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China Quarantines Entire City Where Mystery Virus Outbreak Began

The Chinese government has placed the city of Wuhan under quarantine in an attempt to stop the spread of the deadly, pneumonia-like virus called 2019-nCoV. According to a Chinese news bulletin , all passenger transportation out of the city has been temporarily suspended. That means that the city's 11 million residents, hundreds of whom have fallen ill and at least nine of whom have died from the

1h

Full influenza vaccination among children cuts hospitalization in half

Fully vaccinating children reduces the risk of hospitalization associated with influenza by 54%, according to a study by researchers at the University of Michigan, the Clalit Research Institute, and Ben-Gurion University in Israel.

15h

Solving a biological puzzle: How stress causes gray hair

Scientists have found evidence to support long-standing anecdotes that stress causes hair graying. Researchers found that in mice, the type of nerve involved in the fight-or-flight response causes permanent damage to the pigment-regenerating stem cells in the hair follicle. The findings advance knowledge of how stress impacts the body, and are a first step toward blocking its negative effects.

41min

Surprise discovery shakes up our understanding of gene expression

A group of University of Chicago scientists has uncovered a previously unknown way that our genes are made into reality.

now

Team develops an electrochemical method for extracting uranium, and potentially other metal ions, from solution

Fifty years ago, scientists hit upon what they thought could be the next rocket fuel. Carboranes—molecules composed of boron, carbon and hydrogen atoms clustered together in three-dimensional shapes—were seen as the possible basis for next-generation propellants due to their ability to release massive amounts of energy when burned.

now

Melting rock models shed light on earthquake origins

A new model can predict the early mechanical behaviors and origins of an earthquake in multiple types of rock, researchers report. The model provides new insights into unobservable phenomena that take place miles beneath the Earth's surface under incredible pressures and temperatures, and could help researchers better predict earthquakes—or even, at least theoretically, attempt to stop them. "Ear

now

Ancient Human DNA Provides New Look at African History

Genomic information from four children who lived thousands of years ago in what is now Cameroon could shed light on the spread of the Bantu languages and on the history of present-day African populations.

now

Surprise discovery shakes up our understanding of gene expression

A group of University of Chicago scientists has uncovered a previously unknown way that our genes are made into reality.

6min

Despite less ozone pollution, not all plants benefit

Breathe easy: Concentrations of ozone in the air have decreased over large parts of the country in the past several decades.

6min

What's in Puget sound? New technique casts a wide net for concerning chemicals

The waters of Puget Sound support many species, including mussels, salmon and killer whales. But researchers know that runoff from land in the urbanized areas might contain chemicals that could harm these creatures, even if it's not always clear which chemicals are the most harmful.

6min

Deep diving scientists discover bubbling CO2 hotspot

Diving 200 feet under the ocean surface to conduct scientific research can lead to some interesting places. For University of Texas at Austin Professor Bayani Cardenas, it placed him in the middle of a champagne-like environment of bubbling carbon dioxide with off-the-chart readings of the greenhouse gas.

6min

Coronavirus: WHO steps back from declaring public health emergency

International body to meet again on Thursday to discuss 'evolving and complex situation' as China reports 17 deaths Visual guide: where has coronavirus spread? Have you encountered any precautionary measures? The World Health Organization has stepped back from declaring the growing viral pneumonia outbreak in China to be a public health emergency of international concern, saying its expert commit

9min

Penguin Skin Offers Hints About Dinosaur Fluff

A fossil penguin wing found in Antarctica has broader implications for what dinosaurs looked like. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11min

New study provides insights for detecting the invasive brown treesnake

Visual surveys alone cannot sufficiently detect the Brown Treesnake (BTS), which was introduced to the island of Guam around the time of WWII and has contributed to significant biodiversity loss. Researchers coupled visual surveys with radio telemetry to form a powerful method of detecting the BTS. Their work will improve detection efforts and rapid response should the snake arrive on nearby snake

12min

Deep diving scientists discover bubbling CO2 hotspot

Hydrologists diving off the coast of the Philippines have discovered volcanic seeps with some of the highest natural levels of C02 ever recorded. The scientists were working in Verde Island Passage, one of the most diverse marine ecosystems in the world and is home to thriving coral reefs.

12min

Pitt researchers propose solutions for networking lag in massive IoT devices

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have proposed a system that would use currently underutilized resources in an existing wireless channel to create extra opportunities for lag-free connections. The process, which wouldn't require any additional hardware or wireless spectrum resources, could alleviate traffic backups on networks with many wireless connectio

12min

FSU Research: Despite less ozone pollution, not all plants benefit

Policies and new technologies have reduced emissions of precursor gases that lead to ozone air pollution, but despite those improvements, the amount of ozone that plants are taking in has not followed the same trend, according to Florida State University researchers.

12min

New evidence shows the first building blocks of life on Earth may have been messier than previously thought

When the Earth was born, it was a mess. Meteors and lightning storms likely bombarded the planet's surface where nothing except lifeless chemicals could survive. How life formed in this chemical mayhem is a mystery billions of years old. Now, a new study offers evidence that the first building blocks may have matched their environment, starting out messier than previously thought.

12min

New evidence shows the first building blocks of life on Earth may have been messier than previously thought

When the Earth was born, it was a mess. Meteors and lightning storms likely bombarded the planet's surface where nothing except lifeless chemicals could survive. How life formed in this chemical mayhem is a mystery billions of years old. Now, a new study offers evidence that the first building blocks may have matched their environment, starting out messier than previously thought.

12min

Anthropologists confirm existence of specialized sheep-hunting camp in prehistoric Lebanon

Anthropologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) have confirmed the existence more than 10,000 years ago of a hunting camp in what is now northeastern Lebanon—one that straddles the period marking the transition from nomadic hunter-gatherer societies to agricultural settlements at the onset of the last stone age.

12min

Late Neolithic Italy was home to complex networks of metal exchange

During the 4th and 3rd millennia BC, Italy was home to complex networks of metalwork exchange, according to a new study.

12min

Mosquito-borne diseases could be prevented by skin cream

A skin cream used to treat warts and skin cancer could help protect people against viral diseases such as Zika and dengue, according to new research.

12min

Americans perceive likelihood of nuclear weapons risk as 50/50 toss-up

It has been 30 years since the end of the Cold War, yet on average, Americans still perceive that the odds of a nuclear weapon detonating on U.S. soil is as likely as a coin toss, according to new research.

12min

Sizewell: RSPB Minsmere nature reserve fears 'environmental impact' on wildlife

EDF Energy wants to build new reactors next to the existing Sizewell B near Minsmere nature reserve.

15min

California needs to set more fires

An airman monitors an 800 acre controlled burn in June 2015 at Beale Air Force Base, California meant to renew cattle grazing land and control vegetation growth. (Airman Preston Cherry/) Decades of fire suppression combined with the warmer and drier conditions of climate change have left California ripe for catastrophic blazes . While 2019 saw relatively few acres burned compared to the previous

19min

A Judge's Anguished Warning About Climate Change

The American Revolution had scarcely been over a month when, in a farewell letter to the Continental Army, General George Washington admitted something startling: The war of independence wasn't necessarily a good thing. At least, it wasn't yet. "It is yet to be decided," he wrote, "whether the Revolution must ultimately be considered as a blessing or a curse." His audience had just spent eight ye

22min

Electrochemical method for extracting uranium, and potentially other metal ions, from solution

Fifty years ago, scientists hit upon what they thought could be the next rocket fuel. Carboranes — molecules composed of boron, carbon and hydrogen atoms clustered together in three-dimensional shapes — were seen as the possible basis for next-generation propellants due to their ability to release massive amounts of energy when burned.

27min

Coronavirus outbreak in China traced to snakes

Emerging viral infections — from bird flu to Ebola to Zika infections — pose major threats to global public health, and understanding their origins can help investigators design defensive strategies against future outbreaks. A new study provides important insights on the potential origins of the most recent outbreak of viral pneumonia in China, which started in the middle of December and now is

27min

Domesticated wheat has complex parentage

Certain types of domesticated wheat have complicated origins, with genetic contributions from wild and cultivated wheat populations on opposite sides of the Fertile Crescent.

27min

Even after death, animals are important in ecosystems

Animal carcasses play an important role in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Scientists have published these findings in PLOS ONE. Carcasses not only provide food for carrion-eating animals. Their nutrients also increase the growth of surrounding plants, which attracts many herbivorous insects and their predators. The researchers recommend relaxing regulations governing the disposal of anima

27min

Sea level rise could reshape the United States, trigger migration inland

New study is the first to use machine learning to project migration patterns resulting from sea-level rise. Researchers found the impact of rising oceans will ripple across the country, beyond coastal areas at risk of flooding, as affected people move inland. Popular relocation choices will include land-locked cities such as Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Denver and Las Vegas. The model also predicts s

27min

Scientists Finally Pin Down Why Stress Turns Our Hair Gray

It comes down to the sympathetic nervous system and a common hormone.

27min

Japan Is Launching Its Own Space Defense Unit

Star Wars Japan is following the United States' lead and creating a military unit dedicated to space. On Monday, Prime Minister Shinzō Abe announced during a policy speech that Japan will establish its own space defense unit to protect its orbital assets, according to the Associated Press . Mission Control The Space Domain Mission Unit will launch in April and will be a part of Japan's Air Self-D

27min

Ny behandling mot cancer upptäckt: "Enorm potential"

En grupp brittiska forskare har tagit fram en ny metod som de anser har "enorm potential" till att kunna behandla alla typer av cancer, rapporterar BBC.

32min

Surprise discovery shakes up our understanding of gene expression

A group of scientists has uncovered a previously unknown way that our genes are made into reality. Rather than directions going one-way from DNA to RNA to proteins, the latest study shows that RNA itself modulates how DNA is transcribed–using a chemical process that is increasingly apparent to be vital to biology. The discovery has significant implications for our understanding of human disease a

33min

What's in Puget sound? New technique casts a wide net for concerning chemicals

Using a new 'non-targeted' approach, UW and UW Tacoma researchers screened samples from multiple regions of Puget Sound to look for potentially harmful compounds that might be present.

33min

Study reveals 2 writers penned landmark inscriptions in 8th-century BCE Samaria

A new Tel Aviv University study reveals that only 2 writers penned landmark inscriptions on an 8th-century BCE Samarian ostraca. The discovery illuminates the bureaucratic apparatus of an ancient kingdom of Israel.

33min

Electrochemical method for extracting uranium, and potentially other metal ions, from solution

Fifty years ago, scientists hit upon what they thought could be the next rocket fuel. Carboranes — molecules composed of boron, carbon and hydrogen atoms clustered together in three-dimensional shapes — were seen as the possible basis for next-generation propellants due to their ability to release massive amounts of energy when burned.

34min

Netflix's Big Viewership Numbers Mean Very Little

The streaming service now defines anything watched for at least two minutes as a "view." Wait, what?

39min

Residues in fingerprints hold clues to their age

Police have long relied on the unique whorls, loops or arches encoded in fingerprints to identify suspects. However, they have no way to tell how long ago those prints were left behind — information that could be crucial to a case. A preliminary new study suggests that could change. Researchers report that they could link compounds contained in fingerprints with their age.

41min

Complex rupturing during 2019 Ridgecrest, California, sequence

The 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence, which startled nearby California residents over the 4 July holiday with magnitude 6.4 and magnitude 7.1 earthquakes, included 34,091 earthquakes overall, detailed in a high-resolution catalog created for the sequence.

41min

First ancient DNA from West/Central Africa illuminates deep human past

Scientists have produced the first genome-wide ancient human DNA sequences from west and central Africa.

41min

Engineers develop recipe to dramatically strengthen body armor

Researchers have formulated a new recipe that can prevent weaknesses in modern-day armor. By adding a tiny amount of the element silicon to boron carbide, a material commonly used for making body armor, they discovered that bullet-resistant gear could be made substantially more resilient to high-speed impacts.

46min

Preventing, healing tooth decay with a bioactive peptide

Cavities, or dental caries, are the most widespread non-communicable disease globally, according to the World Health Organization. Having a cavity drilled and filled at the dentist's office can be painful, but untreated caries could lead to worse pain, tooth loss, infection, and even illness or death. Now, researchers report a bioactive peptide that coats tooth surfaces, helping prevent new caviti

46min

A heart-healthy protein from bran of cereal crop

Foxtail millet is an annual grass grown widely as a cereal crop in parts of India, China and Southeast Asia. Milling the grain removes the hard outer layer, or bran, from the rest of the seed. Now, researchers have identified a protein in this bran that can help stave off atherosclerosis in mice genetically prone to the disease.

46min

Cancer: Faster drug discovery to hit 'undruggable' targets

Medicines made from coiled protein fragments could provide a new handle on hard-to-treat diseases like cancer, but they are difficult to design. But a new technique could change that.

46min

Davos 2020: Prince Charles offers stark warning over 'approaching catastrophe'

At the World Economic Forum, he asked: "Do we want to go down in history as the people who did nothing?"

51min

Ancient DNA from West Africa Adds to Picture of Humans' Rise

From a burial site in Cameroon, archaeologists recovered human genetic material dating as far back as 8,000 years.

53min

New Technique Turns Nuclear Waste Into "Diamond Batteries"

Radioactive Recycling To make use of the radioactive waste from nuclear plants, University of Bristol scientists have an unusual plan: turn it into diamonds that can be used as long-lasting batteries. The resulting diamond batteries would remain stable and give off a weak electrical current for an extremely long time, according to Popular Mechanics , making them a potential gamechanger to power m

1h

Report: Saudi Crown Prince Hacked WaPo Owner Jeff Bezos' Phone

A bizarre plot involving the richest man in the world, his mistress, and the successor to the Saudi Arabian throne is currently unfolding — and it may shine new light on the savage murder of a political journalist. The story begins — more or less — in January 2019, when the National Enquirer published text messages and intimate photos sent between Amazon owner Jeff Bezos and his mistress, former

1h

Anthropologists confirm existence of specialized sheep-hunting camp in prehistoric Lebanon

Anthropologists at the University of Toronto have confirmed the existence more than 10,000 years ago of a hunting camp in the mountains along the modern-day border between Lebanon and Syria — one that straddles the period marking the transition from nomadic hunter-gatherer societies to agricultural settlements at the onset of the last stone age. Analysis of decades-old data collected from Nachcha

1h

Glacial quakes reveal huge chunks falling off Antarctic ice mass

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00163-9 Calving events at Thwaites Glacier, which is shedding vast amounts of ice, are detected from up to 1,600 kilometres away.

1h

Mixing the unmixable: Novel approach for efficiently fusing different polymers

Cross-linked polymers are structures where large molecular chains are linked together, allowing exceptional mechanical properties and chemical resistance to the final product. However, their modification is not easy. Now, scientists develop a method that allows the fusion of different polymers together easily, allowing the precise tuning of the properties of the final material by selecting appropr

1h

Determining the atomic structure of natural products more rapidly and accurately

Many drugs are derived from natural products. But before natural products can be exploited, chemists must first determine their structure and stereochemistry. This can be a major challenge, particularly when the molecules cannot be crystallized and contain only few hydrogen atoms. A new NMR-based method now simplifies the analysis and produces more accurate results.

1h

QLED tech aims light one way to up TV energy efficiency

A new technology increases the energy efficiency of quantum dot light emitting diodes for screens by emitting high-intensity light in one direction, researchers report. By minimizing the scattering losses of light inside the diodes, they emit a larger proportion of the light generated towards the viewer. Quantum dot light emitting diode (QLED) screens have been on the market for a few years now.

1h

No, Democrats Aren't Trying to Overturn the 2016 Election

The White House's messaging throughout the impeachment process has been wildly inconsistent on nearly every count save one: Democrats are trying to overturn the 2016 election . Other ideas have come and gone. President Donald Trump has insisted that he wasn't pressuring foreign countries to intervene, and then done so again publicly . He has flip-flopped on what kind of trial he wants in the Sena

1h

Physicist obtain atomically thin molybdenum disulfide films on large-area substrates

Researchers have managed to grow atomically thin films of molybdenum disulfide spanning up to several tens of square centimeters. Thus, the noticeable remnant polarization value and a good switching endurance were obtained directly in contact with MoS2 film, allowing to conclude the possibility of the memory MoS2-based FeFET concept realization.

1h

Autoimmunity may explain why an important immune system is absent in many bacteria

New findings reveal how bacterial immune systems can be harmful for their hosts and explain why they are not found in many bacteria.

1h

Researchers reverse HIV latency, important scientific step toward cure

Overcoming HIV latency — induction of HIV in CD4+ T cells that lay dormant throughout the body – is a major step toward creating a cure for HIV. For the first time, scientists have shown that a new approach can expose latent HIV to attack in two different animal model systems with little or no toxicity.

1h

Determining the atomic structure of natural products more rapidly and accurately

Many drugs are derived from natural products. But before natural products can be exploited, chemists must first determine their structure and stereochemistry. This can be a major challenge, particularly when the molecules cannot be crystallized and contain only few hydrogen atoms. A new NMR-based method now simplifies the analysis and produces more accurate results.

1h

Concussion risk in youth football

For decades, there's been a widespread assumption among people with an interest in sports-related injury that youth football players are more vulnerable to concussion and other head injuries than their older, bigger counterparts.

1h

Cultural difference play crucial role in when people would sacrifice one to save group

Cultural differences play a pivotal role in how people in different parts of the world perceive when it is acceptable to sacrifice one person to save a larger group, new research has shown.

1h

Drug profiling and gene scissors open new avenues in immunotherapy

Researchers have discovered ways to boost CAR T-cell therapy.

1h

You can now own a stock car that's just like what Nascar pros race

The Hendrick Motorsports Track Attack Camaro and Chevrolet SS vehicles. (Hendrick Motorsports/) For less than the price of a Porsche 911 GT3 , you can buy a stock car just like the ones that hammer around Nascar ovals—and then take it to the track yourself. That's the promise of the Hendrick Track Attack Camaro and Chevrolet SS track day cars, which promise to put you into a driver's seat that is

1h

Juhyo: The Snow Monsters on Japan's Mount Zao

Winter conditions at the summit of Mount Zao, a volcano standing between Japan's Yamagata and Miyagi prefectures, can conjure up "creatures" of snow and ice, built up over tree trunks and branches. Windblown ice is covered by snow in repeated cycles, building hulking shapes on the mountain slopes. These famous Juhyo , or "snow monsters," attract visitors to Mount Zao from the end of January throu

1h

The Risk of 'Getting Bangs'

"personally i believe wanting bangs is almost never about wanting bangs and if u want bangs u should go to therapy first," the writer Allie Wach tweeted in February 2018. This personal belief was retweeted 15,000 times and received hundreds of replies. They were mostly from women tagging a friend, without explanation, to come see this truth universally known but slightly-less-frequently acknowled

1h

The microbes in your gut could predict whether you're likely to die in the next 15 years

Two studies find strong predictive power of microbiome in complex diseases and death

1h

Skin cream applied to mosquito bites stops viruses infecting mice

An immune-boosting skin cream applied directly to mosquito bites stopped viral infections in mice. If approved for human use, it could help prevent mosquito-borne viruses like Zika

1h

Severed nerves repaired in monkeys thanks to tubes of growth protein

A synthetic tube filled with a growth protein can span the gap between severed nerves, helping them to regenerate and restore gripping abilities in macaques

1h

Most rehabilitating sea turtles with infectious tumors don't survive

Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is the most significant infectious disease affecting sea turtle populations worldwide. FB leads to tumors on the turtles' eyes, flippers and internal organs and is widespread in warmer climates like Florida. A large-scale study evaluated tumor score, removal and regrowth in rehabilitating green sea turtles with FP in the southeastern US from 2009 to 2017, and found that 75

1h

Human-sparked fires smaller, less intense but more frequent with longer seasons

Fires started by people have steadily increased in recent decades, sparking a major shift in U.S. wildfire norms, according to a new study. The research found human-caused wildfires are more frequent, smaller, less hot and occur over longer seasons than fires started by lightning.

1h

Vomiting bumblebees show that sweeter is not necessarily better

Animal pollinators support the production of three-quarters of the world's food crops, and many flowers produce nectar to reward the pollinators. A new study using bumblebees has found that the sweetest nectar is not necessarily the best: too much sugar slows down the bees. The results will inform breeding efforts to make crops more attractive to pollinators, boosting yields to feed our growing gl

1h

Mixing the unmixable: Novel approach for efficiently fusing different polymers

Cross-linked polymers are structures where large molecular chains are linked together, allowing exceptional mechanical properties and chemical resistance to the final product. However, their modification is not easy. Now, scientists develop a method that allows the fusion of different polymers together easily, allowing the precise tuning of the properties of the final material by selecting appropr

1h

Life's Frankenstein beginnings

When the Earth was born, it was a mess. Meteors and lightning storms likely bombarded the planet's surface where nothing except lifeless chemicals could survive. How life formed in this chemical mayhem is a mystery billions of years old. Now, a new study offers evidence that the first building blocks may have matched their environment, starting out messier than previously thought.

1h

Tiny price gaps cost investors billions

New research shows that, millions of times each day, investors in the US stock market see different prices at the same moment — and that these differing prices cost investors at least $2 billion dollars each year.

1h

Sea level rise could reshape the United States, trigger migration inland

New study is the first to use machine learning to project migration patterns resulting from sea-level rise. Researchers found the impact of rising oceans will ripple across the country, beyond coastal areas at risk of flooding, as affected people move inland. Popular relocation choices will include land-locked cities such as Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Denver and Las Vegas. The model also predicts s

1h

Synthetic nerve conduit bridges the gap in arm nerve repair

A team of scientists has created a biodegradable, synthetic conduit that repairs large gaps in injured nerves, which supported recovery and accelerated neuronal healing in a macaque model.

1h

Antiviral treatments inspire researchers to develop a new kind of cancer drug

An effort to thwart viral diseases like hepatitis or the common cold led to a new collaboration and a novel class of cancer drugs that appears effective in mice.

1h

Carcasses important for plants and insects in the Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve

Allowing the carcasses of dead deer to remain in the Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve has a positive effect on biodiversity in the area. In the short term carcasses attract many more insects and other arthropods. In the long term, plant growth increases. Plants located near animal carcasses became five times bigger than usual, leading to a surge in the number of plant-eating invertebrates on the

1h

How to keep boron inside cells during radiotherapy: a novel approach to cancer treatment

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a technique in which p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is transferred to cancer cells, and the boron in it undergoes nuclear fission reaction upon irradiation of thermal neutrons, releasing high energy particles that kill the cells. Scientists at Tokyo Tech, Kyoto University, and Innovation Center of NanoMedicine (iCONM) improved upon current BNCT by combining BPA

1h

Integrate micro chips for electronic skin

Researchers from Dresden and Osaka present the first fully integrated flexible electronics made of magnetic sensors and organic circuits which opens the path towards the development of electronic skin.

1h

Mushrooms are older than we thought

According to a new study led by Steeve Bonneville from the Université libre de Bruxelles, the first mushrooms were already present on Earth between 715 and 810 million years ago, 300 million years earlier than the scientific community had believed until now. The results, published in Science Advances, also suggest that mushrooms could have been important partners for the first plants that colonize

1h

Even after death, animals are important in ecosystems

Animal carcasses play an important role in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Scientists from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the University of Groningen have published these findings in PLOS ONE. Carcasses not only provide food for carrion-eating animals. Their nutrients also increase the growth of surrounding plants, which attracts many herbivorous insects

1h

How're your cells' motors running?

Kyoto University researchers develop a device that parks individual molecular motors on nano scale platforms and found that two types of 'kinesin' possess different properties of coordination. In kinesin-1, neither the number nor spacing of the molecules change the transport velocity of microtubules, while kinesin-14 decreased transport velocity as the number of motors on a filament increased, but

1h

Mosquito-borne diseases could be prevented by skin cream

A skin cream used to treat warts and skin cancer could help protect people against viral diseases such as Zika and dengue, according to new research from the University of Leeds.

1h

Researchers regrow damaged nerves with polymer and protein

University of Pittsburgh researchers have created a biodegradable nerve guide — a polymer tube — filled with growth-promoting protein that can regenerate long sections of damaged nerves, without the need for transplanting stem cells or a donor nerve.

1h

Domesticated wheat has complex parentage

Certain types of domesticated wheat have complicated origins, with genetic contributions from wild and cultivated wheat populations on opposite sides of the Fertile Crescent. Terence Brown and colleagues at the University of Manchester report these findings in a new paper published Jan. 22, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

1h

Late Neolithic Italy was home to complex networks of metal exchange

During the 4th and 3rd millennia BC, Italy was home to complex networks of metalwork exchange, according to a study published Jan. 22, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andrea Dolfini of Newcastle University (UK), and Gilberto Artioli and Ivana Angelini of the University of Padova (Italy).

1h

Performance and age only partially explain gender pay gap for New Zealand researchers

Over her lifetime, the average female scientific researcher at a New Zealand university earns about NZ$400,000 less than her male counterparts, and less than half of this disparity can be explained by research performance and age. Ann Brower and Alex James of the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, present these findings in PLOS ONE on Jan. 22, 2020.

1h

Stress Really Does Make Hair Go Gray Faster

The same nerves involved in the fight-or-flight response can cause permanent damage to the cells responsible for producing hair color in mice, scientists have found.

1h

Insecticides have gotten way more toxic to honey bees

Insecticides have become significantly more toxic—over 120-fold in some Midwestern states—to honey bees when ingested, according to a new study. Rising neonicotinoid seed treatments applied to corn and soy in US agricultural landscapes during the past 20 years are the primary driver of the change, the researchers found. The study is the first to characterize the geographic patterns of insecticide

1h

A Black Olympic Fencer's Long Road to Glory

"I didn't even think fencing was in my future," says Keeth Smart in the short documentary Stay Close . "I was just holding my breath for [my sister] to make the Olympic team." As children, Keeth and his sister, Erinn, trained at the Peter Westbrook Foundation, a scholarship program named after the first black fencer to win an Olympic medal. Based in Manhattan, the foundation teaches the sport to

1h

New Nerve-Growing Method Could Help Injured Soldiers and Others

Eight years of experiments demonstrate the bridging of large gaps in damaged nerves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Single-cell morphology encodes metastatic potential

A central goal of precision medicine is to predict disease outcomes and design treatments based on multidimensional information from afflicted cells and tissues. Cell morphology is an emergent readout of the molecular underpinnings of a cell's functions and, thus, can be used as a method to define the functional state of an individual cell. We measured 216 features derived from cell and nucleus m

1h

Deficient histone H3 propionylation by BRPF1-KAT6 complexes in neurodevelopmental disorders and cancer

Lysine acetyltransferase 6A (KAT6A) and its paralog KAT6B form stoichiometric complexes with bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) for acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 23 (H3K23). We report that these complexes also catalyze H3K23 propionylation in vitro and in vivo. Immunofluorescence microscopy and ATAC-See revealed the association of this modification with active chromati

1h

Animal simulations facilitate smart drug design through prediction of nanomaterial transport to individual tissue cells

Smart drug design for antibody and nanomaterial-based therapies allows optimization of drug efficacy and more efficient early-stage preclinical trials. The ideal drug must display maximum efficacy at target tissue sites, with transport from tissue vasculature to the cellular environment being critical. Biological simulations, when coupled with in vitro approaches, can predict this exposure in a r

1h

Compression-induced dedifferentiation of adipocytes promotes tumor progression

Dysregulated physical stresses are generated during tumorigenesis that affect the surrounding compliant tissues including adipocytes. However, the effect of physical stressors on the behavior of adipocytes and their cross-talk with tumor cells remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that compression of cells, resulting from various types of physical stresses, can induce dedifferentiation of adipocyt

1h

Focused ultrasound delivery of a selective TrkA agonist rescues cholinergic function in a mouse model of Alzheimers disease

The degeneration of cholinergic neurons is a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In animal models of injury and aging, nerve growth factor (NGF) enhances cholinergic cell survival and function, contributing to improved memory. In the presence of AD pathology, however, NGF-related therapeutics have yet to fulfill their regenerative potential. We propose that stimulating the TrkA recepto

1h

Different motilities of microtubules driven by kinesin-1 and kinesin-14 motors patterned on nanopillars

Kinesin is a motor protein that plays important roles in a variety of cellular functions. In vivo, multiple kinesin molecules are bound to cargo and work as a team to produce larger forces or higher speeds than a single kinesin. However, the coordination of kinesins remains poorly understood because of the experimental difficulty in controlling the number and arrangement of kinesins, which are co

1h

Molecular identification of fungi microfossils in a Neoproterozoic shale rock

Precambrian fossils of fungi are sparse, and the knowledge of their early evolution and the role they played in the colonization of land surface are limited. Here, we report the discovery of fungi fossils in a 810 to 715 million year old dolomitic shale from the Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup, Democratic Republic of Congo. Syngenetically preserved in a transitional, subaerially exposed paleoenvironment, t

1h

Novel CD11b+Gr-1+Sca-1+ myeloid cells drive mortality in bacterial infection

Extreme pathophysiological stressors induce expansion of otherwise infrequent leukocyte populations. Here, we found a previously unidentified CD11b + Gr-1 + myeloid cell population that expresses stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) induced upon experimental infection with Staphylococcus aureus . Although CD11b + Gr-1 + Sca-1 + cells have impaired migratory capacity and superoxide anion–producing activity

1h

Multi-isotope evidence for the emergence of cultural alterity in Late Neolithic Europe

The coexistence of cultural identities and their interaction is a fundamental topic of social sciences that is not easily addressed in prehistory. Differences in mortuary treatment can help approach this issue. Here, we present a multi-isotope study to track both diet and mobility through the life histories of 32 broadly coeval Late Neolithic individuals interred in caves and in megalithic graves

1h

Atmospheric CO2 levels from 2.7 billion years ago inferred from micrometeorite oxidation

Earth's atmospheric composition during the Archean eon of 4 to 2.5 billion years ago has few constraints. However, the geochemistry of recently discovered iron-rich micrometeorites from 2.7 billion–year–old limestones could serve as a proxy for ancient gas concentrations. When micrometeorites entered the atmosphere, they melted and preserved a record of atmospheric interaction. We model the motio

1h

Seismic evidence for megathrust fault-valve behavior during episodic tremor and slip

Fault slip behavior during episodic tremor and slow slip (ETS) events, which occur at the deep extension of subduction zone megathrust faults, is believed to be related to cyclic fluid processes that necessitate fluctuations in pore-fluid pressures. In most subduction zones, a layer of anomalously low seismic wave velocities [low-velocity layer (LVL)] is observed in the vicinity of ETS and sugges

1h

Isothermal digital detection of microRNAs using background-free molecular circuit

MicroRNAs, a class of transcripts involved in the regulation of gene expression, are emerging as promising disease-specific biomarkers accessible from tissues or bodily fluids. However, their accurate quantification from biological samples remains challenging. We report a sensitive and quantitative microRNA detection method using an isothermal amplification chemistry adapted to a droplet digital

1h

Imperceptible magnetic sensor matrix system integrated with organic driver and amplifier circuits

Artificial electronic skins (e-skins) comprise an integrated matrix of flexible devices arranged on a soft, reconfigurable surface. These sensors must perceive physical interaction spaces between external objects and robots or humans. Among various types of sensors, flexible magnetic sensors and the matrix configuration are preferable for such position sensing. However, sensor matrices must effic

1h

Dense hydroxyl polyethylene glycol dendrimer targets activated glia in multiple CNS disorders

Poor transport of neuropharmaceutics through central nervous system (CNS) barriers limits the development of effective treatments for CNS disorders. We present the facile synthesis of a novel neuroinflammation-targeting polyethylene glycol–based dendrimer (PEGOL-60) using an efficient click chemistry approach. PEGOL-60 reduces synthetic burden by achieving high hydroxyl surface density at low gen

1h

Monoubiquitination of p120-catenin is essential for TGF{beta}-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor metastasis

Disassembly of intercellular junctions is a hallmark of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, how the junctions disassemble remains largely unknown. Here, we report that E3 ubiquitin ligase Smurf1 targets p120-catenin, a core component of adherens junction (AJ) complex, for monoubiquitination during transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)–induced EMT, thereby leading to AJ dissociation. U

1h

Poly(vinyl alcohol) boosting therapeutic potential of p-boronophenylalanine in neutron capture therapy by modulating metabolism

In the current clinical boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), p -boronophenylalanine (BPA) has been the most powerful drug owing to its ability to accumulate selectively within cancers through cancer-related amino acid transporters including LAT1. However, the therapeutic success of BPA has been sometimes compromised by its unfavorable efflux from cytosol due to their antiport mechanism. Here, we

1h

New Gene Therapy In Mice Could Offer Lasting Protection Against Nerve Agents

Researchers arm mice with "bioscavengers" that seek and destroy nerve agents, granting immunity.

1h

Ancient Earth's Atmosphere May Have Been Over 70 Percent Carbon Dioxide

Micrometeorites billions of years old provide a unique glimpse at our planet's atmospheric past.

1h

Genetic modification could protect soldiers from chemical weapons

Gene therapy tested in mice turns liver into shield against deadly nerve agents

1h

Sea level rise could reshape the United States, trigger migration inland

When Hurricane Harvey slammed into the Texas coast in 2017, displaced residents flocked inland, trying to rebuild their lives in the disaster's aftermath. Within decades, the same thing could happen at a much larger scale due to rising sea levels, says a new study led by USC Computer Science Assistant Professor Bistra Dilkina.

1h

Tiny price gaps cost investors billions

Imagine standing in the grocery store, looking at a pile of bananas. On your side of the pile, the manager has posted yesterday's newspaper flyer, showing bananas at 62¢ per pound—so that's what you pay at the register. But on the other side of the pile, there's an up-to-the-minute screen showing that the price of bananas has now dropped to 48¢ per pound—so that's what the guy over there pays. Exa

1h

Performance and age only partially explain gender pay gap for New Zealand researchers

Over her lifetime, the average female scientific researcher at a New Zealand university earns about NZ$400,000 less than her male counterparts, and less than half of this disparity can be explained by research performance and age. Ann Brower and Alex James of the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, present these findings in PLOS ONE on January 22, 2020.

1h

Domesticated wheat has complex parentage

Certain types of domesticated wheat have complicated origins, with genetic contributions from wild and cultivated wheat populations on opposite sides of the Fertile Crescent. Terence Brown and colleagues at the University of Manchester report these findings in a new paper published January 22, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

1h

Late Neolithic Italy was home to complex networks of metal exchange

During the 4th and 3rd millennia BC, Italy was home to complex networks of metalwork exchange, according to a study published January 22, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andrea Dolfini of Newcastle University (UK), and Gilberto Artioli and Ivana Angelini of the University of Padova (Italy).

1h

Carcasses important for plants and insects in the Oostvaardersplassen Nature Reserve

Allowing the carcasses of dead deer to remain in the Oostvaardersplassen Nature Reserve has a positive effect on biodiversity in the area. Not only do the carcasses attract many more insects and other arthropods in the short term, but also in the long term, due to increased plant growth. Plants located near animal carcasses became five times bigger than usual, leading to a surge in the number of p

1h

First mushrooms appeared earlier than previously thought

According to a new study led by Steeve Bonneville from the Université libre de Bruxelles, the first mushrooms evolved on Earth between 715 and 810 million years ago, 300 million years earlier than the scientific community had believed until now. The results, published in Science Advances, also suggest that mushrooms could have been important partners for the first plants that colonized the contine

1h

A new 'molecular nano-patterning' technique reveals that some molecular motors coordinate differently

Body movement, from the muscles in your arms to the neurons transporting those signals to your brain, relies on a massive collection of proteins called molecular motors.

1h

Google publishes largest ever high-resolution map of brain connectivity

submitted by /u/HeinieKaboobler [link] [comments]

2h

New Nerve-Growing Method Could Help Injured Soldiers and Others

Eight years of experiments demonstrate the bridging of large gaps in damaged nerves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Researchers trace Coronavirus outbreak in China to snakes

Emerging viral infections — from bird flu to Ebola to Zika infections — pose major threats to global public health, and understanding their origins can help investigators design defensive strategies against future outbreaks. A new study published in the Journal of Medical Virology provides important insights on the potential origins of the most recent outbreak of viral pneumonia in China, which

2h

Old molecule, new tricks

Fifty years ago, scientists hit upon what they thought could be the next rocket fuel. Carboranes — molecules composed of boron, carbon and hydrogen atoms clustered together in three-dimensional shapes — were seen as the possible basis for next-generation propellants due to their ability to release massive amounts of energy when burned.

2h

Domesticated wheat has complex parentage

Certain types of domesticated wheat have complicated origins, with genetic contributions from wild and cultivated wheat populations on opposite sides of the Fertile Crescent. Terence Brown and colleagues at the University of Manchester report these findings in a new paper published January 22, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

2h

Carcasses important for plants and insects in the Oostvaardersplassen Nature Reserve

Allowing the carcasses of dead deer to remain in the Oostvaardersplassen Nature Reserve has a positive effect on biodiversity in the area. Not only do the carcasses attract many more insects and other arthropods in the short term, but also in the long term, due to increased plant growth. Plants located near animal carcasses became five times bigger than usual, leading to a surge in the number of p

2h

First mushrooms appeared earlier than previously thought

According to a new study led by Steeve Bonneville from the Université libre de Bruxelles, the first mushrooms evolved on Earth between 715 and 810 million years ago, 300 million years earlier than the scientific community had believed until now. The results, published in Science Advances, also suggest that mushrooms could have been important partners for the first plants that colonized the contine

2h

2h

New Nerve-Growing Method Could Help Injured Soldiers and Others

Eight years of experiments demonstrate the bridging of large gaps in damaged nerves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Fungal diversity and its relationship to the future of forests

If you indulge in truffles, or porcini and chanterelle mushrooms, you have enjoyed a product of ectomycorrhizal fungi. Forming symbiotic relationships with plants—including pine, birch, oak and willow tree species—these fungi have existed for millions of years, their sprawling filaments supporting ecosystems throughout their reach.

2h

Fungal diversity and its relationship to the future of forests

If you indulge in truffles, or porcini and chanterelle mushrooms, you have enjoyed a product of ectomycorrhizal fungi. Forming symbiotic relationships with plants—including pine, birch, oak and willow tree species—these fungi have existed for millions of years, their sprawling filaments supporting ecosystems throughout their reach.

2h

Americans perceive likelihood of nuclear weapons risk as 50/50 tossup

It has been 30 years since the end of the Cold War, yet, on average, Americans still perceive that the odds of a nuclear weapon detonating on U.S. soil is as likely as a coin toss, according to new research from Stevens Institute of Technology.

2h

Australian Crater Confirmed as World's Oldest Impact Structure

Scientists studying an ancient impact crater in the Australian Outback have finally managed to date the structure, and "ancient" is a bit of an understatement. The Yarrabubba crater was formed by an impact some 2.2 billion years ago, making it the oldest known impact crater on Earth . This date also suggests that the Yarrabubba impact may have helped Earth claw its way out of a global ice age. Th

2h

Study provides insight into 'rapport-building' during victim interviews

A University of Liverpool research paper, published in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, provides details of the approaches needed to help build rapport with victims of crime during interviews.

2h

Fungal diversity and its relationship to the future of forests

Stanford researchers predict that climate change will reduce the diversity of symbiotic fungi that help trees grow.

2h

Americans perceive likelihood of nuclear weapons risk as 50/50 tossup

It has been 30 years since the end of the Cold War, yet on average, Americans still perceive that the odds of a nuclear weapon detonating on U.S. soil is as likely as a coin toss, according to new research from Stevens Institute of Technology.

2h

Study provides insight into 'rapport-building' during victim interviews

A University of Liverpool research paper, published in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, provides details of the approaches needed to help build rapport with victims of crime during interviews.

2h

Autoimmunity may explain why an important immune system is absent in many bacteria

New findings from University of Exeter researchers reveal how bacterial immune systems can be harmful for their hosts and explain why they are not found in many bacteria.

2h

Scientists identify gene that puts brakes on tissue growth

The planarian flatworm is a simple animal with a mighty and highly unusual ability: it can regenerate itself from nearly every imaginable injury, including decapitation. These tiny worms can regrow any missing cell or tissue—muscle, neurons, epidermis, eyes, even a new brain.

2h

Autoimmunity may explain why an important immune system is absent in many bacteria

New findings from University of Exeter researchers reveal how bacterial immune systems can be harmful for their hosts and explain why they are not found in many bacteria.

2h

Scientists identify gene that puts brakes on tissue growth

The planarian flatworm is a simple animal with a mighty and highly unusual ability: it can regenerate itself from nearly every imaginable injury, including decapitation. These tiny worms can regrow any missing cell or tissue—muscle, neurons, epidermis, eyes, even a new brain.

2h

Global-scale human impact on delta morphology has led to net land area gain

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1905-9 A global study of river deltas shows a net increase in delta area by about 54 km2 yr−1 over the past 30 years, in part due to deforestation-induced sediment delivery increase.

2h

Reactivation of latent HIV moves shock-and-kill treatments forward

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00010-x HIV-1 can evade the immune system by hiding out in a dormant form. Two studies describe interventions that can effectively reactivate the latent virus in animals, potentially rendering it vulnerable to immune-mediated death.

2h

Conversion of non-van der Waals solids to 2D transition-metal chalcogenides

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1904-x A synthetic approach is described, for efficiently converting non-van der Waals solids into two-dimensional van der Waals transition-metal chalcogenide layers with specific phases, enabling the high-throughput production of monolayers.

2h

Robust and persistent reactivation of SIV and HIV by N-803 and depletion of CD8+ cells

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1946-0 The interleukin-15 superagonist N-803, combined with the depletion of CD8+ lymphocytes, induced a robust and persistent reactivation of the virus in vivo in both antiretroviral-therapy-treated SIV-infected macaques and HIV-infected humanized mice.

2h

Negative supercoil at gene boundaries modulates gene topology

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1934-4 The topoisomerase Top2 and the chromatin-binding protein Hmo1 maintain under-wound and over-wound DNA at different regions within a gene and thereby modulate the topology of genes.

2h

Suspect that modulates the heartbeat is ensnared

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00096-3 The activity of calcium channels in the heart increases during what is called the fight-or-flight response. An investigation into the 50-year-old mystery of how this occurs has captured a previously overlooked suspect.

2h

Structure of SAGA and mechanism of TBP deposition on gene promoters

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1944-2 Structural studies on the yeast transcription coactivator complex SAGA (Spt–Ada–Gcn5–acetyltransferase) provide insights into the mechanism of initiation of regulated transcription by this multiprotein complex, which is conserved among eukaryotes.

2h

Systemic HIV and SIV latency reversal via non-canonical NF-κB signalling in vivo

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1951-3 Activation of the non-canonical NF-κB signalling pathway by AZD5582 results in the induction of HIV and SIV RNA expression in the blood and tissues of antiretroviral-therapy-treated humanized mice and rhesus macaques.

2h

Constructing protein polyhedra via orthogonal chemical interactions

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1928-2 An inorganic chemical approach to biomolecular design is used to generate 'cages' that can simultaneously promote symmetry and multiple modes of protein interactions.

2h

Versatile strategy for making 2D materials

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00094-5 Two-dimensional materials have potential uses in flexible electronics, biosensors and water purification. A method for producing air-stable 2D materials on an industrial scale, now reported, is a key step in bringing them to market.

2h

Hyperactivation of sympathetic nerves drives depletion of melanocyte stem cells

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1935-3 Stress induces hair greying in mice through depletion of melanocyte stem cells, which is mediated by the activation of sympathetic nerves rather than through immune attack or adrenal stress hormones.

2h

Human activities have changed the shapes of river deltas

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00047-y A model has been devised that quantitatively describes how the shape of a river delta is affected by sediments, tides and waves. It reveals that the area of delta land is increasing globally, as a result of human activities upstream.

2h

Mechanism of adrenergic CaV1.2 stimulation revealed by proximity proteomics

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1947-z An in vivo approach to identify proteins whose enrichment near cardiac CaV1.2 channels changes upon β-adrenergic stimulation finds the G protein Rad, which is phosphorylated by protein kinase A, thereby relieving channel inhibition by Rad and causing an increased Ca2+ current.

2h

Selective inhibition of the BD2 bromodomain of BET proteins in prostate cancer

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1930-8 ABBV-744, a selective inhibitor of the BD2 domains of BET family proteins, is effective against prostate cancer in mouse xenograft models, with lower toxicities than the dual-bromodomain BET inhibitor ABBV-075.

2h

Redox-switchable carboranes for uranium capture and release

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1926-4 Redox-switchable chelation is demonstrated for a carborane cluster molecule, leading to controlled chemical or electrochemical capture and release of uranyl in monophasic or biphasic model solvent systems.

2h

Structure of the transcription coactivator SAGA

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1933-5 Structural studies on the yeast transcription coactivator complex SAGA (Spt–Ada–Gcn5–acetyltransferase) provide insights into the mechanism of initiation of regulated transcription by this multiprotein complex, which is conserved among eukaryotes.

2h

How the stress of fight or flight turns hair white

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03949-8 Signalling from the sympathetic nervous system of mice when subjected to stress leads to the depletion of a stem-cell population in their hair follicles. This discovery sheds light on why stress turns hair prematurely grey.

2h

Podcast: How stress can cause grey hair, and the attitude needed to tackle climate change

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00168-4 Hear the latest science news, brought to you by Nick Howe and Benjamin Thompson.

2h

Software searches out reproducibility issues in scientific papers

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00104-6 Papers are getting more rigorous, but progress is slower than some researchers would like.

2h

Ancient West African foragers in the context of African population history

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1929-1 Genome-wide ancestry profiles of four individuals, dating to 8,000 and 3,000 years before present, from the archaeological site of Shum Laka (Cameroon) shed light on the deep population history of sub-Saharan Africa.

2h

Giant virus diversity and host interactions through global metagenomics

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1957-x

2h

Targeting of temperate phages drives loss of type I CRISPR–Cas systems

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1936-2 CRISPR–Cas systems cannot eliminate temperate bacteriophages from bacterial populations and—in this context—the systems impose immunopathological costs on the host, creating selective pressures that may explain their patchy distribution in bacteria.

2h

2h

To get a better cup of coffee, start with fewer beans

A group of researchers wondered whether the traditional method of using high quantities of very finely ground coffee would indeed produce a primo beverage. Here's some tiresome news for coffee-enthusiasts everywhere: Your morning cup of joe might not be as invigorating as you thought. The conventional coffee-brewing technique—grinding large amounts of beans as finely as possible—may actually deli

2h

DNA from ancient skeletons reveals a lost branch of modern humans

DNA from four skeletons found in Cameroon has revealed a mystery branch of early modern humans, suggesting we may need to rethink our species' family tree

2h

SIM swapping and poor web security may put millions of people at risk

A review of two-factor authentication methods, which involve websites sending confirmation texts to your phone, has found that millions of people may risk having their online accounts hacked

2h

Engineers develop recipe to dramatically strengthen body armor

According to ancient lore, Genghis Khan instructed his horsemen to wear silk vests underneath their armor to better protect themselves against an onslaught of arrows during battle. Since the time of Khan, body armor has significantly evolved—silk has given way to ultra-hard materials that act like impenetrable walls against most ammunition. However, even this armor can fail, particularly if it is

2h

Canberra astronomer becomes first Australian to win major US science award in 133 years

Lisa Kewley has transformed our understanding of the early years of the Universe, the development of galaxies, and what happens when they collide.

2h

Earthquake catalog shows complex rupturing during 2019 Ridgecrest sequence

The 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence, which startled nearby California residents over the 4 July holiday with magnitude 6.4 and magnitude 7.1 earthquakes, included 34,091 earthquakes overall, detailed in a high-resolution catalog created for the sequence.

2h

Genetic identification of human remains from the Spanish Civil War and the dictatorship

It is estimated that around 114,000 people disappeared throughout Spain during the Spanish Civil War and subsequent dictatorship. Unfortunately, eight decades on, only a small percentage of these people have been found or identified, with around 9,000 victims from 700 mass graves (of which it is thought there are approximately 2,000) being recovered in the last fifteen years. As time goes by and t

2h

Inner complexity of Saturn moon, Enceladus, revealed

A team developed a new geochemical model that reveals that carbon dioxide (CO2) from within Enceladus, an ocean-harboring moon of Saturn, may be controlled by chemical reactions at its seafloor. Studying the plume of gases and frozen sea spray released through cracks in the moon's icy surface suggests an interior more complex than previously thought.

2h

Earth's oldest asteroid strike linked to 'big thaw'

Scientists have discovered Earth's oldest asteroid strike occurred at Yarrabubba, in outback Western Australia, and coincided with the end of a global deep freeze known as a Snowball Earth. The research used isotopic analysis of minerals to calculate the precise age of the Yarrabubba crater for the first time, putting it at 2.229 billion years old — making it 200 million years older than the next

2h

Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people — and now scientists know why

Despite their reputation as blood-suckers, mosquitoes actually spent most of their time drinking nectar from flowers. Scientists have identified the chemical cues in flowers that stimulate mosquitoes' sense of smell and draw them in. Their findings show how cues from flowers can stimulate the mosquito brain as much as a warm-blooded host — information that could help develop less toxic repellents

2h

New roles found for Huntington's disease protein

A research team has identified a new function of a gene called huntingtin, a mutation of which underlies the progressive neurodegenerative disorder known as Huntington's Disease. Using genetic mouse models, they have discovered that neurons in the striatum, a brain area involved in controlling movement, require the huntingtin gene for regulating the body's movements, maintaining cell health during

2h

Blood pressure swings may be an early warning for heart disease

Variable blood pressure readings could be an overlooked early warning sign of heart disease, researchers report. In their new analysis, the researchers found that wide swings in blood pressure readings among young adults associate with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease by middle age. The finding suggests that the current practice of averaging blood pressure readings to determine whether med

2h

Google's 3D Map of a Fruit Fly Brain Will Blow Your Mind

Scientists at Google and the Janelia Research Campus in Virginia just published an incredibly-detailed 3D connectome — a map of neural connections — for a fruit fly, including a mind-boggling 20 million synapses connecting 25,000 neurons. According to the researchers, it's the largest synaptic-level connectome ever to be reconstructed. Scientists are already using the groundbreaking map to study

2h

Genetic identification of human remains from the Spanish Civil War and the dictatorship

It is estimated that around 114,000 people disappeared throughout Spain during the Spanish Civil War and subsequent dictatorship. Unfortunately, eight decades on, only a small percentage of these people have been found or identified, with around 9,000 victims from 700 mass graves (of which it is thought there are approximately 2,000) being recovered in the last fifteen years. As time goes by and t

2h

Scientists identify gene that puts brakes on tissue growth

The planarian flatworm is a simple animal with a mighty ability: it can regenerate itself from nearly every imaginable injury, including decapitation. Scientists have studied these worms for decades to better understand fundamental principles of natural regeneration and repair. One mechanism that is yet unknown is how organisms like these control the proportional scaling of tissue during regenerat

2h

Autoimmunity may explain why an important immune system is absent in many bacteria

New findings from University of Exeter researchers reveal how bacterial immune systems can be harmful for their hosts and explain why they are not found in many bacteria.

2h

NIH-supported scientists reverse HIV and SIV latency in two animal models

In a range of experiments, scientists have reactivated resting immune cells that were latently infected with HIV or its monkey relative, SIV, in cells in the bloodstream and a variety of tissues in animals. As a result, the cells started making copies of the viruses, which could potentially be neutralized by anti-HIV drugs and the immune system. This advance, published today in two papers in Natur

2h

Scientific evidence found for role of stress in hair whitening

Partnering with scientists at Harvard, a group of Brazilians affiliated with the Center for Research on Inflammatory Diseases (CRID), supported by FAPESP, described the mechanisms that cause hair color loss in extreme situations.

2h

Researchers reverse HIV latency, important scientific step toward cure

Overcoming HIV latency — induction of HIV in CD4+ T cells that lay dormant throughout the body – is a major step toward creating a cure for HIV. For the first time, scientists at UNC-Chapel Hill, Emory University, and Qura Therapeutics — a partnership between UNC and ViiV Healthcare — have shown that a new approach can expose latent HIV to attack in two different animal model systems with littl

2h

Solving a biological puzzle: How stress causes gray hair

Harvard scientists have found evidence to support long-standing anecdotes that stress causes hair graying. Researchers found that in mice, the type of nerve involved in the fight-or-flight response causes permanent damage to the pigment-regenerating stem cells in the hair follicle. The findings advance knowledge of how stress impacts the body, and are a first step toward blocking its negative effe

2h

First ancient DNA from West/Central Africa illuminates deep human past

An international team led by Harvard Medical School scientists has produced the first genome-wide ancient human DNA sequences from west and central Africa.

2h

In animal models, a 'shocking' step toward a potential HIV cure

Yerkes and UNC researchers report sustained latency reversal in two animal models of HIV infection. It's not a cure, but it's a step forward.

2h

Study shines light on spread of Candida auris

Candida auris is capable of forming high burden biofilms, which may help explain why this fungal pathogen is spreading in hospitals worldwide, according to a study published this week in mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The research also establishes a new model to investigate the spread of this emerging fungal pathogen that causes invasive infections and is

2h

How dams and climate change are choking Asia's great lake

For more than half a century, January meant prime fishing season for Pang Bin. He took his wooden boat out into Cambodia's largest lake, his catches and their sales sustaining his family for much of the year.

2h

The color of your clothing can impact wildlife

Your choice of clothing could affect the behavioral habits of wildlife around you, according to a study conducted by a team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

2h

Preventing, healing tooth decay with a bioactive peptide

Cavities, or dental caries, are the most widespread non-communicable disease globally, according to the World Health Organization. Having a cavity drilled and filled at the dentist's office can be painful, but untreated caries could lead to worse pain, tooth loss, infection, and even illness or death. Now, researchers in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces report a bioactive peptide that coats toot

2h

The color of your clothing can impact wildlife

Your choice of clothing could affect the behavioral habits of wildlife around you, according to a study conducted by a team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

2h

Mapping the path of climate change

Since 1880, the Earth's temperature has risen by 1.9 degrees Fahrenheit and is predicted to continue rising, according to the NASA Global Climate Change website. Scientists are actively seeking to understand this change and its effect on Earth's ecosystems and residents.

2h

Preventing, healing tooth decay with a bioactive peptide

Cavities, or dental caries, are the most widespread non-communicable disease globally, according to the World Health Organization. Having a cavity drilled and filled at the dentist's office can be painful, but untreated caries could lead to worse pain, tooth loss, infection, and even illness or death. Now, researchers in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces report a bioactive peptide that coats toot

2h

Residues in fingerprints hold clues to their age

Police have long relied on the unique whorls, loops or arches encoded in fingerprints to identify suspects. However, they have no way to tell how long ago those prints were left behind—information that could be crucial to a case. A preliminary new study in ACS' Analytical Chemistry suggests that could change. Researchers report that they could link compounds contained in fingerprints with their ag

2h

Signals from inside the Earth: Borexino experiment releases new data on geoneutrinos

Scientists involved in the Borexino collaboration have presented new results for the measurement of neutrinos originating from the interior of the Earth. The elusive "ghost particles" rarely interact with matter, making their detection difficult. With this update, the researchers have now been able to access 53 events—almost twice as many as in the previous analysis of the data from the Borexino d

2h

Sustainability claims about rubber don't stick

Many companies work hard to present an environmentally responsible public image. But how well do these claims stack up? In a new study led by the University of Göttingen, researchers investigated the claims regarding sustainability, including conservation and fair-pay, as presented by the French Michelin Group. The researchers then compared these claims with the effects described by local people i

2h

Quo vadis Antarctic bottom water?

Ocean currents are essential for the global distribution of heat and thus also for climate on earth. For example, oxygen is transferred into the deep sea through the formation of new deep water around Antarctica. Weddell Sea sourced Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) normally spreads northwards into the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans. However, during the peak of the last two ice ages, the supply of d

2h

China Silences Critics Over Coronavirus Outbreak

Beijing has responded faster to the new threat than it did with SARS, but it still silences and punishes those who veer from the official line, with potentially damaging consequences.

2h

Infectious Disease Expert Discusses What We Know about the New Chinese Virus

Federal disease agency director Anthony Fauci discusses the novel pathogen that has, so far, sickened hundreds in Asia and one person in the U.S. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Signals from inside Earth: Borexino experiment releases new data on geoneutrinos

The Borexino collaboration has presented new results for the measurement of neutrinos originating from the interior of the Earth. With this update, the researchers have now been able to access 53 events — almost twice as many as in the previous analysis of the data from the Borexino detector, which is located 1,400 meters below the Earth's surface. The results provide an exclusive insight into pr

2h

Climate change could unlock new microbes and increase heat-related deaths

Scientists warn that global climate change is likely to unlock dangerous new microbes, as well as threaten humans' ability to regulate body temperature.

2h

Cognitive function in people with mental illness

A study has shown few differences in the profiles of genes that influence cognition between people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and the general population. This surprising finding could provide new insights into therapies designed to improve cognition.

2h

Scientists isolate biomarkers that can identify delirium risk and severity

Researchers have identified blood-based biomarkers associated with both delirium duration and severity in critically ill patients. This finding opens the door to easy, early identification of individuals at risk for longer delirium duration and higher delirium severity and could potentially lead to new treatments of this brain failure for which drugs have been shown to be largely ineffective.

2h

Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant

Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). This finding could open a new dimension in the application of artificial machines fabricated from biomolecular motors and other proteins.

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Our biological clock plays crucial role in healing from surgery

If you have just had knee, shoulder or hip surgery, you may want to take anti-inflammatories in the morning or at noon, but not at night. A new study shows, for the first time, that circadian clock genes are involved in healing from surgery. Indeed, the researchers demonstrated that anti-inflammatory medications are most effective in promoting post-operative healing and recovery when taken during

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How giant viruses infect amoeba

Host cells infected with giant viruses behave in a unique manner. To gain deeper insight into the infection mechanism of giant viruses, scientists developed a specialized algorithm that can track the movement of host cells. This method could also be used to study any other type of cells, such as cancer cells, neurons, and immune cells, serving as an efficient tool in the field of cell biology.

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Infectious Disease Expert Discusses What We Know about the New Chinese Virus

Federal disease agency director Anthony Fauci discusses the novel pathogen that has, so far, sickened hundreds in Asia and one person in the U.S. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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China Silences Critics Over Deadly Virus Outbreak

Beijing has responded faster to the new threat than it did with SARS, but it still silences and punishes those who veer from the official line, with potentially damaging consequences.

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Scientists take the first step towards extending the Standard Model in physics

Researchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) in collaboration with colleagues from the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and a number of German scientific organizations, calculated previously unexplored effects in atoms. The results were published in the Physical Review A, highlighted as an Editor's Choice article.

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Acousto-optic modulation of photonic bound state in the continuum

Applying bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic integrated circuits enables low-loss light guidance and routing in low-refractive-index waveguides on high-refractive-index substrates. Here, we demonstrate high-quality integrated lithium niobate microcavities with circulating BICs and further acousto-optically modulate these BICs by surface acoustic waves. The acousto-optic coupling is we

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New survey results reveal the experts and public's attitude towards gene-edited crops

Experts' interest in utilizing gene editing for breeding crops has seen revolutionary growth. Meanwhile, people's awareness of food safety has also been increasing. To understand the attitudinal difference among experts and public towards gene-edited crops, a team of Japanese researchers, led by Dr. Naoko Kato-Nitta, a research scientist at the Joint Support-Center for Data Science Research and Th

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Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant

Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). This finding could open a new dimension in the application of artificial machines fabricated from biomolecular motors and other proteins.

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New survey results reveal the experts and public's attitude towards gene-edited crops

Experts' interest in utilizing gene editing for breeding crops has seen revolutionary growth. Meanwhile, people's awareness of food safety has also been increasing. To understand the attitudinal difference among experts and public towards gene-edited crops, a team of Japanese researchers, led by Dr. Naoko Kato-Nitta, a research scientist at the Joint Support-Center for Data Science Research and Th

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DNA from child burials reveals 'profoundly different' human landscape in ancient Africa

Children's skeletons yield genomes more than 3000 years old

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Stress speeds up hair greying process, science confirms

Fight-or-flight response nerves pump out hormone that wipes out pigmentation cells Lord Byron put it down to sudden fears, which took their toll on men at night. For Wordsworth it was shocks of passion that swiftly turned hair white. But while hair cannot lose its colour in an instant – at least not without help from a bottle of bleach – scientists at Harvard University have shown how stress can,

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Study shines light on spread of Candida auris

Candida auris is capable of forming high burden biofilms, which may help explain why this fungal pathogen is spreading in hospitals worldwide, according to a study published this week in mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The research also establishes a new model to investigate the spread of this emerging fungal pathogen that causes invasive infections and is

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First ancient DNA from West/Central Africa illuminates deep human past

An international team led by Harvard Medical School scientists has produced the first genome-wide ancient human DNA sequences from west and central Africa.

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Children's graves reveal genetic diversity of ancient West Africa

Ancient genomes point to unique population of hunter-gatherers.

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River deltas are changing shape

Modelling reveals impact of human activities around the world.

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Triangles that can more than hold their own

Kirigami inspires another batch of strong structures with potential.

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Why stress can make you go grey

Sometimes an evolutionary response does us a disservice.

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Brewing a better espresso, the scientific way

A multidisciplinary team says its coffee quality adds up.

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Study shines light on spread of Candida auris

Candida auris is capable of forming high burden biofilms, which may help explain why this fungal pathogen is spreading in hospitals worldwide, according to a study published this week in mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The research also establishes a new model to investigate the spread of this emerging fungal pathogen that causes invasive infections and is

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Both simple and advanced imaging can predict best stroke patients for thrombectomy

Both simple and advanced computed tomography (CT) were effective in accurately predicting which stroke patients would benefit from endovascular thrombectomy to remove a large cerebral clot, but together they were even better, reported researchers at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth in Houston. Results were published in the Annals of Neurology.

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A new approach to reveal the multiple structures of RNA

The key of the extraordinary functionality of ribonucleic acid, better known as RNA, is a highly flexible and dynamic structure. Yet, the experimental characterisation of its different configurations is rather complex. A study conducted by SISSA and published on Nucleic Acids Research combines experimental data and molecular dynamics simulations to reconstruct the different dominant and minority s

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Montana State researcher harnesses microorganisms to make living building materials

Chelsea Heveran, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, is the lead author of a new study showing that certain bacteria can be used to create an easily recyclable, concrete-like substance.

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Texas A&M engineers develop recipe to dramatically strengthen body armor

Researchers at Texas A&M University have formulated a new recipe that can prevent weaknesses in modern-day armor. By adding a tiny amount of the element silicon to boron carbide, a material commonly used for making body armor, they discovered that bullet-resistant gear could be made substantially more resilient to high-speed impacts.

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Closing the Ozone Hole Helped Slow Arctic Warming

Ozone-eating chemicals are also potent greenhouse gases, accounting for up to half of the Arctic's temperature rise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New camera has more than just speed

It can capture transparent objects and even shockwaves.

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Australian astronomer wins major US science award

Lisa Kewley transformed our understanding of the universe.

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Sharks Are Evolving to Walk on Land

Land Sharks Four newly-discovered species of shark are capable of trotting around on land, using four fins as stubby legs. They're the most recently-evolved types of sharks known to science, according to CNET . And while they still live in the water, using their fins to crawl across coral reefs, they can briefly wriggle across dry land to migrate from one tide pool to another. Safe For Now This m

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Davos 2020: Prince Charles meets Greta Thunberg

The heir to the throne calls for a "paradigm shift" in the way the world deals with climate change.

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Trump Praises Elon Musk: "He Does Good at Rockets"

During an interview with CNBC's Joe Kernen at the World Economic Forum, United States President Donald Trump couldn't say enough nice things about billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk — though the praise was less than eloquent. "You have to give him credit. I spoke to him very recently, and he's also doing the rockets," Trump told Kernen . "He likes rockets. And he does good at rockets, too, by the

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Earthquake catalog shows complex rupturing during 2019 ridgecrest sequence

The 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence, which startled nearby California residents over the 4 July holiday with magnitude 6.4 and magnitude 7.1 earthquakes, included 34,091 earthquakes overall, detailed in a high-resolution catalog created for the sequence.

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Is it time to stop ringing the cancer bell?

A study published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics finds that patients who celebrate the end of cancer treatment by ringing a bell report more distressful memories of treatment than those who finish without ringing a bell.

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Native Americans did not make large-scale changes to environment prior to European contact

Contrary to long-held beliefs, humans did not make major changes to the landscape prior to European colonization, according to new research. These new insights into the past could help to inform how landscapes are managed in the future.

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Neutron source enables a look inside dino eggs

Did the chicks of dinosaurs from the group oviraptorid hatch from their eggs at the same time? This question can be answered by the length and arrangement of the embryo's bones, which provide information about the stage of development. But how do you look inside fossilized dinosaur eggs?

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Potential way to halt blinding macular degeneration identified

It would be the first treatment for dry age-related macular degeneration and could significantly improve treatment for wet AMD.

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Scientists Predict Fish Behavior from Real-Time Brain Monitoring

Researchers could anticipate which way an eight-day-old zebrafish will flick its tail based on brain activity 10 seconds earlier.

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Daily briefing: Alan Turing's stolen archive has turned up in Colorado

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00169-3 Turing's Princeton degree, Order of the British Empire medal and other personal items have been recovered. Plus: the chemists policing Earth's atmosphere for rogue pollution, and the Wuhan virus has been seen in the United States.

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'Cheer' Is Built on a Pyramid of Broken Bodies

Days after finishing Cheer , Netflix's popular new docuseries about a cheerleading team's pursuit of its 14th national championship in 19 years, two scenes keep replaying in my head. In one, an athlete named TT arrives to practice with a back injury sustained at an event with a club cheerleading team, and Navarro College's head cheerleading coach, Monica Aldama, forces him to practice, punishing

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Everything We Know About the Jeff Bezos Phone Hack

A UN report links the attack on Jeff Bezos' iPhone X directly to Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

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Scientists isolate biomarkers that can identify delirium risk and severity

Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have identified blood-based biomarkers associated with both delirium duration and severity in critically ill patients. This finding opens the door to easy, early identification of individuals at risk for longer delirium duration and higher delirium severity and could potentially lead to new treatments of this brain failure

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University of Miami study explores cognitive function in people with mental illness

A study funded by the Veterans Administration and directed by researchers at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine has shown few differences in the profiles of genes that influence cognition between people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and the general population. This surprising finding could provide new insights into therapies designed to improve cognition. The study was publis

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Self-moisturizing smart contact lenses

Researchers have developed a new type of smart contact lenses that can prevent dry eyes. The self-moisturizing system maintains a layer of fluid between the contact lens and the eye using a novel mechanism.

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Ultrafast camera takes 1 trillion frames per second of transparent objects and phenomena

Engineers have adapted a picosecond imaging technology to take pictures and video of transparent objects like cells and phenomena like shockwaves.

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Ultrafast camera takes 1 trillion frames per second of transparent objects and phenomena

Engineers have adapted a picosecond imaging technology to take pictures and video of transparent objects like cells and phenomena like shockwaves.

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Survival of the Fittest Cells

Cells in the body don't always play nicely together. Could co-opting their competitive nature help to unlock cutting-edge therapies? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #3, 2020

Biography of a policy metric Bård Lahn performs a sweeping literature review to present the history of our notion of a "global carbon budget" and how this number has come to encapsulate a massive amount of scientific research into a useful, easily grasped tool in our policy skill set. A history of the global carbon budget is open access, free to read, worth your time. Wildfire and climate change

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Will we reverse aging in our lifetime?

Will that be possible in the next 60-70 years? submitted by /u/eevem5 [link] [comments]

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Our bodies are chronically in "threat mode"—but being kind recalibrates our nervous system

The default "rest mode" of our brains is often taken over by a "threat mode" setting because of our stressful, "on-the-go" lifestyles. When we are chronically in threat mode, this leaves us with less capacity for compassion. Showing compassion or acting kind to others can actually change your physiology, taking you out of threat mode and putting you back into your natural "rest and digest" mode.

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China Censored Info About Growing Pandemic on Social Media

As the pneumonia-like virus 2019-nCoV spreads outward from China to nearby countries and now the U.S. , the Chinese government is reportedly trying to seize control of the narrative around the disease as much as possible. That includes carefully crafting its own messages and statements — and also censoring social media posts and news articles about the virus, according to The New York Times . So

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Set up your new PC the quick way

You just want your same old laptop… only new. (Wavebreakmedia via Deposit Photos/) Opening the box of a brand-new laptop is quite an experience. You admire the clean, unscratched surface, open up the perfectly smooth hinge, and turn it on… only to realize you have to spend all day setting it up before you can really use it. Once upon a time, I loved setting up a new computer from scratch—beli

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Quo vadis Antarctic bottom water?

The formation of deep water, which is an important component of the climate system, takes place in only a few parts of the ocean: In the subpolar North Atlantic and in a few places in the Southern Hemisphere. There, the so-called Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) is formed. While today AABW is circulating northwards into the other ocean basins, results of a new study show, that this was different unde

4h

Self-moisturizing smart contact lenses

Researchers have developed a new type of smart contact lenses that can prevent dry eyes. The self-moisturizing system maintains a layer of fluid between the contact lens and the eye using a novel mechanism.

4h

Brewing a better espresso, with a shot of math

Researchers are challenging common espresso wisdom, finding that fewer coffee beans, ground more coarsely, are the key to a drink that is cheaper to make, more consistent from shot to shot, and just as strong.

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Coating helps electronics stay cool by sweating

Mammals sweat to regulate body temperature, and researchers are exploring whether our phones could do the same. The authors present a coating for electronics that releases water vapor to dissipate heat from running devices — a new thermal management method that could prevent electronics from overheating and keep them cooler compared to existing strategies.

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Designer-defect clamping of ferroelectric domain walls for more-stable nanoelectronics

Engineered defects in ferroelectric materials provides key to improved polariaztion stability, a significant step forward for domain-wall nanoelectronics in data storage. Researchers achieved stability greater than one year (a 2000% improvement).

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Life aquatic for many spider species

Researchers have found that nearly one fifth of all spider families are associated with saltwater or freshwater aquatic habitats. Their findings address the common misconception that all spiders dwell on land, and reveal surprising evolutionary pathways of this group from a land-based existence back to a water-based existence.

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Buckyballs can pave the way for molecular electronics

Organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been around for over forty years. The most widely used form is based on thiols, bound to a metal surface. However, exposure of these monolayers to air will lead to breakdown within a single day. Scientists have now created SAMs using buckyballs functionalized with 'tails' of ethylene glycol. These have all the properties of thiol SAMs but remain chemic

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Advancing the application of genomic sequences through 'Kmasker plants'

The correct assembly of plant genomes can be hampered by a large amount of repetitive sequences. Researchers have developed a bioinformatics tool for the automatic detection of repetitive genome regions, based on the identification of k-mers (nucleotide sequences of a pre-determined length).

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Genetic identification of human remains from the Spanish Civil War and the dictatorship

The BIOMICs Research Team at the UPV/EHU have published the results of analyses which have enabled the genetic identification of 525 human remains recovered from different mass graves dating from the Spanish Civil War and the subsequent dictatorship. The team is continuously optimising identification techniques, comparing samples with those taken from presumed relatives. In their ten years of expe

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Hopkins news: Climate change could unlock new microbes and increase heat-related deaths

The Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI) recently published 'Viewpoint' articles by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine professors who warn that global climate change is likely to unlock dangerous new microbes, as well as threaten humans' ability to regulate body temperature.

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Scientists take the first step towards extending the Standard Model in physics

Researchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) in collaboration with colleagues from the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and a number of German scientific organizations, calculated previously unexplored effects in atoms. The results were published in the PHYSICAL REVIEW A, highlighted as an Editor's Choice article.

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Potential way to halt blinding macular degeneration identified

It would be the first treatment for dry age-related macular degeneration and could significantly improve treatment for wet AMD.

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What it's like to live without a sense of smell

New research from the University of East Anglia (UK) reveals the impact of smell loss. As many as one in 20 people live without smell. But until now there has been little research into the range of emotional and practical impacts it causes. The new study finds that almost every aspect of life is disrupted – from everyday concerns about personal hygiene to a loss of sexual intimacy and the break-do

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Spikes in blood pressure among young adults spell trouble in mid-age

Wide swings in blood pressure readings among young adults are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease by middle age, a new analysis led by Duke Health researchers shows.

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Survival of the Fittest Cells

Cells in the body don't always play nicely together. Could co-opting their competitive nature help to unlock cutting-edge therapies? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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2020 Kia Telluride Review: The New Benchmark for Midsize SUVs

There's a new sheriff in town: the Kia Telluride midsize SUV, loaded with standard safety tech and driver assists, room for seven or eight, gifted with a smooth ride and the ability to pull to tow a 5,000-pound trailer. This is an amazing vehicle. The Kia Telluride and its fraternal twin Hyundai Palisade are poised to upend the status quo among the larger midsize mainstream SUVs, as well as chall

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What A Special Black-footed Ferret Can Teach Us About Conservation Success

When a species is critically endangered, every individual matters — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Where has coronavirus spread?

Three maps illustrating the fight against the deadly virus outbreak in Wuhan, China Authorities in China are battling to contain an outbreak of a deadly coronavirus, which has spread throughout the country and beyond its borders. Latest official figures put the number of cases in China at more than 470 and 17 people have died, all of them in the central province of Hubei where the illness was fir

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Buckyballs can pave the way for molecular electronics

Organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been around for over forty years. The most widely used form is based on thiols, bound to a metal surface. However, exposure of these monolayers to air will lead to breakdown within a single day. Scientists have now created SAMs using buckyballs functionalized with 'tails' of ethylene glycol. These have all the properties of thiol SAMs but remain chemic

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The LSU Championship Game Further Exposed the NCAA's Hypocrisy

College-sports fans have generally become desensitized to the cognitive dissonances of the NCAA's amateurism policies. The rules, which prevent the payment of cash or other "extra benefits" to student athletes or their families, are necessary to retain the purity of amateur competition, according to the association. Without such restrictions, supporters argue, NCAA sports would devolve into just

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UN calls for investigation of Saudis allegedly hacking Jeff Bezos

A tangled web of espionage may point to an intimidation campaign by the powerful Saudi Crown Prince.

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Light at the end of the tunnel for most individuals with low-vision

Progress in research and technology is giving rise to an optimistic future for compensation and restoration of low vision, according to research in a special issue of Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, published by IOS Press. Seven studies explore different aspects of vision loss after damage to the retina, optic nerve or brain due to diseases such as glaucoma or optic neuropathy. Remarkable

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The color of your clothing can impact wildlife

Your choice of clothing could affect the behavioral habits of wildlife around you, according to a study conducted by a team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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2019's new medicines

With 48 drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), 2019 was another highly productive year for the pharmaceutical industry. The new medicines include treatments for various cancers, sickle cell disease, migraines and postpartum depression. However, the steady flow of drugs could be masking troubling signs about the health of the industry, according to Chemical & Engineering News

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Preventing, healing tooth decay with a bioactive peptide

Cavities, or dental caries, are the most widespread non-communicable disease globally, according to the World Health Organization. Having a cavity drilled and filled at the dentist's office can be painful, but untreated caries could lead to worse pain, tooth loss, infection, and even illness or death. Now, researchers in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces report a bioactive peptide that coats toot

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Mapping the path of climate change

Predicting a major transition, such as climate change, is extremely difficult, but the probabilistic framework developed by the authors is the first step in identifying the path between a shift in two environmental states.

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Rolls-Royce Is Building Tiny Nuclear Reactors

Lil Nuke Rolls-Royce doesn't just manufacture luxurious cars — it's also involved in futuristic projects ranging from electric planes to laser weapon systems . Now, the company is eyeing two sites for tiny nuclear power stations it calls "small modular reactors," Popular Mechanics reports , in Wales and northern England — a program the UK government committed to funding in July 2019. Mega What Th

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Zero-deforestation pledges to protect wildlife in oil palm

New research has found that environmental efforts aimed at eliminating deforestation from oil palm production have the potential to benefit vulnerable tropical mammals.

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New China virus: Five questions scientists are asking

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00166-6 Researchers are racing to find out more about the epidemiology and DNA of the coronavirus spreading in Asia and beyond.

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Pregnancy and breastfeeding linked to lower risk of early menopause

People who have been pregnant or have breastfed a baby are less likely to enter the menopause before the age of 45, a study of 108,000 people suggests

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Maths says you need coarser coffee grounds to make a perfect espresso

Baristas normally aim to grind coffee finely to maximise surface area and extract the most coffee compounds, but a mathematical analysis has found that coarse grounds are better as they reduce clogging

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Residues in fingerprints hold clues to their age

Police have long relied on the unique whorls, loops or arches encoded in fingerprints to identify suspects. However, they have no way to tell how long ago those prints were left behind — information that could be crucial to a case. A preliminary new study in ACS' Analytical Chemistry suggests that could change. Researchers report that they could link compounds contained in fingerprints with their

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Depression common during perimenopause but not regularly assessed by providers

Almost 40% of women experience symptoms of depression during perimenopause, yet it often goes undetected and untreated because many healthcare providers aren't screening for it and aren't prepared with treatment options. A new study analyzed screening practices by women's healthcare providers and their management of depression during perimenopause. Study results are published online in Menopause,

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Signals from inside the Earth: Borexino experiment releases new data on geoneutrinos

The Borexino collaboration has presented new results for the measurement of neutrinos originating from the interior of the Earth. With this update, the researchers have now been able to access 53 events — almost twice as many as in the previous analysis of the data from the Borexino detector, which is located 1,400 meters below the Earth's surface. The results provide an exclusive insight into pr

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Neutron source enables a look inside dino eggs

Did the chicks of dinosaurs from the group oviraptorid hatch from their eggs at the same time? This question can be answered by the length and arrangement of the embryo's bones, which provide information about the stage of development. But how do you look inside fossilized dinosaur eggs? Paleontologists from the University of Bonn used the neutron source of the Technical University of Munich at th

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New groundbreaking method could improve the accuracy of data used to produce lifesaving drugs

A new high-throughput method has revealed metals previously undetected in 3D protein structures.

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Brewing a better espresso, with a shot of math

Mathematicians, physicists and materials experts might not spring to mind as the first people to consult about whether you are brewing your coffee right.But a team of such researchers including Dr. Jamie Foster, a mathematician at the University of Portsmouth, are challenging common espresso wisdom.

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Researchers brew a formula for consistent espresso and industry savings

Espresso delivers a desired jolt of caffeine but getting a consistent good-taste is difficult. New research is offering a roadmap to reproducibility and a potential savings of $3.1 million a day for coffee shops across the United States.

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Locomotor engine in the spinal cord revealed

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have revealed a new principle of organization which explains how locomotion is coordinated in vertebrates akin to an engine with three gears. The results are published in the scientific journal Neuron.

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Community-based counselors help mitigate grief among children orphaned in East Africa

A first-of-its-kind clinical trial involving more than 600 children in Kenya and Tanzania, in which community members were trained to deliver mental health treatment, showed improvement in participants' trauma-related symptoms up to a year after receiving therapy.

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Breastfeeding and childbearing linked to lower early menopause risk

Results of a new epidemiological analysis of more than 108,000 women observed a lower risk of early menopause among women who had at least one pregnancy lasting at least six months and among those who had breastfed their infants. Further, risk was lowest among those who breastfed exclusively. The work is by first author and Ph.D. student Christine Langton, with her advisor Elizabeth Bertone-Johnso

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Brewing a better espresso, with a shot of math

Mathematicians, physicists, and materials experts might not spring to mind as the first people to consult about whether you are brewing your coffee right. But a team of such researchers from around the globenare challenging common espresso wisdom, finding that fewer coffee beans, ground more coarsely, are the key to a drink that is cheaper to make, more consistent from shot to shot, and just as st

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Coating helps electronics stay cool by sweating

Mammals sweat to regulate body temperature, and researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China are exploring whether our phones could do the same. In a study published Jan. 22 in the journal Joule, the authors present a coating for electronics that releases water vapor to dissipate heat from running devices — a new thermal management method that could prevent electronics from overheating

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Mars-undersøgelser og jord-observationer: Danske rumprojekter skal skabe grønne fremskridt

PLUS. Seks nye partnerskaber skal få Danmark helt frem i skoene i rumforskningen. Planerne spænder vidt fra træningsudstyr til samlende uddannelser.

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Secrets of Math From the Bee Whisperer

Scarlett Howard teaches math to honeybees. She began with a few hives on a concrete balcony at RMIT University in Melbourne, when she was a doctoral candidate in zoology. Today, at the University of Toulouse, where she is a postdoctoral fellow, her lessons take place in a small field with approximately 50 hives. It might seem a little strange — bees are insects, after all; what do they know about

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Astronomers find a way to form 'fast and furious' planets around tiny stars

New astronomy research from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) suggests giant planets could form around small stars much faster than previously thought.

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The Most Complete Brain Map Ever Is Here: A Fly's 'Connectome'

It took 12 years and at least $40 million to chart a region about 250 micrometers across—about the thickness of two strands of hair.

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The Science Behind Crafting a Perfect Espresso

A computational chemist unlocks the secrets of the time-grind-water axis—and develops a model for making an impeccable cup of joe.

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This 43-mile-wide crater is 2.2 billion years old—making it Earth's oldest meteorite impact

Really old craters like the above Yarrabubba crater in Western Australia are rare because Earth's surface is constantly being reshaped by plate tectonics and erosion. The Yarrabubba crater is an oddity as far as meteorite-created Earth cavities go. Located in the outback of Western Australia, the 43 mile-wide hole is almost unnoticeable. It's extremely flat, save for a small hill in the center, c

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Largest Brain Wiring Diagram to Date Is Published

The partial fruit fly "connectome" contains approximately 25,000 neurons and 20 million synapses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Largest Brain Wiring Diagram to Date Is Published

The partial fruit fly "connectome" contains approximately 25,000 neurons and 20 million synapses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brewing a better espresso, with a shot of math

Mathematicians, physicists, and materials experts might not spring to mind as the first people to consult about whether you are brewing your coffee right. But a team of such researchers from around the globe—the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, and Switzerland—are challenging common espresso wisdom, finding that fewer coffee beans, ground more coarsely, are the key to a drink

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Coating helps electronics stay cool by sweating

Mammals sweat to regulate body temperature, and researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China are exploring whether our phones could do the same. In a study published January 22 in the journal Joule, the authors present a coating for electronics that releases water vapor to dissipate heat from running devices—a new thermal management method that could prevent electronics from overheating

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Sustainability claims about rubber don't stick

Companies work hard to present an environmentally responsible image. How well do these claims stack up? Researchers from Göttingen University investigated claims regarding sustainability, conservation and fair pay, as presented by the French Michelin Group. Researchers then compared these claims with effects described by local people. Villagers' reports indicated that land-ownership, ecosystems an

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Quo vadis Antarctic bottom water?

The formation of deep water, which is an important component of the climate system, takes place in only a few parts of the ocean: In the subpolar North Atlantic and in a few places in the Southern Hemisphere. There, the so-called Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) is formed. While today AABW is circulating northwards into the other ocean basins, results of a new study show, that this was different unde

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A personal health coach for those living with chronic diseases | Priscilla Pemu

There's no shortage of resources to help people change their health behaviors — but far too often, these resources aren't accessible in underserved communities, says physician Priscilla Pemu. Enter "culturally congruent coaching," a program Pemu and her team developed to help patients with chronic diseases monitor their health with the assistance of a coach from their community. Learn more about

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Maths experts zero in on secret to perfect espresso

It's all in the grind, say mathematicians who turned to equations to solve mystery What's the secret of the perfect espresso? It's a question that has long troubled cafe owners around the world, but now mathematicians say they have worked out the formula for achieving the perfect brew – and it all comes down to the daily grind. "There is a common experience, particularly for people making coffee

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Preparing land for palm oil causes most climate damage

New research has found preparing land for palm oil plantations and the growth of young plants causes significantly more damage to the environment, emitting double the amount of greenhouse gases than mature plantations.

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Largest Brain Wiring Diagram to Date Is Published

The partial fruit fly "connectome" contains approximately 25,000 neurons and 20 million synapses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Staggeringly Huge, Surprisingly Small and Blisteringly Fast — Some of the Universe's Strangest Stars

Stars come in many sizes and flavors, from those as small as Saturn to some still theoretical.

5h

New models reveal inner complexity of Saturn moon

A Southwest Research Institute team developed a new geochemical model that reveals that carbon dioxide (CO2) from within Enceladus, an ocean-harboring moon of Saturn, may be controlled by chemical reactions at its seafloor. Studying the plume of gases and frozen sea spray released through cracks in the moon's icy surface suggests an interior more complex than previously thought.

5h

Rising global temperatures turn northern permafrost region into significant carbon source

Permafrost, the perennially frozen subsoil in Earth's northernmost regions, has been collecting and storing plant and animal matter since long before the last Ice Age. The decomposition of some of this organic matter naturally releases carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere year-round, where it is absorbed by plant growth during the warmer months.

5h

Bosättningslagen – rättvis för vem?

Bosättningslagen skulle hjälpa nyanlända att komma in i det svenska samhället, men har i praktiken bidragit till att skapa osäkerhet och att rycka upp både enskilda personer och hela familjer ur sina nya sammanhang. Den slutsatsen drar chalmersforskarna Kristina Grange och Nils Björling i en ny rapport. Forskarna har ur ett rättviseperspektiv undersökt hur tre västsvenska kommuner tillämpat Bosät

5h

2 doses of flu vaccine for kids cuts hospitalizations in half

Fully vaccinating children reduces the risk of hospitalization associated with influenza by 54%, a new study shows. In Israel, as in the United States, government guidelines recommend that children 8 or younger who have never received a vaccination, or who have only received one dose of flu vaccine, should receive two doses of vaccine. Children vaccinated according to government guidelines have m

5h

Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant

Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). This finding could open a new dimension in the application of artificial machines fabricated from biomolecular motors and other proteins.

5h

Physicists trap light in nanoresonators for record time

An international team of researchers from ITMO University, the Australian National University, and Korea University have experimentally trapped an electromagnetic wave in a gallium arsenide nanoresonator a few hundred nanometers in size for a record-breaking time. Earlier attempts to trap light for such a long time have only been successful with much larger resonators. In addition, the researchers

5h

Most rehabilitating sea turtles with infectious tumors don't survive

Caused by a herpesvirus, fibropapillomatosis (FP) is the most significant infectious disease affecting sea turtle populations worldwide. It is widespread in warmer climates like Florida, where almost 70 percent of sea turtles in a population have FP in some places; it has been documented in the Caribbean, South America, Hawaii, Japan, Australia, and beyond. The disease leads to the formation of tu

5h

Most rehabilitating sea turtles with infectious tumors don't survive

Caused by a herpesvirus, fibropapillomatosis (FP) is the most significant infectious disease affecting sea turtle populations worldwide. It is widespread in warmer climates like Florida, where almost 70 percent of sea turtles in a population have FP in some places; it has been documented in the Caribbean, South America, Hawaii, Japan, Australia, and beyond. The disease leads to the formation of tu

5h

What is coronavirus and how worried should we be?

Experts fear latest strain of virus from Wuhan may spread across world It is a novel coronavirus – that is to say, a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals – possibly seafood. Many of those infected either worked or frequently shopped in the Huanan seafood wholesale market in the centre of the Chinese city. New a

5h

A.I. boosts breast cancer detection accuracy

An artificial intelligence tool—trained on roughly a million screening mammography images—can identify breast cancer with approximately 90% accuracy when combined with radiologist analysis, a new study finds. The study examined the ability of a type of artificial intelligence (AI), a machine learning computer program, to add value to the diagnoses a group of 14 radiologists reached as they review

5h

Bumblebee Vomit: Scientists Are No Longer Ignoring It

Regurgitation is an important consideration when it comes to the process of pollination.

5h

Weights vs. Cardio: Keep Them Separate or Combine?

Confused about whether or not you should lift on the same day as a run? You're not alone. Let's take a deep dive into the research and determine what to do — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

How climate-related weather conditions disrupt power plants and affect people

Severe weather conditions triggered by climate change can adversely affect the operation of power plants.

5h

Fighting microbes with microbes

The intestinal commensal microbial community (or microbiota) is composed of several microorganisms that, among other functions, are beneficial for the protection against infectious agents. When the microbiota is altered many bacteria are lost, compromising the protective ability and enabling invasion by harmful bacteria. Antibiotics, despite being the best way to treat infections, can lead to chan

5h

Self-moisturising smart contact lenses

Researchers at Tohoku University have developed a new type of smart contact lenses that can prevent dry eyes. The self-moisturising system, which is described in the journal Advanced Materials Technologies, maintains a layer of fluid between the contact lens and the eye using a novel mechanism.

5h

Are BMD and CT-FEA effective surrogate markers of femoral bone strength?

An International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) position paper reviews experimental and clinical evidence showing that hip bone strength estimated by bone mineral density (BMD) and/or finite element analysis (FEA) reflects the actual strength of the proximal femur. The paper 'Perspectives on the noninvasive evaluation of femoral strength in the assessment of hip fracture risk,' published in Osteopo

5h

PET/MRI identifies notable breast cancer imaging biomarkers

Researchers have identified several potentially useful breast cancer biomarkers that indicate the presence and risk of malignancy, according to new research published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

5h

New survey results reveal the experts and public's attitude towards gene-edited crops

To understand the attitudinal difference among experts and public towards gene-edited crops, a team of Japanese researchers, led by Dr. Naoko Kato-Nitta, conducted a survey of perceptions of the Japanese experts and public to gene editing versus other emerging or conventional breeding techniques in Japan, where the production of genetically modified crops is strictly regulated and not readily acce

5h

New SwRI models reveal inner complexity of Saturn moon

A Southwest Research Institute team developed a new geochemical model that reveals that carbon dioxide (CO2) from within Enceladus, an ocean-harboring moon of Saturn, may be controlled by chemical reactions at its seafloor. Studying the plume of gases and frozen sea spray released through cracks in the moon's icy surface suggests an interior more complex than previously thought.

5h

Researchers slash pre-drug screening time from years to days

Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) have developed a powerful tool that will streamline and accelerate the development of disease therapies, transforming a multi-year process into just a few days.

5h

Wildfire risk can be reduced with agroforestry

New pan-European research has found that proactive land management with agroforestry—mixing livestock and trees—reduces the risk of wildfires occurring in European Mediterranean areas.

5h

As Coronavirus Spreads from China, Scientists See Grim Reminders

Epidemics of related viruses, like SARS, killed hundreds. But the W.H.O. has postponed a decision on whether the new outbreak is a global emergency.

5h

Fighting microbes with microbes

The intestinal commensal microbial community (or microbiota) is composed of several microorganisms that, among other functions, are beneficial for the protection against infectious agents. When the microbiota is altered many bacteria are lost, compromising the protective ability and enabling invasion by harmful bacteria. Antibiotics, despite being the best way to treat infections, can lead to chan

5h

Researchers slash pre-drug screening time from years to days

Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) have developed a powerful tool that will streamline and accelerate the development of disease therapies, transforming a multi-year process into just a few days.

5h

Ecologist uses scientific approach to rank world's worst problems in new book

From world hunger to nuclear weapons, Kansas State University distinguished professor Walter Dodds ranks the world's worst problems facing humanity in a new book by publisher Springer.

6h

The Real Genius of *Love Island* Is Its Money-Making App

The British network behind the hit series has made millions by selling merch via a companion app. Its success hints at the future of the broadcasting business.

6h

Not Bot, Not Beast: Scientists Create First Ever Living, Programmable Organism

A remarkable combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and biology has produced the world's first "living robots." This week, a research team of roboticists and scientists published their recipe for making a new lifeform called xenobots from stem cells. The term "xeno" comes from the frog cells ( Xenopus laevis ) used to make them. One of the researchers described the creation as "neither a tra

6h

Acousto-optic modulation of photonic bound state in the continuum

Applying bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic integrated circuits enables low-loss light guidance and routing in low-refractive-index waveguides on high-refractive-index substrates. Here, we demonstrate high-quality integrated lithium niobate microcavities with circulating BICs and further acousto-optically modulate these BICs by surface acoustic waves. The acousto-optic coupling is we

6h

Rising global temperatures turn northern permafrost region into significant carbon source

A new study that incorporates datasets gathered from more than 100 sites by institutions including the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, suggests that decomposition of organic matter in permafrost soil is substantially larger than previously thought, demonstrating the significant impact that emissions from the permafrost soil could have on the greenhouse effect and globa

6h

Decline in late stage cancer diagnoses after health reform law

Advanced stage cancer diagnoses declined following health insurance expansion in Massachusetts, likely due to increased access to screening and diagnostic services that identified cancers earlier, according to new research led by health economists at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. The analysis specifically found the decline in colorectal cancers, the second-leading

6h

Ben-Gurion University researchers slash pre-drug screening time from years to days

'Our new approach will increase the understanding of the mechanisms and evolutionary origins of specific PPIs, and facilitate the rational design of specific inhibitors that can discriminate between structurally similar protein targets,' says Professor Niv Papo of BGU's Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering and the National Institute for Biotechnology in the Nege

6h

Kids born to moms with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia at greater risk for obesity

A study in Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics found that when a mother experiences both gestational diabetes and preeclampsia, her child has a growth trajectory that leads to an increased risk of high childhood BMI over time.

6h

Harvey Weinstein's Pain

"I've found a spiritual connection I never had. In that, I have experienced the power of being vulnerable." On Monday evening, in The New York Times , Harvey Weinstein did what he has been doing for decades: He explained the world from the perspective of Harvey Weinstein. This particular explanation came in the form of an email the accused rapist sent to the reporter Alan Feuer, for an article th

6h

Does anything Australians do on climate change matter?

As unprecedented bushfires continue to ravage the country, Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his government have been rightly criticized for their reluctance to talk about the underlying drivers of this crisis. Yet it's not hard to see why they might be dumbstruck.

6h

From bushfires to terrorism: How communities become resilient

The world has watched in sympathy as Australia has come to terms with the ravages of the worst bush fires on record. Communities have been devastated by this crisis, but many have shown incredible resilience in banding together to support one another through the harrowing experience. In New South Wales alone, for example, there are more than 70,000 unpaid rural fire service volunteers. And thousan

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Get children into the real world for effective bushfire education

Children and young people have been deeply impacted by the current bushfire crisis. Schools have been destroyed and thousands of houses have burnt down. Hazardous air pollution is causing major public health concerns and the devastating impacts on animals and wildlife is leading to emotional distress.

6h

New research finds Earth's oldest asteroid strike linked to 'big thaw'

Curtin University scientists have discovered Earth's oldest asteroid strike occurred at Yarrabubba, in outback Western Australia, and coincided with the end of a global deep freeze known as a Snowball Earth. The research, published in the leading journal Nature Communications, used isotopic analysis of minerals to calculate the precise age of the Yarrabubba crater for the first time, putting it at

6h

Fighting microbes with microbes

Researchers studying the effects associated to the consumption of antibiotics discover a bacterium that has a super protective effect, able to reduce the risk of acquiring infections.

6h

Regeringen under pres: Indfør bæredygtighedskrav i byggeriet

PLUS. Det skal ikke være op til den enkelte bygherre, om man vil bygge bæredygtigt, mener både SF, Alternativet og Enhedslisten, mens Radikale, DF og Venstre også er klar til at indføre obligatoriske krav, hvis byggebranchen er klar

6h

Professor: UFOs May Be Time-Traveling Humans From the Future

Aliens Are Us A new book suggests that scientists take a closer look at a seemingly bizarre idea: that it's not extraterrestrials piloting UFOs , but time-traveling humans from the future. "We know we're here. We know humans exist. We know that we've had a long evolutionary history on this planet. And we know our technology is going to be more advanced in the future," author Michael Masters, a pr

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6h

The riddle of the heavenly bursts

This cosmic lightning storm is happening all around us. Somewhere in the earthly sky, there is a pulse that flashes and extinguishes in the next moment. These bursts, which must be measured with radio telescopes and last one thousandth of a second, are one of the greatest mysteries of astrophysics. Scientists doubt that militant aliens are fighting "Star Wars" in the vastness of space. But where d

6h

Picosecond magnetization dynamics of spin modes revealed by diffractive ferromagnetic resonance

As nanoelectronics encounters fundamental barriers, the spin of an electron, in addition to its charge, is being utilized to carry information in electronic devices. This calls for new characterization and detection methods of spin modes in complex magnetic structures. Present techniques measure either material properties on the nanometer length scale or on the picosecond time scale, however, both

6h

Young people feel there are fewer opportunities for them to get involved in sports

New year, new you, or so everyone says. Will 2020 be your year thanks to a change in diet or maybe a new exercise regimen?

6h

Neutron source enables a look inside dino eggs

Did the chicks of dinosaurs from the group oviraptorid hatch from their eggs at the same time? This question can be answered by the length and arrangement of the embryo's bones, which provide information about the stage of development. But how do you look inside fossilized dinosaur eggs? Paleontologists from the University of Bonn used the neutron source of the Technical University of Munich at th

6h

Study investigates enhancements in the superconductivity of electronic nematic systems

High-temperature superconductors, materials that become superconducting at unusually high temperatures, are key components of a variety of technological tools, including MRI machines and particle accelerators. Recently, physicists have observed that the two families of known high-temperature superconductors—copper- and iron-based compounds—both exhibit a unique phenomenon in which electronic degre

6h

Burkina Faso study shows link between land degradation and migration

In the Sahel of West Africa—which covers Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger and Chad—land degradation has led to migration towards less densely populated and more fertile areas. The land has been made less fertile by demographic pressure, fragmenting agricultural units and rainfall variability.

6h

Multivariate patterning of human pluripotent cells reveals induced paracrine factors in kidney organoid development

Bioengineers have shown great promise in creating complex multicellular kidney organoids (tiny, self-organized tissues) in the lab using pluripotent stem cells . They can further improve the procedure for different outcomes, including patterning and maturation of specific cell types, although such experiments are limited by standard tissue culture approaches. Now writing in Science Advances, Nick

6h

Your body clock affects how anti-inflammation drugs work after surgery

Circadian clock genes have a lot to do with how we heal after surgery, a new study shows. The researchers demonstrated that anti-inflammatory medications are most effective in promoting postoperative healing and recovery when patients take them during the active periods of their biological clocks. The study also suggests that if patients take anti-inflammatories either in the afternoon or at nigh

6h

Neutron source enables a look inside dino eggs

Did the chicks of dinosaurs from the group oviraptorid hatch from their eggs at the same time? This question can be answered by the length and arrangement of the embryo's bones, which provide information about the stage of development. But how do you look inside fossilized dinosaur eggs? Paleontologists from the University of Bonn used the neutron source of the Technical University of Munich at th

6h

Multivariate patterning of human pluripotent cells reveals induced paracrine factors in kidney organoid development

Bioengineers have shown great promise in creating complex multicellular kidney organoids (tiny, self-organized tissues) in the lab using pluripotent stem cells . They can further improve the procedure for different outcomes, including patterning and maturation of specific cell types, although such experiments are limited by standard tissue culture approaches. Now writing in Science Advances, Nick

6h

Senator: Climate Change Is Fake. Also, Let's Terraform New Worlds

Fascinating Interpretation According to U.S. Senator Rand Paul, fears of climate change are overblown — but we should also venture out and drastically change the environments of other planets so humanity might settle them. Paul tweeted his bizarre stance ­on Sunday, after he attempted to roast Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over her aggressive plans to fight climate change, a move which,

6h

Blood test can predict when women will have their last period

A blood test can predict if some women are likely to have their last period in the next year. It may be useful for those considering surgery for painful periods

6h

Most rehabilitating sea turtles with infectious tumors don't survive

Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is the most significant infectious disease affecting sea turtle populations worldwide. FB leads to tumors on the turtles' eyes, flippers and internal organs and is widespread in warmer climates like Florida. A large-scale study evaluated tumor score, removal and regrowth in rehabilitating green sea turtles with FP in the southeastern US from 2009 to 2017, and found that 75

6h

Hope for patients with a rare genetic condition linked to severe infections

A research team sheds light on the mechanisms underlying chronic granulomatous disease.

6h

A roadmap for adding ivermectin to the malaria toolbox

A group of experts led by Regina Rabinovich and Carlos Chaccour from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) has published a roadmap to evaluate — and subsequently implement — ivermectin as a complementary vector control tool against malaria. The Ivermectin Roadmap, published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, includes a foreword signed by Nobel laureate Willi

6h

Blood tests can predict timing of final menstrual period

Blood tests could replace menstrual periods as a gauge for when a women is nearing menopause, according to new research published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

6h

Inspiring STEM careers through a hands-on Everglades microbiome study

The Florida Everglades evokes images of fanboats skimming over swamps, while alligators peer through the waters and clouds of insects hover just above. Described as a "river of grass" that stretches some 580,000 square miles across southern Florida, they encompass a wide range of ecosystems ranging from wetlands to tree islands to cattails.

6h

General relativity used to find optimal airplane boarding speed

A team of researchers from Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Riga Technical University and Ben-Gurion University has created a mathematical model that can be used to predict boarding times for airplanes based on the boarding speed of individual passengers. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review E, the group describes using Lorentzian geometry to create their model, an

6h

Opening the Lid on Sarepta's Drug Approvals

Let's talk Sarepta. And FDA approval, because you can't bring up that company without immediately starting a regulatory affairs argument. I was not happy when their initial exon-skipping therapy (Exondys, eteplirsen) for Duchenne muscular dystrophy was approved in 2016, because I thought that the efficacy data were simply not strong enough for such approval. Last summer, another exon-skipping app

6h

Ancient Proteins Reveal 6,000-year-old Ring Was Made From Deer Antler or Bone

The discovery is latest success in a method that's revolutionizing archaeology and paleontology.

6h

Warm-blooded crocs thrived in Jurassic cold snap

They are revered throughout nature as chilling predators … now research shows crocodiles have not always been the cold-blooded creatures they are today.

6h

Mathematician simplifies methods for solving equations of magnetic hydrodynamics

A mathematician from RUDN University has found a new criterion for the regularity of generalized solutions of the equations of magnetic hydrodynamics for an incompressible fluid in three-dimensional space. The use of this criterion simplifies the search for solutions to such equations and can help metallurgists to model the behavior of molten metal, as well as astrophysicists to describe stellar p

6h

We know how to teach reading—why aren't students getting better at it?

Literacy is a problem in our nation's schools. A big one.

6h

NASA sounding rocket observing nitric oxide in polar night

Aurora, also known as the northern lights, are a sight to behold as they dance across the sky when solar winds collide with the Earth's atmosphere.

6h

Melting reveals drug targets in a living organism

Developing new medicines and understanding how they target specific organs often gives a crucial advantage in the fight against human diseases. An international team led by researchers at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory and Cellzome, a GSK company, has developed a technology to systematically identify drug targets in living animals. In their results, published in Nature Biotechnology on

6h

These camera-equipped dog goggles keep special-forces canines connected to their handlers

Fusil and his goggles. (T&S Concepts/) When Thomas was a special forces dog handler in the gendarmerie —a French militarized police force—he found it worrisome when he lost sight of his canine, Fusil. The pooch was trained to follow a laser beam that allows the handler to point to objects or places that are far away, and to work at night or other low-light conditions. But when the dog went out of

6h

Melting reveals drug targets in a living organism

Developing new medicines and understanding how they target specific organs often gives a crucial advantage in the fight against human diseases. An international team led by researchers at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory and Cellzome, a GSK company, has developed a technology to systematically identify drug targets in living animals. In their results, published in Nature Biotechnology on

6h

Ranging behavior found to impact motor self-regulation in free-range chickens

A team of researchers from Yncréa Hauts-de-France and Université de Tours, has found that the ranging behavior of free-range chickens can impact their motor self-regulation. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of free-range chicken personality and how it impacted their impulse control.

6h

Ranging behavior found to impact motor self-regulation in free-range chickens

A team of researchers from Yncréa Hauts-de-France and Université de Tours, has found that the ranging behavior of free-range chickens can impact their motor self-regulation. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of free-range chicken personality and how it impacted their impulse control.

6h

Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant

Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). This finding could open a new dimension in the application of artificial machines fabricated from biomolecular motors and other proteins.

6h

The yellow black-faced triplefin deflects sunlight to break predator camouflage

Small fish use light for active sensing to detect potential predators. The yellow black-faced triplefin (Tripterygion delaisi) can reflect downwelling sunlight sideways with its iris, illuminating its immediate surroundings. A team headed by Professor Nico Michiels from the Institute of Evolution and Ecology at the University of Tübingen has now shown that the fish actively reflects light to locat

6h

Increased inbreeding in thoroughbreds may compromise future sustainability of breed

Inbreeding in the global thoroughbred population has risen significantly over the last 45 years and if left unchecked may compromise the future sustainability of the breed, according to research published in Scientific Reports.

6h

Creating and observing current vortices in 2-D materials

Researchers at the University of Chicago and the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have developed a new method to measure how photocurrents flow in a 2-D material—a result that could have implications for developing quantum sensors and next-generation electronics.

6h

New report unveils key insights into business models that put people and planet first

A University of York academic has co-authored a major report which advocates creating business models that are focused on benefiting society and the planet.

6h

This Indie Horror Game Made Me Confront My Fear of Death

The Space Between expertly plays with connections between intimacy and the human body.

7h

Physicists trap light in nanoresonators for record time

An international team of Russian, Australian and Korean researchers have experimentally trapped an electromagnetic wave in a gallium arsenide nanoresonator for a record-breaking time, over 200 periods of one wave oscillation. The trap has also been tested as a basis for a light frequency nanoconverter. The results were published in Science. Researchers anticipate drastically new opportunities for

7h

Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant

Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). This finding could open a new dimension in the application of artificial machines fabricated from biomolecular motors and other proteins.

7h

The yellow black-faced triplefin deflects sunlight to break predator camouflage

Small fish use light for active sensing to detect potential predators. The yellow black-faced triplefin (Tripterygion delaisi) can reflect downwelling sunlight sideways with its iris, illuminating its immediate surroundings. A team headed by Professor Nico Michiels from the Institute of Evolution and Ecology at the University of Tübingen has now shown that the fish actively reflects light to locat

7h

Increased inbreeding in thoroughbreds may compromise future sustainability of breed

Inbreeding in the global thoroughbred population has risen significantly over the last 45 years and if left unchecked may compromise the future sustainability of the breed, according to research published in Scientific Reports.

7h

Everyday Mathematics, Drugs for a Broken Heart and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Gravitational wave echoes may confirm Stephen Hawking's hypothesis of quantum black holes

Echoes in gravitational wave signals suggest that the event horizon of a black hole may be more complicated than scientists currently think.

7h

New study debunks notion that salt consumption contributes to weight loss

Researchers found that reducing sodium intake in adults with elevated blood pressure or hypertension decreased thirst, urine volume and blood pressure, but did not affect metabolic energy needs. These results support the traditional notion that decreasing sodium intake is critical to managing hypertension — disputing recent studies.

7h

First two nature-based water retention measures are operational in Hungary

Increasingly extreme temperature, hydrology, or other meteorological phenomena are some of the most widely predicted impacts of climate change. This applies to Hungary as well, where rainfall is already limited (potential evapotranspiration exceeds precipitation throughout most of the country), and climate models predict a more unbalanced distribution of precipitation for the next decades to come.

7h

Self-moisturizing smart contact lenses

Researchers at Tohoku University have developed a new type of smart contact lenses that can prevent dry eyes. The self-moisturizing system, which is described in the journal Advanced Materials Technologies, maintains a layer of fluid between the contact lens and the eye using a novel mechanism.

7h

New X-ray method has 'profound implications' for the development of lifesaving drugs

Proteins that contain metal, known as metalloproteins, play important roles in biology, regulating various pathways in the body, which often become targets for lifesaving drugs. While the amount of metal in such proteins is usually tiny, it is crucial to determining the function of these complex molecules.

7h

Growing up in a 'bank desert' has major costs

People who are exposed to banks and other financial institutions as kids are more likely to be financially stable later in life, new research from CU Boulder's Leeds School of Business shows. People without that exposure can expect to face some serious costs.

7h

Grades could give old electric car batteries a 'second life'

A new grading system could pave the way for reusing Electric Vehicle Lithium Ion batteries for domestic and industrial use, researchers report. Once EV batteries have fulfilled their life-span for automotive applications, the manufacturer usually recycles them. Many automotive Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries, however, have enough life left in them after scrapping the car for "second-life" uses. To

7h

Determining the atomic structure of natural products more rapidly and accurately

Many drugs are derived from natural products. But before natural products can be exploited, chemists must first determine their structure and stereochemistry. This can be a major challenge, particularly when the molecules cannot be crystallized and contain only few hydrogen atoms. A new NMR-based method, developed at the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP), now simplifies

7h

Air pollution in New York City linked to wildfires hundreds of miles away

A new study shows that air pollutants from the smoke of fires from as far as Canada and the southeastern U.S. traveled hundreds of miles and several days to reach Connecticut and New York City, where it caused significant increases in pollution concentrations.

7h

Mixing the unmixable: A novel approach to efficiently fusing different polymers

Cross-linked polymers are structures in which large molecular chains are linked together, conferring exceptional mechanical properties and chemical resistance to the final product. However, their modification is not easy. Now, scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a method that allows the fusion of different polymers together easily, allowing the precise tuning of the properti

7h

New X-ray method has 'profound implications' for the development of lifesaving drugs

Proteins that contain metal, known as metalloproteins, play important roles in biology, regulating various pathways in the body, which often become targets for lifesaving drugs. While the amount of metal in such proteins is usually tiny, it is crucial to determining the function of these complex molecules.

7h

Could Psychopaths Have a Cerebral Advantage ?

submitted by /u/smallpocketlibrary [link] [comments]

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Could Psychopaths Have a Cerebral Advantage ?

submitted by /u/smallpocketlibrary [link] [comments]

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Alarm over China virus, extreme Arctic warming and a volcano on alert

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00109-1 The latest science news, in brief.

7h

The night markets of Mellador

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03935-0 A taste not to be forgotten.

7h

General Motors fremviser første selvkørende delebil

Et samarbejde mellem amerikanske General Motors og japanske Honda, har netop præsenteret et nyt køretøj helt uden pedaler og rat. Det er elektrisk, kan køre dag og nat og holde til 1,6 mio. km.

7h

Urine reuse as fertilizer is not likely to transfer antibiotic resistance

Urine is a goldmine of useful substances that can be captured and converted into products such as fertilizer. However, going 'green' with urine carries some potential risks. For instance, DNA released from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in urine could transfer resistance to other organisms at the site where the fertilizer is used. Now, research published in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology (

7h

A heart-healthy protein from bran of cereal crop

Foxtail millet is an annual grass grown widely as a cereal crop in parts of India, China and Southeast Asia. Milling the grain removes the hard outer layer, or bran, from the rest of the seed. Now, researchers have identified a protein in this bran that can help stave off atherosclerosis in mice genetically prone to the disease. They report their results in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Ch

7h

Air pollution in New York City linked to wildfires hundreds of miles away

A new study shows that air pollutants from the smoke of fires from as far as Canada and the southeastern US traveled hundreds of miles and several days to reach Connecticut and New York City, where it caused significant increases in pollution concentrations.

7h

Missing piece to urban air quality puzzle

Air quality models have long failed to accurately predict atmospheric levels of secondary organic aerosol, which comprises a substantial fraction of the fine particulate matter in cities. But researchers have found a missing source of emissions that may explain roughly half of that SOA, closing much of the model-measurement gap.

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Food allergies may be on the rise because babies start solids too late

Giving babies potentially allergenic foods early on may reduce the risk of allergies – but many parents don't as that conflicts with advice to breastfeed until six months

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Black Cumin – Be Skeptical

The claims made for black cumin follow a familiar pattern – implausible and a lack of evidence.

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Undervisning i naturen väcker intresse för biologisk mångfald

Barn och unga vistas allt mindre i naturmiljöer. Men elever som med egna sinnen får upptäcka och bekanta sig med träd och växter i en autentisk miljö utvecklar förståelse för biologisk mångfald och människans påverkan på miljön, visar en avhandling vid Göteborgs universitet. Margaretha Häggström, doktorand inom pedagogiskt arbete har bland annat studerat två skolklasser på låg- och mellanstadiet

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Storbolag större hot än storebror

Varannan svensk anser att de globala plattformsbolagens datainsamling av vad vi gör online utgör ett större hot mot den personliga integriteten än samhällets behov av datainsamling. Det visar resultatet av en landsomfattande undersökning. – Redan med boken 1984 förutspåddes och problematiserades samhällets övervakning av individen och kollektivet. Men när vi nu i dag lever med insamling av vår pe

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Glutamat reglerar hjärnsignaler på flera olika sätt

Glutamat är den signalsubstans som finns i störst mängd i våra hjärnor, och påverkar en stort antal funktioner. Forskare har nu lyckats mäta exakta antalet molekyler glutamat i omlopp – när en signal överförs mellan två hjärnceller. Något som kan öka kunskapen om till exempel neurologiska sjukdomar, vårt minne och vår aptit. Det är forskare på Chalmers och Göteborgs universitet som gjort det som

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What Critics Are Looking Forward to at Sundance 2020

With Oscar nominations out and the awards season drawing to a close, the moviemaking industry will descend on Park City, Utah, on January 23 for the Sundance Film Festival. Although the event is dominated by independent film rather than by studio heavyweights or middle-of-the-road awards contenders, it usually manages to set the tone for the year. Beyond producing surprise box-office hits, such a

7h

SpaceX saves mannequins from fireball. Next up, astronauts.

The SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule survived a planned abort test on Sunday. (Jim Bridenstine/NASA/Twitter/) When the Falcon 9 rocket burst apart into a puff of flame and white smoke on Sunday, the Crew Dragon capsule soared unscathed above it. The explosion would have come as a setback during normal flight operations, but for this intentional safety test, events could not have played out more smoothl

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Image of the Day: Farming Ants

Evolution imbued ants with an agriculture strategy that optimizes food rewards.

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Cats, Once YouTube Stars, Are Now an 'Emerging Audience'

They're addicted to channels like Little Kitty & Family, Handsome Nature, and Videos for Your Cat—provided their owners switch on the iPad first.

8h

The Next Campaign Text You Get May Be From a Friend

Apps for relational organizing—which use personal connections to get out the vote—are the latest political tech arms race. So far, Democrats have the edge.

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Best Amazon Echo and Alexa Speakers (2020): Which Models Are Best?

Here are our favorite speakers from Amazon and its partners, including the Echo Dot, Sonos One, and more.

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A heart-healthy protein from bran of cereal crop

Foxtail millet is an annual grass grown widely as a cereal crop in parts of India, China and Southeast Asia. Milling the grain removes the hard outer layer, or bran, from the rest of the seed. Now, researchers have identified a protein in this bran that can help stave off atherosclerosis in mice genetically prone to the disease. They report their results in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Ch

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A heart-healthy protein from bran of cereal crop

Foxtail millet is an annual grass grown widely as a cereal crop in parts of India, China and Southeast Asia. Milling the grain removes the hard outer layer, or bran, from the rest of the seed. Now, researchers have identified a protein in this bran that can help stave off atherosclerosis in mice genetically prone to the disease. They report their results in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Ch

8h

Fish-Eating Rat Discovered in Peru

Originally published in July 1893 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Male fertility after chemotherapy: New questions raised

Professor Delbès, who specializes in reproductive toxicology, conducted a pilot study in collaboration with oncologists and fertility specialists from the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) on a cohort of 13 patients, all survivors of pediatric leukemia and lymphoma. Their results, recently published in the journal Plos One, raise important questions about male fertility and the long-term qual

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Fish-Eating Rat Discovered in Peru

Originally published in July 1893 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Matter of Facts

W ith much fanfare , The New York Times Magazine devoted an entire issue in August to what it called the 1619 Project. The project's aim, the magazine announced, was to reinterpret the entirety of American history. "Our democracy's founding ideals," its lead essay proclaimed, "were false when they were written." Our history as a nation rests on slavery and white supremacy, whose existence made a

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Calling an Illness "Psychosomatic" Doesn't Mean It's Imaginary

Recent experiments have begun mapping the neuronal connections between mind and body like never before — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Release the Kratom: Inside America's Hottest New Drug Culture

Many use kratom to quit opioids; others just want to get high. There's a push to regulate the plant-derived drug—but experts disagree on its safety.

9h

Laser Headlights Can Make Roads Brighter—and Cars Smarter

The new lamps in BMW's M5 are more precise and efficient than their predecessors, and could someday broadcast data.

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Microsoft Looms Over the Privacy Debate in Its Home State

The software company helped torpedo a facial recognition bill last year, though a state senator—who's also a Microsoft program manager—has a new bill in the works.

9h

Boeing: 737 Max flyver næppe før til sommer

Tidligere har flyproducenten vurderet, at flyet kunne indfases fra januar i år. Men det synes urealistisk nu, lyder det i opdatering til flyselskaberne.

9h

Organisation: Politiet reagerer for langsomt når danskere krænkes seksuelt på nettet

Flere og flere oplever at få deres profiler på sociale medier hacket. Hackerne bruger billeder og samtaler til at afpresse profilens ejer til at sende krænkende billeder. Ifølge Digitalt Ansvar skal politiet reagere hurtigere.

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Calling an Illness "Psychosomatic" Doesn't Mean It's Imaginary

Recent experiments have begun mapping the neuronal connections between mind and body like never before — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pop Culture's Rate of Change May Mirror Organic Evolution

A new study finds that music and some other human phenomena have altered at a pace comparable to that of animals such as Darwin's finches — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Svensk flyskam er slået fast: Ni procent færre indenrigspassagerer sidste år

PLUS. Samlet fløj 3,5 procent færre svenskere i forhold til 2018. Samme udvikling er endnu ikke slået fast i Danmark, men der er begyndende tegn på opbrud.

9h

China warns push to contain virus is at critical stage

Public transport to be suspended in city at centre of Sars-like disease outbreak

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Pop Culture's Rate of Change May Mirror Organic Evolution

A new study finds that music and some other human phenomena have altered at a pace comparable to that of animals such as Darwin's finches — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Regioner om OK21: Lægens honorar skal gøres mere differentieret og fast

Den praktiserende læges honorering skal i endnu højere grad gøres differentieret og mindre ydelsesafhængig, end tilfældet er i dag. Sådan lyder en af de bærende pointer i regionernes oplæg til overenskomstforhandlingerne med PLO, der blev skudt i gang i denne uge.

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GM's Cruise heads down new road with new robotaxi concept

submitted by /u/drunkles [link] [comments]

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SpaceX's Crew Dragon Abort System Delivers a Flawless Victory

submitted by /u/drunk69 [link] [comments]

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These Tiny Nuclear Power Stations Could Be, Well, Huge

submitted by /u/drunkles [link] [comments]

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By developing the ability to deal with the climate crisis we make terraforming Venus far easier.

Venus has one main problem, and that is too much co2 in its atmosphere which traps heat and creates unviable surface conditions. As we learn the techniques and necessary chemistry of co2 sequestration it will also teach us what we need to know to create a second Earth in Venus. submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

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When Black Mirror's Arkangel technology becomes reality

submitted by /u/lonnib [link] [comments]

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Defending Trump Is a Has-Been's Best Hope

Mark Wilson / Getty Trace the careers of Alan Dershowitz and Ken Starr, both of whom joined Donald Trump's impeachment team last week, and you notice a similar arc. As young men, each rapidly ascended to the upper echelons of the legal profession. At age 28, Dershowitz became the youngest tenured professor in the history of Harvard Law School. At age 37, Starr was appointed to the Court of Appeal

9h

The chemists policing Earth's atmosphere for rogue pollution

Nature, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00110-8 These researchers tracked down mysterious sources of ozone-destroying chemicals in China and guard the planet against future illicit emissions.

9h

The Necessity of the Indian Child Welfare Act

Congress today has substantial and sweeping powers over Native nations and Native people, including the authority to abolish tribes and tribal reservations, and to expand or restrict tribal authority. These powers come from a series of Supreme Court decisions in the late 1800s and early 1900s that were based on racist views about American Indians—that Congress needed virtually unlimited authority

9h

Cultural accommodation: How to navigate societal diversity

While it is good to recognize societal diversity, it is difficult to argue in favor of creating cultural accommodations to preserve and protect specific groups. Creating protections for people who belong to certain traditions can result in the creation of cultures that did not previously exist. The challenge would be to find a way to provide protections that are not too explicit while also being

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Has reproducibility improved? Introducing the Transparency and Rigor Index

Some Retraction Watch readers may recall that back in 2012, we called, in The Scientist, for the creation of a Transparency Index. Over the years, we've had occasional interest from others in that concept, and some good critiques, but we noted at the time that we did not have the bandwidth to create it ourselves. … Continue reading

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Sundhedsminister lover sundhedsaftale inden folketingsvalg i 2023

Sundheds- og ældreminister Magnus Heunicke (S) opfordrer KL og regionerne til at mødes konstruktivt i forhandlinger. Han vil ikke sætte en dato på en politisk sundhedsaftale.

10h

Tyske forskere: Vores mad tærer på kloden – men vi har løsningen

PLUS. Det nuværende fødevaresystem kan kun brødføde omkring 3,4 milliarder mennesker uden at tære på klodens miljømæssige kapital. Men det er muligt at omlægge den globale fødevareproduktion, så 10 milliarder mennesker kan få mad og drikke, uden at klima- og miljømæssig påvirkning af kloden.

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As New Virus Spreads From China, Scientists See Grim Reminders

Epidemics of related viruses, like SARS, killed hundreds. Now the World Health Organization must decide whether to declare another global health emergency.

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Euroimmun founder Stöcker: "essential message is beyond any question"

Euroimmun founder Winfried Stöcker replies to criticism of his company's publications: "Dr. Elisabeth Bik's observations are not suitable to bring us into disrepute."

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Balansen mellan dopamin och serotonin påverkar social fobi

Det kan vara balansen mellan signalsubstanserna serotonin och dopamin i hjärnan som påverkar om en person utvecklar social fobi. Tidigare har forskning i huvudsak fokuserat på serotonin- eller dopaminsystemen var för sig. Nu kan forskare vid Uppsala universitet visa att det finns en koppling mellan signalsubstanserna. – Vi ser att det finns en annan balans mellan serotonin- och dopamintransport h

10h

Folketinget opruster værn mod cyberangreb

Flere nye tiltag skal sikre, at Folketinget ikke lige så let bliver ramt af cyberangreb. Det drejer sig blandt om, at partierne nu vil advare hinanden, hvis de bliver udsat for hacking eller it-kriminalitet.

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Komplex smärta vid höftoperation kräver individuell lindring

Höftledsoperationer är vanliga och sker idag nästan enligt en löpande band-princip. Men i detta missas ofta det individuella behovet av smärtlindring. Ny avhandling visar att brist på individuellt anpassad smärtlindring riskerar att orsaka onödigt lidande.

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Coronavirus outbreak: what we know so far

Experts expect number of confirmed cases to rise as deadly disease spreads from China

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Coronavirus: Heathrow to screen arrivals from affected Chinese region

Health team including doctor will meet those travelling from Wuhan as cases estimated at 4,000 Have you encountered any precautionary measures? People arriving at Heathrow airport from the Chinese city at the centre of a coronavirus outbreak will be met by health teams including a doctor, the government has announced, as UK infectious disease experts doubled their estimate of the likely number of

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New tool for investigating brain cells, Parkinson's, and more

Researchers have created a new chemical tool for revealing how specific types of brain cell receptors function in the brain. It's an important step forward for studying Alzheimer's, epilepsy, stroke, and even Parkinson's disease.

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Sticky antibiotic provides glue for successful treatment

Researchers have found how an antibiotic used to treat a debilitating gut infection stays put inside the body giving it time to effectively treat the problem, a discovery that will pave the way for the development of more effective antibiotic treatments to fight superbugs.

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Prenatal dietary supplements influence the infant airway microbiota in a randomized factorial clinical trial

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14308-x Here, the authors present the results of a mother–child cohort randomized clinical trial of n-3 LCPUFA and vitamin D maternal supplementation, finding an association between supplement-induced microbiota changes in infant airways at age 1-month but not the infant fecal or maternal vaginal microbiome.

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Diameter-independent skyrmion Hall angle observed in chiral magnetic multilayers

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14232-9 Magnetic skyrmions are promising objects for future spintronic devices. However, a better understanding of their dynamics is required. Here, the authors show that in contrast to predictions the skyrmion Hall angle is independent of their diameter and motion is dominated by disorder and skyrmion-skyrmion inter

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Attosecond optoelectronic field measurement in solids

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14268-x Characterization of light pulses is important in order to understand their interaction with matter. Here the authors demonstrate a nonlinear photoconductive sampling method to measure electric field wave-forms in the infrared, visible and ultraviolet spectral ranges.

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Persistent activation of central amygdala CRF neurons helps drive the immediate fear extinction deficit

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14393-y Learned conditioned fear associations can be weakened (extinction learning), but extinction is less effective if performed too soon after the original fear conditioning. Here, the authors show that persistent activation of CRF-expressing neurons in the central amygdala is involved in the early fear extinction

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Environmental arginine controls multinuclear giant cell metabolism and formation

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14285-1 Multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) are important in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Here, the authors demonstrate that extracellular presence of the amino acid arginine is required for MGC formation and metabolism, suggesting a translational impact for strategies utilizing systemic arginine depletion in

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The negative cofactor 2 complex is a key regulator of drug resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14191-1 Resistance to primary treatments of invasive aspergillosis is growing. Here, the authors generate a knockout library for 484 transcription factors in Aspergillus fumigatus, and show that loss of the NCT complex leads to cross-resistance to all primary and some salvage therapeutics without affecting pathogenic

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No detectable Weddell Sea Antarctic Bottom Water export during the Last and Penultimate Glacial Maximum

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14302-3 The Southern Ocean plays a key role in glacial-interglacial transitions and today, Weddell Sea derived Antarctic Bottom Water is one of the most important deep water masses. New records show that in contrast to today, no Weddell Sea water was exported during the last two glacial maxima, providing new insights

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Structural basis of subtype-selective competitive antagonism for GluN2C/2D-containing NMDA receptors

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14321-0 Selectively inhibiting N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) containing the GluN2C/2D subunits has been challenging. Here, using electrophysiology and X-ray crystallography, authors show that compounds UBP791 and UBP1700 show over 40- and 50-fold selectivity for GluN2C/2D compared to GluN2A.

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The antibiotic vancomycin induces complexation and aggregation of gastrointestinal and submaxillary mucins

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57776-3

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3D sub-pixel correlation length imaging

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57988-7

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A Common Practice of Widespread Antimicrobial Use in Horse Production Promotes Multi-Drug Resistance

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57479-9

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AMPA receptor-mTORC1 signaling activation is required for neuroplastic effects of LY341495 in rat hippocampal neurons

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58017-3

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Measuring the spatial heterogeneity on the reduction of vaginal fistula burden in Ethiopia between 2005 and 2016

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58036-0

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Study of Soil Seed Banks in Ex-closures for Restoration of Degraded Lands in the Central Rift Valley of Ethiopia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57651-1

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3D printed mold leachates in PDMS microfluidic devices

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57816-y

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Alterations in the innate immune system due to exhausting exercise in intensively trained rats

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57783-4

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The poo panacea: inside the strange, surprising world of faecal transplants

When treating antibiotic-resistant infections, injecting patients with other people's excrement can be highly effective. Could it be the answer to dementia, anorexia and obesity too? The man and woman are wearing blue hospital gowns and clear face shields. Dr James Sones and Dr Indu Srinivasan are in a room in the Division of Digestive Diseases at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in J

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Forskere: DR's og Folketingets hjemmesider er på kant med persondataloven

Det kan være meget svært at undgå cookies – selv på hjemmesider, som er betalt af det offentlige.

10h

When Exercise Comes to the Hospital's Intensive Care Unit

While intensive care in hospitals has improved dramatically over the decades, there is now a broad recognition that survivors are not walking away unscarred. New research suggests that some patients might benefit from less sedation and more movement and exercise, starting early into their stay.

10h

American Journalist Is Arrested in Indonesia Over Visa Issue

The editor, Philip Jacobson, who works for the environmental website Mongabay, was detained last month after attending a public meeting on Borneo island. He was traveling on a business visa.

11h

Dansk mikrofon lytter gennem vindstød

PLUS. Danske GN har udviklet en følsom mikrofon, der fanger lyde og bevægelser hos ekstremsportsudøvere som paragliders og BMX-ryttere, selv i høj fart og hård vind.

11h

Reducing dangerous swelling in traumatic brain injury

After a traumatic brain injury (TBI), the most harmful damage is caused by secondary swelling of the brain compressed inside the skull. There is no treatment. In new research, scientists significantly reduced brain swelling and damage after a TBI by injecting nanoparticles into the bloodstream within two hours after the injury in a preclinical study. 'We believe this may provide the first real tre

11h

Stephen O'Rahilly (Cambridge) 2: Why Does Obesity Lead to Adverse Health Outcomes?

https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/obesity Dr. Stephen O'Rahilly provides a biomedical perspective of obesity, and evaluates which genes could potentially shift the balance towards obesity. Easy access to nutrients has contributed to the increase in obesity in the human population. But, what is obesity and why isn't everybody fat? Dr. Stephen O'Rahilly provides a biomedical perspective of obe

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Stephen O'Rahilly (Cambridge) 1: The Causes of Obesity: Why Isn't everybody fat?

https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/obesity Dr. Stephen O'Rahilly provides a biomedical perspective of obesity, and evaluates which genes could potentially shift the balance towards obesity. Easy access to nutrients has contributed to the increase in obesity in the human population. But, what is obesity and why isn't everybody fat? Dr. Stephen O'Rahilly provides a biomedical perspective of obe

12h

Coronavirus: airports around the world carry out screenings

More countries are carrying out health checks after the virus was detected outside China Countries in Asia and elsewhere are checking the body temperatures of arriving airline passengers and adopting precautionary quarantine procedures in response to a new coronavirus that has sickened nearly 300 people in China. Continue reading…

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Chinese Authorities Cut Off Transportation From Wuhan, Center of Coronavirus Outbreak

A senior health official warned that the annual Spring Festival holiday travel rush would complicate efforts to contain the outbreak, as the official death toll nearly doubled.

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Novel software tool extracts important chemical exposure data

Southwest Research Institute is introducing Floodlight, a novel software tool that efficiently discovers the vast numbers of chemical components—previously known and unknown—present in the food, air, drugs and products we are exposed to every day. This cheminformatics machine learning tool integrates algorithms with analytical chemistry software to provide deep analysis of gas chromatography mass

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Policymakers join experts at the European Parliament for radioligand therapy report launch

Ahead of the European Commission's official launch of 'Europe's Beating Cancer Plan', The Health Policy Partnership and an expert-led steering committee met at the European Parliament in Brussels today to launch a new report, Radioligand therapy: realising the potential of targeted cancer care.

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US is polarizing faster than other democracies, study finds

Political polarization among Americans has grown rapidly in the last 40 years—more than in Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia or Germany—a phenomenon possibly due to increased racial division, the rise of partisan cable news and changes in the composition of the Democratic and Republican parties.

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Researchers test cells with silicon anodes, alumina coatings that protect cathodes

The process of developing better rechargeable batteries may be cloudy, but there's an alumina lining.

12h

Sustainability strategies more successful when managers believe in them

New research from Cass Business School has found that business sustainability strategies can succeed alongside mainstream competitive strategies when managers believe in them.

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Neanderthals may have climbed an active volcano soon after it erupted

Footprints on an extinct Italian volcano suggest ancient humans were regular visitors, and the shapes of the tracks point to the identity of the trackmakers

12h

Caterpillar loss in tropical forest linked to extreme rain, temperature events

Using a 22-year dataset of plant-caterpillar-parasitoid interactions collected within a patch of protected Costa Rican lowland Caribbean forest, scientists report declines in caterpillar and parasitoid diversity and density that are paralleled by losses in an important ecosystem service: biocontrol of herbivores by parasitoids.

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Caterpillar loss in tropical forest linked to extreme rain, temperature events

Using a 22-year dataset of plant-caterpillar-parasitoid interactions collected within a patch of protected Costa Rican lowland Caribbean forest, scientists report declines in caterpillar and parasitoid diversity and density that are paralleled by losses in an important ecosystem service: biocontrol of herbivores by parasitoids.

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Urine fertilizer: 'Aging' effectively protects against transfer of antibiotic resistance

Recycled and aged human urine can be used as a fertilizer with low risks of transferring antibiotic resistant DNA to the environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan.

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Study reveals pre-Hispanic history, genetic changes among indigenous Mexican populations

As more and more large-scale human genome sequencing projects get completed, scientists have been able to trace with increasing confidence both the geographical movements and underlying genetic variation of human populations.

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Study reveals pre-Hispanic history, genetic changes among indigenous Mexican populations

As more and more large-scale human genome sequencing projects get completed, scientists have been able to trace with increasing confidence both the geographical movements and underlying genetic variation of human populations.

13h

Biologists recommend urgent action to protect California spotted owls

In the Pacific Northwest, the range expansion of Barred Owls has contributed to a conservation crisis for Northern Spotted Owls, which are being displaced from their old-growth forest habitat. How will this interaction between species play out in the Sierra Nevada, where Barred Owls are just starting to move into the range of the California Spotted Owl? New research published in The Condor: Ornith

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Biologists recommend urgent action to protect California spotted owls

In the Pacific Northwest, the range expansion of Barred Owls has contributed to a conservation crisis for Northern Spotted Owls, which are being displaced from their old-growth forest habitat. How will this interaction between species play out in the Sierra Nevada, where Barred Owls are just starting to move into the range of the California Spotted Owl? New research published in The Condor: Ornith

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Cardiorespiratory exercises linked to improved cognition – study

submitted by /u/webnaturalist001 [link] [comments]

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Neuroimaging shows that meditation changes the brain for the better

submitted by /u/HeinieKaboobler [link] [comments]

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'People can't learn about treatments they need': why open access to medical research matters

Campaigners have argued for open access to scientific research since the dawn of the internet – so why is it taking so long? In December 2002, a Belfast teenager made world headlines after his father, Don Simms, won him the legal right to access an experimental drug. Jonathan Simms had been diagnosed with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a cruel and fatal neurodegenerative condition that

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Study examines a new model for older adult wellness

Community-based wellness instructors can provide tailored wellness care to older adults, according to researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. A randomized controlled trial assessing whether community self-management with wellness coaching could improve participants' overall wellbeing was the foundation to outline the components of a new model of community-based wellness

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Hong Kong's Protesters Finally Have (Some) Power

HONG KONG—Prior to his second-ever district-council meeting last week, Napo Wong, elected just a couple of months ago, chatted with constituents who voiced concern for protesters arrested during recent demonstrations here. The residents who remembered Hong Kong's wildly corrupt police force of decades ago worried about what might be happening to demonstrators once they were loaded onto vans or de

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Sustainability strategies more successful when managers believe in them

New research from Cass Business School has found that business sustainability strategies can succeed alongside mainstream competitive strategies when managers believe in them.

15h

Program reduces narcotic prescriptions after surgery with over-the-counter pain medicine

Surgeons at Houston Methodist Hospital are stemming the tide of addiction to prescription opioids by managing patients' pain after surgery.

15h

Study reveals pre-Hispanic history, genetic changes among indigenous Mexican populations

To better understand the broad demographic history of pre-Hispanic Mexico and to search for signatures of adaptive evolution, scientists have sequenced the complete protein-coding regions of the genome, or exomes, of 78 individuals from five different indigenous groups from Northern (Rara?muri or Tarahumara, and Huichol), Central (Nahua), South (Triqui, or TRQ) and Southeast (Maya, or MYA) Mexico.

15h

Helping roadside soils bounce back after construction

Research shows tillage and vegetation can help alleviate compaction.

15h

Adults with pain at greater risk for cannabis use disorder, finds study

A new study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons found that non-medical cannabis use — including frequent or problematic use — is significantly more common in adults with pain than in those without pain.

15h

Urine fertilizer: 'Aging' effectively protects against transfer of antibiotic resistance

Recycled and aged human urine can be used as a fertilizer with low risks of transferring antibiotic resistant DNA to the environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan.

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Biologists recommend urgent action to protect California spotted owls

In the Pacific Northwest, the range expansion of barred owls has contributed to a conservation crisis for northern spotted owls, which are being displaced from their habitat. How will this interaction play out in the Sierra Nevada, where barred owls are starting to move into the range of the California spotted owl? New research suggests that wildlife managers may still be able to head off similar

15h

E-cigarette popularity on Instagram is still growing despite an FDA anti-vaping campaign

Despite a recent FDA awareness campaign about the hazards of vaping, promotional Instagram posts are 10,000-fold more prevalent than the FDA's #TheRealCost hashtag, shows a recent study. A deep learning analysis of vaping Instagram images further suggests that 70% contain devices and products that are popular among the youngest, beginner e-cigarette users.

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GM's Latest Has Sensors and Room for 6, but No Steering Wheel

Cruise reveals the Origin, its planned self-driving vehicle, meant to be shared by riders in a ride-hail service.

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Coronavirus: China unveils measures to rein in spread of 'mutating' disease

Wuhan, where the virus first emerged, put under tighter supervision as death toll climbs to nine Seventeen people have now died from the mysterious Sars-like coronavirus, Chinese authorities said on Wednesday, as the government unveiled measures to rein in the spread of the disease and advised residents of Wuhan not to leave the city. The figure, announced by the provincial government of the cent

16h

Advaret siden 1992: Aarhusiansk P-kælder-lukning afslører årtiers svigt i kommunen

PLUS. Mindst tre gange siden 1992 er Aarhus Kommune blevet advaret om, at parkeringskælderen under Aarhus Rutebilstation burde undersøges grundigt. Alligevel fik kommunen ikke undersøgt kælderen ordentligt. Det må ikke kunne ske, erkender ejendomschef, der lover opstramninger

16h

Advokat: Myndigheders formålsløse CPR-abonnementer er ulovlige

Myndigheder og virksomheder abonnerer i flæng på borgeres CPR-oplysninger uden noget åbenlyst formål. Og den praksis er umiddelbart ulovlig, vurderer en dansk advokat.

16h

Japan is latest country to build its own 'space defence' force.

submitted by /u/Aeromarine_eng [link] [comments]

17h

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Earth's oldest asteroid impact 'may have ended ice age'

The 2.2 billion-year-old asteroid impact may explain the end of an ice age, scientists say.

17h

Some people are exceptionally good at recognising voices

People who have a knack for recognising faces are also good at recognising voices, a skill that could be useful for police surveillance operations

17h

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17h

Space mission to reveal 'Truths' about climate change

A UK-led satellite aims to get an absolute measurement of the light reflected off Earth's surface.

18h

UK climate scientist corrects Australian MP Craig Kelly's 'blatant misrepresentation'

Prof Sandy Harrison tells the Liberal on his Facebook page that his misuse of her study should not go unchallenged A leading UK climate scientist has used the Facebook page of the MP Craig Kelly to correct his "blatant misrepresentation" of a study she co-authored on a 70,000-year history of bushfires in Australia. Kelly, a serial denier of climate change, has been using the 2011 study to claim r

18h

The world's oldest asteroid strike in Western Australia may have triggered a global thaw

A new study showing the 70km-wide Yarrabubba crater dates impact to 2.29bn years ago The world's oldest remaining asteroid crater is at a place called Yarrabubba, south-east of the town of Meekatharra in Western Australia. Our new study puts a precise age on the cataclysmic impact – showing Yarrabubba is the oldest known crater and dating it at the right time to trigger the end of an ancient glac

18h

The Solemn Absurdity of Trump's Impeachment Trial

The impeachment trial of the century had barely begun when word came down that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had softened his initial plan to make the House managers and President Donald Trump's lawyers present their cases in marathon 12-hour sessions over four days. He'll allow the teams a more civilized eight hours over six days instead. And a good thing, too—if the first afternoon's d

18h

What Jeff Bezos's Reported Phone Hack Says About Billionaires

Two of the world's richest humans, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, were allegedly having a nice chat on WhatsApp in 2018 when the latter sent Bezos an infected file that exfiltrated data from the CEO's phone. That's according to a new report in The Guardian , which detailed the exchange according to anonymous sources. In the shadow of the new report, there is an

18h

Could China's New Coronavirus Become a Global Epidemic?

Scientists are racing to understand just how bad things could get with the outbreak of a pneumonia-like disease that first appeared in China and has now spread to the US.

18h

Mixing the unmixable — a novel approach for efficiently fusing different polymers

Cross-linked polymers are structures where large molecular chains are linked together, allowing exceptional mechanical properties and chemical resistance to the final product. However, their modification is not easy. Now, scientists at Tokyo Tech develop a method that allows the fusion of different polymers together easily, allowing the precise tuning of the properties of the final material by sel

18h

Clarifying the effect of library batch on extracellular RNA sequencing [Letters (Online Only)]

We read with great interest the recent paper of Zhou et al. (1) which describes a promising low-input protocol for measuring secreted RNA in blood. Zhou et al. (1) apply this technology to 96 samples of serum from cancer patients (28 with recurrence, 68 without) and 32 samples of serum…

18h

Reply to Hartl and Gao: Lack of between-batch difference in the distributions of measured extracellular RNA levels [Letters (Online Only)]

We thank Drs. Hartl and Gao for pointing out the difference in read lengths between the cancer and normal samples (1). Indeed, Illumina discontinued their 50-base pair (bp) sequencing kits after we finished sequencing the cancer samples, forcing us to switch to 75-bp sequencing kits on the normal samples. The…

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20h

Ozone-Depleting Chemicals Led 20th Century Arctic Warming: Study

Chlorofluorocarbons and other substances were banned in 1989 under the Montreal Protocol.

20h

New tool assesses risk of depression in adolescence

A study involving researchers from King's College London, has developed a predictive tool that can recognize adolescents who are at high or low risk of depression in young adulthood.

20h

Doubts raised about effectiveness of HPV vaccines

A new analysis of the clinical trials of HPV vaccines to prevent cervical cancer raises doubts about the vaccines' effectiveness. The analysis, published by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, assessed 12 published Phase 2 and 3 randomized controlled efficacy trials of the HPV vaccines Cervarix and Gardasil.

20h

Can we extrapolate from a Cmah-/-Ldlr-/- mouse model a susceptibility for atherosclerosis in humans? [Letters (Online Only)]

We read with great interest the paper of Kawanishi et al. in PNAS (1). Humans lack a functional cytidine monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH) controlling the synthesis of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). The possible role of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies—present in all human sera and resulting from diet-containing Neu5Gc—in the activation of endothelial cells…

20h

Reply to Soulillou et al.: Difficulties in extrapolating from animal models exemplify unusual human atherosclerosis susceptibility and mechanisms via CMAH loss [Letters (Online Only)]

Soulillou et al. (1) address our report (2) regarding intrinsic and extrinsic atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) in mice with human-like loss of Cmah (cytidine monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase)––eliminating N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) production. While our findings may help explain the unusual human propensity for ASCVD, extrapolation from animal models to human

20h

CagA-ASPP2 complex mediates loss of cell polarity and favors H. pylori colonization of human gastric organoids [Microbiology]

The main risk factor for stomach cancer, the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide, is infection with Helicobacter pylori bacterial strains that inject cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA). As the first described bacterial oncoprotein, CagA causes gastric epithelial cell transformation by promoting an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like phenotype that disrupts…

20h

Chlamydia-induced curvature of the host-cell plasma membrane is required for infection [Microbiology]

During invasion of host cells, Chlamydia pneumoniae secretes the effector protein CPn0678, which facilitates internalization of the pathogen by remodeling the target cell's plasma membrane and recruiting sorting nexin 9 (SNX9), a central multifunctional endocytic scaffold protein. We show here that the strongly amphipathic N-terminal helix of CPn0678 mediates binding…

20h

De novo mutations across 1,465 diverse genomes reveal mutational insights and reductions in the Amish founder population [Genetics]

De novo mutations (DNMs), or mutations that appear in an individual despite not being seen in their parents, are an important source of genetic variation whose impact is relevant to studies of human evolution, genetics, and disease. Utilizing high-coverage whole-genome sequencing data as part of the Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine…

20h

Acrosin is essential for sperm penetration through the zona pellucida in hamsters [Developmental Biology]

During natural fertilization, mammalian spermatozoa must pass through the zona pellucida before reaching the plasma membrane of the oocyte. It is assumed that this step involves partial lysis of the zona by sperm acrosomal enzymes, but there has been no unequivocal evidence to support this view. Here we present evidence…

20h

Retinal inputs signal astrocytes to recruit interneurons into visual thalamus [Neuroscience]

Inhibitory interneurons comprise a fraction of the total neurons in the visual thalamus but are essential for sharpening receptive field properties and improving contrast-gain of retinogeniculate transmission. During early development, these interneurons undergo long-range migration from germinal zones, a process regulated by the innervation of the visual thalamus by retinal…

20h

Nucleosomal proofreading of activator-promoter interactions [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Specificity in transcriptional regulation is imparted by transcriptional activators that bind to specific DNA sequences from which they stimulate transcription. Specificity may be increased by slowing down the kinetics of regulation: by increasing the energy for dissociation of the activator–DNA complex or decreasing activator concentration. In general, higher dissociation energies…

20h

A combined rheometry and imaging study of viscosity reduction in bacterial suspensions [Physics]

Suspending self-propelled "pushers" in a liquid lowers its viscosity. We study how this phenomenon depends on system size in bacterial suspensions using bulk rheometry and particle-tracking rheoimaging. Above the critical bacterial volume fraction needed to decrease the viscosity to zero, ϕc≈0.75%, large-scale collective motion emerges in the quiescent state, and…

20h

Decoding of the other's focus of attention by a temporal cortex module [Neuroscience]

Faces attract the observer's attention toward objects and locations of interest for the other, thereby allowing the two agents to establish joint attention. Previous work has delineated a network of cortical "patches" in the macaque cortex, processing faces, eventually also extracting information on the other's gaze direction. Yet, the neural…

20h

The importance of transient social dynamics for restoring ecosystems beyond ecological tipping points [Sustainability Science]

Regime shift modeling and management generally focus on tipping points, early warning indicators, and the prevention of abrupt shifts to undesirable states. Few studies assess the potential for restoring a deteriorating ecosystem that is on a transition pathway toward an undesirable state. During the transition, feedbacks that stabilize the new…

20h

Structural elements regulating the photochromicity in a cyanobacteriochrome [Biochemistry]

The three-dimensional (3D) crystal structures of the GAF3 domain of cyanobacteriochrome Slr1393 (Synechocystis PCC6803) carrying a phycocyanobilin chromophore could be solved in both 15-Z dark-adapted state, Pr, λmax = 649 nm, and 15-E photoproduct, Pg, λmax = 536 nm (resolution, 1.6 and 1.86 Å, respectively). The structural data allowed identifying…

20h

Receptor recognition by meningococcal type IV pili relies on a specific complex N-glycan [Microbiology]

Bacterial infections are frequently based on the binding of lectin-like adhesins to specific glycan determinants exposed on host cell receptors. These interactions confer species-specific recognition and tropism for particular host tissues and represent attractive antibacterial targets. However, the wide structural diversity of carbohydrates hampers the characterization of specific glycan determin

20h

Widespread remodeling of proteome solubility in response to different protein homeostasis stresses [Biochemistry]

The accumulation of protein deposits in neurodegenerative diseases has been hypothesized to depend on a metastable subproteome vulnerable to aggregation. To investigate this phenomenon and the mechanisms that regulate it, we measured the solubility of the proteome in the mouse Neuro2a cell line under six different protein homeostasis stresses: 1)…

20h

Single-cell RNA sequencing of Trypanosoma brucei from tsetse salivary glands unveils metacyclogenesis and identifies potential transmission blocking antigens [Microbiology]

Tsetse-transmitted African trypanosomes must develop into mammalian-infectious metacyclic cells in the fly's salivary glands (SGs) before transmission to a new host. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this developmental process, known as metacyclogenesis, are poorly understood. Blocking the few metacyclic parasites deposited in saliva from further development in the mammal could…

20h

Far-field midinfrared superresolution imaging and spectroscopy of single high aspect ratio gold nanowires [Applied Physical Sciences]

Limited approaches exist for imaging and recording spectra of individual nanostructures in the midinfrared region. Here we use infrared photothermal heterodyne imaging (IR-PHI) to interrogate single, high aspect ratio Au nanowires (NWs). Spectra recorded between 2,800 and 4,000 cm−1 for 2.5–3.9-μm-long NWs reveal a series of resonances due to the…

20h

The impact of unifying agricultural wholesale markets on prices and farmers' profitability [Sustainability Science]

As a leading effort to improve the welfare of smallholder farmers, several governments have led major reforms in improving market access for these farmers through online agricultural platforms. Leveraging collaboration with the state government of Karnataka, India, this paper provides an empirical assessment on the impact of such a reform—implementation…

20h

Pressure sensing through Piezo channels controls whether cells migrate with blebs or pseudopods [Cell Biology]

Blebs and pseudopods can both power cell migration, with blebs often favored in tissues, where cells encounter increased mechanical resistance. To investigate how migrating cells detect and respond to mechanical forces, we used a "cell squasher" to apply uniaxial pressure to Dictyostelium cells chemotaxing under soft agarose. As little as…

20h

Kinetic coupling of the respiratory chain with ATP synthase, but not proton gradients, drives ATP production in cristae membranes [Biochemistry]

Mitochondria have a characteristic ultrastructure with invaginations of the inner membrane called cristae that contain the protein complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation system. How this particular morphology of the respiratory membrane impacts energy conversion is currently unknown. One proposed role of cristae formation is to facilitate the establishment of local…