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nyheder2020januar23

Black 'rock' from AD 79 Italy eruption is part of exploded brain

It looks like a piece of rock – black, shiny and unexceptional.

2h

Thousands of ancient Aboriginal sites probably damaged in Australian fires

Nature, Published online: 23 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00164-8 The sites are rich in cultural history, but the blazes might also reveal some unknown ones, say archaeologists.

11h

Hovsa-opdagelse: Forskere finder celle, der angriber flere kræfttyper

Det er ikke kuren på kræft, men det er måske et vigtigt værktøj, siger forsker.

10h

Talk like an Egyptian: mummy's voice heard 3,000 years after death

Researchers in UK recreate Nesyamun's sound using 3D version of his vocal tract The "voice" of an ancient Egyptian priest has been heard for the first time since he died and was mummified 3,000 years ago, researchers have said. Nesyamun lived under the pharaoh Rameses XI, who reigned around the beginning of the 11th century BC. Continue reading…

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Don't panic, Dr Matt Hancock will save us from the coronavirus | John Crace

In his Commons statement, health secretary adopts the tone of a disaster movie superhero singlehandedly saving the planet Very few MPs were taking any chances with the new coronavirus outbreak in China. Which is why the Commons chamber was almost entirely empty for the ministerial statement about it. The risk of contagion is clearly deemed so high by many that even talking about it can spread the

now

To remain hidden, these beetles sparkle

A glimmering jewel beetle seems stunning here, but it's camouflaged in the wild. (Bristol Museums, Galleries and Archives/) If you're trying to blend into a crowd or avoid an unwanted gaze, it probably doesn't make sense to throw on your most glittery New Year's Eve getup and strut down the street. But for some creatures, donning a sparkly array of gorgeous colors might be just what they need to

2min

The Mummy Speaks! Listen to a Sound From an Ancient Egyptian Priest

Scientists used a 3-D printer, a loudspeaker and computer software to recreate a part of the voice of a 3,000-year-old mummy.

3min

Grow your own venom to create antivenom

Snake organoids developed in the lab produce and secrete active toxins.

4min

Sign languages grew from five independent lineages

Scientists merge historical linguistics with evolutionary biology.

4min

Can your phone sweat to keep cool?

Researchers propose a new strategy for transient thermal management.

4min

Hiding behind its iridescence

Jewel beetle uses bright colour as camouflage.

4min

Bees need to think about what they drink

Sometimes it's better to tone down the sweetness.

4min

Exploring the inner complexity of Enceladus

Subsurface ocean composition hints at habitable conditions

4min

Tiny organs grown from snake glands produce real venom

Organoids could help develop treatments for snake bites and drugs for human diseases

6min

The dead speak! Scientists re-create voice of 3000-year-old mummy

Brief utterance may reveal what Egyptian priest sounded like

6min

3D-printed vocal tract reproduces sound of ancient mummy

The sound produced by the vocal tract of a 3,000 year-old Egyptian mummy has been synthesized using CT scans, 3-D printing and an electronic larynx. The findings are presented in a study published in Scientific Reports. The acoustic output is a single sound; it does not provide the basis for synthesizing running speech.

6min

Jewel beetles' sparkle helps them hide in plain sight

Bright colors are often considered an evolutionary tradeoff in the animal kingdom. Yes, a male peacock's colorful feathers may help it attract a mate, but they also make it more likely to be seen by a hungry jungle cat. Jewel beetles (Sternocera aequisignata) and their green, blue, and purple iridescent wing cases may be an exception to the rule, researchers report January 23 in the journal Curren

6min

Snake stem cells used to create venom-producing organoids

Organoids have become an important tool for studying many disease processes and testing potential drugs. Now, they are being used in a surprising and unexpected way: for the production of snake venom. On January 23 in the journal Cell, researchers are reporting that they have created organoids of the venom glands of the Cape coral snake (Aspidelaps lubricus cowlesi) and that these glands are capab

6min

Scanning system in sperm may control rate of human evolution

Maturing sperm cells turn on most of their genes, not to follow their genetic instructions like normal, but instead to repair DNA before passing it to the next generation, a new study finds.

6min

Large marine parks can save sharks from overfishing threat

'No-take' marine reserves—where fishing is banned—can reverse the decline in the world's coral reef shark populations caused by overfishing, according to an Australian study.

6min

Does photographing a moment steal the experience from you? | Erin Sullivan

When we witness something amazing, many of us instinctively pull out our phones and snap pictures. Is this obsession with photographing everything impacting our experiences? In a meditative talk, Erin Sullivan reflects on how being more intentional with her lens enhanced her ability to enjoy the moment — and could help you do the same, too.

7min

Går det nu også så hurtigt?

PLUS. Britisk forskergruppe har estimeret hastigheden, hvormed den moderne kultur ændrer sig – med et overraskende resultat.

7min

Politics this week

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9min

Business this week

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9min

KAL's cartoon

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9min

Turntable preamps for every budget

Complete your stereo system. (Jace & Afsoon via Unsplash/) To play vinyl records, you have to boost the weaker phono signal a turntable emits to a line level signal. That requires a preamp, either built into your turntable, as part of your stereo system's amplifier, or as a separate device. Every time a signal passes from one piece of equipment to another, there's an opportunity to impact the ove

9min

Glitch Puts NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover Out of Commission

Freezing Rover NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has experienced a technical glitch, forcing it to stop in its tracks. "Partway through its last set of activities, Curiosity lost its orientation," Dawn Sumner, a planetary geologist at UC Davis and Curiosity science team member, wrote in an update . "Some knowledge of its attitude was not quite right, so it couldn't make the essential safety evaluation.

10min

The biggest, most detailed map yet made of brain cells

It is part of a fly's brain, but other brains will follow

11min

People can now be identified at a distance by their heartbeat

And then dealt with, if they are enemy operatives

11min

11min

Bright, iridescent beetles are surprisingly well camouflaged

On the right sort of leaf they are hard to spot

11min

Jewel beetles' sparkle helps them hide in plain sight

Bright colors are often considered an evolutionary tradeoff in the animal kingdom. Yes, a male peacock's colorful feathers may help it attract a mate, but they also make it more likely to be seen by a hungry jungle cat. Jewel beetles (Sternocera aequisignata) and their green, blue, and purple iridescent wing cases may be an exception to the rule, researchers report January 23 in the journal Curren

11min

Snake stem cells used to create venom-producing organoids

Organoids have become an important tool for studying many disease processes and testing potential drugs. Now, they are being used in a surprising and unexpected way: for the production of snake venom. On January 23 in the journal Cell, researchers are reporting that they have created organoids of the venom glands of the Cape coral snake (Aspidelaps lubricus cowlesi) and that these glands are capab

11min

Scanning system in sperm may control rate of human evolution

Maturing sperm cells turn on most of their genes, not to follow their genetic instructions like normal, but instead to repair DNA before passing it to the next generation, a new study finds.

11min

Large marine parks can save sharks from overfishing threat

'No-take' marine reserves—where fishing is banned—can reverse the decline in the world's coral reef shark populations caused by overfishing, according to an Australian study.

11min

Coronavirus: four tested in Scotland after arriving from Wuhan – live news

Possible cases in Scotland come as World Health Organisation committee meets for second day Four people 'being tested for virus' in Scotland China: three cities in lockdown as lunar new year festivities scrapped What is the Wuhan coronavirus and how worried should we be? 4.04pm GMT It is a novel coronavirus – that is to say, a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered befor

11min

The Eruption of Mount Vesuvius Turned This Ancient Victim's Brain To Glass

The extreme heat from the volcanic explosion in A.D. 79 left a man with glass-like brain matter.

12min

Predicting the degradation behavior of advanced medical devices

Polymer materials play a vital role in today's medicine. While many applications demand for long-lasting devices, others benefit from materials that disintegrate once their job is done. The design of such materials largely depends on the capability to predict their degradation behavior. A team of researchers established a method to faster and more reliably predict the degradation of these polymer

13min

China Silences Critics Over Coronavirus Outbreak

Beijing has responded faster to the new threat than it did with SARS, but it still silences and punishes those who veer from the official line, with potentially damaging consequences.

15min

How Helicobacter stays helical

Stomach cancer is the third-leading cause of cancer-related death across the globe. One of the main risk factors for this disease is infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori. About half of the world's population is chronically infected with the bacterium, which burrows its way into the mucus lining the stomach and sets up long-term inflammation that can trigger ulcers and, more rarely, can

17min

The dramatic dismissal of a landmark youth climate lawsuit might not close the book on that case

A sharply divided panel of three federal judges on Jan. 17 dismissed a high-profile climate lawsuit brought on behalf of 21 young people against the federal government.

18min

3,000-year-old teeth solve Pacific banana mystery

Humans began transporting and growing banana in Vanuatu 3000 years ago, a University of Otago scientist has discovered.

18min

How Helicobacter stays helical

Stomach cancer is the third-leading cause of cancer-related death across the globe. One of the main risk factors for this disease is infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori. About half of the world's population is chronically infected with the bacterium, which burrows its way into the mucus lining the stomach and sets up long-term inflammation that can trigger ulcers and, more rarely, can

18min

Can a tiny invasive snail help save Latin American coffee?

While conducting fieldwork in Puerto Rico's central mountainous region in 2016, University of Michigan ecologists noticed tiny trails of bright orange snail excrement on the undersurface of coffee leaves afflicted with coffee leaf rust, the crop's most economically important pest.

18min

Pride and prejudice at high altitude

Recent tragedies on Everest have exposed growing resentment felt by some Sherpas towards foreign climbers and the foreign companies profiting from the mountain. One source of dispute has been Sherpa concern that some climbers are not fit enough to cope with the altitude.

18min

Wannier90 program becomes community code in major new release

Wannier functions were first introduced by Gregory Wannier in 1937 as an alternative way of describing the electronic ground state of periodic systems. They were linked to Bloch orbitals, the standard method of describing these ground states, by families of transformations in a continuous space of unitary matrices. Unfortunately, this was linked to a large degree of arbitrariness.

18min

Quinoa's flowering genes could make it easier to grow

Scientists have conducted the first genome-wide analysis of quinoa's flowering genes, which could lead to breeding programs for the popular "superfood." Quinoa is an ideal crop for the future, says Agnieszka Golicz of the University of Melbourne's Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences. "In terms of diet, quinoa is an excellent source of essential amino acids, trace elements, and vitamin

21min

The race to decipher how climate change influenced Australia's record fires

Nature, Published online: 23 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00173-7 Researchers have started an attribution study to determine how much global warming is to blame for the blazes that have ravaged the continent.

23min

Turtle tracking reveals key feeding grounds

Loggerhead turtles feed in the same places year after year – meaning key locations should be protected, researchers say.

23min

Unexpected connection between gliomas, neurodegenerative diseases

New basic science and clinical research identifies TAU, the same protein studied in the development of Alzheimer's, as a biomarker for glioma development.

23min

Can a tiny invasive snail help save Latin American coffee?

While conducting fieldwork in Puerto Rico's central mountainous region in 2016, University of Michigan ecologists noticed tiny trails of bright orange snail excrement on the undersurface of coffee leaves afflicted with coffee leaf rust, the crop's most economically important pest.

24min

Unravelling arthropod genomic diversity over 500 million years of evolution

An international team of scientists report in the journal Genome Biology results from a pilot project, co-led by Robert Waterhouse, Group Leader at the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and University of Lausanne, to kick-start the global sequencing initiative of thousands of arthropods. Comparative analyses across 76 species spanning 500 million years of evolution reveal dynamic genomic chang

24min

Unravelling arthropod genomic diversity over 500 million years of evolution

An international team of scientists report in the journal Genome Biology results from a pilot project, co-led by Robert Waterhouse, Group Leader at the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and University of Lausanne, to kick-start the global sequencing initiative of thousands of arthropods. Comparative analyses across 76 species spanning 500 million years of evolution reveal dynamic genomic chang

24min

Sci-fi author William Gibson: 'Future fatigue' is putting people off the 22nd century

The future isn't what it used to be, at least according to the Canadian science fiction novelist William Gibson. In a interview with the BBC, Gibson said people seemed to be losing interest in the future. "All through the 20th century we constantly saw the 21st century invoked," he said. "How often do you hear anyone invoke the 22nd century? Even saying it is unfamiliar to us. We've come to not ha

24min

China's response to the coronavirus shows what it learned from the Sars cover-up | Thomas Abraham

Beijing is determined to crush this disease as firmly as it crushes dissent. But there is no guarantee a lockdown will work A new disease arrives in a Chinese winter – is history repeating itself? At the end of 2002, Sars erupted in the southern Chinese province of Guangdong. Nearly two decades on, another new virus has struck at roughly the same time of year, this time in the central Chinese cit

30min

EU strides forward on just transition, but risks stumbling on fossil fuels

The path to a climate neutral Europe became a little easier today, with the European Commission's proposal for a fund to help coal regions reach climate neutrality. The Just Transition Mechanism aims to mobilise up to €100 billion to support workers and their communities to develop sustainable economic activities in regions whose economies are based on carbon-intensive activities, like coal mining

36min

Scientists invent a new method of generating intense short UV vortices

An international group of scientists, including Skoltech Professor Sergey Rykovanov, has found a way to generate intense "twisted" pulses. The vortices discovered by the scientists will help investigate new materials. The results of their study were published in Nature Communications.

36min

Ny metod upptäcker fler antikroppar – öppnar för fler läkemedel mot cancer

En ny förbättrad metod för att upptäcka nya antikroppar för behandling av exempelvis cancer har tagits fram vid Lunds tekniska högskola i samarbete med BioInvent International AB. Metoden har redan resulterat i en ny antikropp för behandling av leukemi som nu befinner sig i klinisk prövning på människor. Antikroppsläkemedel är den snabbast växande typen av läkemedel och används redan i dag för be

36min

Skin-to-skin contact do not improve interaction between mother and preterm infant

Following a premature birth it is important that the parents and the infant quickly establish a good relationship. Researchers have studied the relationship between mothers and infants who have continuous skin-to-skin contact during the entire period from birth to discharge from the hospital. The results show that continuous skin-to-skin contact does not lead to better interaction between the moth

37min

Hot flashes impair memory performance

If you're having difficulty identifying the right word to express yourself clearly or remembering a story correctly, you may blame menopause. A new study suggests that physiologic hot flashes are associated with decreased verbal memory and with alterations in brain function during encoding and retrieval of memory, especially in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

37min

Bending with the wind, coral spawning linked to ocean environment

A research team has utilized modeling analysis to indicate that environmental factors act as a determinant in the timing of mass spawning.

37min

Ghostly particles detected in condensates of light and matter

Discover 'ghostly' particles and quantum depletion. A new study makes the first observation of 'ghost particles' from Bose-Einstein condensates via 'quantum depletion': particles expelled by interaction-induced quantum fluctuations.

37min

The secret of strong underwater mussel adhesion revealed

Scientists have identified a mechanism of adhesive proteins in a mussel that controls the surface adhesion and cohesion. They substantiated the synergy of molecules in adhesive proteins. Their new discovery is expected to be applied in making stronger underwater bioadhesive than the conventional ones.

37min

Predicting the degradation behavior of advanced medical devices

Polymer materials play a vital role in today's medicine. While many applications demand for long-lasting devices, others benefit from materials that disintegrate once their job is done. The design of such materials largely depends on the capability to predict their degradation behavior. A team of researchers established a method to faster and more reliably predict the degradation of these polymer

37min

Tension between foreign climbers and Sherpas began over 200 years ago

Recent tragedies on Everest have exposed growing resentment felt by some Sherpas towards foreign climbers and the foreign companies profiting from the mountain. One source of dispute has been Sherpa concern that some climbers are not fit enough to cope with the altitude.

37min

How moon jellyfish get about

With their translucent bells, moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) move around the oceans in a very efficient way. Scientists have now used a mathematical model to investigate how these cnidarians manage to use their neural networks to control their locomotion even when they are injured. The results may also contribute to the optimization of underwater robots.

37min

What Is Chernobyl Like Today?

Eerie images from the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster still haunt us 30 years later — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

41min

Study provides insight on how to minimize the impacts of severe weather on wildlife

When Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida in September 2017, the Category 5 storm offered a team of wildlife researchers a first-ever opportunity to observe behavioral responses of white-tailed deer to an extreme weather event in real time. The data collected are providing crucial new insights for scientists seeking to minimize the impacts of severe weather and climate change on wildlife.

42min

Study provides insight on how to minimize the impacts of severe weather on wildlife

When Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida in September 2017, the Category 5 storm offered a team of wildlife researchers a first-ever opportunity to observe behavioral responses of white-tailed deer to an extreme weather event in real time. The data collected are providing crucial new insights for scientists seeking to minimize the impacts of severe weather and climate change on wildlife.

42min

Dommen nærmer sig for hjertelæge anklaget for millionsvindel

Det sidste retsmøde i sagen mod en hjertelæge fra Region Hovedstaden, der står tiltalt for bedrageri for mere end 3,7 mio. kr., blev afholdt torsdag. Nu ventes dommen inden 14 dage, hvor lægen risikerer ubetinget fængsel i op til 2,5 år.

46min

Billigt läkemedel kan ge bättre cancerbehandling

Varje år drabbas 350 svenskar av blodcancerformen akut myeloisk leukemi, AML. Prognosen är dålig för äldre personer och femårsöverlevnaden är i genomsnitt bara 25 procent bland de som insjuknar. En del i detta är att vissa personer har höga halter av ett visst enzym, kallat SAMHD1, som bryter ner den verksamma substansen i den medicin som används i dag.

47min

Victorian efforts to export animals to new worlds failed, mostly

In 1890, a New York bird enthusiast released several dozen starlings in Central Park. No one knows for sure why Eugene Schieffelin set the birds aloft, but he may have been motivated by a sentimental desire to make the American Northeast more like the English countryside.

48min

Can capitalism solve capitalism's problems?

Capitalism is in trouble—at least judging by recent polls.

48min

Study suggests U.S. households waste nearly a third of the food they acquire

American households waste, on average, almost a third of the food they acquire, according to economists, who say this wasted food has an estimated aggregate value of $240 billion annually. Divided among the nearly 128.6 million U.S. households, this waste could be costing the average household about $1,866 per year.

48min

Victorian efforts to export animals to new worlds failed, mostly

In 1890, a New York bird enthusiast released several dozen starlings in Central Park. No one knows for sure why Eugene Schieffelin set the birds aloft, but he may have been motivated by a sentimental desire to make the American Northeast more like the English countryside.

48min

250 millioner Microsoft-brugere har fået lækket support-samtaler

Windows har bekræftet, at en server, der indeholder supportsamtaler fra 250 millioner Microsoft-brugere, har været kompromitteret. Det skyldes ifølge it-giganten, at serveren var forkert konfigureret, og en ekspert hævder at have fundet personfølsomme data blandt logfilerne.

51min

Will It Learn? Can It Learn?

OK, we're going to get a bit esoteric this morning. There are all kinds of things going on in the world, but I'm going to seek refuge for a little bit in abstraction, and if that's your sort of thing, then let's lift off. This is broadly on the hot topic of machine learning, which we will define non-rigorously as "having software dig through a large data set in search of rules, trends, and correl

52min

Predicting the degradation behavior of advanced medical devices

Polymer materials play a vital role in today's medicine. While many applications demand long-lasting devices, others benefit from materials that disintegrate once their job is done. The design of such materials largely depends on the capability to predict their degradation behavior.

54min

Environmentalists lose new Norway lawsuit over Arctic oil

A Norwegian court on Thursday dismissed an appeal by two environmental groups which had sued Norway for granting new oil licenses in the Arctic.

54min

How moon jellyfish get about

With their translucent bells, moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) move around the oceans in a very efficient way. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now used a mathematical model to investigate how these cnidarians manage to use their neural networks to control their locomotion even when they are injured. The results may also contribute to the optimization of underwater robots. The study has al

54min

U.S. geoengineering research gets a lift with $4 million from Congress

Studies will explore controversial cooling approaches

56min

China extends travel restrictions in bid to contain coronavirus

Hospitals in Wuhan overwhelmed by country's worst viral outbreak since Sars

57min

How moon jellyfish get about

With their translucent bells, moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) move around the oceans in a very efficient way. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now used a mathematical model to investigate how these cnidarians manage to use their neural networks to control their locomotion even when they are injured. The results may also contribute to the optimization of underwater robots. The study has al

1h

California's monarch butterflies critically low for 2nd year

The western monarch butterfly population wintering along California's coast remains critically low for the second year in a row, a count by an environmental group released Thursday showed.

1h

California's monarch butterflies critically low for 2nd year

The western monarch butterfly population wintering along California's coast remains critically low for the second year in a row, a count by an environmental group released Thursday showed.

1h

Spot the Robot Dog Trots Into the Big, Bad World

Boston Dynamics' creation is starting to sniff out its role in the workforce: as a helpful canine that still sometimes needs you to hold its paw.

1h

Clays in Antarctica from millions of years ago reveal past climate changes

Members of the TASMANDRAKE research group of the Andalusian Earth Sciences Institute (IACT), which pertains to the University of Granada and CSIC, have published a research paper in the prestigious international journal Scientific Reports describing their analysis of clays from Antarctica dating back 35.5 million years, to reconstruct past climate changes.

1h

Race to the bottom of the sea – the little known heroes of the 20th century's 'inner space race'

On January 23 1960, Jacques Piccard and Don Walsh climbed into an undersea craft called Trieste and dived nearly 11 kilometres to the deepest point in the ocean—the Challenger Deep of the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean.

1h

Shark attacks remained low in 2019—but bites from the elusive cookiecutter were up

Shark attacks were unusually low for the second year running, with 64 unprovoked bites in 2019, according to the University of Florida's International Shark Attack File. The total was roughly in line with 2018's 62 bites and about 22% lower than the most recent five-year average of 82 incidents a year.

1h

Textile-based composites could weave future of aerospace engineering

Advanced materials research at The University of Manchester has demonstrated a comprehensive picture of the evolution of damage in braided textile composites for the first time. This could lead the way to new design and implementation possibilities for next-generation aerospace engineers.

1h

Study provides insight on how to minimize the impacts of severe weather on wildlife

Data collected are providing crucial new insights for scientists seeking to minimize the impacts of severe weather and climate change on wildlife.

1h

Multimorbidity leads to general practitioners suffering burnout

The risk of general practitioners (GPs) suffering burnout increases with the number of patients with complex medical histories. A new study from the Research Unit for General Practice in Denmark is the first to document a correlation between patients with multimorbidity and increased incidences of burnout among their general practitioners.

1h

Global warming could have a negative impact on biodiversity generation processes

An international team led by researchers from Pablo de Olavide University (UPO) and the Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM) has carried out research that suggests global warming could have a negative impact on the processes that generate biodiversity. This is one of the conclusions of a study that focuses on the causes of the evolutionary success of Carex, one of the worlds' three largest genera

1h

Skin-to-skin contact do not improve interaction between mother and preterm infant

Following a premature birth it is important that the parents and the infant quickly establish a good relationship. Researchers at Linköping University have studied the relationship between mothers and infants who have continuous skin-to-skin contact during the entire period from birth to discharge from the hospital. The results show that continuous skin-to-skin contact does not lead to better inte

1h

Hot flashes impair memory performance

If you're having difficulty identifying the right word to express yourself clearly or remembering a story correctly, you may blame menopause. A new study suggests that physiologic hot flashes are associated with decreased verbal memory and with alterations in brain function during encoding and retrieval of memory, especially in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Study results are published onl

1h

The easy route the easy way: New chip calculates the shortest distance in an instant

Combinatorial optimization problems are problems that arise in everyday situations, involving the puzzle of determining the shortest route that can be taken between multiple points. Researchers at the Tokyo University of Science have developed a new chip that uses special components to calculate the shortest distance between up to 22 cities in a very short time.

1h

How the brain processes rewards

Researchers from HSE University, Skoltech and the University of Toronto analyzed data from 190 fMRI studies and found out that food, sex and money implicate similar brain regions whereas different types of reward favor the left and right hemispheres differently. The paper is to be published in Brain Imaging and Behavior.

1h

More autonomy at work reduces the risk of low back pain

A team of psychologists from Technische Universität Dresden, in cooperation with experts from health sciences and the Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, has carried out a meta-analysis to identify psychosocial work factors that pose a risk for the development of chronic low back pain (CLBP). Their study clearly indicates that not only physical but also psychological and social f

1h

Portable device helps doctors diagnose sepsis faster

EPFL researchers have developed a highly sensitive and portable optical biosensor that stands to accelerate the diagnosis of fatal conditions like sepsis. It could be used by ambulances and hospitals to improve the triage process and save lives.

1h

Shark attacks remained low in 2019—but bites from the elusive cookiecutter were up

Shark attacks were unusually low for the second year running, with 64 unprovoked bites in 2019, according to the University of Florida's International Shark Attack File. The total was roughly in line with 2018's 62 bites and about 22% lower than the most recent five-year average of 82 incidents a year.

1h

Turtle tracking reveals key feeding grounds

Loggerhead turtles feed in the same places year after year—meaning key locations should be protected, researchers say.

1h

Unveiling the biggest and most detailed map of the fly brain yet

Janelia and Google scientists have constructed the most complete map of the fly brain ever created, pinpointing millions of connections between 25,000 neurons. Now, a wiring diagram of the entire brain is within reach.

1h

Brains and Buildings

There is a fascinating explosion of potential questions to ask when two previously thought-to-be-unrelated fields converge. One night, as I was having a beer in a Chula Vista brewery with my best friend Alma and her husband Ross, I was invited to be conscious about our surroundings. Alma and Ross Majewski graduated from Cal Poly, […]

1h

Tagging for metal alloys recognizes and labels detailed microscopic structures

Materials scientists in Japan are developing a technique that recognizes and labels detailed microscopic structures inside welded steel, much like some applications tag friends in your photos. The approach could help accelerate our understanding of metal properties, while also paving the way for designing new materials.

1h

Turtle tracking reveals key feeding grounds

Loggerhead turtles feed in the same places year after year—meaning key locations should be protected, researchers say.

1h

Unveiling the biggest and most detailed map of the fly brain yet

Janelia and Google scientists have constructed the most complete map of the fly brain ever created, pinpointing millions of connections between 25,000 neurons. Now, a wiring diagram of the entire brain is within reach.

1h

The Grammys Cannot Ignore Deborah Dugan's Complaint

According to one Recording Academy official , the reason that the CEO of the Grammys was fired after just five months on the job is this: "What we expected was change without chaos." Following years of public criticism , with its president stepping down after more than a decade and a half in the position, the academy hired Deborah Dugan—previously the head of Bono's HIV/AIDS charity—with an impli

1h

Deep diving into the science of beer

How high-tech equipment usually reserved for medical research could help brew the perfect pint.

1h

New cages to trap molecules push boundaries of protein design

Protein design is a popular and rapidly growing field, with scientists engineering novel protein cages—capsule-like nanostructures for purposes such as gene therapy and targeted drug delivery. Many of these structures fashioned in the lab, while perhaps aesthetically pleasing to chemists, have holes too big to trap a target molecule or don't open on command, limiting their functional scope.

1h

New cages to trap molecules push boundaries of protein design

Protein design is a popular and rapidly growing field, with scientists engineering novel protein cages—capsule-like nanostructures for purposes such as gene therapy and targeted drug delivery. Many of these structures fashioned in the lab, while perhaps aesthetically pleasing to chemists, have holes too big to trap a target molecule or don't open on command, limiting their functional scope.

1h

Fear of wildfires inspires forward-thinking communities

Wildfires are bad enough without houses in the way to help them spread.

1h

Deep diving into the science of beer

How high-tech equipment usually reserved for medical research could help brew the perfect pint.

1h

Computer model shows ancient Earth with an atmosphere 70 percent carbon dioxide

A team of researchers from the University of Washington has found evidence that the Earth's atmosphere approximately 2.7 billion years ago might have been up to 70 percent carbon dioxide. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of micrometeorites and what they learned from them.

1h

Global river deltas increasingly shaped by humans, study says

A new study of nearly every delta on the planet shows how river delta shapes and sizes around the world are changing due to human activity—both for the good and bad.

1h

Well-designed substrates make large single crystal bi-/tri-layer graphene possible

Researchers of the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials (CMCM) within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) have reported in Nature Nanotechnology the fabrication and use of single crystal copper-nickel alloy foil substrates for the growth of large-area, single crystal bilayer and trilayer graphene films.

1h

A dash of silicon improves boron carbide body armor

A new recipe can prevent weaknesses in modern-day armor, report researchers. Legend says Genghis Khan instructed his horsemen to wear silk vests underneath their armor to better protect themselves against an onslaught of arrows during battle. Since the time of Khan, body armor has significantly evolved—silk has given way to ultra-hard materials that act like impenetrable walls against most ammuni

1h

Isotopes in teeth suggest two megalithic cultures were separate groups

A team of researchers from the U.K., Belgium and Spain has found evidence that two groups of people in Late Neolithic Europe living approximately 5,500 years ago belonged to two distinct communities. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of isotopes from two burial sites and what they found.

1h

New phase diagrams of superfluid helium under varying degrees of confinement

Physicists have been studying superfluid 3He under nanoscale confinement for several years now, as this unique liquid presents a rich variety of phases with complex order parameters that can be stabilized. While past studies have gathered many interesting observations, a complete and reliable picture of superfluid 3He under confinement has yet to be attained.

1h

How NASA's Webb Telescope will continue Spitzer's legacy

As one window to the universe closes, another will open with an even better view. Some of the same planets, stars and galaxies we first saw through the first window will appear in even sharper detail in the one that will soon open.

1h

Examining the skills most necessary for success in today's workplace

The transition from college to the workforce can be challenging; however, a new University of Minnesota study shows how higher education institutions can more adequately prepare students for life after school. While technical and subject matter expertise are important, researchers found that critical thinking and communication skills are some of the most valued by employers.

1h

Turtle tracking reveals key feeding grounds

Loggerhead turtles feed in the same places year after year – meaning key locations should be protected, researchers say.

1h

How moon jellyfish get about

With their translucent bells, moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) move around the oceans in a very efficient way. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now used a mathematical model to investigate how these cnidarians manage to use their neural networks to control their locomotion even when they are injured. The results may also contribute to the optimization of underwater robots. The study has al

1h

Pride and prejudice at high altitude

Tension between Western climbers and Sherpas began over 200 years ago, a new study suggests.

1h

Wannier90 program becomes community code in major new release

Wannier90–a computer program for generating maximally-localized Wannier functions and using them in the computation of advanced electronic properties of materials–has become a community code with a wide base of contributors over the last few years. This has resulted in a major new release with novel features described in the paper Wannier90 as a community code: new features and applications, pub

1h

New light shed on damaging impact of infrared and visible rays on skin

New research reveals for the first time that UV combined with visible and infrared light cause damage to the skin and we need to protect our skin against all three to prevent aging.

1h

Inhibition of p38 reduces the growth of lung tumours

Ángel Nebreda's team has published a study in the journal PNAS reporting the involvement of the protein p38 in the progression of lung cancer. The work shows that patients with low levels of this protein have a better prognosis. One of the biggest challenges faced by biomedicine is the development of more selective and efficient cancer treatments.

hertilhertil

Unravelling arthropod genomic diversity over 500 million years of evolution

The evolutionary innovations of insects and other arthropods are as numerous as they are wondrous, from terrifying fangs and stingers to exquisitely coloured wings and ingenious feats of engineering. DNA sequencing allows us to chart the genomic blueprints underlying this incredible diversity that characterises the arthropods and makes them the most successful group of animals on Earth.

1h

Predicting the degradation behavior of advanced medical devices

Polymer materials play a vital role in today's medicine. While many applications demand for long-lasting devices, others benefit from materials that disintegrate once their job is done. The design of such materials largely depends on the capability to predict their degradation behavior. A team of researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht led by Prof. Andreas Lendlein established a method to

1h

Djurmarknader får skulden för nya smittor

Levande höns, kaniner, ormar, sköldpaddor och många andra djur säljs som matvaror på marknader i Sydostasien. I trängseln sprids smittor över artgränserna. En uråldrig matkultur har blivit ett hot mot folkhälsan i hela världen, anser kritiker.

1h

Beings That Are Smarter than Humans Inhabit the Galaxy

Originally published in July 1943 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Coronavirus: what you need to know – video explainer

The Guardian's health editor, Sarah Boseley, answers some of the most common and pressing questions surrounding the recent coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, China Coronavirus: three Chinese cities locked down and Beijing festivities scrapped Coronavirus: panic and anger in Wuhan as China orders city into lockdown Continue reading…

1h

Four ways climate change is affecting our health—and what we can do about it

Climate change is already affecting our health, even if we don't think about it much, says a University of Alberta public health expert.

1h

New 'smart' polymer glows brighter when stretched

Scientists from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have created a stress-detecting "smart" polymer that shines brighter when stretched. Researchers hope to use the new polymer to measure the performance of synthetic polymers and track the wear and tear on materials used in engineering and construction industries.

1h

Body heat through flexible fabric could power IoT devices for health monitoring for people, pets, machinery

Wearable electronics and other Internet of Things (IoT) devices are rapidly growing in popularity, but their need for consistent power can place a high burden on users. One recently proposed solution is to generate electricity using heat from the human body, animals or other ambient sources, but typical emerging devices need to be up to an inch thick to harvest maximum results.

1h

Aarhus Universitet overvurderede kvælstofudledning med 3.000 ton

I 2018 blev der kun udledt 55.000 ton kvælstof – ikke 58.000 ton, som Aarhus Universitet ellers havde regnet sig frem til. Men selv når der tages højde for fejlen, er udledningen for høj. Regnefejlen strækker sig tilbage til 1990.

1h

Bending with the wind, coral spawning linked to ocean environment

During the early summer, corals simultaneously release tiny balls composed of sperms and eggs, known as bundles, that float to the ocean surface. Here the bundles open, allowing the sperm to fertilize the eggs where they eventually settle on the seafloor and become new coral on the reef.

1h

The psychology of football rivalries

Why does supporting one club mean you have to hate another? By Paul Hyland for The Blizzard Everyone reading this probably has a favourite football team. I'd also be willing to bet that all of you have at least one football club that you hate. Maybe it's because their star player is a diver, or because they once broke your hearts in a season-defining, must-win game. Though probably it's because y

1h

A design principle for creating selective and robust electrocatalytic interfaces

To effectively counteract climate change and meet rising global energy requirements, humans must drastically change their methods for generating energy. New catalysts for a carbon-neutral conversion of energy could be of great help in facing these challenges, facilitating the shift toward the use of renewable energy sources.

1h

New weather 'normals' show how Madison's climate has changed over 40 years

The National Weather Service's bulletins often mention when extreme weather deviates from normal. But normal is changing.

1h

Bending with the wind, coral spawning linked to ocean environment

During the early summer, corals simultaneously release tiny balls composed of sperms and eggs, known as bundles, that float to the ocean surface. Here the bundles open, allowing the sperm to fertilize the eggs where they eventually settle on the seafloor and become new coral on the reef.

1h

Betelgeuse is continues to dim, diminishes to 1.506 magnitude

Betelgeuse keeps getting dimmer, and everyone is wondering what exactly that means. The star will go supernova at the end of its life, but that's not projected to happen for tens of thousands of years or so. So what's causing the dimming?

1h

Professor modtager årslegat for forskning i menneskets evolution

Forsker Rasmus Nielsen fra Københavns Universitet blotlægger menneskets fortid og evolution…

1h

First treatment for pain using human stem cells a success

Researchers at the University of Sydney have used human stem cells to make pain-killing neurons that provide lasting relief in mice, without side effects, in a single treatment. The next step is to perform extensive safety tests in rodents and pigs, and then move to human patients suffering chronic pain within the next five years.

1h

Bending with the wind, coral spawning linked to ocean environment

A research team from Tohoku University, Ochanomizu University, and the National Institute for Basic Biology have utilized modeling analysis to indicate that environmental factors act as a determinant in the timing of mass spawning.

1h

Study identifies top strategies for successful weight loss maintenance

Some of the most effective behaviors and psychological strategies reported by those maintaining their weight loss included choosing healthy food, tracking what you eat and using positive self-talk, according to a Cal Poly study published in Obesity.

1h

Feel the force: new 'smart' polymer glows brighter when stretched

Scientists from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have created a stress-detecting 'smart' polymer that shines brighter when stretched. Researchers hope to use the new polymer to measure the performance of synthetic polymers and track the wear and tear on materials used in engineering and construction industries.

1h

Inspiring STEM careers through a hands-on Everglades microbiome study

A pilot project between researchers at the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute and biology students from Boca Raton Community High School in Palm Beach County, Florida has culminated in a data report which provides the only known reference microbiome data sets for the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, a 226-square mile area of the northern Everglades. The paper was p

1h

Scientists discover how a curvy, stomach cancer-causing bacterium maintains its shape

A new study published in eLife shows how a common stomach bacterium is able to keep its corkscrew-like shape as it grows. Disrupting the shape could point the way for future, more-specialized antibiotics that prevent the bacterium from being harmful.

1h

Can a tiny invasive snail help save Latin American coffee?

While conducting fieldwork in Puerto Rico's central mountainous region in 2016, University of Michigan ecologists noticed tiny trails of bright orange snail excrement on the undersurface of coffee leaves afflicted with coffee leaf rust, the crop's most economically important pest.

1h

Study suggests US households waste nearly a third of the food they acquire

American households waste, on average, almost a third of the food they acquire, according to economists, who say this wasted food has an estimated aggregate value of $240 billion annually. Divided among the nearly 128.6 million U.S. households, this waste could be costing the average household about $1,866 per year.

1h

Women with PCOS experience poor health and quality of life beyond reproductive years

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) experience poor health and quality of life into their late forties, according to new research published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

1h

Teens with obesity and PCOS have more 'unhealthy' bacteria

Teens with obesity and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have more 'unhealthy' gut bacteria suggesting the microbiome may play a role in the disorder, according to new research published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

1h

5 major advances in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment

Summary of five impactful studies to be presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress, a partnership of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation and the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA).

1h

The secret of strong underwater mussel adhesion revealed

Hyung Joon Cha and his research team identified a mechanism of adhesive proteins in a mussel that controls the surface adhesion and cohesion.They substantiated the synergy of molecules in adhesive proteins. Their new discovery is expected to be applied in making stronger underwater bioadhesive than the conventional ones.

1h

Ghostly particles detected in condensates of light and matter

Discover 'ghostly' particles and quantum depletion. FLEET study led by researchers at the Australian National University makes the first observation of 'ghost particles' from Bose-Einstein condensates via 'quantum depletion': particles expelled by interaction-induced quantum fluctuations.

1h

Study uncovers unexpected connection between gliomas, neurodegenerative diseases

New basic science and clinical research identifies TAU, the same protein studied in the development of Alzheimer's, as a biomarker for glioma development.

1h

Sports can be an important part of Aboriginal culture for women, but many barriers remain

Regular exercise is important for Indigenous women's health, as it protects against obesity and chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. These conditions are more prevalent among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than non-Indigenous people.

1h

Dwindling inflows into catchment areas: A water supply disaster in the making?

A study by UNSW engineers suggests we should get used to water restrictions as modeling predicts inflows into natural reservoirs are set to decrease.

1h

Rust og forkullede knogler skal give renere grundvand

PLUS. Et nyt forskningsprojekt skal udvikle en grønnere og billigere teknik til at fjerne klorerede opløsningsmidler fra forurenet jord og grundvand. Hovedingredienserne er såkaldt 'grøn rust' og knogler, som forkulles ved høj temperatur.

1h

The claim that our food is becoming less nutritious is overblown

Claims that our food is becoming less nutritious are often bandied about, but the truth is far more complicated, says James Wong

1h

This is why you mishear popular song lyrics

So misunderstood (Niv Bavarsky/) When Lil Nas X's " Old Town Road " topped the charts in early 2019, it seemed like you couldn't go five minutes without hearing "I'm gonna take my horse to the old town road." But a significant subgroup caught this instead: "I'm gonna take my horse to the hotel room." This was far from a first. We've been misunderstanding song lyrics for decades, Elton John's "hol

1h

Is mowing or close grazing of rangelands as beneficial as prescribed burning?

When it comes to restoring rangeland habitats, there is no replacement for "prescribed fire," according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) ecologists.

1h

Bird droppings provide clues to environmental change

Queen's University researchers John Smol and Matthew Duda have identified concerning trends in a vulnerable seabird.

1h

Study finds journalists hold strongly to professional identity, even when forced to leave field

When meeting someone for the first time, people often ask, "What do you do for a living?" The question implies what work one performs is one of the most essential aspects of a person's identity. But how would one answer if forced to leave their chosen field? A University of Kansas professor conducted one of the first studies to explore how journalists view the media landscape and their sense of id

1h

Housework nearly equal between boys and girls

While women still do nearly twice as much housework as men, the division of labor between boys and girls doing household chores is nearly equal, according to a recent University of Michigan study.

1h

Between wildfires, land in the US West has short 10- to 15-year reprieve

In the wake of a devastating wildfire, burnt land has a respite before the next blaze. But until now, no one has known just how long that effect lasted across the US West. Researchers from the University of Colorado Denver and Portland State looked into the increasing rates and intensity of fires in the U.S. West, like Colorado's Hayman Fire and California's Camp Fire, are up tenfold over the last

1h

Scientists discover the mechanism of DNA high-order structure formation

The genetic material of our cells—DNA—exists in a high-order structure called chromatin. Chromatin consists of DNA wrapped around histone proteins and efficiently packs DNA into a small volume. Moreover, using a spool and thread analogy, chromatin allows DNA to be locally wound or unwound, thus enabling genes to be enclosed or exposed. The misregulation of chromatin structures results in aberrant

1h

Bird droppings provide clues to environmental change

Queen's University researchers John Smol and Matthew Duda have identified concerning trends in a vulnerable seabird.

1h

Scientists discover the mechanism of DNA high-order structure formation

The genetic material of our cells—DNA—exists in a high-order structure called chromatin. Chromatin consists of DNA wrapped around histone proteins and efficiently packs DNA into a small volume. Moreover, using a spool and thread analogy, chromatin allows DNA to be locally wound or unwound, thus enabling genes to be enclosed or exposed. The misregulation of chromatin structures results in aberrant

1h

Climate change 'a strategic dilemma' for Persian Gulf, expert says

Climate change poses a strategic dilemma for oil-exporting states of the Persian Gulf, according to a new paper by an expert in the Center for Energy Studies at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

2h

Portable device helps doctors diagnose sepsis faster

EPFL researchers have developed a highly sensitive and portable optical biosensor that stands to accelerate the diagnosis of fatal conditions like sepsis. It could be used by ambulances and hospitals to improve the triage process and save lives.

2h

3,000-year-old teeth solve Pacific banana mystery

Humans began transporting and growing banana in Vanuatu 3,000 years ago, a University of Otago scientist has discovered.

2h

Could You Bungee-Jump Using Only Magnets?

Jumping off a high ledge without a cord … maybe we better run a simulation first.

2h

Hyundai's Luxury SUV Mixes Mics and Math for a Silent Ride

The Genesis GV80 comes with noise-canceling tech to do away with the annoying hum of rolling rubber.

2h

Stopping yellow spot fungus that attacks wheat crops

Scientists from the Centre for Crop and Disease Management (CCDM) and Curtin University in Western Australia have used an advanced imaging technique at the Australian Synchrotron for an in-depth look at how a fungus found in wheat crops is damaging its leaves.

2h

Second space data highway satellite set to beam

The second satellite in the European Data Relay System has reached its intended orbit and completed its in-orbit tests.

2h

Astronomers investigate physical properties of the galaxy PGC 26218

By conducting spectroscopic observations, astronomers from China and Spain have investigated physical properties of a nearby lenticular galaxy known as PGC 26218. The new study provides more hints about the origin of starbursts and star formation in this galaxy. Results of the observations were presented in a paper published January 16 on arXiv.org.

2h

Stopping yellow spot fungus that attacks wheat crops

Scientists from the Centre for Crop and Disease Management (CCDM) and Curtin University in Western Australia have used an advanced imaging technique at the Australian Synchrotron for an in-depth look at how a fungus found in wheat crops is damaging its leaves.

2h

You've done a detox. Now what?

What is the best thing to do after you've completed a detox or cleanse?

2h

Group that reused cheese cloth in different experiments up to six retractions

The other day, we reported on the retraction this month of a paper that was laid low by reuse of experimental materials — cheese cloth, to be exact — when fresh were required. At the time, we asked the senior author, Donghai Wang, of Kansas State University, whether any other articles from his group had … Continue reading

2h

Did volcanoes kill the dinosaurs? This team says nope

Activity from volcanoes did not play a direct role in the mass extinction event that killed the dinosaurs, researchers say. It was all about the asteroid. In a break from a number of other recent studies, researchers argue that environmental impacts from massive volcanic eruptions in India in the region known as the Deccan Traps happened well before the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event 66 mi

2h

Four people in Scotland 'being tested for coronavirus'

Health secretary tells MPs authorities are well-prepared to deal with any potential cases Coronavirus latest – live Four people in Scotland are being tested for suspected coronavirus after travelling to the country from Wuhan in China, according to the head of infection medicine at the University of Edinburgh. Prof Jürgen Haas said he believed there would be many more cases from other cities in t

2h

To make better espresso, use less coffee

A new approach can help you make the perfect shot of espresso, researchers report. The key to the approach? Use less coffee at a coarser grind than traditional wisdom has suggested, says Christopher Hendon, a computational chemist in the the chemistry and biochemistry department at the University of Oregon. The formula also makes espresso faster and with less water than usual. "We want to extract

2h

How to Buy Used on eBay: A Beginner's Guide

Gracefully avoid sketchy situations and score a deal on the post-holiday gadget turnover.

3h

Don't Break Up Big Tech

It won't protect small businesses, it won't preserve our data privacy, and it won't help promote democracy.

3h

'We need a people's cryo-EM.' Scientists hope to bring revolutionary microscope to the masses

Cheap cryo–electron microscope could accelerate discovery of protein structures

3h

3h

The timing of the Wuhan coronavirus could be a global-health nightmare

The elderly are especially susceptible to the new virus. (DepositPhoto/) A new virus has public health officials worried about the possibility of a pandemic, and it's officially reached the United States . At a press briefing on Tuesday, the Center for Disease Control confirmed that an unnamed man in his 30s is in isolation at a Washington State medical center. He recently came back from a trip t

3h

Maskiner och lampor påverkar klimatet

Att människan har förändrat klimatet med temperaturökning som följd genom ökade utsläpp av växthusgaser är väl känt. Industrier och transportmedel står för den största påverkan, men även användning av lampor och maskiner bidrar. Hur mycket avslöjar en studie från Göteborgs universitet. – För att kyla ner klimatet lokalt försöker man till exempel i Singapore motverka hettan i storstaden genom att

3h

Image of the Day: Eyed Elater

The click beetle's intricate false eyes cast a deep black color with the help of pigment-coated hairs.

3h

Nature inspires shock absorbing materials

Engineers are working to create architected materials with microstructures that can outperform the natural systems that inspired them. The team is focused, in part, on improving the energy absorption of materials to increase safety and comfort. Think earthquake-resilient buildings, low turbulence air travel, safer sports helmets , and scratch- and dent-resistant cars. And some of their inspiratio

3h

Debat: Vi vil belønnes, hvis vi skal sortere affaldet bedre

PLUS. Brug af normbaseret feed­back og målrettet information kan øge borgernes sorteringsgrad af bioaffald signifikant, viser et eksperiment blandt husholdninger i Københavns Kommune.

3h

Mount Vesuvius eruption: Extreme heat 'turned man's brain to glass'

Experts say the man's brain, found in the Roman town of Herculaneum, was affected by extreme heat.

3h

Asteroid Not Volcanism Killed the Dinosaurs

The popular belief is that an asteroid impact caused the mass extinction at the K-Pg (formerly K-T) boundary 66 million years ago. This is the mass extinction that killed off the non-avian dinosaurs along with 75% of species on Earth. However, in reality there is a raging scientific debate about the exact causes of the extinction event. The two contenders are the asteroid impact, which we know ha

3h

The Tax Code Is Regressive

The tax code is progressive. Economists and analysts and politicians agree on very little when it comes to economic policy, but on that they broadly concur. Rich people fork over a higher percentage of their earnings to the government than poor people do, and the whole of government acts as a kind of Robin Hood Rube Goldberg machine, taking from the well-off and redistributing to the less fortuna

3h

Your plane travel destroys polar bear habitat

A group of polar bear researchers wants you to do more than worry about the fate of these beautiful animals. They've calculated how much summer sea ice is melted per metric tonne of CO2 emissions. Then you can decide if the flight you're planning to take is worth destroying polar bear habitat.

3h

Artificial cells react to environmental changes

Cells are the basic unit of life. They provide an environment for the fundamental molecules of life to interact, for reactions to take place and sustain life. However, the biological cell is very complicated, making it difficult to understand what takes place inside it. One way to tackle this biological problem is to design a synthetic minimal cell as a simpler system compared to biological cells.

3h

A new approach to reveal the multiple structures of RNA

Experimental data and computer simulations have yielded an innovative technique to characterize the configurations of an RNA molecule. The work, published in Nucleic Acids Research, opens new roads to studying dynamic molecular systems.

3h

How old are they? Some non-photosynthetic orchids consist of dead wood

Botanists have long held a fascination for heterotrophic plants, not only because they contradict the notion that autotrophy (photosynthesis) is synonymous with plants, but also because such plants are typically rare and ephemeral. However, it is still a matter of debate as to how these plants obtain nutrition.

3h

Printing objects that can incorporate living organisms

A method for printing 3-D objects that can control living organisms in predictable ways has been developed by an interdisciplinary team of researchers at MIT and elsewhere. The technique may lead to 3-D printing of biomedical tools, such as customized braces, that incorporate living cells to produce therapeutic compounds such as painkillers or topical treatments, the researchers say.

3h

Artificial cells react to environmental changes

Cells are the basic unit of life. They provide an environment for the fundamental molecules of life to interact, for reactions to take place and sustain life. However, the biological cell is very complicated, making it difficult to understand what takes place inside it. One way to tackle this biological problem is to design a synthetic minimal cell as a simpler system compared to biological cells.

3h

Ghostly particles detected in condensates of light and matter

Bose-condensed quantum fluids are not forever. Such states include superfluids and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs).

3h

A Way to Reduce Hospital Infections Dramatically

A technology called "real-time location systems" can make a big difference — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Exposure to diesel exhaust particles linked to pneumococcal disease susceptibility

A new study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, shows that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) can increase an individual's susceptibility to pneumococcal disease.

3h

A new approach to reveal the multiple structures of RNA

Experimental data and computer simulations have yielded an innovative technique to characterize the configurations of an RNA molecule. The work, published in Nucleic Acids Research, opens new roads to studying dynamic molecular systems.

3h

How old are they? Some non-photosynthetic orchids consist of dead wood

Botanists have long held a fascination for heterotrophic plants, not only because they contradict the notion that autotrophy (photosynthesis) is synonymous with plants, but also because such plants are typically rare and ephemeral. However, it is still a matter of debate as to how these plants obtain nutrition.

3h

Andreas Rudkjøbing stopper som formand for Lægeforeningen

Et år før tid stopper Andreas Rudkjøbing som formand for Lægeforeningen. Nu vil han gøre sin uddannelse til speciallæge færdig.

3h

Tulsi Gabbard Sues for Attention

Representative Tulsi Gabbard today filed a defamation lawsuit against Hillary Clinton in federal court. The basis for the suit is a comment Clinton made to the former Obama-campaign manager David Plouffe in an October 2019 podcast. Clinton suggested that Republicans were grooming an unnamed person as a third-party candidate. She added: She's the favorite of the Russians. They have a bunch of site

3h

The Enemies of Writing

Editor's Note: The Hitchens Prize is awarded annually by the Dennis & Victoria Ross Foundation to an author or a journalist whose work, in the spirit of the late Christopher Hitchens, "reflects a commitment to free expression and inquiry, a range and depth of intellect, and a willingness to pursue the truth without regard to personal or professional consequence." The 2019 winner of the Hitchens P

3h

America Is Overrun With Bathrooms

American exceptionalism takes on many forms, both flattering (our immigrant-founded start-ups) and unfortunate (our health-care prices). But perhaps no part of life in the United States is more unambiguously exceptional than this: We have so many damn bathrooms. And the world wants to know why. The internet is filled with long threads, on sites such as Quora and Reddit, in which users swap theori

3h

Cancel Earthworms

O n a sweltering July day, I follow Annise Dobson down an overgrown path into the heart of Seton Falls Park. It's a splotch of unruly forest, surrounded by the clamoring streets and cramped rowhouses of the Bronx. Broken glass, food wrappers, and condoms litter the ground. But Dobson, bounding ahead in khaki hiking pants with her blond ponytail swinging, appears unfazed. As I quickly learn, neith

3h

The Biggest Celestial Event of the Year Could Happen Tomorrow

Sometime this week, you might walk outside in broad daylight, look up at the sky, and see a luminous orb as bright as a full moon. Only it wouldn't be the moon. It would be something far more explosive: the dazzling aftermath of a cataclysm hundreds of light-years away. You'd be seeing the light from a supernova—the final, powerful flash of a dying star. Or … you might see the regular old sky. Su

3h

Studies reveal gruesome last moments of Pompeii volcano's victims

Blistering heat may have affected bodies differently, depending on their location

4h

Bad Math, Pepsi Points, and the Greatest Plane Non-Crash Ever

How calculation errors and misunderstandings led to a very silly lawsuit—and a very lucky landing.

4h

A Way to Reduce Hospital Infections Dramatically

A technology called "real-time location systems" can make a big difference — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Coronavirus: three Chinese cities locked down and Beijing festivities scrapped

Residents in Wuhan, Ezhou and Huanggang hoard supplies and isolate themselves at home Three Chinese cities with a total population of 20 million have been put on lockdown and Beijing has cancelled a number of major public events in an attempt to contain the spread of a deadly coronavirus outbreak. Authorities banned transport links from Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province, on Thursday, as well a

4h

How "Paralinguistic Cues" Can Help You to Persuade

It's not just what you say but how you say it, research shows — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How "Paralinguistic Cues" Can Help You to Persuade

It's not just what you say but how you say it, research shows — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study reveals two writers penned landmark inscriptions in eighth-century BCE Samaria

The ancient Samaria ostraca—eighth-century BCE ink-on-clay inscriptions unearthed at the beginning of the 20th century in Samaria, the capital of the biblical kingdom of Israel—are among the earliest collections of ancient Hebrew writings ever discovered. But despite a century of research, major aspects of the ostraca remain in dispute, including their precise geographical origins—either Samaria o

4h

What Happens to Google Maps When Tectonic Plates Move? – Issue 81: Maps

As a writer on physics, I'm always seeking new metaphors for understanding Einstein's general theory of relativity, and while working on my last book, Spooky Action at a Distance , I thought I'd compare the warping of space and time to the motion of Earth's tectonic plates. Einstein explained gravity as the bending of spacetime. A well-hit baseball arcs through the air to an outfielder's glove be

4h

An Existential Crisis in Neuroscience – Issue 81: Maps

On a chilly evening last fall, I stared into nothingness out of the floor-to-ceiling windows in my office on the outskirts of Harvard's campus. As a purplish-red sun set, I sat brooding over my dataset on rat brains. I thought of the cold windowless rooms in downtown Boston, home to Harvard's high-performance computing center, where computer servers were holding on to a precious 48 terabytes of m

4h

Red Planet Ride-Along – Issue 81: Maps

For human travelers, the iconic moment of space exploration occurred a half-century ago, when Neil Armstrong planted the first human boot-print on the moon. But if you don't mind using robots as our stand-ins, the greatest era is unfolding right now on Mars, where NASA's Curiosity rover is rolling across the rusty, dusty surface and leaving behind tread marks that spell out the letters "J-P-L" in

4h

Tyskans "fel" att svenskan släppt har och hade i bisatser

Har eller inte har, det är frågan. Forskare har undersökt varför och när vi började utelämna har och hade i bisatser – något som är omöjligt i nästan alla andra språk. Den omfattande språkkontakten med dåtidens högtyska, är en förklaring. Ett av de mer udda språkdragen i det svenska språket är att vi kan utelämna verbet har och hade i bisatser. I huvudsatser måste hjälpverbet finnas med, som i "h

4h

Silkeborg Kommune lækker 537 CPR-numre til én borger

I materialet ved en aktindsigt fremgik 537 personnumre. Personen, der modtog dem, meldte det straks til kommunen, der selv har meldt episoden til datatilsynet.

4h

Ekstern batteripakke satte lovende el-passagerfly i brand under test

Israelske Eviation skulle snart testflyve deres nipersoners prototype "Alice", som var det helt store tilløbsstykke til Paris Air Show i sommer. Flyet brød i stedet i brand på jorden.

4h

Stor undersøgelse: Vandtåge er bedst til at slukke batteribrande på skibe

PLUS. Vandtåge både nedkøler, slukker og forhindrer spredning af brande i batterirum. Ventilation skal tilpasses, således at eksplosionsfarlige gasser ledes ud uden at give ekstra næring til branden.

4h

What is the Wuhan coronavirus and how worried should we be?

Experts fear latest strain of virus from Wuhan may spread across world It is a novel coronavirus – that is to say, a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals – possibly seafood. Many of those infected either worked or frequently shopped in the Huanan seafood wholesale market in the centre of the Chinese city. New a

4h

Goop Lab on Netflix shows how easy it is to fall for bad science

Instead of turning off Gwyneth Paltrow's new alternative health Netflix series The Goop Lab, we should watch it for lessons in how to spot bad science, says Clare Wilson

4h

An Impeachment Trial Without Witnesses Would Be Unconstitutional

On the opening day of the impeachment trial, the Senate, in a party-line vote of 53–47, approved an organizing resolution establishing the ground rules for the trial and rejecting efforts by Democrats to compel the testimony of witnesses and the production of documents not included by the House in its impeachment inquiry. However, the resolution allows Democrats to renew their motions to subpoena

4h

Lincoln's law: How did the Civil War change the Constitution?

During the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln decided to suspend habeas corpus, a protection in the Constitution that prohibited imprisonment without a trial. From Lincoln's point of view, following the law to the letter during that unprecedented and pivotal moment in history (i.e. the threat of war and secession from the Union) would put lawfulness itself at risk, so some restrictions of civil liberties

5h

It's too late to ban face recognition – here's what we need instead

Plans to ban face recognition in public places would only halt a tiny fraction of its use. Instead we need to regulate the technology – and fast, says Donna Lu

5h

Ny rapport: Danskernes CO2-udledning er reelt en halv gang højere

En ny rapport fra erhverstænketanken Axcelfuture sætter tal på det reelle danske klimaftryk, der tager højde for vores import af for eksempel tøj og byggematerialer – især fra Kina.

5h

Utlandsfödd och hiv-smittad – extra utsatt inom vården

Utlandsfödda med konstaterad hiv-smitta framstår som en extra utsatt grupp i Sverige och inom svensk vård, visar forskning från Göteborgs universitet. Hur de upplever sin fysiska hälsa varierar stort, mer än hos svenskfödda med hiv. – Utlandsfödda är generellt mycket tacksamma för hiv-vården på infektionsklinikerna, men de har svårare med kontakterna i övriga vården, konstaterar Manijeh Mehdiyar,

5h

Preventing metastasis by stopping cancer cells from making fat

Olivier Feron, a University of Louvain researcher, studies how cancer spreads through the body via metastasis.His major discovery was that cancer cells multiply by using lipids as food. His latest discovery, published in the scientific journal Nature Communications, is that lipid storage promotes cancer invasiveness.A new drug currently being tested to treat obesity may also help fight metastasis.

5h

Technique reveals whether models of patient risk are accurate

MIT researchers have developed a method to determine whether a clinical risk model's predictions can be trusted for a given patient. The findings could help doctors avoid ineffective or unnecessarily risky treatments for some patients.

5h

Researchers uncover the genomics of health

A DNA database of thousands of healthy older Australians is set to change how we determine which genes underpin disease.

5h

Classification and Morphological Analysis of Vector Mosquitoes using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57875-1

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Likelihood contrasts: a machine learning algorithm for binary classification of longitudinal data

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57924-9

5h

Effect of Rhizopus nigricans (Rhizopus stolonifera)-based novel starter culture on quality and safety attributes of doenjang, a traditional Korean soybean fermented food product

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-57382-y Effect of Rhizopus nigricans ( Rhizopus stolonifera )-based novel starter culture on quality and safety attributes of doenjang , a traditional Korean soybean fermented food product

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Adjuvant-free immunization with infective filarial larvae as lymphatic homing antigen carriers

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57995-8

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Semantic Segmentation of the Choroid in Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography Images for Volumetrics

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57788-z

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5h

Quantifying the risk of rabies in biting dogs in Haiti

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57908-9

5h

Smoke from Canadian wildfires caused pollution spikes in New York City

Two spells of unusually poor air quality in New York City have been traced to harmful smoke pouring from wildfires burning hundreds of kilometres away

6h

Climate Change Is a Political Crisis, Not a Reproductive One

Our personal lifestyle choices aren't unimportant. But an obsession with population management as a means for mitigating climate change unfairly puts the burden on the backs of poorer people and people in developing countries. And it distracts from the elephant in the room: the fossil fuel industry.

6h

Hudnära vård gav inte mamman bättre samspel med prematur bebis

Varje år föds runt 15 miljoner barn för tidigt världen över. Eftersom barnen ofta behöver intensivvård är det vanligt att de skiljs från sina föräldrar, vilket kan få negativa konsekvenser för anknytning mellan mor och barn. För föräldrarna kan separationen innebära bland annat skuld och tomhet över att inte kunna vara nära sina nyfödda. För barnen är förlusten av föräldrarnas närhet en av de stö

6h

Vinnarna i julkalendern: "Ibland är ledtråden extra långsökt"

De ord de tog direkt var MES på ledtråden kruka och SNITT på Relation utan gull. Den senare ledtråden tyckte de också var den klurigaste. – När vi kom på den kände vi att det var rätt, säger Jenny Dalenius. Svårast hade de med SKEN och det var också enda gången de skickade in fel ord, pipa, efter att ha blivit missledda av den första ledtråden Benfri flöjt under knät. Det rätta svaret kom de på fö

6h

Læger kritiserer notat om ­omskæring: Under faglig standard

Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed får kritik for arbejde på opdateringen af udskældt notat om omskæring. Styrelsen vil dog ikke svare på spørgsmål i sagen.

6h

Undersøger gasnet til Lolland: Sukkerfabrikker vil udskifte kul og olie med biogas

Statens gasselskab, Evida, er nu gået i gang med at regne på, om der er økonomi i at udvide naturgasnettet ned til Lolland-Falster, hvor sukkerfabrikker kan gøre brug af gassen.

6h

Publisher Correction: Extracellular small non-coding RNA contaminants in fetal bovine serum and serum-free media

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57848-4

6h

Coronavirus Deaths Are So Far Mostly Older Men, Many With Previous Health Issues

As China releases details about the 17 people who have died in the outbreak, a well-known SARS expert raises an alarm about the virus's spread, saying he felt "powerless."

7h

Optimising energy use with machine learning

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

7h

Exclusive look at Cruise's first fully driverless car

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

7h

Does Consciousness Have a Function? | OUPblog

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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The Struggle of a Zero-Waste Restaurant

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Scientists discover 'why stress turns hair white'

Acute stress damages stem cells that control hair and skin colour, a study suggests.

7h

Seven dead in Spain as winter storms lash coast

The death toll from a storm that has lashed Spain with strong winds and heavy snow has risen to seven, while four people were missing, officials said.

7h

First space-baked cookies took two hours in experimental oven

The results are finally in for the first chocolate chip cookie bake-off in space.

7h

Team significantly expands the global diversity of large and giant viruses

While the microbes in a single drop of water could outnumber a small city's population, the number of viruses in the same drop—the vast majority not harmful to humans—could be even larger. Viruses infect bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, and they range in particle and genome size from small, to large and even giant. The genomes of giant viruses are on the order of 100 times the size of what has ty

7h

OSIRIS-REx completes closest flyover of sample site nightingale

Preliminary results indicate that NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft successfully executed a 0.4-mile (620-m) flyover of site Nightingale yesterday as part of the mission's Reconnaissance B phase activities. Nightingale, OSIRIS-REx's primary sample collection site, is located within a crater high in asteroid Bennu's northern hemisphere.

7h

Keeping lead out of drinking water when switching disinfectants

About 80 percent of water systems across the country use a disinfectant in drinking water that can lead to undesirable byproducts, including chloroform. There is an alternative, but many cities have been afraid to use it.

7h

Team significantly expands the global diversity of large and giant viruses

While the microbes in a single drop of water could outnumber a small city's population, the number of viruses in the same drop—the vast majority not harmful to humans—could be even larger. Viruses infect bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, and they range in particle and genome size from small, to large and even giant. The genomes of giant viruses are on the order of 100 times the size of what has ty

7h

Blood and politics in India

Mahatma Gandhi, an icon of nonviolent resistance who helped lead India to independence by force of will and strength of mind, rather than physical power, might not seem like a person preoccupied with corporeal matters.

7h

Obesity embargo alert for February 2020 issue

All print, broadcast and online journalists who receive the Obesity embargo alert agree to abide by the embargo and may not publish, post, broadcast or distribute embargoed news releases or details of the embargoed studies before the embargo date and time.

7h

Coronavirus: panic and anger in Wuhan as China orders city into lockdown

Supermarket shelves are empty and face masks have sold out as residents of city at the centre of the deadly virus hoard supplies and retreat inside A sense of panic has spread in the central Chinese city of Wuhan as the city of 11 million was put on lockdown in an attempt to quarantine a deadly virus believed to have originated there. On Thursday, authorities banned all transport links from the s

10h

Coronavirus Live Updates: More Than 570 Infected, and Fear Grows in Wuhan

Planes and trains have been banned from leaving Wuhan, China, the epicenter of a viral outbreak after the number of reported deaths from the disease nearly doubled.

10h

Major Insurers Pledge $55 Million to Try to Lower Generic Drug Prices

The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and others say they have agreed to invest in a nonprofit's effort to develop and sell cheaper drugs.

10h

Country diary: the quiet miracle of the common feather-moss

Wenlock Edge, Shropshire: Species such as this one contain a remarkable reservoir of potentially medicinal chemicals Green feathers in the wood, the plumage of moss: it appears unaffected by a squall that rattles up the lane. Its rain washes around the old, laid trunks of hedge sycamores, its wind blows goldfinch from mullein seedheads under power lines into hazels; its noise silences the thrush

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How old are they? Some non-photosynthetic orchids consist of dead wood

A research team led by Kobe University's Associate Professor SUETSUGU Kenji (of the Graduate School of Science's Department of Biology) has investigated the carbon age in some non-photosynthetic mycoheterotrophic plants. Using the radiocarbon emitted from atmospheric nuclear bomb tests carried out in the 1950s and 1960s as a tracer, they revealed that some mycoheterotrophic orchids are relying on

10h

11h

Rensningsanlæg vil ikke flytte for Lynetteholmen: Overvejer at blive på Refshaleøen trods pres

PLUS. Det er altså os, der ejer området, lyder det fra Biofos-direktør, som slår fast, at Hvidovre ikke skal anlægge kunstige øer i forvisning om at selskabet flytter ind.

11h

Scratching the surface of what makes soil tick

Farmers of the future will have smart tools to assess what lives below the surface

12h

Would the Coronavirus Quarantine of Wuhan Even Work?

It's almost impossible to shut down a megacity. And even if you do, people (and their germs) would find a way out.

12h

Scale of China's Wuhan Shutdown Is Believed to Be Without Precedent

In sealing off a city of 11 million people, China is trying to halt a coronavirus outbreak using a tactic with a complicated history of ethical concerns.

12h

Trump Removes Pollution Controls on Streams and Wetlands

The Trump administration has finished a new rule that rolls back environmental controls on many wetlands and intermittent streams, delivering a win to rural landowners.

12h

Australia Is About to Experience a 'Bonanza' of Deadly Spiders, Experts Warn

Brave people are being asked to catch them, and for a good reason.

12h

13h

Opinion: Postdocs as Competent Peer Reviewers

Constructively critiquing the scientific literature should be an essential part of the postdoctoral experience, and early career researchers have shown that they are up to the task.

13h

Island of hope for the threatened Nassau grouper [Commentaries]

In January 1971, a young biologist braved strong currents to dive on a massive spawning aggregation (gathering of reproductive adults) of Nassau grouper (family Epinephelidae) at Cat Cay in The Bahamas. The paper he published was the first-ever eye-witness account in the scientific literature describing a spectacular gathering of 30,000…

13h

Dynamical control by water at a molecular level in protein dimer association and dissociation [Chemistry]

Water, often termed as the "lubricant of life," is expected to play an active role in navigating protein dissociation–association reactions. In order to unearth the molecular details, we first compute the free-energy surface (FES) of insulin dimer dissociation employing metadynamics simulation, and then carry out analyses of insulin dimerization and…

13h

Guided transition waves in multistable mechanical metamaterials [Engineering]

Transition fronts, moving through solids and fluids in the form of propagating domain or phase boundaries, have recently been mimicked at the structural level in bistable architectures. What has been limited to simple one-dimensional (1D) examples is here cast into a blueprint for higher dimensions, demonstrated through 2D experiments and…

13h

Arrhythmogenic late Ca2+ sparks in failing heart cells and their control by action potential configuration [Physiology]

Sudden death in heart failure patients is a major clinical problem worldwide, but it is unclear how arrhythmogenic early afterdepolarizations (EADs) are triggered in failing heart cells. To examine EAD initiation, high-sensitivity intracellular Ca2+ measurements were combined with action potential voltage clamp techniques in a physiologically relevant heart failure model….

13h

Plasmodium falciparum evades immunity of anopheline mosquitoes by interacting with a Pfs47 midgut receptor [Microbiology]

The surface protein Pfs47 allows Plasmodium falciparum parasites to survive and be transmitted by making them "undetectable" to the mosquito immune system. P. falciparum parasites express Pfs47 haplotypes compatible with their sympatric vectors, while those with incompatible haplotypes are eliminated by the mosquito. We proposed that Pfs47 serves as a…

13h

Requirement for epithelial p38{alpha} in KRAS-driven lung tumor progression [Medical Sciences]

Malignant transformation entails important changes in the control of cell proliferation through the rewiring of selected signaling pathways. Cancer cells then become very dependent on the proper function of those pathways, and their inhibition offers therapeutic opportunities. Here we identify the stress kinase p38α as a nononcogenic signaling molecule that…

13h

Tool-using puffins prickle the puzzle of cognitive evolution [Commentaries]

In PNAS, Fayet et al. (1) report on two cases of tool use in a seabird. In two distant populations they recorded Arctic puffins (Fratercula arctica) using sticks to scratch themselves (Fig. 1). The documentation of tool use in this species expands the ever-growing list of tool-using birds through rare…

13h

Identifying determinants of bacterial fitness in a model of human gut microbial succession [Microbiology]

Human gut microbiota development has been associated with healthy growth but understanding the determinants of community assembly and composition is a formidable challenge. We cultured bacteria from serially collected fecal samples from a healthy infant; 34 sequenced strains containing 103,102 genes were divided into two consortia representing earlier and later…

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Humanity Has Killed 83% of All Wild Mammals and Half of All Plants

submitted by /u/MayonaiseRemover [link] [comments]

13h

Researchers slash pre-drug screening time from years to days

submitted by /u/HeinrichTheWolf_17 [link] [comments]

13h

Sustainable building: The hottest new material is, uh, wood

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

13h

The color of your clothing can impact wildlife

Your choice of clothing could affect the behavioral habits of wildlife around you, according to a new study.

14h

Women still face barriers to breastfeed at work

Despite the protections in place to support breastfeeding for employees, the burden still falls on working mothers to advocate for the resources they need, according to a new study.

14h

Less may be more in next-gen batteries

Engineers build full lithium-ion batteries with silicon anodes and an alumina layer to protect cathodes from degrading. By limiting their energy density, the batteries promise excellent stability for transportation and grid storage use.

14h

Possible Alzheimer's breakthrough suggested

Researchers say they have identified a previously unknown gene and associated protein (which they have named 'aggregatin') which could potentially be suppressed to slow the advance of Alzheimer's disease.

14h

Traumatic experiences boost the effect of depression-linked genes

Experiencing trauma seems to alter the way genes for depression are expressed. The vulnerable genes may also help us identify people who might benefit from cognitive behavioural therapies

14h

14h

Elections Globally Are Under Threat. Here's How to Protect Them

A new report calls for safeguards to reduce the dangers posed by misinformation, online extremism, and social media manipulation.

14h

Less may be more in next-gen batteries

Engineers build full lithium-ion batteries with silicon anodes and an alumina layer to protect cathodes from degrading. By limiting their energy density, the batteries promise excellent stability for transportation and grid storage use.

14h

Poor mental health 'both cause and effect' of school exclusion

Children with mental health needs require urgent support from primary school onwards to avoid exclusion, which can be both cause and effect of poor mental health, new research concludes.

14h

Climate-friendly food choices protect the planet, promote health, reduce health costs

Increased uptake of plant-based diets in New Zealand could substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions while greatly improving population health and saving the healthcare system billions of dollars in the coming decades, according to a new study.

14h

OSIRIS-REx completes closest flyover of sample site nightingale

OSIRIS-REx successfully executed a 0.4-mile (620-m) flyover of site Nightingale yesterday as part of the mission's Reconnaissance B phase activities.

14h

Keeping lead out of drinking water when switching disinfectants

Researchers found that the hazards of switching disinfectants in water systems — increased lead levels — can be mitigated if the change is done correctly.

14h

Cut meat and dairy intake 'by a fifth', report urges

Taxes may be needed to curb eating meat and dairy in the effort to combat climate change.

15h

Wanted – volunteers to monitor Britain's growing slug population

The first survey in decades will look at the 40 or more species thought to be living in Britain.

15h

WHO panel puts off decision on whether to sound alarm on rapid spread of new virus

Group of experts wants more data before calling coronavirus outbreak an international health emergency

15h

Ivory Coast is using plastic waste to build schools

The West African country has partnered with UNICEF to transform landfill waste into bricks for schools.

15h

Coronavirus outbreak: doctors use robot to treat first known US patient

American citizen in his 30s was admitted to Washington state hospital on Monday after trip to China Doctors have been using a robot to treat the first person known to have been admitted to hospital in the US with a new strain of the coronavirus, as part of an effort to prevent the spread of the disease, which has killed at least 17 people in China and infected hundreds more. The man in his 30s wa

15h

The 737 MAX Delay Is Just One of Boeing's Many Problems

Issues inside the company aren't limited to its commercial airliner business—even the space and defense divisions are suffering.

15h

15h

Poor mental health 'both cause and effect' of school exclusion

Children with mental health needs require urgent support from primary school onwards to avoid exclusion, which can be both cause and effect of poor mental health, new research concludes.

15h

Make airlines and oil firms pay for tree-planting boom, says UK report

North Sea oil firms and airlines should fund a colossal tree-planting drive to fight climate change as soon as next year, the UK government's climate advisers have urged

15h

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Should you grow a beard? Here's how women perceive bearded men

A new study found that women perceive men with facial hair to be more attractive as well as physically and socially dominant. Women tend to associate more masculine faces with physical strength, social assertiveness, and formidability. Women who display higher levels of "moral disgust," or feelings of repugnance toward taboo behaviors, are more likely to prefer hairy faces. None The beard is an e

16h

Wuhan coronavirus may have been transmitted to people from snakes

A new virus that has infected 555 people and claimed 17 lives may have jumped from bats to snakes and then to humans in a food market

16h

"Viktigt för världen att Tyskland lyckas"

Tyskland ska avveckla kärnkraften till 2022 och kolkraften till 2038, samtidigt som landet bygger ut den förnybara energin. Men omställningen, som kallas Energiewende, går inte så snabbt som planerat. Hur ser du på det? – Energiewende är helt nödvändigt, men kraven på takten har med tiden ökat utifrån. Ursula von der Leyen, EU-kommissionens nya ordförande, säger nu att EU bör minska sina utsläpp m

16h

Kärnkraftens vara eller ickevara

Finland bygger nytt. Tyskland lägger ner. I Sverige väcker kärnkraften åter debatt i ljuset av klimatkrisen. Vilken roll ska kärnkraften spela i framtiden?

16h

Controlled-release opioid may be leading to heart infections in persons who inject drugs

A new study from ICES, Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University suggests that injection drug users prescribed controlled-release hydromorphone are three times more likely to develop endocarditis, a serious bacterial heart infection, when compared to those prescribed other opioids. The findings, published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, build on growing evidence that some co

16h

Study highlights effectiveness of behavioral interventions in conflict-affected regions

A new study, published in The Lancet Global Health, highlights the effectiveness of behavioral intervention in reducing psychological distress in conflict-affected regions.

16h

The Lancet Global Health: Guided self-help intervention reduces refugees' psychological distress and improves wellbeing in humanitarian crises

A guided self-help approach that provides strategies for managing distress and coping with adversity is safe, and resulted in meaningful improvements in psychological distress and functioning compared to enhanced usual care over three months in female refugees living in a settlement in Uganda, according to a randomized trial involving almost 700 South Sudanese refugee women, published in The Lance

16h

Industry funding of patient groups lacks governance and transparency

Industry funding of patient groups is common in many high income countries, but few patient groups have formal policies that govern corporate funding and financial transparency is inadequate, warn experts in The BMJ today.

16h

Adult exposure to chickenpox linked to lower risk of shingles, but does not provide full protection

Adults who are exposed to a child with chickenpox (varicella) in the home are around 30% less likely to develop shingles (herpes zoster) over 20 years, finds a study in The BMJ today.

16h

The best microwaves for a fast-paced lifestyle

Great countertop microwaves. (Sarah Wardlaw via Unsplash/) The microwave oven as we know it has been around for more than seven decades now, claiming its place in countless home and office kitchens, humbly warming leftovers and cups of coffee for the masses. This ubiquitousness has not only taken some of the sheen off the microwave's magic, but it's also spoiled our cooking processes to a point.

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Tw writers penned landmark inscriptions in 8th-century BCE Samaria

A new study reveals that only 2 writers penned landmark inscriptions on an 8th-century BCE Samarian ostraca. The discovery illuminates the bureaucratic apparatus of an ancient kingdom of Israel.

16h

Solutions for networking lag in massive IoT devices

Researchers have proposed a system that would use currently underutilized resources in an existing wireless channel to create extra opportunities for lag-free connections. The process, which wouldn't require any additional hardware or wireless spectrum resources, could alleviate traffic backups on networks with many wireless connections, such as those found in smart warehouses and automated factor

16h

Deep diving scientists discover bubbling CO2 hotspot

Hydrologists diving off the coast of the Philippines have discovered volcanic seeps with some of the highest natural levels of C02 ever recorded. The scientists were working in Verde Island Passage, one of the most diverse marine ecosystems in the world and is home to thriving coral reefs.

16h

Scientists identify gene that puts brakes on tissue growth

The planarian flatworm is a simple animal with a mighty ability: it can regenerate itself from nearly every imaginable injury, including decapitation. Scientists have studied these worms for decades to better understand fundamental principles of natural regeneration and repair. One mechanism that is yet unknown is how organisms like these control the proportional scaling of tissue during regenerat

16h

Drug combo reverses arthritis in rats

Researchers have discovered that a powerful combination of 2 experimental drugs reverses the cellular and molecular signs of osteoarthritis in rats as well as in isolated human cartilage cells.

16h

Here, there and everywhere: Large and giant viruses abound globally

Scientists have uncovered a broad diversity of large and giant viruses that belong to the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) supergroup. As a result, virus diversity in this group expanded 10-fold from just 205 genomes, redefining the phylogenetic tree of giant viruses.

16h

What it's like to live without a sense of smell

New research reveals the impact of smell loss. As many as one in 20 people live without smell. But until now there has been little research into the range of emotional and practical impacts it causes. The new study finds that almost every aspect of life is disrupted – from everyday concerns about personal hygiene to a loss of sexual intimacy and the break-down of personal relationships.

16h

What's in Puget sound? New technique casts a wide net for concerning chemicals

Using a new 'non-targeted' approach, researchers screened samples from multiple regions of Puget Sound to look for potentially harmful compounds that might be present.

16h

How to fit in a workout while you travel

Traveling can mean "resting," but it doesn't mean "quitting." (Estradaanton via Deposit /) Traveling plays havoc with workout plans. The time wasted stuck at the airport, the crippling jet lag , and not having your gym or go-to running track at hand, are just some of the most common issues. But not all is lost, and if you really want to keep on top of things, you definitely can. But how difficult

16h

Who Plays by the Rules?

The two men sit barely six feet apart, stationed across the Senate chamber's center aisle, but they seldom cast so much as a sidelong glance each other's way. Sometimes, they actually lean to opposite sides, as if their souls were repellent magnets. They speak to each other—if at all—only through the mediation of Chief Justice John Roberts. As the impeachment trial into President Donald Trump get

16h

6 reasons dogs truly are man's best friend

Dogs have been man's best friend for at least the past 15,000 years. Science now shows that this symbiotic relationship has been as beneficial for humans as their canine companions. Benefits of dog ownership include familial ties, a reduce risk of schizophrenia, and improved cardiovascular health. None Under cover of darkness, a pack of ancient wolves slowly stalk the camps of our nomadic ancesto

17h

Jeff Bezos' Hacked Phone, Coronavirus Hits the US, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

17h

Experts Can't Agree If the Wuhan Virus Is a Global Crisis

As the death toll and infection numbers climb, international health officials struggle to make sense of sparse data on the coronavirus from China.

17h

Earth's 40 Billion-Dollar Weather Disasters of 2019: 4th Most on Record

Seven nations or territories see their costliest weather disasters in history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Deadlocked WHO panel puts off decision on global virus alarm

Group of experts wants more data before calling coronavirus outbreak an international health emergency

17h

Scientists Discover Ancient Viruses Inside Glacier

Break the Ice In 2015, a team of scientists from the United States and China traveled to Tibet to gather samples of Earth's oldest glacial ice. Earlier this month, they published a paper on the pre-print server bioRxiv detailing their discovery of 28 new virus groups in the 15,000-year-old ice — and warning that climate change could free the ancient viruses into the modern world. Ancient Viruses

17h

Smokers Should Quit at Least 4 Weeks Before Surgery, W.H.O. says

In a new study, the health agency urges hospitals and surgeons to play a bigger role to help the world's 1 billion smokers kick the habit.

17h

Researchers Discover 15 New Parasitic Wasps That Mind Control Spiders

Before being eaten by the wasp larvae, the spiders build them a cocoon for their metamorphosis.

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Study results will inform immunization programs globally

The results of the B Part of It study — the largest meningococcal B herd immunity study ever conducted — are published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Medicare may overpay for many surgical procedures

For most surgical procedures, Medicare provides physicians a single bundled payment that covers both the procedure and related postoperative care over a period of up to 90 days. But a mounting body of evidence suggests that surgeons do not provide most of that postoperative care, suggesting changes are needed to make Medicare payments more equitable.

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Genetically Engineered Virus Protects Mice Against Deadly Effects of Nerve Gas and Pesticides

Early research suggests virus can protect rodents without negative side effects. Gas-mask.jpg Image credits: UzFoto/Shutterstock Technology Wednesday, January 22, 2020 – 17:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A single injection of a new gene therapy protected mice from the effects of sarin and other deadly chemical warfare agents for months, new work that could not only help defe

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The oldest fungi fossils have been identified in a Belgian museum

Fossils now confirmed to be at least 715 million-year-old fungi could help us understand how they interacted with the earliest plants on Earth

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Mount Vesuvius eruption 'turned victim's brain to glass'

Scientists discover vitrified remains caused by immense 520C heat of disaster in AD79 When Mount Vesuvius erupted in AD79, the damage wreaked in nearby towns was catastrophic. Now it appears the heat was so immense it turned one victim's brain to glass – thought to be the first time this has been seen. Experts say they have discovered that splatters of a shiny, solid black material found inside t

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Four great treadmills for a convenient home workout

You can't beat this gym commute. (Depositphotos/) Getting regular exercise year-round requires motivation, perseverance, and convenient access to your workout of choice. No matter how much you want to drag yourself to the gym after a long day at the office, it's easy to throw in the towel rather than deal with the hassle of getting there. When you have a treadmill in your home, you have one less

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Australia's Yarrabubba Asteroid Impact Crater Is Oldest on Earth

A new study precisely dates the event to 2.229 billion years ago and suggests that it may have been responsible for ending an ice age.

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Can psychedelics help treat pain?

Pharmacology professor Richard J. Miller is hopeful for the resurgence in clinical studies of psychedelics. Ibogaine, used in France for decades, is making a comeback in potentially helping curb addiction and treat pain. Psychedelics were deemed illegal for political and not medical reasons, an error we are reinvestigating. None With all the hype regarding the potential for psychedelics to help t

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Nature study: First ancient DNA from West Africa illuminates the deep human past

The research team sequenced DNA from four children buried 8,000 and 3,000 years ago at Shum Laka in Cameroon, a site excavated by a Belgian and Cameroonian team 30 years ago. The findings, published Jan. 22 in Nature, represent the first ancient DNA from West or Central Africa, and some of the oldest DNA recovered from an African tropical context. They enable a new understanding of the deep ancest

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The best electronic drum kits for music production

Drums without the noise. (freestocks.org via Unsplash/) Professional drummers, music producer, and drum enthusiasts everywhere know just how complicated owning a traditional set of drums can be. On one hand, few things are as innately gratifying as banging with sticks to keep a beat. On the other hand, if you're sharing a wall with someone else or have a tiny space, you're setting yourself up for

18h

Mathematicians Say They've Figured Out How to Brew a Better Espresso Shot

The sacred belief that finely ground espresso beans are supreme doesn't hold up to scientific testing.

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Opinion: Postdocs as Competent Peer Reviewers

Constructively critiquing the scientific literature should be an essential part of the postdoctoral experience, and early career researchers have shown that they are up to the task.

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WHO warning on vaping draws harsh response from U.K. researchers

Risks and benefits of e-cigarettes fiercely disputed

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This Biohacker Conference Sounds Absolutely Outrageous

"Please Try This At Home" wasn't your average biohacker conference. "The event was a gathering of 'Anarchotranshumanists, Xenofeminists, and Queer Cyborgs' who spent a weekend trying to imagine and build something better than the medical system marginalized bodies are frequently harmed by," journalist Os Keyes wrote in a fascinating Vice story about the second PTTAH conference , which took place

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Snakes Could Be the Original Source of the New Coronavirus Outbreak in China

A study of the virus's genetic sequence suggests similarities to that seen in snakes, but the origin must still be verified — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Climate-friendly food choices protect the planet, promote health, reduce health costs

Increased uptake of plant-based diets in New Zealand could substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions while greatly improving population health and saving the healthcare system billions of dollars in the coming decades, according to a new University of Otago study.

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Shark attacks were 'unusually low' in 2019

Shark attacks in 2019 were unusually low for the second year running, with 64 unprovoked bites in 2019, researchers report. According to the University of Florida's International Shark Attack File , the total was roughly in line with 2018's 62 bites and about 22% lower than the most recent five-year average of 82 incidents a year. Two of the bites, one in Reunion, Florida and one in the Bahamas,

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Feds Want to Rein In 'Emotional Service' Animals on Planes

The viral photos of mini-horses in cabin seats may be numbered, as the Transportation Department announces an effort to ground "Noah's Ark in the air."

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Snakes Could Be the Source of the Coronavirus Outbreak in China

Snakes – the Chinese krait and the Chinese cobra – may be involved in the newly discovered coronavirus that has triggered an outbreak of a deadly infectious respiratory illness in China this winter.

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Snakes Could Be the Original Source of the New Coronavirus Outbreak in China

A study of the virus's genetic sequence suggests similarities to that seen in snakes, but the origin must still be verified — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Skin Cream Could Protect Against Diseases Like Zika and Dengue

Researchers say a skin cream for warts and skin cancer could also prevent infection from certain viruses.

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Genetic modification could protect soldiers from chemical weapons

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US states to challenge publication of 3D-printed gun files

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The Rich Are Preparing For The Apocalypse Better Than You | VICE on HBO

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Google publishes largest ever high-resolution map of brain connectivity

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Memphis Meats raises $161 million Series B to grow meat from cells

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Surprise discovery shakes up our understanding of gene expression

A group of scientists has uncovered a previously unknown way that our genes are made into reality. Rather than directions going one-way from DNA to RNA to proteins, the latest study shows that RNA itself modulates how DNA is transcribed — using a chemical process that is increasingly apparent to be vital to biology. The discovery has significant implications for our understanding of human disease

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Despite less ozone pollution, not all plants benefit

Policies and new technologies have reduced emissions of precursor gases that lead to ozone air pollution, but despite those improvements, the amount of ozone that plants are taking in has not followed the same trend, according to researchers.

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Surprise discovery shakes up our understanding of gene expression

A group of scientists has uncovered a previously unknown way that our genes are made into reality. Rather than directions going one-way from DNA to RNA to proteins, the latest study shows that RNA itself modulates how DNA is transcribed — using a chemical process that is increasingly apparent to be vital to biology. The discovery has significant implications for our understanding of human disease

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Ready For Meat Grown From Animal Cells? A Startup Plans A Pilot Facility

Memphis Meats, a startup company that has just raised $161 million, says it has a "clear path" to bringing cell-based meats to market. Yet the company and its competitors face challenges. (Image credit: Allison Aubrey/NPR)

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Here, there and everywhere: Large and giant viruses abound globally

In Nature, a team led by researchers at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) uncovered a broad diversity of large and giant viruses that belong to the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) supergroup. As a result, virus diversity in this group expanded 10-fold from

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Traces of the European enlightenment found in the DNA of western sign languages

Sign languages throughout North and South America and Europe have centuries-long roots in five European locations, a finding that gives new insight into the influence of the European Enlightenment on many of the world's signing communities and the evolution of their languages.

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Status report: OSIRIS-REx completes closest flyover of sample site nightingale

OSIRIS-REx successfully executed a 0.4-mile (620-m) flyover of site Nightingale yesterday as part of the mission's Reconnaissance B phase activities.

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Keeping lead out of drinking water when switching disinfectants

Researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis found that the hazards of switching disinfectants in water systems — increased lead levels — can be mitigated if the change is done correctly.

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This Functioning Driverless Car Has No Driver's Seat

No Hands Self-driving company Cruise, a Honda-backed General Motors subsidiary, has unveiled an SUV-sized vehicle called "Origin" that's been designed from the ground up to never have a driver, The Verge reports . "We built this car around the idea of not having a driver and specifically being used in a ride-share fleet," Cruise co-founder Kyle Vogt told The Verge . Room for Activities Instead of

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