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Single-use plastic: China to ban bags and other items

One of the world's biggest users of plastic plans to phase out most single-use items by 2025.

8h

Our current food system can feed only 3.4 billion people sustainably

We are struggling to feed half the world sustainably – but reorganising where we farm could allow us to feed 10 billion people within sustainability boundaries

59min

Socialdemokrater: Ny forbindelse over Kattegat kan bygges uden skattekroner

Selv om tidligere undersøgelser har vist, at en kombineret vej- og baneforbindelse over Kattegat vil kræve 52 mia. kr. i offentligt tilskud, mener transportminister Benny Engelbrecht (S), at der ikke er behov for skattekroner

7h

Combined prenatal smo<>king and drinking greatly increases SIDS risk

Children born to mothers who both drank and smoked beyond the first trimester of pregnancy have a 12-fold increased risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) compared to those unexposed or only exposed in the first trimester of pregnancy, according to a new study.

18min

On the edge between science and art: Historical biodiversity data from Japanese 'gyotaku'

Japanese cultural art of 'gyotaku,' which means 'fish impression' or 'fish rubbing,' captures accurate images of fish specimens. It has been used by recreational fishermen and artists since the Edo Period. Distributional data from 261 'Gyotaku' rubbings were extracted for 218 individual specimens, roughly representing regional fish fauna and common fishing targets in Japan through the years.

18min

Seven of our best tips for your Sonos system

It's a bit silly to have a Sonos system you're not using to its fullest. (Michał Borowczyk via Unsplash/) If you've got one or more Sonos speakers at home, you've opened up a whole world of high-quality audio streaming, whether you're playing tunes from your laptop or other services like Spotify, Apple Music , or Deezer. Getting started with a Sonos system is easy—the mobile app guides you throug

21min

Which Evolves Faster, Culture or Biology?

New study presents new way to observe rate at which culture changes. Bookshelf.jpg Image credits: Logan Bush/Shutterstock Space Monday, January 20, 2020 – 13:00 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) — Modern human culture seems to evolve at a dizzying rate. Changes in the media we consume and technology we use often far outstrip our ability to keep up. But there have been few attempts to ac

31min

Wisdom of the crowd? Building better forecasts from suboptimal predictors

Scientists have shown how to combine the forecasts of a collection of suboptimal 'delay embedding' predictors for time series data. This work may help improve the forecasting of floods, stock market gyrations, spatio-temporal brain dynamics, and ecological resource fluctuations.

33min

Dozens of non-oncology drugs can kill cancer cells

Researchers tested approximately 4,518 drug compounds on 578 human cancer cell lines and found nearly 50 that have previously unrecognized anti-cancer activity. These drugs have been used to treat conditions such as diabetes, inflammation, alcoholism, and even arthritis in dogs. The findings suggest a possible way to accelerate the development of new cancer drugs or repurpose existing drugs to tre

33min

Death on Mars

The martian radiation environment is a problem for human explorers that cannot be overstated — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

36min

A new role for neurogenesis

The ability to create new neurons may exist as built-in protection for sensitive brain areas, according to research in mice recently published in JNeurosci.

36min

A good night's sleep helps repair inflammation | Letter

This should become the number one priority in public health, writes Dr Guru Singh Excellent article by Edward Bullmore in Journal ( Inflammation is the new frontier in public health , 20 January). Unfortunately it does not fully explore the role of prevention. It is now being proven that sleep plays a major role in repairing the body, and in particular the brain, especially from the ravages of inf

45min

Strongly 'handed' squirrels less good at learning

Squirrels that strongly favor their left or right side are less good at learning, new research suggests.

45min

Immune discovery 'may treat all cancer'

Research is at an early stage but scientists said it had huge potential for destroying cancers.

57min

People urgently fleeing climate crisis cannot be sent home, UN rules

But it rejects a claim by a man whose Pacific Island nation is threatened by rising sea levels.

57min

Campus attacks by nationalists and police alarm India's scientific community

Scientific establishment, traditionally apolitical, is increasingly speaking out against the Modi government

58min

Michelin sustainable rubber criticised for deforestation

Michelin and WWF have been criticised over a rubber plantation in Indonesia which villagers say has caused deforestation and destroyed elephant habitat

59min

Setting controlled fires to avoid wildfires

Despite having proven effective at reducing wildfire risks, prescribed burns have been stymied by perceived and real risks, regulations and resource shortages. A new analysis highlights ways of overcoming those barriers, offering solutions for wildfire-ravaged landscapes.

1h

Becoming less active and gaining weight: Downsides of becoming an adult

Leaving school and getting a job both lead to a drop in the amount of physical activity, while becoming a mother is linked to increased weight gain, conclude two reviews.

1h

Local water availability is permanently reduced after planting forests

River flow is reduced in areas where forests have been planted and does not recover over time, a new study has shown. Rivers in some regions can completely disappear within a decade. This highlights the need to consider the impact on regional water availability, as well as the wider climate benefit, of tree-planting plans.

1h

Frankrig i front: Så mange penge har EU-landende krævet i GDPR-bøder

Mere end halvandet år efter at GDPR trådte i kraft ligger den samlede bødesum stadig under en milliard. Antallet af sanktioner vil stige i fremtiden, lyder det i ny rapport.

1h

Two killed as storm lashes Spain

Freezing winds, heavy snow and rain lashed parts of Spain Monday, killing two people, forcing the closure of schools and disrupting travel, officials said.

1h

Malaysia returns 42 containers of 'illegal' plastic waste to UK

Malaysia will not become "the garbage dump of the world", says the country's environment minister.

1h

Trump's Impeachment Brief Is a Howl of Rage

Over the weekend, as the Senate prepared for the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, the newly appointed House impeachment managers and the president's newly appointed legal team both filed their initial legal briefs. At least, one of them was a legal brief. The other read more like the scream of a wounded animal. The House managers' brief is an organized legal document. It starts with the law, th

1h

Laser diode emits deep UV light

Researchers say they have designed a laser diode that emits the shortest-wavelength ultraviolet light to-date, with potential applications in disinfection, dermatology, and DNA analyses.

1h

Ozone-depleting substances caused half of late 20th-century Arctic warming, says study

A study examines the greenhouse warming effects of ozone-depleting substances and finds that they caused about a third of all global warming from 1955 to 2005, and half of Arctic warming and sea ice loss during that period.

2h

Climate (not humans) shaped early forests of New England

A new, multidisciplinary study by archaeologists, ecologists, and paleoclimatologists overturns long-held interpretations of the role humans played in shaping the American landscape before European colonization. The findings give new insight into the rationale and approaches for managing biodiverse landscapes in the eastern US.

2h

Infants integrate firsthand and social experiences to decide when and how to try

Persistence is important to learning and is related to success in school and emotional well-being. A new study of persistence from Arizona State University, the University of Washington and University of Toronto shows that 18-month-old infants made rational inferences about applying effort to problem solving. The infants dynamically integrated information from their own and others' experiences in

2h

Physics shows that imperfections make perfect

For the first time, physicists have experimentally demonstrated that certain systems with interacting entities can synchronize only if the entities within the system are different from one another.

2h

Female chimps with powerful moms are less likely to leave home

In chimp society females leave the nest, while males stay with their parents. But some chimp females seem less willing to cut the apron strings. New findings suggest that while the risks of inbreeding push some females to leave home and start their families elsewhere, the perks of having a powerful mom on hand can make it worthwhile for other females to stay.

2h

Setting fires to avoid fires

Despite having proven effective at reducing wildfire risks, prescribed burns have been stymied by perceived and real risks, regulations and resource shortages. A new analysis highlights ways of overcoming those barriers, offering solutions for wildfire-ravaged landscapes.

2h

New technique predicts which melanoma patients are at risk for cancer recurrence, spread

Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, in collaboration with international colleagues, present a new, quantitative technique that leverages DNA sequencing to make more sophisticated and accurate predictions about which primary melanomas are likely to recur and spread.

2h

Dozens of non-oncology drugs can kill cancer cells

Researchers tested approximately 4,518 drug compounds on 578 human cancer cell lines and found nearly 50 that have previously unrecognized anti-cancer activity. These drugs have been used to treat conditions such as diabetes, inflammation, alcoholism, and even arthritis in dogs. The findings suggest a possible way to accelerate the development of new cancer drugs or repurpose existing drugs to tre

2h

Native Americans did not make large-scale changes to environment prior to European contact

Contrary to long-held beliefs, humans did not make major changes to the landscape prior to European colonization, according to new research conducted in New England featuring faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. These new insights into the past could help to inform how landscapes are managed in the future.

2h

Refining breast cancer classification by multiplexed imaging

An imaging approach developed at UZH enables the study of breast cancer tissue in greater detail. It uses 35 biomarkers to identify the different cell types in breast tumors and its surrounding area compared to the current standard of testing single markers. This increases the precision of tumor analysis and classification – and improves personalized diagnostics for breast cancer patients.

2h

New virus surging in Asia rattles scientists

Nature, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00129-x Chinese officials reported more than 100 new infections and South Korea confirmed its first case.

2h

Female chimps with powerful moms are less likely to leave home

In chimpanzee society, males spend their entire lives in the group where they were born, cooperating to defend their territory, while females tend to move away. But some chimp females seem less willing to cut the apron strings.

2h

Laser diode emits deep UV light

Researchers say they have designed a laser diode that emits the shortest-wavelength ultraviolet light to-date, with potential applications in disinfection, dermatology, and DNA analyses.

2h

China reports more than 200 infections with new coronavirus from Wuhan

Beijing and Shenzhen both have cases; Korea becomes third affected country outside China

2h

Pop Culture May Evolve at the Same Rate as Birds and Bugs

How quickly do music and literature change? Evolutionary biology could give us a hint.

2h

Lithospheric thickening beneath the Betics and Rif mountains pulls down the topography by 1500 m

A new study made by researchers at the Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera of the Spanish National Research Council (ICTJA-CSIC) has been able to describe the effects of the lithospheric structure on the topography of the Strait of Gibraltar area. This new research shows the deep structure of the plate boundary between Africa and Eurasia across the Gibraltar Arc. It describes the distribution

2h

Setting fires to avoid fires: Study outlines approaches to enable more prescribed burns

Australians desperate for solutions to raging wildfires might find them 8,000 miles away, where a new Stanford-led study proposes ways of overcoming barriers to prescribed burns—fires purposefully set under controlled conditions to clear ground fuels. The paper, published Jan. 20 in Nature Sustainability, outlines a range of approaches to significantly increase the deployment of prescribed burns i

2h

Climate (not humans) shaped early forests of New England

A new study in the journal Nature Sustainability overturns long-held interpretations of the role humans played in shaping the American landscape before European colonization. The findings give new insight into the rationale and approaches for managing some of the most biodiverse landscapes in the eastern U.S.

2h

Physics shows that imperfections make perfect

Northwestern University researchers have added a new dimension to the importance of diversity.

2h

Female chimps with powerful moms are less likely to leave home

In chimpanzee society, males spend their entire lives in the group where they were born, cooperating to defend their territory, while females tend to move away. But some chimp females seem less willing to cut the apron strings.

2h

Ozone-depleting substances caused half of late 20th-century Arctic warming, says study

A scientific paper published in 1985 was the first to report a burgeoning hole in Earth's stratospheric ozone over Antarctica. Scientists determined the cause to be ozone-depleting substances—long-lived artificial halogen compounds. Although the ozone-destroying effects of these substances are now widely understood, there has been little research into their broader climate impacts.

2h

Ravklumpen med det fantastiske lys

PLUS. En urne udgravet nordvest for Viborg viste sig at indeholde en mærkværdig genstand. Men hvad er dens formål, spørger museumsinspektør læserne.

2h

Refrigeration chemicals helped drive Arctic warming

Montreal Protocol an unsung hero of climate change, research suggests.

2h

Modern culture actually isn't evolving that quickly

Study suggests it's basically on pace with biological evolution.

2h

Medical devices you ingest and forget

All you need is a special gel and an LED light.

2h

Should we thin our forests?

It's complex and controversial, but shouldn't be ruled out.

2h

The power of mum

Researchers discover why some female chimps choose to stay at home.

2h

Lighting up the desert

Two sources make for a sublime view.

2h

Old Drug, New Tricks: Existing Medicines Show Promise in Fighting Cancer

Dozens of compounds approved for other purposes can kill cancer cells selectively — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Old Drug, New Tricks: Existing Medicines Show Promise in Fighting Cancer

Dozens of compounds approved for other purposes can kill cancer cells selectively — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Barometric pressure in London 'highest in 300 years' at least

High pressure at Heathrow Airport reaches 1,049.6 millibars – a record for the UK's capital.

3h

15 inspiring nature words you didn't know you needed

In Landmarks , Robert Macfarlane revives hundreds of nearly-forgotten words to remind us of our relationship with nature. New dictionaries are deleting nature words while adding technology terms, which Macfarlane states further separates us from the environment. The words we speak shape the reality we understand, making it essential to aptly describe what is happening on the planet. None To creat

3h

Ny skatte-analyse: Endnu lavere elafgifter gavner samfundsøkonomien

PLUS. Skatteministeriet viser i en ny rapport, hvordan der er samfundsøkonomiske gevinster at hente ved at nedsætte den almindelige elafgift yderligere end planlagt. Dog uden at tage højde for de klimamæssige følger.

3h

Researchers solve protein structures to fight asthma

Biophysicists from the MIPT Center for Molecular Mechanisms of Aging and Age-Related Diseases have teamed up with colleagues from Canada, the U.S., Japan, France, and Germany to shed light on the structure and functioning mechanism of the CysLT receptors, which regulate inflammatory responses associated with allergic disorders. Their findings are reported in Nature Communications.

3h

How bitter cold winter blasts and a warming planet will chew up the Lake Michigan shoreline

On a tucked-away South Shore beach, there once were cool shallows to swim and buried shells to dig up. For those living feet away, there was the sound of the water, the constant, gentle splash on sand.

3h

Pyrenees glaciers 'doomed', experts warn

Glaciers nestled in the lofty crags of the Pyrenees mountains separating France and Spain could disappear within 30 years as temperatures rise, upending ecosystems while putting local economies at risk, scientists say.

3h

Researchers solve protein structures to fight asthma

Biophysicists from the MIPT Center for Molecular Mechanisms of Aging and Age-Related Diseases have teamed up with colleagues from Canada, the U.S., Japan, France, and Germany to shed light on the structure and functioning mechanism of the CysLT receptors, which regulate inflammatory responses associated with allergic disorders. Their findings are reported in Nature Communications.

3h

How Much Sleep Do You Really Need?

Do you really need eight hours of sleep each night to thrive? Savvy Psychologist Dr. Jade Wu breaks down the eight-hour sleep myth and offers three ways to find the best sleep for you — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

How Much Sleep Do You Really Need?

Do you really need eight hours of sleep each night to thrive? Savvy Psychologist Dr. Jade Wu breaks down the eight-hour sleep myth and offers three ways to find the best sleep for you — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Combined prenatal smoking and drinking greatly increases SIDS risk

Children born to mothers who both drank and smoked beyond the first trimester of pregnancy have a 12-fold increased risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) compared to those unexposed or only exposed in the first trimester of pregnancy, according to a new study supported by the National Institutes of Health.

3h

Scientists were stumped when seabirds started dying. Now they have answers

In the fall of 2015, two years into a heatwave in the Pacific Ocean colloquially known as "the Blob," an unusually large influx of common murres, a small northern seabird, began to wash ashore.

3h

The philosophy of protest: Thoreau, King, and Civil Disobedience

Nonviolent protests designed to effect change are a common occurrence around the world, especially today. While they may seem to be a sign of sour grapes or contrarianism, there is a serious philosophical backing to them. Thinkers from Thoreau to Gandhi and King have made the case for civil disobedience as a legitimate route to change. If you're reading this, there is a fair chance that you are e

3h

Miami sets ambitious emissions goal: carbon neutral by 2050. How to get there isn't clear

With sea level rise already lapping at its door, the city of Miami made its first significant commitment to address the root cause of climate change, not just the symptoms.

3h

Scientists were stumped when seabirds started dying. Now they have answers

In the fall of 2015, two years into a heatwave in the Pacific Ocean colloquially known as "the Blob," an unusually large influx of common murres, a small northern seabird, began to wash ashore.

3h

Contradictions among judges in multi-judge panels aren't self-evident

Dutch judges feel that multi-judge panels can lead to more carefully considered rulings. Although research by Reyer Baas shows that they may be right, the added value of collective decision-making is far from guaranteed. Baas will receive his Ph.D. from Radboud University on January 24th.

3h

Image: The sun in 2019

The changing activity of our sun as seen by ESA's Proba-2 satellite in 2019.

3h

Platelets instead of spheres make screens more economical

ETH scientists have further developed QLED technology for screens. They have produced light sources that for the first time emit high-intensity light in only one direction. This reduces scattering losses, which makes the technology extremely energy efficient.

3h

Record-breaking terahertz laser beam

Terahertz radiation is used for security checks at airports, for medical examinations and also for quality checks in industry. However, radiation in the terahertz range is extremely difficult to generate. Scientists at TU Wien have now succeeded in developing a terahertz radiation source that breaks several records: it is extremely efficient, and its spectrum is very broad—it generates different w

3h

Human impact on nature 'dates back millions of years'

The impact of humans on nature may have been far greater and longer-lasting than we thought, say scientists.

3h

A Surge of New Plastic Is About to Hit the Planet

A world awash in plastic will soon get slammed by more, as major oil companies ramp up their production.

4h

404: The City Left Behind by China's Nuclear Ambitions

An artist goes looking for his past in a Cold War ghost town.

4h

The importance of leisure activities among refugees and forced migrants

Research undertaken at Bournemouth University is looking at ways in which leisure and forms of physical activity, such as dance and music-making, can have an important role in the lives of people seeking asylum.

4h

World's Largest Offshore Wind Farm Will Power 4.5 Million Homes

Renewable energy statistics just keep topping each other. Solar power is getting cheaper. Battery storage capacity is getting better. And wind farms are getting bigger. 2019 saw the world's biggest (at the time) offshore wind farm come online, as well as construction of the biggest offshore wind farm in the US off the coast of Atlantic City. But a new figure blows all of these out of the water. L

4h

Measuring sulfur with satellites

Seagoing vessels may emit fewer and fewer harmful substances, but how do you measure whether they comply with the standards? The Dutch Environment and Transport Inspectorate (ILT) and the universities of Leiden and Wageningen are starting a joint study to detect the emission of sulfur and nitrogen dioxide from sea-going vessels with satellite images.

4h

Can ecosystems recover from dramatic losses of biodiversity?

The sheer scale and intensity of the Australian bushfire crisis have led to apocalyptic scenes making the front pages of newspapers the world over. An estimated 10 million hectares (100,000 sq km) of land have burned since 1 July 2019. At least 28 people have died. And over a billion animals are estimated to have been killed to date. Of course, the actual toll will be much higher if major animal g

4h

Can ecosystems recover from dramatic losses of biodiversity?

The sheer scale and intensity of the Australian bushfire crisis have led to apocalyptic scenes making the front pages of newspapers the world over. An estimated 10 million hectares (100,000 sq km) of land have burned since 1 July 2019. At least 28 people have died. And over a billion animals are estimated to have been killed to date. Of course, the actual toll will be much higher if major animal g

4h

Tuberculosis bacteria survive in amoebae found in soil

Scientists from the University of Surrey and University of Geneva have discovered that the bacterium which causes bovine TB can survive and grow in small, single-celled organisms found in soil and dung. It is believed that originally the bacterium evolved to survive in these single-celled organisms known as amoebae and in time progressed to infect and cause TB in larger animals such as cattle.

4h

Helping roadside soils bounce back after construction

Everyone hates road construction, even the soils and bodies of water around the roads. Paved roads can't absorb water, so that responsibility falls to the soil next to the road. Unfortunately, those soils are often damaged during construction.

4h

Inverse design of porous materials using artificial neural networks

The ability to generate optimized nanomaterials with artificial neural networks can significantly revolutionize the future of materials design in materials science. While scientists had progressively created small and simple molecules, complex crystalline porous materials remain to be generated using neural networks. In a recent report on Science Advances, Baekjun Kim and a team of researchers in

4h

Tuberculosis bacteria survive in amoebae found in soil

Scientists from the University of Surrey and University of Geneva have discovered that the bacterium which causes bovine TB can survive and grow in small, single-celled organisms found in soil and dung. It is believed that originally the bacterium evolved to survive in these single-celled organisms known as amoebae and in time progressed to infect and cause TB in larger animals such as cattle.

4h

Designing lasers based on quantum physics

A five-country research team coordinated by Germán J. de Valcárcel Gonzalvo, Professor of Optics at the University of Valencia, has developed a new theory —the coherent master equation— that describes the behavior of pulsed lasers based on fast materials and highlights its effects of quantum coherence (the ability of material and light electrons to oscillate in unison for some time). These lasers

4h

Updates on Puerto Rico and Whakaari/White Island, Plus Taal Volcano Erupts

2019 ended with a tragic bang, and 2020 is already a busy year for geologic disasters. Here's the latest. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Spacewalking astronauts wrapping up battery improvements

A pair of spacewalking astronauts tackled one last round of battery improvements outside the International Space Station on Monday.

4h

Altruism in bacteria: Colonies divide the work

Bacteria found in soil specialize in the colony by division of labor. Some of the bacteria produce antibiotics, even when it comes at the expense of their individual reproduction success, to defend their colony against competitors.

4h

Altruism in bacteria: Colonies divide the work

Bacteria found in soil specialize in the colony by division of labor. Some of the bacteria produce antibiotics, even when it comes at the expense of their individual reproduction success, to defend their colony against competitors.

4h

Chemists teach neural networks to predict properties of compounds

A new joint Russian-French-Japanese team has developed a computational model able to predict the properties of new molecules based on the analysis of fundamental chemical laws. The study, titled "Using AI methods for the planning of chemical synthesis," is published in the Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling.

4h

Refurbished smart phones—the millennial or Gen X choice

Millions living on the Indian sub-continent aspire to ownership of the technological breakthroughs, smartphones, tablet computers, etc that are now almost ubiquitous in other countries. The question of sustainability arises as does the notion of a so-called "green" economics when considering the huge numbers involved.

4h

4h

Disarming bacteria with mucus and phages

Millions of people are treated with antibiotics each year for infections or as a preventative measure. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that at least 2.8 million people are infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria each year, meaning the germs have found ways to overpower antibiotics and continue to grow. Treating antibiotic-resistant infections is costly and time-intensive

4h

It was microbial mayhem in the Chicxulub crater, research suggests

New insights into how microbial life was quickly re-established following the mass extinction of the dinosaurs have been detailed for the first time by Curtin University-led research.

4h

BSNIP project releases spectra of more than 200 Type Ia supernovae

The Berkeley Supernova Ia Program (BSNIP) has released a dataset containing over 600 spectra of 242 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The new data release, available for astronomers worldwide, was presented in a paper published January 9 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

4h

Disarming bacteria with mucus and phages

Millions of people are treated with antibiotics each year for infections or as a preventative measure. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that at least 2.8 million people are infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria each year, meaning the germs have found ways to overpower antibiotics and continue to grow. Treating antibiotic-resistant infections is costly and time-intensive

4h

VIDEO Se rumkapsel skyde sig væk fra eksploderende raket

SpaceX har gennemført sidste afgørende test af kapsel, der skal fragte astronauter til ISS.

4h

HBO Probably Won't Make a Second Season of *Watchmen*

Meanwhile, NBC finally offered up details about Peacock, its feathered contender in the streaming service arena.

4h

A Practical Guide for Building Ethical Tech

Companies are hiring "chief ethics officers," hoping to regain public trust. The World Economic Forum's head of technology policy has a few words of advice.

4h

Forest thinning is controversial, but it shouldn't be ruled out for managing bushfires

Calls from industry and unions for increased thinning in forests to reduce bushfire risks have been met with concern from conservation scientists. They suggest forest thinning makes forests more fire prone.

4h

Patients Still Struggle To Balance High Costs Of MS Treatment, Despite Generic

Drugs to treat multiple sclerosis can run $70,000 a year or more. Patients hoped competition from a generic version of one of the most popular brands would spur relief, but prices went up. Here's why. (Image credit: Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images)

4h

Plankton phenomenon lights up bay

Bioluminescent algae in Jervis Bay, Australia, glows in a captivating night time display.

5h

The Unexpected Diversity of Pain

It comes in many types that each require specialized treatment, and scientists are learning to diagnose different varieties — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The overwhelming consensus on climate change

The climate is changing, and we are the primary cause. These are simple facts that are supported by a vast body of evidence and agreed upon by virtually all experts. Nevertheless, many people continue to think that the science isn't … Continue reading →

5h

Quantum physics: Controlled experiment observes self-organized criticality

Researchers have observed important characteristics of complex systems in a lab experiment. Their discovery could facilitate the development of quantum technologies.

5h

Rewards improve visual learning, but only after sleep

Rewards improve performance on a visual perceptual task only if participants sleep after training, according to a new study. The new findings may have particular implications for students tempted to sacrifice sleep in favor of late-night study sessions, says study corresponding author Yuka Sasaki, a professor of cognitive, linguistic, and psychological sciences at Brown University. "College stude

5h

Addressing global warming with new nanoparticles and sunshine

Harvesting sunlight, researchers of the Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) published in Materials Today ("Phase-Selective Highly Efficient Nanostructured Metal-decorated Hybrid Semiconductors for Solar Conversion of CO2 to Absolute CO Selectivity") a new strategy to transform carbon dioxide (CO2) into oxygen (O2) and pure carbon m

5h

Jumbo undertaking: Elephant milk under the microscope

On a recent sunny day at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, a team of specialized zookeepers collected breast milk samples from two female elephants nursing their 1-year-old calves. Unlike the mechanical breast pumps used by human mothers, or the machines employed by dairy cow farmers, the process requires hands-on expertise. It's something of a mammoth effort: Success depends a lot upon how the eleph

5h

Jumbo undertaking: Elephant milk under the microscope

On a recent sunny day at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, a team of specialized zookeepers collected breast milk samples from two female elephants nursing their 1-year-old calves. Unlike the mechanical breast pumps used by human mothers, or the machines employed by dairy cow farmers, the process requires hands-on expertise. It's something of a mammoth effort: Success depends a lot upon how the eleph

5h

How black employees see racism at work depends on position

Black workers' position in an organization—top, middle, or bottom—informs and shapes their impressions of workplace racial discrimination, according to new research. "Our paper argues that black workers' perceptions of racial discrimination derive not just from being in the minority, but also from their position in the organizational structure," says coauthor Adia Harvey Wingfield, professor of s

5h

6 million hectares of threatened species habitat up in smoke

More than one billion mammals, birds, and reptiles across eastern Australia are estimated to have been affected by the current fire catastrophe.

5h

Not bot, not beast: Scientists create first ever living, programmable organism

A remarkable combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and biology has produced the world's first "living robots".

5h

Chemists find fungal shrapnel in the air

In a discovery that has implications for our understanding of the air we breathe, UCI chemists report that they've found nanoscale fragments of fungal cells in the atmosphere. The pieces are extremely small, measuring about 30 nanometers in diameter, and much more abundant than previously thought, the researchers say in a study published this week in Science Advances.

5h

Unique organic light-emitting molecular emitters

A team including researchers from Osaka University has produced a new molecular emitter for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Using rational chemical design with U-shaped synthetic building blocks, the scientists were able to arrange the electron donors and acceptors into a large ring called a "macrocycle." The wheel-shaped molecule could potentially be used not only in OLEDs but also in tiny

5h

Modern face of Homo antecessor may have had insufficient room for wisdom teeth

A study led by the University of Bordeaux and the Dental Anthropology Group of the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), which has been published this week in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, reveals that the species Homo antecessor, found in level TD6 of the Gran Dolina site in the Sierra de Atapuerca (Burgos), already endured the drawbacks of having i

5h

Bushfires and storms threaten water supply and much more

Most of the drinking water for our cities and towns comes from densely forested catchments in nearby mountains. These catchments act like large, and very cost effective water treatment plants, slowly filtering rainfall through the soil before releasing clean water back to rivers and reservoirs.

5h

LHCb explores the beauty of lepton universality

The LHCb collaboration has reported an intriguing new result in its quest to test a key principle of the Standard Model called lepton universality. Although not statistically significant, the finding—a possible difference in the behavior of different types of lepton particles—chimes with other previous results. If confirmed, as more data are collected and analyzed, the results would signal a crack

5h

6 million hectares of threatened species habitat up in smoke

More than one billion mammals, birds, and reptiles across eastern Australia are estimated to have been affected by the current fire catastrophe.

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Not bot, not beast: Scientists create first ever living, programmable organism

A remarkable combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and biology has produced the world's first "living robots".

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Ultrafast camera takes 1 trillion frames per second of transparent objects and phenomena

A little over a year ago, Caltech's Lihong Wang developed the world's fastest camera, a device capable of taking 10 trillion pictures per second. It is so fast that it can even capture light traveling in slow motion.

5h

Why cancer treatment causes bone loss

Researchers studying mice have found a driver of bone loss related to cancer treatment. They've shown that radiation and chemotherapy can halt cell division in bone, which results in a stress response referred to as senescence. Bone loss that can lead to osteoporosis and fractures is a major problem for cancer patients who receive chemotherapy and radiation. Since the hormone estrogen plays an im

5h

'Mechanical breathing' in smart windows

Smart windows automatically change transparency when a voltage is applied. However, one reason they aren't more widespread is that the polymer inside dramatically expands and shrinks with every charge. Purdue University researchers have dubbed this effect "mechanical breathing."

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The wizard men curing breast cancer

A breast cancer foundation celebrates its research heroes. Read now here about how great US scientists from Harvard, MIT, Weill Cornell and MD Anderson cure cancer.

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Australia's threatened bats need protection from white-nose syndrome

We already know how deadly this summer's fires have been for mammals, birds, and reptiles across Australia. But beyond this bushfire season, many of those same species—including our bats, which make up around a quarter of all Australian mammal species—are facing another devastating threat to their survival.

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How cluster hiring at U.S. research universities has fared

Cluster hiring is both very popular—and very costly—on university campuses across the U.S. But according to Steven Brint, a sociologist at the University of California, Riverside, far too little research has been done to support the practice's effectiveness.

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Australia's threatened bats need protection from white-nose syndrome

We already know how deadly this summer's fires have been for mammals, birds, and reptiles across Australia. But beyond this bushfire season, many of those same species—including our bats, which make up around a quarter of all Australian mammal species—are facing another devastating threat to their survival.

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A brain transplant for one of Australia's top telescopes

One of Australia's top telescopes will receive an A$2.6 million upgrade to help extend its three-decade record of improving our understanding of the universe.

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California's trees could shift as global warming forces birds to move out

In Northern California's Klamath National Forest, birds are moving to higher elevations to escape rising temperatures. (U.S. Forest Service/) This story was published in partnership with Nexus Media , a syndicated newswire covering climate, energy, policy, art, and culture. Forests are critical to slowing climate change because they soak up huge amounts of heat-trapping carbon dioxide . Birds hel

5h

Study further implicates poultry processing in coastal pollution

Excess nitrogen is a major threat to water quality in coastal waters worldwide. Found in treated wastewater, farm and lawn fertilizers and combustion exhaust, it fuels blooms of algae that shade submerged grasses and suck oxygen from the water when they die and decay.

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Exercise is good for your skin: A protein mimics some antiaging effects in mice

If I cut myself while chopping vegetables, the cells in my skin would repair the damaged tissue in days or weeks, depending on the severity of the wound. Big or small, that cut would eventually close because that's my skin's job as the first line of defense against an outside world full of infections and unwanted microbes.

5h

First results from the Dark Energy Survey

The Dark Energy Survey (DES) program uses the patterns of cosmic structure as seen in the spatial distribution of hundreds of millions of galaxies to reveal the nature of "dark energy," the source of cosmic acceleration. Since it began in 2013, DES has mapped over 10 percent of the sky with a digital camera containing 570 million pixels and five optical filters that provide galaxy colors to estima

5h

ESA opens oxygen plant, making air out of moondust

ESA's technical heart has begun to produce oxygen out of simulated moondust.

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Designer-defect mediated clamping of ferroelectric domain walls for more stable nanoelectronics

A UNSW study published today in Nature Communications presents an exciting step towards domain-wall nanoelectronics: a novel form of future electronics based on nano-scale conduction paths, and which could allow for extremely dense memory storage.

5h

Chemist suggests a way to measure the taste of beer

A chemist from RUDN University has developed a method for analyzing the products of binding of aldehydes with the amino acid cysteine in malt and beer—these substances can adversely affect taste during storage. The technique can be used for the routine detection of these substances, which will help prove or disprove their effect on the taste of beer. The results are published in the Journal of Chr

5h

How Aid Groups Map Refugee Camps That Officially Don't Exist

Workers from Switzerland-based Medair use clipboards, cell phones, and GIS software to locate informal settlements of Syrian refugees across Lebanon.

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4 Best Handheld Vacuums (2020): Cordless, Pet Hair, Portable

From Dustbuster to Dyson, we tried a bunch of hand vacs, and were surprised by just how powerful they've become.

5h

Image of the Day: Neural Branching Gene

A gene involved in a newly described syndrome affects neural functioning in fruit fly embryos.

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Benefits & Risks of Artificial Intelligence

submitted by /u/technicalbabag [link] [comments]

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The World's First Solar Powered Train

submitted by /u/rf97a [link] [comments]

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A brave new workless world

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Arctic Ice Feedback Loops Will Guide the Climate's Future

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Laser diode emits deep UV light

Nagoya University scientists, in cooperation with Asahi Kasei Corporation, have designed a laser diode that emits deep-ultraviolet light, and have published a paper in the journal Applied Physics Express.

6h

Exercise is good for your skin: A protein mimics some antiaging effects in mice

If I cut myself while chopping vegetables, the cells in my skin would repair the damaged tissue in days or weeks, depending on the severity of the wound. Big or small, that cut would eventually close because that's my skin's job as the first line of defense against an outside world full of infections and unwanted microbes.

6h

How the Fight over a Hawaii Mega-Telescope Could Change Astronomy

Thirty Meter Telescope controversy is forcing scientists to grapple with how their research affects Indigenous peoples — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Heat wave signals the growth of a stellar embryo

An international research team with the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA) participating has detected a propagating heat wave near a massive protostar. It confirms the scenario that such objects grow in bursts. This wave became visible by observing naturally generated microwave lasers, whose spatial arrangement changed unexpectedly rapid.

6h

College-Educated Voters Are Ruining American Politics

M any college-educated people think they are deeply engaged in politics. They follow the news—reading articles like this one—and debate the latest developments on social media. They might sign an online petition or throw a $5 online donation at a presidential candidate. Mostly, they consume political information as a way of satisfying their own emotional and intellectual needs. These people are p

6h

Want to know what climate change will do in your backyard? There's a dataset for that

What the global climate emergency has in store may vary from one back yard to the next, particularly in the tropics where microclimates, geography and land-use practices shift dramatically over small areas. This has major implications for adaptation strategies at local levels and requires trustworthy, high-resolution data on plausible future climate scenarios.

6h

Wisdom of the crowd? Building better forecasts from suboptimal predictors

Researchers at the University of Tokyo and Kozo Keikaku Engineering Inc. have introduced a method for enhancing the power of existing algorithms to forecast the future of unknown time series. By combining the predictions of many suboptimal forecasts, they were able to construct a consensus prediction that tended to outperform existing methods. This research may help provide early warnings for floo

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Paris taught me how to do what is necessary to combat climate change

Nature, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00112-6 To the world leaders mustering in Davos: set your minds to reaching net-zero emissions, and you can forge the future we need.

6h

The Coolest Physics You've Ever Heard Of

Ultracold atoms can simulate all sorts of quantum behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

An Open Source Effort to Encrypt the Internet of Things

IoT is a security hellscape. One cryptography company has a plan to make it a little bit less so.

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A Move to Make Auto-Safety Features Speak the Same Language

Super Cruise? Traffic Jam Assist? Autopilot? Translation for all of the above: Keep your eyes on the road\!

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Today's Cartoon: Turing Tested

Check this box for an existential crisis.

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Dear Therapist: My Son Makes My New Husband Feel Alienated in Our Family

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I have two adult sons, both of whom live far away from me. Their dad died unexpectedly 15 years ago, and I have since remarried someone who is a good fit for me but who really has no experience being a father.

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A Film About Teens Finding Love Amid Climate Apocalypse

As Earth's climate continues to change for the worse , a peculiar little subgenre of science fiction, the environmental allegory, is due for a cinematic resurgence. Makoto Shinkai's Weathering With You is a tale of awkward teenagers finding each other and falling in love amid all sorts of trials and tribulations—a specialty for the filmmaker, whose smash hit Your Name made him one of Japan's lead

6h

Where Trump Learned the Art of the Quid Pro Quo

On a debate stage during the 2016 Republican primary, Donald Trump explained why he'd given money to Democratic politicians: "I give to many people," he said. "Before this, before two months ago, I was a businessman. I give to everybody. When they call, I give. And do you know what? When I need something from them two years later, three years later, I call them, they are there for me." Trump has

6h

The Coolest Physics You've Ever Heard Of

Ultracold atoms can simulate all sorts of quantum behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Diamanter – elektronikkens nye bedste ven

PLUS. Amerikansk startup fremstiller syntetiske diamanter til halvledere og ultrahårdt glas med billige gasser. Men der er store udfordringer før diamanterne bliver elektronikken nye bedste ven

7h

More precious than gold: Why the metal palladium is soaring

The price of the precious metal palladium has hit a record high of $2,500 an ounce as demand rises.

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Kritisk sårbarhed i Windows 10: Sikkerhedsekspert spoofer NSA og Github

NSA har tidligere afsløret en kritisk sårbarhed i Windows 10, der tillader hackere at manipulere med certifikatvalideringer for at få adgang til både hjemmesider og servere. På Twitter har en bruger lagt billeder op, der dokumenterer et simuleret angreb på NSA og Github.

7h

Politidroner styrter ved regnvejr i England

Sidste år styrtede 16 droner af typen DJI Matrice 210 ned i Storbritannien. Flere af ulykkerne skyldtes fugt i motorerne ved flyvning i regnvejr.

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China Confirms New Coronavirus Spreads From Humans to Humans

A top Chinese government-appointed expert says a mysterious respiratory illness that has killed at least three people can be transmitted by humans, heightening concern about the outbreak.

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'I'm starting the year off with something I didn't expect to ever do: I'm retracting a paper.'

In journalism, we often joke that three cases of a phenomenon is a trend. If that's the case, the trend of late 2019 and early 2020 would appear to be authors announcing retractions on Twitter. In December, Joscha Legewie took to social media to say he had been made aware of an error that had … Continue reading

7h

Age gives you an edge in the workplace. Here's how.

Melanie Katzman has 30 years of experience in her field, yet was advised to tell people she had just 20 years of experience so she wouldn't seem too out of touch. Katzman strongly disagrees with that assessment of age in the workplace. Rather than see it as a liability, older professionals should embrace their age and experience. They can see patterns more broadly, plus they have deep network con

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Billigt läkemedel hjälper vid svårbehandlad leukemi

Ett vanligt och billigt läkemedel kan användas för att motverka behandlingsresistens vid akut myeloisk leukemi, AML, en av de vanligaste blodcancerformerna hos vuxna. Leukemi är cancer i blodet och innebär att vissa vita blodkroppar ökar i antal. Det finns både kroniska leukemier, som kan ha ett långsamt förlopp under många år, och akuta leukemier som utvecklas snabbt. Akut myeloisk leukemi, AML,

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Big oil is the new big tobacco – and Congress must use its power to investigate | Naomi Oreskes and Geoffrey Supran

Americans had the right to know the harms of smoking. They have the right to know the harms of the energy industry, too Greta Thunberg summed up 2019 in five words: "Our house is on fire." In Australia, this is now literally the case. Wildfires there have been raging for more than a month and now span an area larger than Switzerland. The situation bears all the hallmarks of a hot new world: lives

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Lysende molekyler gør kræftoperationer præcise

PLUS. I dag bliver op mod halvdelen af vævet ikke fjernet, og kræftsygdommen vender tilbage. ​En dansk fluorescerende teknologi gør det lettere for kirurger at se og fjerne cancervævet helt.

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Emergence of chirality and structural complexity in single crystals at the molecular and morphological levels

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13925-5 Single crystallinity combined with multidomain morphology is counterintuitive. Here, the authors achieve such a phenomenon in a metal-organic framework that also displays chirality at both the molecular and morphological levels.

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Unveiling the Re effect in Ni-based single crystal superalloys

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14062-9 Adding minute amounts of rhenium to Ni-based single crystal superalloys extends their high temperature performance in engines, but the reasons behind that are still unclear. Here, the authors combine high resolution imaging and modelling to show that rhenium enriches and slows down partial dislocations to imp

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Scalable photonic sources using two-dimensional lead halide perovskite superlattices

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14084-3 Decoupled high-order MQW superlattices are desired to design miniaturized photonic sources but they are yet to be realized in scalable ways. Here Jagielski et al. achieve this goal using multiple-stacked colloidal lead halide perovskite quantum wells separated by atomically thin quantum barriers.

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Time-of-flight resolved light field fluctuations reveal deep human tissue physiology

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14228-5 Diffuse optical flowmetry is widely used to assess blood flow dynamics, but has remained difficult to interpret. Here, the authors use interferometric near-infrared spectroscopy, revealing additional information about optical phase and time-of-flight, and observe the Brownian nature of blood flow dynamics in

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Antarctic Ice Sheet and emission scenario controls on 21st-century extreme sea-level changes

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14049-6 There are significant uncertainties of how large sea level changes due to Antarctic Ice Sheet melting could be. Here, the authors quantify the impact of different greenhouse gas emission scenarios and different Antarctic contributions to changes to extreme sea-level events and find that even under low emissio

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Nickel-catalyzed allylic carbonylative coupling of alkyl zinc reagents with tert-butyl isocyanide

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14320-1 In contrast to the well-established palladium-catalyzed version, the nickel-catalyzed carbonylative coupling is underdeveloped. Here the authors report a nickel-catalyzed allylic carbonylative coupling with alkyl zinc reagents, allowing for preparation of β,γ-unsaturated ketones in a linear-selective fashion.

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JMJD3 and UTX determine fidelity and lineage specification of human neural progenitor cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14028-x Neurogenesis is an ordered transition from pluriptotent cells to neural precursor cells (NPCs) to neurons. Here the authors show that loss of the lysine demethylases JMJD3 and UTX leads reduced DNA accessibility at neurogenesis loci in human NPCs, and that the chromatin remodeller BAF can rescue differentiati

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Mutational signatures in tumours induced by high and low energy radiation in Trp53 deficient mice

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14261-4 Mutational signatures induced by ionising radiation remain largely unexplored. Here in TP53 mutant mice, the authors characterise the genomic landscape of tumours induced by high- and low-energy radiation.

8h

The wildfires and melting ice that science warned us about are here

News reports of long-predicted disasters are starting to sound familiar. Scientists, too, must carry on repeating calls for rapid cuts to carbon emissions

8h

Want to know what climate change will do in your back yard? There's a dataset for that

The 7-terabyte dataset, the largest of its kind, helps envision climate-change scenarios at scales as small as 1 kilometer. A new review validates and describes the dataset.

8h

Wisdom of the crowd? Building better forecasts from suboptimal predictors

Scientists at the University of Tokyo and Kozo Keikaku Engineering Inc. have shown how to combine the forecasts of a collection of suboptimal 'delay embedding' predictors for time series data. This work may help improve the forecasting of floods, stock market gyrations, spatio-temporal brain dynamics, and ecological resource fluctuations

8h

B-cellernas viktiga roll vid immunterapi

Patienter svarade bättre på immunterapi om melanomtumörer innehöll särskilda kluster med B-celler. Det visar forskning som letts av forskare vid Lunds universitet.

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DNA epigenetic marks are linked to embryo aberrations in amphipods

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57465-1

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Plasmonic ternary hybrid photocatalyst based on polymeric g-C3N4 towards visible light hydrogen generation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57493-x Plasmonic ternary hybrid photocatalyst based on polymeric g-C 3 N 4 towards visible light hydrogen generation

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SLA-1 Genetic Diversity in Pigs: Extensive Analysis of Copy Number Variation, Heterozygosity, Expression, and Breed Specificity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57712-5

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Forecasting high-dimensional dynamics exploiting suboptimal embeddings

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57255-4

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Factors that influence the complications and outcomes of femoral neck fractures treated by cannulated screw fixation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57696-2

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Temperature distribution in driven granular mixtures does not depend on mechanism of energy dissipation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57420-0

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Dust storms and giant hail batter bushfire-weary Australia

Thunderstorms and giant hail battered parts of Australia's east coast on Monday after "apocalyptic" dust storms swept across drought-stricken areas, as extreme weather patterns collided in the bushfire-fatigued country.

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Childhood Obesity Is a Major Problem. Research Isn't Helping.

Something is missing with many study methods.

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It's Fish vs. Dams, and the Dams Are Winning

Thousands of dams across New York, many abandoned, are blocking fish migrations. A movement to remove them is growing.

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John Delaney Is Still Running. Why?

WHAT CHEER, Iowa—Don't let the name fool you: What Cheer is a dreary little town. Other than the gas station, the most notable place in the city is an old building that apparently used to house the What Cheer Telephone Company, whatever that was. Today, cheap white curtains are drawn across the windows. It looks like someone is living there. John Delaney is here at dusk on a Friday night in Janua

8h

Psychology Still Skews Western and Affluent. Can It Be Fixed?

For decades, the overwhelming majority of psychology research has examined people who live in the United States and other affluent Western countries. By focusing on this very narrow population, researchers in the field have — mostly unwittingly — presented a skewed view of the human mind.

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Arbetsmiljöproblem när föräldrar hänger ut lärare på Facebook

Skolan är en utsatt plats. För elever – men också för lärare. Nu ska forskare vid Malmö universitet utveckla metoder för att förebygga digitala kränkningar i skolvärlden. – Sociala medier utmanar gränser i arbetslivet. Tidigare har vi betraktat mobbning som ett internt problem inom organisationer. Nu utmanas gränserna, säger Rebecka Cowen Forssell, forskare vid Malmö universitet. Hängs ut på Face

9h

Australia fires 'devastating habitats' of endangered species

Australia's bushfires and other climate change effects are devastating the habitats of critically endangered species and driving the native platypus towards extinction, according to surveys highlighting the country's vulnerability to rising temperatures.

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Australia fires 'devastating habitats' of endangered species

Australia's bushfires and other climate change effects are devastating the habitats of critically endangered species and driving the native platypus towards extinction, according to surveys highlighting the country's vulnerability to rising temperatures.

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Ny metod daterar urtida jordbävningar

Rörelser i sprickor i berggrunden kan dateras genom en ny teknik. Det gör det möjligt att spåra jordbävningshistorik flera miljarder år tillbaka i tiden. Och kan hjälpa oss både att förstå plattektonisk utveckling och att förutse seismisk aktivitet. Dramatisk frigörelse av energi skapas i jordbävningar när olika segment av berggrunden sätts i rörelse, som vid kollision eller spridning av de tekto

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Ombudsmanden opfordres til at gå ind i sag om lange fastholdelser

Dansk Psykiatrisk Selskab har nu opfordret Ombudsmanden og Folketingets paragraf 71-udvalg om at vurdere, om psykiatriloven tillader lange fastholdelser.

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Afgørelser på internettet kalder på nyt retfærdighedskriterie

I disse år ser vi, at privat udbydere som Airbnb løser konflikter uden om offentligt regulerede…

10h

SpaceX in 'perfect' test of Crew Dragon emergency abort system

SpaceX successfully tested its emergency abort system on an unmanned spacecraft moments after launch Sunday, according to a live broadcast of the event, the last major test before it plans to send NASA astronauts to the International Space Station.

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Threatened species hit hard by Australia's bushfires

Australia's bushfires have burned more than half the known habitat of 100 threatened plants and animals, including 32 critically endangered species, the government said Monday.

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High hopes as Austria's new night train sets off for Brussels

The first night train to set off for Belgium in 16 years departed from Vienna Sunday, carrying Austrian and European politicians who hope the new route can set an example as the continent tries to meet its climate targets.

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Threatened species hit hard by Australia's bushfires

Australia's bushfires have burned more than half the known habitat of 100 threatened plants and animals, including 32 critically endangered species, the government said Monday.

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No astrovans for SpaceX, crews riding to rockets in Teslas

Astronauts launched by SpaceX in coming months will ride to their rockets in high fashion. Instead of using a retro-style astrovan, SpaceX crews will travel to the launch pad in Tesla sports cars.

10h

How to be a good listener: my mission to learn the most important skill of all

The author Kate Murphy thinks our inability to listen properly to other people is leaving us all feeling isolated. In a world of smartphones and busy schedules, can we re-engage? I was very suspicious about this assignment. Kate Murphy's new book, You're Not Listening , suggests that many of us – absorbed in our own thoughts and dreams, occupying our little digital bubbles – have lost the ability

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Online campaign to save malnourished lions at Sudan park

Online calls grew Sunday to help save five "malnourished and sick" African lions held at a park in Sudan's capital, with some demanding the creatures be shifted to a better habitat.

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Online campaign to save malnourished lions at Sudan park

Online calls grew Sunday to help save five "malnourished and sick" African lions held at a park in Sudan's capital, with some demanding the creatures be shifted to a better habitat.

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Evacuation crackdown ordered as Philippine volcano seethes

Philippine officials ordered a crackdown Monday on people being allowed daily visits to the homes they fled after Taal volcano erupted, citing threats it could still explode at any time.

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Billionaires richer than 60 percent of the world's population: Oxfam

The world's billionaires have doubled in the past decade and are richer than 60 percent of the global population, the charity Oxfam said Monday.

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Climate change pushing Australia's platypus towards extinction: researchers

Prolonged drought and other effects of climate change are pushing Australia's unique platypus population towards extinction, scientists warned in a study published Monday.

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Malaysia says won't be 'garbage dump' as it returns waste

Malaysia has sent back 150 shipping containers of plastic waste to mostly wealthier nations, with the Southeast Asian country saying Monday it would not be the world's "garbage dump".

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Climate change pushing Australia's platypus towards extinction: researchers

Prolonged drought and other effects of climate change are pushing Australia's unique platypus population towards extinction, scientists warned in a study published Monday.

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China moves on takeout containers in bid to reduce plastic waste

China will ban non-degradable plastic bags in major cities and single-use straws from restaurants by the end of this year in a bid to cut down on waste.

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Fires set stage for irreversible forest losses in Australia

Australia's forests are burning at a rate unmatched in modern times and scientists say the landscape is being permanently altered as a warming climate brings profound changes to the island continent.

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Is defending science-based medicine worth it?

Pseudoscience, denialism, fake news, and disinformation about health are a bigger problem than ever, thanks to social media. As doctors and scientists join lay defenders of science on social media, will they be willing to pay the price in terms of harassment? Or will they decide it's not worth the hassle? And what about our fellow docs who think that it's beneath them to debunk quackery, that it i

11h

Vår urmoder – ett samarbete mellan tre organismer?

Under livets första två miljarder år fanns bara ensamma enkla celler utan cellkärna. Skillnaden är stor mot de celler som finns i flercelliga växter, djur och svampar. Våra celler har bland annat en cellkärna där arvsmassan lagras och en mitokondrie som förser cellen med energi. Ett olöst mysterium är hur en urtidscell plötsligt blev mer komplex, och i förlängningen kunde bli till så avancerade sa

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Local water availability is permanently reduced after planting forests

River flow is reduced in areas where forests have been planted and does not recover over time, a new study has shown. Rivers in some regions can completely disappear within a decade. This highlights the need to consider the impact on regional water availability, as well as the wider climate benefit, of tree-planting plans.

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On the edge between science and art: Historical biodiversity data from Japanese 'gyotaku'

Historical biodiversity data is being obtained from museum specimens, literature, classic monographs and old photographs, yet those sources can be damaged, lost or not completely adequate. That brings us to the need of finding additional, even if non-traditional, sources.

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On the edge between science and art: Historical biodiversity data from Japanese 'gyotaku'

Historical biodiversity data is being obtained from museum specimens, literature, classic monographs and old photographs, yet those sources can be damaged, lost or not completely adequate. That brings us to the need of finding additional, even if non-traditional, sources.

11h

Strongly 'handed' squirrels less good at learning

Squirrels that strongly favour their left or right side are less good at learning, new research suggests.

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Strongly 'handed' squirrels less good at learning

Squirrels that strongly favour their left or right side are less good at learning, new research suggests.

11h

Tørke og klimaforandringer truer Australiens næbdyr

Allerede nu er næbdyret forsvundet fra op mod 40 procent af dets tilholdssteder, viser dyster undersøgelse.

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The age of the individual must end – our world depends on it | Tom Oliver

The costs of a culture focused on an illusory idea of personal autonomy are making us ill and heating our planet. But a new age may be dawning Last month, as I travelled to see family for a very mild Christmas in the UK, I thought about the bushfires simultaneously raging across Australia. They are just one example from a long series of extreme weather events in 2019, including cyclones in India

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China confirms human-to-human transmission of Sars-like virus

Authorities say 224 patients with the coronavirus have been identified

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What Happens to Lasers Underwater? – Smarter Every Day 219

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

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Multidomain broad spectrum invisibility: what all would need to be considered in developing a device that could potentially render a theoretical technotelepath's eavesdropping useless?

Just an excercise in thought here: with some clever engineering, technotelepathy may be possible in the future through the use of fNIRS based imaging and non-contact, capacitive transducer electrode based electroencephalography. Going even further, radio communications could transmit the state of neural activity through the use of unknowingly insuffulated, absorbed, or ingested nanotechnology. Wh

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Scientists breach brain barriers to attack tumors

submitted by /u/iTwalkers [link] [comments]

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On the edge between science and art: Historical biodiversity data from Japanese 'gyotaku'

Japanese cultural art of 'gyotaku,' which means 'fish impression' or 'fish rubbing,' captures accurate images of fish specimens. It has been used by recreational fishermen and artists since the Edo Period. Distributional data from 261 'Gyotaku' rubbings were extracted for 218 individual specimens, roughly representing regional fish fauna and common fishing targets in Japan through the years. The r

13h

Prolonged breath-holding could help radiotherapy treatment of cardiac arrhythmias

A technique that enables patients suffering from heart conditions to hold their breath safely for over five minutes could have potential as part of a new treatment for cardiac arrhythmias, say researchers at the University of Birmingham.

13h

Nearly 9 in 10 parents say teens spend too much time gaming

Eighty-six percent of parents agree that teens spend too much time gaming, but many may be mistaken about the extent of their own child's video game habits, a new national poll suggests.

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People with inadequate access to food 10% to 37% more likely to die prematurely

Adults with food insecurity (i.e., inadequate access to food because of financial constraints) are 10% to 37% more likely to die prematurely from any cause other than cancer compared to food-secure people, found new research in CMAJ.

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Mindre NOx-udledning i trafikken kan føre til skadelige partikler

PLUS. Ikke alene hæmmer NOx dannelsen af skadelige partikler i byerne. I fravær af NOx kan dannelsen af nye partikler også foregå hurtigere end ventet, fortæller forskere fra KU.

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GSK and gene profiling group 23andMe seek first drug target

UK drugmaker hopes to launch clinical trial by end of the year

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Mathematical model shows how the Nazis could have won WWII's Battle of Britain

The Battle of Britain is widely recognized as one of the most significant battles that occurred during World War II. It marked the first major victory of the Allied forces and shifted the tide of the war. Historians, however, have long debated the deciding factor in the British victory and German defeat. A new mathematical model took into account numerous alternative tactics that the German's cou

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China's struggle to move away from coal

China is a country caught in the middle of a global struggle: to develop but also be green.

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Researchers build living robots from frog cells

Computers designed, and scientists have constructed, programmable living robots. Study announces potentially self-healing, biodegradable, purpose-build automatons. Two "xenobots" are already bumbling their way around dishes of water in a lab. None While we typically think of robots as being constructed from metal, circuitry, and plastic, a team of researchers from Tufts University in Medford, Mas

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Becoming less active and gaining weight: Downsides of becoming an adult

Leaving school and getting a job both lead to a drop in the amount of physical activity, while becoming a mother is linked to increased weight gain, conclude two reviews published today and led by researchers at the University of Cambridge.

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Strongly 'handed' squirrels less good at learning

Squirrels that strongly favour their left or right side are less good at learning, new research suggests.

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Racial disparities in drug prescriptions for dementia

Disparities in drug prescribing suggest that black and Asian people with dementia are not receiving the same quality of care as their white peers, according to a new UCL-led study in the UK, published in Clinical Epidemiology.

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Local water availability is permanently reduced after planting forests

River flow is reduced in areas where forests have been planted and does not recover over time, a new study has shown. Rivers in some regions can completely disappear within a decade. This highlights the need to consider the impact on regional water availability, as well as the wider climate benefit, of tree-planting plans.

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Premature menopause increases the risk of multiple health problems in your 60s

Women who experience premature menopause are almost three times more likely to develop multiple, chronic medical problems in their 60s compared to women who went through the menopause at the age of 50 or 51. These findings, published in Human Reproduction, are from a study of 5,107 women who were part of a national study of 11,258 Australian women.

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Living in Alan Turing's Future

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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How Quartz used AI to sort through the Luanda Leaks

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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SETI, METI and the Fermi Paradox

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Crew Dragon Launch Escape Demonstration

submitted by /u/whatsthis1901 [link] [comments]

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Hull asks to be first UK city to trial universal basic income

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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SpaceX's Explosive Test May Launch Year of Renewed Human Spaceflight

A NASA program could be ready to launch astronauts to orbit once again, and the number of people traveling to space could surge.

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SpaceX crew capsule escape test a success as crowds watch rocket explode

Elon Musk set to launch astronauts from US soil Nasa says manned mission could come as soon as April SpaceX has completed its last big test of its crew capsule before it launches astronauts for Nasa in the next few months. The test launch from Cape Canaveral in Florida took place on Sunday, having been delayed a day by bad weather. No one was aboard the Dragon crew capsule, just two mannequins. T

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2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #3

Story of the Week… Editorial of the Week… Toon of the Week… Quote of the Week… Graphic of the Week… Coming Soon on SkS… Climate Feedback Claim Reviews… SkS Week in Review… Poster of the Week… Story of the Week… 'It's heart-wrenching': 80% of Blue Mountains and 50% of Gondwana rainforests burn in bushfires Guardian Australia analysis reveals the frightening amount of world heri

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2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #3

A chronological listing of news articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Jan 12, 2020 through Sat, Jan 18, 2020 Editor's Pick The Past and the Future of the Earth's Oldest Trees Bristlecone pines have survived various catastrophes over the millennia, and they may survive humanity. Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest – a protected area high in the Whit

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Starwatch: how to see star cluster M41 with the naked eye

This week's challenge is to look for the faint star cluster close to Sirius, the Dog Star, the brightest star in the sky While you are keeping a watch on Betelgeuse to see if it is returning to its usual brightness , there is another challenge waiting in the skies around the constellation of Orion, the hunter. It is to see the faint star cluster M41 with theT naked eye. Catalogued by Charles Mess

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SpaceX 'supersonic abort test' sets up manned mission

Nasa in position to launch astronauts after successful emergency simulation

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A Small Step for Space Force Is Not a Giant Leap for Uniform Design

The unveiling of the new military branch's name tape — "U.S. Space Force," embroidered in blue — was overshadowed by reactions to its familiar camouflage uniform.

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Paleontologists Dig Into a Giant Sloth Boneyard

Ancient drought and unfortunate bathroom habits may have doomed some ice age sloths — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New scheduling tool offers both better flight choices and increased airline profits

Researchers have developed an original approach to flight scheduling that, if implemented, could result in a significant increase in profits for airlines and more flights that align with passengers' preferences.

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Programmable nests for cells

Using DNA, smallest silica particles, and carbon nanotubes, researchers developed novel programmable materials. These nanocomposites can be tailored to various applications and programmed to degrade quickly and gently. For medical applications, they can create environments in which human stem cells can settle down and develop further. Additionally, they are suited for the setup of biohybrid system

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Climate may play a bigger role than deforestation in rainforest biodiversity

In a study on small mammal biodiversity in the Atlantic Forest, researchers found that climate may affect biodiversity in rainforests even more than deforestation does.

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New dog, old tricks? Stray dogs can understand human cues

Pet dogs are highly receptive to commands from their owners. But is this due to their training or do dogs have an innate ability to understand human signals? A new study finds that 80% of untrained stray dogs successfully followed pointing directions from people to a specific location. The results suggest that dogs can understand and respond to complex gestures without any training, meaning that d

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Study traces evolution of acoustic communication

A study tracing acoustic communication across the tree of life of land-living vertebrates reveals that the ability to vocalize goes back hundreds of millions of years, is associated with a nocturnal lifestyle and has remained stable. Surprisingly, acoustic communication does not seem to drive the formation of new species across vertebrates.

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'Melting rock' models predict mechanical origins of earthquakes

Engineers have devised a model that can predict the early mechanical behaviors and origins of an earthquake in multiple types of rock. The model provides new insights into unobservable phenomena that take place miles beneath the Earth's surface under incredible pressures and temperatures, and could help researchers better predict earthquakes — or even, at least theoretically, attempt to stop them

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En miljon sjöfåglar döda i Stilla havet

En uppvärmd vattenmassa i Stilla havet tros ligga bakom massiv fågeldöd, enligt en ny forskningsrapport. Vattenmassan är 6 grader varmare än normalt och är till ytan större än delstaten Texas.

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Programmable nests for cells

Using DNA, smallest silica particles, and carbon nanotubes, researchers developed novel programmable materials. These nanocomposites can be tailored to various applications and programmed to degrade quickly and gently. For medical applications, they can create environments in which human stem cells can settle down and develop further. Additionally, they are suited for the setup of biohybrid system

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