experienced changes to their gut bacteria and a rise in anxiety-like behavior. When rats with spinal injuries were given fecal transplants from healthy rats, their behavior — and gut bacteria — remained normal. Fouad suggests 'poop pills' could one day be used to improve well-being following spinal cord injuries a

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Mutations in donors' stem cells may cause problems for cancer patients

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that extremely rare, harmful genetic mutations present in healthy donors' stem cells — though not causing health problems in the donors — may be passed on to cancer patients receiving stem cell transplants, potentially creating health problems for the recipients. Among the concerns are heart damage, graft-versus-host

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Pathogenic Alzheimer's disease cascade is activated by faulty norepinephrine signaling

Preclinical experiments have revealed a key missing piece of the Alzheimer's disease puzzle. That allowed proof-of-concept experiments — using an existing drug — that dramatically reduced Alzheimer's pathology and symptoms in two mouse models, potentially offering an immediate treatment for this devastating disease. The research included human brain tissue analysis and longitudinal clinical data

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Drug epidemic likely 'killing more Americans than we think'

Drug-related deaths in US are likely twice as many as previously thought, according to research from Samuel Preston of the University of Pennsylvania and Dana Glei of Georgetown University. They also found that drug use decreases life expectancy by 1.4 years for males and 0.7 years for females, figures that more than double for West Virginia, the hardest-hit state and opioid crisis epicenter.

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Slow-motion interplate slip detected in the Nankai Trough near Japan

Japanese researchers used a Global Navigation Satellite System-Acoustic ranging combination technique to detect signals due to slow slip events in the Nankai Trough with seafloor deformations of 5 cm or more and durations on the order of one year. These events generally occurred on the shallow sides of regions with strong interplate coupling and represent variations in interplate friction conditio

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Harmful effects of ageism on older persons' health found in 45 countries

In the largest examination to date of the health consequences of ageism, or age-based bias, researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found evidence that it harms the health of older people in 45 countries and across 5 continents. The study included over 7 million participants.

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Young stem cell donors harbor undetectable mutations linked to disease

A pilot study of 25 donor-recipient pairs reveals that healthy young donors of stem cells harbor previously undetected and potentially disease-causing mutations in their blood stem cells, which were transferred to unrelated recipients of the transplants.

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New nanoparticle therapy offers potential new treatment for aggressive breast cancer

Researchers developed a new nanoparticle drug formulation that targets a specific receptor on cancer cells, and appears to be more effective than a standard nanoparticle therapy currently on the market to treat metastatic breast cancer. The study, published today in the journal Science Advances, found that the new 'DART' nanoparticles bypass healthy cells and tissues and bind to tumor cells, dispe

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Is there a second planet orbiting the nearest star to the sun?

An analysis of cyclical changes in the light spectrum emitted by Proxima Centauri, the star closest to the Sun, suggests it may be orbited by a second planet. Mario Damasso and colleagues present data suggesting that this candidate planet orbits Proxima Centauri every 5.2 years and may be a 'super-Earth,' with a mass higher than Earth's, though much lower than that.

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New study shines light on genetic risk factors for high alcohol intake

A new study, published in Science Advances, identifies genes associated with high alcohol intake.

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The colors of the Pachacamac idol, an Inca god, finally revealed

Researchers have shown colors formerly painted on the Pachacamac idol, a 15th century Inca God and oracle. Paired with the first carbon 14 dating of the object, these results published in PLOS ONE on Jan. 15, 2020, shed light on color practices, and how important they were in the Andes at that time.

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Probiotic drink could offer new way to combat antibiotic resistance

A probiotic drink could become a promising new weapon in the battle against antibiotic resistant bacteria, after a team of scientists at the University of Birmingham engineered and patented a key genetic element that can tackle the genetic basis of resistance.

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Single payer systems likely to save money in US, analysis finds

A single payer healthcare system would save money over time, likely even during the first year of operation, according to nearly two dozen analyses of national and statewide single payer proposals made over the past 30 years.

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Beach-combing Neanderthals dove for shells

A new study suggests that Neanderthals in what is today Italy may have dived into the Mediterranean Sea to collect clam shells.

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How Much Could Prince Harry and Meghan Markle Make From Ads?

What if the Duke and Duchess of Sussex became influencers? First, they probably aren't. But even if they did, experts say calculating their value is complicated.

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Air pollution from oil and gas production sites visible from space

Oil and gas production has doubled in some parts of the United States in the last two years, and scientists can use satellites to see impacts of that trend: a significant increase in the release of the lung-irritating air pollutant nitrogen dioxide, for example, and a more-than-doubling of the amount of gas flared into the atmosphere.

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NASA infrared data analyzes cloud top temperatures in Tropical Cyclone Claudia

Satellite data of Tropical Cyclone Claudia's cloud top temperatures revealed that the storm was weakening.

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Spinning quantum dots

The name 'quantum dots' is given to particles of semiconducting materials that are so tiny—a few nanometres in diameter—that they no longer behave quite like ordinary, macroscopic matter. Thanks to their quantum-like optical and electronic properties, they are showing promise as components of quantum computing devices, but these properties are not yet fully understood. Physicists Sanjay Prabhakar

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NASA, NOAA analyses reveal 2019 second warmest year on record

According to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Earth's global surface temperatures in 2019 were the second warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880.

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This Is Your Life on Climate Change

The 2010s were the hottest decade ever measured on Earth, and 2019 was the second-hottest year ever measured, scientists at NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced today. After a year of flash droughts , rampant wildfires , and searing heatwaves that set all-time records across Europe and turned parts of Greenland's ice sheet into slush, the finding was not a surpri

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Photos From the 2020 Dakar Rally

Leaving from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on January 5, a group of 560 competitors began the 42nd annual Dakar Rally: a 12-day, 4,660-mile (7,500-kilometer) off-roading adventure held entirely in Saudi Arabia this year. The race used to be held in Africa, until 2008, when unrest in Mauritania forced organizers to move to South America, where it was hosted until this year. The vehicles—which include spec

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Neanderthals dived for shells to make tools, research suggests

Study adds weight to claims that stereotype of knuckle-headed Neanderthals is wrong Neanderthals went diving for shells to turn into tools, according to new research, suggesting our big-browed cousins made more use of the sea than previously thought. The study focuses on 171 shell tools that were found in a now inaccessible coastal cave in central Italy, known as the Grotta dei Moscerini, which w

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Transparency discovered in crystals with ultrahigh piezoelectricity

Use of an AC rather than a DC electric field can improve the piezoelectric response of a crystal. Now, an international team of researchers say that cycles of AC fields also make the internal crystal domains in some materials bigger and the crystal transparent.

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Researchers gain control over internal structure of self-assembled composite materials

Composites made from self-assembling inorganic materials are valued for their unique strength and thermal, optical and magnetic properties. However, because self-assembly can be difficult to control, the structures formed can be highly disordered, leading to defects during large-scale production. Researchers have now developed a templating technique that instills greater order and gives rise to ne

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B-cell enrichment predictive of immunotherapy response in melanoma, sarcoma and kidney cancer

Multiple studies out indicate that a patient's response to immune checkpoint blockade may depend on B cells located in special structures within the tumor.

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When the milky way collided with dwarf galaxy gaia-enceladus

A single star has provided information about the collision of the Milky Way with the dwarf galaxy Gaia-Enceladus. The event likely took place approximately 11.5 billion years ago.

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Chemicals between us: Surprising effects of oxytocin on cocaine addiction

Researchers have discovered gender-based differences in response to therapeutic oxytocin treatment in cocaine-addicted individuals with a history of childhood trauma. Oxytocin has been shown previously to function as a potential therapeutic in cases of addiction by reducing cravings. This study found that only men with past trauma had a reduction in cravings after oxytocin. Surprisingly, women wit

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A new 'cool' blue

Throughout history, people have sought vibrant blue pigments. The Egyptians and Babylonians used lapis lazuli 6,000 years ago. In 1802, a French chemist synthesized cobalt blue. More recently, in 2009 scientists discovered YInMn Blue, otherwise known as "Oregon Blue." But most of these pigments have limitations in terms of cost, stability, color or toxicity. Now, researchers report a new class o

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Sub-national 'climate clubs' could offer key to combating climate change

'Climate clubs' offering membership for sub-national states, in addition to just countries, could speed up progress towards a globally-harmonised climate change policy, which in turn offers a way to achieve stronger climate policies in all countries.

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Climate change NGOs from rich countries dominate online conversation, study shows

As climate change threatens the world, governments and organizations from around the globe have banded together to fight its effects. Yet that collaboration has not always carried over into the online world, where technology is often assumed to connect people and break down barriers. Research from the University of Kansas has found that nongovernment organizations, or NGOs, dedicated to fighting c

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Neanderthals Could Swim. They Even Dived.

Shell tools found in a Neanderthal cave may have been retrieved from water as deep as 13 feet.

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The Human Screenome Project will capture everything we do on our phones

It proposes taking screenshots of your smartphone activity every five seconds to better understand our digital lives. Is it worth it?

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Study: Pig virus is easily transmitted among chickens and turkeys

The first animal study of a pig virus' potential to jump to another species shows that the virus, once introduced to a select group of birds, is easily transmitted to healthy chickens and turkeys.

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'The blob,' food supply squeeze to blame for largest seabird die-off

The common murre is a self-sufficient, resilient bird.

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New assessment of gas locked in ice in European waters

A study led by the University of Southampton has mapped several sites in Europe containing gas hydrate—a relatively clean fuel which could help bridge the gap between fossil fuels and renewables.

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Study: Pig virus is easily transmitted among chickens and turkeys

The first animal study of a pig virus' potential to jump to another species shows that the virus, once introduced to a select group of birds, is easily transmitted to healthy chickens and turkeys.

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'Soil photosynthesis' helps to mitigate environmental pollution

NOx gases is the generic term used to refer to the group of gases made up of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide, gases that result from burning fossil fuel, and also from forest fires, volcanic eruptions and natural processes of transforming nitrogen in soil. Even so, the greatest concentration is usually found in urban areas, where they are toxic for our health and contribute to global warming and

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Diabolical points in coupled active cavities with quantum emitters

Diabolical points (DPs) introduce ways to study topological phase and peculiar energy dispersion. Scientists in China and partners from the United Kingdom demonstrated DPs in strongly coupled active microdisks. A new macroscopical control of backscattering based on the competition between defects and quantum emitters was used to achieve DPs. This work paves the way to integrate DPs and more exotic

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Slow-motion interplate slip detected in the Nankai Trough near Japan

Earthquakes are generally thought of as abrupt, violent events that last for only moments. However, movement of the Earth's tectonic plates is often less sudden and more sustained—slow earthquakes can last for hours, months, or even longer.

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Pachacamac Idol of ancient Peru was symbolically painted

The Pachacamac Idol of ancient Peru was a multicolored and emblematic sacred icon worshipped for almost 700 hundred years before Spanish conquest, according to a study published January 15, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marcela Sepúlveda of the University of Tarapacá, Chile and colleagues.

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'The blob,' food supply squeeze to blame for largest seabird die-off

The common murre is a self-sufficient, resilient bird.

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Beach-combing Neanderthals dove for shells

Did Neanderthals wear swimsuits? Probably not. But a new study suggests that some of these ancient humans might have spent a lot of time at the beach. They may even have dived into the cool waters of the Mediterranean Sea to gather clam shells.

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Decontaminating pesticide-polluted water using engineered nanomaterial and sunlight

Atrazine is one of the most widely used pesticides in North America. Researchers at the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) have developed a new method to degrade it that combines a new nanostructured material and sunlight.

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Researchers identify gene with functional role in aging of eye

Researchers say a gene known to be a biomarker of age plays a key role in age-associated functional and anatomical aging in mouse retinas, a finding that has direct relevance to age-related eye diseases.

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Taking the temperature of dark matter

Warm, cold, just right? Physicists at UC Davis are using gravitational lensing to take the temperature of dark matter, the mysterious substance that makes up about a quarter of our universe.

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Bricks Alive! Scientists Create Living Concrete

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This is almost spot on.

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Brave New World Of Retail: Walmart's Robots Are Just The Beginning

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Extremely Low Cost Housing

In 1947, 13% of all personal consumption expenditures in the US was for Clothing. Today, it's a mere 3%. Food went from 25% to just 8%. Technology has made our most basic needs into minor expenses, well almost all of them. Housing has gone up from 9% in 1947 to 16% today. 1947 was a low year, but still, for 90 years our spending on housing has been stubbornly at roughly 15% of personal expenditur

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South Australia big batteries earn $1 million over two days

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Antibiotic production in Streptomyces is organized by a division of labor through terminal genomic differentiation

One of the hallmark behaviors of social groups is division of labor, where different group members become specialized to carry out complementary tasks. By dividing labor, cooperative groups increase efficiency, thereby raising group fitness even if these behaviors reduce individual fitness. We find that antibiotic production in colonies of Streptomyces coelicolor is coordinated by a division of l

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Shallow slow slip events along the Nankai Trough detected by GNSS-A

Various slow earthquakes (SEQs), including tremors, very low frequency events, and slow slip events (SSEs), occur along megathrust zones. In a shallow plate boundary region, although many SEQs have been observed along pan-Pacific subduction zones, SSEs with a duration on the order of a year or with a large slip have not yet been detected due to difficulty in offshore observation. We try to statis

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Microglia response following acute demyelination is heterogeneous and limits infiltrating macrophage dispersion

Microglia and infiltrating macrophages are thought to orchestrate the central nervous system (CNS) response to injury; however, the similarities between these cells make it challenging to distinguish their relative contributions. We genetically labeled microglia and CNS-associated macrophages to distinguish them from infiltrating macrophages. Using single-cell RNA sequencing, we describe multiple

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Modulation of lymphocyte-mediated tissue repair by rational design of heterocyclic aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists

Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is an essential regulator of gut immunity and a promising therapeutic target for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Current AHR agonists are inadequate for clinical translation due to low activity, inadequate pharmacokinetics, or toxicity. We synthesized a structurally diverse library and used integrated computational and experimental studies to discover mechanisms

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The 22 December 2018 tsunami from flank collapse of Anak Krakatau volcano during eruption

On 22 December 2018, a devastating tsunami struck Sunda Strait, Indonesia without warning, leaving 437 dead and thousands injured along the western Java and southern Sumatra coastlines. Synthetic aperture radar and broadband seismic observations demonstrate that a small, 3 landslide on the southwestern flank of the actively erupting volcano Anak Krakatau generated the tsunami. The landslide did n

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Triangular correlation (TrC) between cancer aggressiveness, cell uptake capability, and cell deformability

The malignancy potential is correlated with the mechanical deformability of the cancer cells. However, mechanical tests for clinical applications are limited. We present here a Triangular Correlation (TrC) between cell deformability, phagocytic capacity, and cancer aggressiveness, suggesting that phagocytic measurements can be a mechanical surrogate marker of malignancy. The TrC was proved in hum

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Decreased nonspecific adhesivity, receptor-targeted therapeutic nanoparticles for primary and metastatic breast cancer

Development of effective tumor cell–targeted nanodrug formulations has been quite challenging, as many nanocarriers and targeting moieties exhibit nonspecific binding to cellular, extracellular, and intravascular components. We have developed a therapeutic nanoparticle formulation approach that balances cell surface receptor-specific binding affinity while maintaining minimal interactions with bl

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Highly efficient and tumor-selective nanoparticles for dual-targeted immunogene therapy against cancer

While immunotherapy holds great promise for combating cancer, the limited efficacy due to an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and systemic toxicity hinder the broader application of cancer immunotherapy. Here, we report a combinatorial immunotherapy approach that uses a highly efficient and tumor-selective gene carrier to improve anticancer efficacy and circumvent the systemic toxicity. I

2h

The Euler spiral of rat whiskers

This paper reports on an analytical study of the intrinsic shapes of 523 whiskers from 15 rats. We show that the variety of whiskers on a rat's cheek, each of which has different lengths and shapes, can be described by a simple mathematical equation such that each whisker is represented as an interval on the Euler spiral. When all the representative curves of mystacial vibrissae for a single rat

2h

Aquatic and terrestrial cyanobacteria produce methane

Evidence is accumulating to challenge the paradigm that biogenic methanogenesis, considered a strictly anaerobic process, is exclusive to archaea. We demonstrate that cyanobacteria living in marine, freshwater, and terrestrial environments produce methane at substantial rates under light, dark, oxic, and anoxic conditions, linking methane production with light-driven primary productivity in a glo

2h

Structure-guided discovery of a single-domain antibody agonist against human apelin receptor

Developing antibody agonists targeting the human apelin receptor (APJ) is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of chronic heart failure. Here, we report the structure-guided discovery of a single-domain antibody (sdAb) agonist JN241-9, based on the cocrystal structure of APJ with an sdAb antagonist JN241, the first cocrystal structure of a class A G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) w

2h

A low-mass planet candidate orbiting Proxima Centauri at a distance of 1.5 AU

Our nearest neighbor, Proxima Centauri, hosts a temperate terrestrial planet. We detected in radial velocities evidence of a possible second planet with minimum mass m c sin i c = 5.8 ± 1.9 M and orbital period years. The analysis of photometric data and spectro-scopic activity diagnostics does not explain the signal in terms of a stellar activity cycle, but follow-up is required in the coming ye

2h

Atmospheric fungal nanoparticle bursts

Aerosol nanoparticles play an important role in the climate system by affecting cloud formation and properties, as well as in human health because of their deep reach into lungs and the circulatory system. Determining nanoparticle sources and composition is a major challenge in assessing their impacts in these areas. The sudden appearance of large numbers of atmospheric nanoparticles is commonly

2h

Direct targeting of oncogenic RAS mutants with a tumor-specific cytosol-penetrating antibody inhibits RAS mutant-driven tumor growth

Oncogenic RAS mutant (RAS MUT ) proteins have been considered undruggable via conventional antibody regimens owing to the intracellular location restricting conventional-antibody accessibility. Here, we report a pan-RAS–targeting IgG antibody, inRas37, which directly targets the intracellularly activated form of various RAS MUT subtypes after tumor cell–specific internalization into the cytosol t

2h

Functional validity, role, and implications of heavy alcohol consumption genetic loci

High alcohol consumption is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality, yet few genetic loci have been robustly associated with alcohol intake. Here, we use U.K. Biobank ( n = 125,249) and GERA ( n = 47,967) datasets to determine genetic factors associated with extreme population-level alcohol consumption and examine the functional validity of outcomes using model organisms and in silico technique

2h

Scientists: Global Warming Could Kill Tardigrades

Tardigrades are arguably the most resilient creatures in the known universe — and even they might not be able to live through global warming. The micro-animals colloquially known as " water bears " are capable of entering a state of suspended animation, bringing their own metabolic activities almost to a halt in response to environmental stressors. In this death-like state, tardigrades can surviv

2h

Blue-Green Algae Produce Methane

Biological production of this greenhouse gas, once thought to be the reserve of anaerobic microbes, occurs in these widespread, photosynthesizing cyanobacteria.

2h

The Curious Case of Proxima C

Astronomers continue to gather evidence for a second world around the sun's nearest neighboring star — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

The Curious Case of Proxima C

Astronomers continue to gather evidence for a second world around the sun's nearest neighboring star — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Potassium-driven rechargeable batteries: An effort towards a more sustainable environment

Concerns about the scarcity of lithium and other materials necessary in the now-ubiquitous lithium-ion batteries have recently driven many researchers to look for alternatives, such as sodium and potassium. Prof Shinichi Komaba from Tokyo University of Science, Japan, and his team have worked for over a decade on this topic. In his latest review article, he extensively discusses his findings on th

2h

Researchers discover novel potential target for drug addiction treatment

New University of Minnesota Medical School research discovers a novel potential target for treating drug addiction through 'the hidden stars of the brain.'

2h

Glimpses of fatherhood found in non-pair-bonding chimps

Although they have no way of identifying their biological fathers, male chimpanzees form intimate bonds with them, a finding that questions the idea of fatherhood in some of humanity's closest relatives, according to a study of wild chimpanzees in Uganda.

2h

B cells: New allies in sarcoma immunotherapy?

How can we improve and better personalize the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas, these particularly resistant and aggressive forms of cancer? An international team led by Wolf Hervé Fridman with researchers from Inserm, Sorbonne Université and Université de Paris, has shown that B cells also play a major role in predicting of patient's response to immunotherapy. Their findings, to be published in

2h

NASA infrared data analyzes cloud top temperatures in Tropical Cyclone Claudia

Satellite data of Tropical Cyclone Claudia's cloud top temperatures revealed that the storm was weakening.

2h

Astronomers discover class of strange objects near our galaxy's enormous black hole

Astronomers have discovered a new class of bizarre objects at the center of our galaxy, not far from the supermassive black hole called Sagittarius A*.

2h

New assessment of gas locked in ice in European waters

A study has mapped several sites in Europe containing gas hydrate – a relatively clean fuel which could help bridge the gap between fossil fuels and renewables.

2h

Period underwear may contain troubling chemicals—but the real problem is much bigger

No one is keeping tabs on your tampons. (DepositPhoto/) If you're someone who menstruates, you might reasonably assume that the products you use to deal with your period aren't actively bad for your health. Unfortunately, that's not necessarily the case; a number of studies have found toxic chemicals in pads, tampons, and cups . The latest menstrual product to come under scrutiny is period underw

2h

Are big tech monopolies ruining American capitalism?

American capitalism is once again under threat from monopolies, according to one economist. Luigi Zingales of the University of Chicago often says that only an immigrant like himself can really appreciate American capitalism. In his native Italy, Zingales says what you know and what you do are far less important that who you know and what you do for them. But in the last decade, Zingales says the

2h

Rick's Hunt for Nuggets Comes Up Empty | Gold Rush

Rick is desperate to find gold nuggets to save his season, but so far he's only finding frozen ground. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.

2h

What the five hottest years on Earth look like – in pictures

The past five years – and the past decade – are the hottest in 150 years, the latest research has shown. It is bringing increasingly severe storms, floods, drought and wildfires, with one scientist saying the records being broken year after year is "the drumbeat of the Anthropocene". We look at what the five hottest years look like in pictures Continue reading…

2h

DeepMind found an AI learning technique also works in human brains

Researchers at tech firm DeepMind have found that a learning technique used by AI is also used by dopamine neurons in the brain

2h

Strange spider-shaped microorganisms could be our distant ancestors

Since the discovery of Asgard archaea in 2015, evidence has mounted that these peculiar single-celled organisms could be the source of all complex life – including us

2h

Weird dust balls seen impossibly close to our galaxy's huge black hole

At the centre of our galaxy, six strange clouds that look like dust and gas orbit a black hole so closely that if they were really just clouds they should have been sucked in by now

2h

Forget exercise and diet fads – this is the secret of a healthy life

New Scientist columnist Graham Lawton has just written a scientific guide to healthy diet, sleep and exercise – and says the evidence for what works is crystal clear

2h

Air pollution from oil and gas production sites visible from space

US and European satellites help scientists measure nitrogen dioxide from drilling, production and flaring.

2h

NASA, NOAA analyses reveal 2019 second warmest year on record

According to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Earth's global surface temperatures in 2019 were the second warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880.

2h

How cells assemble their skeleton

Microtubules, filamentous structures within the cell, are required for many important processes, including cell division and intracellular transport. A research team recently discovered how the spiral-shaped, modular microtubules are formed and how their formation is controlled. These processes were visualized using state-of-the-art cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

2h

Scientists breach brain barriers to attack tumors

The brain is a sort of fortress, equipped with barriers designed to keep out dangerous pathogens. But protection comes at a cost: These barriers interfere with the immune system when faced with dire threats such glioblastoma, a deadly brain tumor for which there are few effective treatments. Researchers have found a novel way to circumvent the brain's natural defenses when they're counterproductiv

2h

New assessment of gas locked in ice in European waters

A study has mapped several sites in Europe containing gas hydrate – a relatively clean fuel which could help bridge the gap between fossil fuels and renewables.

2h

Pig virus is easily transmitted among chickens and turkeys

The first animal study of a pig virus' potential to jump to another species shows that the virus, once introduced to a select group of birds, is easily transmitted to healthy chickens and turkeys.

2h

Chemicals between us: Surprising effects of oxytocin on cocaine addiction

Medical University of South Carolina researchers have discovered gender-based differences in response to therapeutic oxytocin treatment in cocaine-addicted individuals with a history of childhood trauma. Oxytocin has been shown previously to function as a potential therapeutic in cases of addiction by reducing cravings. This study found that only men with past trauma had a reduction in cravings af

2h

Dating a galaxy crash

A single star has provided information about the collision of the Milky Way with the dwarf galaxy Gaia-Enceladus. The event likely took place approximately 11.5 billion years ago

2h

B-cell enrichment predictive of immunotherapy response in melanoma, sarcoma and kidney cancer

Multiple studies out in Nature indicate that a patient's response to immune checkpoint blockade may depend on B cells located in special structures within the tumor.

2h

Astronomers discover class of strange objects near our galaxy's enormous black hole

UCLA astronomers have discovered a new class of bizarre objects at the center of our galaxy, not far from the supermassive black hole called Sagittarius A*. 'Mergers of stars may be happening in the universe more often than we thought, and likely are quite common,' said Andrea Ghez, UCLA's Lauren B. Leichtman and Arthur E. Levine Professor of Astrophysics. She believes the objects were binary star

2h

Researchers gain control over internal structure of self-assembled composite materials

Composites made from self-assembling inorganic materials are valued for their unique strength and thermal, optical and magnetic properties. However, because self-assembly can be difficult to control, the structures formed can be highly disordered, leading to defects during large-scale production. Researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Michigan have developed a templating t

2h

Scientists breach brain barriers to attack tumors

The brain is a sort of fortress, equipped with barriers designed to keep out dangerous pathogens. But protection comes at a cost: These barriers interfere with the immune system when faced with dire threats such glioblastoma, a deadly brain tumor for which there are few effective treatments. Yale researchers have found a novel way to circumvent the brain's natural defenses when they're counterprod

2h

Transparency discovered in crystals with ultrahigh piezoelectricity

Use of an AC rather than a DC electric field can improve the piezoelectric response of a crystal. Now, an international team of researchers say that cycles of AC fields also make the internal crystal domains in some materials bigger and the crystal transparent.

2h

New neutron detector can fit in your pocket

Researchers at Northwestern University and Argonne National Laboratory have developed a new material that opens doors for a new class of neutron detectors. The semiconductor-based detector is highly efficient, stable, and can be used both in small, portable devices for field inspections and very large detectors that use arrays of crystals.

2h

Meningeal lymphatic network: A new avenue in the treatment of brain tumors

Glioblastomas are the most common type of brain tumor, and their prognosis is often highly unfavorable. A collaborative study by Jean-Léon Thomas, Inserm researcher at the Brain & Spine Institute (Inserm/CNRS/Sorbonne Université) and Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital AP-HP, and Akiko Iwasaki (Department of Immunology, Yale University School of Medicine, USA), has revealed the beneficial role played by th

2h

Why Are There Seven Days in a Week?

We can thank the Babylonians for our seven-day week.

2h

Joe Biden, Incumbent

Last night's Democratic debate was a microcosm of the Democratic presidential primary: A hotly anticipated confrontation between Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders mostly fizzled. Tom Steyer said some weird stuff. Pete Buttigieg struggled to speak about race. The commentariat was impressed with Amy Klobuchar, but voters shrugged. And at the end of the night, there was Joe Biden: underwhelming, m

2h

Earth Had Its Second Warmest Year in Recorded History in 2019

The six warmest years in recorded history have been the last six years: 2014 – 2019 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

This Strange Microbe May Mark One of Life's Great Leaps

A organism living in ocean muck offers clues to the origins of the complex cells of all animals and plants.

2h

Drinking 1% rather than 2% milk accounts for 4.5 years of less aging in adults

A new study shows drinking low-fat milk — both nonfat and 1% milk — is significantly associated with less aging in adults.

3h

New algorithm predicts gestational diabetes

Timely prediction may help prevent the condition using nutritional and lifestyle changes.

3h

Newly created embryo nourishes hope for the survival of the northern white rhino

In December 2019 the team of scientists and conservationists repeated the egg collection from the northern white rhinos in Kenya and was able to create a new embryo over Christmas.

3h

Active asteroid unveils fireball identity

At around 1 a.m. local standard time on April 29, 2017, a fireball flew over Kyoto, Japan. Compared to other fireballs spotted from Earth, it was relatively bright and slow. Now, scientists have determined not only what the fireball was, but also where it came from.

3h

Building materials come alive with help from bacteria

New living building materials can grow and multiply — and may help to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from infrastructure in the future.

3h

Animals should use short, fast movements to avoid being located

Most animals need to move, whether this is to seek out food, shelter or a mate. New research has shown that movement doesn't always break camouflage and if an animal needs to move, animals that are unpatterned and use short, fast movements are less likely to be located by predators.

3h

Skeptical Science New Research for Week #2, 2020

Conflation and how to fix it VIa AMS, Raul Lejano looks at what in a layperson's thinking would be called conflation— confusion and blending of entirely different topics— when people think about climate change. Ideology and the Narrative of Skepticism (open access) starts with some arguably frightening false connections between the science and policy outcomes of climate change with other drivers

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'Cranky Uncle' smart phone game will show you how to disarm climate deniers

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Bud Ward (Image: Courtesy of John Cook) When it comes to climate change, it seems every family has its own version of the proverbial Cranky Uncle. An uncle, cousin, grandparent, in-law, neighbor, whatever. Just think back to the recent holiday season's large family get-togethers. They're everywhere. And now your unique climate change version of C

3h

Building materials come alive with help from bacteria

New living building materials can grow and multiply — and may help to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from infrastructure in the future.

3h

A distributional code for value in dopamine-based reinforcement learning

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1924-6 Analyses of single-cell recordings from mouse ventral tegmental area are consistent with a model of reinforcement learning in which the brain represents possible future rewards not as a single mean of stochastic outcomes, as in the canonical model, but instead as a probability distribution.

3h

Transparent ferroelectric crystals with ultrahigh piezoelectricity

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1891-y The use of alternating-current electric fields to control domain size in ferroelectric crystals affords excellent transparency, piezoelectricity and birefringence.

3h

Podcast: Strange objects at the centre of the galaxy, and improving measurements of online activity

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00102-8 Listen to the latest from the world of science, brought to you by Benjamin Thompson and Nick Howe.

3h

Meet the relatives of our cellular ancestor

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00039-y Microorganisms related to lineages of the Asgard archaea group are thought to have evolved into complex eukaryotic cells. Now the first Asgard archaeal species to be grown in the laboratory reveals its metabolism and cell biology.

3h

Signatures of self-organized criticality in an ultracold atomic gas

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1908-6 A driven–dissipative gas of ultracold potassium atoms is used to demonstrate three key signatures of self-organized criticality, and provides a system in which the phenomenon can be experimentally tested.

3h

Host-mediated ubiquitination of a mycobacterial protein suppresses immunity

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1915-7 Mycobacterium tuberculosis suppresses the production of inflammatory cytokines by host cells through the host-mediated ubiquitination of a mycobacterial protein, enhancing the interaction of a host signalling inhibitor with another signalling molecule.

3h

New predictors for immunotherapy responses sharpen our view of the tumour microenvironment

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03943-0 Three studies reveal that the presence in tumours of two key immune components — B cells and tertiary lymphoid structures — is associated with favourable outcomes when individuals undergo immunotherapy.

3h

B cells and tertiary lymphoid structures promote immunotherapy response

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1922-8 Multiomic profiling of several cohorts of patients treated with immune checkpoint blockade highlights the presence and potential role of B cells and tertiary lymphoid structures in promoting therapy response.

3h

Synthesis of rare sugar isomers through site-selective epimerization

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1937-1

3h

Time for the Human Screenome Project

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00032-5 To understand how people use digital media, researchers need to move beyond screen time and capture everything we do and see on our screens.

3h

Antagonistic cooperativity between crystal growth modifiers

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1918-4 Inhibitor pairs that suppress the crystallization of haematin, which is a part of malaria parasites' physiology, show unexpected antagonism due to attenuation of step pinning by kink blockers.

3h

Direct thermal neutron detection by the 2D semiconductor 6LiInP2Se6

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1886-8 The semiconductor 6LiInP2Se6 is used for the direct detection of thermal neutrons at room temperature, demonstrating good energy resolution.

3h

B cells are associated with survival and immunotherapy response in sarcoma

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1906-8 Immune profiling of the tumour microenvironment of soft-tissue sarcoma identifies a group of patients with high levels of B-cell infiltration and tertiary lymphoid structures that have improved survival and a high response rate to immune checkpoint blockade therapy.

3h

Archimedean lattices emerge in template-directed eutectic solidification

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1893-9 Directional solidification of a simple AgCl-KCl lamellar eutectic material is modified by the presence of a pillar template, leading to disordered, trefoil, quatrefoil, cinquefoil and hexafoil mesostructures.

3h

The life of archaea

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00087-4 Cultivation of Asgard archaea brings us closer to understanding how complex life evolved.

3h

VEGF-C-driven lymphatic drainage enables immunosurveillance of brain tumours

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1912-x In a mouse model of glioblastoma, treatment with VEGF-C increases lymphatic drainage in the central nervous system and improves the immune response, suggesting that modulating meningeal lymphatics could enhance checkpoint inhibitor therapy.

3h

An anti-CRISPR viral ring nuclease subverts type III CRISPR immunity

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1909-5 Bacteria and archaea use cyclic oligoadenylate molecules as part of the CRISPR system for antiviral defence; here, a family of viral enzymes that rapidly degrades cyclic oligoadenylates is identified and biochemically and structurally described.

3h

Evolution of circuits for machine learning

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00002-x The fundamental machine-learning task of classification can be difficult to achieve directly in ordinary computing hardware. Unconventional silicon-based electrical circuits can be evolved to accomplish this task.

3h

Isolation of an archaeon at the prokaryote–eukaryote interface

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1916-6 Isolation and characterization of an archaeon that is most closely related to eukaryotes reveals insights into how eukaryotes may have evolved from prokaryotes.

3h

A population of dust-enshrouded objects orbiting the Galactic black hole

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1883-y The Galactic Centre is orbited by two objects that look like gas and dust clouds but behave more like stars, and now four additional similar objects are reported.

3h

Improved protein structure prediction using potentials from deep learning

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1923-7 AlphaFold predicts the distances between pairs of residues, is used to construct potentials of mean force that accurately describe the shape of a protein and can be optimized with gradient descent to predict protein structures.

3h

Design and synthesis of multigrain nanocrystals via geometric misfit strain

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1899-3 Heteroepitaxy is used to precisely control the growth of Mn3O4 shells on the faces of a Co3O4 nanocube crystal, producing uniform grain boundary defects and highly ordered multigrain nanostructures.

3h

A watershed moment for protein structure prediction

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03951-0 Two threads of research in the quest for methods that predict the 3D structures of proteins from their amino-acid sequences have become fully intertwined. The result is a leap forward in the accuracy of predictions.

3h

Transparent crystals with ultrahigh piezoelectricity

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00038-z It has been difficult to make transparent materials that have extremely high piezoelectricity — a useful property related to the coupling of electric fields and mechanical strain. This hurdle has now been overcome.

3h

Classification with a disordered dopant-atom network in silicon

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1901-0 The nonlinearity of hopping conduction in a disordered network of boron dopant atoms in silicon is used to perform nonlinear classification and feature extraction.

3h

The arms race between bacteria and their phage foes

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1894-8 Understanding the dynamics between bacteria and bacteriophages could enable the development of phage-based therapies and biotechnological tools and provide insights into the ecology and evolution of these microorganisms.

3h

Tertiary lymphoid structures improve immunotherapy and survival in melanoma

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1914-8 The co-occurrence of tumour-associated CD8+ T cells and CD20+ B cells, and the formation of tertiary lymphoid structures, are linked with improved survival in cohorts of patients with metastatic melanoma.

3h

Decoding the development of the human hippocampus

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1917-5 Single-cell RNA sequencing is used to catalogue and explore the developmental trajectories of more than 30,000 cells in the developing human hippocampus.

3h

An algorithm that learns through rewards may show how our brain does too

By optimizing reinforcement-learning algorithms, DeepMind uncovered new details about how dopamine helps the brain learn.

3h

Missing brain protein can cause autism-like behaviors

When a key protein needed to generate new brain cells during prenatal and early childhood development is missing, part of the brain goes haywire, researchers say. That can cause an imbalance in the brain's circuitry leading to long-term cognitive and movement behaviors characteristic of autism spectrum disorder, according to a new study. "During brain development, there is a coordinated series of

3h

'Giant, shape-shifting stars' spotted near Milky Way's black hole

Objects raise hopes of scientists managing to track 'blobs' being swallowed by black hole A number of bizarre shape-shifting objects have been discovered close to the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way. The blobs are thought to be giant stars that spend part of their orbits so close to the black hole that they get stretched out like bubble gum before returning to a compact, ro

3h

Mysterious, Dusty Objects Are Swarming the Milky Way's Core

Swirling around our galaxy's central supermassive black hole, these objects share properties with both stars and gas clouds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Air pollution from oil and gas production sites visible from space

US and European satellites help scientists measure nitrogen dioxide from drilling, production and flaring.

3h

NASA, NOAA analyses reveal 2019 second warmest year on record

According to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Earth's global surface temperatures in 2019 were the second warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880.

3h

Spinning quantum dots

A new paper in EPJ B presents a theoretical analysis of electron spins in moving semiconductor quantum dots, showing how these can be controlled by electric fields in a way that suggests they may be usable as information storage and processing components of quantum computers.

3h

How cells assemble their skeleton

Microtubules, filamentous structures within the cell, are required for many important processes, including cell division and intracellular transport. A research team led by scientists from Heidelberg University recently discovered how the spiral-shaped, modular microtubules are formed and how their formation is controlled. These processes were visualised using state-of-the-art cryo-electron micros

3h

Mysterious, Dusty Objects Are Swarming the Milky Way's Core

Swirling around our galaxy's central supermassive black hole, these objects share properties with both stars and gas clouds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Florida Cracks Down on Foreign Government Involvement in Research

Four University of Florida faculty members leave their jobs as a state committee that formed last month pledges to investigate individual researchers and institutions.

3h

Be an Individual: Single-Cell Resolution of Autoimmune Disorders

The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to discuss their research of autoimmune diseases using single-cell techniques.

3h

Astronomers discover class of strange objects near our galaxy's enormous black hole

Astronomers from UCLA's Galactic Center Orbits Initiative have discovered a new class of bizarre objects at the center of our galaxy, not far from the supermassive black hole called Sagittarius A*. They published their research today in the journal Nature.

3h

Researchers gain control over internal structure of self-assembled composite materials

Composites made from self-assembling inorganic materials are valued for their unique strength and thermal, optical and magnetic properties. However, because self-assembly can be difficult to control, the structures formed can be highly disordered, leading to defects during large-scale production. Researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Michigan have developed a templating t

3h

Transparency discovered in crystals with ultrahigh piezoelectricity

Use of an AC rather than a DC electric field can improve the piezoelectric response of a crystal. Now, an international team of researchers say that cycles of AC fields also make the internal crystal domains in some materials bigger and the crystal transparent.

3h

Researchers demonstrate first stable semiconductor neutron detector

Homeland Security might soon have a new tool to add to its arsenal.

3h

2019 slår ny rekord: Havet har aldrig været varmere

Havtemperaturen er den bedste indikator på klimaforandringerne, siger danske forskere.

3h

'Frankenstein' material can self-heal, reproduce

Bacteria produce "living concrete"

3h

After stroke, women and men significantly more likely to have dangerous heart complications

The study demonstrated for the first time that in people with no underlying heart disease, after a stroke they were more than 20 times more likely than those who didn't have a stroke (23-fold in women and 25-fold in men) to have a first-in-life major adverse cardiovascular event. These events include things like heart attack, chest pain, cardiac failure or cardiac death.

3h

Study answers when moderate to late preterm babies go home

'When is my baby going home?' is one of the first questions asked by families of infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Now clinicians have a data-based answer.

3h

Climate change NGOs from rich countries dominate online conversation, study shows

Mass communication professors at the University of Kansas analyzed a year of Twitter activity from nearly 500 climate change NGOs from 79 countries and found those from rich nations were most engaged and had the biggest audience, leaving others at risk of not having their message heard and being left out of the global movement.

3h

Voluntary limit-setting can keep intense online gamblers in check

A new study has shown that, among online gamblers, setting voluntary monetary limits can help players stay in control of their gambling and the most significant effects were seen among intense gamblers.

3h

Study challenges concerns over hospital readmission reduction practices

A UT Southwestern study is challenging concerns that a federal health policy enacted in 2012 to reduce hospital readmissions leaves patients more vulnerable.

3h

Irrigation temporarily alleviates hot extremes

Researchers found evidence that expanding irrigation has dampened anthropogenic warming during hot days, with particularly strong effects over South Asia.

3h

The mysterious movement of water molecules

Water is all around us and essential for life. Nevertheless, research into its behavior at the atomic level — above all how it interacts with surfaces — is thin on the ground. Thanks to a new experimental method, researchers have now delivered insights into the atomic-level movement of water molecules.

3h

The mysterious movement of water molecules

Water is all around us and essential for life. Nevertheless, research into its behavior at the atomic level — above all how it interacts with surfaces — is thin on the ground. Thanks to a new experimental method, researchers have now delivered insights into the atomic-level movement of water molecules.

3h

3h

AJ and the Queen Says Drag Will Make America Okay Again

On a TV in an RV, Oprah speaks. "You have to start with beginning to love yourself," she says. "You hear a lot of that in the '80s. And what does that mean?" Oprah's guru guest, a feathered blonde in a blazer, replies that it means that you should stop beating up on yourself. "When you begin to love who you are, then you can love your neighbor, because you love yourself," the woman says. "See, I

3h

NASA Data Confirms the Last Decade Was the Hottest on Record

Earth has been on a clear warming trend for decades now, and 2019 did nothing to change that. New data released by NASA and NOAA illustrate the accelerating pace of climate change. 2019 was the second hottest on record, but more troubling, it also made the last decade the hottest period since record-keeping began . The new data released this week confirm that the past five years have all been amo

3h

Democratic Candidates Agree on Climate Change, Except for Role of Natural Gas

Whether to allow fracking and the use of natural gas as a transition fuel emerged as a rare point of contention in last night's debate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

How zebra finches learn to sing

Complex learning processes like speaking or singing follow similar patterns. Using the example of zebra finches, researchers have investigated how young birds imitate the courtship songs of their fathers and practice them thousands of times. The study has revealed what aspects of the song are remembered overnight, and that sleep allows the bird to optimally build upon the progress made on the prev

3h

Beauty sleep could be real, say body clock biologists

Biologists have explained for the first time why having a good night's sleep really could prepare us for the rigors of the day ahead.

3h

New study on a recently discovered chlorophyll molecule could be key to better solar cells

Photosynthesis, the process by which some organisms convert sunlight into chemical energy, is well known. But, it is a complex phenomenon, which involves a myriad of proteins. The molecule Chl f, a new type of chlorophyll, is known to play a part in photosynthesis, but owing to its recent discovery, its location and functions are not understood. Scientists have now analyzed in detail the protein c

3h

Biologists make living sperm glow

By applying a novel method, biologists have successfully analyzed the metabolism of intact tissues of the fruit fly using a label-free microscopy technique. They used the natural fluorescence of certain metabolic molecules and found that sperm, compared to other tissues, are highly glycolytic.

3h

Sleep is key for zebra finches learning to sing

Sleep allows zebra finches learning to sing to build on the progress they made during the previous day, researchers report. The ability to learn new motor skills is critical to almost all aspects of our lives. We often learn such skills through practice, over the course of many thousands of repetitions. Some repetitions are better than others, and overall they keep on improving. Changes in the wi

3h

NSF rolls out huge makeover of science statistics

Agency aims to make authoritative Indicators report more timely

3h

New assessment of gas locked in ice in European waters

A study led by the University of Southampton has mapped several sites in Europe containing gas hydrate – a relatively clean fuel which could help bridge the gap between fossil fuels and renewables.

3h

First randomized clinical trial found no harms from dementia screening in primary care

In the first randomized controlled trial to evaluate pros and cons of population screening for dementia, Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine researchers found no harm, as measured by patient reported depressive and anxiety symptoms, from screening for Alzheimer's disease and related dementia in diverse rural, suburban and urban primary care clinics.

3h

Advisers not enough to guarantee a strong retirement

Rui Yao, a nationally recognized expert on retirement savings from the University of Missouri, suggests that employees can't trust that the retirement plan sponsored by their employer is in good hands just because the plan uses an adviser. To ensure a strong retirement plan performance, consumers must be active participants in retirement planning, she says.

3h

Study: Pig virus is easily transmitted among chickens and turkeys

The first animal study of a pig virus' potential to jump to another species shows that the virus, once introduced to a select group of birds, is easily transmitted to healthy chickens and turkeys.

3h

Black patients have worse outcomes of lower spinal fusion surgery

Black patients undergoing lumbar (lower) spinal fusion surgery have worse outcomes — including higher complication rates, more hospital days, and higher costs — compared to white patients, suggests a study in Spine. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

3h

Sub-national 'climate clubs' could offer key to combating climate change

'Climate clubs' offering membership for sub-national states, in addition to just countries, could speed up progress towards a globally harmonized climate change policy, which in turn offers a way to achieve stronger climate policies in all countries. This is the key finding of a new study by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Autonomous University of Barc

3h

Emotions to help engage school students in learning

Psychology researchers from HSE University have trialed the reliability of a student engagement scale on 537 Russian primary school students. The findings indicated that the emotional component contributes the most to school engagement. The paper has been published in PLOS ONE journal.https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0225542

3h

Advisers not enough to guarantee a strong retirement

Starting a new job often includes enrolling in a company's retirement plan. As defined contribution plans, such as 401(k) plans, become more common than pension plans, American workers are increasingly responsible saving for retirement. Rui Yao, a nationally recognized expert on retirement savings from the University of Missouri, suggests that employees can't trust that the retirement plan sponsor

3h

Predicting the year in chemistry

With 2020 just starting, scientists around the world are wondering what the year has in store for them. To help steer them straight, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, is highlighting key business and policy issues that will impact the chemistry enterprise across the globe.

3h

Emotions to help engage school students in learning

Psychology researchers from HSE University have trialed the reliability of a student engagement scale on 537 Russian primary school students. The findings indicated that the emotional component contributes the most to school engagement. The paper has been published in PLOS ONE journal.

3h

Keep your photos from getting stolen on the internet

You went all the way up there to take that photo—no way you should let somebody else make money off of it. (Blake Cheek Unsplash/) If you post your photos online, there's a good chance someone will eventually steal them. I've had my photos stolen to be used on websites and even to catfish people on online dating apps—and it can happen to you. You should know that any photo you take is, theoretica

3h

Should We Alter the Human Genome? Let Democracy Decide

We need greater scientific and moral clarity on germline editing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Daily briefing: Firefighters saved the last remaining grove of a rare Australian tree

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00107-3 The last stand of wild Wollemia nobilis trees was protected by a secret firefighting mission. Plus: human body temperature is dropping and the anti-CRISPR proteins that put the brakes on gene editing.

3h

Animals should use short, fast movements to avoid being located

Most animals need to move, whether this is to seek out food, shelter or a mate. New research has shown that movement doesn't always break camouflage and if an animal needs to move, animals that are unpatterned and use short, fast movements are less likely to be located by predators.

4h

Animals should use short, fast movements to avoid being located

Most animals need to move, whether this is to seek out food, shelter or a mate. New research has shown that movement doesn't always break camouflage and if an animal needs to move, animals that are unpatterned and use short, fast movements are less likely to be located by predators.

4h

Call for Entries: Atlantic Media's 2020 Michael Kelly Award

Atlantic Media has issued a call for entries for the 2020 Michael Kelly Award. The deadline to enter is Monday, February 17, 2020. There is no entry fee. Submission guidelines and more details about the award are at www.kellyaward.com . The Michael Kelly Award, now in its 17th year, recognizes writers and editors at U.S.-based newspapers, magazines, and online publications whose work exemplifies

4h

New study on a recently discovered chlorophyll molecule could be key to better solar cells

All living organisms need energy for their survival, and this energy indirectly comes from the sun. Some organisms, such as plants, cyanobacteria, and algae, are capable of directly converting this light energy into chemical energy via a process called "photosynthesis." These photosynthetic organisms contain special structures to mediate photosynthesis, called "photosystems."

4h

High-quality graters for cheese, citrus, spices, and more

The greatest graters. (Brenan Greene via Unsplash/) A grater is an essential kitchen tool. Need to add lemon zest into your pie filling? Top off a pasta with parmesan? Want to finely shred carrots for a salad? You'll want a grater. They range from multitasking box graters that sit on a kitchen counter to slim zesters you can easily store in a drawer. The best graters have sharp blades and are eas

4h

Biologists make living sperm glow

How do female insects manage to keep sperm fresh for months after mating? This has been a central question for the sperm biologists of the Chair of Applied Zoology headed by Prof. Dr. Klaus Reinhardt. Now the scientists have presented their first promising results in the journal Scientific Reports.

4h

Nitrogen-fixing genes could help grow more food using fewer resources

Scientists have transferred a collection of genes into plant-colonizing bacteria that let them draw nitrogen from the air and turn it into ammonia, a natural fertilizer.

4h

Toward safer disposal of printed circuit boards

Printed circuit boards are vital components of modern electronics. However, once they have served their purpose, they are often burned or buried in landfills, polluting the air, soil and water. Most concerning are the brominated flame retardants added to printed circuit boards to keep them from catching fire. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering have developed a ba

4h

Biologists make living sperm glow

How do female insects manage to keep sperm fresh for months after mating? This has been a central question for the sperm biologists of the Chair of Applied Zoology headed by Prof. Dr. Klaus Reinhardt. Now the scientists have presented their first promising results in the journal Scientific Reports.

4h

New study on a recently discovered chlorophyll molecule could be key to better solar cells

All living organisms need energy for their survival, and this energy indirectly comes from the sun. Some organisms, such as plants, cyanobacteria, and algae, are capable of directly converting this light energy into chemical energy via a process called "photosynthesis." These photosynthetic organisms contain special structures to mediate photosynthesis, called "photosystems."

4h

Fever chart: Earth had its hottest decade on record in 2010s

The decade that just ended was by far the hottest ever measured on Earth, capped off by the second-warmest year on record, two U.S. agencies reported Wednesday. And scientists said they see no end to the way man-made climate change keeps shattering records.

4h

New computational screening approach identifies potential solid-state electrolytes

Replacing the volatile and flammable liquid or polymer electrolytes now used in lithium-ion batteries with inorganic solid-state lithium-ionic ceramic conductors could significantly improve both safety and performance of the cells. Solid-state conductors would allow for novel cathode and anode chemistry, prevent the growth of Li-metal dendrites and push miniaturization.

4h

Scientists explain how leaf apex enhances water drainage

Chinese scientists have recently shown how the tiny apex structure in plant leaves controls water drainage and confers an evolutionary advantage.

4h

Nitrogen-fixing genes could help grow more food using fewer resources

Scientists have transferred a collection of genes into plant-colonizing bacteria that let them draw nitrogen from the air and turn it into ammonia, a natural fertilizer.

4h

Hot OLEDs can 'switch back'

It is well-known that LEDs and transistors should not be connected in parallel as slight differences in resistance can lead to imbalanced current flow. This effect gets even stronger if the devices heat up as their resistance changes with temperature. For organic LEDs (OLEDs), this is a big issue: Every large-area OLED lighting panel can be understood as a parallel connection of numerous individua

4h

UN warns of 'much extreme weather' ahead after hottest decade on record

The past decade has been the hottest on record, the UN said Wednesday, warning that the higher temperatures were expected to fuel numerous extreme weather events in 2020 and beyond.

4h

4h

Deepfake Porn Harms Adult Performers, Too

Their bodies are being weaponized for online harassment—and the experience, actors say, is eviscerating.

4h

Universities must overhaul the toxic working culture for academic researchers | Anton Muscatelli

A survey has warned that researchers are too stressed. It's up to universities to improve their working environment Academic research is an exciting, creative and varied endeavour, yet there is growing evidence that our culture has developed unhealthy levels of anxiety and stress. As the UK increases research and development spending – all the more important after Brexit – we will see much-needed

4h

Reinventing the computer: Brain-inspired computing for a post-Moore's Law era

Computing development has seen a consistent doubling of the number of transistors that can fit on a chip. But that trend, Moore's Law, may reach its limit as components of submolecular size encounter problems with thermal noise, making further scaling impossible. In Applied Physics Reviews, researchers present an examination of the computing landscape, focusing on functions needed to advance brain

4h

Drinking 1% rather than 2% milk accounts for 4.5 years of less aging in adults

A new study shows drinking low-fat milk — both nonfat and 1% milk — is significantly associated with less aging in adults.Research on 5,834 US adults by Brigham Young University exercise science professor Larry Tucker, Ph.D., found people who drink low-fat (1% and skim) milk experience several years less biological aging than those who drink high-fat (2% and whole) milk.

4h

BPA activates immune response in mice that passes down through generations

Some plastic food and beverage containers still contain bisphenol A (BPA), which can mimic the hormone estrogen. Although experts say that small amounts of BPA detected in foods are unlikely to cause problems, some people worry that constant low-level exposures could have health effects, especially for developing fetuses, infants and children. Now, researchers report in ACS' Journal of Proteome Re

4h

Certified nurse-midwives lead collaborative care model as solution to obstetrician shortage

Fewer physicians are pursuing careers in obstetrics, in part because of the intense, round-the-clock demands of the job and a high burnout rate. An unusually large number of practicing obstetricians are expected to retire within the next decade, which will add to an already acute physician shortage.

4h

Immigration and transition: Emerging trends in spina bifida care

In this collection of articles in the Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine (JPRM) experts highlight the emerging trends in spina bifida care in response to challenges faced by spina bifida patients and their physicians due to demographic shifts in age and ethnicity and other societal factors.

4h

A new 'cool' blue

Throughout history, people have sought vibrant blue pigments. The Egyptians and Babylonians used lapis lazuli 6,000 years ago. In 1802, a French chemist synthesized cobalt blue. More recently, in 2009 scientists discovered YInMn Blue, otherwise known as "Oregon Blue." But most of these pigments have limitations in terms of cost, stability, color or toxicity. Now, researchers in ACS Omega report a

4h

Animals should use short, fast movements to avoid being located

Most animals need to move, whether this is to seek out food, shelter or a mate. New research has shown that movement doesn't always break camouflage and if an animal needs to move, animals that are unpatterned and use short, fast movements are less likely to be located by predators.

4h

Toward safer disposal of printed circuit boards

Printed circuit boards are vital components of modern electronics. However, once they have served their purpose, they are often burned or buried in landfills, polluting the air, soil and water. Most concerning are the brominated flame retardants added to printed circuit boards to keep them from catching fire. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering have developed a ba

4h

Putting Air Filters in Classrooms Could Give Student Performance a Serious Boost

Air filters could raise test scores in schools as much as cutting class size by a third.

4h

Should We Alter the Human Genome? Let Democracy Decide

We need greater scientific and moral clarity on germline editing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

The Filmmaker Who Says M. Night Shyamalan Stole Her Movie

The first time Francesca Gregorini heard of the new Apple TV+ series Servant , created by M. Night Shyamalan and Tony Basgallop, was in November 2019, the day the trailer for the horror series was released. The filmmaker immediately began receiving calls from friends and fellow directors. "Some of the calls were congratulatory, because they assumed I had sold the rights to my film and it had been

4h

Flying toys that will enthrall your kids

Tiny helicopters and fairies that twirl in the air. (DepositPhotos/) Propelled by the growing popularity and availability of drones, more and more toys seem to be taking to the sky. Be it a helicopter, spaceship, or fairy princess, your kid's favorite plaything likely flies through the air. There are plenty of delightful, easy-to-maneuver toys that will (passively) teach kids the basics of flight

4h

Alcoholics Anonymous isn't sexist – it's supportive and free | Letters

Readers who have attended AA praise the service it provides Holly Whitaker's views about Alcoholics Anonymous need to be challenged ( 'AA's rules are written for men' , G2, 14 January). At meetings I attend there are individuals who have lost jobs, families and have been rough sleepers. AA being for "the people who sit at the top of our society," not for the marginalised is the opposite of my expe

4h

Newly created embryo nourishes hope for the survival of the northern white rhino

In December 2019 the team of scientists and conservationists repeated the egg collection from the northern white rhinos in Kenya and was able to create a new embryo over Christmas.

4h

The mysterious movement of water molecules

Water is all around us and essential for life. Nevertheless, research into its behaviour at the atomic level — above all how it interacts with surfaces — is thin on the ground. Thanks to a new experimental method, TU Graz researchers have now delivered insights into the atomic-level movement of water molecules, which they outline in a paper in Nature Communications.

4h

New computational screening approach identifies potential solid-state electrolytes

Though researchers have been looking for solid-state electrolytes that could enhance both the safety and performance of lithium-ion batteries for decades, no thoroughly suitable candidate has been found. Computational screening may offer better chances of success. In a recent paper, NCCR MARVEL researchers presented a computational framework for predicting the diffusion of Li-ions in solid-state m

4h

There's a growing threat in the mountains thanks to climate change: glacial lake outburst floods

As the climate changes and glaciers melt, a lesser-known threat lurks in alpine areas: glacial lake outburst floods. These events happen rapidly, releasing huge amounts of water with little or no warning. Unsuspecting communities lying in the flood path can suffer serious losses. Researchers seek better ways to predict these outburst floods and mitigate their danger. Take a hike through the Swiss

4h

Stress, anxiety, harassment: huge survey reveals pressures of scientists' working lives

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00101-9 Global study highlights long hours, poor job security and mental-health struggles.

4h

The history of bagels is an American tale

Bagels have roots in 17th-century Poland, but it's American wheat—along with Jewish immigration to New York, labor organizing, and an epic battle between bakers—that made them what they are today, according to one expert. In this video, Jacob Remes , a clinical associate professor at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University, uses the New York City bakery staple as a lens

4h

Climate emergency: 2019 was second hottest year on record

Last decade was also hottest yet in 150 years of measurements, say scientists The year 2019 was the second hottest on record for the planet's surface, according to latest research. The analyses reveal the scale of the climate crisis: both the past five years and the past decade are the hottest in 150 years. The succession of records being broken year after year is "the drumbeat of the Anthropocen

4h

Living 'concrete' made from bacteria used to create replicating bricks

Buildings may one day be made using a strain of bacteria that creates a concrete-like material when combined with sand and nutrients

4h

The Big Split Emerging in the Democratic Party

Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren seemed to be arguing about the finer points of troop levels in the Middle East, but what was really in dispute was a much bigger question: whether the world's most powerful military actually provides stability abroad and security at home when intervening in international conflicts. In calling for maintaining a small number of U.S. forces in the Middle East during la

4h

Bricks Alive! Scientists Create Living Concrete

'A Frankenstein material' teeming with — and ultimately made by — photosynthetic microbes. And it can reproduce.

4h

Studies of membrane vesicles pave the way to innovative treatments of degenerative diseases

Membrane vesicles can become a new therapeutic tool in regenerative medicine and a new class of effective and safe medications.

4h

New algorithm predicts gestational diabetes

Timely prediction may help prevent the condition using nutritional and lifestyle changes.

4h

Innovative research uncovers mechanism behind epilepsy in Angelman syndrome

First-of-its-kind study led by Duke-NUS Medical School and National Neuroscience Institute (NNI) applies experimental methodology using human neural cells and brain organoids to investigate mechanism underlying epileptic seizures in Angelman syndrome, an autism spectrum disorder. Findings may lead to treatment for this currently untreatable condition.

4h

How zebra finches learn to sing

Complex learning processes like speaking or singing follow similar patterns. Using the example of zebra finches, researchers at UZH and ETH Zurich have investigated how young birds imitate the courtship songs of their fathers and practice them thousands of times. The study has revealed what aspects of the song are remembered overnight, and that sleep allows the bird to optimally build upon the pro

4h

Beauty sleep could be real, say Body Clock biologists

Biologists from The University of Manchester have explained for the first time why having a good night's sleep really could prepare us for the rigours of the day ahead.

4h

Diabolical points in coupled active cavities with quantum emitters

Diabolical points (DPs) introduce ways to study topological phase and peculiar energy dispersion. Scientists in China and cooperators from the United Kingdom demon-strated DPs in strongly coupled active microdisks. A new macroscopical control of backscattering based on the competition between defects and quantum emitters was used to achieve DPs. This work paves the way to integrate DPs and more ex

4h

'Soil photosynthesis' helps to mitigate environmental pollution

An UCO research group has discovered that the effect from solar radiation produces an exchange of nitrogen gases in soil that allows for sequestering harmful gases and turning them into nitrate.

4h

Nine researchers receive EMBO Installation Grants to establish independent laboratories

EMBO is pleased to announce that nine life scientists have been selected to receive Installation Grants, which will support them in establishing independent laboratories in the Czech Republic, Poland, Portugal and Turkey.

4h

Imprinted color patterns

Structural colors appear because the imprinted pattern on a surface changes the wavelengths of light. Chinese scientists have introduced an azopolymer that allows the imprinting of nanopatterns in a novel room-temperature lithographic process. A key aspect of the technique is the light-induced phase change of a novel azopolymer, explains the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The pr

4h

New study on a recently discovered chlorophyll molecule could be key to better solar cells

Photosynthesis, the process by which some organisms convert sunlight into chemical energy, is well known. But, it is a complex phenomenon, which involves a myriad of proteins. The molecule Chl f, a new type of chlorophyll, is known to play a part in photosynthesis, but owing to its recent discovery, its location and functions are not understood. Scientists from Japan have now analyzed in detail th

4h

Involving family in bipolar care helps children and teens stay healthier, longer

In a UCLA-led study, children and adolescents with a high risk for developing bipolar disorder stayed healthier for longer periods when their family members participated in their psychotherapy sessions.

4h

Study of patients on heart pumps debunks myths about categories and outcomes

Findings led by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital could lead to a major change in thinking around adjudication of left-ventricular assist devices (LVADs) into discrete categories.

4h

Study: Women's blood vessels age faster than men's

Many medical experts have long believed that women simply 'catch up' to men in terms of their cardiovascular risk, but new research shows for the first time that women's blood vessels age at a faster rate than men's. The findings could help to explain why women tend to develop different types of cardiovascular disease and with different timing than men.

4h

More interventions follow gastric bypass than gastric sleeve, large study shows

A study involving tens of thousands of bariatric surgery patients found that gastric bypass patients were significantly more likely than gastric sleeve patients to end up back in the hospital in the years following surgery.

4h

Building materials come alive with help from bacteria

New living building materials can grow and multiply — and may help to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from infrastructure in the future.

4h

Bacteria and sand engineered into living concrete

Cement and concrete haven't changed much as technology in over a hundred years, but researchers in Colorado are revolutionizing building materials by literally bringing them to life. The method developed, presented Jan. 15 in the journal Matter, combines sand and bacteria to build a living material that has structural load-bearing and biological function.

4h

Climate change: Last decade confirmed as warmest on record

Global data from three agencies also shows that 2019 was the second warmest year since 1850.

5h

Research Harnesses Bacterial Power to Generate Self-Reproducing Building Material

Combine sand, gelatin and bacteria, let them rest, and watch one brick turn into eight. Bacteria-Brick.jpg Image credits: College of Engineering and Applied Science at Colorado Technology Wednesday, January 15, 2020 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Castles made of sand could, with the help of bacteria, grow copies of themselves and become as strong as the cement that comm

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MicroMedicine

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Global roadmap to insect recovery

International researchers urge a suite of conservation measures.

5h

Want to beautify your street? Ask a computer

New AI approach could help planners give urban areas a facelift.

5h

How to create living concrete

Bacteria help scientists take tentative steps into a new world of construction.

5h

Earth bacteria may have colonised other solar systems

Astronomers suggest microbes might hitch lifts on interstellar asteroids.

5h

Tracking animals without seeing them

Trials further test the potential of eDNA for conservation.

5h

Dresden biologists make living sperm glow

By applying a novel method, biologists at TU Dresden have successfully analysed the metabolism of intact tissues of the fruit fly using a label-free microscopy technique. They used the natural fluorescence of certain metabolic molecules and found that sperm, compared to other tissues, are highly glycolytic.

5h

Irrigation alleviates hot extremes

Researchers from ETH Zurich and other universities found evidence that expanding irrigation has dampened anthropogenic warming during hot days, with particularly strong effects over South Asia.

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How supply chain transparency can help the planet | Markus Mutz

Given the option, few would choose to buy products that harm the earth — yet it's nearly impossible to know how most consumer goods are made or where they're sourced from. That's about to change, says supply chain innovator Markus Mutz. He shares how he used blockchain technology to track Patagonian toothfish on their journey from ocean to dinner plate — and proved it's possible to offer consume

5h

Building materials come alive with help from bacteria

University of Colorado Boulder researchers have developed a new approach to designing more sustainable buildings with help from some of the tiniest contractors out there.

5h

Google results for probiotics are totally unreliable

Probiotics make a lot of claims, but right now a lot of them are unfounded (Daily Nouri/) They're not Goop-level pseudoscience , but most probiotics lack solid scientific evidence in their favor. Supplement brands claim that daily use can ease digestive issues and reduce the risk of colon cancer, among others on a lengthy list of dubious benefits. As shoppers clamor for probiotics to ease stomach

5h

This Vantablack Watch Costs $75,000

Watch List Swiss luxury watchmaker H. Moser & Cie. has partnered with Surrey NanoSystems — the company behind ultra-dark material Vantablack — to create a wristwatch that looks like you're staring into a black hole, The New York Times reports . "I knew if we wanted to make black watches we would have to do something unique," H. Moser & Cie. CEO Edouard Meylan told the Times . Limited Edition The

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Hottest decade 'driven by man-made climate change'

Nasa and UK Met Office unequivocally blame human influence on warming planet

5h

Silicon Valley Abandons the Culture That Made It the Envy of the World

For decades, whole regions, nations even, have tried to model themselves on a particular ideal of innovation, the lifeblood of the modern economy. From Apple to Facebook, Silicon Valley's freewheeling ecosystem of new, nimble corporations created massive wealth and retilted the world's economic axis. Silicon Valley meant young companies scrambling to create the next great thing, and that scramble

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4 strategies for pitching ideas to your project leader

There are strategies you can use to successfully pitch your ideas to a project leader at work, says an expert in organizational behavior. Kimberly Elsbach, professor at the UC Davis Graduate School of Management, draws the tactics from a recently study that, building on earlier work about both Hollywood pitches and toy car designers, took her inside a multinational food company. There, she interv

5h

Introducing a new Aussie dinosaur

Discovery suggests the presence of a second megaraptorid species in the area.

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From plastic toys to Industry 4.0: How Taiwan is using science to upgrade its manufacturing

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00060-1 The island is turning to smart machinery and artificial intelligence to improve the quality and flexibility of the products it makes.

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Taiwanese start-up detects an opportunity

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00061-0 Evolution of a company that uses spectroscopy techniques shines a light on business development in Taiwan.

5h

Ancient iron-sulfur-based mechanism monitors electron flow in photosynthesis

Scientists know that a particular protein is responsible for regulating gene expression of photosystems in response to perturbations in photosynthetic electron flow, but how it senses the electrons has been an unresolved question — until now.

5h

Podcast Preview: Introducing The Joy of x

Hosted by Steven Strogatz, a mathematician and author, each episode is a window into the inner world of a top-tier scientist or mathematician. Guests come from diverse disciplines, running the spectrum from neurobiology to astrophysics. Each conversation illuminates the scientist's own research, while also shining light on more universal themes like creativity, collaboration or navigating profess

5h

Global warming to increase violent crime in the United States

People in the United States could see tens of thousands of extra violent crimes every year—because of climate change alone.

5h

DNA Damage to Breast Cells from chemicals in some cosmetics, sunscreens

A new approach to studying the effects of two common chemicals used in cosmetics and sunscreens found they can cause DNA damage in breast cells at surprisingly low concentrations, while the same dose did not harm cells without estrogen receptors.

5h

How coworkers impact the value of your skills

New research uncovers the importance of teams and coworkers in shaping productivity, earning potential, and stays of employment. The research analyzed data from Sweden. It found that to earn high wages and returns on education, workers must find coworkers who complement their own skills rather than duplicate them.

5h

Can We Predict Earthquakes At All?

If we can predict hurricanes, floods, and tornados to differing degrees of reliability, why don't we know when the next big earthquake will come? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The very best watercolor starter sets

Color your canvas. (Nick Collins via Unsplash/) Watercolor is a gorgeous, versatile medium for any artist. Armed with just watercolor pans or tubes, water and a brush, you can create quick, layered sketches for bigger paintings or make full ink and wash illustrations in a sketchbook. Watercolors blend and layer beautifully, capturing light and motion. They're great for much more than just traditi

5h

Newly discovered genetic element adjusts coat color in dogs

Why are Irish Setters so red? Geneticists at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine now have an answer for why some dogs have more intense coat colors than others.

5h

Newly discovered genetic element adjusts coat color in dogs

Why are Irish Setters so red? Geneticists at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine now have an answer for why some dogs have more intense coat colors than others.

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Tennessee review: 2% of providers account for 25% of pediatric antibiotic prescriptions

Fewer than 2% of providers accounted for 25% of antibiotic prescriptions for children in Tennessee, with the highest number of prescriptions coming from general pediatricians and those who graduated prior to 2000, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

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Daily users account for over 80% of all cannabis consumed in Australia

A new study published in the scientific journal Addiction estimates that in Australia between 2007 and 2016, 81% to 85% of all cannabis was consumed by the 16% of all Australian cannabis users who used daily. Weekly users and daily users together accounted for an estimated 98% of all cannabis consumed in Australia between 2007 and 2016.

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Expert calls for 'fire-line' to future-proof against bushfire disaster

As fires continue to burn across Australia, damage estimates are now in the billions. More than 8.4 million hectares have been burnt, almost 2000 homes have been destroyed, and 26 people have lost their lives.

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The burden of climate risk falls on the poor

Storm, flood, drought: With global warming, extreme events become more frequent and intense. They especially impact the poorest of the poor. Geographer Matthias Garschagen examines how urban societies can adapt to climate change.

5h

Meet the narwhal, 'unicorn of the sea'

Narwhals are often called the unicorns of the sea. The long tusk of the male narwhal sets these whales apart, but it's not the only thing that makes Monodon monoceros among the most intriguing and mysterious marine mammals.

5h

Brain-inspired computing for a post-Moore's Law era

Since the invention of the transistor in 1947, computing development has seen a consistent doubling of the number of transistors that can fit on a chip. But that trend, known as Moore's Law, may reach its limit as components of submolecular size encounter problems with thermal noise, making further scaling impossible.

5h

Putting the universe under the telescope

We humans are a curious, questing lot, and the 2020s will see us continue to observe the universe around us, trying to understand more about fundamental particles, forces, objects and relationships from both ground and space-based instruments.

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The best drones for curious kids

Drones for all levels. (William Daigneault via Unsplash/) Toy designers throughout history have always made kids smaller versions of the latest innovations: train sets, model airplanes, and miniature cars included. Drones are being tapped by adults to do everything from take photos to deliver groceries to win a war, so it makes sense that toy developers are churning out less potent quadcopters fo

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Meet the narwhal, 'unicorn of the sea'

Narwhals are often called the unicorns of the sea. The long tusk of the male narwhal sets these whales apart, but it's not the only thing that makes Monodon monoceros among the most intriguing and mysterious marine mammals.

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Irrigation alleviates hot extremes

Researchers from ETH Zurich and other universities found evidence that expanding irrigation has dampened anthropogenic warming during hot days, with particularly strong effects over South Asia.

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Shrinking dinosaurs and the evolution of endothermy in birds

The evolution of endothermy (thermoregulation by metabolic means) represents a major transition in vertebrate history. However, the process of endothermy evolution and its timeline in birds and mammals remains controversial. In a new report on Science Advances, Enrico L. Rezende and a team of researchers at the Center of Applied Ecology and Sustainability, and the Institute of Environmental and Ev

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'Russian doll' molecules could really clean up

The Nitschke Group at the University of Cambridge designs hollow molecules that act as capsules or cages that enclose guest molecules. These cages have exciting potential applications in a variety of fields. They could, for example, be tailored to deliver drugs to where they are needed or to remove a pollutant molecule from a solution. In work recently published in the Journal of the American Chem

6h

Plant-powered sensor sends signal to space

A device that uses electricity generated by plants as its power source has communicated via satellite—a world first.

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Home cooking is healthier, but income plays a role

Americans who cook meals at home frequently are more likely to have an overall better quality diet, according to new research. The study also finds, however, that the association between cooking at home and diet quality differs between high- and low-income populations. The research highlights the importance of promoting meal preparation and cooking at home as key strategies for improving eating h

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The mysterious movement of water molecules

Water is ubiquitous and essential for life. Nevertheless, experimental information about its behaviour on the atomic level—above all how it interacts with surfaces—is scarce. Thanks to a new experimental method, TU Graz researchers have now delivered insights into the atomic-level movement of water molecules, which they outline in a paper in Nature Communications.

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Homelessness in the Living Rooms of the Rich

The project puts DIY shelters built by the unhoused in some of San Francisco's most valuable homes.

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EQRx's Challenge, And My Challenge to Them

It's time to talk about a new venture called EQRx. This has made quite a splash in the last few days at the JP Morgan investor conference, and it's been launched by Alexis Borisy (involved with founding and/or helping run CombinatoRx, Foundation, Blueprint, WarpDrive Bio, Editas, Relay and others) with the aim of generating cheaper medicines. How, you ask, are they going to do that? Are they aimi

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How Google's New Weather AI Will Make Sure You Never Get Caught in the Rain

Among the many things we've become addicted to on our smartphones is checking the weather. If you're anything like me, you open a weather app at least twice a day: in the morning to know what to expect for the day ahead, maybe before your commute home so you can prepare for possible rain or snow, and sometimes before bed to get an idea of what to wear or what activities to plan for the next day.

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Stardust in meteorite is oldest solid stuff ever found on Earth

Stardust from a meteorite is five to seven billion years old—the oldest solid material ever found on Earth—report researchers who determined its age. Stars are born when bits of dust and gas floating through space find each other and collapse in on each other and heat up. They burn for millions to billions of years, and then they die. When they die, they pitch the particles that formed in their w

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Active asteroid unveils fireball identity

At around 1 a.m. local standard time on April 29, 2017, a fireball flew over Kyoto, Japan. Compared to other fireballs spotted from Earth, it was relatively bright and slow. Now, scientists have determined not only what the fireball was, but also where it came from.

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Designing better nursing care with robots

Robots are becoming an increasingly important part of human care, according to researchers based in Japan. To help improve the safety and efficacy of robotic care, the scientists have developed a control method that could help robots better replicate human movement when lifting and moving a patient. They published their results in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica.

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Alcohol tax reform needed

La Trobe University researchers have found introducing a minimum unit price (MUP) of $1.30 per standard drink across Australia could dramatically reduce alcohol consumption.

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OHSU research informs NIH panel on achieving equity in preventive health services

In a review of 120 previously published articles, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center at Oregon Health & Science University assessed the effects of barriers that create health disparities in 10 select preventive services, such as cancer screening, smoking cessation or obesity management, and the effectiveness of interventions to reduce barriers.Their findings indica

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Hot OLEDs can 'switch back'

Organic LEDs have found their way into commercially relevant applications such as smartphone displays and TV screens. They are also considered for lighting and functional lights in and around cars. In these very high-brightness applications, self-heating plays an important role and leads to fascinating non-linear effects that can even result in switched-back regions as experimentally proven in a j

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A smart way to predict building energy consumption

In a time of aging infrastructure and increasingly smart control of buildings, the ability to predict how buildings use energy — and how much energy they use — has remained elusive, until now. Researchers from Saudi Arabia, China and the United States collaborated to develop a smarter way to predict energy use through a method that involved artificial systems, computational experiments and paral

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Scientists validate new technology that transforms sewage sludge into fertilizer more efficiently

World population growth and lifestyle are the main causes of the increase in the volume of wastewater. As a result of the treatment of these waters, millions of tons of sewage sludge are generated, filling landfills and generating pollution, unpleasant odors, and public health risks. To combat these issues, one of the most important alternatives is to transform sewage sludge, which has a high orga

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Overlægers utilfredshed med sundhedsplatformen ignoreres

Koncerndirektionen burde offentligt indrømme, hvor dilettantisk man har håndteret implementeringen af denne vel nok største IT-begivenhed nogensinde i det danske sundhedsvæsen. Den manglende offentlige indrømmelse har gjort skade på vores indbyrdes relation, og det gavner ingen.

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The Science Behind Snow Rollers, Ice Circles and Other Winter Phenomena

A meteorologist explains how bizarre snow and ice formations take shape—and where you're most likely to see them

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Bredside til robotingeniører: Humanister vil gøre robotter sociale

PLUS. Danske forskere vil inddrage humanister i udviklingen af robotter med sociale egenskaber. Andre mener, AI-teknologien slet ikke er klar til robotter med 'social intelligens'.

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Newly discovered genetic element adjusts coat color in dogs

Why are Irish Setters so red while other breeds can come in different hues? Geneticists now have an answer for why some dogs have more intense coat colors than others.

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Analyzing DNA in soil could be an effective way of tracking animals

Genetic material left behind by animals can provide critical clues to aid conservation and research. New research shows studying DNA in soil samples can be more effective, efficient and affordable than traditional tracking methods, such as camera traps, for assessing biodiversity.

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Global warming to increase violent crime in the United States

A new study predicts millions of additional violent crimes in coming decades.

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Nitrogen-fixing genes could help grow more food using fewer resources

Scientists have transferred a collection of genes into plant-colonizing bacteria that let them draw nitrogen from the air and turn it into ammonia, a natural fertilizer. The work could help farmers around the world use less human-made fertilizers to grow important food crops like wheat, corn, and soybeans.

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'Swiss cheese' bone growth could cause mystery low back pain

The vast majority of low back pain in people may have roots in an overgrowth of pain-sensing nerves into spinal cartilaginous tissue, a new study with genetically engineered and old mice shows. An estimated 80% of people worldwide will experience low back pain in their lifetimes, sometimes owing to strain or injury. But the vast majority of low back pain emerges in the absence of injury, especial

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Faster, cheaper tests for myopia possible

The world's most common vision problem myopia or short/near sightedness, which causes damage to the eye and even blindness, just got easier to assess. Progressive research at Flinders University in Australia has identified a new method to measure how it affects the eye, a new article in PLOS ONE reveals.

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The heat is on for Australia's beloved marsupials

As Australia's weather heats up, it could have serious consequences for some of our country's most iconic animals, according to new research from The Australian National University (ANU).

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Bushfire crisis spells trouble for Aussie insects

Australia's current bushfire crisis could wipe out some of our rarer insect species, according to a group of experts.

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The heat is on for Australia's beloved marsupials

As Australia's weather heats up, it could have serious consequences for some of our country's most iconic animals, according to new research from The Australian National University (ANU).

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Bushfire crisis spells trouble for Aussie insects

Australia's current bushfire crisis could wipe out some of our rarer insect species, according to a group of experts.

6h

Opening up DNA to delete disease

Protein editorial assistants are clearing the way for cut-and-paste DNA editors, like CRISPR, to access previously inaccessible genes of interest. Opening up these areas of the genetic code is critical to improving CRISPR efficiency and moving toward futuristic, genetic-based assaults on disease.

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The Opportunity That Warren and Sanders Passed Up

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET on January 15, 2020. The two most liberal candidates drove the conversation at last night's Democratic presidential debate, but in a manner that underscores the challenge each may face in building a coalition across the party's ideological divides. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, the two senators jostling for the support of the Democrats' most progressive voters, bot

6h

Baseball's ban on sign-stealing technology doesn't make sense

Red Sox and Astros managers should not have been fired for seeking a competitive advantage

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[in-depth] How it's made: the science behind cultivated meat, part 4b: the composition of fetal bovine serum

The /r/Futurology subreddit frequently features highly upvoted posts on cultivated meat, reflecting the media attention and public interest that has followed the industry. There are many introductory resources to how cultivated meat is produced and what its benefits may be, however, there are no comprehensive resources that fully inform those interested in learning more. Below you'll find the six

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China – The First Artificial Intelligence Superpower

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China Finally Boots Up Colossal Alien-Hunting Radio Telescope

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Reconnecting with nature key for sustainability

People who live in more built up areas and spend less free-time in nature are also less likely to take actions that benefit the environment, such as recycling, buying eco-friendly products, and environmental volunteering.

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Opening up DNA to delete disease

Protein editorial assistants are clearing the way for cut-and-paste DNA editors, like CRISPR, to access previously inaccessible genes of interest. Opening up these areas of the genetic code is critical to improving CRISPR efficiency and moving toward futuristic, genetic-based assaults on disease.

6h

Researchers unlock secrets of cell division, define role for protein elevated in cancer

Researchers have successfully recreated a key process involved in cell division in a test tube, uncovering the vital role played by a protein that is elevated in over 25% of all cancers.

6h

Brain model offers new insights into damage caused by stroke and other injuries

A researcher has developed a computer model of the human brain that more realistically simulates actual patterns of brain impairment than existing methods. The novel advancement creates a digital simulation environment that could help stroke victims and patients with other brain injuries by serving as a testing ground for hypotheses about specific neurological damage.

6h

Debunking the viral tales of wombat 'heroes'

If you've been following the bushfire crisis on social media and elsewhere, you may have seen reports of benevolent wombats herding other animals to shelter into their fire-proof burrows.

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Precise measurements find a crack in universal physics

The concept of universal physics is intriguing, as it enables researchers to relate physical phenomena in a variety of systems, irrespective of their varying characteristics and complexities. Ultracold atomic systems are often perceived as ideal platforms for exploring universal physics, owing to the precise control of experimental parameters (such as the interaction strength, temperature, density

6h

Bushfire smoke is everywhere: Exactly what are you inhaling?

As bushfire smoke blankets large parts of Australia, it's time to examine what this complex chemical mixture is made of, to better understand what it's doing to both our bodies and the planet.

6h

Debunking the viral tales of wombat 'heroes'

If you've been following the bushfire crisis on social media and elsewhere, you may have seen reports of benevolent wombats herding other animals to shelter into their fire-proof burrows.

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Scientist group highlights the need to address escalating levels of contaminants of emerging concern in water

The protection of our environment and natural resources is crucial. A major focus is on climate change, mitigation and adaptation, a core issue of which is the availability, quantity and quality of our water resources. However, millions of people who consume drinking water every day are at risk from, amongst other factors, animal and human waste, pesticides, emerging contaminants, risks from "esta

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Azopolymer material allows light-assisted imprinting of nanostructures for structurally colored surfaces

Structural colors appear because the imprinted pattern on a surface changes the wavelengths of light. Chinese scientists have introduced an azopolymer that allows the imprinting of nanopatterns in a novel room-temperature lithographic process. A key aspect of the technique is the light-induced phase change of a novel azopolymer, explains the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The pr

6h

Can intuitive building design help stop an active shooter?

Burçin Becerik-Gerber had just returned to her London hotel room when she got the voicemails from her sons' L.A. elementary school. The first message announced an emergency lockdown; there was a threat in the school.

6h

Rising sea temperatures could threaten Atlantic salmon production

In 2017, aquaculture production in the EU reached a decade high thanks to increased production of high-value species like salmon and seabass, according to a report by the European Market Observatory for Fisheries and Aquaculture Products (EUMOFA). The same report also shows that in 2015, per capita world consumption of fish was 8 percent higher than in 2005, with Asia registering the highest growt

6h

Nitrogen-fixing genes could help grow more food using fewer resources

Scientists have transferred a collection of genes into plant-colonizing bacteria that let them draw nitrogen from the air and turn it into ammonia, a natural fertilizer. The work could help farmers around the world use less man-made fertilizers to grow important food crops like wheat, corn, and soybeans.

6h

Study shows lactate may prompt cancer formation

A byproduct of glucose called lactate, used by every cell in the body, may also prompt a mutated cell to become cancerous, according to new research from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

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UMass Amherst researchers identify new mechanism involved in promoting breast cancer

A new approach to studying the effects of two common chemicals used in cosmetics and sunscreens found they can cause DNA damage in breast cells at surprisingly low concentrations, while the same dose did not harm cells without estrogen receptors.

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Exposure to chemicals in drinking water associated with 5% of annual bladder cancer burden in Europe

Macro study analyzes for the first time the presence and health impact of trihalomethanes in tap water in 26 European Union countries.

6h

Global warming to increase violent crime in the United States

A new study predicts millions of additional violent crimes in coming decades.

6h

Newly discovered genetic element adjusts coat color in dogs

Why are Irish Setters so red while other breeds can come in different hues? Geneticists at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine now have an answer for why some dogs have more intense coat colors than others.

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China is closing gap with United States on research spending

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00084-7 The United States is no longer the 'uncontested leader' in science globally, the National Science Foundation says.

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Microbes endure a variety of inhospitable conditions in California's Mono Lake

Microbes found across distinct layers in California's Mono Lake may be surviving by using a variety of carbohydrates for energy, according to a recent study.

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Bushfire smoke is bad for your eyes, too—here's how you can protect them

As we continue to contend with smoke haze in various parts of the country, many Australians may find themselves with watery, burning, irritated or red eyes.

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Verifying the output from a quantum computer by comparing it to the output of another quantum computer

A team of researchers from the University of Innsbruck and the Austrian Academy of Sciences has developed a way to verify the output from one quantum computer by comparing it to the output of another quantum computer. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes developing and testing their efficient approach to verifying quantum devices.

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V473 Lyr has a low-mass companion, study suggests

Using ESA's XMM-Newton spacecraft, astronomers have conducted X-ray observations of a peculiar Cepheid variable star known as V473 Lyr. Results of the study suggest that this star has a young, low-mass companion. The finding is detailed in a paper published January 7 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

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From election upsets to climate chaos, rolling the dice helps us appreciate the odds

"He [God] does not play dice," quipped Albert Einstein, but for mortals chance is part of life. We cannot experience, measure and predict with absolute certainty. We may win a prize in a Christmas raffle. There's also a small but real chance of being struck by lightning.

7h

Helmet trouble strikes second all-female spacewalk

Two NASA astronauts ventured out Wednesday on a second all-female spacewalk to finish upgrades to the International Space Station's power grid, but quickly ran into a helmet problem.

7h

'Coolsculpting' inventors develop new non-surgical method for targeting fat

Researchers are developing a new form 'Coolsculpting' technology that can selectively reduce fat almost anywhere in the body using a safe, injectable ice solution or 'slurry.'

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Robotic gripping mechanism mimics how sea anemones catch prey

Researchers demonstrated a robotic gripping mechanism that mimics how a sea anemone catches its prey. The bionic torus captures and releases objects by crimping its skin. The grasper not only is relatively cheap and easy to produce but also can grab a variety of objects of different sizes, shapes, weights and materials.

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Impaired driving — even once the high wears off

Researchers have discovered that recreational marijuana use affects driving ability even when users are not intoxicated. Cannabis users had more accidents, drove at higher speeds, and drove through more red lights than non-users.

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Elevated leukemia incidence is found in World Trade Center rescue and recovery workers

Responders who worked at the World Trade Center site after the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, have an increased overall cancer incidence compared to the general population, particularly in thyroid cancer, prostate cancer, and, for the first time ever reported, leukemia, according to a new study.

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Where Surgeons Don't Bother With Checklists

In many poor countries, older surgeons resist being questioned, and operations are more often emergencies, which leaves less time to review checklists.

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Germany to support 'bio-economy' with 3.6 bn euros

German ministers on Wednesday agreed an action plan for the "bio-economy" worth 3.6 billion euros to help sustainable resources replace material of fossil origin in everyday products.

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Scientists contribute to major new report on climate change impact on UK coasts and seas

University scientists have contributed to a major new publication by the Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership (MCCIP) which highlights the current and future impacts of climate change on UK seas and dependent industries and society.

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Your Fat Cells Never Disappear — Making Future Weight Gain More Likely

Like it or not, our fat cells are with us for life — even if we lose weight.

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Professor: Electrons and Quarks May Experience Consciousness

The only reason humans know about the existence of consciousness — the phenomenon of having subjective feelings and experiences — is because we have feelings and experiences. But despite centuries of study, scientists have yet to make any major progress in understanding consciousness. A recently published book by philosopher Philip Goff, however, takes a deep dive into a millennia-old theory that

7h

Scientists Fight Back Against Toxic 'Forever' Chemicals

The ubiquitous compounds known as PFAS are nearly indestructible. But scientists are learning to split their ultra-strong carbon-fluorine bonds.

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Can a Digital Avatar Fire You?

Samsung's new artificial humans look, blink, and smile like us. But bots still shouldn't deal with complex human emotions.

7h

The Winner of 'The Circle' Opens Up About Life IRL

WIRED spoke with the winning contestant of Netflix's reality show about the apartment, the rules of catfishing, and what's next. (Spoilers ahead.)

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TESSA: A practical tool to measure the impact of protecting biodiversity

Researchers, public officials and NGOs often ask, "Can we put a price on forests?". The question may sound absurd or even cynical, but as an expert in environmental-conservation practices, I believe that measuring biodiversity value could help us better preserve it. Evaluating the "price" of a forest, a lake or a hill for a village, a city or even a country would ensure better conservation practic

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Formula 1 says it's going carbon neutral—fans must demand detail on how

When Formula 1 announced late last year that the sport would be carbon neutral by 2030, the organization's chief technical officer spoke of the transition to a lower carbon world: "F1 could play a huge role in this transition. It has continually proven its ability to advance technology readiness levels from experimental to production and must do so again. It also has the profile to engage the publ

7h

X-60A program conducts integrated vehicle propulsion system verification test

The Air Force Research Laboratory's X-60A program recently achieved a key developmental milestone with the completion of integrated vehicle propulsion system verification ground testing.

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How coworkers impact the value of your skills

In today's world, most workers are highly specialized, but this specialization can come at a cost—especially for those on the wrong team. New research by Harvard's Growth Lab uncovers the importance of teams and coworkers when it comes to one's productivity, earning potential, and stays of employment.

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A deep dive into how knife blades are made

A stack of cut-out knife blanks waiting to be finished. (Crucible Industries/) This story originally featured on Field & Stream . Steel is an alloy that most of us take for granted. In its simplest form, it's a mix of iron and carbon. But there are a lot of other elements in blade steel that impact the performance of a knife. These elements, added in small amounts, help knives maintain an edge, n

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Scientists explain how leaf apex enhances water drainage

Chinese scientists from the Technical Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have recently shown how the tiny apex structure in plant leaves controls water drainage and confers an evolutionary advantage.

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TESSA: A practical tool to measure the impact of protecting biodiversity

Researchers, public officials and NGOs often ask, "Can we put a price on forests?". The question may sound absurd or even cynical, but as an expert in environmental-conservation practices, I believe that measuring biodiversity value could help us better preserve it. Evaluating the "price" of a forest, a lake or a hill for a village, a city or even a country would ensure better conservation practic

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Predicting hurricane damage through semantic web resources

Predicting the damage caused by a hurricane might be possible thanks to an analysis of semantic web resources, according to work published in the International Journal of Computational Science and Engineering.

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Rising sea levels and increased storms pose threat to coastal communities

The rate of coastal erosion around the UK is expected to increase substantially in the future, according to a new study by the University of Plymouth.

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Scientists highlight effects of climate change on UK's plankton

Marine scientists in Plymouth have led a major study highlighting the effects of climate change on the plankton populations in UK seas.

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Old fishing hooks are severe hazards for sharks

Startling data fresh off an eight-year tiger shark study in French Polynesia shows severe impacts the creatures of the sea face long after they are cut loose from fishing lines.

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Scientists highlight effects of climate change on UK's plankton

Marine scientists in Plymouth have led a major study highlighting the effects of climate change on the plankton populations in UK seas.

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Old fishing hooks are severe hazards for sharks

Startling data fresh off an eight-year tiger shark study in French Polynesia shows severe impacts the creatures of the sea face long after they are cut loose from fishing lines.

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Why we don't know how many mountain gorillas live in the wild

A new census—carried out by the Greater Virunga Transboundary Collaboration (a coalition of governments, non-profits and conservationists) in 2018—shows that the population of mountain gorillas in Uganda's Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park is now at 459, up from 400 in 2011. This could bring the total number count for the subspecies to 1,069 gorillas. Katerina Guschanski explains that while

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Survey uncovers need to reimagine how research works

Over three years, I dedicated long hours and weekends to the Ph.D. project that I was desperate to make a success. I wanted my research to make a useful contribution to knowledge, but I also knew that my future career in research depended on it.

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Why we don't know how many mountain gorillas live in the wild

A new census—carried out by the Greater Virunga Transboundary Collaboration (a coalition of governments, non-profits and conservationists) in 2018—shows that the population of mountain gorillas in Uganda's Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park is now at 459, up from 400 in 2011. This could bring the total number count for the subspecies to 1,069 gorillas. Katerina Guschanski explains that while

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The connection between water and human biology is more important now than ever

A researcher at Penn State is developing a way to consistently research water and its effects on human biology and health.

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Príncipe's Obô snail population declined by more than 75% in the last 20 years

On the island of Príncipe a forest giant, known locally as the Obô snail, has undergone a population decline of more than 75 percent within the last 20 years and its range has decreased by approximately 40 percent, according to a recent report.

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A.I. amplifies 'help speech' to fight hate speech online

A new system leverages artificial intelligence to rapidly analyze hundreds of thousands of comments on social media and identify the fraction that defend or sympathize with disenfranchised minorities such as the Rohingya community. The Rohingyas began fleeing Myanamar in 2017 to avoid ethnic cleansing. Human social media moderators, who couldn't possibly manually sift through so many comments, wo

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How coworkers impact the value of your skills

New research by Harvard's Growth Lab uncovers the importance of teams and coworkers in shaping productivity, earning potential, and stays of employment. The research — published in the journal Science Advances – analyzed data from Sweden. It found that to earn high wages and returns on education, workers must find coworkers who complement their own skills rather than duplicate them.

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Príncipe's Obô snail population declined by more than 75% in the last 20 years

On the island of Príncipe a forest giant, known locally as the Obô snail, has undergone a population decline of more than 75 percent within the last 20 years and its range has decreased by approximately 40 percent, according to a recent report.

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We need a smarter solution: Shaming people for flying won't cut airline emissions

"Fake news," the chief executive of Lufthansa has called it. But his counterpart at Air France calls it the airline industry's "biggest challenge". So does the president of Emirates: "It's got to be dealt with."

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Sulfur hexafluoride: The truths and myths of this greenhouse gas

The atmospheric concentration of the highly-potent greenhouse gas SF6 has never been higher. Fingers have been pointed at the expanding renewables industry, but is that a fair assessment?

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Research explores the correlation between political engagement and lawfulness

Higher levels of engagement in the political process may make citizens more willing to follow laws, according to faculty researchers at Penn State Brandywine.

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Scientists Find Material in Meteorite Older Than the Solar System Itself

When we talk about extremely "old" things on Earth, that usually means a few billion years old. After all, Earth itself is only about four and a half billion years old. Scientists now say they've found something much much older on Earth. However, it didn't come from Earth . Studying the remains of a meteorite have yielded the oldest known material ever studied up close. A team of researchers from

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Microwaving sewage waste may make it safe to use as fertilizer on crops

My team has discovered another use for microwave ovens that will surprise you.

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Being copycats might be key to being human

Chimpanzees, human beings' closest animal relatives, share up to 98% of our genes. Their human-like hands and facial expressions can send uncanny shivers of self-recognition down the backs of zoo patrons.

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Active asteroid unveils fireball identity

At around 1 a.m. local standard time on April 29, 2017, a fireball flew over Kyoto, Japan. Compared to other fireballs spotted from Earth, it was relatively bright and slow. Now, scientists have determined not only what the fireball was, but also where it came from.

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How zebra finches learn to sing

Complex learning processes like speaking or singing follow similar patterns. Using the example of zebra finches, researchers at UZH and ETH Zurich have investigated how young birds imitate the courtship songs of their fathers and practice them thousands of times. The study has revealed what aspects of the song are remembered overnight, and that sleep allows the bird to optimally build upon the pro

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How zebra finches learn to sing

Complex learning processes like speaking or singing follow similar patterns. Using the example of zebra finches, researchers at UZH and ETH Zurich have investigated how young birds imitate the courtship songs of their fathers and practice them thousands of times. The study has revealed what aspects of the song are remembered overnight, and that sleep allows the bird to optimally build upon the pro

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Huygens landing spin mystery solved

Fifteen years ago today, ESA's Huygens probe made history when it descended to the surface of Saturn's moon Titan and became the first probe to successfully land on another world in the outer solar system. However, during its descent, the probe began spinning the wrong way—and recent tests now reveal why.

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Super-fast beer fermentation from ancient Norwegian yeast

The distinctly Norwegian beer-brewing yeast kveik reduces fermentation time drastically. That's a huge advantage, according to NTNU Ph.D. candidate Christian Schulz.

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Is there implicit gender bias in the field of economics?

In the field of economics, seminars serve as the platform through which researchers disseminate new work, practitioners test out new theories, and young people network and find jobs. But, new research from Northeastern shows that men and women are treated very differently at such seminars.

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High-gravity water waves

What might look like jelly being stirred is actually water subjected to 20 times normal Earth gravity within ESA's Large Diameter Centrifuge—as part of an experiment giving new insight into the behavior of wave turbulence.

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Image: Astronaut captures the fires ravaging Australia

Another pair of eyes provides a sobering perspective on the fires ravaging Australia. ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano took images such as this one on 12 January from his vantage point of the International Space Station.

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Mission X 2020 Walk to the Moon Challenge is open

Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut is an international educational challenge, focusing on health, science, fitness and nutrition, which encourages pupils to train like an astronaut.

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Ny kunstig krop holder donor-lever frisk i en uge

PLUS. Forskere fra ETH Zürich har udviklet en maskine, der kan holde en donor-lever i live uden for kroppen i en uge. Det kan øge antallet af tilgængelige organer til levertransplantationer.

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Super-fast beer fermentation from ancient Norwegian yeast

The distinctly Norwegian beer-brewing yeast kveik reduces fermentation time drastically. That's a huge advantage, according to NTNU Ph.D. candidate Christian Schulz.

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Multimodal genomic analyses predict response to immunotherapy in lung cancer patients

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have developed an integrated genomic approach that potentially could help physicians predict which patients with non-small cell lung cancer will respond to therapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors.

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Machine keeps livers going outside the body for a whole week

A new machine can repair injured human livers and keep them alive outside the body for one week, researchers report. The machine may increase the number of available organs for transplantation, saving many lives of patients with severe liver diseases or cancer. Until now, livers could be stored safely outside the body for only a few hours. With the novel perfusion technology, livers—even injured

7h

Astronomers reveal interstellar thread of one of life's building blocks

Phosphorus is an essential element for life as we know it. But how it arrived on the early Earth is something of a mystery. Astronomers have now traced the journey of phosphorus from star-forming regions to comets using the combined powers of ALMA and the European Space Agency's probe Rosetta. Their research shows where molecules containing phosphorus form, how this element is carried in comets, a

7h

What keeps couples together

In mammals, pair bonds are very rare, one of the few exceptions being red titi monkeys. Researchers have now investigated how pair relationships work in titi monkeys. Their results support the 'male-services hypothesis': Males provide a useful service by taking more care of the offspring and defending the territory against intruders, while females are more involved in relationship management and,

7h

Having less sex linked to earlier menopause

Women who engage in sexual activity weekly or monthly have a lower risk of entering menopause early relative to those who report having some form of sex less than monthly, according to a new study.

7h

Miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy may trigger long-term post-traumatic stress

One in six women experience long-term post-traumatic stress following miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy.

7h

Generation and manipulation of spin currents for advanced electronic devices

Graphene-based van der Waals heterostructures could be used to design ultra-compact and low-energy electronic devices and magnetic memory devices, according to a study led by ICREA Prof. Sergio O. Valenzuela, head of the ICN2 Physics and Engineering of Nanodevices Group. This is what a paper published in the latest issue of the journal suggests. The results have shown that it is possible to perfor

7h

Home grown

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03933-2 A creative process.

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A new illness, an Earth-size exoplanet and a 12-year prison sentence

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00088-3 The latest science news, in brief.

7h

What are the ethics of CGI actors – and will they replace real ones?

James Dean is set to be the latest actor to star in a film long after his death, but the rise of true Hollywood immortality raises big ethical questions

7h

Exclusive: UK considering ambitious new climate plan soon after Brexit

The UK government is considering a new, more ambitious blueprint to reduce its carbon emissions after the country leaves the European Union at the end of the month

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Are sinking soils in the Everglades related to climate change?

Characterized by alligators, airboats and catfish, the Everglades is a region of swampy wetlands in southern Florida. In addition to the area's role in Florida's tourism industry, the Everglades play a significant part in protecting our environment – through carbon sequestration.

7h

The U.S. Space Force Is Not a Joke

Last month, not long before boarding a plane to Mar-a-Lago for Christmas, President Trump signed legislation that created the newest military branch in the United States in more than 70 years: the Space Force. Between the holiday season and more pressing military news, the creation of the Space Force did not initially make a big impression. But the president seems pleased with his newest armed se

8h

'Star Trek: Picard': Everything You Need to Watch Before the New CBS Series

Watching every piece of canon that's featured Patrick Stewart could take a while. Focus here instead.

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Probiotics Online

Probiotics still don't live up to the hype, and online information is mostly misleading.

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Image of the Day: Kidney Lymphatics

Single-cell-resolution imaging offers a glimpse into lymphatic vessel formation in the mouse embryo.

8h

Glacial Lake Outburst Floods: A New Climate-Related Threat From Above

As the climate changes and glaciers melt, a lesser-known threat lurks in alpine areas: glacial lake outburst floods. These events happen rapidly, releasing huge amounts of water with little or no… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Vad berättar en död val?

Tre näbbvalar från de Nordatlantiska vidderna irrade sig in och dog på svenska västkusten sommaren 2019. En sorglig syn, men också en möjlighet att vetenskapligt undersöka några av världshavens mest gåtfulla valar. Det såg först ut som att det skulle sluta väl. Den fjärde augusti låg tre valar på grunt vatten i Åbyfjorden, strax utanför djurparken Nordens Ark i Sotenäs kommun. De levde och slog m

8h

Minskningen av däggdjursarter började med människans förfäder

Den pågående biologiska mångfaldskrisen är inget nytt fenomen, utan representerar en acceleration av en process som människans förfäder påbörjade för miljontals år sedan, enligt ny forskning på fossiler. Minskningen av däggdjur började tidigt och till följd av konkurrens om mat, enligt studien från forskare i Sverige, Schweiz och Storbritannien. – Utrotningar av arter, som vi kan se den i fossilr

8h

'Muslim' Is Not an Insult

Donald Trump recently retweeted a doctored photo of the Democratic congressional leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer wearing a traditional Iranian maghnaeh (headscarf) and amameh (turban), respectively, and accused them of sympathizing with Iran's supreme leader. The image was disturbing, confusing, and—given that hate crimes against Muslims and those perceived to be Muslim are a growing conce

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Lame sheep adjust their behavior to cope with their condition, study finds

Using novel sensing technology, experts from the University of Nottingham have found that lame sheep adjust how they carry out certain actives, such as walking, standing or lying down, rather than simply reducing the amount they do.

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Lame sheep adjust their behavior to cope with their condition, study finds

Using novel sensing technology, experts from the University of Nottingham have found that lame sheep adjust how they carry out certain actives, such as walking, standing or lying down, rather than simply reducing the amount they do.

8h

Warren's Attempt to Turn Her Greatest Weakness Into a Strength

In recent months, Democratic presidential candidate Senator Elizabeth Warren has come under fire because of the high cost of her proposed Medicare-for-All health plan. It's estimated to cost the country $20.5 trillion , twice the estimated amount of her other policy proposals. As The Atlantic 's Ron Brownstein wrote in November , that's more than the federal government now spends on Social Securi

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Is Trump a Jacksonian at Heart?

Last week's hostilities with Iran prompted the most significant foreign-policy debate on the right since Donald Trump became president––a debate that is ultimately about America's role in the Middle East and the world. At a moment when President Trump's actions are difficult to predict––and when many voters are wondering whether Republicans or Democrats are more likely to end old wars and avoid n

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Tunnels Would Be Cheaper than Police

Originally published in December 1868 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Taal Volcano Eases, but Philippines Worries Worst Is to Come

The potential threat alarms a country that is no stranger to natural disasters like typhoons, earthquakes, mudslides, tsunamis and floods.

9h

Organisation: Landapoteker truet af lukning

Landdistrikternes Fællesråd frygter fremtiden for apoteker i landområder og skriver brev til sundhedsministeren.

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Now Stores Must Tell You How They're Tracking Your Every Move

California's new privacy law has spurred a torrent of online notices. But the law is also forcing changes offline, in traditional stores.

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Cats Are Making Australia's Bushfire Tragedy Even Worse

Cats are attracted to bushfire burn scars, where they hunt vulnerable survivors with merciless impunity. It's devastating for ecosystems.

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Diving Beetles Dramatically Take Down Tadpoles

Insects have an outsize impact on their vertebrate prey — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Flere multisyge patienter øger lægers risiko for at brænde ud

Aarhus-forskere har i et nyt studie påvist en sammenhæng mellem antallet af multisyge patienter og udbrændthed blandt praktiserende læger. Det bør give anledning til nye tanker om organiseringen af almen praksis, lyder det fra studiets førsteforfatter.

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Diving Beetles Dramatically Take Down Tadpoles

Insects have an outsize impact on their vertebrate prey — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Troops Is an Unethical Euphemism

Linguists are famous—or perhaps infamous—for our tolerant attitude toward language and how it changes. Given the widespread misconception that we are professional grammar police, we often disappoint people in saying that it is not scientifically "wrong" to say "less books" rather than "fewer books" or to say "irregardless" rather than "regardless." Among the many reasons we view language so impar

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Hundredvis af praksislæger har indhentet udleveringstilladelse til fnatmedicin

Lægemiddelstyrelsen har siden november måned givet mere end 430 praksislæger en generel udleveringstilladelse til fnatmedicin. Det har betydet hurtigere behandling hos egen læge, men papirarbejdet er fortsat unødigt tungt, ifølge DSAM-formand.

9h

'Amazing': New embryo made of nearly extinct rhino species

Researchers say they have successfully created another embryo of the nearly extinct northern white rhino in a global effort to keep the species alive. Just two animals remain, and both are female.

9h

Professor og politikere: »Vi mangler en samlet beregning af bro-projekter«

Regionale og nationale politikere efterlyser en samlet analyse af fremtidige bro-projekter. Professor i økonomi Mogens Fosgerau mener også, at det er nødvendigt med et fælles beslutningsgrundlag.

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'Amazing': New embryo made of nearly extinct rhino species

Researchers say they have successfully created another embryo of the nearly extinct northern white rhino in a global effort to keep the species alive. Just two animals remain, and both are female.

9h

Astronomers reveal interstellar thread of one of life's building blocks

Phosphorus is an essential element for life as we know it. But how it arrived on the early Earth is something of a mystery. Astronomers have now traced the journey of phosphorus from star-forming regions to comets using the combined powers of ALMA and the European Space Agency's probe Rosetta. Their research shows where molecules containing phosphorus form, how this element is carried in comets, a

9h

What it's like to trip on psilocybin for a scientific research study

The psychoactive compound psilocybin may hold promise for treating depression, but how do we know it's safe? Sam Wong volunteered for a study to find out

10h

The kill-switch for CRISPR that could make gene-editing safer

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00053-0 How anti-CRISPR proteins and other molecules could bolster biosecurity and improve medical treatments.

10h

Efter kinesisk Crispr-skandale: Alle leder efter Lulu og Nana

PLUS. De kinesiske myndigheder har skjult sagen om gen­redigering af fostre. Men et kig på forskningen bag rejser bekymring for børnene i sagens midte.

10h

The psychology of magic: Where do we look for meaning in life?

By embracing a rational approach to life, society at large has stripped away meaning from psychologically important elements of life, including death. A lack of meaning leads to discomfort, which results in a desperate search for narrative in things that feel transcendent and bigger than ourselves. For some, the wonder of magic fills that void and provides the meaning and structure that has been

10h

Astronomers reveal interstellar thread of one of life's building blocks

Phosphorus, present in our DNA and cell membranes, is an essential element for life as we know it. But how it arrived on the early Earth is something of a mystery. Astronomers have now traced the journey of phosphorus from star-forming regions to comets using the combined powers of ALMA and the European Space Agency's probe Rosetta. Their research shows, for the first time, where molecules contain

10h

Chris Evans Goes to Washington

The actor's new project, A Starting Point, aims to give all Americans the TL;DR on WTF is going on in politics. It's harder than punching Nazis on the big screen.

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Bad Algorithms Didn't Break Democracy

And better ones won't save it. To get past misinformation and tribal rancor online, we need to face why people really want misinformation and rancor.

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Presidential Candidates on the Disunited State of America

Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Amy Klobuchar, Donald Trump. We asked every White House hopeful to weigh in on how they would reverse the country's devastating polarization.

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Can This Notorious Troll Turn People Away From Extremism?

Steven Bonnell, known online as Destiny, has made a business of picking fights with alt-right carnival barkers and other partisan provocateurs.

10h

Blowing in the Wind: Why the Netherlands Is Sinking

Over the centuries, the Dutch have built windmills to drain peatland in a country that is nearly a third below sea level. Now the ground is slowly sinking, damaging building foundations and roads, and increasing the risk of catastrophic flooding. It remains unclear who's in charge of fixing the problem.

10h

Grønlandsk regering vil indføre digitalt valg

Den grønlandske regering vil indføre en ny måde at afgive sin stemme på, og i et nyt lovforslag lægges der op til, at det fremover skal være muligt at brevstemme digitalt. Med den nye stemmeform gives der også større ansvar til vælgerne, der selv skal være med til at holde deres stemmer hemmelige.

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World's largest radio telescope needs to hit US$1-billion target

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00089-2 Countries won't say how much they have pledged to the Square Kilometre Array in Australia and South Africa.

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Grafik: På Risø kan en container levere bæredygtig energi

PLUS. Mash Energy er et spin-off fra DTU, hvor forskningen i termokemiske processer såsom totrinsforgasseren har været i gang i flere årtier. Virksomheden bygger f.eks. biomasseforgassere i containerstørrelse, som udmærker sig ved at kunne håndtere mange forskellige typer biomasse med højt fugtindhold,…

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Global problems need social science

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00064-x Without human insights, data and the hard sciences will not meet the challenges of the next decade, says Hetan Shah.

10h

Heterogeneity of liver cancer cells helps explain tumor progression in patients

Many liver cancer tumors contain a highly diverse set of cells, a phenomenon known as intra-tumor heterogeneity that can significantly affect the rate at which the cancer grows, Mount Sinai researchers report. The immune system's contribution to this heterogeneity can have major clinical implications.

10h

Good connections key to startup success

The future potential of early stage startups can be assessed by their existing professional relationships, research led by a team at Queen Mary University of London suggests.

10h

A predator-prey interaction between a marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. and Gram-positive bacteria

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14133-x Predator-prey interactions play important roles in the cycling of marine organic matter. Here the authors show that a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from marine sediments can kill and feed on Gram-positive bacteria by secreting a peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme.

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Anti-BCMA chimeric antigen receptors with fully human heavy-chain-only antigen recognition domains

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14119-9 Chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) use antibody variable regions to activate anti-tumor immunity. Here the authors show that a mouse IgH/IgL variable region used in a clinical CAR induces host immune responses to possibly reduce therapy efficacy, but an IgH-only CAR T design achieves similar CAR T activity but

10h

An efficient analytical reduction of detailed nonlinear neuron models

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13932-6 Realistic simulations of neurons and neural networks are key for understanding neural computations. Here the authors describe Neuron_Reduce, an analytic approach to simplify neurons receiving thousands of synapses and accelerate their simulations by 40–250 folds, while preserving voltage dynamics and dendriti

10h

Tree species traits affect which natural enemies drive the Janzen-Connell effect in a temperate forest

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14140-y The Janzen-Connell hypothesis posits that seedlings may be less likely to establish near conspecifics due to shared natural enemies. Here, Jia et al. show that tree species traits determine whether fungal pathogens or insect herbivores inhibit seedling recruitment and survival in a temperate forest.

10h

Classification and characterization of nonequilibrium Higgs modes in unconventional superconductors

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13763-5 The lately reported Higgs modes in unconventional superconductors require a classification and characterization allowed by nontrivial symmetry of the gap and the quench pulses. Here, the authors provide a classification scheme of Higgs oscillations with their excitation processes allowing them to distinguish

10h

Generating quantitative binding landscapes through fractional binding selections combined with deep sequencing and data normalization

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13895-8 Quantifying the effect of mutations on binding free energy is important to understand protein-protein interaction (PPI). Here the authors develop a method based on yeast display and next-generation sequencing to generate quantitative binding landscapes for any PPI regardless of their Kd value.

10h

Acquisition, transmission and strain diversity of human gut-colonizing crAss-like phages

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14103-3 CrAss-like phages are bacterial viruses often found in the human gut. Here, Siranosian et al. analyze gut metagenomic data to evaluate the patterns of acquisition, transmission and strain diversity of these phages in mother-infant pairs and in patients undergoing fecal microbiota transplantation.

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Irp2 regulates insulin production through iron-mediated Cdkal1-catalyzed tRNA modification

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14004-5 Iron metabolism is linked to type 2 diabetes. Here the authors describe a mechanism through which cellular iron deficiency caused by loss of Irp2 impairs Cdkal1 function, resulting in inaccurate proinsulin translation, impaired proinsulin processing and reduced insulin secretion.

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Reinterpretation of common pathogenic variants in ClinVar revealed a high proportion of downgrades

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57335-5

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Comparative analysis of pathophysiological parameters between emphysematous smokers and emphysematous patients with COPD

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57354-2

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Machine Learning Classifies Core and Outer Fucosylation of N-Glycoproteins Using Mass Spectrometry

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57274-1

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Vitamin D/VDR signaling induces miR-27a/b expression in oral lichen planus

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57288-9

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Combined microRNA and mRNA detection in mammalian retinas by in situ hybridization chain reaction

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57194-0

11h

När solens utbrott hotar jorden

Solstormar är fenomen som börjar på solens yta, men har effekter långt utanför solen. I värsta fall kan de slå ut tekniska system på jorden och orsaka stora problem i samhället. Den 13 maj 1921 syntes ovanligt kraftiga norrsken över Sverige, och som vanligt följdes himlafenomenet av störningar i telefon- och telegrafkommunikationerna. I Karlstad gick det riktigt illa: telefonstationen började brin

11h

Good connections key to startup success

The future potential of early stage startups can be assessed by their existing professional relationships, research led by a team at Queen Mary University of London suggests.

11h

How to survive after a nuclear war: eat mushrooms and seaweed

submitted by /u/Mitchhumanist [link] [comments]

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Grønlandsk testmølle flækker vingen igen: »Arktis er mere ekstremt end resten af verden«

PLUS. En af vingerne på en husstandsvindmølle opsat i Grønland er efter knap seks måneders drift flækket. Det er anden gang, møllen havarerer.

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12h

Australian wildfire smoke stokes health fears in cities

Fire alarms have been sounding in high-rise buildings across downtown Sydney and Melbourne as dense smoke from distant wildfires confuse electronic sensors. Modern government office blocks in the Australian capital Canberra have been closed because the air inside is too dangerous for civil servants to breathe.

12h

Including irregular time intervals improves animal movement studies

Studies of animal movement and behavior—including those addressing disease spread and animal conservation—should monitor animals at both regular and irregular time points to improve understanding of animal movement behavior, according to a new study by Penn State statisticians. The study, which appears online this month in the journal Environmetrics, is the first to provide guidance about sampling

12h

Reconnecting with nature key for sustainability

People who live in more built up areas and spend less free-time in nature are also less likely to take actions that benefit the environment, such as recycling, buying eco-friendly products, and environmental volunteering.

12h

Including irregular time intervals improves animal movement studies

Studies of animal movement and behavior—including those addressing disease spread and animal conservation—should monitor animals at both regular and irregular time points to improve understanding of animal movement behavior, according to a new study by Penn State statisticians. The study, which appears online this month in the journal Environmetrics, is the first to provide guidance about sampling

12h

Infectious disease defenses among ancient hominid contributions to adaptation of modern humans

During the past decade, our human evolutionary tree has turned into something more resembling an unwieldy bush. Scientists have discovered swapped segments of DNA that we shared from mating between two other hominids, Neanderthals and Denisovans, which were first sequenced in 2010 and 2014, respectively.

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Infectious disease defenses among ancient hominid contributions to adaptation of modern humans

During the past decade, our human evolutionary tree has turned into something more resembling an unwieldy bush. Scientists have discovered swapped segments of DNA that we shared from mating between two other hominids, Neanderthals and Denisovans, which were first sequenced in 2010 and 2014, respectively.

12h

Researchers unlock secrets of cell division, define role for protein elevated in cancer

Researchers at Princeton University have successfully recreated a key process involved in cell division in a test tube, uncovering the vital role played by a protein that is elevated in over 25% of all cancers. The researchers' findings, described in a pair of papers published in the journals eLife and Nature Communications, are a key step toward recreating the entire cell division machinery and c

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Researchers unlock secrets of cell division, define role for protein elevated in cancer

Researchers at Princeton University have successfully recreated a key process involved in cell division in a test tube, uncovering the vital role played by a protein that is elevated in over 25% of all cancers. The researchers' findings, described in a pair of papers published in the journals eLife and Nature Communications, are a key step toward recreating the entire cell division machinery and c

12h

Scientists provide novel strategies for parasitic weed control

Parasitic weeds are among the world's most economically damaging agricultural pests. They use an organ called the haustorium to build connections with host plants and draw nutrients from them.

12h

Australia's fire-driven storms are pumping smoke into the stratosphere

Thunderstorms generated by the Australian bushfires are very likely to have pumped as much smoke into the stratosphere as a volcanic eruption

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Scientists provide novel strategies for parasitic weed control

Parasitic weeds are among the world's most economically damaging agricultural pests. They use an organ called the haustorium to build connections with host plants and draw nutrients from them.

12h

Deforestation in Brazil's Amazon up 85 percent in 2019

Deforestation in the Amazon rainforest in northern Brazil soared 85 percent in 2019, compared with the previous year, official data showed Tuesday.

12h

Experts seek answers behind constant quakes in Puerto Rico

Seismologists in southern Puerto Rico gingerly walked around a patch of dirt that marks the location of recently buried sensors they hope will reveal answers behind the constant and unusual shaking in the region that has terrified residents.

12h

Slagelse får professor i neurologiske sygdomme

Nasrin Asgari er udnævnt til klinisk professor ved Slagelse Sygehus og Syddansk Universitet.

12h

Ny process skräddarsyr paketering av genmedicin

Neuroforskare i Lund har utvecklat en ny högteknologisk process för att skräddarsy virushöljen, för transport av genmedicin som ska nå exakt den celltyp i kroppen som behöver behandlas.

13h

Researchers facing 'shocking' levels of stress, survey reveals

Nearly two thirds of those who took part had witnessed bullying or harassment Overwhelming work pressure, discrimination, and widespread bullying and harassment are contributing to "shocking" levels of stress and mental health problems among scientists, according to a major survey into research culture. Nearly two thirds of scientists who took part had witnessed bullying or harassment, with many

14h

Värmerekord i världshaven – och uppvärmingen accelererar

När vi pratar om global uppvärmning menar vi oftast att temperaturen ökar på land och i atmosfären. Men mer än 90 procent av uppvärmningen sedan 1970 har ägt rum i havet, och därför är havstemperaturen den säkraste mätaren av klimatkrisen globalt. Det säger kinesiska och amerikanska forskare bakom en stor forskningsstudie med data från hela världen. De senaste tio åren har varit de varmaste som up

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The Endorsement Iran's Protesters Didn't Want

Last weekend, Donald Trump offered Iran some sage, if obvious, advice: Do not kill your protesters. The warning came amid ongoing demonstrations in Iran following the country's admission that it had mistakenly struck down a Ukrainian airliner, killing all 176 people on board, including 83 Iranian nationals. The announcement followed days of denial and obfuscation by Iranian authorities. Anger abo

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Ingen regulering af elbilbatterier: Beredskab indfører nu egne regler

PLUS. Ild i elbilbatterier giver brandfolk nye udfordringer. Lovgivning følger ikke med, og beredskab indfører derfor særlige sikkerhedsforanstaltninger.

15h

Unge vælgere sikrede rekordhøj stemmeprocent ved 2019 EP-valg

Den internationale klima-debat og den træge Brexit-proces var med til at trække stemmeprocenten…

15h

It's 2020: Time to teach teens 'safe' sexting

Telling youth not to 'sext' doesn't seem to be reducing the prevalence of them sharing nude photos or videos. A national sample of about 5,000 youth ages 12 to 17 showed 14 percent had sent and 23 percent had received sexually explicit images. Researchers say it's time to teach teens 'safe' sexting and provide important tips to avoid significant and long-term consequences, such as humiliation, ext

15h

Reconnecting with nature key for sustainability

People who live in more built up areas and spend less free-time in nature are also less likely to take actions that benefit the environment, such as recycling, buying eco-friendly products, and environmental volunteering.

15h

Sticky situation inside blood vessels can worsen stroke damage

A stroke appears to create a sticky situation inside the blood vessels of the brain that can worsen damage days, even months later, scientists report.

15h

Are sinking soils in the Everglades related to climate change?

Soils releasing carbon as gas lead to challenges on valuable farmland

15h

American cancer survivors face substantial financial hardship and financial sacrifices

American cancer survivors, particularly those 64 years or younger, faced substantial medical financial hardship and sacrifices in spending, savings, or living situation, according to data from a survey.

15h

Be wary of online probiotic health-benefit claims

A new study cautions that while Google is adept at sorting the most reliable websites to the top of the list, most websites providing information on probiotics are from unreliable commercial sources. The public should be wary of searching for probiotic information online as the majority of webpages originate from unreliable sources and health-benefit claims are often not supported by robust scient

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America's Great Divide, Part 1 (full film) | FRONTLINE

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Sådan fandt tre unge danskere verdensomspændende sikkerhedshul i routere: »Hvis vi kan verificere det her, så skal der øl på bordet!«

200 millioner routere er påvirket i EU alene, heraf er op mod 800.000 danske. Version2 har talt med de danske sikkerhedsfolk, der fandt sårbarheden.

16h

Warren's New Electability Argument

Throughout her campaign, Senator Elizabeth Warren has largely sidestepped the question of sexism. It's a lose-lose situation: Women candidates don't want to seem whiny, but they also don't want to look weak if they're insulted or discriminated against because of their gender. When CNN reported on Monday that Bernie Sanders told her in 2018 that a woman could not be elected president, Warren seeme

16h

The Vote That Bernie Sanders Keeps Talking About

In 2008, Barack Obama won the Democratic presidential nomination arguably based on a single policy position that distinguished him from his chief rival: his opposition to the U.S.-led war in Iraq from its outset. Twelve years later, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont could conceivably capture the party's nomination because of that same stance on that same war. At tonight's Democratic debate, in Io

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Birmingham car ban: How would the scheme work?

A scheme to stop cars travelling across the city has been proposed, but how would it actually work?

18h

HS2 could threaten irreplaceable natural habitats, report warns

Wildlife group says rare species could be wiped out by rail link and calls for a "greener" approach.

18h

Further wet-taro evidence from Polynesia's southernmost Neolithic production margins [Letters (Online Only)]

For Prebble et al. (1), the cultivation of introduced semiaquatic tropical taro (Colocasia esculenta) on cooler southern Pacific islands during the Polynesian "initial colonization period" (ICP) (1200 to 1500 CE) represents a "striking" Neolithic example of nonoptimal, marginal crop production. In that respect, ICP taro pollen from Ahuahu, a warm-temperate,…

19h

How dangerous is China's latest viral outbreak?

Questions raised over severity of incidences of coronavirus follow flaws in handling of Sars

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Senators Propose $1B to Outpace Huawei in 5G. That's Small Change

The plan calls for federal subsidies for R&D in next-generation wireless, but the sums pale compared with existing investments.

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COP26: Climate summit may cost 'several hundred million pounds'

The UK government shows "lack of clarity" on funding the COP26 conference in Glasgow this year.

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Cardiff congestion: £2 charge plan to cut city traffic

Cardiff could join London and Durham and charge city centre drivers to meet clean air targets.

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Antibiotics often sold without prescription in retail pharmacies in China

It is easy to obtain antibiotics without prescription in retail pharmacies in China, even though selling antibiotics without a prescription conflicts with regulations, a study published in the open-access journal Antimicrobial Resistance & Infection Control suggests. More work needs to be done to ensure that antibiotics are obtainable by subscription only, according to researchers at Zhejiang Univ

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: Getting Out the (Latino) Vote

It's Tuesday, January 14. In today's newsletter: The final Democratic debate before Iowa will be an all-white, six-person affair (one billionaire included). Plus: Are Democrats overlooking what may be the largest minority voting bloc of 2020? * « TODAY IN POLITICS » Jose De Jesus Esparza Morales ​and Ivan Vargas canvass for the Latino activist network Mi​jente in Georgia during the 2018 midterm e

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