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America's most widely consumed oil causes genetic changes in the brain

New UC Riverside research shows soybean oil not only leads to obesity and diabetes, but could also affect neurological conditions like autism, Alzheimer's disease, anxiety, and depression.

9h

How 'spooky' is quantum physics? The answer could be incalculable

Nature, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00120-6 Proof at the nexus of pure mathematics and algorithms puts 'quantum weirdness' on a whole new level.

20h

4h

Scientists Say They've Found a Way to Make Oxygen From Moon Dust

Making Air European Space Agency (ESA) scientists say they've found a way to produce oxygen from lunar dust. Samples of real lunar dust have been found to be made up of 40 to 45 percent of oxygen by weight, according to the ESA. The team just opened a "prototype oxygen plant" inside a European Space Research and Technology Center lab in the Netherlands. "Being able to acquire oxygen from resource

3min

Shooting the Messenger

The Trump administration has placed civil servants and nonpolitical government employees in a terrible position. Their job is to provide accurate, nonpartisan information and make decisions grounded in law; sometimes that involves providing testimony to Congress, which legally must be truthful. Yet if they tell the truth, President Donald Trump and his allies will publicly crucify them. Bureaucra

33min

The new black-and-white Leica does things color cameras can't

When it comes to cameras, there's none more black. (Leica/) Almost every subculture and craft has its own specific lexicon that can quickly identify outsiders. Say "tattoo gun" instead of "tattoo machine" in a shop, for instance, and you'll immediately reveal yourself as an outsider who hasn't learned the parlance. The same goes for photographers. Call digital noise "grain" in front of a photo sn

42min

U.S. appeals court tosses children's climate lawsuit

Innovative legal strategy fails key test

46min

Hospital: We Need Facial Recognition to Catch Baby Snatchers

Baby Monitor The St. James Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, plans on installing facial recognition security cameras in a new children's hospital facility that's still under construction. When the decision prompted backlash, a representative of a group that oversees development of new pediatric hospitals argued that the technology would protect babies from would-be kidnappers, according to The Irish T

46min

Prosecutors' race, class bias may not drive criminal justice disparities

Years of observational studies suggest that prosecutors' race and class biases are among the primary drivers for disparities in criminal justice. Recent University of Arizona-led research indicates otherwise.

50min

Ingestible medical devices can be broken down with light

MIT engineers have developed a light-sensitive material that allows gastrointestinal devices to be triggered to break down inside the body when they are exposed to light from an ingestible LED.

50min

Walking with atoms — chemical bond making and breaking recorded in action

Scientists have for the first time captured and filmed atoms bonding together, using advanced microscopy methods they captured a moment that is around half a million times smaller than the width of a human hair.

50min

Watch the first ever video of a chemical bond breaking and forming

A chemical bond between two metal atoms has been filmed breaking and forming for the first time – something scientists say they only dreamed of seeing

51min

A special kind of nose cell may trigger allergic reactions

Mice have thousands of allergen-sensing nose cells, a discovery which may offer clues as to why some people with allergies lose their sense of smell

51min

Three U.S. Airports to Screen Passengers for Chinese Coronavirus

Passengers from Wuhan, China, will be screened at J.F.K. beginning Friday night, and in San Francisco and Los Angeles starting Saturday.

1h

Pacific Ocean's Warm "Blob" Killed a Million Seabirds in One Year

Attack of the Blob In 2013, scientists detected a large patch of water in the Pacific Ocean that was warmer than it should've been based on its location and the time of year. They dubbed the patch " The Blob " — and subsequently determined that climate change had caused it. Now, a new study has identified what may be the blob's greatest victim yet: a species of seabird known as the murre. Mass De

1h

Edible caterpillars become rare in drought-hit Botswana

Packed with protein and calcium, mopane worms are a delicacy in Botswana, where they are stirred into chunky tomato and peanut stews.

1h

This Fish Knows How to Stick Around

The remora clings to other fish—and appears to use an unusual sense of touch to do so. Christopher Intagliata reports.

1h

LEDs used in tests to replace invasive medical procedures

Researchers produce gadgets such as gastric balloons that break down when lit by swallowable lights The days of having to have medical devices removed through an invasive procedure could be numbered. Researchers have produced gadgets such as gastric balloons that break down when light from a swallowable LED shines upon them. The team say the approach could be extended to a broader range of medica

1h

Spotlight on Neuroscience

Profiling five neuroscientists who use single cell and spatial profiling techniques to gain new insights into nervous system dysfunction.

1h

Deciphering a cancer treatment's dark side

New work suggests overproduction of proteins from a cell therapy sets off a dangerous side effect

1h

Four-dimensional micro-building blocks

Four-dimensional (4D) printing relies on multimaterial printing, reinforcement patterns, or micro/nanofibrous additives as programmable tools to achieve desired shape reconfigurations. However, existing programming approaches still follow the so-called origami design principle to generate reconfigurable structures by self-folding stacked 2D materials, particularly at small scales. Here, we propos

1h

When and how self-cleaning of superhydrophobic surfaces works

Despite the enormous interest in superhydrophobicity for self-cleaning, a clear picture of contaminant removal is missing, in particular, on a single-particle level. Here, we monitor the removal of individual contaminant particles on the micrometer scale by confocal microscopy. We correlate this space- and time-resolved information with measurements of the friction force. The balance of capillary

1h

Anisotropic dynamics and kinetic arrest of dense colloidal ellipsoids in the presence of an external field studied by differential dynamic microscopy

Anisotropic dynamics on the colloidal length scale is ubiquitous in nature. Of particular interest is the dynamics of systems approaching a kinetically arrested state. The failure of classical techniques for investigating the dynamics of highly turbid suspensions has contributed toward the limited experimental information available up until now. Exploiting the recent developments in the technique

1h

Ultrafast x-ray diffraction study of melt-front dynamics in polycrystalline thin films

Melting is a fundamental process of matter that is still not fully understood at the microscopic level. Here, we use time-resolved x-ray diffraction to examine the ultrafast melting of polycrystalline gold thin films using an optical laser pump followed by a delayed hard x-ray probe pulse. We observe the formation of an intermediate new diffraction peak, which we attribute to material trapped bet

1h

Shape-morphing living composites

This work establishes a means to exploit genetic networks to create living synthetic composites that change shape in response to specific biochemical or physical stimuli. Baker's yeast embedded in a hydrogel forms a responsive material where cellular proliferation leads to a controllable increase in the composite volume of up to 400%. Genetic manipulation of the yeast enables composites where vol

1h

Light-degradable hydrogels as dynamic triggers for gastrointestinal applications

Triggerable materials capable of being degraded by selective stimuli stand to transform our capacity to precisely control biomedical device activity and performance while reducing the need for invasive interventions. Here, we describe the development of a modular and tunable light-triggerable hydrogel system capable of interfacing with implantable devices. We apply these materials to two applicat

1h

Access to tetracyclic aromatics with bridgehead metals via metalla-click reactions

The never-ending pursuits for exploring aromatic molecular architectures result in the large libraries of aromatics with fascinating structures, which have greatly broadened the scope of aromaticity. Despite extensive efforts that have been paid to develop aromatic frameworks, the construction of polycyclic aromatics that share a bridgehead atom with more than three rings has never been accomplis

1h

Monolithic mtesla-level magnetic induction by self-rolled-up membrane technology

Monolithic strong magnetic induction at the mtesla to tesla level provides essential functionalities to physical, chemical, and medical systems. Current design options are constrained by existing capabilities in three-dimensional (3D) structure construction, current handling, and magnetic material integration. We report here geometric transformation of large-area and relatively thick (~100 to 250

1h

Imaging an unsupported metal-metal bond in dirhenium molecules at the atomic scale

Metallic bonds remain one of the most important and least understood of the chemical bonds. In this study, we generated Re 2 molecules in which the Re–Re core is unsupported by ligands. Real-time imaging of the atomic-scale dynamics of Re 2 adsorbed on a graphitic lattice allows direct measurement of Re–Re bond lengths for individual molecules that changes in discrete steps correlating with bond

1h

Picosecond-resolution phase-sensitive imaging of transparent objects in a single shot

With the growing interest in the optical imaging of ultrafast phenomena in transparent objects, from shock wave to neuronal action potentials, high contrast imaging at high frame rates has become desirable. While phase sensitivity provides the contrast, the frame rates and sequence depths are highly limited by the detectors. Here, we present phase-sensitive compressed ultrafast photography (pCUP)

1h

Biophysical and biomolecular interactions of malaria-infected erythrocytes in engineered human capillaries

Microcirculatory obstruction is a hallmark of severe malaria, but mechanisms of parasite sequestration are only partially understood. Here, we developed a robust three-dimensional microvessel model that mimics the arteriole-capillary-venule (ACV) transition consisting of a narrow 5- to 10-μm-diameter capillary region flanked by arteriole- or venule-sized vessels. Using this platform, we investiga

1h

Ultrafast optically induced spin transfer in ferromagnetic alloys

The vision of using light to manipulate electronic and spin excitations in materials on their fundamental time and length scales requires new approaches in experiment and theory to observe and understand these excitations. The ultimate speed limit for all-optical manipulation requires control schemes for which the electronic or magnetic subsystems of the materials are coherently manipulated on th

1h

Nearly room temperature ferromagnetism in a magnetic metal-rich van der Waals metal

In spintronics, two-dimensional van der Waals crystals constitute a most promising material class for long-distance spin transport or effective spin manipulation at room temperature. To realize all-vdW-material–based spintronic devices, however, vdW materials with itinerant ferromagnetism at room temperature are needed for spin current generation and thereby serve as an effective spin source. We

1h

Real-time observation of water radiolysis and hydrated electron formation induced by extreme-ultraviolet pulses

The dominant pathway of radiation damage begins with the ionization of water. Thus far, however, the underlying primary processes could not be conclusively elucidated. Here, we directly study the earliest steps of extreme ultraviolet (XUV)–induced water radiolysis through one-photon excitation of large water clusters using time-resolved photoelectron imaging. Results are presented for H 2 O and D

1h

Direct light-induced spin transfer between different elements in a spintronic Heusler material via femtosecond laser excitation

Heusler compounds are exciting materials for future spintronics applications because they display a wide range of tunable electronic and magnetic interactions. Here, we use a femtosecond laser to directly transfer spin polarization from one element to another in a half-metallic Heusler material, Co 2 MnGe. This spin transfer initiates as soon as light is incident on the material, demonstrating sp

1h

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Chemosensory Cells in the Nose Play a Role in Allergic Reactions

In mice, a group of nasal epithelial cells called brush cells release pro-inflammatory signals in response to allergens.

1h

Air France-KLM chief warns carbon taxes could backfire

Air France-KLM chief executive Ben Smith said Friday that imposing carbon taxes on ticket prices could prove counterproductive, hindering efforts by airlines to buy more fuel-efficient planes that could significantly reduce emissions.

1h

NASA water vapor imagery shows Tino's heavy rain potential over Fiji

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean it gathered water vapor data that provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Tino.

1h

Walking with atoms—chemical bond making and breaking recorded in action

Ever since it was proposed that atoms are building blocks of the world, scientists have been trying to understand how and why they bond to each other. Be it a molecule (which is a group of atoms joined together in a particular fashion), or a block of material or a whole living organism, ultimately, everything is controlled by the way atoms bond, and the way bonds break.

1h

Ingestible medical devices can be broken down with light

A variety of medical devices can be inserted into the gastrointestinal tract to treat, diagnose, or monitor GI disorders. Many of these have to be removed by endoscopic surgery once their job is done. However, MIT engineers have now come up with a way to trigger such devices to break down inside the body when they are exposed to light from an ingestible LED.

1h

Court Quashes Youth Climate Change Case Against Government

Two of three judges on the panel said that climate change was an issue for lawmakers, not the courts.

1h

Do Artificial Sweeteners Actually Help With Weight Loss?

Sweet like sugar, but without the calories — a promise that might be too good to be true.

1h

Low doses of radiation used in medical imaging lead to mutations in cell cultures

Common medical imaging procedures use low doses of radiation that are believed to be safe. A new study, however, finds that in human cell cultures, these doses create breaks that allow extra bits of DNA to integrate into the chromosome.

1h

The Guardian view on 'flight shaming': face it – life must change | Editorial

Individual choices will not solve the climate crisis but ministers should not be encouraging flying It started in Sweden, where the term flygskam (flight shame) was coined in 2018 to describe the unease about flying experienced by environmentally conscious travellers. The hashtag #jagstannarpåmarken (which translates as #stayontheground) came into use around the same time, as groups sprang up to s

1h

Identity Theft Is a Real Threat. Luckily, Modern Tech Offers Real Solutions.

There are a lot of preventative actions you can take to reduce your likelihood of becoming a victim of identity theft, from placing a security freeze on credit reports and shredding all those credit card applications you get in the mail, to encrypting your data with a VPN or bolstering security with a high-tech password manager . However, no matter how careful you are, it's pretty much impossible

1h

2019 was the second warmest year on record—here's what this means for our future

NOAA found that temperatures in 2019 were 1.71 degrees Fahrenheit higher than the 20th Century average. Last year was a scorcher of epic—but not surprising—proportions, according to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The agencies reported on January 15 that 2019 was the second warmest year on record, closing out the warmest five-year perio

1h

Fun and Games with Neuroscience

"Brain Games" turns human behavior into pop television entertainment.

1h

Scientists Create "Strange Metal" Packed With Entangled Electrons

An international team of researchers has created what's called a "strange metal" — and they say it could help harness the potential of the quantum world in a practical way. Specifically, the metal provides evidence for the quantum entanglement nature of quantum criticality. But that's a lot to unpack, so let's start with something most of us probably learned about in elementary school: phase tran

1h

At the Bottom of the Sea, They Wait to Feast on Alligators

Usually the large reptiles feed on other creatures. But scientists found a surprise at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico.

1h

Men's outdoor boots that keep you warm, dry, and stable

Reliable boots for explorations of all types. (Toomas Tartes via Unsplash/) Outdoor boots are an essential part of any man's shoe collection. Whether you face gnarly winters or go hiking routinely, you'll need the right support and protection for your ankles and feet. And while fashion-over-comfort won't get you too far in the realm of outdoor boots, who's to say you can't have at least a little

2h

NASA water vapor imagery shows Tino's heavy rain potential over Fiji

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean it gathered water vapor data that provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Tino.

2h

3 brain games boost memory, focus, and flexible thinking

Three digital games can help children and adults improve their cognitive skills, say the researchers who created them. They designed and developed the games—available online and in the iOS and Google Play app stores—to help users' brains work more efficiently. While some games falsely claim to improve cognitive skills, these three games have actually proven to help users boost memory, inhibition

2h

Avoiding Carsickness When the Cars Drive Themselves

If the future lets people focus on work instead of driving during the daily commute, many of us will have to conquer motion sickness to read memos (or tweets). Researchers are working on some fixes.

2h

Arnold Schwarzenegger Is Not Impressed

SANTA MONICA, Calif.—In another world, Arnold Schwarzenegger might be an elder statesman in his party. The former Republican governor of California might even be a top ally of the entertainment president: They used to be friendly, and Schwarzenegger was Donald Trump's successor on Celebrity Apprentice . In Trump's world, though, Schwarzenegger is a GOP apostate. Fresh off of playing the president

2h

In About 60 Years, a 'Guest Star' May Shine as One of the Brightest in the Sky

That's when the two stars in the binary system V Sagittae are set to merge in a spectacularly luminous fashion. newstar2083_top2.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics Space Friday, January 17, 2020 – 12:30 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) – The constellation Sagitta, or the Arrow, is smaller and less wel

2h

To Conserve Marine Species, Make Protected Areas Mobile

Because climate change is shifting ocean ecosystems, sanctuaries need to shift with them, experts argue — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ecuadorian Cactus Absorbs Ultrasound, Enticing Bats to Flowers

Many plants reflect ultrasonic waves, thereby attracting the pollinators, but one cactus takes a different approach.

2h

Spider-Man-style robotic graspers defy gravity

Specially designed vacuum suction units allow humans to climb walls. Scientists have developed a suction unit that can be used on rough surfaces, no matter how textured, and that has applications in the development of climbing robots and robotic arms with grasping capabilities.

2h

Scientists measure the evolving energy of a solar flare's explosive first minutes

Toward the end of 2017, a massive new region of magnetic field erupted on the Sun's surface next to an existing sunspot. The powerful collision of magnetic energy produced a series of potent solar flares, causing turbulent space weather conditions at Earth. These were the first flares to be captured, in their moment-by-moment progression, by NJIT's then recently opened Expanded Owens Valley Solar

2h

Chemists allow boron atoms to migrate

Organic molecules with atoms of the semi-metal boron are among the most important building blocks for synthesis products that are needed to produce drugs and agricultural chemicals. However, during the usual chemical reactions used in industry, the valuable boron unit, which can replace another atom in a molecule, is often lost. Chemists at the University of Münster have now succeeded in significa

2h

Not all of nature's layered structures are tough as animal shells and antlers, study finds

Nacre—the iridescent part of mollusk shells—is a poster child for biologically inspired design. Despite being made of brittle chalk, the intricately layered microstructure of nacre gives it a remarkable ability to resist the spread of cracks, a material property known as toughness.

2h

Human fetal lungs harbor a microbiome signature

The lungs and placentas of fetuses in the womb — as young as 11 weeks after conception — already show a bacterial microbiome signature, which suggests that bacteria may colonize the lungs well before birth. This first-time finding deepens the mystery of how the microbes or microbial products reach those organs before birth and what role they play in normal lung and immune system development.

2h

Transformational innovation needed to reach global forest restoration goals

New research finds that global South countries have pledged the largest areas of land to forest restoration, and are also farthest behind in meeting their targets due to challenging factors such as population growth, corruption, and deforestation.

2h

Chemists allow boron atoms to migrate

Organic molecules with atoms of the semi-metal boron are important building blocks for synthesis products to produce drugs and agricultural chemicals. However, the conversion of substances commonly used in industry often results in the loss of the valuable boron unit, which can replace another atom in a molecule. Chemists now introduce carbon-carbon couplings in which the boron atom is retained.

2h

Neuron found in mice could have implications for effective diet drugs

A CALCR cell found in mice may stop feeding without subsequential nauseating effects, as well as influence the long term intake of food.

2h

Scientists measure the evolving energy of a solar flare's explosive first minutes

In 2017, a massive new region of magnetic field erupted on the sun's surface next to an existing sunspot. The powerful collision of magnetic energy produced a series of solar flares, causing turbulent space weather conditions at Earth. Scientists have now pinpointed for the first time exactly when and where the explosion released the energy that heated spewing plasma to energies equivalent to 1 bi

2h

A new method for dating ancient earthquakes

Constraining the history of earthquakes produced by bedrock fracturing is important for predicting seismic activity and plate tectonic evolution. In a new study published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports Jan 17, 2020, a team of researchers presents a new microscale technique to determine the age of crystals grown during repeated activation of natural rock fractures over a time range of bil

2h

Material developed which is heat-insulating and heat-conducting at the same time

Styrofoam or copper—both materials have very different properties with regard to their ability to conduct heat. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz and the University of Bayreuth have now jointly developed and characterized a novel, extremely thin and transparent material that has different thermal conduction properties depending on the direction. While it

2h

Molecules move faster on a rough terrain

Roughness, the presence of irregularities on a surface, is commonly associated with slower motion and stickiness. This is true at different length scales: at human size (1 meter), it takes longer to walk along a path that goes up and down, rather than walking on a flat road. At the size of smaller objects (1/100 – 1/1000 meter), Italians use pasta shapes with a rough surface, e.g. rigatoni, to mak

2h

Human fetal lungs harbor a microbiome signature

The lungs and placentas of fetuses in the womb — as young as 11 weeks after conception — already show a bacterial microbiome signature, which suggests that bacteria may colonize the lungs well before birth. This first-time finding deepens the mystery of how the microbes or microbial products reach those organs before birth and what role they play in normal lung and immune system development.

2h

When David poses as Goliath

Observations have shown that stellar black holes typically have masses of about ten times that of the Sun. Recently, Chinese astronomers claimed to have discovered a black hole as massive as 70 solar masses, which, if confirmed, would challenge the current view of stellar evolution. Astronomers from the Universities of Erlangen-Nürnberg and Potsdam discovered that it may not necessarily be a black

2h

This Fish Knows How to Stick Around

The remora clings to other fish—and appears to use an unusual sense of touch to do so. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Acid reflux drugs may have negative side effects for breast cancer survivors

Acid reflux drugs that are sometimes recommended to ease stomach problems during cancer treatment may have an unintended side effect: impairment of breast cancer survivors' memory and concentration.

2h

Human ancestors started biodiversity decline millions of years ago

The human-caused biodiversity decline started much earlier than researchers used to believe. According to a new study the process was not started by our own species but by some of our ancestors.

2h

Molecules move faster over rough terrain

Contrary to what one might think, molecules can move faster in the proximity of rougher surfaces.

2h

It takes more than two to tango: Microbial communities influence animal sex and reproduction

It is an awkward idea, but a couple's ability to have kids may partly depend on who else is present. The reproductive tracts of males and females contain whole communities of micro-organisms. These microbes can have considerable impact on (animal) fertility and reproduction. They may even lead to new species.

2h

Activation of a distinct genetic pathway can slow the progress of metastatic breast cancer

Activation of the BMP4 signalling pathway presents a new therapeutic strategy to combat metastatic breast cancer, a disease that has shown no reduction in patient mortality over the past 20 years.

2h

Elon Musk Says He'll Put A Million People on Mars By 2050

Going Multiplanetary In a series of Thursday evening tweets, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk revealed new details about his plans to colonize Mars. In theory, 1,000 Starships could eventually send "maybe around 100k people per Earth-Mars orbital sync," Musk tweeted . "That's the goal," he added . Musk envisions these ships departing Earth orbit over a 30-day period, the window of time when Earth and Mars ar

2h

Mojo Vision's Augmented Reality Contact Lenses Kick off a Race to AR in Your Eye

The digital world has been creeping closer to your face. Was a time when a laptop was about as personal as you got with a computer. Then came smartphones, and a few years later, some of us started strapping screens to our heads. Now, in what must be the penultimate step to tapping brains directly, the world has a working digital display in a contact lens. After years of quiet research, startup Mo

2h

Bio-Rad Enters RNA-Seq Library Prep Market with Launch of the SEQuoia Complete Stranded RNA Library Prep Kit

Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb) today announced the launch of the SEQuoia Complete Stranded RNA Library Prep Kit, a novel approach to RNA-Seq library preparation.

2h

These Researchers Want You to Live In a Fungus Megastructure

Imagine that you roll out of bed onto a living fungus floor. The walls and ceiling — heck, the whole apartment building, down to the plumbing and electrical systems — are made of fungus too. Wood and concrete are remnants of the distant past; this entire city, from the schools to the stores to the hospitals, is made of living fungus — constantly growing, dying off and regenerating itself. That's

2h

Real or Fake: New NBC Peacock Shows

Is the new streaming service literally going to offer a TV show about Twitter?

2h

There's Not Enough Data on How Women Deal With Endometriosis. These Scientists are Changing That

Phendo is an app that, with the help of citizen scientists, seeks to catalog endometriosis symptoms and increase understanding and visibility of this "invisible" disease.

2h

Why Twitter May Be Ruinous for the Left

Something odd happened this week on Twitter: A hashtag became the most popular topic in the country by accident. After Senator Elizabeth Warren brushed away the handshake of Senator Bernie Sanders in the moments following a debate, Sanders supporters—or at least alleged Sanders supporters— began to tweet #NeverWarren . Several left-leaning journalists and online Sanders surrogates noticed the ris

2h

Eminem Slips Into the Mind of the Las Vegas Shooter

Gun violence is a crisis that you can see and hear. There's surveillance footage of the Columbine killings, and the assailants taped home videos bragging about what they were about to do. When a Las Vegas music festival was targeted in 2017 , audience video showed the moment when shots began raining down. The alleged Christchurch, New Zealand, gunman live-streamed his attack on a mosque last year

2h

UVA engineering professor Jack W. Davidson named an IEEE fellow

UVA Engineering computer science professor Jack W. Davidson has been named an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Fellow in recognition of his contributions to compilers, computer security and computer science education.

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UVA professor Matthew B. Dwyer named a fellow by the Association for Computing Machinery

The Association for Computing Machinery has named Matthew B. Dwyer, a University of Virginia professor of computer science, a fellow. Fellowships are conferred to association members for technological accomplishments that help define the digital age and improve professional and personal lives. Association for Computing Machinery Fellows comprise an elite group that represents less than 1% of the a

2h

This Fish Knows How to Stick Around

The remora clings to other fish—and appears to use an unusual sense of touch to do so. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Inductive Charging Stand from BrandTech® Scientific

NEW! An inductive charging stand is now available for the BRAND® HandyStep® touch and HandyStep® touch S repeating pipettes.

3h

NJIT scientists measure the evolving energy of a solar flare's explosive first minutes

In 2017, a massive new region of magnetic field erupted on the sun's surface next to an existing sunspot. The powerful collision of magnetic energy produced a series of solar flares, causing turbulent space weather conditions at Earth. Scientists have now pinpointed for the first time exactly when and where the explosion released the energy that heated spewing plasma to energies equivalent to 1 bi

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Senate bill would boost spending on Trump administration's research priorities

Bipartisan group of legislators backs "Industries of the Future"

3h

China's Mysterious Virus Spreads to Japan and Thailand

The respiratory virus that put Chinese authorities on high alert in December has reportedly spread to Japan and Thailand. This week, the government of Thailand announced that it had identified two cases of the pneumonia-like illness, according to Reuters , with Japanese authorities confirming another case. While most people who contracted the virus — dubbed 2019-nCoV — survived, the fact that it'

3h

'Resistant' trees planted in Hampshire in ash dieback fight

Scientists have identified 3,000 ash trees with suspected resistance to a deadly disease.

3h

One Sugar Turns Into Another

As someone who used a lot of carbohydrates as chiral pool starting materials in grad school, I regard this paper as the next thing to witchcraft. Even folks without carbohydrate experience appreciate readily that there are sugars that you hear about all the time (such as glucose, mannose, and galactose) and some that you hardly ever hear about at all (such as allose, gulose, and talose). That's n

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Not all of nature's layered structures are tough as animal shells and antlers

Engineers looking to nature for inspiration have long assumed that layered structures like those found in mollusk shells enhance a material's toughness, but a study shows that's not always the case. The findings may help engineers avoid 'naive biomimicry, the researchers say.

3h

Real risks associated with cannabis exposure during pregnancy

A new study has definitively shown that regular exposure to THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, during pregnancy has significant impact on placental and fetal development.

3h

The core of massive dying galaxies already formed 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang

The most distant dying galaxy discovered so far, more massive than our Milky Way — with more than a trillion stars — has revealed that the 'cores' of these systems had formed already 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang, about 1 billion years earlier than previous measurements revealed. The discovery will add to our knowledge on the formation of the Universe more generally, and may cause the com

3h

The way you dance is unique, and computers can tell it's you

Nearly everyone responds to music with movement, whether through subtle toe-tapping or an all-out boogie. A recent discovery shows that our dance style is almost always the same, regardless of the type of music, and a computer can identify the dancer with astounding accuracy.

3h

Charge model for calculating the photoexcited states of one-dimensional Mott insulators

Researchers have developed a charge model to describe photoexcited states of one-dimensional Mott insulators. They have also succeeded in constructing a many-body Wannier function as the localized basis state of the photoexcited states and calculating large-system, optical conductivity spectra that can be compared with experimental results.

3h

Hands off our grasslands

In the north eastern Free State, a 60 km green corridor is being created that will link the upper Wilge Protected Environment to the Sneeuwberg.

3h

Reward improves visual perceptual learning — but only after people sleep

A new study from Brown researchers finds that rewards improve performance on a visual perceptual task only if participants sleep after training.

3h

Spider-Man-style robotic graspers defy gravity

Traditional methods of vacuum suction and previous vacuum suction devices cannot maintain suction on rough surfaces due to vacuum leakage, which leads to suction failure. Researchers Xin Li and Kaige Shi developed a zero-pressure difference method to enhance the development of vacuum suction units. Their method overcame leakage limitations by using a high-speed rotating water ring between the surf

3h

Study: Critical care improvements may differ depending on hospital's patient population

A new study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveals that while critical care outcomes in ICUs steadily improved over a decade at hospitals with few minority patients, ICUs with a more diverse patient population did not progress comparably.

3h

New scheduling tool offers both better flight choices and increased airline profits

Researchers from Dartmouth and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed an original approach to flight scheduling that, if implemented, could result in a significant increase in profits for airlines and more flights that align with passengers' preferences. The approach is presented in a paper, 'Airline Timetable Development and Fleet Assignment Incorporating Passenger Choice,

3h

Hands off our grasslands

In the north eastern Free State, a 60 km green corridor is being created that will link the upper Wilge Protected Environment to the Sneeuwberg.

3h

Tired of waiting for a university, a publisher commissions its own investigation — and retracts two papers

The journal Diabetes has retracted two 2006 papers by a group of researchers in Germany whose work has long been the subject of concerns about image duplication and manipulation. The first author of the articles is Kathrin Maedler, a prominent diabetes specialist at the University of Bremen, where she'd been a named professor but lost … Continue reading Tired of waiting for a university, a publish

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As the World Faces One of the Worst Flu Outbreaks in Decades, Scientists Eye a Universal Vaccine

A universal flu vaccine would eliminate the need for seasonal shots and defend against the next major outbreak

3h

Rethinking interactions with mental health patients

New research overturns the belief that people with severe mental illness are incapable of effective communication with their psychiatrist, and are able to work together with them to achieve better outcomes for themselves.

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Chemists allow boron atoms to migrate

Organic molecules with atoms of the semi-metal boron are important building blocks for synthesis products to produce drugs and agricultural chemicals. However, the conversion of substances commonly used in industry often results in the loss of the valuable boron unit, which can replace another atom in a molecule. Chemists at Münster University now introduce carbon-carbon couplings in which the bor

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Researchers find that cookies increase ad revenue for online publishers

How long has it been since you logged onto a Web site and you were prompted to decide whether to opt out of 'cookies' that the site told you will enhance your online experience? Minutes? Hours?

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Study: Neuron found in mice could have implications for effective diet drugs

A CALCR cell found in mice may stop feeding without subsequential nauseating effects, as well as influence the long term intake of food.

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Not all of nature's layered structures are tough as animal shells and antlers, study finds

Engineers looking to nature for inspiration have long assumed that layered structures like those found in mollusk shells enhance a material's toughness, but a study shows that's not always the case. The findings may help engineers avoid 'naive biomimicry, the researchers say.

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Observational study explores fish oil supplements, testicular function in healthy young men

An observational study of nearly 1,700 young healthy Danish men looked at how fish oil supplements were associated with testicular function as measured by semen quality and reproductive hormone levels. Limitations of this study include a lack of information on the actual concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in the fish oil supplements self-reported by the men. Researchers suggest randomized clinic

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Climate may play a bigger role than deforestation in rainforest biodiversity

"Save the rainforests" is a snappy slogan, but it doesn't tell the full story of how complicated it is to do just that. Before conservationists can even begin restoring habitats and advocating for laws that protect land from poachers and loggers, scientists need to figure out what's living, what's dying, and which patterns explain why. Tackling these questions—in other words, finding out what driv

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Climate may play a bigger role than deforestation in rainforest biodiversity

"Save the rainforests" is a snappy slogan, but it doesn't tell the full story of how complicated it is to do just that. Before conservationists can even begin restoring habitats and advocating for laws that protect land from poachers and loggers, scientists need to figure out what's living, what's dying, and which patterns explain why. Tackling these questions—in other words, finding out what driv

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Internet use reduces study skills in university students

Research conducted at Swansea University and the University of Milan has shown that students who use digital technology excessively are less motivated to engage with their studies, and are more anxious about tests. This effect was made worse by the increased feelings of loneliness that use of digital technology produced.

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Rich rewards: Scientists reveal ADHD medication's effect on the brain

Researchers have identified how certain areas of the human brain respond to methylphenidate — a stimulant drug which is used to treat symptoms of ADHD. The work may help researchers understand the precise mechanism of the drug and ultimately develop more targeted medicines for the condition.

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Charge model for calculating the photoexcited states of one-dimensional Mott insulators

Researchers have developed a charge model to describe photoexcited states of one-dimensional Mott insulators. They have also succeeded in constructing a many-body Wannier function as the localized basis state of the photoexcited states and calculating large-system, optical conductivity spectra that can be compared with experimental results.

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Why can't we talk about periods? | Jen Gunter

"It shouldn't be an act of feminism to know how your body works," says gynecologist and author Jen Gunter. In this revelatory talk, she explains how menstrual shame silences and represses — and leads to the spread of harmful misinformation and the mismanagement of pain. Declaring the era of the menstrual taboos over, she delivers a clear, much-needed lesson on the once-mysterious mechanics of the

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K5 Blazer With a Bass-Dropping Trailer | Diesel Brothers

The Diesel Brothers complete their transformation on an old K5 Blazer and square body truck bed into the ultimate diesel-powered party on wheels. Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow

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Astronomers Find Four Strange New Objects in the Center of the Milky Way

The dust-shrouded objects may be binary stars merging as they orbit the supermassive black hole in our galaxy's core.

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Marijuana Might Impair Driving Abilities Even After the High Wears Off

In a driving simulation, people who started using recreational cannabis prior to age 16 had difficulty following the rules of the road.

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Programmable nests for cells

Using DNA, small silica particles, and carbon nanotubes, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed novel programmable nanocomposites that can be tailored to various applications and programmed to degrade quickly and gently. For medical applications, they can create environments in which human stem cells can settle down and develop further. Additionally, they are suited

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3-D printing with applications in the pharmaceutical industry

University of Seville researchers, in collaboration with the University of Nottingham, have managed to create the first image of nanoparticles of stabilised gold with biodegradable and biocompatible systems that have been obtained with 3-D-printng techniques. The image chosen for this test was the logo of the University of Seville.

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Acid reflux drugs may have negative side effects for breast cancer survivors

Acid reflux drugs that are sometimes recommended to ease stomach problems during cancer treatment may have an unintended side effect: impairment of breast cancer survivors' memory and concentration.

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Microplastics affect sand crabs' mortality and reproduction, study finds

Sand crabs, a key species in beach ecosystems, were found to have increased adult mortality and decreased reproductive success when exposed to plastic microfibers, according to a new Portland State University study.

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Charge model for calculating the photo-excited states of one-dimensional Mott insulators

Assistant Professor Ohmura Shu and Professor Takahashi Akira of the Nagoya Institute of Technology and others have developed a charge model to describe photo-excited states of one-dimensional Mott insulators under the JST Strategic Basic Research Programs. They have also succeeded in constructing a many-body Wannier function as the localized basis state of the photo-excited states and calculating

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Transformational innovation needed to reach global forest restoration goals

The U.N. and other international organizations agree that forest restoration is a critical part of the collective global effort to combat climate change, reduce extinctions, and improve the lives of people in rural communities. Dozens of nations have pledged to restore 230 million hectares of forest so far as part of projects such as the Bonn Challenge and REDD+. The Bonn Challenge goal is to rest

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Self-assembled artificial microtubule like LEGO building blocks

Simple LEGO bricks can be assembled to more complicated structures, which can be further associated into a wide variety of complex architectures, from automobiles, rockets, and ships to gigantic castles and amusement parks. Such an event of multi-step assembly, so-called 'hierarchical self-assembly,' also happens in living organisms.

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Sea lions yawn due to anxiety

Researchers have analysed these animals for 14 months, concluding that the frequency of their yawns increases immediately after a social conflict among members of the group.

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The war on waste pickers

The man in the tattered shirt, biceps bulging as he pulls an enormous bag of waste behind him on a trolley. The blaring horns as cars slide by, annoyed at the intrusion in their lane. The furtive WhatsApp messages on community channels, "Are these waste pickers dangerous? I don't like them digging through my trash …"

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Why bosses should let employees surf the web at work

If you're like most workers, you don't spend 100% of your time at the office doing what you're supposed to be doing.

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Nailbiter to keen runner: the three secrets to turning a bad habit into a good one

From looking at my phone too much to sucking air through my teeth and biting my nails, I have habits I'd like to change. Can a treadmill desk and cookery lessons with my girlfriend help? I am going to talk to Wendy Wood about my bad habits. Professor of psychology at the University of Southern California, Wood researches how habits guide behaviour and has written a new book about it: Good Habits,

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Watch This Adorable Mini Cybertruck Drift in the Snow

Cybertruck Kart YouTubers from the account "The Hacksmith" have built a half-scale Cybertruck, the stainless steel monstrosity Tesla first showed off in November. In a new update video uploaded Thursday, the team can be seen whipping around a snowy parking lot in the tiny vehicle. Small yet Mighty The Canadian team of engineering enthusiasts constructed the adorable miniature out of the skeleton

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Sea lions yawn due to anxiety

Researchers have analysed these animals for 14 months, concluding that the frequency of their yawns increases immediately after a social conflict among members of the group.

4h

Chemist proposes new method for synthesizing precursors for Parkinson's drugs

A chemist from RUDN University has proposed a new method for the synthesis of secondary propargylamine used to create antidepressants, drugs for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, as well as malaria. It differs from the known methods in its simplicity and stability of the resulting substance. The paper was published in the Journal of Organic Chemistry.

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Programmable nests for cells

Using DNA, smallest silica particles, and carbon nanotubes, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) developed novel programmable materials. These nanocomposites can be tailored to various applications and programmed to degrade quickly and gently. For medical applications, they can create environments in which human stem cells can settle down and develop further. Additionally, they a

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3D printing with applications in the pharmaceutical industry

This achievement will have applications in the pharmaceutical industry, such as in the preparation of biocompatible biosensors based in gold, which have already been shown to be effective in the detection of carcinogenic cells and tumour biomarkers.

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Research shows real risks associated with cannabis exposure during pregnancy

A new study from researchers at Western University and Queen's University is the first to definitively show that regular exposure to THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, during pregnancy has significant impact on placental and fetal development. With more than a year since the legalization of recreational cannabis in Canada, the effects of its use during pregnancy are only now beginn

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The way you dance is unique, and computers can tell it's you

Nearly everyone responds to music with movement, whether through subtle toe-tapping or an all-out boogie. A recent discovery shows that our dance style is almost always the same, regardless of the type of music, and a computer can identify the dancer with astounding accuracy.

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Branchen: Derfor gik det galt for danske geotermi-projekter

PLUS. To af tre danske geotermianlæg til fjernvarmen er stoppet. Forkert design og drift får skylden.

4h

Changing the leopard's spots

Since wildlife poaching in Africa became a critical conservation issue, Chinese people have been portrayed as ruthless in the apparent pursuit of wildlife body parts. The Africa-China Reporting Project in Wits Journalism enable journalists to cut through the rhetoric, stereotypes and generalisations.

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In New Jersey and Nationwide, Battles Over Vaccinations Continue

Five states ban religious exemptions from vaccines, compelling parents to have their kids vaccinated as a condition for attending public school. New Jersey sought this week to become the sixth, but to the chagrin of public health advocates, the bill failed. The fight there — and elsewhere — will continue.

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Changing the leopard's spots

Since wildlife poaching in Africa became a critical conservation issue, Chinese people have been portrayed as ruthless in the apparent pursuit of wildlife body parts. The Africa-China Reporting Project in Wits Journalism enable journalists to cut through the rhetoric, stereotypes and generalisations.

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Researchers testing ability of floating wetlands to survive winter

The grasses are dormant, their brown leaves poking the sky as they float in one of the frigid lily ponds in Lincoln's Sunken Gardens, the 1.5-acre public garden at 27th Street and Capital Parkway.

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Stephen King's Comments About the Oscars Explain the Oscars

It started, as it so often does, with a series of tweets from someone famous enough to need a social-media manager. Early Tuesday morning, the author Stephen King logged on to Twitter to share his thoughts about the fact that the Oscar nominees, announced the day before, included no female directors and a single actor of color. "As a writer, I am allowed to nominate in just 3 categories: Best Pic

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Equipment essentials for beginner DJs

Learn to DJ with this basic equipment. (Marius Serban via Unsplash/) Vinyl may be back , but if you're just learning to DJ, purchasing quality turntables and building up your record collection is a big investment. Enter the world of modern DJ controllers, which work with the music files on your laptop to mix killer sets with old-school FX. Here are two great controllers for beginners, and a pair

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The first step in managing plastic waste is measuring it – here's how we did it for one Caribbean countryhertilhertil

Countries around the world throw away millions of tons of plastic trash every year. Finding ways to manage plastic waste is daunting even for wealthy nations, but for smaller and less-developed countries it can be overwhelming.

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Battling longer, more intense fire seasons

Fires in Australia have been burning for months. At least 28 people and hundreds of thousands of animals have died, and more than 15 million acres have been destroyed as firefighters work to squelch the blaze. Penn doctoral student Clare Super has been closely watching news of the fires. Super is a third-year doctoral student in the Department of Anthropology in the School of Arts and Sciences at

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New astronomical instrument on the hunt for exoplanets

At the highest point of the Quinlan mountains, overlooking the Sonoran Desert as it stretches across southern Arizona, NEID (pronounced like "fluid") recently collected its first observations, known colloquially by astronomers as "first light," at the Kitt Peak National Observatory.

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Is Eating Late Bad for Your Heart?

The American Heart Association suggests that late-night eating might increase your risk of heart disease. But how solid is the evidence? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Raincoats to keep you dry in a downpour

Bring it on. (Alesia Kazantceva via Unsplash/) Sometimes umbrellas just don't work, especially when it's windy. If you're looking for a jacket for rainy days that will keep you dry but not overheated, you'll want something lightweight, breathable, and with a hood that'll stay up even on blustery days. Some factors to consider include: how portable the jacket is, how long it's cut, and the style.

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It takes more than two to tango: Microbial communities influence animal sex and reproduction

It is an awkward idea, but a couple's ability to have kids may partly depend on who else is present. The reproductive tracts of males and females contain whole communities of micro-organisms. These microbes can have considerable impact on (animal) fertility and reproduction, as shown by Melissah Rowe, from the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), and co-authors this week with an extensive

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Violence and adversity in early life can alter the brain

But social supports can reduce the negative effects of childhood stress. Childhood adversity is a significant problem in the US, particularly for children growing up in poverty. Those who experience poverty have a much higher risk of being exposed to violence and suffering from a lack of social support, which can have long-term consequences including higher rates of diabetes, cancer, and other dis

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Miniature double glazing

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz and the University of Bayreuth have jointly developed and characterized a novel, extremely thin and transparent material that has different thermal conduction properties depending on the direction. While it can conduct heat extremely well in one direction, it shows good thermal insulation in the other direction.

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Psychedelic drugs could help treat PTSD

Clinical trials suggest treatment that involves psychedelics can be more effective than psychotherapy alone. More than three million people in the United States are diagnosed each year with post-traumatic stress disorder, whose symptoms include nightmares or unwanted memories of trauma, heightened reactions, anxieties, and depression–and can last months, or even years.

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The core of massive dying galaxies already formed 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang

The most distant dying galaxy discovered so far, more massive than our Milky Way — with more than a trillion stars — has revealed that the 'cores' of these systems had formed already 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang, about 1 billion years earlier than previous measurements revealed. The discovery will add to our knowledge on the formation of the Universe more generally, and may cause the com

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Human-caused biodiversity decline started millions of years ago

The human-caused biodiversity decline started much earlier than researchers used to believe. According to a new study published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters the process was not started by our own species but by some of our ancestors.

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Artificial intelligence to improve resolution of brain magnetic resonance imaging

Researchers of the ICAI Group -Computational Intelligence and Image Analysis- of the University of Malaga (UMA) have designed an unprecedented method that is capable of improving brain images obtained through magnetic resonance imaging using artificial intelligence.

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Molecules move faster on a rough terrain

Contrary to what one might think, molecules can move faster in the proximity of rougher surfaces. This is the conclusion of a research, published in Physical Review Letters by researchers from Université libre de Bruxelles.

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Chemists have managed to stabilize the 'capricious' phosphorus

An international team of Russian, Swedish and Ukrainian scientists has identified an effective strategy to improve the stability of two-dimensional black phosphorus, which is a promising material for use in optoelectronics.

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Inside China's new robotic restaurant in Guangzhou

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Europe Mulls New Tougher Rules for Artificial Intelligence

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Forging global cooperation and collaboration

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Hundreds of millions of workers need reskilling. Where do we start?

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Flying pigeonbot mimics bird flight

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Floating cities. Recent developments and promising concepts.

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We need to modernize how we measure national wealth

I recently tried an experiment. I changed several light bulbs, and since one required a little rewiring, I sent my wife (also known as the majority shareholder) a bill for $110.50 (plus GST). In return, she sent me a bill of $457.98 for her preparation in late December of a sumptuous meal, plus her work managing all social connections associated with the holidays.

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Mysterious little red jellies: A case of mistaken identity

Little red jellies are commonplace near the deep seafloor in Monterey Bay and around the world. Most of them are small—less than five centimeters (two inches) across—and a ruddy red color, but we know little else about them. Though MBARI researchers have observed them for decades, their role in the food web, what they eat, and what eats them, still largely remain mysteries. Now scientists are find

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Living yoga for the mind

Plants in the office are not there just to look pretty. They can lead to increased productivity, as well as improved mental health for workers.

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How grass dances with fire

There's a long-held myth that Johannesburg is the globe's largest urban forest, resplendent with an annual purple Jacaranda show. But before the planting of these (alien) trees for timber during the Gold Rush in the 19th Century, Johannesburg was a rich and varied grassland—a biome [community of plants and animals] that is one of the least protected in South Africa. Fortunately, the Department of

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Mysterious little red jellies: A case of mistaken identity

Little red jellies are commonplace near the deep seafloor in Monterey Bay and around the world. Most of them are small—less than five centimeters (two inches) across—and a ruddy red color, but we know little else about them. Though MBARI researchers have observed them for decades, their role in the food web, what they eat, and what eats them, still largely remain mysteries. Now scientists are find

4h

How grass dances with fire

There's a long-held myth that Johannesburg is the globe's largest urban forest, resplendent with an annual purple Jacaranda show. But before the planting of these (alien) trees for timber during the Gold Rush in the 19th Century, Johannesburg was a rich and varied grassland—a biome [community of plants and animals] that is one of the least protected in South Africa. Fortunately, the Department of

4h

The Books Briefing: What's White and Black and Read All Over?

In uncovering truths and disseminating information, journalists shape the way the public understands world events. Ida Tarbell went to great lengths to gather information on her subjects, and her immersive reporting for McClure's magazine—which Stephanie Gorton chronicles in Citizen Reporters— laid the foundation for the way members of the press work today. Timothy Thomas Fortune's identity as a

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Self-assembled artificial microtubules developed

Simple LEGO bricks can be assembled to more complicated structures, which can be further associated into a wide variety of complex architectures, from automobiles, rockets, and ships to gigantic castles and amusement parks. Such an event of multi-step assembly, so-called 'hierarchical self-assembly', also happens in living organisms.

5h

Here and gone: Outbound comets are likely of alien origin

Astronomers at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) have analyzed the paths of two objects heading out of the Solar System forever and determined that they also most likely originated from outside of the Solar System. These results improve our understanding of the outer Solar System and beyond.

5h

Microplastics affect sand crabs' mortality and reproduction

Sand crabs, a key species in beach ecosystems, were found to have increased adult mortality and decreased reproductive success when exposed to plastic microfibers, according to a new study.

5h

Self-assembled artificial microtubules developed

Simple LEGO bricks can be assembled to more complicated structures, which can be further associated into a wide variety of complex architectures, from automobiles, rockets, and ships to gigantic castles and amusement parks. Such an event of multi-step assembly, so-called 'hierarchical self-assembly', also happens in living organisms.

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Focus on opioids and cannabis in chronic pain media coverage

New Zealand media reports on chronic pain are focusing on treatments involving opioids and cannabis at the expense of best practice non-drug treatments, researchers have found.

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Scientists create titanium parts using additive technologies

Manufacturing products from titanium and its alloys using traditional methods remains a complex technological task that requires a lot of time and money. Scientists at South Ural State University have developed a new universal technology for manufacturing titanium alloy parts using additive technologies. The new technology will allow significant savings in further machining. An article about the s

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Before we rush to rebuild after fires, we need to think about where and how

A primary school in East Gippsland was burnt down in the current bushfire crisis. While Premier Daniel Andrews immediately committed to rebuilding the school as it was, media reported the local CFA captain didn't want it rebuilt.

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Expert discusses the prospects of climate engineering

Climate engineering may offer a last-ditch technological solution to catastrophic climate change, but who makes the decisions on which solutions to implement, and who the beneficiaries will be? Once we start fiddling with the Earth's fundamental processes, where will it end? Schalk Mouton asks Professor Bob Scholes.

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Techtopia 138: Mød den ægte Mr. Robot

Marc Rogers har hacket både Apples iPhone og Elon Musks Tesla, hvilket skaffede ham jobbet som manden, der konstruerer de meget ægte hacks i tv-serien "Mr. Robot".

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French oyster farmers fume as norovirus shuts down sales

Several oyster farmers along France's Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts have been forced to halt sales since December after their sites were contaminated by the highly contagious norovirus, which they blame on overflowing sewage treatment plants.

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The way you dance is unique, and computers can tell it's you

Nearly everyone responds to music with movement, whether through subtle toe-tapping or an all-out boogie. A recent discovery shows that our dance style is almost always the same, regardless of the type of music, and a computer can identify the dancer with astounding accuracy.

5h

French oyster farmers fume as norovirus shuts down sales

Several oyster farmers along France's Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts have been forced to halt sales since December after their sites were contaminated by the highly contagious norovirus, which they blame on overflowing sewage treatment plants.

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A Vision of Ephemeral Ice

Artist Shoshannah White views the endangered Arctic ice through a unique lens — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Person Who Changes the Constitution

Earlier this week, Virginia's legislature voted to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), clearing the 38-state threshold to place the amendment in the U. S. Constitution. But that may not happen: Virginia's ratification comes 37 years after Congress's ratification deadline, and the Department of Justice's Office of Legal Counsel recently issued an opinion that the amendment is no longer valid.

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The greenbacks in mobile phone mines

No-one who is economically active can afford to go without at least a mobile phone, and at the pace that electronic equipment is re-invented, it's only a matter of time before your 'latest' iPhone 11 ends up on a dump site.

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Why action on climate change gets stuck and what to do about it

Work crews descended on 12 commuter parking lots in Toronto in late November 2018, and headed to the electric vehicle (EV) charging stations. Their work came on the heels of an IPCC report that warned of dire environmental, economic and health consequences in the absence of any serious momentum toward decarbonization by 2030.

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Lessons on how to effectively tackle insect invasions

Kenyan food production and grazing land is under threat from a huge desert locust invasion. The insects are currently in two counties in northern Kenya and are now spreading to other Kenyan regions including Meru, Laikipia, and Rift Valley. The government has yet to quantify losses but past attacks have caused harvest losses of up to 70%.

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An evolving understanding of extinction

Few things related to science capture the imagination more than the magic of worlds past. This includes the origins of life, dinosaurs, mass extinctions, meteorite impacts, and the evolution of our species. Understanding the evolution of life is central to the way we view ourselves and others and developing this field is thus critical.

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Newly developed screening processes will accelerate carbon capture research

University of Alberta researchers have developed techniques that save a significant amount of time in developing more efficient carbon capture technologies, which may help lower the costs to use the technologies and increase their adoption as a way to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions.

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Lessons on how to effectively tackle insect invasions

Kenyan food production and grazing land is under threat from a huge desert locust invasion. The insects are currently in two counties in northern Kenya and are now spreading to other Kenyan regions including Meru, Laikipia, and Rift Valley. The government has yet to quantify losses but past attacks have caused harvest losses of up to 70%.

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How Much Superpower Does It Take to Bash a Bullet in Midair?

In the upcoming movie 'Wonder Woman 1984,' our hero is able to knock a bullet off to the side with just her arm. Let's look at the physics.

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Digital athletics in analogue stadiums

Why do people pay money travel to big arenas to watch people sit in chairs and stare into screens? What are they getting in real life that they can't get from streaming it online? Researchers in Finland have studied for the first time what motivates the 'in real life' consumption of e-sports.

5h

Rethinking interactions with mental health patients

New research overturns the belief that people with severe mental illness are incapable of effective communication with their psychiatrist, and are able to work together with them to achieve better outcomes for themselves.

5h

Charge model for calculating the photoexcited states of one-dimensional Mott insulators

Japanese researchers have developed a charge model to describe photoexcited states of one-dimensional Mott insulators. They have also succeeded in constructing a many-body Wannier function as the localized basis state of the photoexcited states and calculating large-system, optical conductivity spectra that can be compared with experimental results.

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Rich rewards: Scientists reveal ADHD medication's effect on the brain

Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have identified how certain areas of the human brain respond to methylphenidate — a stimulant drug which is used to treat symptoms of ADHD. The work may help researchers understand the precise mechanism of the drug and ultimately develop more targeted medicines for the condition.

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Transformational innovation needed to reach global forest restoration goals

New research finds that global South countries have pledged the largest areas of land to forest restoration, and are also farthest behind in meeting their targets due to challenging factors such as population growth, corruption, and deforestation. 'We've identified countries that need help, not failures,' says UMBC's Matt Fagan. With the right kind of international support — that listens to local

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Novel protein positioning technique improves functionality of yeast cells

A research team at Kobe University has developed a method of artificially controlling the anchorage position of target proteins in engineered baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The group demonstrated that this technique could be utilized to improve the amount of ethanol produced from hydrothermally processed rice straw by 30%. It is expected that these results will contribute to improved ye

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Nu får kontaktlinsen digital skærm

Amerikanske Mojo Vision er i stand til at placere en mikroskopisk microLED-skærm oven på en kontaktlinse. Der går dog år før kontaktlinserne bliver godkendt medicinsk udstyr.

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A Vision of Ephemeral Ice

Artist Shoshannah White views the endangered Arctic ice through a unique lens — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Image: Hubble views galaxy from famous catalog

This bright, somewhat blob-like object—seen in this image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope—is a galaxy named NGC 1803. It is about 200 million light-years away, in the southern constellation of Pictor (the Painter's Easel).

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The burning issue of population control

The increasing human population is putting large amounts of pressure on our natural resources and is contributing to climate change, leading many people to call for increased population control—especially for poorer communities. Beth Amato investigates whether this could be a solution to decrease the rate of climate change.

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Native plants can flourish after bushfire, but there's only so much hardship they can take

In a fire-blackened landscape, signs of life are everywhere. A riot of red and green leaves erupt from an otherwise dead-looking tree trunk, and the beginnings of wildflowers and grasses peek from the crunchy charcoal below.

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Image: Japanese archipelago and the western Pacific Ocean

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission takes us over the Japanese archipelago—a string of islands that extends about 3000 km into the western Pacific Ocean.

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Using waste carbon dioxide to separate metals from ores

A combined team of researchers from the University of Lyon and the University of Turin has developed a way to use waste CO2 to separate metals used in products. In their paper published in the journal Nature Chemistry, the group describes their process and why they believe it can be used as a global warming mitigation tool.

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Making new catalysts from unique metallic alloys

Heusler alloys are magnetic materials made from three different metals that are not magnetic individually. The alloys are used broadly for their magnetic and thermoelectric properties, and their ability to regain their original shape after being deformed, known as shape memory. Investigations by Tohoku University's advanced materials scientist An-Pang Tsai and colleagues now show that these materi

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Little kids learn gratitude, but revenge comes naturally

Kids have to learn reciprocity—the "you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours" response—but not revenge, research finds. "In our series of experiments, we thought we'd see that children would display positive direct reciprocity—the tendency to pay back those who have helped—from an early age. That wasn't the case," says lead author Nadia Chernyak, assistant professor of cognitive sciences at the Un

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Native plants can flourish after bushfire, but there's only so much hardship they can take

In a fire-blackened landscape, signs of life are everywhere. A riot of red and green leaves erupt from an otherwise dead-looking tree trunk, and the beginnings of wildflowers and grasses peek from the crunchy charcoal below.

5h

Black rhino population shows steady growth

Good news stories can be hard to come by in an era of extinction, but the steady improvement in the fortunes of the black rhino is one of those stories.

5h

Black rhino population shows steady growth

Good news stories can be hard to come by in an era of extinction, but the steady improvement in the fortunes of the black rhino is one of those stories.

5h

Using machine learning to fine-tune views of the ancient past

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and two in the U.S. has developed a way to use machine learning to get a better look at the past. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they used machine learning to analyze records of the past.

5h

Human-caused biodiversity decline started millions of years ago

The human-caused biodiversity decline started much earlier than researchers used to believe. According to a new study published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters the process was not started by our own species but by some of our ancestors.

5h

Microplastics affect sand crabs' mortality and reproduction, PSU study finds

Sand crabs, a key species in beach ecosystems, were found to have increased adult mortality and decreased reproductive success when exposed to plastic microfibers, according to a new Portland State University study.

5h

Here and gone: Outbound comets are likely of alien origin

Astronomers at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) have analyzed the paths of two objects heading out of the Solar System forever and determined that they also most likely originated from outside of the Solar System. These results improve our understanding of the outer Solar System and beyond.

5h

Focus on opioids and cannabis in chronic pain media coverage

New Zealand media reports on chronic pain are focusing on treatments involving opioids and cannabis at the expense of best practice non-drug treatments, researchers have found.

5h

POSTECH developed self-assembled artificial microtubule like LEGO building blocks

Professor Kimoon Kim and his research team identified a new hierarchical self-assembly mechanism

5h

Human-caused biodiversity decline started millions of years ago

The human-caused biodiversity decline started much earlier than researchers used to believe. According to a new study published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters the process was not started by our own species but by some of our ancestors.

5h

Fins and limbs tell evolutionary tale

About 400 million years ago, our early ancestors took their first hesitant steps out of the primordial seas on to land.

5h

Measuring the wear and tear of metals

For the past 50 years, researchers at the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) have been conducting detailed short- and long-term testing of a wide variety of structural materials manufactured in Japan to ensure they can withstand long-term stresses. Now, NIMS scientists have reviewed this data, in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, summarizing the institute's maj

5h

How biology creates networks that are cheap, robust, and efficient

From veins that deliver oxygen to tissues to xylem that send water into stems and leaves, vascular networks are a crucial component of life. In biology, there is a wide range of unique patterns, like the individualized structures found on leaves, along with many conserved structures, such as named arteries and veins in the human body. These two observations led scientists to think that vascular ne

5h

Fins and limbs tell evolutionary tale

About 400 million years ago, our early ancestors took their first hesitant steps out of the primordial seas on to land.

5h

Vital Signs: The end of the checkout signals a dire future for those without the right skills

There has already been a fair number of jobs lost to automation over recent decades—from factory workers to bank tellers.

5h

Male and female firefighters have different problems with protective suits

When female firefighters put on the protective suits they need for their work, they're often using gear that has been designed for a male body.

5h

Video: Researching wildfire with the Navajo Nation

Connecting with the land and nature plays a large role in many Indigenous cultures. Northern Arizona University's School of Forestry is partnering with Diné College and Navajo Forestry in researching the effects of fire on the Navajo Nation. Through working together, these organizations hope to educate students from all different backgrounds by combining western science and traditional knowledge t

5h

How do sea stars move without a brain? The answer could impact robotics and more

Have you ever seen a sea star move? To many of us, sea star seem motionless, like a rock on the ocean's floor, but in actuality, they have hundreds of tube feet attached to their underbelly. These feet stretch and contract to attach to rough terrain, hold on to prey and, of course, move.

5h

Novel protein positioning technique improves functionality of yeast cells

A research team at Kobe University has developed a method of artificially controlling the anchorage position of target proteins in engineered baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

5h

Surveying all the proteins on a neuron's surface

Scientists have found a new way to home in on the proteins covering a particular cell's surface. The feat offers insight into how brain cells form intricate networks during development.

5h

5h

Here and gone: Outbound comets are likely of extra-solar origin

Astronomers at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) have analyzed the paths of two objects heading out of the Solar System forever and determined that they also most likely originated from outside of the Solar System. These results improve our understanding of the outer Solar System and beyond.

5h

XMM-Newton discovers scorching gas in Milky Way's halo

ESA's XMM-Newton has discovered that gas lurking within the Milky Way's halo reaches far hotter temperatures than previously thought and has a different chemical make-up than predicted, challenging our understanding of our galactic home.

5h

How do sea stars move without a brain? The answer could impact robotics and more

Have you ever seen a sea star move? To many of us, sea star seem motionless, like a rock on the ocean's floor, but in actuality, they have hundreds of tube feet attached to their underbelly. These feet stretch and contract to attach to rough terrain, hold on to prey and, of course, move.

5h

Novel protein positioning technique improves functionality of yeast cells

A research team at Kobe University has developed a method of artificially controlling the anchorage position of target proteins in engineered baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

5h

Surveying all the proteins on a neuron's surface

Scientists have found a new way to home in on the proteins covering a particular cell's surface. The feat offers insight into how brain cells form intricate networks during development.

5h

5h

Small economic gambles are insignificant when large background uncertainty is considered

The decision to buy a lottery ticket, gamble on a stock, or buy an insurance policy often comes down to an assessment of risk. How much do I have to lose or gain? For centuries, economists have debated about when somebody should take or walk away from a bet. Now, in new research from Caltech and Yale University, economists are weighing in on the conversation with new mathematical arguments that ta

5h

5 tips to get your children excited about math

What are parents to do when their children don't show much interest or become easily frustrated by math?

5h

Plant organ growth is not so different from animals

For a long time, researchers assumed that cell death occurs mainly during animal organ growth, but not in plant organs. A research group led by Hannele Tuominen from UPSC has now demonstrated that the death of certain cells in the root facilitated the growth of lateral roots. These new findings hint at organ growth of plants and animals might not be so different as thought. The study was published

5h

What's in the smoke given off by the Australian wildfires?

Wildfires such as the ones that have been burning across Australia for months, pose different threats to the firefighters battling them. And, because the safety equipment used by woodland firefighters is far less regulated than that of their counterparts who fight fires in buildings and other structures, the long-term effects of these threats are still largely unknown, say two assistant bioenginee

5h

Plant organ growth is not so different from animals

For a long time, researchers assumed that cell death occurs mainly during animal organ growth, but not in plant organs. A research group led by Hannele Tuominen from UPSC has now demonstrated that the death of certain cells in the root facilitated the growth of lateral roots. These new findings hint at organ growth of plants and animals might not be so different as thought. The study was published

5h

Climate may play a bigger role than deforestation in rainforest biodiversity

In a study on small mammal biodiversity in the Atlantic Forest, researchers found that climate may affect biodiversity in rainforests even more than deforestation does.

5h

First Major Food Brand Adds Carbon Footprint Labels to Products

They Do Labels If you're looking at a food's label, it's probably because you want to know something about its ingredients or nutritional content. But Quorn Foods thinks consumers will be interested in knowing what sort of impact its popular fake meat products have on the environment, too — so it's adding carbon labels to all its food products, according to a new Guardian story . Double Checked A

6h

Panic like it's 1999: Why aren't we tackling climate change like we did Y2K?

On Dec. 31, 1999, USC students rang in the New Year in a variety of fashions. But they all faced the prospect of a global IT implosion, now that each year was about to start with a two instead of a one.

6h

Diverse cropping systems don't increase carbon storage compared to corn-soybean rotations

Integrating perennial crops into corn and soybean rotations doesn't consistently increase the ability of soils to store carbon, according to a new study that defies expectations for how diverse cropping systems affect carbon sequestration.

6h

First Spacebus Neo satellite launched

Ariane 5's first launch of 2020 has delivered two telecom satellites, Konnect and GSAT-30, into their planned transfer orbits. Arianespace announced liftoff at 21:05 GMT (22:05 CET, 18:05 local time) this evening from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.

6h

How sensitive can a quantum detector be?

Quantum physics is moving out of the laboratory and into everyday life. Despite headline results about quantum computers solving problems impossible for classical computers, technical challenges are standing in the way of getting quantum physics into the real world. New research published in Nature Communications from teams at Aalto University and Lund University could provide an important tool in

6h

Sanitary care by social ants shapes disease outcome

Sanitary care in ants to fight disease is known to improve the wellbeing of the colony, yet it has been unclear how social disease defense interferes with pathogen competition inside the individual host body. In their recent study published in Ecology Letters, Sylvia Cremer and her research group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) revealed that collective care-giving

6h

Sea lions: Cash cows in the Bay Area, but farther south, fishermen say 'Shoot 'em'

Sea lions are increasingly living in parallel universes along the California coast, a disparity best observed amid the noisy, stinking spectacle that rolls out daily at San Francisco's Pier 39 shopping center.

6h

Internet use reduces study skills in university students

Research has shown that students who use digital technology excessively are less motivated to engage with their studies, and are more anxious about tests. This effect was made worse by the increased feelings of loneliness that use of digital technology produced.

6h

Cheap drug may alleviate treatment-resistance in leukemia

A common and inexpensive drug may be used to counteract treatment resistance in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), one of the most common forms of blood cancer. The researchers will now launch a clinical study to test the new combination treatment in patients.

6h

How sensitive can a quantum detector be?

Measuring the energy of quantum states requires detecting energy changes so exceptionally small they are hard to pick out from background fluctuations, like using only a thermometer to try and work out if someone has blown out a candle in the room you're in. New research presents sensitive quantum thermometry hitting the bounds that nature allows.

6h

My Long and Arduous Journey Across the Frontiers of Fertility Technology

Elizabeth Katkin tried for years to conceive a child. With the help of futuristic fertility tech, she finally succeeded.

6h

Grodceller blir levande minirobot

Forskare vid University of Vermont har utvecklat en ny typ av levande maskin som kan röra sig mot ett utvalt mål och utföra enkla uppgifter. Dessutom kan de självläka om de skadas. Dessa små "xenobotar", som forskarna valt att kalla dem, har konstruerats med hjälp av AI i en superdator och sedan byggs ihop av hud- och hjärtceller från en groda.

6h

How sensitive can a quantum detector be?

Measuring the energy of quantum states requires detecting energy changes so exceptionally small they are hard to pick out from background fluctuations, like using only a thermometer to try and work out if someone has blown out a candle in the room you're in. New research presents sensitive quantum thermometry hitting the bounds that nature allows.

6h

Sanitary care by social ants shapes disease outcome

Sanitary care in ants to fight disease is known to improve the wellbeing of the colony, yet it has been unclear how social disease defense interferes with pathogen competition inside the individual host body. In their recent study published in Ecology Letters, Sylvia Cremer and her research group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) revealed that collective care-giving

6h

Sea lions: Cash cows in the Bay Area, but farther south, fishermen say 'Shoot 'em'

Sea lions are increasingly living in parallel universes along the California coast, a disparity best observed amid the noisy, stinking spectacle that rolls out daily at San Francisco's Pier 39 shopping center.

6h

The Disturbing Case of the Disappearing Sci-Fi Story

A young writer wrote a controversial bit of military science fiction about sexual politics. The fallout was nuclear.

6h

Avlidna i överdoser oftast kända av myndigheterna

En stor del av dem som avlidit av opioidförgiftning hade kontakt med vårdgivande myndigheter under sitt sista år i livet. Ny forskning vid Malmö universitet visar att myndigheterna hade flera tillfällen att nå personer i riskzonen och stora möjligheter att ingripa, men att de insatser som getts inte varit tillräckliga.

6h

Internet use reduces study skills in university students

Research conducted at Swansea University and the University of Milan has shown that students who use digital technology excessively are less motivated to engage with their studies, and are more anxious about tests. This effect was made worse by the increased feelings of loneliness that use of digital technology produced.

6h

Study quashes controversial vitamin C treatment for sepsis with global trial

A paper published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association by Monash researchers comprehensively quashes the idea that the vitamin C-based cocktail has any positive impact on patients with sepsis.

6h

Liknande organutveckling hos både växter och djur

Kontrollerad celldöd är viktig under djurs utveckling, till exempel för bildning av fingrar eller tår. Forskning från Umeå universitet visar att död av vissa celler i roten är viktig för att sidorötter ska växa. Studien tyder på att organbildning i växter och djur inte skiljer sig så mycket. Tidigare antog man att kontrollerad celldöd som är essentiell för tillväxt och utveckling av djurorgan är

6h

America's most widely consumed oil causes genetic changes in the brain

New research shows soybean oil not only leads to obesity and diabetes, but could also affect neurological conditions like autism, Alzheimer's disease, anxiety, and depression.

6h

Sepsis accounts for 1 in 5 deaths worldwide

Twice as many people as previously believed are dying of sepsis worldwide, according to a new study. A disproportionately high number of the deaths are children in poor areas. The study reveals 48.9 million global cases of sepsis in 2017 and 11 million deaths, or 1 in 5 deaths worldwide. Sepsis occurs when a person's organs cease to function properly as the result of an out-of-control immune resp

6h

It's a Topsy-Turvy World. Can We Make Some Money From That?

Bad news used to spook the markets. Now it seems to lift them. How weird is that?

6h

Human ancestors may have eaten hard plant tissues without damaging teeth

Hard plant foods may have made up a larger part of early human ancestors' diet than currently presumed, according to a new experimental study of modern tooth enamel. The results have implications for reconstructing diet, and for our interpretation of the fossil record of human evolution, researchers said.

6h

Sanitary care by social ants shapes disease outcome

Sanitary care in ants to fight disease is known to improve the wellbeing of the colony, yet it has been unclear how social disease defense interferes with pathogen competition inside the individual host body. Biologists now revealed that collective care-giving has the power to bias the outcome of coinfections in fungus-exposed colony members.

6h

Chinese Chang'e 4 engineer explains how to garden on the moon

The brains behind the first plant ever to germinate on the moon explains how the Chinese mission succeeded

6h

China Catches Up with the US in Science and Tech

A new report from the National Science Board identifies changes in the US's global R&D investment and output, as well as in the country's science and engineering workforce in recent years.

7h

Nature Will Triumph—and Reclaim All Our Gadgets

A new art exhibit, "The World After Us," shows the power and ingenuity of nature to make use of machines in a world without humans.

7h

SpaceX Will Blow Up a Falcon 9 Rocket to Prove It's Safe for People

On Saturday, Elon Musk's space company will attempt its last big test before it can begin launching humans from US soil.

7h

Heat and drought are causing feral camels to overrun communities in Australia

Camels crossing through the Newhaven Wildlife Sanctuary in Australia (Josef Schofield/AWC 2010/) If the loss of millions of animals from raging wildfires in Australia wasn't enough, news of another loss is circulating—that of over 5,000 camels . In a media statement , officials explained that the cull was needed to control the thousands of camels trodding into Aboriginal communities in Anangu Pit

7h

'Smart building skins' change shape in the heat

Researchers are using nature-inspired design and new materials to create smart building skins to make the structures more energy efficient. A smart skin enables a building to function like elements of some living systems. It allows a building to "breathe," but without needing centralized control. "When it's hot, we want the building skin to be open to absorb air, and when it's cold, we want it cl

7h

Dinosaur extinction: 'Asteroid strike was real culprit'

A team of scientists discounts the idea that large-scale volcanism drove the demise of the dinosaurs.

7h

Australia fires: 'Apocalypse' comes to Kangaroo Island

Australia's Kangaroo Island has been likened to Noah's Ark – but its unique wildlife is under threat.

7h

Övning med stridsflyg hindrar renar att undkomma insekter

Insekter är en sommarplåga för renar på fjället. Renarnas strategi är att fly till blåsiga och svala områden, eller springa i timmar för att undkomma. Forskare från SLU studerade hur detta fungerade då renbetesmarkerna sammanföll med ett provområde för övningsskjutning och provning av robotsystem. Gruvprospektering och planer på nya stora vindkraftparker kan leda till omfattande mänskliga aktivit

7h

Image of the Day: Wolves Playing Fetch

A new study shows wolf pups responding to vocal encouragement from humans.

7h

Kill Switch for CRISPR Could Make Gene Editing Safer

Anti-CRISPR proteins could bolster biosecurity and improve medical treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Personality Test Pseudoscience – Swedish Edition

Our skeptical colleagues over in Sweden have been tackling one of the most popular pseudosciences there (thanks to Swedish Skeptics president Pontus Böckman for the heads up) – their "Fraudster of the year in 2018 was author Thomas Erikson for his book Surrounded by Idiots . The book popularized a dubious personality test known as DiSC, which uses four colors to characterize personality types, re

7h

It's a Topsy-Turvy World. Can We Make Some Money From That?

Bad news used to spook the markets. Now it seems to lift them. How weird is that?

7h

Catastrophic Australian bushfires derail research

Nature, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00130-4 But scientists see chance to control invasive species and study ecosystem disruption.

7h

The War Machine Is Run on Contracts

Mike Jabbar never met his replacement. But when Nawres Hamid died in a rocket attack on a military base in Iraq after Christmas, Jabbar saw photos of the wreckage and recognized the American flag he himself had helped paint on the door of a room now mangled. That was his old room, on his old base. It could have been him. "Imagine something like that happens, knowing that you were supposed to be t

7h

Earth's Magnetic Field Is Drastically Revised

Originally published in March 1965 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

The Peril and Power of Following the Evidence

The author, a climate scientist, faced a political controversy along with a personal crisis more than two decades ago, bringing lessons that resonate today — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Trods dyr og umoden teknologi: Kommunale selskaber ønsker strategi for CO2-fangst

Affalds- og fjernvarmeforeninger efterlyser en national plan for udvikling og udnyttelse af CCS-teknologi. På verdensplan findes adskillige fejlslagne CCS-projekter og kun to fungerende, kommercielle anlæg, men reduktionskrav kan genoplive teknologien.

8h

Gadget Lab Podcast: One Wheel, Zero Buttons

This week, the hosts debate whether one wheel is better than two, and whether having a few buttons on a smartphone is better than having none at all.

8h

Apple's Latest Deal Shows How AI Is Moving Right Onto Devices

The iPhone maker's purchase of startup Xnor.ai is the latest move toward a trend of computing on the "edge," rather than in the cloud.

8h

Seriously, It's Time to Lean Into Monowheels

Call them fanciful, or a faceplant waiting to happen. But one-wheeled vehicles are how we'll roll into the future.

8h

The Peril and Power of Following the Evidence

The author, a climate scientist, faced a political controversy, along with a personal crisis, more than two decades ago, bringing lessons that resonate today — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Are Human Body Temperatures Cooling Down?

A new study finds that they have dropped, on average, over the past century and a half — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

VITAMINS trial report on vitamin C, hydrocortisone, thiamine for septic shock

In this randomized clinical trial of about 200 patients with septic shock, combination treatment with intravenous vitamin C, hydrocortisone and thiamine compared with intravenous hydrocortisone alone didn't significantly improve the amount of time patients were alive and free of medicines that raise blood pressure (vasopressors) over seven days. The study findings are being released to coincide wi

8h

Are Human Body Temperatures Cooling Down?

A new study finds that they have dropped, on average, over the past century and a half — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Skats skandaler udløser ekstraregning på 300 millioner for advokater

Kuldsejlede it-projekter til gældsinddrivelse og ejendomsvurderinger er en af årsagerne til, at Skatteministeriet skulle betale 292 millioner kroner ekstra til Kammeradvokaten i 2018.

8h

Vargar kan förstå människor och apportera bollar

För många hundar är apport en naturlig lek. Nu har forskare vid Stockholms universitet upptäckt att också vargar kan tolka mänsklig kommunikation och förstå att de ska hämta en kastad boll. En förmåga som man tidigare trott uppstod hos hundar först sedan de blivit tama. – När jag såg den första vargvalpen hämta bollen fick jag bokstavligen gåshud, berättar Christina Hansen Wheat, Zoologiska insti

8h

Cheap drug may alleviate treatment-resistance in leukemia

A common and inexpensive drug may be used to counteract treatment resistance in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), one of the most common forms of blood cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in mice and human blood cells performed at Karolinska Institutet and SciLifeLab and published in the medical journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. The researchers will now launch a clinical study to te

8h

Can You Cure a Domestic Abuser?

The photograph above shows Andrew Lisdahl and his fiancée, Theresa, at their home, along with Andrew's daughter with his ex-wife (left) and one of Theresa's daughters (right). Andrew Lisdahl was mad. His wife, Gretchen, had smoked a cigarette, a habit he detested. They fought, and Gretchen spent the night at a friend's house. The next day, Andrew drank a bottle of tequila and hitched a ride to th

8h

PODCAST: Levende robotter, syntetiske diamanter og bakterier, der laver beton

Ny type biologiske maskiner af levende materialer har set dagens lys. Kunstige diamanter kan erstatte sicilium i chips. Amerikansk firma fremstiller beton ved hjælp af bakterier.

9h

Ethan Hawke: You are everything and you are nothing

Ethan Hawke is inspired by others' excellence and ability to see the context of the larger community, those who value their work but don't take it too seriously. One of his heroes, River Phoenix, exhibited this kind of humility by taking on roles that were meaningful to him but were seen as controversial. "Phil Hoffman used to say this all the time, that it's the most important thing in the world

9h

Teknikken er klar – politikerne tøver: Nu er det knald eller fald for grøn fjernvarme fra dybet

PLUS. For første gang i mange år har flere store byer planer om udnyttelse af geotermisk varme i fjernvarme­forsyningen i samarbejde med professionelle boreselskaber – men ramme­betingelserne modarbejder.

9h

Forskere skal i stigende grad selv finde midler til skanninger og medicin

Klinikledere afviser i stigende grad at køre forskningsprojekter, med mindre de involverede forskere fra afdelingerne selv kan finansiere al ekstra drift og afledte effekter af forskningen i form af f.eks. ekstra skanninger og medicin. Det er en showstopper, siger forskerne.

9h

Mangelfuld evidens hæmmer nyt princip for behandling af kræft

Evidensen for en række nye personlige kræftbehandlinger er for dårlige, vurderer rådgivere fra det britiske prioriteringsinstitut NICE i en artikel i BMJ. Trods det ser formanden for Medicinrådets fagudvalg på feltet perspektiver i de nye lægemidler.

9h

β4GALT1 controls β1 integrin function to govern thrombopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14178-y Mutations affecting sialylation and galactosylation affect megakaryocyte function and thrombopoiesis. Here the authors show that the enzyme β4GalT1 regulates thrombopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis by controlling beta-1 integrin function.

9h

A transcomplementing gene drive provides a flexible platform for laboratory investigation and potential field deployment

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13977-7 Gene drives raise safety concerns around unintended propagation. Here the authors present a trans-complementing split-gene drive that requires inheritance of separate transgenes to assemble a fully functional drive.

9h

Large-scale lipid analysis with C=C location and sn-position isomer resolving power

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14180-4 Coupling photochemical derivatization with tandem mass spectrometry enables C=C-isomer resolved lipidomics. Here, the authors further develop this approach into a shotgun lipidomics workflow that allows simultaneous characterization of lipid C=C locations and sn-positions in complex biological samples.

9h

Ultrafast shock synthesis of nanocarbon from a liquid precursor

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14034-z Carbon nanomaterials have widespread application but fundamental aspects of their formation are still unclear. Here the authors explore the shock-induced synthesis of carbon nanoallotropes from liquid CO by time-resolved reflectivity and computations identifying the growth mechanism at the sub-nanosecond time

9h

Rad50 zinc hook functions as a constitutive dimerization module interchangeable with SMC hinge

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14025-0 The Mre11/Rad50 complex, which functions in genome surveillance, possesses antiparallel coiled-coil arms forming a ring-like structure similar to that of the SMC family proteins. Here the authors find that the Rad50 zinc hook functions similarly to the hinge of the SMC protein, and that the ring structure of

9h

An ultra-stable cytoplasmic antibody engineered for in vivo applications

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13654-9 Antibodies expressed in the cytosol often form insoluble aggregates, which makes it hard to target intracellular proteins. Here the authors engineer an ultra-stable cytoplasmic antibody (STAND) with a low isoelectric point that can be used in vivo.

9h

Single cell and genetic analyses reveal conserved populations and signaling mechanisms of gastrointestinal stromal niches

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14058-5 Wnt signals for intestinal stem cell self-renewal originate from the stroma and Paneth cells, but the source in stomach is unclear. Here the authors identify a conserved population of stromal cells adjacent to stomach epithelia where Gli2 activates Wnt ligands to promote gastrointestinal regeneration and deve

9h

Hepatic TET3 contributes to type-2 diabetes by inducing the HNF4α fetal isoform

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14185-z The HNF4α gene contains two promoters, which are thought to be active in the fetal and adult liver, the latter contributing to hepatic glucose production. Here the authors show that the fetal isoform of HNF4a is induced in mouse livers upon fasting and in type-2 diabetes in a manner regulated by TET3.

9h

Has the Women's March Accomplished Anything?

This Saturday, protesters in distinctive pink "pussy" hats will once again gather in Washington, D.C., for the Women's March. And yet the march, which once symbolized the massive, female-led backlash against President Donald Trump, has struggled to establish a clear identity and purpose for 2020. After three years spent battling controversy, it's not clear what, if anything, the Women's March org

9h

Andrew Yang's Campaign Is Not a Joke

BURLINGTON, Iowa—Not long ago, Andrew Yang would have considered his presidential campaign a success just for having injected a discussion of job automation into the race. He was a novelty candidate, a single-issue candidate, known as much for joking around on the debate stage and for viral videos (like the one that shows him squirting whipped cream into the mouths of two kneeling volunteers ) as

9h

Study traces evolution of acoustic communication

A study tracing acoustic communication across the tree of life of land-living vertebrates reveals that the ability to vocalize goes back hundreds of millions of years, is associated with a nocturnal lifestyle and has remained stable. Surprisingly, acoustic communication does not seem to drive the formation of new species across vertebrates.

9h

Green in tooth and claw

Hard plant foods may have made up a larger part of early human ancestors' diet than currently presumed, according to a new experimental study of modern tooth enamel from Washington University in St. Louis. The results have implications for reconstructing diet, and for our interpretation of the fossil record of human evolution, researchers said.

9h

How sensitive can a quantum detector be?

Measuring the energy of quantum states requires detecting energy changes so exceptionally small they are hard to pick out from background fluctuations, like using only a thermometer to try and work out if someone has blown out a candle in the room you're in. New research in Nature Communications from a team in Finland presents sensitive quantum thermometry hitting the bounds that nature allows.

9h

Psychology program for refugee children improves wellbeing

A positive psychology program created by researchers at Queen Mary University of London focuses on promoting wellbeing in refugee children. It is unusual in that it focuses on promoting positive outcomes, rather than addressing war trauma exposure.

9h

'Melting rock' models predict mechanical origins of earthquakes

Engineers at Duke University have devised a model that can predict the early mechanical behaviors and origins of an earthquake in multiple types of rock. The model provides new insights into unobservable phenomena that take place miles beneath the Earth's surface under incredible pressures and temperatures, and could help researchers better predict earthquakes — or even, at least theoretically, a

9h

10h

Anticipatory Control of Momentum for Bipedal Walking on Uneven Terrain

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57156-6

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Genome- and transcriptome-derived microsatellite loci in lumpfish Cyclopterus lumpus: molecular tools for aquaculture, conservation and fisheries management

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57071-w Genome- and transcriptome-derived microsatellite loci in lumpfish Cyclopterus lumpus : molecular tools for aquaculture, conservation and fisheries management

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Variation among S-locus haplotypes and among stylar RNases in almond

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57498-6 Variation among S -locus haplotypes and among stylar RNases in almond

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Colossal heating efficiency via eddy currents in amorphous microwires with nearly zero magnetostriction

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57434-8

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Spatial Network Connectivity and Spatial Reasoning Ability in Children with Nonverbal Learning Disability

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56003-y

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Statin use, HMGCR expression, and breast cancer survival – The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57323-9

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The relationship between consumption of nitrite or nitrate and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57453-5

10h

Despite 'Unsupportable' Bloodstain Analysis, No Relief for Man Convicted of Murder

Joe Bryan has maintained his innocence since his sentencing for the 1985 murder. The highest criminal court in Texas this week denied a last-ditch effort to obtain a new trial.

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Study traces evolution of acoustic communication

Imagine taking a hike through a forest or a stroll through a zoo and not a sound fills the air, other than the occasional chirp from a cricket. No birds singing, no tigers roaring, no monkeys chattering, and no human voices, either. Acoustic communication among vertebrate animals is such a familiar experience that it seems impossible to imagine a world shrouded in silence.

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Study traces evolution of acoustic communication

Imagine taking a hike through a forest or a stroll through a zoo and not a sound fills the air, other than the occasional chirp from a cricket. No birds singing, no tigers roaring, no monkeys chattering, and no human voices, either. Acoustic communication among vertebrate animals is such a familiar experience that it seems impossible to imagine a world shrouded in silence.

10h

'Melting rock' models predict mechanical origins of earthquakes

Engineers at Duke University have devised a model that can predict the early mechanical behaviors and origins of an earthquake in multiple types of rock. The model provides new insights into unobservable phenomena that take place miles beneath the Earth's surface under incredible pressures and temperatures, and could help researchers better predict earthquakes—or even, at least theoretically, atte

10h

How Mathematics Can Save Your Life

From the spread of infectious disease to crime statistics and choosing the shortest line in a grocery store, mathematics is crucial to understanding everything around us. In "The Math of Life and Death," Kit Yates illuminates the roles that numbers, calculations, and equations play in everyday life.

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Clean Meat will lead to a revolution in Human stem cell and 3D Printed Organ manufacturing…dramatically bringing prices down and increasing effectiveness for bio organ transplants

Once clean meat goes mainstream the next logical step is human stem cell culturing and mass production of bio organs for transplants and replacements. Given current projections with clean meat this would seem at least 5-10 years away or more given the potential ethical issues involved. Thoughts? DiscGenics is one of the early companies doing Discogenic Cells research for degenerative disk disease

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Dutch universities are working on a brain-inspired system

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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PEPTIC trial comparing strategies to prevent stress ulcers in ICU patients needing mechanical ventilation

Researchers report on a randomized clinical trial that compared two strategies (proton pump inhibitors vs. histamine-2 receptor blockers) to prevent stress ulcers among adult patients in intensive care units who needed mechanical ventilation. The trial was conducted at 50 ICUs in five countries to compare in-hospital death rates using the two strategies. The study is being released to coincide wit

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Akutlægehelikopterne flyver til de mest kritisk syge patienter

To ud tre patienter, der får hjælp med akutlægehelikopteren, er livstruende syge, viser den første landsdækkende undersøgelse af akutlægehelikopterordningen. Det viser, at visitatorerne på vagtcentralerne gør det godt, siger anæstesilæge Karen Alstrup, som står bag undersøgelsen.

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Rain brings joy for Australian firefighters, farmers

Drought-breaking storms dumped desperately needed rain on some bushfire-ravaged parts of eastern Australia on Friday, while giving joy to many farmers who have faced losing precious livestock and crops.

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Trophy hunt of protected Alpine ibex sparks Swiss debate

A woman wearing a bright orange vest aims her rifle and on her second shot, a large Alpine ibex with majestic curved horns collapses in the snow.

11h

Trophy hunt of protected Alpine ibex sparks Swiss debate

A woman wearing a bright orange vest aims her rifle and on her second shot, a large Alpine ibex with majestic curved horns collapses in the snow.

11h

Spørg Fagfolket: Trænger der havvand ind i Øresundstunnelen?

En læser har set voksende, hvide mærker i Øresundstunelens loft og vil gerne vide, om det er havvand, der trænger ind. Det svarer Øresundsbron på.

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Fires, then floods: How much can a koala bear?

A week ago, koalas at an Australian wildlife park were in the path of raging bushfires. On Friday, they were soaking wet and being carried to safety from flash floods.

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Climate change: What can I do about it and other questions

From population to plants, your questions answered about climate change.

11h

Giant jet engines aim to make our flying greener

How much more efficiency can be wrung out of the jet engine – technology which is over 70 years old?

11h

Heating woes fuel Balkan smog crisis

As winter grips the Balkans, the poor are caught in a cruel bind, being forced to light fires at home for heating while fuelling a pollution crisis smothering the region.

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Fiji cyclone leaves two missing, 119 in emergency shelter

A father and daughter were swept away in a swollen stream as Tropical Cyclone Tino caused widespread flooding in Fiji, forcing more than 100 people to take refuge in evacuation centres.

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The Goop Lab on Netflix shows how easy it is to fall for bad science

Instead of turning off Gwyneth Paltrow's new alternative health Netflix series The Goop Lab, we should watch it for lessons in how to spot bad science, says Clare Wilson

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New dog, old tricks? Stray dogs can understand human cues

If you have a dog, hopefully you're lucky enough to know that they are highly attuned to their owners and can readily understand a wide range of commands and gestures. But are these abilities innate or are they exclusively learned through training?

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New dog, old tricks? Stray dogs can understand human cues

If you have a dog, hopefully you're lucky enough to know that they are highly attuned to their owners and can readily understand a wide range of commands and gestures. But are these abilities innate or are they exclusively learned through training?

11h

ISSCR statement on ethical standards for stem cell-based embryo models

The ISSCR is updating its Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation to respond to recent scientific advances that include the use of pluripotent stem cell (PSC) to create models of early human embryo development (see Stem Cell Reports 14:1-6). As the science continues to advance, it raises important scientific, clinical, ethical, and societal issues for researchers, regulators, an

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ISSCR statement on ethical standards for stem cell-based embryo models

The ISSCR is updating its Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation to respond to recent scientific advances that include the use of pluripotent stem cell (PSC) to create models of early human embryo development (see Stem Cell Reports 14:1-6). As the science continues to advance, it raises important scientific, clinical, ethical, and societal issues for researchers, regulators, an

11h

Tænkeboks: Vinglasset er 18 cm højt

Her får du løsningen på årets første opgave.

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Får du reklamer for Løvens Hule-produkter, efter du har set programmet? Her er forklaringen

Dine privatdata og din færden på nettet gør det nemmere at målrette annoncer.

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Effektivare sätt att vaccinera mot tuberkulos

Globalt avlider fler människor i tuberkulos än i någon annan infektionssjukdom trots att majoriteten av alla människor är vaccinerade – enligt Världshälsoorganisationen WHO blir närmare 80 procent av alla barn vaccinerade i de länder där vaccinet ingår i vaccinationsprogrammet. Orsaken är att det vaccin som används, Bacille Calmette-Guérlin, BCG, inte skyddar så bra.

13h

Donald Trump Stumbles Into a Foreign-Policy Triumph

A year and a half into Donald Trump's presidency, Henry Kissinger set out a theory. "I think Trump may be one of those figures in history who appears from time to time to mark the end of an era and to force it to give up its old pretences," he told the Financial Times . "It doesn't necessarily mean that he knows this, or that he is considering any great alternative. It could just be an accident."

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Finally, we have the proven ability to end the suffering of HIV.

submitted by /u/coggerz [link] [comments]

14h

'Invisible computing' startup unveils smart contact lens

submitted by /u/lasercat_pow [link] [comments]

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How (not) to start a revolution in decentralized identity

submitted by /u/Mobilenewsflash [link] [comments]

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Photos of the Week: Giant Boar, Ice Music, Patagonian Glacier

A bull-taming festival in India, icy purification in Tokyo, locusts in Ethiopia, speed skating in the Netherlands, illuminated hats in Switzerland, fashion in Berlin and Paris, an iguana claw in Germany, a "Coming of Age" ceremony in Tokyo, bushfires in Australia, and much more.

14h

Sådan indsamler Facebook data om dit liv

Tech-giganterne lytter næppe med. Til gengæld bruger de andre tricks for at målrette reklamer til dig.

14h

Benzodiazepine prescriptions reach 'disturbing' levels in the US

Addictive benzodiazepines are prescribed at 66 million doctor appointments a year in the US – often with opioids, making it easier to fatally overdose

14h

Facebook ændrer algoritmer – vil gøre brugerne mere glade

Man vil i højere grad se opslag fra nære venner og familie på Facebook og Instagram i fremtiden.

14h

Long-term risks cast further doubt on the use of Viagra for fetal therapy

University of Manchester scientists investigating a possible treatment for fetal growth restriction (FGR), a condition in which babies grow poorly in the womb, have urged further caution on the use of Viagra.The drug, commonly used to treat erectile dysfunction, as it enhances blood flow — has been undergoing trials as a potential treatment for FGR. However, in a recent study in mice, Viagra show

14h

Sanitary care by social ants shapes disease outcome

Sanitary care in ants to fight disease is known to improve the wellbeing of the colony, yet it has been unclear how social disease defense interferes with pathogen competition inside the individual host body. In their recent study published in Ecology Letters, Sylvia Cremer and her research group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) revealed that collective care-giving

14h

Study finds disparity in critical care deaths between non-minority and minority hospitals

While deaths steadily declined over a decade in intensive care units at hospitals with few minority patients, in ICUs with large numbers of minority patients, there was less improvement, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

14h

New dog, old tricks? Stray dogs can understand human cues

Pet dogs are highly receptive to commands from their owners. But is this due to their training or do dogs have an innate ability to understand human signals? A new study finds that 80% of untrained stray dogs successfully followed pointing directions from people to a specific location. The results suggest that dogs can understand and respond to complex gestures without any training, meaning that d

14h

Psychology in an emergency: Science Weekly podcast

As the bushfires continue to rage across Australia, thousands of people have ended up face to face with the emergency. It's hard to imagine how you would behave in a disaster like this. Would you panic? Or act quickly and be organised? More than 50 years of psychological and sociological evidence covering mass emergencies shows that people typically behave with cooperation and coordination. Nicola

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Psychology in an emergency: Science Weekly podcast

As the bushfires continue to rage across Australia, thousands of people have ended up face to face with the emergency. It's hard to imagine how you would behave in a disaster like this. Would you panic? Or act quickly and be organised? More than 50 years of psychological and sociological evidence covering mass emergencies shows that people typically behave with cooperation and coordination. Nicol

15h

24-årige Jessica vandt IBMs første kvante-hackathon: »Kan man lave noget fornuftigt med 53 qubit?«

Jessica Pointing forsker i programmering af kvantecomputere. Version2 har talt med hende om perspektiverne for blandt andet kemi, materialefysik og medicinalområdet.

16h

Geotermi slår fejl i to ud af tre fjernvarmeanlæg

PLUS. Mens både Aalborg og Aarhus går med store planer for geotermi, er to af de tre eksisterende danske anlæg stoppet pga. tekniske problemer. Professor advarer.

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Primordial 'Asgard' Lifeform Has Been Successfully Grown in The Lab

It could answer questions about our very existence.

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A 300-fold enhancement of imino nucleic acid resonances by hyperpolarized water provides a new window for probing RNA refolding by 1D and 2D NMR [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

NMR sensitivity-enhancement methods involving hyperpolarized water could be of importance for solution-state biophysical investigations. Hyperpolarized water (HyperW) can enhance the 1H NMR signals of exchangeable sites by orders of magnitude over their thermal counterparts, while providing insight into chemical exchange and solvent accessibility at a site-resolved level. As HyperW's enhancements.

18h

New maps reveal Scotland's seabird breeding hotspots

Conservationists mapped the most critical areas of Scotland for endangered birds like the kittiwake.

18h

Climate change: Citizens' assembly prepares to tackle climate change

UK panel will tackle some of the dilemmas around global warming.

18h

Why we differ in our ability to fight off gut infections

Scientists at EPFL have published two papers showing how genetics affects the ability of different individuals to fight off gut infections.

18h

If Your Brain Could Speak

As neuroscientists, we spend much of our time staring at brain signals trying to decipher what the brain is "telling" us. We draw conclusions about memories, actions and even emotions from patterns of neural activity. In a very metaphorical sense the data "speaks to us", it answers our questions, begs us to ask more, and […]

18h

Climate change: Can Glasgow go carbon neutral?

As more cities declare climate emergencies, we look at how Glasgow aims to cancel out its carbon footprint.

19h

Giant Ocean Heatwave Called 'The Blob' Has Caused The Biggest Seabird Die-Off on Record

Almost a million birds of a single species have been wiped out.

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A Windows 10 Vulnerability Was Used to Rickroll the NSA and Github

A researcher demonstrated the attack less than a day after Microsoft disclosed one of the most critical Windows vulnerabilities ever.

19h

Older ethnic minority adults have fewer close friends

Older adults from ethnic minority groups report having fewer close friends and fewer friends who live locally than older white people, according a new UCL study.

19h

Researchers investigate molecule, VISTA, which keeps immune system quiet against cancer

Researchers are studying a valuable target in regulating the immune response in cancer and autoimmunity. VISTA is a tempering molecule that hinders T cells in the immune system from activating against self-antigens such as cancer cells. Their new publication describes how VISTA controls T-cell responses.

20h

Mobile protected areas needed to protect biodiversity in the high seas

As the United Nations rewrites the laws of the high seas, the new document should anticipate emerging technologies that allow protected areas to move as animals migrate or adapt to climate change.

20h

Sepsis associated with 1 in 5 deaths globally, double previous estimate

Twice as many people as previously believed are dying of sepsis worldwide, according to a new analysis. Among them are a disproportionately high number of children in poor areas.

20h

Making sense of the self

Interoception is the awareness of our physiological states. But precisely how the brain calculates and reacts to this information remains unclear. Neuroscientists now demonstrate how the insular cortex orchestrates the process. The work represents the first steps toward understanding the neural basis of interoception, which could allow researchers to address key questions in eating disorders, obes

20h

Physicists design 'super-human' red blood cells to deliver drugs to specific targets

A team of physicists from McMaster University has developed a process to modify red blood cells so they can be used to distribute drugs throughout the body, which could specifically target infections or treat catastrophic diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer's.

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Small change for climate change: Time to increase research funding to save the world

A new study shows that there is a huge disproportion in the level of funding for social science research into the greatest challenge in combating global warming — how to get individuals and societies to overcome ingrained human habits to make the changes necessary to mitigate climate change.

20h

Hormone resistance in breast cancer linked to DNA 'rewiring'

Researchers have revealed changes to the 3D arrangement of DNA linked to treatment resistance in ER+ breast cancer.

20h

Action needed to improve poor health and disadvantage in the youth justice system

In the first global review, researchers have examined the health of detained adolescents from 245 peer-reviewed journal articles and review publications. Researchers found that detained adolescents have a significantly higher prevalence of mental health disorders and suicidal behaviors than their peers in the community, along with substance use disorders, neurodevelopment disabilities, and sexuall

20h

The Lancet Digital Health: Real-time flu prediction may be possible using wearable heart rate and sleep tracking devices

The research, published in The Lancet Digital Health journal, demonstrates the potential of data from wearable devices to improve surveillance of infectious disease. Resting heart rate tends to spike during infectious episodes and this is captured by wearable devices such as smartwatches and fitness trackers, that track heart rate.

20h

Falling risk of heart disease among survivors of child cancer since the 1970s

There has been a measurable decline in serious heart conditions among adult survivors of childhood cancer since the 1970s, finds a new study.

20h

Blue light can help heal mild traumatic brain injury

Daily exposure to blue wavelength light each morning helps to re-entrain the circadian rhythm so that people get better, more regular sleep which was translated into improvements in cognitive function, reduced daytime sleepiness and actual brain repair.

20h

Slow-motion interplate slip detected in the Nankai Trough near Japan

Researchers used a Global Navigation Satellite System-Acoustic ranging combination technique to detect signals due to slow slip events in the Nankai Trough with seafloor deformations of 5 cm or more and durations on the order of one year. These events generally occurred on the shallow sides of regions with strong interplate coupling and represent variations in interplate friction conditions, which

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MS drug costs nearly triple over 7 years, even with introduction of generic

The cost of prescriptions for multiple sclerosis (MS) drugs nearly tripled over seven years, and the introduction of a generic version of one of the most common drugs had little overall effect on prices, according to a new study.

20h

China's Mystery Virus Has Now Been Confirmed in Japan

We're still not sure how it's spreading.

20h

Activation of a distinct genetic pathway can slow the progress of metastatic breast cancer

Activation of the BMP4 signalling pathway presents a new therapeutic strategy to combat metastatic breast cancer, a disease that has shown no reduction in patient mortality over the past 20 years.

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Loss of function in key Y-chromosome genes increases cancer risk in men

A new study by researchers from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a centre supported by 'la Caixa,' has identified a key biological mechanism that puts men at higher risk of cancer: loss of function in certain genes of the sex-determining Y chromosome, which is present only in men.

20h

Death rates plunge in older people with diabetes, but not younger people

New research covering the entire population of Hong Kong shows that while death rates from any cause (all-cause mortality), cardiovascular disease and cancer are plummeting overall and in adults with diabetes aged 45 to 74 years, those in younger adults aged 20 to 44 years are barely changing.

20h

The Atlantic Daily: The Senate Takes the Impeachment Case

It's Thursday, January 16. Impeachment managers have been assigned. The articles of impeachment have been read to the Senate. Chief Justice John Roberts and the senators have been sworn in. The trial resumes next week. In today's newsletter: Who is Lev Parnas again? Plus, the constitutionality of the ERA, and bipartisan kumbaya in Kansas (spoiler: it worked). * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (Mike Segar /

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Author Correction: Lipid normalization and stable isotope discrimination in Pacific walrus tissues

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57689-1

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New vulnerability in kidney cancer

Medical researchers have identified a possible way to treat tumors while sparing nearby healthy tissue.

21h

A Smart Contact Lens, Trouble for Water Bears, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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EU considers temporary ban on facial recognition in public spaces

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Sierra Nevada eyes 2021 launch of Dream Chaser space plane

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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What *can't* be mined from asteroids?

While asteroid mining is considered the wave of the future by many, myself included, I can't help but feel there's something we're missing. Namely what asteroids are missing; some important element or compound that we could only get from planets. But what? I'm no geologist, even an amateur one, but perhaps someone here is. submitted by /u/AlgaeNymph [link] [comments]

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China: renewables will be cheaper than coal by 2026

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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