Search Posts

nyheder2020januar16

The mysterious, legendary giant squid's genome is revealed

How did the monstrous giant squid—reaching school-bus size, with eyes as big as dinner plates and tentacles that can snatch prey 10 yards away—get so scarily big?

6h

Rekordlav CO2-udledning fra danskernes elforbrug i 2019

Mindre kul og mere vindkraft har sænket CO2-udledningen pr. kWh til blot 150 gram i 2019. Det er markant lavere end 2018, hvor en gennemsnitlig kWh udledte 199 gram CO2.

1h

Correlative three-dimensional super-resolution and block-face electron microscopy of whole vitreously frozen cells

Within cells, the spatial compartmentalization of thousands of distinct proteins serves a multitude of diverse biochemical needs. Correlative super-resolution (SR) fluorescence and electron microscopy (EM) can elucidate protein spatial relationships to global ultrastructure, but has suffered from tradeoffs of structure preservation, fluorescence retention, resolution, and field of view. We develo

3h

Billions of quantum entangled electrons found in 'strange metal'

Physicists have observed quantum entanglement among 'billions of billions' of flowing electrons in a quantum critical material. The research provides the strongest direct evidence to date of entanglement's role in bringing about quantum criticality.

2h

Ny aftale: Sidste tyske kulkraftværk lukker i 2038

Den tyske regering er blevet enig med landets fire kulproducerende delstater om en milliarddyr kompensationsordning, der skal gøre det muligt at lukke landets kulkraftværker.

7h

At-home brew kits that let you make your own beer

DIY brew kits. (Adam Wilson via Unsplash/) If you're one of those people who keeps telling themselves they're going to start brewing their own beer, now is the time to start. Brewing at home can be a complex process, so finding the right kit and accessories is so essential, especially for beginners. We've compiled a list of great starter kits for the newbie and accessories for the at-home brew ex

5min

New York Public Library's 10 most checked-out books of all time

New York Public library is celebrating its 125th birthday in 2020. With over 90 locations across New York City's boroughs, it is the nation's largest public library system. Based on circulation data, popularity, trends, and other criteria dating back to 1895, these books are considered the library's most checked-out titles of all time. "The Snowy Day" by Ezra Jack Keats was checked out 485,583 ti

19min

This Sci-Fi-Inspired Device Could Replace Bulky, Expensive X-Ray Machines

We're still a long way from Star Trek -style tricorders that can instantly diagnose disease, but medical startup Nanox is hoping to bring a little of the 24th century to a hospital near you. The company has unveiled a new low-cost X-ray scanner called the Nanox.Arc. It hopes to deploy 15,000 units in the coming years, with the aim of making medical scans more available and affordable. Nanox was f

36min

ISSCR statement on ethical standards for stem cell-based embryo models

The ISSCR is updating its Guidelines to respond to recent scientific advances that include the use of pluripotent stem cell (PSC) to create models of early human embryo development (see Stem Cell Reports 14:1-6). As the science continues to advance, it raises important scientific, clinical, ethical, and societal issues for researchers, regulators, and funding agencies. The ISSCR believes the scien

44min

Atomic-bomb carbon unmasks fraudulent luxury whisky

Nature, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00121-5 Carbon-14 dating reveals that an 'antique' Scotch is roughly 150 years younger than claimed.

45min

This Developer Wants to Pack Renters Into Tiny Underground Pods

Living Small The average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco is $3,600 per month , almost a full $1,000 higher than the next most expensive city in the United States. Now, a Kansas-based housing developer has come up with a plan to bring affordable housing to San Francisco — and it involves packing people into underground sleeping pods barely larger than a king-size mattress. Really

51min

Michio Kaku: 5 fascinating moments from this 1991 interview

Michio Kaku is a theoretical physicist and renowned science communicator. In 1991, he sat down for an hour-long interview in which he discussed climate change, nuclear weapons, human evolution, and more. Kaku is a regular contributor to Big Think. None Dr. Michio Kaku is one of the world's most beloved science communicators, having helped millions of people better understand the nature of the uni

1h

Scientists Made a Drone Fly Better Using Real Pigeon Feathers

PigeonBot Researchers at Stanford University have built a drone called PigeonBot, with wings coated in real pigeon feathers. And it flies so deftly, New Scientist reports , that it could change the way aircraft are built in the future. "We let go of the idea that you have to control every degree of freedom and I think future aircraft will benefit from this finding," David Lentink, lead author of

1h

UTSW researchers uncover new vulnerability in kidney cancer

Qing Zhang, Ph.D., and his colleagues identified a possible way to treat tumors while sparing nearby healthy tissue.

1h

Edible 'security tag' to protect drugs from counterfeit

Researchers are aiming to stump drug counterfeiters with an edible 'security tag' embedded into medicine. To imitate the drug, a counterfeiter would have to uncrack a complicated puzzle of patterns not fully visible to the naked eye.

1h

Mix of stress and air pollution may lead to cognitive difficulties in children

Children with elevated exposure to early life stress in the home and elevated prenatal exposure to air pollution exhibited heightened symptoms of attention and thought problems, according to researchers. Early life stress is common in youth from disadvantaged backgrounds who also often live in areas with greater exposure to air pollution.

1h

Helping patients prep mind and body for surgery pays off

An inexpensive program to help surgery patients get physically and mentally ready for their upcoming operation may help reduce overall costs and get them home faster, according to new research involving hundreds of patients in 21 hospitals.

1h

Classic international games to add to your collection

There's so much more than Monopoly. (DepositPhotos/) Games are an excellent way to reinforce and work through social dynamics. Hands-on, interactive games are also just a fun way to pass the time, and a unique way to bond with friends and family. Below, a selection of classic games from around the world. A French classic that puts bean toss to shame. (Amazon /) This popular lawn game is similar t

1h

Estrogen may facilitate the growth of liver metastases in non-sex-specific cancers

A study led by Dr. Pnina Brodt shows that the liver immune microenvironment reacts to metastatic cells differently in male and that in female mice and estrogen can indirectly contribute to the growth of metastases. These findings provide a rationale for further exploration of the role of sex hormones in female cancer patients and the potential benefits of anti-estrogen drugs such as tamoxifen in t

1h

New hospital-based data contradicts HUD estimates on homelessness

Illinois hospital visits associated with homelessness have tripled since 2011 and conservative estimates of homelessness using hospital-based data exceeded similar estimates from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, or HUD.

1h

Judges deny abortion care to teens

Thirty-seven states require minors to either notify their parents or go before a judge before having an abortion. New research shows as many 13% are denied in court.

1h

Meet your new hobby: model airplane kits

Take to the skies. (DepositPhotos/) The notion of flying has captivated humankind for centuries. An excavation of burial grounds in Saqqara, Egypt in 1898 turned up a wooden artifact dated around 200 BCE that strikingly resembles, among other things, an early model airplane. Modern airplane models are a great way to exercise patience, hone your tactical building skills, and are a fun way to pass

1h

Immunology Leader Vincenzo Cerundolo Dies

The Oxford researcher's work on lipid and peptide antigens revealed key mechanisms in inflammation, immunotherapy, and vaccination, which are being pursued in clinical trial treatments.

1h

A path to security for the world's deadliest countries | Rachel Kleinfeld

You are more likely to die violently if you live in a middle-income democracy with high levels of inequality and political polarization than if you live in a country at war, says democracy advisor Rachel Kleinfeld. This historical shift in the nature of violence presents an opportunity: because while few people can do much to end war, regular voters can be the greatest force for change in rotten d

1h

Can Wolves Play Fetch? Yes, But Researchers Don't Know Why

Wolf pups retrieved balls for humans in a new study — but questions remain as to why this behavior exists.

1h

Helping patients prep mind and body for surgery pays off, study suggests

An inexpensive program to help surgery patients get physically and mentally ready for their upcoming operation may help reduce overall costs and get them home faster, according to new research involving hundreds of patients in 21 hospitals.

1h

Mix of stress and air pollution may lead to cognitive difficulties in children

Children with elevated exposure to early life stress in the home and elevated prenatal exposure to air pollution exhibited heightened symptoms of attention and thought problems, according to researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and Columbia Psychiatry. Early life stress is common in youth from disadvantaged backgrounds who also often live in areas with greater exposur

1h

Department of Energy moves carefully on assessing foreign research collaborations

DOE isn't yet applying its "risk matrix" for sensitive technologies

1h

Edible 'security tag' to protect drugs from counterfeit

Purdue University researchers are aiming to stump drug counterfeiters with an edible 'security tag' embedded into medicine. To imitate the drug, a counterfeiter would have to uncrack a complicated puzzle of patterns not fully visible to the naked eye.

2h

There's a bizarre group of shapeshifting objects at the center of the Milky Way

At least six unidentified orbiting objects swing around the galaxy's central black hole. ( Anna Ciurlo, Tuan Do/UCLA Galactic Center Group/) In 2012, black hole spectators thought they had hit the jackpot: a gas cloud, dubbed G2, was swinging into a potential danger zone at the Milky Way's core. For two years, astronomers watched with bated breath as G2 sped closer to the galaxy's central black h

2h

Spotify will now create playlists for your pet

Spotify has just announced a free playlist-creation site for pets. Research suggests that animals have their own music preferences. Hedgehogs possibly don't get enough respect. None Dear Spotify, I am a hedgehog and a regular listener when my human plays Spotify as she works. I would like to point out the bias in your new pet playlist feature. Why are there no playlists for hedgehogs? Hedgehogs r

2h

Microsoft will invest $1 billion into carbon reduction and removal technologies

The software giant plans to offset all the emissions it produced since 1975.

2h

Australia had plans to prevent fire blackouts. They just weren't ready in time.

Bushfires have shown how vulnerable modern infrastructure can be—but there are projects underway to boost isolated communities when power and communications fall down.

2h

2019 – näst varmaste året som uppmätts

Förra året är det näst varmaste som hittills uppmätts i världen – och det allra varmaste i Europa. Det fastslår nu Världsmeteorologiska organisationen WMO efter att ha granskat alla temperaturdata. – Vi kan se att det är dags att hissa varningsflaggan, säger Omar Baddour, forskare på WMO.

2h

2020 Hyundai Venue Subcompact SUV Review: Good Car, Inexpensive

The Hyundai Venue may be the simplest-to-describe new car of 2020. It is a two-row SUV with impeccable fit and finish, an engine and acceleration that help you avoid traffic tickets, virtually all the driver assists you want, and a price that lets you buy new rather than used. There are not many cars available for less than $20,000 with an 8-inch color LCD standard and Android Auto / Apple CarPla

2h

Large hippocampus, better memory? Not necessarily

Having a larger hippocampus doesn't always reliably predict learning and memory abilities in older adults, research finds. It's normal for the hippocampus—a curved, seahorse-shaped structure embedded deep in the brain—to shrink as we age, but it's much more pronounced in people with mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease . Scientists long believed that a bigger hippocampus meant a bette

2h

Wine stoppers to make your best bottles last longer

Cheers! (Matthieu Joannon via Unsplash/) So you bought yourself a pricey bottle of wine as a midweek pick me up, then realized after one glass that you're immediately ready for bed. Don't let that bottle go to waste—after you open a bottle of wine, it gets exposed to oxygen, which will flatten its fresh flavors and aromatics and turn your treat into a disappointment. While sticking the original c

2h

Tardigrades' kryptonite? Climate change.

Tardigrades, also known as water bears, are microscopic creatures best known for their ability to withstand a variety of extreme conditions, such as high heat, extreme cold, high pressure, and even the vacuum of space. However, new research shows that the famously durable creatures aren't so robust against the long-term heat of climate change. The findings underscore how fundamentally humans have

2h

Exploring the Solar System Anew at the Hayden Planetarium

The American Museum of Natural History's first new space show since 2013 is a head-spinning adventure that makes a statement about the fragility of Earth.

2h

How Hard Is It to Quit Coal? For Germany, 18 Years and $44 Billion

The 18-year time frame shows how costly and politically complicated it is to leave the world's dirtiest fossil fuel in the ground.

2h

Billions of quantum entangled electrons found in 'strange metal'

Physicists have observed quantum entanglement among 'billions of billions' of flowing electrons in a quantum critical material. The research provides the strongest direct evidence to date of entanglement's role in bringing about quantum criticality.

2h

AOC Warns That Facial Recognition Is "Real-Life 'Black Mirror'"

Dark Times On Wednesday, the United States House Oversight and Reform Committee held a hearing on facial recognition technology. During it, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez closed her remarks by comparing the tech to a dystopian sci-fi series . "This is some real-life 'Black Mirror' stuff that we're seeing here," she said. "And I think it's really important that everyone really understand what's hap

2h

In death of dinosaurs, it was all about the asteroid — not volcanoes

Volcanic activity did not play a direct role in the mass extinction event that killed the dinosaurs, according to an international team of researchers. It was all about the asteroid.

2h

'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Birdlike Flight

Birds change the shape of their wings far more than planes. The complexities of bird flight have posed a major design challenge for scientists trying to translate the way birds fly into robots. (Image credit: Lentink Lab/Stanford University)

2h

Delightful drink coasters that protect your furniture and show off your sense of style

No more coffee rings. (Amazon/) The first coasters were designed for decanters or wine bottles so that they could be slid—or, you know, coasted —around the table even after the servants had retired. In 1880, the Germans invented the beer mat, made out of wood pulp, in order to save the tables from the wear caused by condensation from beer bottles. Today, thanks to the boundless imagination of hum

2h

What's the temperature of dark matter?

Physicists are taking the temperature of dark matter, the mysterious substance that makes up about a quarter of our universe. We have very little idea of what dark matter is, and physicists have yet to detect a dark matter particle. But we do know that the gravity of clumps of dark matter can distort light from distant objects. Chris Fassnacht, a physics professor at the University of California,

2h

Brain imaging may improve diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders

Brain imaging may one day be used to help diagnose mental health disorders–including depression and anxiety–with greater accuracy, according to a new study conducted in a large sample of youth at the University of Pennsylvania and led by Antonia Kaczkurkin, PhD and Theodore Satterthwaite, MD.

2h

New study identifies potential path forward for brachial plexus injury recovery

The study has identified a strategy that may support the regeneration of nerves affected by the injury.

2h

Older undiagnosed sleep apnea patients need more medical care

Older adults with undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea seek more health care, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. The study examined the impact of untreated sleep apnea on health care utilization and costs among Medicare beneficiaries.

2h

2h

20,000 Apply to Be Billionaire's Girlfriend, Get Free Moon Trip

Ready to Mingle Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa is single and ready to mingle — and he evidently hates traveling alone. Over 20,000 people have offered to become Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa's romantic companion on his trip around the Moon, Reuters reports . Travel Companion In September 2018, SpaceX announced that Maezawa would be a passenger on the company's commercial Starship rocke

2h

A secreted signature of aging cells

Senescent cells undergo an irreversible and permanent arrest of cell division and are hallmarks of both the aging process and multiple chronic diseases. Senescent cells — and more importantly the factors they secrete, known collectively as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) — are widely accepted as drivers of aging and multiple age-related diseases.

2h

Efficacy of drugs against pork tapeworm

Taenia solium — also called pork tapeworm — is a parasite which causes disease around the world, particularly in very poor communities with deficient sanitation and where pigs roam free. Researchers have now analyzed the efficacy and adverse effects of three chemotherapeutics against T. solium.

2h

New model shows how crop rotation helps combat plant pests

A new computational model shows how different patterns of crop rotation — planting different crops at different times in the same field — can impact long-term yield when the crops are threatened by plant pathogens.

2h

Mosquitoes engineered to repel dengue virus

Scientists have synthetically engineered mosquitoes that halt the transmission of the dengue virus. Biologists developed a human antibody for dengue suppression in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the insects that spread dengue. The development marks the first engineered approach in mosquitoes that targets the four known types of dengue, improving upon previous designs that addressed single strains.

2h

Improved brain chip for precision medicine

A biomedical research team is reporting an improvement on a microfluidic brain cancer chip. The new chip allows quick assessment of the effectiveness of cancer drugs on brain tumors.

2h

Cybercriminals gang up to pull off a job, then disband

New research identifies common attributes of cybercrime networks, revealing how these groups function and work together to cause an estimated $445-600 billion of harm globally per year. "It's not the 'Tony Soprano mob boss type' who's ordering cybercrime against financial institutions," says coauthor Thomas Holt, professor of criminal justice at Michigan State University. "Certainly, there are di

3h

Microsoft says it will cut emissions to be carbon negative by 2030

Microsoft says that by 2030 it will remove more carbon from the environment than it emits, and by 2050 it plans to offset all emissions the firm has made since 1975

3h

A robot equipped with real pigeon feathers flies like a living bird

Pigeons feathers are remarkably complex and understanding how they work has led to the first robot that flies like a pigeon, dubbed PigeonBot

3h

AI suggests Earth has had fewer mass extinctions than we thought

The late Devonian mass extinction around 375 million years ago may not have really happened, according to an analysis using machine learning

3h

How to get ahead in work and life, according to a dominatrix

Professional dominatrixes develop an intuitive understanding of the human psyche at its most revealing. The techniques pro-dommes use to control their clients can be translated to other endeavors, especially finances and work. Studying the principles of these techniques can help anyone improve a craft or skill. None Ask someone to describe a "dominatrix." Chances are, they'll conjure an image of

3h

3h

3h

3h

Microsoft: carbon negative by 2030 and remove historical carbon by 2050

submitted by /u/derekantrican [link] [comments]

3h

3h

3h

Here's how just four satellites could provide worldwide internet

A group of engineers thinks it's found a cheaper way to use high-altitude satellites to deliver global coverage.

3h

Can Gut Bacteria Pass Diseases Like Alzheimer's and Diabetes Among People? A Theory Says It Might Be Possible

If microbes influence our health, and if we share bacteria with the people around us, then we might be influencing whether or not they get Type II diabetes, heart disease or other conditions.

3h

With Help from Pigeon Feathers, This Robot Takes to the Sky

The PigeonBot could help improve wing design, and may advance understanding of avian evolution.

3h

Study finds billions of quantum entangled electrons in 'strange metal'

US and Austrian physicists have observed quantum entanglement among 'billions of billions' of flowing electrons in a quantum critical material. The research appears this week in Science and provides the strongest direct evidence to date of entanglement's role in bringing about quantum criticality.

3h

Improved brain chip for precision medicine

The Akay Lab biomedical research team at the University of Houston is reporting an improvement on a microfluidic brain cancer chip previously developed in their lab. The new chip allows quick assessment of the effectiveness of cancer drugs on brain tumors.

3h

A secreted signature of aging cells

Senescent cells undergo an irreversible and permanent arrest of cell division and are hallmarks of both the aging process and multiple chronic diseases. Senescent cells — and more importantly the factors they secrete, known collectively as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) — are widely accepted as drivers of aging and multiple age-related diseases.

3h

Low doses of radiation used in medical imaging lead to mutations in cell cultures

Common medical imaging procedures use low doses of radiation that are believed to be safe. A new study, however, finds that in human cell cultures, these doses create breaks that allow extra bits of DNA to integrate into the chromosome. Roland Kanaar and Alex Zelensky of Erasmus University Medical Center and Oncode Institute and colleagues report these new findings in a study published 16th Januar

3h

A new look at 'strange metals'

'Strange metals' could be the key to finally understanding high-temperature superconductors. After years of research, scientists have now found a way to analyze these materials, answering important questions in materials science.

3h

Breakthrough on curbing dengue

Scientists from Australia's national science agency, CSIRO, and the University of California San Diego have engineered the first breed of genetically modified mosquitoes resistant to spreading all four types of the dengue virus.

3h

Engineered mosquitoes cannot be infected with or transmit any dengue virus

Genetically engineered mosquitoes are resistant to multiple types of dengue virus (DENV), according to a study published Jan. 16 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Prasad Paradkar of the Australian Animal Health Laboratory, and Omar Akbari of the University of California, San Diego, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, this is the first engineered approach that targets all types of D

3h

No clear evidence of increase in adolescent suicide after '13 Reasons Why'

Contrary to the findings of a 2019 study that associated the release of the Netflix series '13 Reasons Why' with an increase in monthly suicide rates among adolescent boys, a reanalysis of the data by the Annenberg Public Policy Center finds no evidence of contagion. The reanalysis, published today in PLOS ONE, found that after controlling for the dramatic increase in adolescent suicide in recent

3h

In death of dinosaurs, it was all about the asteroid — not volcanoes

Volcanic activity did not play a direct role in the mass extinction event that killed the dinosaurs, according to an international, Yale-led team of researchers. It was all about the asteroid.

3h

Mosquitoes engineered to repel dengue virus

An international team of scientists has synthetically engineered mosquitoes that halt the transmission of the dengue virus. Led by biologists at UC San Diego, the researchers developed a human antibody for dengue suppression in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the insects that spread dengue. The development marks the first engineered approach in mosquitoes that targets the four known types of dengue, imp

3h

Asteroid impact killed dinosaurs while volcanism shaped life in the aftermath

Researchers who analyzed well-preserved ocean drilling and global temperature records have added support to the idea that the primary cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) mass extinction was an asteroid impact, rather than extreme volcanism.

3h

Machine learning greatly reduces uncertainty in understanding of paleozoic biodiversity

Previous analyses of global paleobiodiversity have been coarsely resolved to roughly 10 million years, obscuring the effects of ecological processes and events that operate at shorter timescales.

3h

'PigeonBot's' feather-level insights push flying bots closer to mimicking birds

Birds fly in a meticulous manner not yet replicable by human-made machines, though two new studies in Science Robotics and Science — by uncovering more about what gives birds this unparalleled control — pave the way to flying robots that can maneuver the air as nimbly as birds.

3h

New model shows how crop rotation helps combat plant pests

A new computational model shows how different patterns of crop rotation — planting different crops at different times in the same field — can impact long-term yield when the crops are threatened by plant pathogens. Maria Bargués-Ribera and Chaitanya Gokhale of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Germany present the model in PLOS Computational Biology.

3h

Stage is set to develop clinically relevant, senescence-based biomarkers of aging

Biomarkers are essential in order to develop clinically-approved interventions for human aging and age-related diseases. We live too long to wait for results to be validated in traditional methods. The stage is now set to develop senescence-based biomarkers of aging. Senescent cells are long-recognized drivers of multiple diseases of aging. The Proteomic Atlas of Senescence-Associated Secretomes,

3h

Mobile protected areas needed to protect biodiversity in the high seas

As the United Nations rewrites the laws of the high seas, the new document should anticipate emerging technologies that allow protected areas to move as animals migrate or adapt to climate change.

3h

Microscopy technique reveals cells’ 3D ultrastructure in new detail

The method melds the best of super-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy to show how proteins relate to cells’ ultrastructure.

3h

Researchers investigate molecule, VISTA, which keeps immune system quiet against cancer

Researchers led by Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center are studying a valuable target in regulating the immune response in cancer and autoimmunity. VISTA is a tempering molecule that hinders T cells in the immune system from activating against self-antigens such as cancer cells. Their new publication describes how VISTA controls T-cell responses.

3h

Do studies underestimate the prevalence of typhoid?

Blood culture surveillance programs are critical for estimating the prevalence of typhoid and paratyphoid fevers, but cases can be missed when patients don't seek medical care, or seek medical care and don't have a blood culture test. Researchers writing in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now calculated inflation factors that can be used to adjust these incidence rates to account for under-d

3h

Study gauges efficacy of drugs against pork tapeworm

Taenia solium — also called pork tapeworm — is a parasite which causes disease around the world, particularly in very poor communities with deficient sanitation and where pigs roam free. Researchers have now analyzed the efficacy and adverse effects of three chemotherapeutics against T. solium and report their results in a review published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

3h

Even Ultra-Tough Water Bears May Be Vulnerable to Climate Change

Tardigrades are known for their ability to survive extreme temperatures. But new research suggests they might be more sensitive than previously thought.

3h

3h

Meteorite or Volcano? New Clues to the Dinosaurs' Demise

Twin calamities marked the end of the Cretaceous period, and scientists are presenting new evidence of which drove one of Earth's great extinctions.

3h

Microscopy technique reveals cells' 3-D ultrastructure in new detail

Inside a cell, tentacled vesicles shuttle cargo for sorting. DNA rearranges in the nucleus as stem cells differentiate into neurons. Neighboring neurons cling to one another through a web-like interface. And a new microscopy technique shows it all, in exquisite detail.

3h

In death of dinosaurs, it was all about the asteroid—not volcanoes

Volcanic activity did not play a direct role in the mass extinction event that killed the dinosaurs, according to an international, Yale-led team of researchers. It was all about the asteroid.

3h

Study finds billions of quantum entangled electrons in 'strange metal'

In a new study, U.S. and Austrian physicists have observed quantum entanglement among "billions of billions" of flowing electrons in a quantum critical material.

3h

New model shows how crop rotation helps combat plant pests

A new computational model shows how different patterns of crop rotation—planting different crops at different times in the same field—can impact long-term yield when the crops are threatened by plant pathogens. Maria Bargués-Ribera and Chaitanya Gokhale of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Germany present the model in PLOS Computational Biology.

3h

Mobile protected areas needed to protect biodiversity in the high seas

World leaders are currently updating the laws for international waters that apply to most of the world's ocean environment. This provides a unique opportunity, marine scientists argue this week, to introduce new techniques that allow protected zones to shift as species move under climate change.

3h

Genetically engineered mosquitoes resist spreading any form of dengue

Equipping mosquitoes with an antidengue antibody could someday protect millions of people from dreaded virus

3h

The PigeonBot flies like a bird but won't poop like one

The PigeonBot is a combination of the biological and artificial. (Lentink Lab / Stanford University /) Pigeons are so ubiquitous, they've earned the urban nickname of "rats with wings." But they do have at least one thing going for them: They're strong, muscular fliers, naturally suited to handling the gusty winds that blow between buildings. And now engineers are turning to the species for resea

3h

Experts Don't Know Why Boeing 777 Doused Children With Jet Fuel

On Tuesday, a Boeing 777 dumped jet fuel on at least 60 people — including 20 children — just prior to making an emergency landing in Los Angeles. While dumping fuel isn't entirely unheard of, the Delta pilots' decision to do so over a populated area and from an elevation of just 2,300 feet has left experts baffled. "I'm just puzzled why these folks decided to do it this way," Ross Aimer, a retir

3h

New model shows how crop rotation helps combat plant pests

A new computational model shows how different patterns of crop rotation—planting different crops at different times in the same field—can impact long-term yield when the crops are threatened by plant pathogens. Maria Bargués-Ribera and Chaitanya Gokhale of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Germany present the model in PLOS Computational Biology.

3h

Mobile protected areas needed to protect biodiversity in the high seas

World leaders are currently updating the laws for international waters that apply to most of the world's ocean environment. This provides a unique opportunity, marine scientists argue this week, to introduce new techniques that allow protected zones to shift as species move under climate change.

3h

Microscopy technique reveals cells' 3-D ultrastructure in new detail

Inside a cell, tentacled vesicles shuttle cargo for sorting. DNA rearranges in the nucleus as stem cells differentiate into neurons. Neighboring neurons cling to one another through a web-like interface. And a new microscopy technique shows it all, in exquisite detail.

3h

The carbon footprint of dinner: How 'green' are fish sticks?

Fish sticks may be a tasty option for dinner, but are they good for the planet?

3h

How anti-sprawl policies may be harming water quality

Urban growth boundaries are created by governments in an effort to concentrate urban development—buildings, roads and the utilities that support them—within a defined area. These boundaries are intended to decrease negative impacts on people and the environment. However, according to a Penn State researcher, policies that aim to reduce urban sprawl may be increasing water pollution.

3h

NASA catches the dissipation of Tropical Cyclone Claudia

Tropical Cyclone Claudia was dissipating in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of storm as it flew overhead in its orbit around the Earth.

3h

What really killed the dinosaurs?

Lingering doubts about the cause of a mass extinction are put to rest

3h

Robot pigeon promises new generation of flying machines

US team mixes mechanics and feathers to produce a prototype for avian-inspired aviation.

3h

What can oceans tell us about the end of the dinosaurs?

An asteroid did do the deed, study suggests, then volcanism shaped life in its aftermath.

3h

More strange things lurking near Sagittarius A*

Discoveries expand the G objects class from two to six.

3h

Crabs compromise to avoid competition

Hermit crab species co-exist by living in different shaped shells.

3h

Hot end to our hottest decade

WMO confirms what we probably all knew.

3h

So that's what comes out in the wash

Decisions in the laundry can keep microfibres out of the ocean, study finds.

3h

Supercomputer scours fossil record for Earth's hidden extinctions

Nature, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00117-1 Palaeontologists have charted 300 million years of Earth's history in breathtaking detail.

3h

Træt af reklamer, der forfølger dig? Sådan undgår du nogle af dem

Tech-virksomheder er verdensmestre i at samle data om dig. Men du kan begrænse deres snageri.

3h

Every Place Is the Same Now

Those old enough to remember video-rental stores will recall the crippling indecision that would overtake you while browsing their shelves. With so many options, any one seemed unappealing, or insufficient. In a group, different tastes or momentary preferences felt impossible to balance. Everything was there, so there was nothing to watch. Those days are over, but the shilly-shally of choosing a

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

How anti-sprawl policies may be harming water quality

Urban growth boundaries are created by governments in an effort to concentrate urban development — buildings, roads and the utilities that support them — within a defined area. These boundaries are intended to decrease negative impacts on people and the environment. However, according to a researcher, policies that aim to reduce urban sprawl may be increasing water pollution.

3h

The carbon footprint of dinner: How 'green' are fish sticks?

Fish sticks may be a tasty option for dinner, but are they good for the planet? A new study of the climate impacts of seafood products reveals that the processing of Alaskan pollock into fish sticks, imitation crab, and fish fillets generates significant greenhouse gas emissions.

3h

Active babies may have lower obesity risk later

Less active babies may accumulate more fat, which in turn may put them at risk for obesity later in life, a new study shows. Researchers tracked the physical activity levels of 506 infants using small ankle-worn accelerometers for four days per tracking period at ages 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. For each tracking period after 3 months, average physical activity increased by about 4%, in line with inf

3h

3h

News at a glance

[no content]

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

Transparency on trial

[no content]

3h

Gaming the system

[no content]

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

The legacy of logging

[no content]

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

On impact and volcanism across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary

The cause of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction is vigorously debated, owing to the occurrence of a very large bolide impact and flood basalt volcanism near the boundary. Disentangling their relative importance is complicated by uncertainty regarding kill mechanisms and the relative timing of volcanogenic outgassing, impact, and extinction. We used carbon cycle modeling and paleotemperature recor

3h

A high-resolution summary of Cambrian to Early Triassic marine invertebrate biodiversity

One great challenge in understanding the history of life is resolving the influence of environmental change on biodiversity. Simulated annealing and genetic algorithms were used to synthesize data from 11,000 marine fossil species, collected from more than 3000 stratigraphic sections, to generate a new Cambrian to Triassic biodiversity curve with an imputed temporal resolution of 26 ± 14.9 thousa

3h

Decay of the coronal magnetic field can release sufficient energy to power a solar flare

Solar flares are powered by a rapid release of energy in the solar corona, thought to be produced by the decay of the coronal magnetic field strength. Direct quantitative measurements of the evolving magnetic field strength are required to test this. We report microwave observations of a solar flare, showing spatial and temporal changes in the coronal magnetic field. The field decays at a rate of

3h

Nitromethane as a nitrogen donor in Schmidt-type formation of amides and nitriles

The Schmidt reaction has been an efficient and widely used synthetic approach to amides and nitriles since its discovery in 1923. However, its application often entails the use of volatile, potentially explosive, and highly toxic azide reagents. Here, we report a sequence whereby triflic anhydride and formic and acetic acids activate the bulk chemical nitromethane to serve as a nitrogen donor in

3h

Singular charge fluctuations at a magnetic quantum critical point

Strange metal behavior is ubiquitous in correlated materials, ranging from cuprate superconductors to bilayer graphene, and may arise from physics beyond the quantum fluctuations of a Landau order parameter. In quantum-critical heavy-fermion antiferromagnets, such physics may be realized as critical Kondo entanglement of spin and charge and probed with optical conductivity. We present terahertz t

3h

Subwavelength dielectric resonators for nonlinear nanophotonics

Subwavelength optical resonators made of high-index dielectric materials provide efficient ways to manipulate light at the nanoscale through mode interferences and enhancement of both electric and magnetic fields. Such Mie-resonant dielectric structures have low absorption, and their functionalities are limited predominantly by radiative losses. We implement a new physical mechanism for suppressi

3h

How flight feathers stick together to form a continuous morphing wing

Variable feather overlap enables birds to morph their wings, unlike aircraft. They accomplish this feat by means of elastic compliance of connective tissue, which passively redistributes the overlapping flight feathers when the skeleton moves to morph the wing planform. Distinctive microstructures form "directional Velcro," such that when adjacent feathers slide apart during extension, thousands

3h

Stormy water on Mars: The distribution and saturation of atmospheric water during the dusty season

The loss of water from Mars to space is thought to result from the transport of water to the upper atmosphere, where it is dissociated to hydrogen and escapes the planet. Recent observations have suggested large, rapid seasonal intrusions of water into the upper atmosphere, boosting the hydrogen abundance. We use the Atmospheric Chemistry Suite on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter to characterize the

3h

Lipid-gated monovalent ion fluxes regulate endocytic traffic and support immune surveillance

Despite ongoing (macro)pinocytosis of extracellular fluid, the volume of the endocytic pathway remains unchanged. To investigate the underlying mechanism, we used high-resolution video imaging to analyze the fate of macropinosomes formed by macrophages in vitro and in situ. Na + , the primary cationic osmolyte internalized, exited endocytic vacuoles via two-pore channels, accompanied by parallel

3h

Integrated hearing and chewing modules decoupled in a Cretaceous stem therian mammal

On the basis of multiple skeletal specimens from Liaoning, China, we report a new genus and species of Cretaceous stem therian mammal that displays decoupling of hearing and chewing apparatuses and functions. The auditory bones, including the surangular, have no bone contact with the ossified Meckel's cartilage; the latter is loosely lodged on the medial rear of the dentary. This configuration pr

3h

Phonon hydrodynamics and ultrahigh-room-temperature thermal conductivity in thin graphite

Allotropes of carbon, such as diamond and graphene, are among the best conductors of heat. We monitored the evolution of thermal conductivity in thin graphite as a function of temperature and thickness and found an intimate link between high conductivity, thickness, and phonon hydrodynamics. The room-temperature in-plane thermal conductivity of 8.5-micrometer-thick graphite was 4300 watts per met

3h

Fluorination of arylboronic esters enabled by bismuth redox catalysis

Bismuth catalysis has traditionally relied on the Lewis acidic properties of the element in a fixed oxidation state. In this paper, we report a series of bismuth complexes that can undergo oxidative addition, reductive elimination, and transmetallation in a manner akin to transition metals. Rational ligand optimization featuring a sulfoximine moiety produced an active catalyst for the fluorinatio

3h

New Products

[no content]

3h

3h

Getting personal

[no content]

3h

VISTA is a checkpoint regulator for naïve T cell quiescence and peripheral tolerance

Negative checkpoint regulators (NCRs) temper the T cell immune response to self-antigens and limit the development of autoimmunity. Unlike all other NCRs that are expressed on activated T lymphocytes, V-type immunoglobulin domain-containing suppressor of T cell activation (VISTA) is expressed on naïve T cells. We report an unexpected heterogeneity within the naïve T cell compartment in mice, wh

3h

Quantum spin liquids

Spin liquids are quantum phases of matter with a variety of unusual features arising from their topological character, including "fractionalization"—elementary excitations that behave as fractions of an electron. Although there is not yet universally accepted experimental evidence that establishes that any single material has a spin liquid ground state, in the past few years a number of materials

3h

3h

3h

Researcher: SpaceX Satellite Plans Break US Environmental Law

Ruining the Night Sky Thanks to their relatively low orbit, which makes them extremely bright in the night sky, SpaceX's internet-beaming Starlink satellites are already wreaking havoc on astronomical efforts despite only having launched a few hundred out of a planned 42,000 so far. Ramon Ryan, law student at Vanderbilt University, argues in a yet to be published paper that the Federal Communicat

4h

Sepsis deaths around world 'twice as high as previously thought'

There were 11 million deaths in 2017 – more than from cancer – with children in poorer countries most at risk, study finds Deaths from sepsis around the world are twice as high as previously thought, with babies and small children in poorer countries at greatest risk, a major study has revealed. There were almost 50m sepsis cases worldwide and 11m deaths in 2017, according to US researchers writi

4h

Cozy flannel for almost every occasion (and companion)

Snuggle up with these flannel favorites. ( Max Bender via Unsplash/) Who needs itchy wool, rough twill, or static-filled fleece when you can cover yourself in flannel? Iconic buffalo (red and black) plaid evokes lumberjacks, ski lodges, and '90s grunge all at once, but also is the one of the coziest patterns on the market. Here are some stylish ideas to help you make peace with the cold, whether

4h

Your Chemical Romance

The authors of the new book Love Drugs: The Chemical Future of Relationships really, really want readers to know they have not written a book promoting love potions—drugs that will hypnotize, brainwash, or otherwise ensnare people into being artificially in love (or artificially not in love). Rather, over the course of some 200 pages, the ethicist Brian D. Earp and the philosopher Julian Savulesc

4h

We Can't Afford to Ignore Lev Parnas's Explosive Claims

Irony is thriving in the Trump administration. Consider this: The president spent months, and was ultimately impeached for, badgering the Ukrainian government to announce a probe into the natural-gas company Burisma. Yet all it took was the release of some text messages by Lev Parnas, an accused criminal with a checkered past, for Ukraine to quickly announce it is investigating alleged illegal su

4h

Mac Miller Was Trying to Tell a Survival Story

Mac Miller wanted to change the story. In the summer of 2018, the headlines about the rapper mainly regarded his DUI car crash and his ex Ariana Grande calling her relationship with him "toxic." But on the first track of Swimming , the album he put out in early August of that year, the 26-year-old conveyed a tentative sense of recovery: "I was drowning, but now I'm swimming / Through stressful wa

4h

Astronomers Detect Second Planet Orbiting Nearest Star

Scientists used to wonder how common planets were throughout the universe, and now we know — they're everywhere. Even with our relatively rudimentary methods of detecting exoplanets, we've identified thousands of alien worlds, including some in our own backyard. In 2016, astronomers discovered an exoplanet around Proxima Centauri, the nearest star to the sun. Now, it looks like there might be a s

4h

The volcano erupting in the Philippines could be building up to another explosion

Taal on January 12, 2020. (Exec8 via Wikimedia Commons/) The ongoing eruption event of the second-most active volcano in the Philippines is… complicated. Taal Volcano (pronounced Ta-al) is located about 37 miles south of the country's capital, Manila. On Monday, the volcano became active with a steam-driven or phreatic explosion, and spurted 1,600-foot-tall fountains of lava for about an hour and

4h

'Living fossil' may upend basic tenet of evolutionary theory

A research team has discovered the first conclusive evidence that selection may also occur at the level of the epigenome — a term that refers to an assortment of chemical 'annotations' to the genome that determine whether, when and to what extent genes are activated — and has done so for tens of millions of years.

4h

Bartonella bacteria found in hemangiosarcoma tumors from dogs

Researchers have found a very high prevalence of Bartonella bacteria in tumors and tissues – but not blood samples – taken from dogs with hemangiosarcoma, a cancer of the blood vessels.

4h

Scientists unexpectedly witness wolf puppies play fetch

When it comes to playing a game of fetch, many dogs are naturals. But now, researchers report that the remarkable ability to interpret human social communicative cues that enables a dog to go for a ball and then bring it back also exists in wolves.

4h

The mysterious, legendary giant squid's genome is revealed

Important clues about the anatomy and evolution of the mysterious giant squid (Architeuthis dux) are revealed through publication of its full genome sequence.

4h

The carbon footprint of dinner: How 'green' are fish sticks?

Fish sticks may be a tasty option for dinner, but are they good for the planet? A new study of the climate impacts of seafood products reveals that the processing of Alaskan pollock into fish sticks, imitation crab, and fish fillets generates significant greenhouse gas emissions.

4h

NASA catches the dissipation of Tropical Cyclone Claudia

Tropical Cyclone Claudia was dissipating in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of storm as it flew overhead in its orbit around the Earth.

4h

Survivors of firearm violence worse long-term outcomes than motor vehicle crash survivors

A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that 6-to-12 months after traumatic injury, rates of chronic pain, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other poor physical and mental health outcomes were alarmingly high among survivors of firearm violence — even higher than among survivors who had sustained similar injuries in motor vehicle crashes.

4h

First Look: Rob Riggle: Global Investigator

Actor, comedian and retired Marine, Rob Riggle is taking on a new mission – traveling the globe to unearth some of the world's greatest legends and mysteries. In his quest for answers to humanity's biggest questions, Riggle teams up with experts and scholars that help him use history, archaeology, science and more to uncover the truth. He'll embark on thrilling adventures, seeing everything the w

4h

4h

4h

You Could Probably Hibernate

Complaining about winter is one of the few remaining bastions of reliably safe small talk. Some people protest— I absolutely love freezing —but most will happily engage in winter bashing. In addition to widespread access to heated homes, offices, and vehicles, new industries continue to emerge on the promise of combatting winter. Moisturizing skin-care regimens are sold as the only way to keep ou

4h

The worst time of middle age? When you're 47.

In 132 countries, a clear U shape is seen in happiness in the late 40s. The study controls for influencing factors in arriving at its conclusions. Three possible reasons for a post-middle-age return to happiness are suggested. None It's a good-news, bad-news thing. The bad new first: Statistically speaking, according to a a new study and companion paper, if your 47th birthday was 73 days ago, thi

4h

Artist Refik Anadol Turns Data Into Art, With Help From AI

He sees pools of data as raw material for visualizations that he calls a new kind of "sculpture."

4h

A bargain-rate satellite system could keep an eye on nearly all of Earth

Nature, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00099-0 A four-satellite network takes advantage of forces that would hamper other spacecraft.

4h

Colloidal quantum dot photodetectors can now see further than before

Optical sensing in the mid to long infrared (5 microns [um]) is becoming of utmost importance in different fields since it is proving to be an excellent tool for environmental monitoring, gas sensing, thermal imaging as well as food quality control or the applications within the pharmaceutical industry, to name a few. The amount of information hidden within this very rich spectral window opens new

4h

Complex, porous, chiral nano-patterns arise from a simple linear building blocks

Nanoscience can arrange minute molecular entities into nanometric patterns in an orderly manner using self-assembly protocols. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have functionalized a simple rod-like building block with hydroxamic acids at both ends. They form molecular networks that not only display the complexity and beauty of mono-component self-assembly on surfaces; they al

4h

Organized cybercrime — not your average mafia

Scientists have identified common attributes of cybercrime networks, revealing how these groups function and work together to cause an estimated $445-600 billion of harm globally per year.

4h

New optical technique captures real-time dynamics of cement setting

Researchers have developed a nondestructive and noninvasive optical technique that can determine the setting times for various types of cement paste, which is used to bind new and old concrete surfaces. The new method could aid in the development of optimized types of cement with less impact on the environment.

4h

Are bigger brains better?

When it comes to certain parts of the brain, bigger doesn't necessarily equate to better memory.

4h

Study unravels new insights into a Parkinson's disease protein

The new study explores alpha-synuclein's basic properties, with a focus on a section of the protein known as the non-amyloidal component (NAC). The research was done on fruit fly larvae that were genetically engineered to produce both normal and mutated forms of human alpha-synuclein.

4h

Cancer study may accidentally help researchers create usable blood stem cells

A new study shows that cancer-causing MLL gene may also push pluripotent stem cells to make hematopoietic stem cells, a strong step in the decades-long effort to make personalizable, durable blood stem cells.

4h

Glimpse into ancient hunting strategies of dragonflies and damselflies

Dragonflies and damselflies are animals that may appear gentle but are, in fact, ancient hunters. The closely related insects shared an ancestor over 250 million years ago — long before dinosaurs — and provide a glimpse into how an ancient neural system controlled precise and swift aerial assaults.

4h

Scientists uncover how an explosion of new genes explain the origin of land plants

Scientists have made a significant discovery about the genetic origins of how plants evolved from living in water to land 470 million years ago.

4h

How decisions unfold in a zebrafish brain

Researchers were able to track the activity of each neuron in the entire brain of zebrafish larvae and reconstruct the unfolding of neuronal events as the animals repeatedly made 'left or right' choices in a behavioral experiment. The resulting frame-by-frame view of a decision in the making was so detailed that, 10 seconds before the fish responded, the researchers could predict what their next m

4h

New method detects toxin exposure from harmful algal blooms in human urine

A newly developed method can detect even low-dose human exposure to microcystins and nodularin in human urine. During harmful algal blooms (HABs), species of cyanobacteria release toxic peptides, including microcystins and nodularin into waterways, impacting wildlife and humans living in these marine environments. These findings are the first to report microcystin concentrations directly from expo

4h

Ugens debat: Strøm på de københavnske busser

PLUS. I en video tog ing.dk i denne uge brugerne med ind i en af Arrivas nye elbusser. Mange var interesserede i at kigge med, og nogle efterlyste endnu flere detaljer.

4h

How anti-sprawl policies may be harming water quality

Urban growth boundaries are created by governments in an effort to concentrate urban development — buildings, roads and the utilities that support them — within a defined area. These boundaries are intended to decrease negative impacts on people and the environment. However, according to a Penn State researcher, policies that aim to reduce urban sprawl may be increasing water pollution.

4h

Microsoft makes 'carbon negative' pledge

The tech giant promises to remove all the carbon it has emitted since its founding in 1975.

4h

Gene helps cat-poo parasite to lie in wait in the body

Nature, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00100-w The toxoplasmosis parasite can hide in a person's organs after infection and re-emerge years later.

4h

The 2010s Were the Hottest Decade–the 2020s Will Top Them

By the mid-2030s, global temperatures will likely top 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

What's MER? It's a way to measure quantum materials, and it's telling us new and interesting things

Experimental physicists have combined several measurements of quantum materials into one in their ongoing quest to learn more about manipulating and controlling the behavior of them for possible applications. They even coined a term for it— Magneto-elastoresistance, or MER.

4h

Organized cybercrime—not your average mafia

Does the common stereotype for "organized crime" hold up for organizations of hackers? Research from Michigan State University is one of the first to identify common attributes of cybercrime networks, revealing how these groups function and work together to cause an estimated $445-600 billion of harm globally per year.

4h

New optical technique captures real-time dynamics of cement setting

Researchers have developed a nondestructive and noninvasive optical technique that can determine the setting times for various types of cement paste, which is used to bind new and old concrete surfaces. The new method could aid in the development of optimized types of cement with less impact on the environment.

4h

Attentiveness and trust are especially effective in combating juvenile crime

Although coming from a disadvantaged background, experiencing violence within the family, having a negative school environment or consuming violent media such as films and computer games have little or no direct influence on potential criminal behaviour among adolescents and young adults. These factors do often result in young people regarding violent acts as harmless and spending their time with

4h

Banking on a new community isotope database

Stable isotopes act like fingerprints or fibers in forensics, capturing details of where someone or something lived, what it ate or breathed, and how its environment changed over time.

4h

'Living fossil' may upend basic tenet of evolutionary theory

The field of evolutionary biology has seen its share of spirited debates. But if there's one principle that virtually every expert in the field agrees on, it's that natural selection occurs at the level of the genome.

4h

Taal volcano lake all but gone in eruption

Satellites continue to monitor the Philippines volcano which has experienced a lull in activity.

4h

Daily briefing: Cell that kicked off complex life grown in the lab for the first time

Nature, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00123-3 'Asgard archaea' isolated from deep-sea sediment and painstakingly grown over 12 years. Plus: a damning survey of scientific careers and a proposal for a Human Screenome Project.

4h

Good wolf! Wild canines play ball with people

Nature, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00083-8 Young wolves' enthusiasm for retrieving toys hints at an ability to read cues from humans.

4h

Fossil is the oldest-known scorpion

Scientists studying fossils collected 35 years ago have identified them as the oldest-known scorpion species, a prehistoric animal from about 437 million years ago. The researchers found that the animal likely had the capacity to breathe in both ancient oceans and on land.

4h

What's MER? A new way to measure quantum materials

Experimental physicists have combined several measurements of quantum materials into one in their ongoing quest to learn more about manipulating and controlling the behavior of them for possible applications. They even coined a term for it — magneto-elastoresistance, or MER.

4h

Banking on a new community isotope database

Stable isotopes act like fingerprints or fibers in forensics, capturing details of where someone or something lived, what it ate or breathed, and how its environment changed over time.

4h

'Living fossil' may upend basic tenet of evolutionary theory

The field of evolutionary biology has seen its share of spirited debates. But if there's one principle that virtually every expert in the field agrees on, it's that natural selection occurs at the level of the genome.

4h

NASA Wants to Grow a Moon Base Out of Mushrooms

Shroom Base NASA scientists are exploring a peculiar strategy for building a Moon base and other off-world structures: growing them onsite out of living mushrooms. The space agency first considered the possibility of fungal space habitats in 2018, but now scientists are conducting tests to determine how well mycelia fungus might grow in Martian soil, Space.com reports . If the research pans out,

4h

Artificial photosynthesis produces 'green methane'

Artificial photosynthesis devices have long been touted as a way to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and turn it into useful products. New research describes a highly efficient and cheap device that could be used to turn waste carbon dioxide into methane. Natural gas, which mainly consists of methane, is a cleaner fuel than coal and has been characterized as a "bridge fuel" prior to tran

5h

Attentiveness and trust are especially effective in combating juvenile crime

The criminologist Professor Klaus Boers (University of Münster) and the sociologist Professor Jost Reinecke (University of Bielefeld) have presented the results of their long-term study 'Crime in the modern city.' The scientists have observed and analyzed the delinquency behavior of around 3,000 young people in German cities for almost 20 years.

5h

Are bigger brains better?

When it comes to certain parts of the brain, bigger doesn't necessarily equate to better memory.

5h

New optical technique captures real-time dynamics of cement setting

Researchers have developed a nondestructive and noninvasive optical technique that can determine the setting times for various types of cement paste, which is used to bind new and old concrete surfaces. The new method could aid in the development of optimized types of cement with less impact on the environment.

5h

An electrically pumped surface-emitting semiconductor green laser

Scientists and Engineers have used surface-emitting semiconductor lasers in data communications, for sensing, in FaceID and within augmented reality glasses. In a new report, Yong-Ho Ra and a research team in the departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Advanced Electronics and Photonics in Canada, Korea and the U.S., detailed the first achievement of an all-epitaxial, distributed B

5h

NRL researching rivers in the sky

Meteorologists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory plan to take a harder look in 2020 at a prime, yet difficult to model, component of the global water cycle known as atmospheric rivers.

5h

Quantum physics: Controlled experiment observes self-organized criticality

Writing in Nature, researchers describe the first-time observation of 'self-organized criticality' in a controlled laboratory experiment. Complex systems exist in mathematics and physics, but also occur in nature and society. The concept of self-organized criticality claims that without external input, complex systems in non-equilibrium tend to develop into a critical state far away from a stable

5h

Bartonella bacteria found in hemangiosarcoma tumors from dogs

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a very high prevalence of Bartonella bacteria in tumors and tissues—but not blood samples—taken from dogs with hemangiosarcoma, a cancer of the blood vessels. The work further supports the connection between persistent infection and some types of cancer and adds to the evidence that Bartonella can remain and thrive, undetected, within tis

5h

A wearable gas sensor for health and environmental monitoring

A highly sensitive, wearable gas sensor for environmental and human health monitoring may soon become commercially available, according to researchers at Penn State and Northeastern University.

5h

Cells protect themselves against stress by keeping together

Cell-to-cell contacts are necessary for the survival of human cells under protein-damaging conditions and stress. This was one of the conclusions made by a research team working under the leadership of Lea Sistonen, Professor in Cell and Molecular Biology at Åbo Akademi University. The results of their research were recently published in the Cell Reports journal.

5h

Sleep linked to language skills in neurodevelopmental disorders

New research has discovered that Down's syndrome, Fragile X syndrome and Williams syndrome are all linked to sleep disruption in very young children, and that sleep plays a crucial role in the development of these children's language skills.

5h

Progress in unraveling the mystery of the genomics of Parkinson's disease

The International Parkinson Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDGC) has now been in existence for ten years. The consortium now reviews the progress made over the past decade in the genomics of Parkinson's disease (PD) and related disorders including Lewy body diseases, progressive supranuclear palsy, and multiple system atrophy and looks ahead at its future direction and research priorities.

5h

Lights on for germ-free wound dressings

Infections are a dreaded threat that can have fatal consequences after an operation, in the treatment of wounds, and during tissue engineering. Biomimetic hydrogels with 'built-in' antimicrobial properties can significantly decrease this danger. Scientists have now introduced a gel that is activated by red light to produce reactive oxygen compounds that effectively kill bacteria and fungi.

5h

Bartonella bacteria found in hemangiosarcoma tumors from dogs

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a very high prevalence of Bartonella bacteria in tumors and tissues—but not blood samples—taken from dogs with hemangiosarcoma, a cancer of the blood vessels. The work further supports the connection between persistent infection and some types of cancer and adds to the evidence that Bartonella can remain and thrive, undetected, within tis

5h

Cells protect themselves against stress by keeping together

Cell-to-cell contacts are necessary for the survival of human cells under protein-damaging conditions and stress. This was one of the conclusions made by a research team working under the leadership of Lea Sistonen, Professor in Cell and Molecular Biology at Åbo Akademi University. The results of their research were recently published in the Cell Reports journal.

5h

Crop residues are a potential source of beneficial microorganisms and biocontrol agents

While studies of the microbiomes (which comprises all the microorganisms, mainly bacteria and fungi) of the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of plants are important, scientists at INRA believe more attention should be given to the microbiomes of crop residues.

5h

Ancient shark used its teeth like the blade of a power tool

The extinct shark Edestus used its teeth like saw blades, sliding them past each other like a power tool to slice through the soft flesh of its prey

5h

Crop residues are a potential source of beneficial microorganisms and biocontrol agents

While studies of the microbiomes (which comprises all the microorganisms, mainly bacteria and fungi) of the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of plants are important, scientists at INRA believe more attention should be given to the microbiomes of crop residues.

5h

Organized cybercrime — not your average mafia

Research from Michigan State University is one of the first to identify common attributes of cybercrime networks, revealing how these groups function and work together to cause an estimated $445-600 billion of harm globally per year.

5h

Cancer study may accidentally help researchers create usable blood stem cells

University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows that cancer-causing MLL gene may also push pluripotent stem cells to make hematopoietic stem cells, a strong step in the decades-long effort to make personalizable, durable blood stem cells.

5h

What's MER? A new way to measure quantum materials

Experimental physicists have combined several measurements of quantum materials into one in their ongoing quest to learn more about manipulating and controlling the behavior of them for possible applications. They even coined a term for it — magneto-elastoresistance, or MER.

5h

Fossil is the oldest-known scorpion

Scientists studying fossils collected 35 years ago have identified them as the oldest-known scorpion species, a prehistoric animal from about 437 million years ago. The researchers found that the animal likely had the capacity to breathe in both ancient oceans and on land.

5h

Study unravels new insights into a Parkinson's disease protein

The new study explores alpha-synuclein's basic properties, with a focus on a section of the protein known as the non-amyloidal component (NAC). The research was done on fruit fly larvae that were genetically engineered to produce both normal and mutated forms of human alpha-synuclein.

5h

Colloidal Quantum Dot Photodetectors can now see further than before

An ICFO study published in Nanoletters reports on the development of a colloidal quantum dot photodetector capable of detecting light in the far infrared.

5h

'Living fossil' may upend basic tenet of evolutionary theory

A UC San Francisco-led research team has discovered the first conclusive evidence that selection may also occur at the level of the epigenome — a term that refers to an assortment of chemical "annotations" to the genome that determine whether, when and to what extent genes are activated — and has done so for tens of millions of years.

5h

Sepsis associated with 1 in 5 deaths globally, double previous estimate

Twice as many people as previously believed are dying of sepsis worldwide, according to an analysis published today in The Lancet and announced at the Critical Care Reviews annual meeting in Belfast. Among them are a disproportionately high number of children in poor areas. Led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and University of Washington schools of medicine, the study revealed 48.9

5h

World's Oldest Scorpions May Have Moved From Sea to Land 437 Million Years Ago

A pair of pristinely preserved fossils suggest scorpions have looked mostly the same since they first crawled onto land

5h

Complex porous, chiral nano-patterns arise from a simple linear building block

Nanoscience can arrange minute molecular entities into nanometric patterns in an orderly manner using self-assembly protocols. Scientists have functionalized a simple rod-like building block with hydroxamic acids at both ends. They form molecular networks that not only display the complexity and beauty of mono-component self-assembly on surfaces; they also exhibit exceptional properties.

5h

Piece of Astronaut's Spacesuit Falls Off During Spacewalk

Lights Out Without fellow NASA astronaut Jessica Meir , Christina Koch would've been left in the dark outside the International Space Station on Wednesday. About 30 minutes into the second-ever all-female spacewalk , the video camera system and lights on Koch's helmet somehow came loose. When attempts to reattach the system failed, she stowed it in her bag — and relied on her partner's light for

5h

Official drug death stats are off by half

Deaths classified as drug-related for 15- to 64-year-olds hit 9% in 2016, up from about 4% seven years prior, but new research suggests the true number is actually more than double that. "It's obvious that the drug epidemic is a major American disaster," says Samuel Preston, a professor of sociology and member of the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania. "The basic records

5h

Teen brains are no match for fast food TV ads

How teens' brains respond to TV advertisements for fast food can predict what they are going to eat for dinner, according to new research. Teens who had greater responses in reward centers of the brain when viewing commercials for unhealthy foods—like cheeseburgers and milkshakes—from fast food restaurants ate more junk food in a simulated fast food restaurant. Surprisingly, teens who had heighte

5h

Facts and figures behind our climate and weather

What can the weather tell us about our changing planet? Ben Rich looks at the latest data in the first of our new monthly series, Climate Check.

5h

Cells protect themselves against stress by keeping together

For the first time, research shows that the contacts between cells, known as cell adhesion, are essential for cells to survive stress. The findings also suggest that impaired cell adhesion may sensitize cancer cells to drugs that damage cell proteins and cause stress.

5h

Complex porous, chiral nano-patterns arise from a simple linear building block

Nanoscience can arrange minute molecular entities into nanometric patterns in an orderly manner using self-assembly protocols. Scientists have functionalized a simple rod-like building block with hydroxamic acids at both ends. They form molecular networks that not only display the complexity and beauty of mono-component self-assembly on surfaces; they also exhibit exceptional properties.

5h

Walnuts may be good for the gut and help promote heart health

Researchers found that eating walnuts daily as part of a healthy diet was associated with increases in certain bacteria that can help promote health. Additionally, those changes in gut bacteria were associated with improvements in some risk factors for heart disease.

5h

Whooping cough evolving into a superbug

Whooping cough bacteria are becoming smarter at colonizing and feeding off unwitting hosts — whether they have been vaccinated or not — strengthening calls for a new vaccine.

5h

How to recover deleted photos from an SD card

That SD card may still be holding pics you thought long gone. That's a good thing and a bad thing, depending of what kind of photo you're talking about. (Luca Lorenzelli via Deposit Photos/) There are few things more soul-crushing than losing that last photo of grandma , or videos of your child's first steps. But SD cards can be fussy, and occasionally those photos can get corrupted or accidental

5h

Quantum physics: Controlled experiment observes self-organized criticality

Researchers from Cologne, Heidelberg, Strasbourg and California have observed important characteristics of complex systems in a lab experiment. Their discovery could facilitate the development of quantum technologies.

5h

Mortality rate is cut in half by a lung rescue team at Massachusetts General

A specialized Lung Rescue Team established to evaluate and treat patients with obesity receiving mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure has significantly reduced the risk of mortality

5h

Less active infants had greater fat accumulation, study finds

Less physical activity for infants below one year of age may lead to more fat accumulation which in turn may predispose them to obesity later in life, suggests a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

5h

Head/neck cancer diagnosis, time to treatment after ACA Medicaid expansions

Researchers for this observational study examined the association between the expansion of Medicaid coverage in some states after the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed and the diagnosis and treatment of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The analysis included nearly 91,000 adults with newly diagnosed HNSCC who were identified from the National Ca

5h

Ancient shark used its teeth like the blade of a power saw

The extinct shark Edestus used its teeth like saw blades, sliding them past each other like a power tool to slice through the soft flesh of its prey

5h

The 'Space Architects' of Mars | The Age of A.I.

submitted by /u/cloudrunner69 [link] [comments]

5h

5h

5h

5h

Cyanobacteria in water and on land identified as source of methane

Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, are among the most common organisms on Earth. A research team has now shown for the first time that Cyanobacteria produce relevant amounts of methane in oceans, inland waters and on land. Due to climate change, "Cyanobacteria blooms" increase in frequency and extent, amplifying the release of methane from inland waters and oceans to the atmosphere.

5h

Photoelectrochemical water-splitting efficiency hits 4.5%

Solar-to-fuel conversion offers a promising technology to solve energy problems, yet device performance could be limited by undesired sunlight absorption. Researchers show copper thiocyanate can assist hole transport in oxide photoelectrodes and enable a 4.55% solar-to-hydrogen efficiency in tandem devices.

5h

Pulling the plug on calcium pumps — potential new treatment strategy for pancreatic cancer

UK scientists have identified a new way to kill pancreatic cancer cells by 'pulling the plug' on the energy generator that fuels calcium pumps on their cell surface. The study reports how switching off the cancer's energy supply causes the pancreatic cancer cells to become 'poisoned' by an irreversible build-up of calcium.

5h

Deep learning enables real-time imaging around corners

Researchers have harnessed the power of a type of artificial intelligence known as deep learning to create a new laser-based system that can image around corners in real time. With further development, the system might let self-driving cars 'look' around parked cars or busy intersections to see hazards or pedestrians.

5h

Bartonella bacteria found in hemangiosarcoma tumors from dogs

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a very high prevalence of Bartonella bacteria in tumors and tissues – but not blood samples – taken from dogs with hemangiosarcoma, a cancer of the blood vessels.

6h

January Alzheimer's & Dementia highlights: Sleep, race/ethnicity, artificial intelligence

Phase 3 drug trial results on improving sleep for persons living with Alzheimer's disease. The US Hispanic/Latino population is predicted to have the largest increase in Alzheimer's and all dementia by mid-century. Artificial intelligence may help with early detection of dementia.

6h

Crop residues are a potential source of beneficial microorganisms and biocontrol agents

While studies of the microbiomes (which comprises all the microorganisms, mainly bacteria and fungi) of the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of plants are important, scientists at INRA believe more attention should be given to the microbiomes of crop residues.

6h

Research shows that older patients with untreated sleep apnea need greater medical care

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common and costly medical Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) found that the medical costs are substantially higher among older adults who go untreated for obstructive sleep apnea.

6h

Politics this week

[no content]

6h

Business this week

[no content]

6h

KAL's cartoon

[no content]

6h

A new human coronavirus has appeared in China

So far, only one person has died. But more than 40 are ill

6h

A research team builds robots from living cells

They can do simple tasks, and one day might reproduce themselves

6h

This is the oldest scorpion known to science

Ancient arachnid could reveal clues about the evolution of modern scorpions and spiders

6h

Researchers Finally Sequence Giant Squid's Entire Genome

First Look For the first time, scientists have sequenced the entire genetic code of a giant squid. Because the massive creature has never been captured alive , biologists have largely been left in the dark as to how the giant squid grows and behaves. After sequencing its genes, University of Copenhagen and Marine Biological Laboratory researchers found several oddities in the giant squid's DNA —

6h

Structure of the M2 muscarinic receptor–β-arrestin complex in a lipid nanodisc

Nature, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1954-0

6h

We've seen wolf pups play fetch just like dogs for the first time

Wolf pups have been seen playing fetch with humans, a behaviour we thought was unique to domesticated dogs

6h

Walnuts may be good for the gut and help promote heart health

Researchers found that eating walnuts daily as part of a healthy diet was associated with increases in certain bacteria that can help promote health. Additionally, those changes in gut bacteria were associated with improvements in some risk factors for heart disease.

6h

Pretty with a twist

Nanoscience can arrange minute molecular entities into nanometric patterns in an orderly manner using self-assembly protocols. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have functionalized a simple rod-like building block with hydroxamic acids at both ends. They form molecular networks that not only display the complexity and beauty of mono-component self-assembly on surfaces; they al

6h

A wearable gas sensor for health and environmental monitoring

A highly sensitive, wearable gas sensor for environmental and human health monitoring may soon become commercially available, according to researchers at Penn State and Northeastern University.

6h

Cells protect themselves against stress by keeping together

For the first time, research shows that the contacts between cells, known as cell adhesion, are essential for cells to survive stress. The findings also suggest that impaired cell adhesion may sensitize cancer cells to drugs that damage cell proteins and cause stress.

6h

Most youths surviving opioid overdose not getting timely treatment to avoid recurrence

A study of more than 4 million Medicaid claims records during a recent seven-year period concludes that less than a third of the nearly 3,800 US adolescents and young adults who experienced a nonfatal opioid overdose got timely (within 30 days) follow-up addiction treatment to curb or prevent future misuse and reduce the risk of a second overdose.

6h

Making sense of the self

Interoception is the awareness of our physiological states. But precisely how the brain calculates and reacts to this information remains unclear. In a paper published in the journal Neuron, neuroscientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) demonstrate how the insular cortex orchestrates the process. The work represents the first steps toward understanding the neural basis of interoc

6h

Neuromuscular organoid: It's contracting!

MDC researchers established a new model to study neuromuscular development and disorders. For the first time two distinct human tissues co-developed in the lab from one progenitor cell type and self-organized into a complex, functional neuromuscular organoid.

6h

How decisions unfold in a zebrafish brain

Researchers were able to track the activity of each neuron in the entire brain of zebrafish larvae and reconstruct the unfolding of neuronal events as the animals repeatedly made 'left or right' choices in a behavioral experiment. The resulting frame-by-frame view of a decision in the making was so detailed that, 10 seconds before the fish responded, the researchers could predict what their next m

6h

Scientists uncover how an explosion of new genes explain the origin of land plants

Scientists have made a significant discovery about the genetic origins of how plants evolved from living in water to land 470 million years ago.

6h

Zika virus' key into brain cells ID'd, leveraged to block infection and kill cancer cells

Two different UC San Diego research teams identified the same molecule — αvβ5 integrin — as Zika virus' key to brain cell entry. They found ways to take advantage of the integrin to both block Zika virus from infecting cells and turn it into something good: a way to shrink brain cancer stem cells.

6h

Comparing cancer costs is challenging, despite new price transparency rules

A federal rule that requires hospitals to publicly list standard charges for services and procedures — the foundation of price transparency — does not facilitate comparison shopping for a standard radiation treatment for prostate cancer at National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers, according to a study led by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researche

6h

Partnership with China prompts change in care for high-risk type of leukemia

Findings from a collaborative clinical trial have generated key insights into how targeted therapy should be used to treat leukemia driven by the Philadelphia chromosome.

6h

Glimpse into ancient hunting strategies of dragonflies and damselflies

Dragonflies and damselflies are animals that may appear gentle but are, in fact, ancient hunters. The closely related insects shared an ancestor over 250 million years ago — long before dinosaurs — and provide a glimpse into how an ancient neural system controlled precise and swift aerial assaults.

6h

Paleontology: New species of prehistoric scorpion may have been early land explorer

A new species of prehistoric scorpion from the early Siluarian period (approximately 437.5 to 436.5 million years ago) is described in a study in Scientific Reports. The findings suggest that Parioscorpio venator is the oldest-known scorpion reported to date and may have been capable of leaving its marine habitat and venturing onto land, a behaviour similar to that of present-day horseshoe crabs.

6h

Scientists unexpectedly witness wolf puppies play fetch

When it comes to playing a game of fetch, many dogs are naturals. But now, researchers report that the remarkable ability to interpret human social communicative cues that enables a dog to go for a ball and then bring it back also exists in wolves. The study appears Jan. 16 in the journal iScience.

6h

Sir David Attenborough blasts inaction on climate change

The naturalist and broadcaster has warned that "the moment of crisis has come".

6h

Researchers Find New High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources in the Galaxy

The finding may help physicists better understand where cosmic rays — energetic particles that permeate the universe — come from.

6h

Structure of the neurotensin receptor 1 in complex with β-arrestin 1

Nature, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1953-1

6h

What Captivates Children About The Snowy Day?

COURTESY OF THE EZRA JACK KEATS FOUNDATION Kids and families love Ezra Jack Keats's The Snowy Day so much that they've checked it out of the New York Public Library system more than any other book in the NYPL's 125 years of existence —485,583 times since it was published in 1962. That's more than The Cat in the Hat , Where the Wild Things Are , Charlotte's Web, and even Harry Potter and the Sorce

6h

Ancient fossil 'may prove scorpion was first land-dwelling animal'

Fossil is earliest evidence of breathing structure compatible with life on land, scientists say Fossil experts in the US have revealed the remains of what they say is the first animal that may have set foot on land – an ancient scorpion. The earliest animals were aquatic, but eventually transitioned on to land. While scorpions are known to be one of the first animals to have become fully land-dwe

6h

A Silurian ancestral scorpion with fossilised internal anatomy illustrating a pathway to arachnid terrestrialisation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56010-z

6h

Oldest Known Scorpion May Have Been First To Explore Land

Fossils of Parioscorpio venator, 437 million years old, include internal anatomy.

6h

Local activism can't be crushed, research finds. At most, it changes target

According to received wisdom, local activism against the establishment of industrial plants follows a cycle, with its highest intensity a short time after mobilization. If a firm stands, activism is destined to fade away. New research published in the Strategic Management Journal suggests we should think again.

6h

Fetching With Wolves: What It Means That A Wolf Puppy Will Retrieve A Ball

Some wolf puppies will unexpectedly play "fetch," researchers say, showing that an urge to retrieve a ball might be an ancient wolf trait and not a result of dog domestication. (Image credit: Christina Hansen Wheat)

6h

What Wolf Pups That Play Fetch Reveal About Your Dog

If wolf pups will retrieve a ball for a stranger, no training necessary, maybe dogs' wild ancestors were also ready for human games.

6h

Why are drug prices so high? Investigating the outdated US patent system | Priti Krishtel

Between 2006 and 2016, the number of drug patents granted in the United States doubled — but not because there was an explosion in invention or innovation. Drug companies have learned how to game the system, accumulating patents not for new medicines but for small changes to existing ones, which allows them to build monopolies, block competition and drive prices up. Health justice lawyer Priti Kr

6h

Seabird die-off 'has no precedent'

Why did nearly one million common murres wash ashore dead from California to Alaska in 2015 and 2016? "The blob," caused this seabird die-off, say researchers. Although the common murre must eat about half of its body weight in prey each day, common murres are experts at catching the small "forage fish" they need to survive. Herring, sardines, anchovies, and even juvenile salmon are no match for

6h

6h

Experts predict dozens more earthquake aftershocks in Puerto Rico

Current #TemblorPR Map shows the latest 4.0 M South of Ponce. It's the most Easternmost #EarthQuake for these recent #Aftershocks pic.twitter.com/1n7AehUNWz — TemblorPR (@TemblorPR) January 10, 2020

6h

Watch wolf puppies stun scientists by playing fetch

Some dog behaviors may have been present before domestication

6h

Factors that ensure cellular protein production

Defects in tRNA biogenesis influence gene expression and are associated with many types of human diseases, such as cancer and neurological diseases. In his thesis, Fu Xu contributes to new knowledge about the factors that modulate tRNA-biogenesis.

6h

Scientists unexpectedly witness wolf puppies play fetch

When it comes to playing a game of fetch, many dogs are naturals. But now, researchers report that the remarkable ability to interpret human social communicative cues that enables a dog to go for a ball and then bring it back also exists in wolves. The study appears January 16 in the journal iScience.

6h

Glimpse into ancient hunting strategies of dragonflies and damselflies

Dragonflies and damselflies are animals that may appear gentle but are, in fact, ancient hunters. The closely related insects shared an ancestor over 250 million years ago—long before dinosaurs—and provide a glimpse into how an ancient neural system controlled precise and swift aerial assaults.

6h

Researchers decode the circuitry of neuromuscular organoids

The Gouti lab from the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC) has developed functional neuromuscular organoids (NMOs) that self-organize into spinal cord neurons and muscle tissue. Together, the two cell types form a complex neuronal network that directs muscle tissue to contract. The neuromuscular organoids, described in the journal Cell Stem Cell, represent

6h

Factors that ensure cellular protein production

Defects in tRNA biogenesis influence gene expression and are associated with many types of human diseases, such as cancer and neurological diseases. In his thesis, Fu Xu contributes to new knowledge about the factors that modulate tRNA-biogenesis.

6h

Clearing up cloudy climate predictions

U.K. scientists are taking to the skies as part of a major international research campaign to better understand the behaviour of clouds and their role in climate change.

6h

Far-right violence in Portugal draws strength from skinhead roots—study

Far-right agitators in Portugal now have different reasons to their 1970s predecessors for becoming radicalised and committing acts of political violence—a new study shows.

6h

Ageism can shorten life expectancy

Ageism can harm older people's health, a review of research in 45 countries across 5 continents shows. The researchers base their analysis on a systematic review of 422 studies around the world that included over 7 million participants. There was evidence of the adverse effects of ageism on older persons in 96% of the studies. "The injurious reach of ageism that our team documented demonstrates t

6h

Debat: Uafhængige universiteter bygger på troværdighed

Efterårets skandaleombruste oksekødsrapport udfordrede Aarhus Universitet og såede tvivl om troværdigheden af en del af forskningen. Derfor skal universitets uafhængighed altid bygge på transparens og armslængde, som skal fastholdes hver eneste dag.

6h

Menthol ban could increase health equity

Current policies that include restrictions on the sale of menthol flavored tobacco and nicotine products are less likely to reach those that would benefit from them the most, according to new research from the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine.

6h

Virtual physical therapy after knee replacement brings similar outcomes, lower costs

A virtual system for in-home physical therapy (PT) provides good outcomes for patients undergoing rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) — with lower costs than traditional in-person PT, reports a study in the Jan. 15, 2020, issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

6h

Progress in unraveling the mystery of the genomics of Parkinson's disease

The International Parkinson Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDGC) has now been in existence for ten years. In an article published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease the consortium reviews the progress made over the past decade in the genomics of Parkinson's disease (PD) and related disorders including Lewy body diseases, progressive supranuclear palsy, and multiple system atrophy and looks ahead

6h

Physicists design 'super-human' red blood cells to deliver drugs to specific targets

A team of physicists from McMaster University has developed a process to modify red blood cells so they can be used to distribute drugs throughout the body, which could specifically target infections or treat catastrophic diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer's.

6h

Cyanobacteria in water and on land identified as source of methane

Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, are among the most common organisms on Earth. A research team led by the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries and Heidelberg University has now shown for the first time that Cyanobacteria produce relevant amounts of methane in oceans, inland waters and on land. Due to climate change, "Cyanobacteria blooms" increase in frequency

6h

B cells linked to effective cancer immunotherapy

Cancer patients responded better to immunotherapy and had a better prognosis if their melanoma tumors contained specific clusters of B cells, according to new research from Lund University in Sweden. The study is published in Nature.

6h

Visualizing molecular patterns of membrane TNF receptors

Whether a sick cell dies, divides, or travels through the body is regulated by a sophisticat-ed interplay of signal molecules and receptors on the cell membrane. One of the most im-portant molecular cues in the immune system is Tumour Necrosis Factor α (TNFα). Now, for the first time, researchers from Goethe University have visualised the molecular organ-isation of individual TNFα receptor molecul

6h

How Mass Animal Die-Offs Reshape Ecosystems

The wildfires raging across Australia have already killed hundreds of millions of animals. In the United States, researchers are simulating the effects of these mass die-offs by placing the carcasses of feral pigs in fields. The chemical and biological effects on the surrounding ecosystem can be long-lasting.

6h

Fossil is the oldest-known scorpion

Scientists studying fossils collected 35 years ago have identified them as the oldest-known scorpion species, a prehistoric animal from about 437 million years ago. The researchers found that the animal likely had the capacity to breathe in both ancient oceans and on land.

6h

Scientists unexpectedly witness wolf puppies play fetch

When it comes to playing a game of fetch, many dogs are naturals. But now, researchers report that the remarkable ability to interpret human social communicative cues that enables a dog to go for a ball and then bring it back also exists in wolves. The study appears January 16 in the journal iScience.

6h

Glimpse into ancient hunting strategies of dragonflies and damselflies

Dragonflies and damselflies are animals that may appear gentle but are, in fact, ancient hunters. The closely related insects shared an ancestor over 250 million years ago—long before dinosaurs—and provide a glimpse into how an ancient neural system controlled precise and swift aerial assaults.

6h

Researchers decode the circuitry of neuromuscular organoids

The Gouti lab from the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC) has developed functional neuromuscular organoids (NMOs) that self-organize into spinal cord neurons and muscle tissue. Together, the two cell types form a complex neuronal network that directs muscle tissue to contract. The neuromuscular organoids, described in the journal Cell Stem Cell, represent

6h

Scientists uncover how an explosion of new genes explain the origin of land plants

The new study, led by scientists from the universities of Bristol and Essex and published today in Current Biology, challenge the established view of the origin of plants on land, and reveal that compared to the origin of animals, plants are better at inventing new genes during periods of evolution.

6h

Organs-on-Chips Centre opens in UK for advancements in medical research and drug development

A new research centre which aims to revolutionise medical research and drug development using microengineered Organs-on-Chips has opened at Queen Mary University of London.

6h

Physicists design 'super-human' red blood cells to deliver drugs to specific targets within the body

A team of physicists from McMaster University has developed a process to modify red blood cells so they can be used to distribute drugs throughout the body, which could specifically target infections or treat catastrophic diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer's.

6h

Research funding to save the world needs to be drastically stepped up, study finds

A new study shows that there is a huge disparity in the level of funding for social science research into the greatest challenge in combatting global warming—how to get individuals and societies to overcome ingrained human habits to make the changes necessary to mitigate climate change.

6h

Nanopore sequencing of African swine fever virus

African swine fever (ASF) is one of the most pathogenic viral diseases in pigs caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV). The fatality rate is almost 100%, which brings huge economic losses to the hog industry in countries with epidemics. China was the first Asian country to have an ASF epidemic, and it spread quickly across the country after the first epidemic was reported in August 2018. After

6h

AlphaZero learns to rule the quantum world

The chess world was amazed when the computer algorithm AlphaZero learned, after just four hours on its own, to beat the best chess programs built on human expertise. Now a research group at Aarhus University in Denmark has used the very same algorithm to control a quantum computer.

6h

Scientists uncover how an explosion of new genes explain the origin of land plants

The new study, led by scientists from the universities of Bristol and Essex and published today in Current Biology, challenge the established view of the origin of plants on land, and reveal that compared to the origin of animals, plants are better at inventing new genes during periods of evolution.

6h

Organs-on-Chips Centre opens in UK for advancements in medical research and drug development

A new research centre which aims to revolutionise medical research and drug development using microengineered Organs-on-Chips has opened at Queen Mary University of London.

6h

Physicists design 'super-human' red blood cells to deliver drugs to specific targets within the body

A team of physicists from McMaster University has developed a process to modify red blood cells so they can be used to distribute drugs throughout the body, which could specifically target infections or treat catastrophic diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer's.

6h

Nanopore sequencing of African swine fever virus

African swine fever (ASF) is one of the most pathogenic viral diseases in pigs caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV). The fatality rate is almost 100%, which brings huge economic losses to the hog industry in countries with epidemics. China was the first Asian country to have an ASF epidemic, and it spread quickly across the country after the first epidemic was reported in August 2018. After

6h

Do We Possess a Transpersonal Imagination?

Some products of our imaginations seem to spring from sources beyond our everyday selves. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Why This 18th-Century Naturalist Believed He'd Discovered an Eyewitness to the Biblical Flood

Smithsonian paleontologist Hans Sues recounts a colossal tale of mistaken identity

6h

Large African herbivores have helped to repair their environment

Nature, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00093-6 The reintroduction of ruminant herbivores to a national park in Mozambique has controlled the encroachment of a notoriously invasive plant species.

6h

Sleep linked to language skills in neurodevelopmental disorders

New research has discovered that Down's syndrome, Fragile X syndrome and Williams syndrome are all linked to sleep disruption in very young children, and that sleep plays a crucial role in the development of these children's language skills.

7h

Lights on for germ-free wound dressings

Infections are a dreaded threat that can have fatal consequences after an operation, in the treatment of wounds, and during tissue engineering. Biomimetic hydrogels with 'built-in' antimicrobial properties can significantly decrease this danger. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a gel that is activated by red light to produce reactive oxygen compounds that effectivel

7h

Larotrectinib in tumours with NTRK gene fusion: Data are not yet sufficient

for derivation of an added benefitThe small studies on the histology-independent use of the inhibitor have no controls. The amount of other data is also still too small to assess an added benefit.

7h

Structual color barcode micromotors for multiplex biosensing

A novel micromotors with obvious structural color was proposed by Professor Yuanjin Zhao, et al. By using functional hydrogel to replicate the structure of photonic colloid clusters which was fabricated through rapid solvent extracting of the droplet templets, structural color barcode micromotors were obtained. And it's indicated that the novel micromotors could not only realize multiplex biosensi

7h

Small change for climate change: Time to increase research funding to save the world

A new study shows that there is a huge disproportion in the level of funding for social science research into the greatest challenge in combating global warming — how to get individuals and societies to overcome ingrained human habits to make the changes necessary to mitigate climate change.

7h

Local activism can't be crushed, research finds. At most, it changes target

According to received wisdom, local activism against the establishment of industrial plants follows a cycle, with its highest intensity a short time after mobilization. If a firm stands, activism fades. New research by Fabrizio Perretti and Alessandro Piazza in Strategic Management Journal analyzes the American anti-nuclear movement and finds that the strategic decisions made by a firm affect both

7h

Startup Unveils Working Prototype of AR Contact Lens

Smart Vision A startup called Mojo Vision unveiled a working prototype today of what it claims to be "the world's first true smart contact lens." The smart lens is essentially a miniaturized display that you can wear in your eye. The company says it could provide directions, sports scores, or even let them see in the dark . "People can't tell you are wearing it, so we want the interaction to be s

7h

Bill Barr Doesn't Get to Decide What's in the Constitution

Quick: What's the most common word in the English language that does not appear anywhere in the U.S. Constitution? The answer is a revealing one: she . Presidents, senators, and representatives are always designated as "he." Even the Nineteenth Amendment, which gave women the right to vote, simply bans abridgment of that right "on account of sex." That resolutely masculine language will not chang

7h

'Rosalind Franklin' Mars rover edges closer to launch

Europe's six-wheeled robot completes more key tests ahead of its planned summer launch.

7h

Calling out the system: More black and ethnic minority faces in cultural spaces

Have you ever been to the theater, looked around, and thought about how predominantly white the audience is? Does the same impression come to mind when visiting museums? If it does and the answer is a resounding yes, then you're not alone. There is a major problem in Britain's cultural industry and it's time we all took a hard look at why.

7h

Does Social Media Cause Depression?

The answer's not black-and-white — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Does Social Media Cause Depression?

The answer's not black-and-white — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Deep learning enables real-time imaging around corners

Researchers have harnessed the power of a type of artificial intelligence known as deep learning to create a new laser-based system that can image around corners in real time. With further development, the system might let self-driving cars 'look' around parked cars or busy intersections to see hazards or pedestrians.

7h

Violence against women in poor settings: Randomized trial shows mixed outcomes

Violence against women and girls in South Africa is now recognized as a national crisis. Far too many women and girls experience violence, primarily from their intimate partners.

7h

Man arrested in Peru airport with 20 birds in suitcase

The Belgian traveller was trying to smuggle the protected species from Peru to Spain, officers say.

7h

Dolittle Is One of the Worst Movies in Years

Hollywood makes bad movies all the time. Sometimes they're highly enjoyable pieces of schlock that divert your attention for 90 minutes before vanishing from memory. Sometimes they're unwatchable slogs, similarly not worth remembering. Then there are the debacles of the release calendar: genuine catastrophes such as Dolittle , the likes of which are rarer than a talking dragonfly. The newest adap

7h

Bird species are facing extinction hundreds of times faster than previously thought

Extinction, or the disappearance of an entire species, is commonplace. Species have been forming, persisting and then shuffling off their mortal coil since life began on Earth. However, evidence suggests the number of species going extinct, and the rate at which they disappear, is increasing dramatically.

7h

Linguistics student pinpoints differences in Western Canadian dialects

It's only a 40-minute drive from Queens to the Bronx in New York, but the difference in dialect is obvious to most familiar with the English language.

7h

Incubated Prometheoarchaeum syntrophicum samples may provide clues about origin of eukaryotic cells

A team of researchers affiliated with a large number of institutions in Japan has found a possible link between primitive archaea and the development of eukaryotes. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes culturing Prometheoarchaeum syntrophicum samples and what they learned by studying them.

7h

Intel's new modular computers let gamers dip a toe into compact PC building

Intel's NUC9 Extreme Kit shoves a full-fledged gaming PC into a console-like box. (Intel /) Building a gaming PC can be part of the fun—if you know what you're doing. You get to select all your parts from the CPU to the RAM, and then you get to dig in and customize your rig so you can brag about features like your cable management. It's not for everyone, though. Some PC gamers live in the middle

7h

The manicured wetland that sucks up more carbon than a natural marsh

Nature, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00098-1 Restoration and strict controls help a saltwater marsh in China to absorb greenhouse gases.

7h

Bird species are facing extinction hundreds of times faster than previously thought

Extinction, or the disappearance of an entire species, is commonplace. Species have been forming, persisting and then shuffling off their mortal coil since life began on Earth. However, evidence suggests the number of species going extinct, and the rate at which they disappear, is increasing dramatically.

7h

Incubated Prometheoarchaeum syntrophicum samples may provide clues about origin of eukaryotic cells

A team of researchers affiliated with a large number of institutions in Japan has found a possible link between primitive archaea and the development of eukaryotes. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes culturing Prometheoarchaeum syntrophicum samples and what they learned by studying them.

7h

'1917' VFX Artists Had to Completely Rethink How Films Are Made

Sam Mendes' war epic is presented as one continuous shot. Making the illusion work was no small feat.

7h

Blue-green algae found to produce greenhouse gas methane

An international team of researchers has found that cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) produce the greenhouse gas methane. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes tests they carried out with blue-green algae in their lab and what they found.

7h

The Future of Money: AI Investors, Crowdlending, and the Death of Cash

Every day, roughly 60 percent of all market trades are made by computer. When the market turns volatile, this can climb to as high as 90 percent. Robo-advisors are increasingly making this process available to the consumer, saving them time and money as a result. With humans no longer in the transaction chain, fees are slashed. Undercutting the typical 2 percent cut of profits (not to mention 20

7h

Body's natural signal carriers can help melanoma spread

A new study sheds fresh light on how melanoma cells interact with other cells via extracellular vesicles they secrete. The researchers found that extracellular vesicles secreted by melanoma cells use the so-called hedgehog signalling pathway to intensify the malignant properties of the cells they are targeting. The discovery can help in the development of better treatment and diagnostics for melan

7h

Solving the Greek monkey mystery gave us an important clue to Bronze Age world

The blue monkeys painted on the walls of Akrotiri on the Greek island of Santorini are among many animals found in the frescoes of this 3,600-year-old city. Historians have studied the murals for decades since they were unearthed in the 1960s and 1970s on the island, which was once known as Thera. But when we and a team of other primatologists recently examined the paintings, we realized the monke

7h

Blue-green algae found to produce greenhouse gas methane

An international team of researchers has found that cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) produce the greenhouse gas methane. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes tests they carried out with blue-green algae in their lab and what they found.

7h

Deep learning enables real-time imaging around corners

Researchers have harnessed the power of a type of artificial intelligence known as deep learning to create a new laser-based system that can image around corners in real time. With further development, the system might let self-driving cars "look" around parked cars or busy intersections to see hazards or pedestrians. It could also be installed on satellites and spacecraft for tasks such as captur

7h

Fossils of largest theropod to date found in Australia

A team of researchers from the University of New England, the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Natural History Museum and Swinburne University of Technology, all in Australia, has identified fossils found near Winton as remains of the largest theropod found to date in Australia. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes the bones they found and its likely s

7h

Nearly barren Icelandic landscapes guide search for extraterrestrial life

New research on microbial lifeforms living in nearly barren volcanic landscapes in Iceland may help scientists understand how best to search for life on other planets.

7h

Nanopore sequencing of African swine fever virus

Researchers from China for the first time utilized the nanopore sequencing technology to obtain the whole genome from a clinical sample of African swine fever virus. After that they evaluated the quality and feasibility of different approaches for African swine fever virus full genome sequencing.

7h

Pulling the plug on calcium pumps — potential new treatment strategy for pancreatic cancer

UK scientists have identified a new way to kill pancreatic cancer cells by 'pulling the plug' on the energy generator that fuels calcium pumps on their cell surface. The study, published in the British Journal of Cancer, reports how switching off the cancer's energy supply causes the pancreatic cancer cells to become 'poisoned' by an irreversible build-up of calcium.

7h

Study uses eye movement test to confirm brain ageing effects

A new study, published in PeerJ, shows how University of Liverpool researchers have used a newly developed eye movement test to improve the understanding of how parts of the brain work.

7h

AlphaZero learns to rule the quantum world

The chess world was amazed when the computer algorithm AlphaZero learned, after just four hours on its own, to beat the best chess programs built on human expertise. Now a research group at Aarhus University in Denmark has used the very same algorithm to control a quantum computer.

7h

Scientists discover link between ALS genes

Researchers at the University of Malta have discovered a link between diverse genes whose mutation causes the debilitating and fatal human disease known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Convergence in the molecular pathways underlying different ALS-causing genes points to potential new targets for drug development.

7h

Antipsychotics associated with increased risk of head, brain injuries in persons with AD

The use of antipsychotics is associated with increased risks of head and brain injuries among persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. The risk increase was highest at the initiation of antipsychotic use. The results were published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS).

7h

JACEP Open: Vaping emergencies may initially go unrecognized

Diagnosing EVALI–the e-cigarette, or vaping, product use associated lung injury illness that's recently garnered national attention–can be challenging. Initial symptoms may resemble pneumonia or go unrecognized, according to case analysis in the Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians (JACEP) Open, a new open access journal.

7h

A sea monster's genome

The giant squid is an elusive giant, but its secrets are about to be revealed. A new study led by the University of Copenhagen has sequenced the creature's entire genome, offering an opportunity to throw some light on its life in the depths of the sea.

7h

Parents with terminally ill children tend to hide emotional pain from their spouses

A study led by NTU Singapore suggests that Asian parents with terminally ill children found tend to defer discussing their psychological pain with their spouses to protect them from emotional distress. Instead, they prefer to revealed the parents' preference to support each other in pragmatic and solution-oriented ways such as discussing treatment options, arranging care plans and sharing caregivi

7h

Photoelectrochemical water-splitting efficiency hits 4.5%

Solar-to-fuel conversion offers a promising technology to solve energy problems, yet device performance could be limited by undesired sunlight absorption. Researchers show copper thiocyanate can assist hole transport in oxide photoelectrodes and enable a 4.55% solar-to-hydrogen efficiency in tandem devices.

7h

Scientists create decoy molecule that neutralizes arenaviruses

A host of disease-causing viruses called arenaviruses lurk in animal populations in various parts of the world, sometimes crossing over into humans. When they do cross over, they can be lethal, and only very few treatments exist. Researchers led by scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science have now devised a clever decoy for these viruses that may keep them from spreading in the body.

7h

Biomimetic hydrogel with photodynamic antimicrobial effect

Infections are a dreaded threat that can have fatal consequences after an operation, in the treatment of wounds, and during tissue engineering. Biomimetic hydrogels with "built-in" antimicrobial properties can significantly decrease this danger. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a gel that is activated by red light to produce reactive oxygen compounds that effectivel

7h

ExoMars Rover completes environmental tests

The Rosalind Franklin rover of the joint ESA-Roscosmos ExoMars mission completed a series of environmental tests at the end of 2019 at Airbus, Toulouse, France. This included final thermal and vacuum tests where the Rover is heated and cooled to simulate the temperatures of its journey through space and on the surface of Mars. For example, Rosalind Franklin can expect temperatures dropping to –120

7h

Exploring tiny forces with single molecule force spectroscopy

In terms of space organization, DNA has powers rivaling Marie Kondo. A strand of DNA that is two meters long intricately folds itself into a cell nucleus only 10 microns across. (One of the hairs on your head has a diameter of 100 microns, and you can't see anything smaller than that without a microscope.) Everything that needs to happen biochemically for the DNA to function hinges upon the precis

7h

Heat check on a chip: Nanoscalechip can detect sub-microwatt changes in temperature

Scientists working in medical research, biology, cellular studies, and in understanding bacteria and other pathogens often need to know about temperature rises and falls in the systems on which they focus. Many processes involve heat production and tracking those changes can get to the core of understanding a process, diagnosing a disease or perhaps investigating whether a pharmaceutical, such as

7h

Texas patients are more likely to self-manage abortion

Approximately 7% of patients seeking abortion at Texas clinics had tried to end their current pregnancy on their own before coming to the clinic, research finds. This is higher than the national rate of 2.2%. Patients in the study mentioned four primary reasons for attempting to self-manage their abortion: they could not afford to get to a clinic or pay for the procedure; their local clinic had c

7h

Scientists create decoy molecule that neutralizes arenaviruses

A host of disease-causing viruses called arenaviruses lurk in animal populations in various parts of the world, sometimes crossing over into humans. When they do cross over, they can be lethal, and only very few treatments exist. Researchers led by scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science have now devised a clever decoy for these viruses that may keep them from spreading in the body.

7h

Biomimetic hydrogel with photodynamic antimicrobial effect

Infections are a dreaded threat that can have fatal consequences after an operation, in the treatment of wounds, and during tissue engineering. Biomimetic hydrogels with "built-in" antimicrobial properties can significantly decrease this danger. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a gel that is activated by red light to produce reactive oxygen compounds that effectivel

7h

Welcome to Late Stage Capitalism, Where One Company Buys Another and Your Stuff Stops Working

Once upon a time, there was a company named Wyze that made cheap security cameras and other various IoT products. As of today, Wyze cameras won't detect people anymore. People detection, to be clear, is a major feature of Wyze cameras. The Wyze Cam is advertised as offering "custom zone detection and sensitivity settings," and you automatically get a clip of what the camera captures while the ful

7h

Crowdsourcing pollution data could benefit public health

Wildfire smoke regularly threatens air quality over vast regions of places like California. But a new study finds a network of low-cost sensors placed in private homes could paint a more detailed picture of localized pollution, especially in areas where data on air quality is limited.

8h

When bushfires create their own weather system

The recent bushfires in Australia have been terrifying. As we talk of firenadoes and megablazes, we're understanding just how dangerous and unpredictable fire behavior can be.

8h

Florida buys Everglades land to prevent oil drilling

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis on Wednesday announced a massive land buyout that will kill a plan to drill for oil in the Everglades.

8h

Might the bushfire crisis be the turning point on climate politics Australian needs?

Countries have long periods in which policies change little, and only by increments.

8h

How sports fans respond to their teams' wavering odds of winning

The most diehard NFL fans have already seen their seasons come to an end. This has nothing to do with whether their hometown team made the playoffs and everything to do with the annual exercise in humility known as fantasy football.

8h

Blue light can boost healing for mild brain injuries

Early morning blue light exposure therapy can aid the healing process of people with mild traumatic brain injury, according to new research. "Daily exposure to blue wavelength light each morning helps to re-entrain the circadian rhythm so that people get better, more regular sleep. This is likely true for everybody, but we recently demonstrated it in people recovering from mild traumatic brain in

8h

Team sequences genome of elusive giant squid

For the first time, scientists have sequenced and annotated the genome of a giant squid, which shed light on its life in the depths of the sea. Sailors' yarns about the Kraken, a giant sea-monster lurking in the abyss, may have an element of truth. In 1857, the Danish naturalist Japetus Steenstrup linked the tall tales of ships being dragged to the ocean floor to the existence of the giant squid

8h

Can sea star movement inspire better robots?

What researchers have learned about how a sea star accomplishes movement synchronization, given that it has no brain and a completely decentralized nervous system, might help us design more efficient robotics systems.

8h

Can heading a football lead to dementia? The evidence is growing

Concussion can have lifelong consequences and children are particularly at risk The death in 2002 of the former England and West Bromwich Albion striker Jeff Astle from degenerative brain disease placed the spotlight firmly on the possibility of a link between heading footballs and the risk of dementia. The coroner at the inquest ruled that Astle, 59, died from an "industrial disease" brought on

8h

Inside the Lipid Droplets

Figuring out an unusual natural product's activity can be a difficult but rewarding exercise. Deep evolutionary time has provided us with a bizarre range of chemical structures that are presumably not being synthesized by organisms for the sheer fun of it – these things are acting as signaling molecules, antifeedants, poisons for the competition, pheromones and who knows what else. Many biochemic

8h

Body's natural signal carriers can help melanoma spread

A new study from Finland sheds fresh light on how melanoma cells interact with other cells via extracellular vesicles they secrete. The researchers found that extracellular vesicles secreted by melanoma cells use the so-called hedgehog signalling pathway to intensify the malignant properties of the cells they are targeting. The discovery can help in the development of better treatment and diagnost

8h

Compact broadband acoustic absorber with coherently coupled weak resonances

Recently, the research teams from Tongji University and The Hong Kong Polytechnic University demonstrate that a compact broadband acoustic absorber can be achieved with coherently coupled 'weak resonances' (resonant sound absorbing systems with low absorption peaks).

8h

Kom med en løsning: Hvordan får vi elbilen til at slukke sin egen brand?

Problemet med at få slukket en brændende elbil er igen kommet på dagordenen. Vi spørger læserne: Hvordan får vi bilerne til at slukke sig selv?

8h

8h

What should we do with the millions of animals killed by bushfires?

Bushfires this season have left an estimated 1 billion dead animals in their wake, their carcasses dotting the blackened landscape.

8h

Worst marine heatwave on record killed one million seabirds in North Pacific Ocean

The common guillemot (known as the common murre in North America) breeds in both the Pacific and the Atlantic and is among the most abundant seabirds in the northern hemisphere. But like many other seabirds, its numbers have declined over the last few decades. Part of that decline is due to the marine environment—a seabird's home and hunting ground—becoming increasingly unpredictable and difficult

8h

What should we do with the millions of animals killed by bushfires?

Bushfires this season have left an estimated 1 billion dead animals in their wake, their carcasses dotting the blackened landscape.

8h

Worst marine heatwave on record killed one million seabirds in North Pacific Ocean

The common guillemot (known as the common murre in North America) breeds in both the Pacific and the Atlantic and is among the most abundant seabirds in the northern hemisphere. But like many other seabirds, its numbers have declined over the last few decades. Part of that decline is due to the marine environment—a seabird's home and hunting ground—becoming increasingly unpredictable and difficult

8h

Coherent master equation for laser modelocking

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14013-4 Modelocked lasers are typically modeled using the Haus master equation which, albeit powerful, provides only a limited description in certain parameter regimes. The authors introduce another master equation formalism to describe laser modelocking that accounts for coherent effects and overcomes these limitati

3h

Uploading your brain will leave you exposed to software glitches

Think a digital version of your mind will allow you to live forever? It might, but it will also open you up to software manipulation and server problems, says Annalee Newitz

3min

History almost forgot this speech by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

A 1966 speech by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr in North Carolina—and the KKK's response—have largely faded from record. Jason Miller, an English professor at North Carolina State University, is the curator of an on-campus photography exhibit about the historical event. (Credit: NC State) We tend to gloss over 1966 and 1967 in our considerations of Dr. King, Miller says, skipping from the March on Wa

3min

Strange Shape-Shifting Objects Found Near Milky Way's Black Hole

Like a G Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, have identified a new type of astronomical object in our galaxy — and they appear to shape shift. They're called G objects, and so far, astronomers have identified six of them orbiting the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way. When the G objects are farthest away from the black hole, they are compact. But when

3min

Hormone resistance in breast cancer linked to DNA 'rewiring'

Garvan researchers have revealed changes to the 3D arrangement of DNA linked to treatment resistance in ER+ breast cancer.

4min

New method detects toxin exposure from harmful algal blooms in human urine

A newly developed method can detect even low-dose human exposure to microcystins and nodularin in human urine. During harmful algal blooms (HABs), species of cyanobacteria release toxic peptides, including microcystins and nodularin into waterways, impacting wildlife and humans living in these marine environments. These findings are the first to report microcystin concentrations directly from expo

4min

Research collaboration reveals promising drug candidate for treatment of blood cancers

An international research collaboration between the United States and Australia has revealed a promising new drug which could treat high-risk leukemia.

4min

Whooping cough evolving into a superbug

Whooping cough bacteria are becoming smarter at colonising and feeding off unwitting hosts — whether they have been vaccinated or not — strengthening calls for a new vaccine, according to UNSW researchers.

4min

Protein i jäst kan ge ledtrådar om Parkinson

När våra celler bygger proteiner kan mycket gå fel. En avhandling vid Umeå universitet har upptäckt att en viss liten molekyl hos jäst påverkar hur DNA-koden läses av när nya proteiner ska tillverkas. Felaktigheter i processen förknippas med Parkinson och andra neurologiska sjukdomar. Produktion av olika ämnen inuti levande organismer är komplex, och de faktorer som krävs för att processen ska fu

7min

Apple TV\+ Nabs Spike Jonze's Beastie Boys Doc

Meanwhile, Netflix is about to unleash Miss Americana, its documentary about Taylor Swift .

8min

Scientists Find Evidence of Second Planet Orbiting Closest Star

Howdy Neighbor An international team of astronomers have found new evidence of a second exoplanet orbiting Proxima Centauri, the star that's closest to the Sun at only 4.22 light years away. "Proxima is our closest neighbor in an immense universe," co-author Fabio Del Sordo, an astronomer at Yale University, told Scientific American . "How could we not be charmed by it?" Proxima C In a study publ

13min

Dirty Money and Bad Science at MIT's Media Lab

The school's investigation shows that two separate scandals—over Jeffrey Epstein and OpenAg—were closely linked.

15min

Creating learning resources for blind students

Mathematics and science Braille textbooks are expensive and require an enormous effort to produce — until now. A team of researchers has developed a method for easily creating textbooks in Braille, with an initial focus on math textbooks. The new process is made possible by a new authoring system which serves as a 'universal translator' for textbook formats. Based on this new method, the producti

17min

Lame sheep adjust their behavior to cope with their condition

Using novel sensing technology, experts have found that lame sheep adjust how they carry out certain actives, such as walking, standing or laying down, rather than simply reducing the amount they do.

17min

Male songbirds can't survive on good looks alone

Brightly colored male songbirds not only have to attract the female's eye, but also make sure their sperm can last the distance, according to new research.

17min

Good connections key to startup success

The future potential of early stage startups can be assessed by their existing professional relationships, research suggests.

17min

18min

The Display of the Future Might Be in Your Contact Lens

submitted by /u/APimpAndHisTurtle [link] [comments]

18min

18min

18min

18min

18min

18min

18min

18min

DeepMind found an AI learning technique also works in human brains

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

18min

18min

The Overlooked History of Women at Work

A Grolier Club exhibition explores 500 years of women as scientists, midwives, writers, activists, undertakers and more.

20min

The FCC's Approval of SpaceX's Starlink Mega Constellation May Have Been Unlawful

A new paper suggests that the agency broke U.S. environmental law in its approval of the satellites and that if it was sued in court, it would likely lose — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23min

Poetry: Maria Sibylla Merian, January 1670

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

24min

"Birdbrain" Turns from Insult to Praise

Some avian species use tools and can recognize themselves in the mirror. How do tiny brains pull off such big feats? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

24min

Poetry: Maria Sibylla Merian, January 1670

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

26min

The FCC's Approval of SpaceX's Starlink Mega Constellation May Have Been Unlawful

A new paper suggests that the agency broke U.S. environmental law in its approval of the satellites and that if it was sued in court, it would likely lose — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

26min

"Birdbrain" Turns from Insult to Praise

Some avian species use tools and can recognize themselves in the mirror. How do tiny brains pull off such big feats? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

26min

A technology for embedding data in printed objects

A team from Nara Institute of Science and Technology, composed of Ph.D. Student Arnaud Delmotte, Professor Yasuhiro Mukaigawa, Associate Professor Takuya Funatomi, Assistant Professor Hiroyuki Kubo, and Assistant Professor Kenichiro Tanaka, has developed a new method to embed information in a 3D printed object and retrieve it using a consumer document scanner. Information such as a serial ID can b

26min

Mutations in donors' stem cells may cause problems for cancer patients

A new study suggests that extremely rare, harmful genetic mutations present in healthy donors' stem cells — though not causing health problems in the donors — may be passed on to cancer patients receiving stem cell transplants, potentially creating health problems for the recipients. Among the concerns are heart damage, graft-versus-host disease and possible new leukemias.

32min

Obesity crisis blamed for a rise in fatty liver disease amongst young adults

One in five young people have fatty liver disease (steatosis), with one in 40 having already developed liver scarring (fibrosis), new research has found. The study is the first to attempt to determine the prevalence of fatty liver disease and fibrosis in young healthy adults in the UK.

32min

Rich People Don't Just Live Longer. They Also Get More Healthy Years.

Wealthy men and women generally have seven to nine more years of "disability-free" life after age 50 than poor people do, according to a new study of English and American adults.

37min

Fler behandlingar på rotfyllda tänder med komposit

​Rotfyllda tänder som lagats med kompositmaterial måste oftare lagas på nytt eller dras ut inom fem år, jämfört med tänder som lagats med krona. Det visar forskaren Victoria Dawson, som däremot inte hittar några belägg för att komposit skulle vara en risk för inflammation vid tandens rotspets. I en ny avhandling har Victoria Dawson, doktorand vid Malmö universitet, jämfört två metoder för att ers

38min

Ny art antibiotikaresistenta bakterier påträffad i infekterat sår

En hittills okänd art av antibiotikaresistenta bakterier, inom samma familj som E. coli och salmonella, har påträffats och klassificerats i Sverige. Arten, som är den första inom sitt släkte, föreslås få namnet Scandinavium goeteborgense, efter staden Göteborg där forskningen bedrivits. Att veta vilken bakterie som orsakar en infektion och vilka antibiotika som fungerar eller inte är mycket vikti

38min

Jumping genes threaten egg cell quality

A woman's supply of eggs is finite, so it is crucial that the quality of their genetic material is ensured. New work elucidates a mechanism by which, even before birth, the body tries to eliminate egg cells of the poorest quality.

47min

Hookah smoke may be associated with increased risk of blood clots

In a new study conducted in mice, researchers found that tobacco smoke from a hookah caused blood to function abnormally and be more likely to clot and quickly form blood clots. The findings provide new evidence that hookah smoking may not be a safe alternative to cigarettes.

47min

Women's blood vessels age faster than men's

Many medical experts have long believed that women simply 'catch up' to men in terms of their cardiovascular risk, but new research shows for the first time that women's blood vessels age at a faster rate than men's. The findings could help to explain why women tend to develop different types of cardiovascular disease and with different timing than men.

47min

Sticky situation inside blood vessels can worsen stroke damage

A stroke appears to create a sticky situation inside the blood vessels of the brain that can worsen damage days, even months later, scientists report.

47min

Brave New World Of Retail: Walmart's Robots Are Just The Beginning

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

1h

Leaders use shortcut to assess who trusts them

As a leader, do you know if your employees trust you? Is your sense of their trust accurate? If you're wrong, will that affect your success?

1h

Chimp sons like to hang with fathers and brothers

Even if they have no way of identifying them, male chimpanzees form intimate bonds with their fathers, according to a new study of wild chimpanzees in Uganda. In adulthood, male chimpanzees form strong relationships with one another. These bonds can be mutually beneficial—to relieve stress, protect one another, and share food . In the new study, which examines when and with whom these bonds devel

1h

Why can't Bertrand Might cry? Scientists offer an answer: missing water channels

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that cells from children with NGLY1 deficiency–a rare disorder first described in 2012–lack sufficient water channel proteins called aquaporins. The discovery was published in Cell Reports and may help explain the disorder's wide-ranging symptoms–including the inability to produce tears, seizures and developmental delay

1h

How Did Humans Boil Water Before the Invention of Pots?

On a blustery day in October, Andrew Langley and 13 other graduate students headed to the woods to learn to boil water. They were allowed no obvious cooking vessels: no pots, no pans, no bowls, no cups, no containers at all. But they did bring deer hides, which Langley had carefully procured from deer farms. They were to boil water the Paleolithic way. Langley is a doctoral student in archaeology

1h

Potential to adapt is revealed by evolutionary genomics

Global climate change is going to drastically alter the environmental conditions for humans and nature. Animals and plants unable to cope with the new conditions are thus forced to shift their range to different areas or to adapt genetically. Otherwise they are in danger of extinction. Mobile species such as birds can change their migration routes and colonize new, more suitable habitats. Earth wo

1h

New mechanisms describe how the genome regulates itself

An organism's genome contains all of the information necessary for each of its cells and tissues to develop and function properly. Written in DNA, each individual gene encodes for something, whether it is a structural protein that helps define a tissue's shape, an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reactions of life, or a signaling protein that cells use to communicate.

1h

Predicting hydraulic fracture propagation more accurately

Researchers at EPFL have developed a new model to calculate hydraulic fracture propagation. Acclaimed for its accuracy by experts, the model better predicts fracture geometry and the energy cost of hydraulic fracturing—a widely used technique in areas such as CO2 storage, hydrocarbon extraction, dams and volcano hazard monitoring.

1h

How is a brown recluse spider like a samurai swordsmith?

There are two characteristics that work together to make spider silk so strong and tough.

1h

B-cellernas viktiga roll vid immunterapi

Patienter svarade bättre på immunterapi om melanomtumörer innehöll särskilda kluster med B-celler. Det visar forskning från Lunds universitet. Immunterapi, som nobelprisades 2018, stärker immunförsvaret så att det kan oskadliggöra cancercellerna på ett mer effektivt sätt. Men långt ifrån alla patienter blir hjälpta av den så kallade checkpoint -terapin och intensiv forskning pågår nu för att förs

1h

Potential to adapt is revealed by evolutionary genomics

Global climate change is going to drastically alter the environmental conditions for humans and nature. Animals and plants unable to cope with the new conditions are thus forced to shift their range to different areas or to adapt genetically. Otherwise they are in danger of extinction. Mobile species such as birds can change their migration routes and colonize new, more suitable habitats. Earth wo

1h

New mechanisms describe how the genome regulates itself

An organism's genome contains all of the information necessary for each of its cells and tissues to develop and function properly. Written in DNA, each individual gene encodes for something, whether it is a structural protein that helps define a tissue's shape, an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reactions of life, or a signaling protein that cells use to communicate.

1h

Den tyrkiske højesteretsdomstol genåbner Wikipedia

Borgere i Tyrkiet kan igen gå på Wikipedia fra tyrkiske IP-adresser. Online-leksikonet blev blokeret i 2017, men nu har den tyrkiske højesteret afgjort, at blokeringen strider mod den tyrkiske forfatning.

1h

Slukningscontainer: Her kan brandvæsenet isolere brændende elbiler

Beredskab Øst har investeret i en såkaldt brandslukningscontainer til elbiler og batterier i brand. En type brand, der er så udfordrende, at containeren vil kunne hjælpe beredskaber i hele landet og det sydlige Sverige.

1h

Ny analyse af geriatrien: Hospitaler i Region Midtjylland klarer sig bedst og dårligst

Dagens Medicin har kortlagt, hvordan landets hospitaler klarer sig inden for den geriatriske behandling. Analysen viser, at der er store regionale forskelle på, hvordan de bedste og dårligste hospitaler klarer sig.

1h

Behind howls of solar wind, quiet chirps reveal its origins

There's a wind that emanates from the sun, and it blows not like a soft whistle but like a hurricane's scream.

1h

Nestle to invest 2bn Swiss francs in recycled plastics

Swiss food giant Nestle said Thursday it would invest 2.0 billion Swiss francs (1.8 billion euros, $2.1 billion) over five years to cut its use of virgin plastics in favour of food-grade recycled plastics.

1h

Possible Missing Link in Alzheimer's Pathology Identified

It may open the door to new treatments and explain why previous ones failed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

The Philadelphia Eagles are driving the NFL toward a greener future

Though it may not be visually apparent from the 50-yard line, the Eagles' stadium is one of the most sustainable in the NFL. (Wikimedia Commons/) Without humans for scale, an NFL stadium can seem quite cozy from the turf. Or so I observed at Lincoln Financial Field, home of the Philadelphia Eagles, on a visit last fall. For 45 minutes, Norman Vossschulte, the team's Director of Guest Experience a

1h

The Display of the Future Might Be in Your Contact Lens

Mojo Vision's prototypes can enhance your vision or show you your schedule—right from the surface of your eyes.

1h

Possible Missing Link in Alzheimer's Pathology Identified

It may open the door to new treatments and explain why previous ones failed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Race to save animals on Australia's fire-ravaged 'Galapagos'

On an island famed as Australia's "Galapagos" for its unique and abundant wildlife, rescuers are racing to save rare animals in a bushfire-ravaged landscape.

1h

Image of the Day: Living Concrete

Bacteria and sand form a strong building material.

1h

Anti-Vaxxers Strike Back

This is going to be a long struggle, perhaps endless. Antivaxxers have been around since there have been vaccines, for over two hundred years, so there is no reason to expect they are going anywhere. Rather, we need an equally permanent anti-antivaxxer movement (otherwise known as the skeptical movement). After the Disneyland measles outbreak, there has been political pressure to push back agains

1h

Possible Missing Link in Alzheimer's Pathology Identified

It may open the door to new treatments and explain why previous ones failed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Trees struggle when forests become too small

As forest areas shrink and become fragmented, many tree species face problems. They often rely on animals that can no longer disperse their seeds effectively.

1h

Trees struggle when forests become too small

As forest areas shrink and become fragmented, many tree species face problems. They often rely on animals that can no longer disperse their seeds effectively.

1h

Power struggles: How Tennessee became more racially and politically divided

Tennessee has long been considered politically moderate and relatively racially progressive, compared to other southern states. But researchers say the Volunteer State has become considerably more conservative—and racially polarized—since the turn of the 21st century.

1h

Why single-parent homes don't affect black children as negatively as white kids

,Social policy and popular culture promote the two-parent nuclear family as an ideal structure for raising successful, healthy children. But the reality of family life in America looks very different from that: Half of all children spend time living with a single parent, and one in three spends some time living with an extended relative. Christina Cross, a postdoctoral scholar and incoming assista

1h

Women in leadership positions face more sexual harassment

Power in the workplace does not stop women's exposure to sexual harassment. On the contrary, women with supervisory positions are harassed more than women employees. These are the results from a new study from the Swedish Institute for Social Research at Stockholm University, which examined the conditions in Sweden, the U.S. and Japan.

1h

New software to better understand conversations between cells

One of the most fascinating and important properties of living cells is their capacity for self-organization. By talking to each other, cells can, among other things, determine where they are in relation to each other and whether they need to turn certain genes on or off. Thus, large groups of cells are able to work together and organize into all kinds of tissues. Researchers at Delft University o

1h

New software to better understand conversations between cells

One of the most fascinating and important properties of living cells is their capacity for self-organization. By talking to each other, cells can, among other things, determine where they are in relation to each other and whether they need to turn certain genes on or off. Thus, large groups of cells are able to work together and organize into all kinds of tissues. Researchers at Delft University o

1h

Decontaminating pesticide-polluted water using engineered nanomaterial

Atrazine is one of the most widely used pesticides in North America. Researchers at the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) have developed a new method to degrade it that combines a new nanostructured material and sunlight.

1h

How much microplastic is there in your laundry basket?

Every time you wash clothes, you are releasing microplastics into the sea, but we know little about the amount and distribution of such material from different types of textile. Research scientists are now working on measuring and capturing microplastics in our laundry.

1h

Possible discovery of a new super-Earth orbiting Proxima Centauri

Astronomers have discovered another candidate exoplanet orbiting our neighbor Proxima Centauri. A paper announcing these results was just published in the journal Science Advances. If confirmed, it will be the second exoplanet discovered to be orbiting the star.

1h

Potassium-driven rechargeable batteries: An effort toward a more sustainable environment

Our modern lifestyle would be immensely different without rechargeable batteries. Owing to their low-cost, recyclable technology, these batteries are used in most portable electronic devices, electric and hybrid vehicles, and renewable power generation systems. They offer an elegant solution to the world's growing energy demands. Moreover, rechargeable batteries are an essential tool in systems th

1h

Researchers propose 'Human Screenome Project' to study the impacts of digital media

As digital devices become ubiquitous, so have concerns about the harmful effects of screen-related behaviors. Does screen time impair concentration, lead to anxiety or depression, hinder social behavior or curb our ability to tell fake from real news?

1h

Image: Flooding in southern Iran

Heavy rainfall has triggered flooding in southern Iran, particularly in the Sistan and Baluchestan, Hormozgan and Kerman provinces. The downpour has led to blocked roads and destroyed bridges, crops and houses—displacing thousands of people.

1h

Sådan finder vi de bedste til behandling af geriatriske sygdomme

Dagens Medicin har ranglistet landets hospitaler i forhold til behandling af geriatriske sygdomme. Se her hvordan.

1h

Let's Stop Talking About "Battling Cancer"

Describing it that way can be damaging to patients, families and caregivers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

How cells assemble their microtubule skeleton

Microtubules, filamentous structures within the cell, are required for many important processes, including cell division and intracellular transport. A research team led by scientists from Heidelberg University recently discovered how the spiral-shaped, modular microtubules are formed and how their formation is controlled. These processes were visualized using state-of-the-art cryo-electron micros

2h

How cells assemble their microtubule skeleton

Microtubules, filamentous structures within the cell, are required for many important processes, including cell division and intracellular transport. A research team led by scientists from Heidelberg University recently discovered how the spiral-shaped, modular microtubules are formed and how their formation is controlled. These processes were visualized using state-of-the-art cryo-electron micros

2h

Prohibition Was a Failed Experiment in Moral Governance

A century ago, Prohibition went into effect around the United States, and the evangelical Protestants who had fought for 80 years to make it a reality celebrated. With the ratification of the Eighteenth Amendment, which proscribed "the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors" across the United States, they had achieved something unparalleled by any movement before or since: T

2h

The Reading Assignment That Changed Garth Greenwell's Life

By Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Jonathan Franzen, Amy Tan, Khaled Hosseini, and more. Doug McLean The novelist Garth Greenwell was still an undergraduate when he took the poetry class that changed his life. Though he had been studying opera, the course affected him so profoundly that he decided, instead, to p

2h

Klimatutsläpp från svenskars flygresor kan minskas med en fjärdedel

Det finns stor potential för minskade klimatutsläpp från svenskarnas flygresor genom ändrat resebeteende. Hos resenärerna finns stor acceptans både för att välja närmre destinationer och andra transportslag. Det visar en studie gjord av forskare vid Göteborgs universitet och Chalmers tekniska högskola. – I många fall finns det alternativa resor, med lägre klimatpåverkan, som människor upplever so

2h

Större risk för sexuella trakasserier som kvinnlig chef

Att göra karriär och bli chef skyddar inte kvinnor mot sexuella trakasserier på arbetsplatsen. Tvärtom är det vanligare att kvinnor utsätts för trakasserier när de har arbetsledande funktioner. Det visar en ny studie från Institutet för social forskning som undersökt förhållanden i Sverige, USA och Japan. Genom att analysera enkätsvar från Sverige, USA och Japan har forskare från Institutet för s

2h

A Chameleon City Is Built to Make Movies

Originally published in April 1915 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

What Atlanta Can Teach Tech About Cultivating Black Talent

The city is rich in opportunity for African Americans, who are largely underrepresented in the industry. It's also poised to become a hotbed for AI innovation.

2h

This Apple-FBI Fight Is Different From the Last One

In 2016, the iPhone encryption debate ended in a draw. Don't count on 2020's scuffle over the Pensacola shooter's devices to play out the same way.

2h

Let's Stop Talking About "Battling Cancer"

Describing it that way can be damaging to patients, families and caregivers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Johns Hopkins Scientists Give Psychedelics the Serious Treatment

The first research center of its kind in the country is bringing renewed rigor to the investigation of the drugs' therapeutic uses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Johns Hopkins Scientists Give Psychedelics the Serious Treatment

The first research center of its kind in the country is bringing renewed rigor to the investigation of the drugs' therapeutic uses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Johns Hopkins Scientists Give Psychedelics the Serious Treatment

The first research center of its kind in the country is bringing renewed rigor to the investigation of the drugs' therapeutic uses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Bakterieproduceret beton skal gøre byggepladsen mere CO2-venlig

Danske Novo Holdings har købt sig ind i den amerikanske startup BioMason, som bruger bakterieproduceret 'lim' i beton i stedet for cement.

2h

Where the Shelters Are Full and the Skyscrapers Are Vacant

In Manhattan, the homeless shelters are full, and the luxury skyscrapers are vacant. Such is the tale of two cities within America's largest metro. Even as 80,000 people sleep in New York City's shelters or on its streets, Manhattan residents have watched skinny condominium skyscrapers rise across the island. These colossal stalagmites initially transformed not only the city's skyline but also th

2h

USA lægger pres på Storbritannien: Fravælg Huawei

Amerikanerne vil ikke dele efterretninger med allierede, der bruger Huawei-udstyr i deres 5G-netværk. Sådan lyder truslen mod Storbritannien, der skal træffe en endelig beslutning om, hvorvidt man vil bruge udstyr fra den kinesiske producent. Britiske embedsmænd har allerede sagt, at der ikke vil…

2h

Why Discovering Martians Could Be Disappointing – Issue 80: Aliens

While some scientists search for extraterrestrial life by landing rovers on Mars, launching telescopes into space, and scanning the skies with giant radio dishes, geobiologist Joseph Kirschvink thinks that the first telltale signs of alien life may be sitting on a shelf at NASA's Johnson Space Center, bundled in a Martian rock that conveniently fell to Earth. On the wall of Kirschvink's office at

2h

Do We Share DNA with ET? – Issue 80: Aliens

The primary difficulty of interstellar communication is finding common ground between ourselves and other intelligent entities about which we can know nothing with absolute certainty. This common ground would be the basis for a universal language that could be understood by any intelligence, whether in the Milky Way, Andromeda, or beyond the cosmic horizon. To the best of our knowledge, the laws

2h

What Are the Odds of Alien Contact? – Issue 80: Aliens

The only intelligent life forms we know of reside here on Earth. But that hasn't stopped us from trying to answer the question: "Are we alone?" The search for extraterrestrial intelligence now has an accepted acronym, SETI, and a growing number of interested participants. The odds of galactic company can only be estimated, and a primary tool to predict the number of other civilizations out there

2h

Galactic Settlement and the Fermi Paradox – Issue 80: Aliens

A spacefaring species could easily settle the entire Milky Way given billions of years. Yet the fact is that there is no obvious one in our solar system right now. The supposed inconsistency between these statements is the Fermi Paradox, named for the Nobel Prize-winning physicist who supposedly first formulated it. In a trenchant formulation of the Fermi Paradox, American astrophysicist Michael

2h

It May Not Feel Like Anything To Be an Alien – Issue 80: Aliens

Humans are probably not the greatest intelligences in the universe. Earth is a relatively young planet and the oldest civilizations could be billions of years older than us. But even on Earth, Homo sapiens may not be the most intelligent species for that much longer. The world Go, chess, and Jeopardy champions are now all AIs. AI is projected to outmode many human professions within the next few

2h

2h

AI Therapeutics announces that a common LAM-002 mechanism in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases shows antitumor activity in the clinic and hope for ALS

AI Therapeutics has made significant recent progress with its four clinical assets and proprietary Guardian Angel™ algorithm.

3h

Mysterious drone swarms flying at night are baffling US authorities

Swarms of drones have been seen flying over Colorado, Nebraska and Wyoming in the past few weeks, but no one has claimed responsibility

3h

How to keep your audience engaged

The most important part of being a writer is feeling that you're not important and that the work you're doing is not about you. "A journalist is someone who is willing to disappoint themselves with the truth." Every piece of journalism has a narrative arc, and that arc is integral to any human storytelling. Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging List Price: $22.00 New From: $11.45 in Stock Used From:

3h

Author 'still shocked by the blatancy of the plagiarism and by the stupidity' after a reviewer steals his work

A group of researchers in France has lost a 2019 paper in Cell Calcium because one of the authors too, um, a bit too much inspiration for the work from a manuscript he'd reviewed for another publication. The article, "TRPV6 calcium channel regulation, downstream pathways, and therapeutic targeting in cancer," was written by a team … Continue reading

3h

Inside the Feds' Battle Against Huawei

How Washington went to war against the Chinese smartphone giant, and how the runaway conflict could spell the end of a single, global internet.

3h

Trump's Malign Neglect of Puerto Rico

SAN JUAN—Weeks into an ominous pattern of earthquakes, Puerto Rico is still shaking violently. On December 28, what might have been an ordinary holiday week was suddenly interrupted by a mild tremor whose intensity registered at 3.8 on the Richter scale. Mild in itself, it began what geologists call an "earthquake swarm" of more than 1,000 tremors to date. The worst was a 6.4 temblor on January 7

3h

Reducing Fire, and Cutting Carbon Emissions, the Aboriginal Way

As blazes rage in southern Australia, Indigenous fire-prevention techniques that have sharply cut destructive bushfires in the north are drawing new attention.

3h

#75 Robotterne kommer – kolde hænder ryster ikke

Podcasten Stetoskopet undersøger, hvordan en robotassisteret operation foregår, og hvordan fremtiden for robotkirurgi ser ud i det danske sundhedsvæsen.

3h

Epigenetic reprogramming at estrogen-receptor binding sites alters 3D chromatin landscape in endocrine-resistant breast cancer

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14098-x Endocrine therapy resistance occurs often in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. Here, the authors find that 3D epigenome remodelling at ER-bound enhancer-promoter interactions is a key mechanism underlying endocrine resistance.

3h

Word contexts enhance the neural representation of individual letters in early visual cortex

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13996-4 Letters are more easily identified when embedded in a word. Here, the authors show that word contexts can enhance letter information in early visual cortex, suggesting that the advantage offered by words occurs already during early perceptual processing.

3h

Crystal structures of fukutin-related protein (FKRP), a ribitol-phosphate transferase related to muscular dystrophy

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14220-z Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) catalyses the addition of ribitol-phosphate (RboP) to the O-mannosyl glycan of α-dystroglycan and mutations in FKRP cause dystroglycanopathy. Here the authors provide insights into its oligomerization and recognition of the substrates, CDP-Rbo and the RboP-(phospho-)core M3 glyc

3h

A network analysis to identify mediators of germline-driven differences in breast cancer prognosis

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14100-6 In breast cancer the contribution of different genetic variants to disease heritability is complex and not fully understood. Here, the authors present a network-based analysis in 84,567 patients studying ~7.3 million variants, identifying gene modules associated with breast cancer survival.

3h

Cu2O photocathodes with band-tail states assisted hole transport for standalone solar water splitting

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13987-5 While solar-to-fuel conversion offers a promising technology to produce energy, device components can limit light absorption and reduce performances. Here, authors show copper thiocyanate to assist hole transport in photoelectrodes and enable a 4.55% solar-to-hydrogen efficiency in tandem devices.

3h

Two-way tuning of structural order in metallic glasses

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14129-7 While metallic glasses are expected to have tunable structures, these have rarely been demonstrated. Here, the authors combine temperature and pressure to show a two-way structural tuning in rare earth-based metallic glasses beyond the nearest-neighbor atomic shells.

3h

Trapped ion mobility spectrometry and PASEF enable in-depth lipidomics from minimal sample amounts

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14044-x Trapped ion mobility (TIMS)-mass spectrometry with parallel accumulation-serial fragmentation (PASEF) facilitates high-sensitivity proteomics experiments. Here, the authors expand TIMS and PASEF to small molecules and demonstrate fast and comprehensive lipidomics of low biological sample amounts.

3h

Ny rapport: Elbilen kan udrydde hvert fjerde job i den tyske bilindustri

Der er risiko for, at industrien gør sig afhængig af leverandører fra andre lande for at bygge elbiler.

3h

Stor miljövinst om svenskar semestrar i Europa

– I många fall finns det alternativa resor med lägre klimatpåverkan, som människor upplever som mer eller mindre lika bra som de resor de har gjort med flyg. Detta innebär att det finns en realistisk potential för att minska utsläppen från svenskarnas flygresor med cirka en fjärdedel, säger Erik Lundberg, forskare vid Göteborgs universitet.

3h

Organisation: Landapoteker truet af lukning

Landdistrikternes Fællesråd frygter fremtiden for apoteker i landområder og skriver brev til sundhedsministeren.

4h

Jumping genes threaten egg cell quality

A woman's supply of eggs is finite, so it is crucial that the quality of their genetic material is ensured. New work from Carnegie's Marla Tharp, Safia Malki, and Alex Bortvin elucidates a mechanism by which, even before birth, the body tries to eliminate egg cells of the poorest quality.

4h

Hookah smoke may be associated with increased risk of blood clots

In a new study conducted in mice, researchers found that tobacco smoke from a hookah caused blood to function abnormally and be more likely to clot and quickly form blood clots. The findings provide new evidence that hookah smoking may not be a safe alternative to cigarettes.

4h

Sleep/Wake Regularity Associated with Default Mode Network Structure among Healthy Adolescents and Young Adults

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57024-3

4h

Quantitative and Fast Sterility Assurance Testing of Surfaces by Enumeration of Germinable Endospores

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57175-3

4h

Electron Scattering in Conventional Cell Flask Experiments and Dose Distribution Dependency

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57029-y

4h

Evolution and Determinants of Lung Function until Late Infancy among Infants Born Preterm

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57359-x

4h

Neurosurgical lesions to sensorimotor cortex do not impair action verb processing

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57361-3

4h

Chronotherapy of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs May Enhance Postoperative Recovery

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57215-y

4h

Design of nanoscaled heterojunctions in precursor-derived t-ZrO2/SiOC(N) nanocomposites: Transgressing the boundaries of catalytic activity from UV to visible light

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57394-8 Design of nanoscaled heterojunctions in precursor-derived t -ZrO 2 /SiOC(N) nanocomposites: Transgressing the boundaries of catalytic activity from UV to visible light

4h

Targeting Forward and Reverse EphB4/EFNB2 Signaling by a Peptide with Dual Functions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57477-x

4h

Putin Pays Backhanded Tribute to Democracy

Yesterday's government shake-up in Moscow and the institutional changes Vladimir Putin proposed with it are plainly a response to what Russian observers call "Problem-24." As in 2024—when Putin's current, fourth presidential term expires. In 2024, Putin will turn 72. He will have been in power for 24 years. Because of the toxic investment climate, rife with bureaucratic racketeering and corruptio

4h

Joe Biden's Bipartisan Dream Comes True in Kansas

I magine: A veteran Democrat with a reputation for bipartisan dealmaking defeats a Republican who complains about voter fraud and crusades against illegal immigration. A GOP legislative leader, recognizing the political ground shifting under him, comes reluctantly to the negotiating table. After months of talks, the two strike a compromise on health care that dramatically expands publicly funded

4h

First stranded Orca found in almost 20 years in the Wash

The dead 15ft (4.5m) long juvenile killer whale was found on the coast of Norfolk and Lincolnshire.

4h

Scientists Sent Mighty Mice To Space To Improve Treatments Back On Earth

Forty mice spent more than a month in orbit to test two approaches to strengthening muscle and bone in microgravity conditions. The results could help people with muscle and bone diseases. (Image credit: NASA)

4h

Jumping genes threaten egg cell quality

A woman's supply of eggs is finite, so it is crucial that the quality of their genetic material is ensured. New work from Carnegie's Marla Tharp, Safia Malki, and Alex Bortvin elucidates a mechanism by which, even before birth, the body tries to eliminate egg cells of the poorest quality. Their findings describing this mechanism are published by Nature Communications.

4h

Jumping genes threaten egg cell quality

A woman's supply of eggs is finite, so it is crucial that the quality of their genetic material is ensured. New work from Carnegie's Marla Tharp, Safia Malki, and Alex Bortvin elucidates a mechanism by which, even before birth, the body tries to eliminate egg cells of the poorest quality. Their findings describing this mechanism are published by Nature Communications.

4h

Humans' Enduring Toll on the Galápagos Islands

The Galápagos Islands are home to some of the most unique natural habitats in the world, teaming with species found nowhere else on Earth. But ever since humans set foot there nearly 500 years ago, efforts to study and preserve the islands have been met with attempts to exploit and profit from them too.

4h

Nu kommer de levende robotter

PLUS. En amerikansk forskergruppe fremstiller biologiske maskiner, der befinder sig i gråzonen mellem levende og døde organismer.

4h

Brexit: Den europæiske forskning ender som taberen

Usikkerheden om fremtiden for de europæiske forskere vokser. Hvis briterne forlader EU med et no-deal Brexit, vil det få store konsekvenser for forskningen.

4h

4h

4h

4h

What would you do differently if your sure that we will cure aging in the future.

If you know you have infinite time, what will you do instead? submitted by /u/853240936 [link] [comments]

4h

4h

If CEO's and other administrative positions are so expensive and automation cuts costs; at what point in the future will AI (or robots I suppose) start to replace CEOs?

I would imagine someone creates an open source kind of manager-bot or something along those lines like Linux but for administrative duties. I mean proprietary software is potentially possibly as well but who is going to make it? IBM? Oracle? A weird offshoot of Byrd Scooter Technology? My point is, companies could save a lot of money but having an AI run things. And they would never need to worry

4h

Deliferate misteaks by Tradional Chinese Medicine

Smut Clyde studies two Chinese research groups to understand how TCM can be used to create modern Photoshop art.

5h

Police platform patrols create 'phantom effect' that cuts crime in London Underground

A massive experiment that deployed regular police patrols on platforms in the London Underground has shown that four 15-minute patrols a day in some of the capital's most crime-ridden stations reduced reported crime and disorder by 21%.

5h

Ubudne gæster i Region Sjællands it-systemer: Flere hjemmesider er nede

Ukendte gerningsmænd har forsøgt at udnytte en sårbarhed hos Region Sjælland. Konsekvenserne er endnu ukendte, men flere af regionens hjemmesider er fortsat nede.

5h

Meghan, Kate, and the Architecture of Misogyny

Are you Team Kate or Team Meghan? If you're anything like me, you don't want to pick a side—and you don't think there should be "sides" at all. Yet ever since Meghan Markle married Prince Harry, parts of the media have pitted the former actor against her sister-in-law. Where Kate Middleton was once depicted as a dull social climber, she is now presented as the epitome of female virtue : a respect

5h

Solar-powered barge a key 'interceptor' for plastic waste

Scooping waste from a Malaysian river to stop it reaching the sea, a solar-powered barge named the "Interceptor" is the latest weapon in a global battle to rid the world's waters of plastic.

5h

Tiny Seychelles island coaxes bird back from brink

Giant tortoises amble across Cousin Island as rare birds flit above.

5h

Australia firefighters save world's only rare dinosaur trees

Specialist firefighters have saved the world's last remaining wild stand of a prehistoric tree from wildfires that razed forests west of Sydney, officials said Thursday.

5h

Tiny Seychelles island coaxes bird back from brink

Giant tortoises amble across Cousin Island as rare birds flit above.

5h

Police platform patrols create 'phantom effect' that cuts crime in London Underground

A major experiment introducing proactive policing to Underground platforms finds that short bursts of patrolling create a "phantom effect": 97% of the resulting crime reduction was during periods when police weren't actually present.

5h