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13h

 

New species of Allosaurus discovered in Utah

 

A remarkable new species of meat-eating dinosaur, Allosaurus jimmadseni, was unveiled at the Natural History Museum of Utah. The huge carnivore inhabited the flood plains of western North America during the Late Jurassic Period, between 157-152 million years ago, making it the geologically oldest species of Allosaurus, predating the more well-known state fossil of Utah, Allosaurus fragilis.

4h

 

Larm fra trafikken slår ihjel: Millioner udsættes for farlig trafikstøj – og flere kommer til

 

PLUS. Stigende trafik på især motorveje udsætter flere danskere for støj, som forskerne stadigt mere entydigt kobler til sygdomsrisiko.

13h

 

Like It or Not, Automation Is Coming

 

We should embrace its benefits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8min

 

Organoids show the brain's cognitive centre taking shape

 

Nature, Published online: 23 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00174-6 Brain models in a dish offer clues to molecular signals involved in the human forebrain's development.

12min

 

With a protein 'delivery,' parasite can suppress its host's immune response

 

The parasite Toxoplasma gondii need not infect a host immune cell to alter its behavior, according to a new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.

18min

 

Dance of the honey bee reveals fondness for strawberries

 

Bees are pollinators of many plants, but their diversity and density is declining. A team led by Göttingen investigated their foraging behaviour in agricultural landscapes. They found that honey bees prefer strawberry fields, even if flowering next to oilseed rape fields. Only when oilseed rape was in full bloom were fewer honey bees in the strawberries. Wild bees, on the other hand, consistently

18min

 

MTU engineers examine lithium battery defects

 

Lithium dendrites cause poor performance and even explosions in batteries with flammable liquid electrolytes. How these dendrites grow, even with a solid electrolytes, is still a mystery, but materials engineers at MTU and Oak Ridge study the conditions that enable dendrites and how to stop them.

18min

 

Principales for a green chemistry future

 

A team led by researchers from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies recently authored a paper featured in Science that outlines how green chemistry is essential for a sustainable future.

18min

 

Like It or Not, Automation Is Coming

 

We should embrace its benefits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20min

 

New AI can identify you by your dancing "fingerprint"

 

The way we dance to music is so signature to an individual that a computer can now identify us by our unique dancing "fingerprint" with over 90 percent accuracy. The AI had a harder time identifying dancers who were trying to dance to metal and jazz music. Researchers say they are interested in what the results of this study reveal about human response to music, rather than potential surveillance

20min

 

Virologist: China Pandemic Will Be At Least 10x Worse Than SARS

 

As China struggles to contain the deadly coronavirus that originated in the city of Wuhan and has since spread throughout the world, disease experts have a grim outlook. The pandemic naturally invites comparisons to the SARS outbreak of 2003, which killed over 700 people around the world. But Guan Yi, a virologist who helped identify SARS, told The Washington Post that "conservatively," the Wuhan

22min

 

The CDC just confirmed a second U.S. case of the Wuhan coronavirus

 

The virus first emerged in China, but has now been confirmed in Nepal, Macau, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Singapore, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and the United States. A second case of the new coronavirus out of Wuhan has been confirmed in the United States, the CDC announced in a press briefing Friday morning. That makes two confirmed patients, with more expected in the coming weeks. However,

25min

 

Here's What Meteors Streaking Toward Earth Look Like From Space

 

An astronaut aboard the International Space Station captured the action as a shower of bright fireball meteors rained down

28min

 

See Boston Dynamics' Robot Dog Tackle an Outdoor Obstacle Course

 

Former "MythBusters" co-host Adam Savage compared himself to a kid with an early Christmas present in the intro to a newly released video for his "Tested" YouTube series. The reason? He was sitting on large crate containing Boston Dynamics' robot dog, Spot. "This is an object I have coveted for years — literally years," Savage said, adding, "Time for some adventures!" As Savage explained in the v

30min

 

Acetone plus light creates a green jet fuel additive

 

Take biomass-derived acetone — common nail polish remover — use light to upgrade it to higher-mass hydrocarbons, and, voila, you have a domestically generated product that can be blended with conventional jet fuel to fly while providing environmental benefits, creating domestic jobs, securing the nation's global leadership in bioenergy technologies, and improving U.S. energy security.

30min

 

Storm Gloria claims 12 lives in Spain, four missing

 

A violent storm which wrought havoc across huge swathes of Spain's eastern and southern coastline this week claimed 12 lives and left four others missing, Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said Friday, blaming climate change for the extreme weather.

34min

 

Quantum physics: On the way to quantum networks

 

Physicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich, together with colleagues at Saarland University, have successfully demonstrated the transport of an entangled state between an atom and a photon via an optic fiber over a distance of up to 20 km — thus setting a new record.

36min

 

Weight loss and health improvements with Mediterranean, fasting & Paleo diets

 

There were some weight loss and health benefits for overweight adults who followed the Mediterranean, Intermittent Fasting and Paleo diets, though adherence to the diets dropped off considerably during the one-year study, new research shows.

38min

 

Predictive touch response mechanism is a step toward a tactile internet

 

A team of researchers has developed a method for enhancing haptic feedback experiences in human-to-machine applications that are typical in the Tactile Internet.

38min

 

2018's Four Corners drought directly linked to human-caused climate change

 

The western United States has experienced such intense droughts over the past decade that technical descriptions are becoming inadequate. In many places, conditions are rocketing past "severe," through "extreme," all the way to "exceptional drought."

38min

 

Mapping the cumulative health effects of environmental exposures

 

The genomics revolution has provided powerful insights into genetic risk factors for human disease while also revealing the limits of genetic determinants, which account for only a fraction of total disease risk. A new article argues that a similar large-scale effort is needed to ensure a more complete picture of disease risk by accounting for the exposome, defined as our cumulative exposure to en

38min

 

Acetone plus light creates a green jet fuel additive

 

Take biomass-derived acetone — common nail polish remover — use light to upgrade it to higher-mass hydrocarbons, and, voila, you have a domestically generated product that can be blended with conventional jet fuel to fly while providing environmental benefits, creating domestic jobs, securing the nation's global leadership in bioenergy technologies, and improving U.S. energy security.

38min

 

US confirms second coronavirus case as China extends travel ban

 

Shutdown affects 36m people as S&P warns disease could hurt economic growth

42min

 

Get Out, Do Science, Make a Difference: The Field Guide to Citizen Science

 

Coming this February, the Field Guide to Citizen Science appeared on a Discover Magazine "reading list for a greater appreciation of the universe in 2020." Now you get a first look at the book's introduction!

45min

 

Drug To Prevent Premature Birth Divides Doctors, Insurers And FDA Experts

 

An expert panel convened by the FDA says the drug Makena should be withdrawn from the market because a review of its effectiveness shows it doesn't work. But OB-GYNS who prescribe the drug disagree. (Image credit: Luis Davilla/Getty Images)

46min

 

The Blue Acceleration: Recent colossal rise in human pressure on ocean quantified

 

Human pressure on the world's oceans accelerated sharply at the start of the 21st century and shows no sign of slowing, according to a comprehensive new analysis on the state of the ocean.

48min

 

Four "Generations" of Spread Seen with Virus in China, Alarming Experts

 

Evidence suggests at least one Chinese patient ignited a chain of human-to-human transmission — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

50min

 

Deciphering the sugar code

 

Like animals and humans, plants possess a kind of immune system. It can e.g. recognize pathogenic fungi by the chitin in their cell walls, triggering disease resistance. Some fungi hide from the immune system by modifying some of the chitin building blocks, converting chitin into chitosan. Researchers of the University of Münster now found that plants can react to a certain pattern in this chitosa

54min

 

Deciphering the sugar code

 

Like animals and humans, plants possess a kind of immune system. It can e.g. recognize pathogenic fungi by the chitin in their cell walls, triggering disease resistance. Some fungi hide from the immune system by modifying some of the chitin building blocks, converting chitin into chitosan. Researchers of the University of Münster now found that plants can react to a certain pattern in this chitosa

54min

 

Researchers explain how disorder in tiny crystals enables heat-therapeutic systems

 

A new research study at the Institute of Electronic Structure and Lasers (IESL) of the Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH) finds that minute crystals, many thousand times smaller than a particle of dust, when they are dressed by the right kind of imperfections, adjust their electronic properties to favorably convert energy into heat, an important attribute for potential use in sm

54min

 

NASA's Kepler witnesses vampire star system undergoing super-outburst

 

NASA's Kepler spacecraft was designed to find exoplanets by looking for stars that dim as a planet crosses the star's face. Fortuitously, the same design makes it ideal for spotting other astronomical transients—objects that brighten or dim over time. A new search of Kepler archival data has uncovered an unusual super-outburst from a previously unknown dwarf nova. The system brightened by a factor

54min

 

The Blue Acceleration: Recent colossal rise in human pressure on ocean quantified

 

Human pressure on the world's ocean accelerated sharply at the start of the 21st century and shows no sign of slowing, according to a comprehensive new analysis on the state of the ocean.Scientists have dubbed the dramatic rise the "Blue Acceleration". The researchers from the Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, synthesized 50-years of data from shipping, drilling, deep-sea mining,

58min

 

Family caregivers are rarely asked about needing assistance with caring for older adults

 

Family caregivers usually are not asked by health care workers about needing support in managing older adults' care, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

58min

 

Increasing opportunities for sustainable behavior

 

To mitigate climate change and safeguard ecosystems, we need to make drastic changes in our consumption and transport behaviors. A new IIASA study shows how even minor changes to available infrastructure can trigger tipping points in the collective adoption of sustainable behaviors.

58min

 

Nano-thin flexible touchscreens could be printed like newspaper

 

Taking a thin film common in cell phone touchscreens, researchers have used liquid metal chemistry to shrink it from 3D to 2D. The ultra-thin and ultra-flexible electronic material could be printed and rolled out like newspaper, for the touchscreens of the future.

58min

 

I

Study suggests sperm donation, like organs, should be allowed post-mortem

 

Many parts of the world are suffering from a shortage of sperm donors due to the high bar for acceptance and varying laws regarding donor anonymity. A recent article suggested that, as a solution, we should consider allowing men to opt-in to posthumous sperm donation, much like men and women do for organ donation. It's technically feasible, but how would we navigate the complex ethical and legal

1h

 

Canadian start-up GHGSat to make global methane map

 

A private company tracing methane emissions is building a global map of the gas in Earth's atmosphere.

1h

 

Antallet af trafikdræbte og tilskadekomne i København stiger med 30 procent

 

224 personer kom alvorligt til skade på de københavnske gader i 2018. Og syv mistede livet. Det er det højeste antal siden 2008. Ombygning af kryds og ensretning flere steder kan øge sikkerheden

1h

 

Coronavirus: second confirmed US case identified in Chicago

 

Individual recently travelled from the Wuhan region of China, where the virus is believed to originate Live updates on the coronavirus outbreak A traveler in Chicago has been identified as the US's second confirmed case of the coronavirus . The Illinois department of health has confirmed the latest diagnosis to local news radio station WBBM. According to health officials, the individual recently

1h

 

'I felt like ET': UK man describes surreal coronavirus quarantine

 

Michael Hope says he struggled to get GP appointment until he revealed he had been in China Coronavirus death toll rises to 26 – live updates When Michael Hope returned to the UK from Wuhan in China and started to feel unwell, his first thought was that he had jet lag. Four days later he was struggling to breathe and coughing continuously. His family urged him to seek medical advice. From the mom

1h

 

High-protein diets boost artery-clogging plaque, mouse study shows

 

High-protein diets may help people lose weight and build muscle, but a new study in mice suggests they have a down side: They lead to more plaque in the arteries. Further, the new research shows that high-protein diets spur unstable plaque — the kind most prone to rupturing and causing blocked arteries. More plaque buildup in the arteries, particularly if it's unstable, increases the risk of hear

1h

 

China Is Building a 1,000-Bed Hospital Specifically to Treat Mystery Epidemic

 

The Chinese city of Wuhan is building a 1,000-bed hospital specifically to treat victims of the deadly virus that has killed dozens in China and infected hundreds worldwide, Reuters reports . More than 100 construction workers plan to finish the hospital in six days, according to The Guardian , and to expedite construction authorities are using prefabricated buildings. The news comes after China

1h

 

These adorable sharks have evolved to walk across the seafloor

 

Walking sharks have strong muscular pectoral fins that allow them to take strides along the seafloor. In the waters surrounding Australia, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea, there lives a very unusual kind of shark. Known as walking sharks, the nine species of the genus Hemiscyllium have the ability to crawl across the seafloor. "They'll stand up on their very muscular pectoral fins and they'll kin

1h

 

What ocean microbes reveal about the changing climate | Angelicque White

 

When the ocean changes, the planet changes — and it all starts with microbes, says biological oceanographer Angelicque White. Backed by decades of data, White shares how scientists use these ancient microorganisms as a crucial barometer of ocean health — and how we might rejuvenate them as marine temperatures steadily rise.

1h

 

Registry data — of sufficient quality — suitable for extended benefit assessment of drugs

 

Registry data — of sufficient quality — are suitable for the extended benefit assessment of drugs. Rapid report shows how routine practice data should be collected and processed.

1h

 

Deciphering the sugar code

 

Like animals and humans, plants possess a kind of immune system. It can e.g. recognize pathogenic fungi by the chitin in their cell walls, triggering disease resistance. Some fungi hide from the immune system by modifying some of the chitin building blocks, converting chitin into chitosan. Researchers of the University of Münster now found that plants can react to a certain pattern in this chitosa

1h

 

Australia fires speed global CO2 level rise: UK Met Office

 

Carbon emissions from the wildfires that have ravaged much of southeast Australia are a major driver of what are predicted to be record worldwide atmospheric CO2 levels throughout 2020, Britain's Met Office said Friday.

1h

 

The regulators active during iron deficiency

 

Iron deficiency is a critical situation for plants, which respond using specific genetic programmes. Biologists from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and Michigan State University (MSU) used artificial intelligence methods to examine how to predict regulatory genetic sequences. They have now published the findings from their joint research work in the journal Plant Physiology.

1h

 

Horror movies manipulate brain activity expertly to enhance excitement

 

Finnish research team maps neural activity in response to watching horror movies. A study conducted by the University of Turku shows the top horror movies of the past 100 years, and how they manipulate brain activity.

1h

 

The highways of our brain

 

Researcher of the Netherlands Institute for neuroscience found that myelin, the sheath around neurons, creates a coaxial cable producing multiple waves of electrical potentials traveling in a more complicated manner than was envisioned earlier. These findings allow us to create better theories and tools to understand demyelinating diseases, including the most common neurological disorder, multiple

1h

 

Teen boys and girls now do equal amounts of housework

 

While women still do nearly twice as much housework as men, the division of labor between boys and girls doing household chores is nearly equal, according to a new study. Researchers studied change in housework as well as "marketwork"—work done for pay outside the home—between 1983 and 2015. This kind of core household chores include the daily drudgery of washing dishes, sweeping, and vacuuming.

1h

 

Organisational Mechanics of Voice and Exit

 

submitted by /u/dx1012 [link] [comments]

1h

 

New research Reveals How Some People Function With Only Half a Brain

 

submitted by /u/smallpocketlibrary [link] [comments]

1h

 

The regulators active during iron deficiency

 

Iron deficiency is a critical situation for plants, which respond using specific genetic programmes. Biologists from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and Michigan State University (MSU) used artificial intelligence methods to examine how to predict regulatory genetic sequences. They have now published the findings from their joint research work in the journal Plant Physiology.

1h

 

Locusts the latest curse of East Africa weather extremes

 

Billions of locusts swarming through East Africa are the result of extreme weather swings and could prove catastrophic for a region still reeling from drought and deadly floods, experts said Friday.

1h

 

UK nuclear fusion reactor will fire up for the first time in 23 years

 

Within months researchers will attempt to create a ball of plasma hotter than the sun inside the Joint European Torus, a doughnut-shaped machine in south-east England

1h

 

UK coronavirus tests clear 14 people

 

Chief medical officer says more people being checked for virus which has broken out in China Follow the latest coronavirus news Tests for coronavirus on 14 people in the UK have come back negative but checks are being carried out on other people, the chief medical officer has said. Prof Chris Whitty made the announcement on Friday after the Cobra emergency committee met to discuss the threat to t

1h

 

Inequality is bad for society, economic prosperity good

 

Rich countries vary a lot when it comes to health and social problems. A comparison of social ills ranging from intentional homicides to obesity rates in 40 rich societies shows that Asian and European countries fare much better than Anglophone and Latin American countries. The most problem-ridden countries are Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay and the United States. The positive end of the list is hea

1h

 

Our pee could become fertilizer with low drug-resistance risk

 

Recycled and aged human urine can serve as a fertilizer with low risks of spreading antibiotic-resistant DNA, according to new research. It's a key finding in efforts to identify more sustainable alternatives to widely used fertilizers that contribute to water pollution. Their high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus can spur the growth of algae, which can threaten our sources of drinking water. Ur

1h

 

Adding memory to pressure-sensitive phosphors

 

Mechanoluminescence (ML) is a type of luminescence induced by any mechanical action on a solid, leading to a range of applications in materials research, photonics and optics. For instance, the mechanical action can release energy previously stored in the crystal lattice of phosphor via trapped charge carriers. However, the method has limits when recording ML emissions during a pressure-induced ev

1h

 

Schools and media key to cutting financial illiteracy

 

Japan's government should set up special programs to teach financial literacy in schools and through the media, according to researchers who carried out a detailed study of the causes of low levels of ability in handling money.

1h

 

NASA launches in-depth snow study—first in 30 years

 

The last time NASA carried out an in-depth study of winter storms in the heavily populated Northeast, the Berlin Wall had just come down and George H.W. Bush occupied the White House.

1h

 

Chinese tariff rate quota policy severely impacted US wheat exports

 

The U.S. and China recently agreed to a phase one trade deal that aims to resolve the current trade war between the two countries. But that is just the latest development in longstanding and complicated U.S.-Chinese trade disputes.

1h

 

Biologist provides framework for national invasive species policy, implementation

 

A special issue of the journal Biological Invasions, co-edited by University of Rhode Island ecologist Laura Meyerson and University of Tennessee biologist Daniel Simberloff, provides a pathway to strengthening national policies and implementing strategies for addressing a growing threat to national security—invasive species.

1h

 

As gray whale migration reaches its peak, scientists fear another unexplained die-off

 

As California gray whales wind their way south along North America's Pacific coast—from their feeding grounds in the Arctic to their spring destination in the secluded lagoons of Mexico's Baja Peninsula—researchers from Alaska to Mexico are watching, worried about another year of unexplained die-offs.

1h

 

Is Nutrition Research Broken? An Interview with Taylor Wallace

 

U.S. dietary recommendations lag decades behind the emerging science on diet and nutrition — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

 

Biologist provides framework for national invasive species policy, implementation

 

A special issue of the journal Biological Invasions, co-edited by University of Rhode Island ecologist Laura Meyerson and University of Tennessee biologist Daniel Simberloff, provides a pathway to strengthening national policies and implementing strategies for addressing a growing threat to national security—invasive species.

1h

 

As gray whale migration reaches its peak, scientists fear another unexplained die-off

 

As California gray whales wind their way south along North America's Pacific coast—from their feeding grounds in the Arctic to their spring destination in the secluded lagoons of Mexico's Baja Peninsula—researchers from Alaska to Mexico are watching, worried about another year of unexplained die-offs.

1h

 

15,000-year-old viruses found in Tibetan glacier

 

A team of researchers from The Ohio State University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found a host of ancient virus groups in ice cores taken from a Tibetan glacier. They have written a paper about their discovery and uploaded it to the bioRxiv preprint server.

1h

 

What Are RAs' Social Lives Like?

 

Each installment of The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with a man and a woman who met as residential assistants (RAs) at the University of Hartford about the unique social situation that arises when you are an authority figure to your peers. The j

1h

 

The Books Briefing: Short Stories to Read and Reread This Weekend

 

In recent years, The Atlantic 's publication of short stories has only been occasional. But the magazine has harbored a love of literature since its very first issue —and thanks to our new fiction initiative , you'll soon see short stories on our site on a more regular basis. To that end, we're starting with Lauren Groff's new story, "Birdie," in which a visit to a friend's deathbed prompts a wom

1h

 

Inequality is bad for society, economic prosperity good

 

Rich countries vary a lot when it comes to health and social problems. A comparison of social ills ranging from intentional homicides to obesity rates in 40 rich societies shows that Asian and European countries fare much better than Anglophone and Latin American countries. The most problem-ridden countries are Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay and the United States.

1h

 

The regulators active during iron deficiency

 

Iron deficiency is a critical situation for plants, which respond using specific genetic programmes. Biologists from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and Michigan State University (MSU) used artificial intelligence methods to examine how to predict regulatory genetic sequences. They have now published the findings from their joint research work in the journal Plant Physiology.

1h

 

15,000-year-old viruses found in Tibetan glacier

 

A team of researchers from The Ohio State University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found a host of ancient virus groups in ice cores taken from a Tibetan glacier. They have written a paper about their discovery and uploaded it to the bioRxiv preprint server.

1h

 

Hål lagade i anonymitetsnätverket Tor

 

Anonymitetsnätverket Tor, med miljontals dagliga användare världen över, är viktigt för människor i utsatta situationer för att exempelvis undgå övervakning eller censur. Nu har två Karlstadforskare identifierat brister i anonymitetsskyddet och bidragit till tekniker som gör nätverket säkrare för användarna. Syftet med Tor är att du som användare ska kunna surfa på webben anonymt utan att informa

1h

 

Vart tredje barn med leukemi har D-vitaminbrist

 

En tredjedel av barn med leukemi i Sverige har för låga halter av D-vitamin redan vid diagnosen. Låga värden kan också associeras med sämre överlevnad hos barn upp till 6 år, enligt en ny forskningsstudie vid Akademiska sjukhuset/Uppsala universitet. – Normala D-vitaminnivåer är positivt både för friska och sjuka barn. Det kan vara så att de barn som hade vitaminvärden under 50 nmol/L, som är grä

1h

 

Hold businesses to account on their carbon footprints by including their supply chains

 

Donald Trump may not believe climate change is happening, but most business leaders do and it is no surprise to see it top of the agenda at the World Economic Forum in Davos.

2h

 

A new stretchable battery can power wearable electronics

 

Electronics are showing up everywhere: on our laps, in pockets and purses and, increasingly, snuggled up against our skin or sewed into our clothing.

2h

 

Researchers find ways to improve on soap and water

 

Nanosafety researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health have developed a new intervention to fight infectious disease by more effectively disinfecting the air around us, our food, our hands, and whatever else harbors the microbes that make us sick. The researchers, from the School's Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, were led by Associate Professor of Aerosol Physics Phi

2h

 

How high-protein diets could increase heart attack risk

 

High-protein diets may help people lose weight and build muscle, but a new study in mice suggests a down side: more plaque in the arteries. Further, the new research shows that high-protein diets spur unstable plaque—the kind most prone to rupturing and causing blocked arteries. More plaque buildup in the arteries, particularly if it's unstable, increases the risk of heart attack. "There are clea

2h

 

Researchers create novel platform to standardize paleoclimatology data

 

Sometimes the most unrelated things can produce the most innovative results. Take, for instance, aikido—a Japanese martial art that can be translated as the "way of unifying energy"—and paleoclimatology, a scientific field examining climate evolution.

2h

 

Growing global population: Research into food production lacks a holistic perspective

 

Meeting one of the great challenges of our time—providing a growing global population with food—requires research with a holistic perspective on food production, people's eating habits, and the population increase. However, during the last few decades, the world's researchers have primarily focused on the first of these factors, and more or less ignored the other two. This has recently been establ

2h

 

Holocaust archaeology: Uncovering vital evidence to prove the deniers wrong

 

It's now 75 years since Soviet troops liberated the notorious death camp at Auschwitz and the vast majority of Holocaust survivors are no longer with us. The impact of continuing to research the Holocaust can, therefore, not be underestimated. The further away we move from the events and the more first-hand witnesses we lose, the more disconnected we feel, both individually and as a society.

2h

 

Efforts to tackle tobacco harm explored by experts

 

The impact of the tobacco display ban on young people's attitudes to smoking has been analysed by University of Stirling experts.

2h

 

More than 40% of status epilepticus patients suffer adverse outcomes

 

A new study published in Seizure gives insight into the short-term outcome of patients treated for status epilepticus in Kuopio University Hospital in Finland. The researchers found a 9% risk of death and a 32% risk of functional loss at one month after status epilepticus. The patient's risk of death could be predicted relatively reliably already in the emergency room by using status epilepticus-r

2h

 

A new stretchable battery can power wearable electronics

 

The adoption of wearable electronics has so far been limited by their need to derive power from bulky, rigid batteries that reduce comfort and may present safety hazards due to chemical leakage or combustion. Stanford researchers have developed a soft and stretchable battery that relies on a special type of plastic to store power more safely than the flammable formulations used in conventional bat

2h

 

Microsoft's Moonshot Plan to Reverse Its Lifetime CO2 Emissions by 2050

 

The alarming headlines about Australia's bush fires over the last couple weeks have heightened the global outcry over climate change, and companies, NGOs, and governments are taking action. One of the most ambitious targets was set last week by Microsoft. In a press conference on January 16, CEO Satya Nadella announced that not only does the company plan to be carbon negative by 2030 , but if it

2h

 

Nature-deficit disorder: What kids lose by not experiencing the outdoors enough

 

"Nature-deficit disorder" is the term coined by author Richard Louv, to help put a name to the ever-growing problems associated with children spending less time in nature. Research has provided evidence that prove Richard Louv's theories on the importance of nature to the human body and mind. This research proves a link between time spent in nature and improvements in areas such as motivation, pr

2h

 

An S.O.S. for Australian wildlife

 

Almost 30 people have died and thousands of homes have burned as wildfires have rampaged through Australia, but it is the wildlife that has borne the biggest brunt of the devastation.

2h

 

Calls for global ban on wild animal markets amid coronavirus outbreak

 

Experts say wildlife sold for human consumption raises risk of new epidemics Wild animal markets must be banned worldwide, say experts in and outside China, warning that the sale of sometimes endangered species for human consumption is the cause both of the new coronavirus outbreak and other past epidemics. The Huanan seafood market in Wuhan, which has been closed down as the source of the infect

2h

 

An S.O.S. for Australian wildlife

 

Almost 30 people have died and thousands of homes have burned as wildfires have rampaged through Australia, but it is the wildlife that has borne the biggest brunt of the devastation.

2h

 

Four graphs that suggest we can't blame climate change on solar activity

 

The past decade (2010-2019) was the hottest on record and five of the top 10 warmest single years have all occurred since 2015, according to reports released by the UK Met Office and the World Meteorological Organisation.

2h

 

Public database of mine tailings storage facilities launched to prevent dam failures

 

Environmental organization GRID-Arendal with support from the UN Environment Program has launched the world's first publicly accessible global database of mine tailings storage facilities.

2h

 

URI biologist provides framework for national invasive species policy, implementation

 

A special issue of the journal Biological Invasions, co-edited by University of Rhode Island ecologist Laura Meyerson and University of Tennessee biologist Daniel Simberloff, provides a pathway to strengthening national policies and implementing strategies for addressing a growing threat to national security – invasive species.

2h

 

Polygraph lie detector tests: Can they really stop criminals reoffending?

 

The UK government recently announced it was planning to increase the use of polygraphs to monitor offenders on probation, specifically those convicted of terrorist offenses.

2h

 

What we learn from a fish that can change sex in just 10 days

 

The bluehead wrasse is a fish that lives in small social groups in coral reefs in the Caribbean. Only the male has a blue head—signaling his social dominance over a harem of yellow-striped females.

2h

 

What we learn from a fish that can change sex in just 10 days

 

The bluehead wrasse is a fish that lives in small social groups in coral reefs in the Caribbean. Only the male has a blue head—signaling his social dominance over a harem of yellow-striped females.

2h

 

How to help your kids with homework—without doing it for them

 

Parents are a child's first and most important teachers. Parent involvement in their child's learning can help improve how well they do in school. However, when it comes to helping kids with homework, it's not so simple.

2h

 

Female bigamists often treated lightly by judges, researcher finds

 

When "Britain's most notorious bigamist," Emily Horne, was handed a 10-month suspended prison sentence in 2009 for marrying five times without ever divorcing, her gender caught many off guard.

2h

 

Is turmeric-film packaging the future for supermarket shelves?

 

Researchers in Malaysia have developed a biopolymer film incorporating turmeric oil that stops the growth of a common food fungus and degrades well in soil. The film could provide an environmentally friendly way to extend food shelf life.

2h

 

Gravity: We might have been getting it wrong this whole time

 

Symmetry has been one of the guiding principles in physicists' search for fundamental laws of nature. What does it mean that laws of nature have symmetry? It means that laws look the same before and after an operation, similar to a mirror reflection, the same but right is now left in the reflection.

2h

 

Experimental probe of a complete 3-D photonic band gap

 

A crystal with a 3-D photonic band gap is a powerful tool to control light, with applications for new types of solar cells, sensors and miniature lasers. Inside a man-made crystal like this, a range of light wavelengths is forbidden. Until now, the characteristic wavelength region is determined by using theoretical models. These idealized models have clear shortcomings. Researchers of the Universi

2h

 

Scientists capture molecular maps of animal tissue with unprecedented detail

 

Scientists have refined a technique called mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) that translates reams of data into detailed visuals of the molecular makeup of biological samples. Their work features images with mass resolution so high that every color in the image represents a distinct kind of molecule.

2h

 

Sonos just reminded everyone that every smart gadget has an expiration date

 

The Sonos One is still in production for now. (Stan Horaczek /) This week, connected audio company Sonos announced that it was ending official support for several of its earlier products. This collection of speakers, amps, and subs came from a time where wireless audio was expensive and smart speakers didn't live in every room of your house—we even gave it a Best of What's New award back in 2004.

2h

 

Experts call for overhaul of pesticide regulations

 

A trio of researchers from Aarhus University, Agroscope, Wädenswil and Vetagro Sup, France, Marcy l'étoile has published a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science calling for an overhaul of the regulatory frameworks that define the ways that pesticides can be used. Christopher Topping, Annette Aldrich and Philippe Berny suggest that the current system is outdated and needs to be changed because

2h

 

Would modifying payment of the earned income tax credit help struggling families?

 

he federal earned income tax credit mitigates the tax burden of low- to moderate-income families by providing a bigger tax refund. University of Illinois human development and family studies professor Karen Kramer was the lead author of a recent study that explored whether receiving the EITC in four installments rather than a lump sum benefited more than 500 families living in Chicago public housi

2h

 

On the way to quantum networks

 

Physicists at LMU, together with colleagues at Saarland University, have successfully demonstrated the transport of an entangled state between an atom and a photon via an optic fiber over a distance of up to 20 km—thus setting a new record.

2h

 

Did a volcanic eruption in Indonesia really lead to the creation of Frankenstein?

 

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein tells the tale of a monster created by an obsessed scientist. Since its inception in 1816, the story has haunted scientists, warning against the worst excesses of scientific misadventure and technological hubris.

2h

 

Climate-linked financial crises loom, but the fix isn't up to central banks

 

The Bank for International Settlements—the "central bank" for central banks—made headlines this week with a report outlining how the next major financial crisis may come from unexpected climate risks.

2h

 

Cyberkrig er med til at stille Dommedagsuret 20 sekunder frem

 

Den globale sikkerhedssituation er uholdbar og ekstremt farlig med risiko for altødelæggende atomkrig og klimaforandringer. Truslen fra cyberkrig gør verden mere farlig end nogensinde.

2h

 

Sustainable agriculture: Guaranteeing yield while reducing greenhouse gases

 

The NUMAPS group of the UPV/EHU has analyzed the benefits of adding nitrification inhibitors to ammonium-based fertilizers. The study was conducted on a wheat crop and compared a conventional tillage management system with one involving minimum tillage. To do this, parameters such as grain yield and quality, efficiency in nitrogen use and greenhouse gas emissions, among other things, were measured

2h

 

OK, computer: Let's bring text-generating artificial intelligence into the classroom

 

Artificial intelligence-based (AI) programs are quickly improving at writing convincingly on many topics, for virtually no cost. It's likely in a few years they'll be churning out C-grade worthy essays for students.

2h

 

European fish stocks on the move

 

Many European fish populations are on the move due to warming oceans and increasing numbers, according to new research from an international team of scientists led by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea and the University of Aberdeen.

2h

 

Stanford researchers conduct census of cell surface proteins

 

A new technique for systematically surveying proteins on the outer surface of cells, which act like molecular social cues to guide cell-cell interactions and assembly into tissues and organs.

2h

 

A single number helps Stanford data scientists find most dangerous cancer cells

 

Biomedical data scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown that the number of genes a cell uses to make RNA is a reliable indicator of how developed the cell is, a finding that could make it easier to target cancer-causing genes.

2h

 

Chinese tariff rate quota policy severely impacted US wheat exports

 

China has consistently used tariff rate quotas to restrict grain imports, and in 2016 the US launched a complaint to the World Trade Organization (WTO) over China's implementation of tariff rate quotas on wheat, corn and rice. WTO sided with the US, but did not provide an assessment of the effect on U.S. exports. A new study from University of Illinois quantifies those effects and shows that China

2h

 

European fish stocks on the move

 

Many European fish populations are on the move due to warming oceans and increasing numbers, according to new research from an international team of scientists led by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea and the University of Aberdeen.

2h

 

Watch how scientists are attempting to replace the ubiquitous chemical BPA in food and drink cans

 

Researchers in the private sector team with independent scientists to test a safe alternative to a controversial chemical

2h

 

Phosphorylation Without Pain

 

Phosphorylation is a prime example of a reaction that's hugely important in biochemistry that organic synthesis struggles with terribly (as opposed to the efficiency and finesse with which it's handled in by enzymatic processes). The methods used to attach phosphate esters in the flask are frankly pretty crude (all the way up, or down, to good ol' phosphorus oxychloride), and generally involve hy

2h

 

Så uppstod universums ljusstarkaste explosioner

 

Svenska och japanska forskare har efter tio år hittat en förklaring till de besynnerliga emissionslinjerna hos en av de ljusaste explosioner som observerats, supernovan SN 2006gy. Samtidigt fann de en förklaring till hur supernovan uppstod. Superluminösa supernovor är universums mest ljusstarka explosioner. Trots att supernovan SN 2006gy är en av de mest välstuderade har forskare hittills varit o

2h

 

Steam Boilers Are Exploding Everywhere

 

Originally published in March 1881 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

 

En overset dræber i vores hverdag

 

PLUS. Støj er skyld i, at mindst en million leveår går tabt eller leves med sygdom i Vesteuropa. Og ny forskning bekræfter hele tiden forskernes værste anelser.

3h

 

Chime Chai Maker Review: A Pricey, Speedy Way to Make Chai

 

For chai lovers, Chime's hands-free and speedy pod-based brewing process is convenience at its finest.

3h

 

Athletic Authorities Must Reckon With Racing Tech Again

 

As World Athletics debates whether to ban Nike's carbon-fiber running shoe, it should heed lessons from the case of "Bionic Olympian" Oscar Pistorius.

3h

 

Sure, 'The Goop Lab' Is Absurd—but It Also Offers Hope

 

Gwyneth Paltrow's Netflix show offers controversial treatments for people who feel they've been failed by everything else.

3h

 

Engineered capillaries model traffic in tiny blood vessels

 

3D microvessels have been created to observe how red blood cells transit ultra-small blood vessels. They squeeze single-file through microvessels to bring oxygen and nutrients. Red cells burdened with malaria stall, blocking the blood vessel. The platform is expected to have other uses in studies of how microvascular damage occurs in diabetes and sickle cell anemia. They might be further developed

3h

 

38% of mass shooters have committed domestic violence

 

A new study that measures the extent to which perpetrators of domestic violence also commit mass shootings suggests how firearm restrictions may prevent these tragedies. Under federal law, people convicted of domestic violence misdemeanor crimes are prohibited from purchasing and possessing guns for the rest of their lives. But holes in the system may allow potential mass shooters to slip through

3h

 

Astronomers detect large amounts of oxygen in ancient star's atmosphere

 

Astronomers have detected large amounts of oxygen in the atmosphere of one of the oldest and most elementally depleted stars known — a 'primitive star' scientists call J0815+4729. This new finding provides an important clue on how oxygen and other important elements were produced in the first generations of stars in the universe.

3h

 

Engineered capillaries model traffic in tiny blood vessels

 

3D microvessels have been created to observe how red blood cells transit ultra-small blood vessels. They squeeze single-file through microvessels to bring oxygen and nutrients. Red cells burdened with malaria stall, blocking the blood vessel. The platform is expected to have other uses in studies of how microvascular damage occurs in diabetes and sickle cell anemia. They might be further developed

3h

 

Jewel beetles' sparkle helps them hide in plain sight

 

Bright colors are often considered an evolutionary tradeoff in the animal kingdom. Yes, a male peacock's colorful feathers may help it attract a mate, but they also make it more likely to be seen by a predator. Jewel beetles and their iridescent wing cases may be an exception to the rule, researchers report. They found that the insects' bright colors can act as a form of camouflage.

3h

 

Snake stem cells used to create venom-producing organoids

 

Organoids have become an important tool for studying many disease processes and testing potential drugs. Now, they are being used in a surprising and unexpected way: for the production of snake venom. Researchers are reporting that they have created organoids of the venom glands of the Cape coral snake (Aspidelaps lubricus cowlesi) and that these glands are capable of producing venom.

3h

 

Study: Activism and civil disobedience help communicate the science of climate change

 

A group of the world's top climate change biologists, including Professor Pete Smith from the University of Aberdeen, have published an editorial highlighting how global movements of civil disobedience focused on climate change are playing an important role in increasing public awareness and engagement with issues of climate change.

3h

 

People with obesity who experience self-directed weight shaming benefit from intervention

 

While it's known that weight 'self-stigma' is associated with poor mental and physical health, little is known about how to help people combat it. Now, in a first-of-its-kind study, researchers at Penn Medicine showed that people who received a new stigma-reduction intervention, along with standard behavioral weight loss treatment, devalued themselves less due to their weight compared to participa

3h

 

'Too early to say how serious coronavirus is' says WHO expert – video

 

At a UN briefing in Geneva, WHO spokesman says it is too early to draw conclusions on the severity of the coronavirus outbreak. 'We may see more mild cases as surveillance intensifies. So the issue is not so much on numbers that we know will go up,' says Tarik Jašarević. He adds: 'There is no particular treatment, but it doesn't mean that you cannot treat people' Continue reading…

3h

 

Study: U.S. biofuels not to blame for Indonesia and Malaysia deforestation

 

Since 1990, the United States has ramped up its production of biofuels—to about 16 billion gallons of ethanol and 1.6 billion gallons of biodiesel in 2017. At the same time, production of palm oil has increased nearly sixfold, mainly for food production, and with it significant deforestation in Indonesia and Malaysia.

3h

 

Human Brain Project Summit & Open Day 2020 – Welcome Video

 

The HBP Summit & Open Day will explore multiple dimensions of neuroscience, including infrastructure, research, technology, application, education, and innovation. From: HumanBrainProject

3h

 

The UNHCR Defends Its Global Compact on Refugees

 

The World Is Turning Its Back on Refugees In December, Lama Mourad and Kelsey P. Norman argued that the UN Global Compact on Refugees has failed. "The well-meaning document sought to recast refugees as an economic benefit to nations that receive them," Mourad and Norman wrote. "But by furthering the premise that refugees should be accepted because of their potential for self-sufficiency—rather th

3h

 

Visualizing every step of on-surface cycloaddition reactions

 

By observing individual atoms as they rearrange themselves step by step, chemists at RIKEN have cast new light on the route by which halogenated aromatic molecules join together on a silver surface1. These insights promise to help engineers generate atomically precise nanomaterials and electronic devices.

4h

 

Small Modular Reactors

 

What do you call it when you are both excited and pessimistic about something at the same time? Well whatever the word is, that's what I feel now. Rolls-Royce has announced that it plans to build so-called small modular reactors (SMRs), which could be in operation by 2029. These are small nuclear reactors that would sit on a 10 acre space, about 1/16 the size of a standard reactor. The Rolls-Royc

4h

 

Pesticide testing is flawed—and it's harming our birds and bees

 

A tractor sprays insecticide over a field (Aqua Mechanical/) Since the DDT days of the 1950s and 60s—when the pesticide caused alarming declines in bird species, including iconic birds of prey—regulators and chemical companies have adopted far more rigorous testing guidelines. But the biodiversity crisis still looms, and we've continued to see drops in avian and insect species , among other losse

4h

 

NESSI emerges as new tool for exoplanet atmospheres

 

The darkness surrounding the Hale Telescope breaks with a sliver of blue sky as the dome begins to open, screeching with metallic, sci-fi-like sounds atop San Diego County's Palomar Mountain. The historic observatory smells of the oil pumped in to support the bearings that make this giant telescope float ever so slightly as it moves to track the stars.

4h

 

A relationship between severe winter weather and Arctic warmth?

 

A new review article published in Nature Climate Change evaluates whether severe winter weather in the United States, Europe and Asia is sensitive to Arctic temperatures. The lead author is NSF-funded scientist Judah Cohen, director of seasonal forecasting at Atmospheric and Environmental Research.

4h

 

Putting humanitarian work on the map

 

Australia's community services have reaped the rewards of data crunching projects that transform complex social information into visual tools.

4h

 

Chaos theory may explain instability in U.S. economy

 

Jeff Goldblum's character in "Jurassic Park" famously popularized the concept of chaos theory as it relates to science. But one University of Kansas professor is applying that theory to the economy.

4h

 

Tackling antibiotic resistance: Phage-mimicking antibacterial core-shell nanoparticles could help

 

According to the World Health Organization, one of the biggest health threats around the world is antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Every day people use antibiotics to prevent or fight back against infection, but as bacteria evolve and develop resistance, diseases such as pneumonia and tuberculosis are becoming harder to treat.

4h

 

For lithium metal, smaller is stronger

 

The formation of lithium dendrites is still a mystery, but materials engineers study the conditions that enable dendrites and how to stop them.

4h

 

Improving the manipulation of microparticles by sound

 

A simple but accurate theory of how sound interacts with small particles has been developed by theoretical physicists at RIKEN. This advance will help to improve the manipulation of microparticles by sound.

4h

 

"Organoids" Reveal How Human Forebrain Develops

 

Studying gene expression in human brain tissue grown in the lab could offer insight into disorders such as autism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

 

Gadget Lab Podcast: Oral Hygiene Tech and Espresso Science

 

On this week's episode: hacking oral hygiene with AI, and hacking espresso with science.

4h

 

The Future of Death-Tech Has No Rules—Yet

 

Mortuary startups, like one that plans to freeze and shatter corpses, have run afoul of some fusty regulations.

4h

 

Image of the Day: Tumor Vasculature

 

Researchers use a cutting-edge technique to map the blood vessels of brain tumors as patients are awake during surgery with the hope of reducing damage to adjacent tissues.

4h

 

Aiming for the stars: how New Zealand's space industry is causing turbulence

 

The once-sleepy Mahia peninsula is now the site of regular rocket launches but a plan to put US spy satellites into space is causing concern Life on the Mahia peninsula on New Zealand's North Island used to be quiet: surfing beaches, historical monuments, and good snapper fishing. Then space came to town. Continue reading…

4h

 

"Organoids" Reveal How Human Forebrain Develops

 

Studying gene expression in human brain tissue grown in the lab could offer insight into disorders such as autism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

 

Why people go into debt: The money isn't really theirs

 

In 2019, U.S. consumer debt reached an all-time high, surpassing levels last seen during the 2008 financial crisis. Such debt takes many forms, including mortgages and student loans. But credit card debt alone exceeded $870 billion, and most of that is the result of discretionary spending. Why are so many Americans needlessly putting themselves in the hole?

4h

 

Discovery sheds new light on how cells move

 

When we cut our skin, groups of cells rush en masse to the site to heal the wound.

4h

 

"Organoids" Reveal How Human Forebrain Develops

 

Studying gene expression in human brain tissue grown in the lab could offer insight into disorders such as autism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

 

4h

 

Is it just me or are the topics here on /Futurology far more negative lately?

 

Maybe it's the climate issues, the threat of impending war, etc. Or maybe it's mvea leaving and not posting all the positive content here anymore. Whatever it is, this place seems much more negative about the future than ever before. It used to be somewhere I came to get a big dose of positivity, and it was cool to see what people around the world were working on to improve things. submitted by /

4h

 

Samsung's $1,400 dry-cleaning closet is fresh and expensive

 

submitted by /u/Imaginary_Status [link] [comments]

4h

 

4h

 

Rolls-Royce plans mini nuclear reactors in the UK by 2029

 

submitted by /u/filosoful [link] [comments]

4h

 

How can a small nation such as Denmark become a leading power in the field of AI?

 

The AI race between countries can only be expected to intensify in the future. How is it possible to gain an edge over others if you're a small Scandinavian nation with a population of about 5 million people? What does a government need to do in order to ensure growth and innovation within the sector? I think this article from BotXO provides an interesting take on the topic. What other nations ar

4h

 

4h

 

People can now be identified at a distance by their heartbeat

 

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

4h

 

What we can learn about robots from Japan

 

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

4h

 

NOAA Gets Go-Ahead to Study Controversial Climate Plan B

 

submitted by /u/GlobalWFundfEP [link] [comments]

4h

 

Germany Rejected Nuclear Power—and Deadly Emissions Spiked

 

submitted by /u/megaboz [link] [comments]

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4h

 

No one should ever buy a car again. Here's why.

 

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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4h

 

*NEW* term added to the r/Futurology Glossary – "Xenobot"

 

A new term has been added to the r/Futurology Glossary – "Xenobot" Xenobot – a biological machine made of skin cells and heart cells small enough to safely deliver drugs inside the human body and pave the way for understanding how to form organs for regenerative medicine. Inspired by research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America – "A scalabl

4h

 

4h

 

The Self-Driving Car Revolution – BBC Click

 

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

4h

 

MIT Uses AI to Create Updated Street Maps from Satellite Imagery

 

We've all been there — your GPS says there's supposed to be a turn coming up, and you trust the machine. Then, you find yourself going the wrong way or stuck on a private road with nowhere to turn around. Getting accurate street-level maps is difficult, and even technically accurate maps can be confusing without sufficient details. Researchers from MIT and the Qatar Computing Research Institute (

4h

 

Image: Deforestation in Bolivia

 

This Copernicus Sentinel-2 image features an area in the Santa Cruz Department of Bolivia, where part of the tropical dry forest has been cleared for agricultural use.

4h

 

Life under lockdown in China: hospital queues and empty streets

 

With resources at breaking point and a pervading sense of panic, the Chinese city of Wuhan battles coronavirus Coronavirus latest – live updates Chinese cities in lockdown In hospitals across Wuhan, the city at the centre of the new coronavirus outbreak, there is panic and despair. Patients wearing masks queue for hours, waiting to be called by nurses. Staff who have worked endless shifts are for

4h

 

The Troubling Ideals at the Heart of Abortion Rights

 

Many Americans think of Roe v. Wade as the defining Supreme Court decision on the issue of abortion. But a 1992 high-court decision actually governs abortion law. That ruling rested on fateful assumptions about the relationship between abortion and women's equality. But in so doing, it has served to enshrine social and professional inequalities, which mothers must fight against every day. In that

4h

 

What are the symptoms of the new coronavirus and how deadly is it?

 

Everything you need to know about the Wuhan coronavirus that emerged in China and has caused over 600 cases so far

4h

 

Space cookies: First food baked in space by astronauts

 

They were cooked in a special oven at the International Space Station – but are yet to be tasted.

4h

 

The full-service paper mill and its Chinese customers

 

An investigation by Elisabeth Bik, Smut Clyde, Morty and Tiger BB8 reveals the workings of a paper mill. Its customers are Chinese doctors desperate for promotion. Apparently even journal editors are part of the scam, publishing fraudulent made-up science.

4h

 

Vitamin E acetate in products used by the first cases of EVALI in New York State

 

A new study published on Jan. 24, 2020, in the journal Toxics provides important insight into the recent lung intoxication epidemic referred to as 'e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury' (EVALI). The study presents, for the first time, a comprehensive analysis of products used by EVALI patients. Vitamin E acetate was the main finding in cannabinoid liquids. No compound that coul

5h

 

Abuse of Power Is a Dangerous Standard for Democrats to Play With

 

Almost the minute after the White House released its 110-page brief for the Senate impeachment trial, careful observers noticed a contradiction between the White House counsel's view and Attorney General William Barr's. The White House brief argues that there can be no impeachable "abuse of power" without a violation of established law. Meanwhile, in a memorandum to senior Justice Department lawy

5h

 

Matthew McConaughey Can Do Better Than This

 

When he emerged as a filmmaker in the late 1990s, Guy Ritchie fashioned himself as a kind of British Quentin Tarantino. His early movies ( Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch ) were set in criminal underworlds, crackled with witty and shockingly profane dialogue, and gleefully chopped up their timelines. Ritchie has occasionally sojourned back to that territory (in 2008's RocknRolla ,

5h

 

America Has Come Full Circle in the Middle East

 

In 1958, U.S. leaders stood at the threshold of an American era in the Middle East, conflicted about whether it was worth the trouble to usher in. A year earlier, in the context of the emergent Cold War and fading British and French power in the region, Dwight Eisenhower had articulated and received congressional approval for what became known as the Eisenhower doctrine . The United States had fo

5h

 

The Divine Origins of the Horny Chain Text

 

The day the 45th president of the United States was impeached, I was alerted to the situation by a text message full of emoji tongues. "🚨🚨🚨HAPPY IMPEACHMENT DAY to all my freedom🗽loving hoes💦👅👅👅," began the missive, forwarded to me without comment by my former roommate. It thanked its recipients for "putting the 🍑in IM🍑MENT" and made passing reference to "hoe biden" and "daddy ukraine,"

5h

 

AI Isn't a Solution to All Our Problems

 

It's simply a tool—and hardly a perfect one — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

The Bird 'Snarge' Menacing Air Travel

 

When winged wildlife slams into aircraft, disasters can happen. Inside the world of bird-strike countermeasures, where avian goo is the enemy.

5h

 

The Strange, Subtle Matter of ASMR Erotica

 

Although many fans and creators claim the appeal isn't sexual, much of the genre flirts with intimacy. Close your eyes—and open up.

5h

 

The Rise of Mouth Tech: Oral-B, AI Toothbrushes, Burst Oral Care

 

It's easy to bristle at a $200 AI-powered toothbrush, but not for the reasons you might think.

5h

 

Are Humans Cooling? Probably Not.

 

Are humans cooling? According to a recent study out of Stanford, yes we are…a bit. I'm skeptical of the findings, however, and even more so of the proposed explanations. More data is needed.

5h

 

5h

 

New species of Allosaurus discovered in Utah

 

A remarkable new species of meat-eating dinosaur has been unveiled at the Natural History Museum of Utah. Paleontologists unearthed the first specimen in early 1990s in Dinosaur National Monument in northeastern Utah. The huge carnivore inhabited the flood plains of western North America during the Late Jurassic Period, between 157-152 million years ago, making it the geologically oldest species o

5h

 

Byggebranche til politikere: »Kræv, at vi bygger bæredygtigt«

 

PLUS. Både bygherrer, rådgivere og entreprenører opfordrer regeringen til at indføre obligatoriske bæredygtighedskrav i bygningsreglementet. Men der er brug for en indfasningsperiode.

5h

 

AI Isn't a Solution to All Our Problems

 

It's simply a tool—and hardly a perfect one — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

PDZRN3 protects against apoptosis in myoblasts by maintaining cyclin A2 expression

 

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58116-1

5h

 

Understanding the Lipid and Protein Corona Formation on Different Sized Polymeric Nanoparticles

 

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57943-6

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Author Correction: Shape fidelity and structure of 3D printed high consistency nanocellulose

 

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58231-z

5h

 

Integrated photonic guided metalens based on a pseudo-graded index distribution

 

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58029-z

5h

 

Author Correction: Common neural value representations of hedonic and utilitarian products in the ventral striatum: An fMRI study

 

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58293-z

5h

 

Erythroid differentiation regulator-1 induced by microbiota in early life drives intestinal stem cell proliferation and regeneration

 

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14258-z Gut microbiota and their metabolites regulate homeostasis of the intestine, but their effects on intestine development are unclear. Here the authors use RNAseq and germ free mice to show that intestinal microbiota promote the expression of Erdr1, which increases Lgr5+ intestinal stem cell number and activity.

5h

 

Galileo now replying to SOS messages worldwide

 

As well as providing global navigation services, Europe's Galileo satellite constellation is contributing to saving more than 2000 lives annually by relaying SOS messages to first responders. And from now on the satellites will reply to these messages, assuring people in danger that help is on the way.

5h

 

Digitaliseringsstyrelsen kritiserer E-boks efter adskillige nedbrud

 

Efter at E-boks har været ramt af flere nedbrud, retter Digitaliseringsstyrelsen nu kritik mod E-boks. E-boks og KMD arbejder sammen på at finde en løsning på problemet.

5h

 

Mathematician proposes a new criterion for solving the Boussinesq equations

 

A RUDN University mathematician has proposed a new criterion for solving the Boussinesq equations. These equations describe the nonlinear propagation of waves in certain media, e.g. plasma, a surface of liquid of shallow depth, and so on. They examined the Boussinesq equation in three-dimensional space and derived a criterion for uniqueness and the existence of important solutions of a special typ

5h

 

Digging deeper: Authors retract soil paper so "the error we made does not propagate"

 

The authors of a 2018 paper on how much carbon soil can store have retracted the work after concluding that their analysis was fatally flawed. The article, "Soil carbon stocks are underestimated in mountainous regions," appeared in the journal Geoderma. Its authors are affiliated with the French National Institute for Agricultural Research. According to the … Continue reading

5h

 

Sweet Potato Sends Secret Signals

 

One variety alerts neighbors to keep pests at bay — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

Sweet Potato Sends Secret Signals

 

One variety alerts neighbors to keep pests at bay — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

The Plight of the Woman Trumpist

 

When CNN's Manu Raju asked Senator Martha McSally of Arizona whether she'd vote to "consider new evidence as part of the impeachment trial," the Republican, flanked by two staffers, barely looked up as she called Raju a "liberal hack." She then repeated the insult theatrically. About an hour later, McSally registered the domain name LiberalHack.com and began the sale of " liberal hack " T-shirts.

5h

 

The RNA-binding protein AKAP8 suppresses tumor metastasis by antagonizing EMT-associated alternative splicing

 

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14304-1 Splice isoform switching regulated by the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNPM) induces EMT and metastasis. Here, the authors report that AKAP8 is a metastasis suppressor that inhibits the splicing activity of hnRNPM and antagonizes genome-wide EMT-associated alternative splicing to maintain epit

5h

 

PODCAST: Nordpolen rykker mod Sibirien. Nyt byggeri på Amager Fælled greenwashes

 

Den magnetiske nordpol er på vej mod Sibirien. Op mod 500 danskere dør hvert år for tidligt pga. trafikstøj. Nybyggeri på Amager Fælled påstås at øge biodiversiteten. Det er skidt for genbrug, når borgerne skal blande metal, glas og plast i samme spand.

5h

 

Deepfake software translates videos from one language to another

 

An AI based on deepfake technology can translate videos of a person speaking in one language into another. In future, it could help people who don't speak the same language communicate

5h

 

Taking Viagra in early labour reduces the need for emergency caesarean

 

A study has found that taking Viagra at the beginning of labour increases blood flow to the baby and halves the chance of needing an emergency c- section

5h

 

What is the coronavirus and how worried should we be?

 

What are the symptoms caused by the China virus and at what point should you go to the doctor? Coronavirus latest news – live Chinese cities in lockdown It is a novel coronavirus – that is to say, a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of those infected either worked or frequently shopped in the Huanan se

5h

 

After Colombia's civil war ended, so did 'gunpoint conservation'

 

Nature, Published online: 24 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00126-0 The rebels' departure from their rainforest strongholds triggered mass deforestation.

5h

 

Author Correction: The Reaction of Dimerization by Itself Reduces the Noise Intensity of the Protein Monomer

 

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58230-0

5h

 

The Brains Cells That Guide Animals – Facts So Romantic

 

Virtual-reality experiments on fruit flies offer insight into how the brains of mammals, like us, might build maps of their world. Photograph by Tanya Wolff It may seem absurd to compare a tiny fruit fly's brain to that of a majestic elephant. Yet it is the dream of many neuroscientists to find deep rules that very different brains share. As Gilles Laurent, a neuroscientist at the Max Planck Inst

5h

 

The Democrats Are Letting Roberts Off Too Easily

 

As they press their impeachment case against President Donald Trump, the Democrats need help from Chief Justice John Roberts. And they're not going to get it unless they ask for it. Far from securing the 67-vote majority needed to remove Trump from office, Democrats are desperate to flip a paltry four Republican senators just to be able to call witnesses. The conventional wisdom is that Majority

6h

 

How The Two Popes Condemns Current-Day Authoritarianism

 

In The Two Popes , a recent feature film produced by Netflix, Father Jorge Bergoglio is sent into the wilderness, where he wanders alone in the Argentine mountains for two years. During an intense process of spiritual rebirth—crucial to his transformation into Pope Francis—he turns to radical books of the very kind he had cleared out of the Jesuit order in the late 1970s, during the military dict

6h

 

Neil deGrasse Tyson: How science literacy can save us from the internet

 

The internet has become a tool to tribalize us, a place where opinions become identities in a fight to the death of who's right and who's wrong. As information continues to flow in, many of us lack the training to effectively sort opinion from fact. This leads to widespread disinformation. We need science literacy. With an understanding of how things work, or how to question how things work, we e

6h

 

Climate change: 'We're not perfect', says Marion Cotillard on Antarctica trip

 

Actor Marion Cotillard says even remote places like "pristine" Antarctica are being harmed by humans.

6h

 

Vejen væk fra trafikstøj koster milliarder

 

PLUS. For én milliard kroner får man støjskærme til 66 km motorvej. Men på få år kan støjen krybe over selv fire meter høje skærme.

6h

 

Extensive rewiring of the EGFR network in colorectal cancer cells expressing transforming levels of KRASG13D

 

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14224-9 Kras is often mutated in colorectal cancer but how this oncogenic mutation alters signalling pathways globally is undetermined. Here, the authors analyse how this mutation affects protein interaction networks and signal flow showing an extensive re‐wiring of signalling in response to KRas mutation

6h

 

Programmable meroterpene synthesis

 

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14354-5 Meroterpenes are a particularly important class of biologically active bicyclo[3.3.1]nonane-containing molecules. Here, the authors report a general strategy toward these valuable targets based on abiotic annulation/rearrangement steps resulting in a concise total synthesis of garsubellin A.

6h

 

Mocking 'Prophets of Doom' Abroad, Trump Guts Water Rules at Home

 

The U.S. President scolded what he called the "perennial prophets of doom and their predictions of the apocalypse" at the World Economic Forum in Davos this week, while back at home, Trump administration officials finalized a rollback of Obama-era water protections that were supported by most scientists.

6h

 

Dødsdømte Sonos-højttalere får stadig ikke ny software – men de får lov at overleve

 

Højtalerproducenten vil fortsætte med sikkerhedsopdateringer til ældre højtalersystemer – så længe det er muligt. Nye funktioner må ældre Sonos-brugere dog stadig se langt efter.

6h

 

Why eating yogurt may help lessen the risk of breast cancer

 

One of the causes of breast cancer may be inflammation triggered by harmful bacteria suggest researchers. Scientists advise consuming natural yogurt, which contains beneficial bacteria which dampens inflammation and which is similar to the bacteria found in breastfeeding mothers. Their suggestion is that this bacteria is protective because breast feeding reduces the risk of breast cancer. The cons

6h

 

World's first public database of mine tailings dams aims to prevent deadly disasters

 

GRID-Arendal has launched the Global Tailings Portal, a new public, searchable database with detailed information on more than 1,700 mine tailings dams around the world. The data are based on disclosures provided by mining companies following a request from the Church of England Pensions Board and the Swedish National Pension Funds' Council of Ethics. The portal is designed to be used by scientist

6h

 

TP53 gene variant in people of African descent linked to iron overload, may improve malaria response

 

In a study by Wistar and collaborators, a rare, African-specific variant of the TP53 gene called P47S causes iron accumulation in macrophages and other cell types and is associated with poorer response to bacterial infections, along with markers of iron overload in African Americans. Macrophage iron accumulation disrupts their function, resulting in more severe bacterial infections.

6h

 

Marburg virus found in Sierra Leone bats

 

Scientists have detected Marburg virus in fruit bats in Sierra Leone, marking the first time the deadly virus has been found in West Africa. Eleven Egyptian rousette fruit bats tested positive for active Marburg virus infection. The presence of Marburg virus, a close relative to Ebola virus that also causes hemorrhagic disease in people, was detected in advance of any reported cases of human illne

6h

 

Brain-cell helpers powered by norepinephrine during fear-memory formation

 

A sustained state of vigilance will generate a different type of memory than a momentary startle, and these differences are linked to distinct signaling molecules in the brains of mice. Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) have visualized these dynamics in the living mouse brain for the first time, observing two molecular pathways that support memory function. These processes ta

6h

 

Researchers obtain 'high-definition' view of diabetes-related proteins

 

Scientists have examined a key receptor for the first time at high resolution — broadening understanding of how it might function, and opening the door to future improvements in treating conditions such as type 2 diabetes.

6h

 

Byar tappar fåglarna när husen moderniseras

 

Antalet fåglar i byar minskar ofta när äldre hus rivs och ersätts med moderna hus, enligt en polsk studie. Nu visar forskare vid SLU och i Polen att fåglarna också missgynnas av att äldre hus renoveras för att till exempel bli mer energisnåla. En orsak är att tillgången på boplatser minskar. Många fågelarter som lever nära människor visar en nedåtgående trend. Det gäller till exempel gråsparven s

7h

 

Deval Patrick's Righteous Anger

 

COLUMBIA, S.C.—Pretty much everyone hates what the Democratic primary race has become. It's gone on too long, cost too much money, and tended to reward people who've been repeating the same lines for years. Pretty much everyone also hates the debates. (How many people watched last week's debate and saw a future president? How many people saw someone who they're confident can beat Donald Trump?) A

7h

 

A Reckoning Over Iowa

 

DES MOINES, Iowa—The contrast was unmistakable: Most people in the crowd at the venerable Brown & Black Forum on minority issues here were African American, Latino, or Asian American. But all of the Democratic candidates onstage, apart from Andrew Yang, were white. "It is disappointing," said Bridgette Andrews, an African American executive assistant from the nearby suburb of Johnston, as she wal

7h

 

Human-wildlife conflict threatens protected reserves in East Africa

 

Each year, more than a million wildebeest migrate across the grassy plains of the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania into Kenya's Masai Mara National Reserve. But on the borders of these protected areas, human populations are increasing and wild ecosystems are struggling to survive in the face of development. Understanding these pressures is crucial for protecting people and wildlife, and to curb

7h

 

Human-wildlife conflict threatens protected reserves in East Africa

 

Each year, more than a million wildebeest migrate across the grassy plains of the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania into Kenya's Masai Mara National Reserve. But on the borders of these protected areas, human populations are increasing and wild ecosystems are struggling to survive in the face of development. Understanding these pressures is crucial for protecting people and wildlife, and to curb

7h

 

Researchers obtain 'high-definition' view of diabetes-related proteins

 

Scientists have examined a key receptor for the first time at high resolution—broadening understanding of how it might function, and opening the door to future improvements in treating conditions such as type 2 diabetes.

7h

 

Tidig språklek minskar risk för läs- och skrivsvårigheter

 

Om barn i 5–6-årsåldern leker språklekar i 15–20 minuter varje dag, kommer de att bli duktigare på läsförståelse som tonåringar, visar Ann-Christina Kjeldsen, doktor i logopedi vid Åbo Akademi i sin avhandling. Hon har studerat barns språkutveckling och läsförmåga under sammanlagt tio års tid, och följt barngrupper från 6-årsåldern hela vägen upp genom grundskolan.

7h

 

Researchers obtain 'high-definition' view of diabetes-related proteins

 

Scientists have examined a key receptor for the first time at high resolution—broadening understanding of how it might function, and opening the door to future improvements in treating conditions such as type 2 diabetes.

7h

 

Simulations reveal galaxy clusters details

 

Inspired by the science fiction of the spacefaring Romulans of Star Trek, astrophysicists have used XSEDE-allocated supercomputers to develop cosmological computer simulations called RomulusC, where the 'C' stands for galaxy cluster. With a focus on black hole physics, RomulusC has produced some of the highest resolution simulations ever of galaxy clusters, which can contain hundreds or even thous

7h

 

Tracking the Florida Panther's Tenuous Comeback

 

In "Cat Tale: The Wild, Weird Battle to Save the Florida Panther," Craig Pittman chronicles Florida's fraught relationship with its state animal. After prompting the cats' decline, humans are now embroiled in a messy, up and down struggle to ensure the population's future and save it from extinction.

7h

 

What we know so far about the coronavirus outbreak

 

Death toll stands at 26 and 1,000-bed hospital being built in Wuhan to deal with outbreak is due to open next week Coronavirus outbreak latest – live The official death toll stands at 26 people , most of them in Hubei province in central China, but two people have died outside of that zone – one man just outside of Beijing, and the other in the north-eastern province of Heilongjiang, which border

7h

 

Sharp increase in Ningaloo whale shark injuries might be due to boat encounters

 

Almost one-fifth of the whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) in Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef Marine Park show major scarring or fin amputations, with the number of injured animals increasing in recent years, new research reveals.

7h

 

Rolls-Royce plans mini nuclear reactors by 2029

 

The firm says it plans to build up to 15 of the mini reactors, which can be delivered by a lorry.

7h

 

Sharp increase in Ningaloo whale shark injuries might be due to boat encounters

 

Almost one-fifth of the whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) in Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef Marine Park show major scarring or fin amputations, with the number of injured animals increasing in recent years, new research reveals.

7h

 

Bayer stock climbs on report of Roundup settlement

 

Shares in German chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer climbed Friday on a report it was nearing a $10 billion settlement with US plaintiffs claiming weedkiller Roundup caused their cancer.

7h

 

Bayer stock climbs on report of Roundup settlement

 

Shares in German chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer climbed Friday on a report it was nearing a $10 billion settlement with US plaintiffs claiming weedkiller Roundup caused their cancer.

7h

 

Death toll rises to 11 in Spain as Storm Gloria ebbs

 

The death toll from a violent storm that has wrought havoc across huge swathes of Spain's eastern and southern coastline rose to 11 on Thursday, with rescue workers still searching for four people.

7h

 

Scientists capture molecular maps of animal tissue with unprecedented detail

 

We've all heard, and seen, how a picture paints a thousand words. Now, in a scientific twist on that saying, researchers at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (National MagLab), are creating pictures that paint thousands of molecules.

7h

 

Researcher looking for clues in the mystery of the Grand Canyon's water supply

 

Where does the water in the Grand Canyon come from?

7h

 

Coronavirus: UK universities issue quarantine warning to Chinese students

 

Students going to China for new year may not be readmitted without quarantine period China death toll rises – live updates What we know so far British universities have warned students considering travelling home to China to celebrate Chinese new year that they risk being quarantined on their return. The University of Chester said it had warned its Chinese students in the UK that if they returned

8h

 

Boligejere har betalt 150 millioner i forkert grundskyld: Nye it-fejl forsinker tilbagebetalinger

 

Et gammelt it-system til ejendomsvurderinger har opkrævet forkert grundskyld for 150 millioner kroner. De berørte borgere skal have deres penge tilbage, men nu har nye fejl i systemet sat en stopper for sagsbehandlingen.

8h

 

Retten til at dø

 

Jeg er ikke tilhænger af aktiv dødshjælp, men til gengæld mener jeg, at man skal have lov til at fravælge genoplivning, når man har fået et hjertestop. Selv om reglerne lige er lavet om, er det stadig ikke muligt for alle, skriver Hanne Irene Jensen.

8h

 

Giv psykiatrien et vitamintilskud på kompetencerne

 

Der er brug for at tænke nyt i psykiatrien – et vigtigt bud kunne være psykiatriske APN-sygeplejersker, skriver en række debattører.

8h

 

The Wuhan Coronavirus: what we know and don't know – Science Weekly podcast

 

A new virus, never before seen in humans, has emerged from the city of Wuhan in China. Since the start of the outbreak, the virus has spread to more than seven countries and more than 500 people have been infected. Hannah Devlin speaks to Prof Ian Jones about exactly what a coronavirus is. And we hear from epidemiologist Dr Rosalind Eggo about how scientists model the spread of novel viruses, oft

8h

 

Sepsiskedjan leder till bättre vård på de skånska sjukhusen

 

Införandet av Sepsiskedjan i Region Skåne har inneburit att patienterna får snabbare och bättre initialt omhändertagande samt att diagnostiken och den understödjande behandlingen förbättrats.

9h

 

The Wuhan Coronavirus: what we know and don't know – Science Weekly podcast

 

A new virus, never before seen in humans, has emerged from the city of Wuhan in China. Since the start of the outbreak, the virus has spread to more than seven countries and more than 500 people have been infected. Hannah Devlin speaks to Prof Ian Jones about exactly what a coronavirus is. And we hear from epidemiologist Dr Rosalind Eggo about how scientists model the spread of novel viruses, ofte

9h

 

Snabba spinntillstånd öppnar för kvantdatorer

 

Framtidens elektroniska teknik, som datorer, kräver allt mindre komponenter. Här kan kvantmekaniken bli en lösning, men det finns många utmaningar. Nu har forskare från bland annat Uppsala och Örebro universitet visat att så kallade spinntillstånd kan förflyttas mellan atomer mycket snabbare än förväntat. Moores lag förutsäger att antalet transistorer på ett chip dubbleras varje decennium. Men de

10h

 

10h

 

Curiosity Killed the … Mouse?

 

The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii boosts curiosity in mice—which makes them more likely to be caught by cats, thus continuing the parasite's life cycle. Karen Hopkin reports.

10h

 

Italy's Answer to Populism

 

For months, a burgeoning grassroots movement has staged flash mobs across Italy to express opposition to the country's populist firebrand, Matteo Salvini. Its ability to pack city squares with tens of thousands of people— like sardines , as the group has come to be known—has offered one of the most visible examples of anti-populist mobilization in Europe. Spontaneously mobilizing scores of people

10h

 

Coronavirus: Chinese hospitals in chaos as lockdown spreads to affect 36m people

 

Public transport suspended in at least 10 cities as death toll rises and heath care centres struggle to cope with influx of patients Coronavirus outbreak latest – live What we know so far At least 36 million people in China have been affected by unprecedented lockdowns imposed across 13 cities during the country's most important holiday, as officials attempt to contain the deadly new coronavirus.

10h

 

11h

 

Wuhan: the city of 11 million at the heart of the coronavirus outbreak

 

Capital of Hubei province sits on the Yangtze river and is the birthplace of China's steel industry The city of Wuhan is one of China's largest industrial hubs and a major crossroads. The capital of Hubei province has 11 million people and is under an unprecedented, open-ended lockdown to try to prevent the spread of a virus that first appeared in the city last month . Continue reading…

11h

 

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11h

 

Photos of the Week: Impeachment Trial, Virtual Singer, Bat Clinic

 

The annual Women's March in New York City, the Tour Down Under cycling event in Australia, a newborn giant anteater in Germany, a firefighting robot in India, anti-government protests in Iraq, the 2020 Winter Youth Olympics in Switzerland, haute-couture fashion in Paris, an elevator test tower in Germany, and much more.

11h

 

Coronavirus Live Updates: Deaths Recorded Hundreds of Miles from Center of Outbreak

 

Two deaths have been reported outside the city of Wuhan, the center of the mysterious outbreak. The new virus has sickened more than 800 people in China.

11h

 

Benefits of fetal surgery for spina bifida continue through school age

 

The benefits of fetal surgery to repair spina bifida, a procedure pioneered at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) in 1997, continue through school age, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) study reports today in the journal Pediatrics.

11h

 

Benefits of fetal surgery for spina bifida persist in school-age children

 

In a follow-up to the landmark 2011 study that demonstrated prenatal surgery for spina bifida has measurable benefits over surgery after birth for one of the most disabling neural tube defects, researchers have published new findings. These findings show significant physical and emotional benefits a decade later in school-age children who received corrective surgery in the womb for myelomeningocel

11h

 

What goes up may actually be down

 

A new study in Frontiers in Neuroscience used virtual reality to determine how people plan their movements by 'seeing' gravity using visual cues in the landscape around them, rather than 'feeling it' through changes in weight and balance.

11h

 

Lung microbiome may help predict outcomes in critically ill patients

 

Changes in the lung microbiome may help predict how well critically ill patients will respond to care, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

11h

 

NIH study finds benefits of fetal surgery for spina bifida persist through school age

 

Children as young as 6 years old who underwent fetal surgery to repair a common birth defect of the spine are more likely to walk independently and have fewer follow-up surgeries, compared to those who had traditional corrective surgery after birth, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health.

11h

 

Curiosity Killed the … Mouse?

 

The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii boosts curiosity in mice—which makes them more likely to be caught by cats, thus continuing the parasite's life cycle. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

 

Hvordan bruger vi apps i almen praksis?

 

For at apps kan spille en positiv rolle i almen praksis, skal de gøre en forskel for både læge, patient og sundhedsvæsen. Her giver en række praktiserende læger og iværksætterne fire forslag til, hvordan Danmark kan gå forrest.

12h

 

12h

 

Fra de skrå brædder til ­patientstuen: Hospital livestreamer ­teaterforestillinger

 

Patienterne på Regionshospital Nordjylland kan se frem til at få kultur på recept, når Vendsyssel Teater fra foråret livestreamer fire teaterforestillinger direkte til hospitalet. Læger og andre ansatte må også gerne se med, siger hospitalsdirektør.

12h

 

Her er de bedste til 10 hjerte-kar-behandlinger

 

Rigshospitalet scorer højest på behandlingskvalitet inden for hjerte-kar-sygdomme, men datagrundlaget er i høj grad ramt af de østdanske hospitalers problemer med at levere fyldestgørende data til kvalitetsdatabaserne.

12h

 

Datahul har fjernet mulighed for at overvåge kvalitet af hjerteindgreb

 

Invasive kardiologer fra Rigshospitalet, Gentofte og Roskilde har siden indførelsen af Sundhedsplatformen ikke været i stand til at kontrollere kvaliteten af de indgreb, de foretager. I fire år har Dansk Hjerteregister manglet data fra østdanske hospitaler, og det bekymrer kardiologer og Hjerteforeningen. Region Hovedstaden forventer en løsning inden for de nærmeste måneder.

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Lægestafetten: En fysiologisk bygningsingeniør

 

Jeppe Barckman elsker at bygge og reparere. Som ung ville han være bygningsingeniør, men endte med at kombinere sine interesser og blive ortopædkirurg.

12h

 

Curiosity Killed the … Mouse?

 

The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii boosts curiosity in mice—which makes them more likely to be caught by cats, thus continuing the parasite's life cycle. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

 

Doomsday Clock nears apocalypse over climate and nuclear fears

 

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13h

 

13h

 

A megalibrary of nanoparticles

 

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13h

 

Waymo's self-driving trucks and minivans are headed to New Mexico and Texas

 

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13h

 

Betelgeuse is continues to dim, diminishes to 1.506 magnitude

 

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13h

 

Mummy's voice heard 3,000 years after death

 

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13h

 

World's largest offshore wind farm – 3.6GW – begins construction

 

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13h

 

Traditional TV Enters Its Final Death Spiral

 

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13h

 

Carbon-neutral in 15 years? Finland has an ambitious plan.

 

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Adam Savage Tests Boston Dynamics' Spot Robot!

 

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New Nerve-Growing Method Could Help Injured Soldiers and Others

 

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13h

 

China's Battle With a Deadly Coronavirus, in Photos

 

Here are the latest images as the country confronts a major public health crisis.

14h

 

China steps up coronavirus clampdown as chaos hits hospitals – video

 

After preventing travel from Wuhan, China has locked down several more cities as it attempts to contain the deadly coronavirus. Footage online reveals the quarantine measures the country is taking to prevent the spread China coronavirus: US investigates suspected case as first death confirmed outside Hubei province – live news Continue reading…

14h

 

15h

 

Structural analysis of the intrinsically disordered splicing factor Spp2 and its binding to the DEAH-box ATPase Prp2 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

 

The spliceosome consists of five small RNAs and more than 100 proteins. Almost 50% of the human spliceosomal proteins were predicted to be intrinsically disordered or to contain disordered regions, among them the G-patch protein Spp2. The G-patch region of Spp2 binds to the DEAH-box ATPase Prp2, and both proteins…

15h

 

Molecular adaptations of the blood-brain barrier promote stress resilience vs. depression [Systems Biology]

 

Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that inflammation and vascular dysfunction contribute to the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD). Chronic social stress alters blood–brain barrier (BBB) integrity through loss of tight junction protein claudin-5 (cldn5) in male mice, promoting passage of circulating proinflammatory cytokines and depression-like behaviors. This effect is…

15h

 

SYNPLA, a method to identify synapses displaying plasticity after learning [Neuroscience]

 

Which neural circuits undergo synaptic changes when an animal learns? Although it is widely accepted that changes in synaptic strength underlie many forms of learning and memory, it remains challenging to connect changes in synaptic strength at specific neural pathways to specific behaviors and memories. Here we introduce SYNPLA (synaptic…

15h

 

Polymeric sheet actuators with programmable bioinstructivity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

 

Stem cells are capable of sensing and processing environmental inputs, converting this information to output a specific cell lineage through signaling cascades. Despite the combinatorial nature of mechanical, thermal, and biochemical signals, these stimuli have typically been decoupled and applied independently, requiring continuous regulation by controlling units. We employ a…

15h

 

Wireless, battery-free subdermally implantable photometry systems for chronic recording of neural dynamics [Neuroscience]

 

Recording cell-specific neuronal activity while monitoring behaviors of freely moving subjects can provide some of the most significant insights into brain function. Current means for monitoring calcium dynamics in genetically targeted populations of neurons rely on delivery of light and recording of fluorescent signals through optical fibers that can reduce…

15h

 

Structural instability and divergence from conserved residues underlie intracellular retention of mammalian odorant receptors [Cell Biology]

 

Mammalian odorant receptors are a diverse and rapidly evolving set of G protein-coupled receptors expressed in olfactory cilia membranes. Most odorant receptors show little to no cell surface expression in nonolfactory cells due to endoplasmic reticulum retention, which has slowed down biochemical studies. Here we provide evidence that structural instability…

15h

 

Skin permeability barrier formation by the ichthyosis-causative gene FATP4 through formation of the barrier lipid {omega}-O-acylceramide [Biochemistry]

 

The epidermis-specific lipid acylceramide plays a pivotal role in the formation of the permeability barrier in the skin; abrogation of its synthesis causes the skin disorder ichthyosis. However, the acylceramide synthetic pathway has not yet been fully elucidated: Namely, the acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) involved in this pathway remains to be…

15h

 

Release of a disordered domain enhances HspB1 chaperone activity toward tau [Biochemistry]

 

Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are a class of ATP-independent molecular chaperones that play vital roles in maintaining protein solubility and preventing aberrant protein aggregation. They form highly dynamic, polydisperse oligomeric ensembles and contain long intrinsically disordered regions. Experimental challenges posed by these properties have greatly impeded our understanding of…

15h

 

ARABIDOPSIS DEHISCENCE ZONE POLYGALACTURONASE 1 (ADPG1) releases latent defense signals in stems with reduced lignin content [Plant Biology]

 

There is considerable interest in engineering plant cell wall components, particularly lignin, to improve forage quality and biomass properties for processing to fuels and bioproducts. However, modifying lignin content and/or composition in transgenic plants through down-regulation of lignin biosynthetic enzymes can induce expression of defense response genes in the absence…

15h

 

Genome-scale transcriptional dynamics and environmental biosensing [Systems Biology]

 

Genome-scale technologies have enabled mapping of the complex molecular networks that govern cellular behavior. An emerging theme in the analyses of these networks is that cells use many layers of regulatory feedback to constantly assess and precisely react to their environment. The importance of complex feedback in controlling the real-time…

15h

 

Designing effective control of dengue with combined interventions [Systems Biology]

 

Viruses transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, such as dengue, Zika, and chikungunya, have expanding ranges and seem unabated by current vector control programs. Effective control of these pathogens likely requires integrated approaches. We evaluated dengue management options in an endemic setting that combine novel vector control and vaccination using an agent-based…

15h

 

GABA-mediated tonic inhibition differentially modulates gain in functional subtypes of cortical interneurons [Neuroscience]

 

The binding of GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) to extrasynaptic GABAA receptors generates tonic inhibition that acts as a powerful modulator of cortical network activity. Despite GABA being present throughout the extracellular space of the brain, previous work has shown that GABA may differentially modulate the excitability of neuron subtypes according to…

15h

 

A molecular basis for the T cell response in HLA-DQ2.2 mediated celiac disease [Immunology and Inflammation]

 

The highly homologous human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 molecules, HLA-DQ2.5 and HLA-DQ2.2, are implicated in the pathogenesis of celiac disease (CeD) by presenting gluten peptides to CD4+ T cells. However, while HLA-DQ2.5 is strongly associated with disease, HLA-DQ2.2 is not, and the molecular basis underpinning this differential disease association is unresolved….

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16h

 

No, the Wuhan Virus Is Not a 'Snake Flu'

 

One paper advanced a controversial theory about the disease's origin. Other scientists aren't biting.

16h

 

16h

 

Here's Why The WHO Hasn't Declared China's Coronavirus a Global Health Emergency

 

20 million people have been effectively quarantined.

16h

 

For under $40, you can get over 1 million royalty-free vector graphics to use for life

 

VectorGrove features 1.2 million vector images for use in graphics projects. These royalty-free images can be used anywhere and are fully customizable. A $4,999 value, a lifetime VectorGrove subscription is now only $39. If you want a quality product, start with quality ingredients. That's why any digital art pro will tell you that having a collection of quality vector graphics ready to incorpora

16h

 

16h

 

Arkeolog: Kunskap om textilier har gått förlorad

 

Anita Malmius har studerat textilier från över 100 gravar från bronsålder till vikingatid. Kläder och andra textilier från gravar har alltid systematiskt undervärderats inom arkeologin, anser hon. – När bara män var arkeologer fanns inget intresse för textilier. Minsta lilla nit fick ett fyndnummer, men tygfragment inget alls. Hjalmar Stolpe, som grävde i Birka, tänkte bort textilierna när han skr

16h

 

Doctors urged to recognize post-antidepressant sexual dysfunction

 

A psychiatrist specializing in sexual dysfunction caused by antidepressants is calling for greater recognition of the problems that can endure after treatment stops. Professor David Healy, writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, said problems may begin after only a few doses and leave someone affected for life, or a relatively mild dysfunction can worsen dramatically when the pers

17h

 

Australia's fires may accelerate a jump in CO2 forecasted in 2020

 

The UK's Met Office is forecasting a big increase in CO2 levels in 2020, due in part to the extreme wildfires that have been burning for months in Australia

17h

 

Space-baked cookies are now a thing – but take two hours longer than on Earth

 

Astronauts on the ISS baked chocolate chip cookies from raw ingredients for the first time although no one has yet tasted them The results are finally in for the first chocolate chip cookie bake-off in space. While looking more or less normal, the best cookies required two hours of baking time last month up at the International Space Station. It takes far less time on Earth, under 20 minutes. Con

17h

 

The End May Be Nearer: Doomsday Clock Moves Within 100 Seconds Of Midnight

 

The two-minute warning that had held over the past two years has now shrunk to 100 seconds before midnight on the Doomsday Clock set by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists . (Image credit: Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images)

17h

 

Low-dose aspirin may reduce preterm birth risk among first-time mothers

 

Daily low-dose aspirin, from as early as the sixth week of pregnancy through the 36th week, may lower the risk for preterm birth among first-time mothers, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

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17h

 

Insys Founder Gets 5½ Years in Prison in Opioid Kickback Scheme

 

The company executive, John Kapoor, was accused of bribing doctors and misleading insurers to increase sales of a highly addictive painkiller.

17h

 

Many in China Wear Them, but Do Masks Block Coronavirus?

 

They may help, but experts say it's more important to wash your hands.

17h

 

The Atlantic Politics Daily: Trump's Favorite Impeachment Defenses

 

It's Thursday, January 23. In today's newsletter: All the president's talking points. Plus: Is a Senate impeachment trial that's called no witnesses unconstitutional? * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / GETTY) Trump's Favorite Impeachment Defenses President Donald Trump has a whole lot of talking points he turns to fire back against impeachment—from "a perfect phone call" to simply

17h

 

Airborne pollution associated with more severe rhinitis symptoms

 

A team of scientists from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a research institute supported by 'la Caixa,' has discovered that the nasal symptoms of rhinitis are more severe in people exposed to higher levels of outdoor air pollution. The study will be published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

17h

 

Author Correction: Thickness-dependent magnetic order in CrI3 single crystals

 

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58155-8 Author Correction: Thickness-dependent magnetic order in CrI 3 single crystals

18h

 

Electric snow blowers that ease the pain of shoveling

 

Enjoy the beauty of snowfall without dreading the cleanup. (Adrian via Unsplash/) Making snow forts, sculpting magnificent snowpeople, and starting snowball fights all add up to a helluva good time. Moving pound after pound of frozen water particles from your driveway or front walk with a shovel is not. These electric snow blowers will save you time and heavy labor without sucking up a ton of fos

18h

 

Tips to get your fancy camera off the shelf and start taking more pictures

 

Your smartphone can't do everything. (Kane Reinholdtsen via Unspla/) A lot of people have a new-ish DSLR or mirrorless camera just sitting in a drawer. It's just that there's really not a pressing need for one—most of the time, your smartphone will be able to capture that photo you want, or you'll be able to get close enough to the action that there's actually no point in more camera power. But,

18h

 

Facial paralysis stigma takes emotional toll, especially when acquired later in life

 

People with facial paralysis are more likely to face depression and anxiety than the general population, especially if the paralysis occurs later in life rather than at birth, according to a recent study.

18h

 

Sharp increase in Ningaloo whale shark injuries might be due to boat encounters

 

Almost one-fifth of the whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) in Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef Marine Park show major scarring or fin amputations, with the number of injured animals increasing in recent years, new research reveals.

18h

 

Scientist Scrutinize New Coronavirus Genome for Answers

 

Researchers are trying to figure out where it came from, whether it's evolving, and just how big a threat it will be.

18h

 

Iguanas falling from trees in Florida

 

As temperatures drop in Florida more and more iguanas are plummeting to the ground.

18h

 

A Robot Dog With a Job, a Noise-Canceling Car, and More News

 

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

18h

 

How To See The Future (No Crystal Ball Needed)

 

When disaster strikes, we want to know, who screwed up? This week we explore the psychology of warnings: Why some warnings get heard, and why some of us are better at seeing what lies ahead. (Image credit: Angela Hsieh)

18h

 

Novel Coronavirus that recently emerged in China

 

The new cluster of viral pneumonia cases originating in Wuhan, China, marks the third time in 20 years that a member of the large family of coronaviruses (CoVs) has jumped from animals to humans and sparked an outbreak.

18h

 

Mystery of Grand Canyon's water supply

 

Researchers looked at how scientists model the vulnerability of karst formations around the Grand Canyon. They then created a new model that can give land and water managers more information so they can better protect the water system.

18h

 

Living near major roads linked to risk of dementia, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and MS

 

Living near major roads or highways is linked to higher incidence of dementia, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), suggests new research.

18h

 

Microchip capability expanded ewith new 3D inductor technology

 

Smaller is better when it comes to microchips, researchers said, and by using 3D components on a standardized 2D microchip manufacturing platform, developers can use up to 100 times less chip space. A team of engineers has boosted the performance of its previously developed 3D inductor technology by adding as much as three orders of magnitudes more induction to meet the performance demands of mode

18h

 

Twenty-Eight Shades of Shoes

 

New Research Using Crocs Explains The Dress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

 

Forget Meters and Feet

 

There's only one truly basic unit of length for Earthlings — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

 

As Coronavirus Spreads from China, Scientists See Grim Reminders

 

Epidemics of related viruses, like SARS, killed hundreds. But the W.H.O. has postponed a decision on whether the new outbreak is a global emergency.

18h

 

Doomsday Clock is reset to 100 seconds until midnight, closest ever

 

Move prompted by new threats including hypersonic weapons and fake news

18h

 

Subtle structural features in donated kidneys may predict risk of transplant failure

 

Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered that subtle structural features in kidneys from living donors that can only be seen with a microscope may predict the risk of transplant failure in recipients. The findings are published online in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

18h

 

Brains Turned to Glass? Suffocated in Boathouses? Vesuvius Victims Get New Look

 

Two studies examined grim scenes left at a Roman settlement devastated by the 79 A.D. eruption.

19h

 

Boeing Quits — and Kills — DARPA Experimental Spaceplane Program

 

Game Over In 2013, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) launched the Experimental Spaceplane (XSP) project. Its goal? Create a reusable hypersonic vehicle that could deliver small satellites into orbit for the United States military. In 2017, DARPA selected Boeing to build and test the spaceplane. But this week, the company announced it was quitting the program — prompting DARPA

19h

 

WHO says no need—yet—to declare spread of novel virus is an international emergency

 

Critics of decision see global threat from a coronavirus that emerged in China last month and has jumped to several countries

19h

 

Eleven animals you can identify by their poop

 

Identifying different kinds of droppings can help you understand a lot about how animals use the landscape. (Pete Sucheski/) This story originally featured on Field & Stream . A lot of things will lie to you in your life, but not poop. Close examination of animal scat will help you identify not only the species but how recently the animal was there, its sex, what it ate, and even where it might b

19h

 

Some Scientists Skeptical about Snakes Spreading New Virus in China

 

A genetic analysis suggests a reptilian reservoir, but researchers doubt the coronavirus could have originated in animals other than birds or mammals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

 

Researcher looking for clues in the mystery of the Grand Canyon's water supply

 

Research technician Natalie Jones is the lead author on a paper that looked at how scientists model the vulnerability of karst formations around the Grand Canyon. Along with professor Abe Springer, she created a new model that can give land and water managers more information so they can better protect the water system.

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19h

 

Stress Turns Hair Gray By Depleting Pigment-Producing Stem Cells

 

In mice, the fight-or-flight response overactivates the cells, causing a drop in their numbers, which leads to loss of hair color.

19h

 

Ultrasonic Hands Could Give Robots a Lighter Touch

 

Hands Off A Swiss researcher has created a prototype robot hand that moves objects without ever touching them. The system exploits a phenomenon that's been around for 80 years — and it has the potential to bring the benefits of robotics to a wider range of industries in the future. Magic Robot Hand Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich researcher Marcel Schuck's robot hand looks like a

19h

 

This Advanced Nootropic 'Brain Food' Is Designed to Maximize Cognitive Performance

 

Do want to enhance cognitive function? Improve mental clarity? Sharpen concentration? Boost memory? We all do. And technically speaking, no one of needs a cognitive nutrition supplement to do it. If we just exercise every day, eat perfectly balanced low-fat sugar-free diets packed with essential vitamins and minerals, get eight to nine hours of high-quality sleep every night, and practice meditat

19h

 

Teens with obesity and PCOS have more 'unhealthy' bacteria

 

Teens with obesity and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have more 'unhealthy' gut bacteria suggesting the microbiome may play a role in the disorder, according to new research.

19h

 

Researchers regrow damaged nerves with polymer and protein

 

Researchers have created a biodegradable nerve guide — a polymer tube — filled with growth-promoting protein that can regenerate long sections of damaged nerves, without the need for transplanting stem cells or a donor nerve.

19h

 

Integrating micro chips for electronic skin

 

Researchers present the first fully integrated flexible electronics made of magnetic sensors and organic circuits which opens the path towards the development of electronic skin.

19h

 

Blood tests can predict timing of final menstrual period

 

Blood tests could replace menstrual periods as a gauge for when a women is nearing menopause, according to new research.

19h

 

Spacewatch: successful SpaceX test a key milestone for Nasa

 

Crew Dragon capsule's abort test means Nasa may return to launching astronauts from US soil as early as spring Nasa could return to launching American astronauts from US soil as early as the spring now that the SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule has completed a high-altitude abort test . The successful test took place on 19 January, when a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched from the Kennedy Space Center at

19h

 

These Lab-Grown Snake Organoids Produce Real Venom

 

Oozing with poison and small enough to fit in a petri dish, the organoids could one day help provide sorely-needed antivenoms.

19h

 

'Doomsday Clock' closer to midnight than ever

 

The Doomsday Clock on Thursday ticked down to 100 seconds to midnight, symbolizing the greatest level of peril to humanity since its creation in 1947 as the threat posed by climate change and a growing nuclear race loomed large.

19h

 

Quantum experiments explore power of light for communications, computing

 

Quantum researchers have conducted a series of experiments to gain a better understanding of quantum mechanics and pursue advances in quantum networking and quantum computing, which could lead to practical applications in cybersecurity and other areas.

19h

 

Researchers regrow damaged nerves with polymer and protein

 

Researchers have created a biodegradable nerve guide — a polymer tube — filled with growth-promoting protein that can regenerate long sections of damaged nerves, without the need for transplanting stem cells or a donor nerve.

19h

 

Integrating micro chips for electronic skin

 

Researchers present the first fully integrated flexible electronics made of magnetic sensors and organic circuits which opens the path towards the development of electronic skin.

19h

 

Maglab scientists capture molecular maps of animal tissue with unprecedented detail

 

Scientists have refined a technique called mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) that translates reams of data into detailed visuals of the molecular makeup of biological samples. Their work, published this week in Analytical Chemistry, features images with mass resolution so high that every color in the image represents a distinct kind of molecule.

19h

 

Weight loss and health improvements with Mediterranean, fasting & paleo diets

 

There were some weight loss and health benefits for overweight adults who followed the Mediterranean, Intermittent Fasting and Paleo diets, though adherence to the diets dropped off considerably during the one-year study, new University of Otago research shows.

19h

 

What does Trump actually believe on climate change?

 

He has called it all of these things: "mythical", "a hoax", not a hoax, and "a very serious subject".

19h

 

Why cells need acidic lysosomes

 

Just like the body contains lungs, liver, and lymph nodes, so does each of the body's cells contain tiny specialized organs. Perhaps most peculiar among them are lysosomes—bubble-like sacks that act as part recycling bin, part stomach.

19h

 

Quantum experiments explore power of light for communications, computing

 

Quantum researchers have conducted a series of experiments to gain a better understanding of quantum mechanics and pursue advances in quantum networking and quantum computing, which could lead to practical applications in cybersecurity and other areas.

19h

 

More autonomy at work reduces the risk of low back pain

 

A team of psychologists has carried out a meta-analysis to identify psychosocial work factors that pose a risk for the development of chronic low back pain (CLBP). Their study clearly indicates that not only physical but also psychological and social factors exert considerable influence on the development of the disease.

19h

 

Two-drug combo halts the growth of cancer cells

 

Researchers have discovered a two-drug combo that halts the growth of cancer cells that carry HER2 mutations.

19h

 

Why cells need acidic lysosomes

 

Just like the body contains lungs, liver, and lymph nodes, so does each of the body's cells contain tiny specialized organs. Perhaps most peculiar among them are lysosomes—bubble-like sacks that act as part recycling bin, part stomach.

19h

 

Climate hazard scientists connect 2018's Four Corners drought directly to human-caused climate change

 

The western United States has experienced such intense droughts over the past decade that technical descriptions are becoming inadequate. In many places, conditions are rocketing past "severe," through "extreme," all the way to "exceptional drought."

19h

 

Study Finds No Association Between Herpes Virus and Alzheimer's

 

While the findings contradict previous studies that have linked human herpesvirus 6 to the neurodegenerative disease, they do not eliminate the possibility of a relationship.

19h

 

NIAID officials discuss novel Coronavirus that recently emerged in China

 

The new cluster of viral pneumonia cases originating in Wuhan, China, marks the third time in 20 years that a member of the large family of coronaviruses (CoVs) has jumped from animals to humans and sparked an outbreak. In a new JAMA Viewpoint essay, Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), looks back at two earlier novel CoV outb

19h

 

Data from behind enemy lines: How Russia may have used Twitter to seize Crimea

 

Online discourse by users of social media can provide important clues about the political dispositions of communities. New research suggests it can even be used by governments as a source of military intelligence to estimate prospective casualties and costs incurred from occupying foreign territories.

19h

 

Can I mix those chemicals? There's an app for that!

 

Improperly mixed chemicals cause a shocking number of fires, explosions, and injuries in laboratories, businesses, and homes each year.

19h

 

Experts Call for System Preventing Satellite Collisions

 

Satellite Collision SpaceX is planning to launch more than 40,000 tiny Starlink satellites to bring broadband internet service to the entire globe. On Friday, the Elon Musk-led company is planning to send up another 60 satellites, bringing the total to nearly 240 . Keeping track of such an immense cloud of orbital objects is becoming increasingly difficult and could potentially result in disaster

19h

 

Keeping guns away from potential mass shooters

 

The United States currently averages 20 mass shootings per year. Researchers from Michigan State University measured the extent to which mass shootings are committed by domestic violence perpetrators, suggesting how firearm restrictions may prevent these tragedies.

20h

 

Astronomers detect large amounts of oxygen in ancient star's atmosphere

 

An international team of astronomers from the University of California San Diego, the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), and the University of Cambridge have detected large amounts of oxygen in the atmosphere of one of the oldest and most elementally depleted stars known—a "primitive star" scientists call J0815+4729.

20h

 

New experimental vaccine for African swine fever virus shows promise

 

Government and academic investigators have developed a vaccine against African swine fever that appears to be far more effective than previously developed vaccines. The research appears this week in the Journal of Virology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology.

20h

 

As Coastal Cities Flood, Here's Where US Climate Refugees Might End Up

 

By 2100, millions could flood into cities and communities around the country to escape rising waters.

20h

 

Making 'lemonade': Chance observation leads to study of microbial bloom formation

 

A scientific discovery often starts with a chance observation made by open minds who realize its potential. This happens over and over again in the MBL's Advanced Research Training courses. A fresh insight leads to a course research project that, after the course is over, can blossom into a full-scale scientific collaboration that continues to connect course participants across the globe.

20h

 

Acetone plus light creates a green jet fuel additive

 

Take biomass-derived acetone—common nail polish remover—use light to upgrade it to higher-mass hydrocarbons, and, voila, you have a domestically generated product that can be blended with conventional jet fuel to fly while providing environmental benefits, creating domestic jobs, securing the nation's global leadership in bioenergy technologies, and improving U.S. energy security.

20h

 

NASA finds wind shear affected new Tropical Cyclone 09S

 

Tropical Cyclone 09S formed on Jan. 22 in the Southern Indian Ocean despite being affected by vertical wind shear and one day later, wind shear caused its demise. The end of 09S was caught by NASA's Aqua satellite.

20h

 

Taming electrons with bacteria parts

 

In a new study, scientists report a new synthetic system that could guide electron transfer over long distances.

20h

 

New experimental vaccine for African swine fever virus shows promise

 

Government and academic investigators have developed a vaccine against African swine fever that appears to be far more effective than previously developed vaccines. The research appears this week in the Journal of Virology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology.

20h

 

Why Rilke's words still resonate (and appear in 'Jojo Rabbit')

 

The writings of Rainer Maria Rilke take a star turn in the the film Jojo Rabbit , which has been nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The best-selling Austrian poet and novelist's poem "Go to the Limits of Your Longing" and the letter "Requiem for a Friend"—a tribute to painter Paula Modersohn-Becker—appear in Jojo Rabbit . The film is a biting and poignant satire, in which a

20h

 

Germany Rejected Nuclear Power—and Deadly Emissions Spiked

 

After Fukushima, the country opted to decommission its nuclear reactors. The US has a lot to learn from what happened next.

20h

 

The unpaid work that GDP ignores — and why it really counts | Marilyn Waring

 

If you: do laundry, are (or have been) pregnant, tidy up, shop for your household or do similar labor, then by GDP standards, you're unproductive. In this visionary talk, economist Marilyn Waring seeks to correct the failures of this narrow-minded system, detailing why we deserve a better way to measure growth that values not just our own livelihood but the planet's as well.

20h

 

Taking aim at gastric cancer

 

A novel drug, named 'FerriIridium,' can simultaneously help diagnose and treat gastric cancer. The initially weakly active precursor (prodrug), based on an iridium-containing compound, is selectively activated only after reaching the interior of a tumor cell. This is possible because of the higher amount of iron present there, report scientists. Selective activation reduces undesired side effects.

20h

 

US households waste nearly a third of the food they acquire

 

American households waste, on average, almost a third of the food they acquire, according to economists, who say this wasted food has an estimated aggregate value of $240 billion annually. Divided among the nearly 128.6 million U.S. households, this waste could be costing the average household about $1,866 per year.

20h

 

Technique reveals whether models of patient risk are accurate

 

Researchers have developed a method to determine whether a clinical risk model's predictions can be trusted for a given patient. The findings could help doctors avoid ineffective or unnecessarily risky treatments for some patients.

20h

 

Biodegradable "Bridge" Could Repair Damaged Nerves

 

People in the United States sustain approximately 600,000 nerve injuries every year — and a newly unveiled biodegradable "bridge" could improve treatment for them. The human nervous system is divided into two parts. There's the central nervous system, which comprises our brains and spinal cords . And then there's the peripheral nervous system , which consists of all the nerves in our arms, legs,

20h

 

Vitrified brains and baked bones tell the story of Vesuvius deaths

 

Nature, Published online: 23 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00162-w Remains found at a city near Pompeii present opposing narratives of how people perished in the AD 79 eruption.

20h

 

Finally, You Can Stop Robocalls for an Unbelievably Low Price

 

If you are sick of being hounded by unwanted texts or robocalls , you are hardly alone. According to Swedish research firm Truecaller, the United States is the eighth-most spammed country in the world, with the average American receiving 18 spam calls every single month. In fact, despite the increased efforts of the four major cellular service providers to block unwanted robocalls and identify po

20h

 

Bilingual language program for babies: online training for teachers

 

A study shows that a bilingual language program for babies can reach more families, and instructors, through online training for teachers.

20h

 

Can I mix those chemicals? There's an app for that!

 

Improperly mixed chemicals cause a shocking number of fires, explosions, and injuries in laboratories, businesses, and homes each year. A new open source computer program called ChemStor developed by engineers at the University of California, Riverside, can prevent these dangerous situations by telling users if it is unsafe to mix certain chemicals.

20h

 

Revealed an alteration related to the loss of effectiveness of a treatment in lung cancer

 

Researchers from IJC reveal that non-smoking patients with lung cancer that have an alteration in RB1 and are treated with EGFR inhibitors, acquire resistance to treatment through the mechanism of histopathological transformation, either to non-small cell lung cancer (SCLC) or SLCL combined with a transformation to squamous cell lung cancer.

20h

 

Inside Pwn2Own's High-Stakes Industrial Hacking Contest

 

At Pwn2Own, hackers had no trouble dismantling systems that help run everything from car washes to nuclear plants.

20h

 

Europe's new space mission to uncover 'Truths' on climate change

 

TRUTHS would use state-of-the-art technology to precisely measure Earth's so-called "radiation budget." The new technology would also help calibrate instruments aboard existing satellites. The European Space Agency and UK Space Agency are expected to launch the mission in 2026. None The European Space Agency is set to launch a satellite designed to boost the accuracy of climate-change predictions

20h

 

LightSail 2′s success could pave the way for more sun-powered spacecrafts

 

LightSail 2 captured this image as it cruised over Australia. (The Planetary Society/) Long before anyone considered exploring space with thrusters, German astronomer Johannes Kepler—noticing that the sun appeared to blow back the tails of comets—dreamt about getting around on celestial winds. "Provide ships or sails adapted to the heavenly breezes," he wrote to Galileo Galilei in 1608, "and ther

20h

 

GM's Cruise Origin Is an Autonomous Vehicle From the Future

 

Cruise Automation, the GM self-driving-car subsidiary, showed off its latest and most solid self-driving car yet this week, the Cruise Origin. The Origin is both electric and autonomous. The Origin is equally defined by what the vehicle is not: your personal self-driver you put away at day's end. Instead, it's meant to be a six-person taxi for ride shares in and around urban areas such as San Fra

20h

 

Engineered capillaries model traffic in tiny blood vessels

 

3D microvessels have been created to observe how red blood cells transit ultra-small blood vessels. They squeeze single-file through microvessels to bring oxygen and nutrients. Red cells burdened with malaria stall, blocking the blood vessel. The platform is expected to have other uses in studies of how microvascular damage occurs in diabetes and sickle cell anemia. They might be further developed

21h

 

Astronomers detect large amounts of oxygen in ancient star's atmosphere

 

Astronomers using W. M. Keck Observatory on Maunakea in Hawaii have detected large amounts of oxygen in the atmosphere of one of the oldest and most elementally depleted stars known — a 'primitive star' scientists call J0815+4729. This new finding provides an important clue on how oxygen and other important elements were produced in the first generations of stars in the universe.

21h

 

Researchers expand microchip capability with new 3D inductor technology

 

Smaller is better when it comes to microchips, researchers said, and by using 3D components on a standardized 2D microchip manufacturing platform, developers can use up to 100 times less chip space. A team of engineers has boosted the performance of its previously developed 3D inductor technology by adding as much as three orders of magnitudes more induction to meet the performance demands of mode

21h

 

Predictive touch response mechanism is a step toward a tactile internet

 

A team of researchers led by Elaine Wong at the University of Melbourne, Australia, developed a method for enhancing haptic feedback experiences in human-to-machine applications that are typical in the Tactile Internet.

21h

 

Astronomers Find a New Explanation for a Super-Bright Supernova

 

It may have been caused by the collision of two stars.

21h

 

Could new study on cow communication lead to more humane farming?

 

New audio recordings of cows reveal rich communication and unique individual voices. Cows do more than vocalize to their calves — they share emotions with each other. A better understanding of what cows are saying and feeling can help in the formulation of humane cattle-care standards. None Previous research has demonstrated that mother cows recognize and respond to the voices of their own offspr

21h

 

21h

 

WHO Declines to Declare China Virus Outbreak a Global Health Emergency

 

The agency's director-general said it is an emergency in China, but not yet globally — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

 

Daily briefing: New Zealand's unique academic rating system reveals gender pay gap in unprecedented detail

 

Nature, Published online: 23 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00181-7 Age and performance fail to explain the gap. Plus: Aboriginal sites at risk and Wuhan on lockdown.

21h

 

Novel communication between intestinal microbes and developing immune cells in the thymus

 

Researchers discover microbes regulate the development of specialized immune cells in the thymus that play a critical role in mucosal tolerance.

21h

 

Making 'lemonade': Chance observation leads to study of microbial bloom formation

 

A team from the Microbial Diversity course at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass., studied a brackish, shallow lagoon over time and found it releases hydrogen sulfide, particularly upon physical disturbance, causing blooms of anoxygenic sulfur-oxidizing phototrophs. To study the habitat, microbial community structure, assembly and function they carried out in situ experiments inves

21h

 

WHO urges global unity in fight against coronavirus outbreak

 

With 18 deaths in China, several countries introduce screening for arriving passengers The World Health Organization has called on the global community to work together to fight the new coronavirus that is causing an epidemic of viral pneumonia and deaths in China, but stopped short of declaring it a public health emergency of international concern. After the second day of meetings of the emergen

21h

 

Why Icelandic Dads Take Parental Leave and Japanese Dads Don't

 

Earlier this month, the 38-year-old Japanese environment minister, Shinjiro Koizumi, did something that would not make national, or even local, news in many industrialized countries: A couple of days before the birth of his and his wife's first child, he said he planned to take time off from work to care for the baby. Koizumi's planned leave is meager—he expects to take about two weeks off over t

21h

 

NASA infrared telescope says goodbye after 16-year run

 

Spitzer studied the warm glow of distant galaxies and nearby planets

21h

 

Acetone plus light creates a green jet fuel additive

 

Take biomass-derived acetone — common nail polish remover — use light to upgrade it to higher-mass hydrocarbons, and, voila, you have a domestically generated product that can be blended with conventional jet fuel to fly while providing environmental benefits, creating domestic jobs, securing the nation's global leadership in bioenergy technologies, and improving U.S. energy security.

21h

 

Liver fibrosis 'off switch' discovered in mice

 

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified several genetic switches, or transcription factors, that determine whether or not liver cells produce collagen — providing a new therapeutic target for liver fibrosis.

21h

 

Why cells need acidic lysosomes

 

Little organs within cells called lysosomes digest unwanted material. And like stomachs, they must be acidic to do so. If they aren't, cells stop growing. Researchers wanted to know why.

21h

 

UK universities issue health warnings over travel to China

 

Institutions are monitoring staff and students who have recently come from areas affected by the coronavirus UK universities with links to China have issued warnings to staff and students travelling to and from areas affected by the coronavirus, urging anyone with symptoms to seek medical advice. With concern growing about the spread of the virus, universities in the UK are keeping a check on sta

21h

 

Finally, Apple Has Made a Great TV Show With Little America

 

For an enterprise so richly resourced, it's remarkable just how middling Apple's television offerings have been thus far. Since the premium service's launch in November, its lineup has been almost impressively haphazard: There's the discordant horror of M. Night Shyamalan's ( much-contested ) Servant ; the disappointing tonal incoherence of the network's flagship series, The Morning Show ; the vi

21h

 

Antibiotic resistance genes can be passed around by bacteria in dust

 

Disease-causing bacteria living in dust can pass antibiotic resistance genes to one another, a study of samples of dust in public buildings suggests

21h

 

Mysteriously bright supernova may have smashed up a huge gas cloud

 

A strange supernova that's 100 times brighter than it should be has long been a mystery, but it may be explained by the explosion slamming into a cloud of gas

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21h

 

Warmer, dryer, browner

 

Climate hazard scientists connect 2018's Four Corners drought directly to human-caused climate change.

22h

 

Living near major roads linked to risk of dementia, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and MS

 

Living near major roads or highways is linked to higher incidence of dementia, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), suggests new research published this week in the journal Environmental Health.

22h

 

High-protein diets boost artery-clogging plaque, mouse study shows

 

High-protein diets may help people lose weight and build muscle, but a new study in mice suggests they have a down side: They lead to more plaque in the arteries. Further, the new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that high-protein diets spur unstable plaque — the kind most prone to rupturing and causing blocked arteries. More plaque buildup in the arteries

22h

 

Facial paralysis stigma takes emotional toll, especially when acquired later in life

 

People with facial paralysis are more likely to face depression and anxiety than the general population, especially if the paralysis occurs later in life rather than at birth, according to a recent study.

22h

 

Study finds many youth living with undiagnosed chronic fatigue syndrome

 

Most youth living with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) have not been diagnosed, according to a new prevalence study from researchers at DePaul University and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, published by the journal Child & Youth Care Forum. Leonard A. Jason, a professor of psychology at DePaul University, led the seven-year study to screen more tha

22h

 

New insights about the brightest explosions in the Universe

 

Swedish and Japanese researchers have, after ten years, found an explanation to the peculiar emission lines seen in one of the brightest supernovae ever observed — SN 2006gy. At the same time they found an explanation for how the supernova arose.

22h

 

Chemicals in the environment: A focus on mixtures

 

The real world is marked by multiple stressors, among them cocktails of chemicals. The review article published in the current issue of Science magazine presents methodological approaches to isolating, characterizing and tracking chemicals of concern in complex mixtures. Techniques that combine chemical analysis and bioassays are most suited to this purpose — according to an international team of

22h

 

Scientists highlight potential of exposome research

 

The genomics revolution has provided powerful insights into genetic risk factors for human disease while also revealing the limits of genetic determinants, which account for only a fraction of total disease risk. A new article in the journal Science argues that a similar large-scale effort is needed to ensure a more complete picture of disease risk by accounting for the exposome, defined as our cu

22h

 

'To safeguard people from chemical pollution, another approach is warranted'

 

As many as nine million people (16% of all deaths worldwide) die yearly as a result of air, water and soil pollution. Although there is extensive evidence that exposure to specific chemicals can lead to disease, the current research approach does not provide sufficient insight to intervene. In an article in Science, Utrecht professor Roel Vermeulen and his colleagues therefore call for a systemati

22h

 

West Nile virus triggers brain inflammation by inhibiting protein degradation

 

West Nile virus (WNV) inhibits autophagy — an essential system that digests or removes cellular constituents such as proteins — to induce the aggregation of proteins in infected cells, triggering cell death and brain inflammation (encephalitis), according to Hokkaido University researchers.

22h

 

Special issue: Chemistry for Tomorrow's Earth

 

Through modern chemistry, we live better. However, as researchers continue to recognize the environmental and health risks associated with the mass production, use and disposal of complex synthetic molecules, a need for safer and more sustainable chemicals has become clear.

22h

 

Organoids open window into development of human forebrain

 

Brain region-specific organoids have allowed researchers to peer inside the complex programming of human forebrain development, a process once inaccessible to molecular study.

22h

 

A proposal to change environmental risk assessment for pesticides

 

Despite regulatory frameworks designed to prevent environmental damage, pesticide use is still linked to declines in insects, birds and aquatic species, an outcome that raises questions about the efficacy of current regulatory procedures.

22h

 

Revealed: The explosive origin of superluminous supernova SN 2006gy

 

Providing answers about its curious supreme brightness, researchers say the superluminous supernova SN 2006gy — one of the brightest stellar explosions ever studied, and discovered in 2006 — gained its exceptional luster when a normal Type Ia explosion smashed into a surrounding shell of ejected stellar material.

22h

 

A megalibrary of nanoparticles

 

Using straightforward chemistry and a mix-and-match, modular strategy, researchers have developed a simple approach that could produce over 65,000 different types of complex nanoparticles.

22h

 

Sharp increase in Ningaloo whale shark injuries might be due to boat encounters

 

Almost one-fifth of the whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) in Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef Marine Park show major scarring or fin amputations, with the number of injured animals increasing in recent years, new research reveals.

22h

 

Stressed-out dust is sharing antibiotic resistance genes

 

A new Northwestern University study is the first to find that bacteria living in household dust can spread antibiotic resistance genes. Although most bacteria are harmless, the researchers believe these genes could potentially spread to pathogens, making infections more difficult to treat.

22h

 

New understanding of condensation could lead to better power plant condenser, de-icing materials

 

For decades, it's been understood that water repellency is needed for surfaces to shed condensation buildup – like the droplets of water that form in power plant condensers to reduce pressure. New research shows that the necessity of water repellency is unclear and that the slipperiness between the droplets and solid surface appears to be more critical to the clearing of condensation. This develop

22h

 

WHO: Wuhan-virus er endnu ikke en international sundhedstrussel

 

WHO har efter et todages hastemøde konkluderet, at der på nuværende ikke er tale om en global sundhedskrise, selv om corona-virussen fra Wuhan har spredt sig ud over Kinas grænser. Men sagen følges tæt.

22h

 

World financial markets rocked by China coronavirus

 

Oil and travel shares slide amid fears outbreak could hit growth in second largest economy China coronavirus – live updates Financial markets around the world have been rattled by the coronavirus outbreak, with its centre in Wuhan, a city known as the Chicago of China for its central location and booming car manufacturing industry. Amid growing concern over the spread of the virus, China has put

22h

 

Should you worry about the Wuhan coronavirus?

 

Since December, the Wuhan coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China, has killed at least 17 people and sickened close to 600. Cases continue to spread globally, with one identified in Washington state. In response to the evolving outbreak, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has redirected US-bound travelers from Wuhan to five airports for screening at JFK New York, San Francisco,

22h

 

Can't find the Middle East on a map? Here's why.

 

If the Middle East is easier to find in the news than on the map, there's a good reason for that. The term is a fairly recent invention with myriad definitions and applications. In some versions, it extends further west than Ireland and as far north as Copenhagen. (Not) finding Iran At the start of January, as America's assassination of Iran's general Qasem Soleimani brought the two countries to

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Drop the chalk

 

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News at a glance

 

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Cheap shots

 

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The stillness of sleep

 

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A notorious Nazi, revealed

 

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Can do

 

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Learning from the past and considering the future of chemicals in the environment

 

Knowledge of the hazards and associated risks from chemicals discharged to the environment has grown considerably over the past 40 years. This improving awareness stems from advances in our ability to measure chemicals at low environmental concentrations, recognition of a range of effects on organisms, and a worldwide growth in expertise. Environmental scientists and companies have learned from t

22h

 

Tracking complex mixtures of chemicals in our changing environment

 

Chemicals have improved our quality of life, but the resulting environmental pollution has the potential to cause detrimental effects on humans and the environment. People and biota are chronically exposed to thousands of chemicals from various environmental sources through multiple pathways. Environmental chemists and toxicologists have moved beyond detecting and quantifying single chemicals to

22h

 

The exposome and health: Where chemistry meets biology

 

Despite extensive evidence showing that exposure to specific chemicals can lead to disease, current research approaches and regulatory policies fail to address the chemical complexity of our world. To safeguard current and future generations from the increasing number of chemicals polluting our environment, a systematic and agnostic approach is needed. The "exposome" concept strives to capture th

22h

 

Designing for a green chemistry future

 

The material basis of a sustainable society will depend on chemical products and processes that are designed following principles that make them conducive to life. Important inherent properties of molecules need to be considered from the earliest stage—the design stage—to address whether compounds and processes are depleting versus renewable, toxic versus benign, and persistent versus readily deg

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Breathing faster in thin air

 

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A one-two, CAR-T cell punch

 

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More diversity at the top

 

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Shining a light on STM

 

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Imaging reactive surface water

 

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Taking the stress out of life

 

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Keeping the noise down

 

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Filling in the gaps

 

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Guiding solvothermal synthesis

 

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Linking microwaves to photons

 

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Single-cell transcriptional diversity is a hallmark of developmental potential

 

Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) is a powerful approach for reconstructing cellular differentiation trajectories. However, inferring both the state and direction of differentiation is challenging. Here, we demonstrate a simple, yet robust, determinant of developmental potential—the number of expressed genes per cell—and leverage this measure of transcriptional diversity to develop a computa

22h

 

Attosecond coherent manipulation of electrons in tunneling microscopy

 

Nanoelectronic devices operating in the quantum regime require coherent manipulation and control over electrons at atomic length and time scales. We demonstrate coherent control over electrons in a tunnel junction of a scanning tunneling microscope by means of precise tuning of the carrier-envelope phase of two-cycle long (

22h

 

A type Ia supernova at the heart of superluminous transient SN 2006gy

 

Superluminous supernovae radiate up to 100 times more energy than normal supernovae. The origin of this energy and the nature of the stellar progenitors of these transients are poorly understood. We identify neutral iron lines in the spectrum of one such supernova, SN 2006gy, and show that they require a large mass of iron (0.3 solar masses) expanding at 1500 kilometers per second. By modeling a

22h

 

Rational construction of a scalable heterostructured nanorod megalibrary

 

Integrating multiple materials in arbitrary arrangements within nanoparticles is a prerequisite for advancing many applications. Strategies to synthesize heterostructured nanoparticles are emerging, but they are limited in complexity, scope, and scalability. We introduce two design guidelines, based on interfacial reactivity and crystal structure relations, that enable the rational synthesis of a

22h

 

Entanglement-based single-shot detection of a single magnon with a superconducting qubit

 

The recent development of hybrid systems based on superconducting circuits provides the possibility of engineering quantum sensors that exploit different degrees of freedom. Quantum magnonics, which aims to control and read out quanta of collective spin excitations in magnetically ordered systems, provides opportunities for advances in both the study of magnetism and the development of quantum te

22h

 

Visualizing H2O molecules reacting at TiO2 active sites with transmission electron microscopy

 

Imaging a reaction taking place at the molecular level could provide direct information for understanding the catalytic reaction mechanism. We used in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy and a nanocrystalline anatase titanium dioxide (001) surface with (1 x 4) reconstruction as a catalyst, which provided highly ordered four-coordinated titanium "active rows" to realize real-time m

22h

 

A two-way molecular dialogue between embryo and endosperm is required for seed development

 

The plant embryonic cuticle is a hydrophobic barrier deposited de novo by the embryo during seed development. At germination, it protects the seedling from water loss and is, thus, critical for survival. Embryonic cuticle formation is controlled by a signaling pathway involving the ABNORMAL LEAF SHAPE1 subtilase and the two GASSHO receptor-like kinases. We show that a sulfated peptide, TWISTED SE

22h

 

Four glial cells regulate ER stress resistance and longevity via neuropeptide signaling in C. elegans

 

The ability of the nervous system to sense cellular stress and coordinate protein homeostasis is essential for organismal health. Unfortunately, stress responses that mitigate disturbances in proteostasis, such as the unfolded protein response of the endoplasmic reticulum (UPR ER ), become defunct with age. In this work, we expressed the constitutively active UPR ER transcription factor, XBP-1s,

22h

 

A common hub for sleep and motor control in the substantia nigra

 

The arousal state of the brain covaries with the motor state of the animal. How these state changes are coordinated remains unclear. We discovered that sleep–wake brain states and motor behaviors are coregulated by shared neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr). Analysis of mouse home-cage behavior identified four states with different levels of brain arousal and motor activity: loc

22h

 

An RNA vaccine drives expansion and efficacy of claudin-CAR-T cells against solid tumors

 

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)–T cells have shown efficacy in patients with B cell malignancies. Yet, their application for solid tumors has challenges that include limited cancer-specific targets and nonpersistence of adoptively transferred CAR-T cells. Here, we introduce the developmentally regulated tight junction protein claudin 6 (CLDN6) as a CAR target in solid tumors and a strategy to ove

22h

 

A tensile ring drives tissue flows to shape the gastrulating amniote embryo

 

Tissue morphogenesis is driven by local cellular deformations that are powered by contractile actomyosin networks. How localized forces are transmitted across tissues to shape them at a mesoscopic scale is still unclear. Analyzing gastrulation in entire avian embryos, we show that it is driven by the graded contraction of a large-scale supracellular actomyosin ring at the margin between the embry

22h

 

Total synthesis reveals atypical atropisomerism in a small-molecule natural product, tryptorubin A

 

Molecular shape defines function in both biological and material settings, and chemists have developed an ever-increasing vernacular to describe these shapes. Noncanonical atropisomers—shape-defined molecules that are formally topologically trivial but are interconvertible only by complex, nonphysical multibond torsions—form a unique subset of atropisomers that differ from both canonical atropiso

22h

 

Phase separation provides a mechanism to reduce noise in cells

 

Expression of proteins inside cells is noisy, causing variability in protein concentration among identical cells. A central problem in cellular control is how cells cope with this inherent noise. Compartmentalization of proteins through phase separation has been suggested as a potential mechanism to reduce noise, but systematic studies to support this idea have been missing. In this study, we use

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A lesson from Bollywood

 

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Chromatin accessibility dynamics in a model of human forebrain development

 

Forebrain development is characterized by highly synchronized cellular processes, which, if perturbed, can cause disease. To chart the regulatory activity underlying these events, we generated a map of accessible chromatin in human three-dimensional forebrain organoids. To capture corticogenesis, we sampled glial and neuronal lineages from dorsal or ventral forebrain organoids over 20 months in v

22h

 

A new blood component revealed

 

Does the blood we thought to know so well contain elements that had been undetectable until now? The answer is yes, according to a team of researchers which has revealed the presence of whole functional mitochondria in the blood circulation. The discovery may deepen our knowledge of physiology and open up new avenues for treatment.

22h

 

New experimental vaccine for African swine fever virus shows promise

 

Government and academic investigators have developed a vaccine against African swine fever that appears to be far more effective than previously developed vaccines.

22h

 

New understanding of condensation could lead to better power plant condenser, de-icing materials

 

For decades, it's been understood that water repellency is needed for surfaces to shed condensation buildup – like the droplets of water that form in power plant condensers to reduce pressure. New research shows that the necessity of water repellency is unclear and that the slipperiness between the droplets and solid surface appears to be more critical to the clearing of condensation. This develop

22h

 

Mechanism for how common gene therapy vectors enter cells

 

Researchers have identified a novel cellular entry factor for adeno-associated virus vector (AAV) types — the most commonly used viral vectors for in vivo gene therapy. The researchers identified that GPR108, a G protein-coupled receptor, served as a molecular 'lock' to the cell. The discovery could one day enable scientists to better direct AAV gene transfers to specific tissues.

22h

 

Missing link in mechanisms underlying fight-or-flight response

 

We've all felt the effects of an adrenaline rush. Faced with danger, real or perceived, the heart beats faster, breathing quickens and muscles tighten as the body prepares to fight a threat or flee from it.

22h

 

Evidence to explain behavior of slow earthquakes

 

A team of researchers has made an important breakthrough that will help better understand the origin and behavior of slow earthquakes. Their work presents unprecedented evidence that slow earthquakes are related to dynamic fluid processes at the boundary between tectonic plates. These slow earthquakes are quite complex, and many theoretical models of slow earthquakes require the pressure of these

22h

 

To replace controversial plastic additive BPA, a chemical company teams up with unlikely allies

 

To test its new compound, Sherwin-Williams sought help from scientists and environmental groups critical of bisphenol A

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Breathing faster in thin air

 

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A one-two, CAR-T cell punch

 

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More diversity at the top

 

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Shining a light on STM

 

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Imaging reactive surface water

 

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Taking the stress out of life

 

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Keeping the noise down

 

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Filling in the gaps

 

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Stressed-out dust is sharing antibiotic resistance genes

 

Indoor dust is evolving—and not in a good way.

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Aarhus-forsker i Science: Godkendelser af pesticider skal vendes helt på hovedet

 

PLUS. Tre forskere fra Danmark, Schweiz og Frankrig foreslår et paradigmeskift i den måde, som risikovurderinger og godkendelser af pesticider foregår på i dag.

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A megalibrary of nanoparticles

 

Using straightforward chemistry and a mix-and-match, modular strategy, researchers have developed a simple approach that could produce over 65,000 different types of complex nanoparticles, each containing up to six different materials and eight segments, with interfaces that could be exploited in electrical or optical applications. These rod-shaped nanoparticles are about 55 nanometers long and 20

22h

 

Chemicals in the environment: A focus on mixtures

 

Chemicals have improved our quality of life. But at the same time, they pose a considerable risk for humans and the environment: pesticides, pharmaceuticals and plasticisers enter the environment and the food chain, causing unwanted effects in addition to the desired ones. Despite the legislation in place, risk assessment and monitoring remain insufficient.

22h

 

Stressed-out dust is sharing antibiotic resistance genes

 

Indoor dust is evolving—and not in a good way.

22h

 

New insights about the brightest explosions in the Universe

 

Swedish and Japanese researchers have, after ten years, found an explanation to the peculiar emission lines seen in one of the brightest supernovae ever observed—SN 2006gy. At the same time they found an explanation for how the supernova arose.

22h

 

Low/no calorie sweeteners can make a useful contribution to public health strategies

 

A new scientific report, published in Nutrition Research Reviews, gathers the consensus of 17 experts who reviewed during a dedicated workshop the scientific evidence around low/no calorie sweeteners, including in the context of public health recommendations. The experts agreed these have a beneficial role to play in helping reducing sugar and calorie intake, and on the need for evidence-based com

22h

 

A Zika vaccine could save suffering and costs

 

A new study found that routinely giving the Zika vaccine to women of childbearing age could save money if the risk of Zika is around that of other mosquito-borne diseases like dengue and chikungunya.

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Tinder vil indføre en panik-knap til folk, der føler sig truede

 

I første omgang er den kun for amerikanerne. Men Tinder arbejder på at udbrede knappen.

22h

 

Lay counselors help kids in East Africa cope with trauma

 

Mental health therapy from trained community-based lay counselors improves trauma-related symptoms up to a year later, a clinical trial with more than 600 children in Kenya and Tanzania shows. Researchers trained laypeople as counselors to deliver treatment in both urban and rural communities in Kenya and Tanzania, and evaluated the progress of children and their guardians through sessions of tra

22h

 

Data from behind enemy lines: How Russia may have used Twitter to seize Crimea

 

Online discourse by users of social media can provide important clues about the political dispositions of communities. New research suggests it can even be used by governments as a source of military intelligence to estimate prospective casualties and costs incurred from occupying foreign territories.

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Room for complexity? The many players in the coffee agroecosystem

 

The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.

22h

 

Reducing the effects of inflammation | Letters

 

Dr Colin Sutherland says certain foods can be anti-inflammatory, while John O'Dwyer feels the link between inflammation and depression may have been overstated Dr Edward Bullmore ( Inflammation is the new frontier in public health , Journal, 20 January) is right in saying that inflammation "seems to be everywhere". In fact, many of the diseases of ageing have been linked to the rise in three infl

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The Doomsday Clock is now closer to midnight than ever before

 

Nuclear weapons test in 1952. (U.S. Department of Energy/) —so close that, instead of minutes, we're now counting down to metaphorical oblivion in seconds. According to the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, we have just 100 seconds to midnight. Here's what that actually means. What is the Doomsday Clock? The Doomsday Clock is neither a meaningless art project nor a precise scientific measurement

22h

 

First suspected cases of the Wuhan coronavirus in the UK

 

Three people are being tested in Edinburgh, UK, for the new coronavirus that first emerged in Wuhan, China, and a fourth possible case is suspected in Glasgow

22h

 

Mars Rover Is Frozen in Place Following Software Error

 

The Curiosity rover has performed admirably on Mars for more than seven years, but there have been a few bumps along the way. After all, it was only designed to last a few years. NASA reports that Curiosity has suffered a system failure that left the robot unaware of its position and attitude on the red planet. Until it recovers, Curiosity is frozen in place . Curiosity arrived on Mars in 2012, m

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The Wuhan Coronavirus: Symptoms, Spread, and What Scientists Know

 

A respiratory virus has spread from China to a half-dozen other countries, including the U.S. Here's what you need to know.

22h

 

Animal trade in spotlight as China seeks source of coronavirus

 

Authorities believe new strain of coronavirus came from a market in Wuhan where wildlife was sold illegally China's coronavirus outbreak: latest developments Officials in China are searching to uncover the origin of the coronavirus outbreak, amid heightened scrutiny of the country's poorly regulated animal trade. Related: What is the coronavirus and how worried should we be? Continue reading…

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Just six awesome jigsaw puzzles for all ages

 

A surprisingly fun way to spend a few hours. (Ryoji Iwata via Unsplash/) Working on a puzzle is at once entertaining, meditative, and group-friendly. Puzzles can provide a nice point of focus whether you're relaxing alone or spending time with loved ones. You can actively assemble a puzzle while maintaining spirited conversation or listening to music or podcasts. Puzzles are also designed to suit

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NASA finds wind shear affected new Tropical Cyclone 09S

 

Tropical Cyclone 09S formed on Jan. 22, 2020 in the Southern Indian Ocean despite being affected by vertical wind shear, and one day later wind shear caused its demise. The end of 09S was caught by NASA's Aqua satellite.

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A Zika vaccine could save suffering and costs

 

A new study led by researchers at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) and the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine found that routinely giving the Zika vaccine to women of childbearing age could save money if the risk of Zika is around that of other mosquito-borne diseases like dengue and chikungunya.

22h

 

ICUs receive higher satisfaction scores for end-of-life care than other hospital units

 

The research challenges a common belief that dying in the ICU is a less favorable experience than dying elsewhere in the hospital.

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AJR researchers take step toward automating thyroid cancer triage

 

An article published ahead-of-print in the April issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) details how a Stanford University team developed a quantitative framework able to sonographically differentiate between benign and malignant thyroid nodules at a level comparable to that of expert radiologists, which could provide second-opinion malignancy risk estimation to clinicians and ultimat

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Keeping guns away from potential mass shooters

 

Researchers from Michigan State University measured the extent to which mass shootings are committed by domestic violence perpetrators, as well as identyifying how they illegally obtain guns, suggesting how firearm restrictions may prevent these tragedies.

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California will be hit hard as Trump administration weakens clean water protections

 

Defying environmentalists and public health advocates, the Trump administration on Thursday will announce the replacement of Obama-era water protections with a significantly weaker set of regulations that lifts limits on how much pollution can be dumped into small streams and wetlands.

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Why So Many High-Profile Videogames Have Been Delayed

 

This month alone, *Cyberpunk 2077*, *Marvel's Avengers*, *Dying Light 2*, and *Final Fantasy VII Remake* have all been pushed back. For some, it's probably for the best.

23h

 

Donald Trump Has One Problem

 

Donald Trump faces the diciest moment of his presidency, a Senate impeachment trial, with a pair of distinct handicaps: shattered credibility and a West Wing that is broken into fiefdoms and often clueless about his intentions. Both were years in the making; neither seems easily fixed. From the outside, these can seem like two different problems. But in many ways, they're one and the same. False

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Easy-to-use carpet cleaners that pull up dirt and stains

 

It doesn't have to be a big production. (DepositPhotos/) Living rooms and bedrooms with soft, plush carpet sound luxurious. But what about upkeep? No one wants their flooring to provide a historical record of the dog "incident" in September or the coffee spill last Wednesday. With a good carpet cleaning machine, you can enjoy walking around in your socks on an everyday basis, instead of just resi

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Athol Hughes obituary

 

The psychoanalyst Athol Hughes, who has died aged 98, worked with both adults and children, teaching and supervising in Britain and abroad. One of three daughters of Mona (nee Murray) and Herman Hughes, Athol was born and brought up in Toronto, where her father worked in the family business, having recently returned from first world war service. Athol and her sisters went to Branksome Hall school

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Scientists Break World Record for Fastest-Spinning Object

 

Broken Record Scientists from Purdue University have broken their own record for building the world's fastest-spinning object. In 2018, the team built a tiny machine capable of completing 60 billion revolutions per minute. Their latest creation rotates five times faster — and they say it could improve our scientific understanding of "nothingness." Spin Cycle For their study , which was recently p

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India Wants to Send This Legless Humanoid Robot Into Space

 

Meet Vyommitra The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) has unveiled a legless robot called "Voymmitra" that it wants to send into space on an uncrewed mission later this year. The eerily humanoid robot can reportedly speak two languages, according to Business Insider . "Vyommitra will simulate human functions, will interact with the environmental control and life-support system," ISRO chair

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Trump removes protections for waterways, aiding developers

 

The Trump administration is lifting protections for some of the nation's millions of miles of streams, arroyos and wetlands, nearing completion on one of its most far-reaching environmental rollbacks.

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Racial discrimination in mortgage market persistent over last four decades

 

A new Northwestern University analysis finds that racial disparities in the mortgage market suggest that discrimination in loan denial and cost has not declined much over the previous 30 to 40 years, yet discrimination in the housing market has decreased during the same time period.

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Book chronicles history of gender-neutral pronouns, from Shakespeare to email

 

Email signatures are almost as likely to include the preferred gender pronouns of the senders as they are their names and titles. The declaration of preferred pronouns is a contemporary cultural issue, but people have been searching for gender-neutral pronouns since at least the late 18th century.

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Research expands bilingual language program for babies

 

Knowledge of multiple languages has long been shown to have lifelong benefits, from enhancing communication skills to boosting professional opportunities to staving off the cognitive effects of aging.

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Taking aim at gastric cancer: New approach to selective chemotherapy

 

A novel drug, named "FerriIridium," can simultaneously help diagnose and treat gastric cancer. The initially weakly active precursor (prodrug), based on an iridium-containing compound, is selectively activated only after reaching the interior of a tumor cell. This is possible because of the higher amount of iron present there, report scientists in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Selective activatio

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The average American household wastes $1,866 of food per year

 

American households waste, on average, almost a third of the food they acquire, economists report. This food waste has an estimated aggregate value of $240 billion annually. Divided among the nearly 128.6 million US households, the waste could cost the average household about $1,866 per year. This inefficiency in the food economy has implications for health, food security, food marketing, and cli

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New experimental vaccine for African swine fever virus shows promise

 

Government and academic investigators have developed a vaccine against African swine fever that appears to be far more effective than previously developed vaccines. The research appears this week in the Journal of Virology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology.

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Oral hormone-blocking drug may help with heavy menstrual bleeding

 

In women with uterine fibroids, the drug elagolix suppresses ovarian hormone production and prevents heavy menstrual bleeding.

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Taking aim at gastric cancer: New approach to selective chemotherapy

 

A novel drug, named "FerriIridium," can simultaneously help diagnose and treat gastric cancer. The initially weakly active precursor (prodrug), based on an iridium-containing compound, is selectively activated only after reaching the interior of a tumor cell. This is possible because of the higher amount of iron present there, report scientists in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Selective activatio

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The Torturers Wanted to Stop, but the CIA Kept Going

 

A psychologist who helped the CIA torture people told a chilling story this week at the Guantánamo Bay Naval Base in Cuba, where legal cases are proceeding against five defendants accused of murdering almost 3,000 people on September 11, 2001. James Mitchell, one of the architects and practitioners of waterboarding, still defends the interrogation method, which involves strapping human beings to

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New understanding of condensation could lead to better power plant condenser, de-icing materials

 

For decades, it's been understood that water repellency is needed for surfaces to shed condensation buildup—like the droplets of water that form in power plant condensers to reduce pressure. New research shows that the necessity of water repellency is unclear and that the slipperiness between the droplets and solid surface appears to be more critical to the clearing of condensation. This developme

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Quantum experiments explore power of light for communications, computing

 

A team from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted a series of experiments to gain a better understanding of quantum mechanics and pursue advances in quantum networking and quantum computing, which could lead to practical applications in cybersecurity and other areas.

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Mysterious Chinese Virus May Have Spread From Snakes

 

Scientists may have figured out where 2019-nCoV, the virus behind China's growing pandemic , came from. The viral outbreak began at a seafood market in Wuhan, China that sold both butchered meat and live animals . A team of Peking University of China researchers suspects that the original culprit wasn't one of the fish — arguing instead that an infected snake likely set the whole thing off, accor

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Researchers find evidence to explain behavior of slow earthquakes

 

A team of researchers at the University of Ottawa has made an important breakthrough that will help better understand the origin and behavior of slow earthquakes, a new type of earthquake discovered by scientists nearly 20 years ago.

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Women-only business groups marginalize and fail to empower members

 

Women-only business networks fail to boost female entrepreneurship and instead serve to marginalise further the very people they seek to help.

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Fuel efficient tech may threaten climate, public health

 

New automotive technology that promises enhanced fuel efficiency may have a serious downside, including significant climate and public health impacts, according to research from the University of Georgia College of Engineering.

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Will the future's super batteries be made of seawater?

 

We all know the rechargeable and efficient lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries sitting in our smartphones, laptops and also in electric cars.

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Researchers obtain atomically thin molybdenum disulfide films on large-area substrates

 

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have managed to grow atomically thin films of molybdenum disulfide spanning up to several tens of centimeters square. It was demonstrated that the material's structure can be modified by varying the synthesis temperature. The films, which are important to electronics and optoelectronics, were obtained at 900-1,000° Celsius. The findin

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