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Lab turns trash into valuable graphene in a flash

That banana peel, turned into graphene, can help facilitate a massive reduction of the environmental impact of concrete and other building materials. While you're at it, toss in those plastic empties.

1h

Pterosaurs ate soft-bodied cephalopods (Coleoidea)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57731-2

8h

Forskere beskylder arkitekt og rådgiver for greenwashing på Amager Fælled

Nyt byggeri på Amager Fælled vil ifølge arkitekten og de rådgivende ingeniører være med til at øge biodiversiteten. Professor kalder det for grotesk og imod al vores viden om natur.

8h

C-SPAN Is So Hot Right Now

People across America turn to it regularly. It's getting lovingly roasted on late-night television. It's going viral on YouTube with sizzling footage of Jerry Nadler talking two decades ago. C-SPAN is so hot right now. And that's a symptom of something gone deeply wrong. The fact that so many people want to watch Congress's activity points to just how disturbing and dysfunctional the current poli

2min

How Pop's Biggest Weirdo Swept the Grammys

Billie Eilish scarfs spiders , scowls at cameras , and sings about murdering all her friends . She wears sneakers scrawled with the words "FUCK U," and she makes music with dental-drill noises. She's a creep ; she's a weirdo. What the hell is she doing here, on the Grammys stage, as the consensus pick for the music biz's masses? The 18-year-old Eilish took five of the six trophies she was nominat

2min

Recreational fishers catching more sharks and rays

Recreational fishers are increasingly targeting sharks and rays, a situation that is causing concern among researchers.

6min

Study points to 'unintended consequences' of heavy data surveillance in rugby

New research suggests that intense monitoring and surveillance in rugby can lead players to think more about their own results than those of the team.

6min

Unanticipated response to estrogen at the single cell level

A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine found that not only do individual mammalian cells in a population fail to respond synchronously to estrogen stimulation, neither do individual gene copies, known as alleles.

6min

New bacteriophage fully characterized and sequenced

Researchers have identified a new bacteriophage that can infect and destroy bacteria in the genus Pantoea, for which few bacteriophage have been identified and characterized.

6min

Human longevity largest study of its kind shows early detection of disease & disease risks

Human Longevity, Inc. (HLI) announced the publication of a ground-breaking study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Study participants were evaluated with Human Longevity's multi-modal precision health platform, the Health Nucleus™. The assessment yielded highly actionable findings, most of which were not previously known, resulting in early identification of di

6min

The brain may need iron for healthy cognitive development

Iron levels in brain tissue rise during development and are correlated with cognitive abilities, according to research in children and young adults recently published in JNeurosci. Future work could lead to iron supplementation as an intervention for atypical cognitive development.

6min

Harsh peer reviewer comments disproportionately affect minorities

A survey has found that women and ethnic minority researchers are more likely to experience self-doubt in response to unprofessional comments from peer reviewers

8min

9min

More than a week of keto might not be good for you

A ketogenic diet—which provides 99% of calories from fat and protein and only 1% from carbohydrates—produces health benefits in the short term, but negative effects after about a week, research in mice shows. The results offer early indications that the keto diet could, over limited time periods, improve human health by lowering diabetes risk and inflammation. They also represent an important fir

12min

Brazil's pick of a creationist to lead its higher education agency rattles scientists

Schools should teach intelligent design, appointee has said

14min

How I find career motivation in my father's diabetes

Nature, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00225-y Natalie Brown explains how her father's childhood diagnosis has inspired her to research the condition as an undergraduate.

16min

Animal rights conflict prompts leading researcher to leave Germany for China

Neuroscientist Nikos Logothetis will co-direct new primate institute in Shanghai

22min

Intel Is Patching the Patch for the Patch for Its 'Zombieload' Flaw

Intel's made two attempts to fix the microprocessor vulnerability it was warned about 18 months ago. Third time's the charm?

23min

Kobe Bryant's Unfinished Business

Yesterday afternoon, the shocking news that Kobe Bryant had died in a helicopter crash, alongside his daughter Gianna and seven others, ripped through my social-media feeds and group texts. Like many Laker fans, I spent the first hour stunned and mostly silent, just trying to come to grips with the unreality of the first reports. But by the time night fell, I could no longer dwell on the tragedy'

24min

Blood pressure drug linked to lower risk of gout

A new study led by physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) reports that the antihypertensive drug amlodipine lowered long-term gout risk compared to two other drugs commonly prescribed to lower blood pressure. The findings are published in the Journal of Hypertension.

29min

An egg a day not tied to risk of heart disease

The controversy about whether eggs are good or bad for your heart health may be solved, and about one a day is fine. A team of researchers from the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences found the answer by analyzing data from three large, long-term multinational studies.

29min

Micro-scaled method holds promise as improved cancer diagnostic platform

A new-method analyzes the combination of tumor genetic material (genomics) with deep protein and phosphoprotein characterization (proteomics) using a single-needle core biopsy from a patient's tumor, providing more detailed information about the cancer than conventional approaches.

29min

Genetic marking discovery improves fruit quality, bolsters climate defenses

Transferring genetic markers in plant breeding is a challenge, but a team of grapevine breeders and scientists at Cornell University have come up with a powerful new method that improves fruit quality and acts as a key defense against pests and a changing climate.

29min

Nearly all middle school teachers are highly stressed, MU study finds

Researchers from the University of Missouri have found that 94% of middle school teachers experience high levels of stress, which could contribute to negative outcomes for students. Researchers say that reducing the burden of teaching experienced by so many teachers is critical to improve student success — both academically and behaviorally.

29min

Enhancing drug testing with human body-on-chip systems

Scientists at Tel Aviv University and Harvard University have devised a functioning comprehensive multi-Organ-on-a-Chip (Organ Chip) platform that enables effective preclinical drug testing of human drug pharmacology.

29min

Is prosecutor bias really behind disparities in prison?

America's prison populations are disproportionately filled with people of color, but prosecutors' biases toward defendants' race and class may not be the primary cause for those disparities, new research suggests. The finding, which comes from a unique study involving hundreds of prosecutors across the US, counters decades of previous research. Those studies relied on pre-existing data, such as c

32min

Electricity turns garbage into graphene

Brief jolt converts almost any source of solid carbon into material behind high-strength plastic and flexible electronics

35min

Daily briefing: Why Namibia might be the next big thing in astronomy

Nature, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00221-2 The Namibian astronomy community has a bold plan to take advantage of the country's spectacularly dark, clear skies. Plus, machine-learning researchers talk ethics at NeurIPS and the China coronavirus latest.

36min

Notable Quotable

Nature, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00222-1

36min

Wild tomatoes resist devastating bacterial canker

Many New York tomato growers are familiar with the scourge of bacterial canker—the wilted leaves and blistered fruit that can spoil an entire season's planting. For those whose livelihoods depend on tomatoes, this pathogen—Clavibacter michiganensis—is economically devastating.

41min

Unique centromere type discovered in the European dodder

Whenever the European dodder, Cuscuta europaea, is under scientific scrutiny, it usually is due to its lack of chloroplasts and its concomitant parasitic lifestyle. However, since the beginning of this year its chromosomes became the new centre of attention, when researchers discovered a new type of centromere inherent to C. europaea.

41min

'Profound' evolution: Wasps learn to recognize faces

One wasp species has evolved the ability to recognize individual faces among their peers—something that most other insects cannot do—signaling an evolution in how they have learned to work together.

41min

Wild tomatoes resist devastating bacterial canker

Many New York tomato growers are familiar with the scourge of bacterial canker—the wilted leaves and blistered fruit that can spoil an entire season's planting. For those whose livelihoods depend on tomatoes, this pathogen—Clavibacter michiganensis—is economically devastating.

42min

Unique centromere type discovered in the European dodder

Whenever the European dodder, Cuscuta europaea, is under scientific scrutiny, it usually is due to its lack of chloroplasts and its concomitant parasitic lifestyle. However, since the beginning of this year its chromosomes became the new centre of attention, when researchers discovered a new type of centromere inherent to C. europaea.

42min

'Profound' evolution: Wasps learn to recognize faces

One wasp species has evolved the ability to recognize individual faces among their peers—something that most other insects cannot do—signaling an evolution in how they have learned to work together.

42min

Protein AKAP8 suppresses breast cancer metastasis

A protein naturally produced in the body has been found to suppress breast cancer metastasis in animal models of human tumors.

46min

The virome of HPV-positive tonsil squamous cell carcinoma and neck metastasis

In this prospective study, a pan-pathogen microarray was used to determine the virome of early stage, p16-positive OPSCC and neck metastasis treated with transoral robotic surgery and neck dissection.

46min

'Profound' evolution: Wasps learn to recognize faces

One wasp species has evolved the ability to recognize individual faces among their peers — something that most other insects cannot do — signaling an evolution in how they have learned to work together.

46min

Biochemist Hans Kornberg Dies

An expert on carbohydrate transport, Kornberg contributed to the discovery of several metabolic cycles in microorganisms during his seven-decade career.

53min

Northamptonshire oak: 5,000-strong petition could save tree

Highways England say it will carry out extensive investigations to try save "Three Oaks".

53min

Synthesis of bio-based high-performance polyamide from biogenic residues

A research team from the Fraunhofer Society and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) led by chemist Volker Sieber has developed a new polyamide family which can be produced from a byproduct of cellulose production—a successful example for a more sustainable economy with bio-based materials.

56min

Icelandic volcano swell signals potential eruption

Small earthquakes and a so-called "inflation" of the mountain, signalling a potential volcanic eruption, have been reported near Iceland's famous "Blue Lagoon," local authorities said Monday.

56min

Flight safety is at risk when communication breaks down

In Atlanta, where the world's busiest airport fields thousands of flights each day, one researcher is working to improve communication and safety in global travel. Eric Friginal , a professor of applied linguistics at Georgia State University, recently cowrote English in Global Aviation (Bloomsbury Press, 2019) with his former student Jennifer Roberts, now an aviation English specialist at Embry-

59min

Did you solve it? Toot toot for world palindrome day!

The answer to today's puzzle Earlier today I set you the following puzzle: What is the highest value of UK coins you can have in your pocket without being able to exchange them exactly for a £10 note? Continue reading…

59min

Climate change: UK has 'one shot' at success at Glasgow COP26

If the Glasgow meeting fails, it will raise tough questions about the UN climate talks process, says the woman in charge.

1h

Macedonia imposes urgent measures due to severe pollution

North Macedonia's government on Monday said it was imposing urgent measures in the country's capital, Skopje, and the western city of Tetovo in order to protect people from severely high levels of air pollution.

1h

Brazil region swept by floods and record rains faces muddy desolation

Elaine Almeida looked at her aunt's ruined house in Sabara, a town in a southeastern region of Brazil where at least 45 people have died in floods that followed record rainfall.

1h

British carbon tax leads to 93% drop in coal-fired electricity

A tax on carbon dioxide emissions in Great Britain, introduced in 2013, has led to the proportion of electricity generated from coal falling from 40% to 3% over six years, according to research led by UCL.

1h

Science at the interface: Bioinspired materials reveal useful properties

The design of sophisticated new materials is undergoing brisk technological advancement. Innovations in material science promise transformative improvements in industries ranging from energy to manufacturing.

1h

Konsumentmakt stoppar inte överfiske

− Vi är inte jättenöjda med att komma med budskapet att det inte är så mycket du kan göra åt svensk havsmiljö genom val av sjömat, men man får ju vara realist, säger Sara Hornborg vid forskningsinstitutet RISE och medförfattare till rapporten Svensk konsumtion av sjömat och dess påverkan på haven kring Sverige.

1h

US, UK, Japan and France prepare to evacuate nationals

Beijing says it will offer 'necessary assistance' as Chinese city remains on lockdown

1h

Discovery could lead to new treatment for rare blood disease

A new study shows cancer cells found in the lesions on the skin of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma patients originate from the blood, not the skin as was believed. The protocol to treat the disease was to eliminate the cancer cells from the skin. Based on the findings, researchers believe it would be more effective to treat the malignant clones in the blood rather than waiting until the cells reach the

1h

Most young people do not vape, and even fewer vape regularly

While youth vaping rates have increased in recent years, most middle and high school students don't vape or smoke and very few vape or smoke daily, finds a study led by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health.

1h

New Dartmouth study explores prevalence of drug promotions in primary care practices

A new Dartmouth study finds that pharmaceutical companies' promotional access to outpatient practices that deliver primary care in the US is substantial, especially in smaller practices, those outside of healthcare systems, and those without academic affiliation, possibly impacting prescribing quality and cost.

1h

'What if We All Get Sick?': Coronavirus Strains China's Health System

To fight the expanding epidemic, the country is relying on a medical system that is overburdened even in normal times.

1h

Kiss and run: How cells sort and recycle their components

What can be reused and what can be disposed of? Cells also face this tricky task. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have now discovered a cellular machine, called FERARI, that sorts out usable proteins for recycling. In Nature Cell Biology, they explain how FERARI works and why it is so special.

1h

Kiss and run: How cells sort and recycle their components

What can be reused and what can be disposed of? Cells also face this tricky task. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have now discovered a cellular machine, called FERARI, that sorts out usable proteins for recycling. In Nature Cell Biology, they explain how FERARI works and why it is so special.

1h

'When, not if it happens': Factors favor possible Austin mega-wildfire event

All it will take for Central Texas to become the next area engulfed by catastrophic wildfires like those seen in Australia is a dry spring and summer, an errant flame and sustained winds.

1h

Victims of mass atrocities often portrayed as disempowered in international law

According to a doctoral thesis completed by Nadia Valentina Tapia Navarro, victims of mass atrocities are often portrayed as disempowered, passive, defenceless and docile in discourses pertaining to international law.

1h

19th-century bee cells in a Panamanian cathedral shed light on human impact on ecosystems

Despite being "neotropical-forest-loving creatures," some orchid bees are known to tolerate habitats disturbed by human activity. However, little did the research team of Paola Galgani-Barraza (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) expect to find as many as 120 clusters of nearly two-centuries-old orchid bee nests built on the altarpiece of the Basilica Cathedral in Casco Viejo (Panamá). Their

1h

How employees' rankings disrupt cooperation and how managers can restore it

"First prize is a Cadillac Eldorado, second prize a set of steak knives, third prize you're fired." What Alec Baldwin introduces in a famous "Glengarry Glen Ross" scene is a particularly crude form of performance ranking and what follows in the movie is a story of cheating, betrayal, and infighting as actors attempt to get ahead in the ranking.

1h

19th-century bee cells in a Panamanian cathedral shed light on human impact on ecosystems

Despite being "neotropical-forest-loving creatures," some orchid bees are known to tolerate habitats disturbed by human activity. However, little did the research team of Paola Galgani-Barraza (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) expect to find as many as 120 clusters of nearly two-centuries-old orchid bee nests built on the altarpiece of the Basilica Cathedral in Casco Viejo (Panamá). Their

1h

Discovery of a new liquid-liquid interfacial deformation by partial miscibility

The international collaborative team of Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT, Japan), IIT Ropar (India), Osaka Univ. (Japan) has discovered that "partially miscibility," in which two liquids do not mix completely with finite solubility, is capable of deforming the liquid-liquid interface. This interfacial deformation originates due to the spontaneous motion driven by phase separati

1h

Northeast governors slow to embrace regional climate pact

Supporters of a regional pact that would tackle transportation emissions are struggling to win over several New England governors concerned that the climate change initiative will increase gas prices.

1h

US officials revisit rules for disclosing risky disease experiments

Nature, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00210-5 An expert panel is considering how much to reveal about a largely secret review process of 'gain-of-function' research.

1h

Glial Brain Cells, Long in Neurons' Shadow, Reveal Hidden Powers

The sting of a paper cut or the throb of a dog bite is perceived through the skin, where cells react to mechanical forces and send an electrical message to the brain. These signals were believed to originate in the naked endings of neurons that extend into the skin. But a few months ago, scientists came to the surprising realization that some of the cells essential for sensing this type of pain a

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World's Biggest 3D Printed Building Opens in Dubai

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

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Is paper better than plastic? How paper is making a comeback

submitted by /u/sciencewarrior [link] [comments]

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The State of AI in 2020

submitted by /u/ThatAi_guy [link] [comments]

1h

How personality predicts seeing others as sex objects

Several personality traits related to psychopathy — especially being openly antagonistic — predict a tendency to view others as merely sex objects, finds a study by psychologists at Emory University.

1h

A sustainable alternative to crude oil

A research team from the Fraunhofer Society and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) led by chemist Volker Sieber has developed a new polyamide family which can be produced from a byproduct of cellulose production — a successful example for a more sustainable economy with bio-based materials.

1h

Autism diagnosis test needs improvement, Rutgers researchers say

Rutgers researchers have found that a test widely used to diagnose whether children have autism is less reliable than previously assumed.

1h

Children to bear the burden of negative health effects from climate change

The grim effects that climate change will have on pediatric health outcomes was the focus of a 'Viewpoint' article published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation by Susan E. Pacheco, MD, an expert at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

1h

AI to help monitor behavior

Algorithms based on artificial intelligence do better at supporting educational and clinical decision-making, according to a new study.

1h

Wild tomatoes resist devastating bacterial canker

Many tomato growers are familiar with the scourge of bacterial canker – the wilted leaves and blistered fruit that can spoil an entire season's planting. For those whose livelihoods depend on tomatoes, this pathogen — Clavibacter michiganensis — is economically devastating. In a new paper, Cornell University researchers showed that wild tomato varieties are less affected by bacterial canker than

1h

Keto diet works best in small doses, Yale researchers find

A ketogenic diet — which provides 99% of calories from fat and only 1% from carbohydrates — produces health benefits in the short term, but negative effects after about a week, Yale researchers found in a study of mice.

1h

CRISPR-Edited Babies Arrived, and Regulators Are Still Racing to Catch Up

One year after the world learned of He Jiankui's editing of twins, gaps in rules remain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

An Introduction to the Collected Works of Frederick D. Funkle

His body of work is broad but unnervingly shallow — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Containing the coronavirus is a forlorn hope

A revised timeline suggests it has been circulating longer than first thought

1h

CRISPR-Edited Babies Arrived, and Regulators Are Still Racing to Catch Up

One year after the world learned of He Jiankui's editing of twins, gaps in rules remain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

See how birds change their tunes to fit their surroundings

Nature puts every chirp in its proper place. Avian sounds—flutish trills, alarmlike buzzes, and one-note squawks alike—​are immediately absorbed, reflected, and scattered by everything in a bird's habitat. Nearby leaves or branches, canyon walls, and even the wind influence notes, so over time, species tailor songs to suit those surroundings. Some minimize echoes by putting more space between not

1h

How founding a company compares to graduate school

Nature, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00219-w Although only a small number of PhD graduates become professors, most career guidance in PhD programmes centres on the academic career ladder. Adam Chekroud shares his experience of starting a company.

1h

How to Survive as a Night Owl in a 9-to-5 World

Living as a night owl in a lark's world could be damaging your health. Here are three tips (backed by science) for thriving among the day dwellers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Unique centromere type discovered in the European dodder

Commonly, the presence of histone variant CENH3 epigenetically determines the positioning of centromeres. In monocentric chromosomes, CENH3 occurs in a single region, whilst in holocentrics, CENH3 is distributed along the entire chromosome. Scientists have discovered a new type of centromere in the plant Cuscuta europae. Centromere activity is distributed in holocentric fashion, despite CENH3 only

1h

Rural kids carrying handguns is 'not uncommon' and starts as early as sixth grade

Roughly one-third of young males and 1 in 10 females in rural communities have carried a handgun, reports a new University of Washington study. And, the study found, many of those rural kids started carrying as early as the sixth grade.

1h

Kiss and run: How cells sort and recycle their components

What can be reused and what can be disposed of? Cells also face this tricky task. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have now discovered a cellular machine, called FERARI, that sorts out usable proteins for recycling. In Nature Cell Biology, they explain how FERARI works and why it is so special.

1h

Doctors and immunologists implement a new approach for melanoma treatment

Worldwide, the incidence rates of skin cancer, like other types of cancer, is increasing. People in Europe and the Nordic countries are, compared to other areas of the world, at a higher risk of developing skin cancer due to their predominantly light and sun-sensitive skin type. The number of new cases of cancer in Estonia and Nordic countries has reached the same level as in sunny Australia, New

1h

With high fiber diets, more protein may mean more bloating

People who eat high fiber diets are more likely to experience bloating if their high fiber diet is protein-rich as compared to carbohydrate-rich, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

1h

How to Survive as a Night Owl in a 9-to-5 World

Living as a night owl in a lark's world could be damaging your health. Here are three tips (backed by science) for thriving among the day dwellers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Reports of Coronavirus Outbreak Hit Every Inhabited Continent

On Saturday, officials in Australia confirmed the continent's first case of 2019-nCoV, the pneumonia-like virus that emerged from Wuhan, China last month. By Monday, Australia had confirmed five cases, according to The Straits Times . That means the viral pandemic has now definitively spread to yet another continent, the latest after making its way to the U.S. and France last week. And more could

1h

My story of magic, kindness and survival during the Holocaust | Werner Reich

Holocaust survivor Werner Reich recounts his harrowing adolescence as a prisoner transported between concentration camps — and shares how a small, kind act can inspire a lifetime of compassion. "If you ever know somebody who needs help, if you know somebody who is scared, be kind to them," he says. "If you do it at the right time, it will enter their heart, and it will be with them wherever they g

2h

Elsker vi naturen til døde? Nu skal nye boliger levere både natur og by

PLUS. Engang flyttede vi ud af byen for at få frisk luft og natur. Nu vil vi have det hele i byen – også natur. Men ét er planlægning, noget andet beboernes dagligdag.

2h

Effect of Amoxicillin in combination with Imipenem-Relebactam against Mycobacterium abscessus

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57844-8

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Techniques converge to map the developing human heart at single-cell level

Nature, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00151-z Three methods for gene-expression profiling have now been combined to produce spatially defined single-cell maps of developing human organs from limited sample material, overcoming a major hurdle in studying human development.

2h

Rice lab turns trash into valuable graphene in a flash

Scientists at Rice University are using high-energy pulses of electricity to turn any source of carbon into turbostratic graphene in an instant. The process promises environmental benefits by turning waste into valuable graphene that can then strengthen concrete and other composite materials.

2h

Science at the interface: Bioinspired materials reveal useful properties

In a new study, researchers at ASU's Biodesign Institute and their colleagues explore new materials with physical properties that can be custom-tailored to suit particular needs. The work is inspired by mechanisms in nature, where the complex three-dimensional structure of surrounding proteins influences the electrochemical properties of metals at their core.

2h

'Cinderella subject' of Sport & Exercise Science vital to keeping Wales healthy & wealthy

Sport and Exercise Science has been described as the 'Cinderella' subject of Wales and a key part of the Welsh economy, according to new labour market data being released at an event in the Assembly tomorrow (Tuesday).

2h

anti-cancer drug safe and effective for treating light chain (AL) amyloidosis

There's a new treatment option available for patients with AL amyloidosis: daratumumab. Studied in a prospective clinical trial, only one of the two clinical trials of this agent in AL amyloidosis worldwide, researchers have found this anti-cancer drug to be well tolerated and effective in patients with relapsed AL amyloidosis when used with appropriate pre- and post-infusion medications.

2h

Weight loss surgery may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer

Weight loss surgery may reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer by one-third, according to an analysis of all relevant published studies. The findings are published in BJS (British Journal of Surgery).

2h

Weight loss surgery may reduce the risk of heart failure and premature death

Compared with routine care, weight loss surgery was linked with a reduced risk of hypertension, heart failure, and early death in a study based on information from a primary care database in the UK. The findings are published in BJS (British Journal of Surgery).

2h

Mild cognitive impairment, ISS produces the first epidemiological estimation

In a study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISS researchers estimated about 680,000 cases of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), in a total of 12,730,960 migrants, aged between 60 and 89 years, living in the European Union (EU) in 2018.

2h

Current model for storing nuclear waste is incomplete

The materials the United States and other countries plan to use to store high level nuclear waste will likely degrade faster than anyone previously knew, because of the way those materials interact, new research shows. The findings, published today in the journal Nature Materials, show that corrosion of nuclear waste storage materials accelerates because of changes in the chemistry of the nuclear

2h

UCI oceanographers predict increase in phytoplankton by 2100

A neural network-driven Earth system model has led University of California, Irvine oceanographers to a surprising conclusion: phytoplankton populations will grow in low-latitude waters by the end of the 21st century.

2h

Parkinson's disease may start before birth

People who develop Parkinson's disease before age 50 may have been born with disordered brain cells that went undetected for decades, according to EMBARGOED Cedars-Sinai research that will publish Jan. 27 in the journal Nature Medicine. The research points to a drug that potentially might help correct these disease processes.

2h

Buildings can become a global CO2 sink if made out of wood instead of cement and steel

A material revolution replacing cement and steel in urban construction by wood can have double benefits for climate stabilization. First, it can avoid greenhouse gas emissions from cement and steel production. Second, it can turn buildings into a carbon sink as they store the CO2 taken up from the air by trees that are harvested and used as engineered timber.

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Research suggests benefits of conservation efforts may not yet be fully visible

Last year, a UN report on global biodiversity warned one million species are at risk of extinction within decades, putting the world's natural life-support systems in jeopardy. But work published today in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution offers new hope that in some cases, conservation measures may not necessarily be failing, it is just too early to see the progress that is being made.

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Cutting road transport pollution could help plants grow

Cutting emissions of particular gases could improve conditions for plants, allowing them to grow faster and capture more carbon, new research suggests.

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Ecofriendly catalyst for converting methane into useful gases using light instead of heat

Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), National Institute for Materials Science, Kochi University of Technology, Shizuoka University, and Kyushu University developed a catalyst to convert abundant methane gas into more useful synthesis gas. Unlike conventional catalysts, this catalyst operates at much lower temperatures by using light, thus saving a tremendous amount of ener

2h

New look at odd holes involved in taste, Alzheimer's, asthma

Large holes in our cells have been implicated in depression, Alzehimer's disease, asthma, and even taste. Now, we know what two kinds of these pores look like, potentially creating new opportunities to discover effective treatment options.

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Patterns of thinning of Antarctica's biggest glacier are opposite to previously observed

Using the latest satellite technology from the European Space Agency (ESA), scientists from the University of Bristol have been tracking patterns of mass loss from Pine Island — Antarctica's largest glacier.

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Detection of very high frequency magnetic resonance could revolutionize electronics

A team of scientists led by a physicist at the University of California, Riverside, has discovered an electrical detection method for terahertz electromagnetic waves, which are extremely difficult to detect. The discovery could help miniaturize the detection equipment on microchips and enhance sensitivity.

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Another reason to reduce man-made ozone: To cool a warming planet

In a News and Views article in Nature Climate Change ('Cleaner Air is a Win-Win,') Lehigh University Professor of Earth and Environmental Science, Benjamin S. Felzer, highlights the importance of a new analysis based on Earth system modelling, showing that cleaning up ozone precursors within specific economic sectors can increase the mitigation potential of the land carbon sink by enhancing the ab

2h

Human Body-on-Chip platform enables in vitro prediction of drug behaviors in humans

Wyss Institute researchers have created a human Body-on-Chips platform that lays the foundation for better and faster drug testing. The system links together multiple Organ Chips via shared fluidic channels, mimicking how all human organs are normally connected via the vascular system, and can accurately predict how a given drug will behave in the human body at a holistic scale. The Body-on-Chips

2h

Successfully predicting bone marrow failure caused by drugs, radiation, and disease

A new human Bone Marrow Chip that more closely recapitulates drug- and radiation-induced responses observed in patients (e.g., as a result of cancer treatments), and was used to uncover a previously unknown abnormality in the bone marrow of patients with a rare genetic disorder, and sets the stage for better toxicology studies and personalized medicine.

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Simple test identifies patients at high risk for future dialysis or transplant

A low-cost test that screens for excess protein in the urine has been shown to accurately identify patients at higher risk for progressive kidney disease after being hospitalized for acute kidney injury, according to a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

2h

Unmet need for physicians, services among US adults

Twenty years of survey data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used to examine the unmet need to see a physician and for services among insured and uninsured adults from 1998 to 2017, a time of change in the U.S. health care system that included passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

2h

Diabetes screening in barbershops to identify undiagnosed black men

This research letter reports on diabetes screening in barbershops to identify undiagnosed black men.

2h

Study examines poverty, suicide associations among US youth

Associations between county-level concentrations of poverty in the United States and suicide rates among children and adolescents (ages 5 to 19) were explored in this observational study.

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More youth suicide found in poor communities across US

A study led by Jennifer Hoffmann, M.D., from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, found that higher county-level poverty is associated with increased youth suicide rates among children 5-19 years old in the United States in 2007-2016.

2h

The Argument Against High School Animal Dissections

Dissections, though a time-honored science class tradition, may actually be turning some students away from STEM.

2h

Can an N95 face mask protect you from catching the new coronavirus?

Face masks are reportedly selling out across China, as people try to protect themselves from the new coronavirus. But in some cases, it may be dangerous to wear certain masks

2h

Building High-Rises Out of Wood Can Help Save the Planet

Concrete and steel come with massive emissions. So let's ditch them and build towers out of wood. Yes, wood.

2h

"Serengeti" by Will Gregory and the BBC Concert Orchestra (Music Video)

'Serengeti' Written, Produced, & Composed by Will Gregory. Performed By: BBC Concert Orchestra Additional Music and Vocals by: Lola Lennox Stream the entire Serengeti Soundtrack: https://awal.ffm.to/p6myv2n Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/album/0lVH5XjvtLsb8ToKWjlsfZ Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/album/serengeti-music-from-the-discovery-bbc-television-series/1491967924?ls=1 iTunes: htt

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Spin current from sub-terahertz-generated antiferromagnetic magnons

Nature, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1950-4 Pure spin currents are simultaneously generated and detected electrically through sub-terahertz magnons in the antiferromagnetic insulator Cr2O3, demonstrating the potential of magnon excitations in antiferromagnets for high-frequency spintronic devices.

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Gram-scale bottom-up flash graphene synthesis

Nature, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1938-0 Flash Joule heating of inexpensive carbon sources is used to produce gram-scale quantities of high-quality graphene in under a second, without the need for a furnace, solvents or reactive gases.

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Research suggests benefits of conservation efforts may not yet be fully visible

The time it takes for species to respond to conservation measures—known as an 'ecological time lag' – could be partly masking any real progress that is being made, experts have warned.

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Build a floating key organizer cabinet you'll love coming home to

With a simple design, this small organizational cabinet floats on a hidden French cleat and employs the same joinery used to build full sized cabinets. (David Kaleko/) You know you're serious about DIY when you purchase your first table saw. To build this floating cabinet you'll need a fence and a miter gauge, which most new table saws come with. Warning: DIY projects can be dangerous, even for t

2h

Billie Eilish Cleaned Up at the Grammys

The 18-year-old won five of the six awards for which she was nominated.

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Detection of very high frequency magnetic resonance could revolutionize electronics

A team of physicists has discovered an electrical detection method for terahertz electromagnetic waves, which are extremely difficult to detect. The discovery could help miniaturize the detection equipment on microchips and enhance sensitivity.

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Cutting road transport pollution could help plants grow

Cutting emissions of particular gases could improve conditions for plants, allowing them to grow faster and capture more carbon, new research suggests.

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Oceanographers predict increase in phytoplankton by 2100

A neural network-driven Earth system model has led University of California, Irvine oceanographers to a surprising conclusion: phytoplankton populations will grow in low-latitude waters by the end of the 21st century.

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Patterns of thinning of Antarctica's biggest glacier are opposite to previously observed

Using the latest satellite technology from the European Space Agency (ESA), scientists from the University of Bristol have been tracking patterns of mass loss from Pine Island—Antarctica's largest glacier.

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Research suggests benefits of conservation efforts may not yet be fully visible

The time it takes for species to respond to conservation measures—known as an 'ecological time lag' – could be partly masking any real progress that is being made, experts have warned.

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Another reason to reduce man-made ozone: To cool a warming planet

While elected officials in the U.S. debate a proposed "Green New Deal" and U.S. President Donald Trump derides "prophets of doom" in Davos, environmental scientists continue to gather evidence about how changes to industry could mitigate the harms of climate change.

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New look at odd holes involved in taste, Alzheimer's, asthma

Many cells are covered with mysterious large holes, pores that have been associated with the sense of taste as well as Alzheimer's disease, depression, and even asthma. Knowing the structure of these varied holes will help researchers better understand this range of associations and provide a blueprint for developing new therapies.

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Current model for storing nuclear waste is incomplete

The materials the United States and other countries plan to use to store high-level nuclear waste will likely degrade faster than anyone previously knew because of the way those materials interact, new research shows.

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Topological defects produce exotic mechanics in complex metamaterials

Metamaterials have properties that depend on their shape and architecture. Researchers at AMOLF, Leiden University and Tel Aviv University have found a new way of designing these metamaterials and their properties by deliberately incorporating small errors. They have published their results in Nature Physics.

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Ecofriendly catalyst for converting methane into useful gases using light instead of heat

Methane is present in the natural gas that is abundant in the Earth's crust, and has found many uses in modern applications, mainly as a burning fuel. Alternatively, methane can be converted into a useful mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, called "synthesis gas," by reaction with carbon dioxide in what is referred to as dry reforming of methane (DRM). This DRM reaction is described as "uphil

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Buildings made of wood instead of cement and steel could be important global carbon sinks

A material revolution replacing cement and steel in urban construction with wood can have double benefits for climate stabilization, a new study shows. First, it can avoid greenhouse gas emissions from cement and steel production. Second, it can turn buildings into carbon sinks as they store the CO2 taken up from the air by trees that are harvested and used as engineered timber. However, while the

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New look at odd holes involved in taste, Alzheimer's, asthma

Many cells are covered with mysterious large holes, pores that have been associated with the sense of taste as well as Alzheimer's disease, depression, and even asthma. Knowing the structure of these varied holes will help researchers better understand this range of associations and provide a blueprint for developing new therapies.

2h

Study urges national review of support services for male survivors of sexual violence

A call for a complete review of national support services for male survivors of sexual violence and abuse has been made following a study by Lancaster University, launched today. The comments are made in a 40-page study carried out by Lancaster University for the Male Survivors Partnership.

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19th-century bee cells in a Panamanian cathedral shed light on human impact on ecosystems

About 120 clusters of 19th-century orchid bee nests were found during restoration work on the altarpiece of Basilica Cathedral in Casco Viejo (Panamá). Having conducted the first pollen analysis for these extremely secretive insects, the researchers identified the presence of 48 plant species, representing 23 families. Their findings, openly accessible in the Journal of Hymenoptera Research, give

2h

1 step keeps lead out of water when swapping disinfectants

Adding orthophosphate to the water supply before switching drinking water disinfectants from free chlorine to chloramine can prevent lead contamination in certain situations, researchers report. About 80% of water systems across the country use a disinfectant in drinking water that can lead to undesirable byproducts, including chloroform. There is an alternative, but many cities have been afraid

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Superfast insights into cellular events

In the same way that a single piece of a puzzle fits into the whole, the molecule hypoxanthine binds to a ribonucleic acid (RNA) chain, which then changes its three-dimensional shape within a second and in so doing triggers new processes in the cell. Thanks to an improved method, researchers are now able to follow almost inconceivably tiny structural changes in cells as they progress—both in terms

2h

Economic growth and environmental sustainability

There are political and business leaders who do not care if economic growth causes environmental damage, and there are environmental advocates who do not believe you can have economic growth without causing environmental damage. In a New York Times piece on the climate and economics discussions at Davos, Mark Landler and Somini Sengupta reported that:

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Superfast insights into cellular events

In the same way that a single piece of a puzzle fits into the whole, the molecule hypoxanthine binds to a ribonucleic acid (RNA) chain, which then changes its three-dimensional shape within a second and in so doing triggers new processes in the cell. Thanks to an improved method, researchers are now able to follow almost inconceivably tiny structural changes in cells as they progress—both in terms

2h

Elon Musk Spotted Joyriding Around California In His Cybertruck

Cruis'n USA Tesla CEO Elon Musk has again been spotted driving his Cybertruck around California, near the SpaceX and Tesla offices. In a video uploaded to social media, Musk can be seen with a cheeky grin on his face as he spots the phone camera pointed at him in Hawthorne, CA. First unveiled in November, Tesla's electric pickup made headlines for its unusual design and ambitious specs . Now, wit

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How employees' rankings disrupt cooperation and how managers can restore it

First prize is a Cadillac Eldorado, second prize a set of steak knives, third prize you're fired». What Alec Baldwin introduces in a famous Glengarry Glen Ross scene is a particularly crude form of performance ranking and what follows in the movie is a story of cheating and infighting as actors attempt to get ahead in the raking. In the real life, the risks with performance rankings are similar, B

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When did animals first begin to bark, chirp, and moo?

The ability to vocalize goes back hundreds of millions of years and is associated with a nocturnal lifestyle, researchers tracing the evolution of acoustic communication report. Imagine taking a hike through a forest or a stroll through a zoo and not a sound fills the air, other than the occasional chirp from a cricket. No birds singing, no tigers roaring, no monkeys chattering—and no human voice

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A Graveyard of Giant Spacecraft Spins Through Space

A collection of defunct spacecraft, their mission to chronicle the wonders of the universe long ended, glide silently in Earth's vicinity. This week, NASA will turn off another, the Spitzer telescope, which has spent 16 years observing the cosmos. The telescope trails the Earth, looping around the sun, and little by little, it has drifted away from us. The growing expanse, now hundreds of million

2h

Demi Lovato Makes a Powerful Confession at the Grammys

In June of 2018, Demi Lovato did something pop stars aren't supposed to do: tell the difficult truth. The former Disney actor had struggled in the public eye with drug addiction, but she'd also built a narrative of overcoming that addiction, with lyrics and a documentary attesting to six years of sobriety. Then she changed the story . "We've been down this road before," she sang on a new song, "S

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Atmospheric river storms and climate change are driving increased and costly flooding

Ask people to name the world's largest river, and most will probably guess that it's the Amazon, the Nile or the Mississippi. In fact, some of Earth's largest rivers are in the sky—and they can produce powerful storms, like those currently soaking the Pacific Northwest.

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How CEOs, experts and philosophers see the world's biggest risks differently

We live in a world threatened by numerous existential risks that no country or organization can resolve alone, such as climate change, extreme weather and the coronavirus.

2h

'Net' is closing in on more viable biological control options for fall armyworm menace

The 'net' is closing in on more viable biological control agents to fight the scourge of the fall armyworm (FAW) pest which is already wreaking havoc in most African countries as well as more than a dozen Asian countries including China and India.

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Can tiny doses of lithium treat Alzheimer's disease?

Very low doses of a certain formulation of lithium can halt signs of advanced Alzheimer's disease and recover lost cognitive abilities, a new study with rats suggests. The lithium in the study was in a formulation that facilitates passage to the brain. The findings appear in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease . The value of lithium therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease remains controversial in

2h

Förmåga att hantera kris svårt att mäta

Förmåga att kunna hantera besvärliga situationer och kriser – det borde vara viktigt att mäta när krisberedskap bedöms. Sverige satsar miljarder på krisberedskap. Syftet är att stå bättre rustade i händelse av kris eller katastrof. Men att ta reda på om satsningarna har effekt och ökar förmågan är svårt med dagens bedömningsmetoder. "Vi måste stärka vår förmåga". Detta och liknande uttryck hörs a

2h

Interactive map of mass uprisings around the world shows nonviolence works

The Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University has launched a new interactive map that catalogs all mass uprisings around the world between 1945-2014. The data, collected by Professor Erica Chenoweth and Fellow Christopher Shay, resoundingly show that nonviolent campaigns are more successful at achieving their political goals than violent campaigns. The findings upend the l

2h

New type of curved acoustic beams to provide manipulations with nanoparticles

Previously, scientists knew only one type of curved optical rays—Airy beams and their derivatives. They were obtained back in 2007. Due to their physical properties, the beams can be used for manipulating small particles, which can be applied in microfluidics and cell biology. Obtaining such beams requires advanced equipment. Therefore, researchers from all around the world are looking for new typ

2h

'Net' is closing in on more viable biological control options for fall armyworm menace

The 'net' is closing in on more viable biological control agents to fight the scourge of the fall armyworm (FAW) pest which is already wreaking havoc in most African countries as well as more than a dozen Asian countries including China and India.

2h

Fungal decisions can affect climate

When we think of climate change, we tend to think about greenhouse gases, fossil fuels and pollution. Most of us don't think about fungi.

2h

Fungal decisions can affect climate

When we think of climate change, we tend to think about greenhouse gases, fossil fuels and pollution. Most of us don't think about fungi.

3h

Coronavirus/luxury: a new consumption

Reliance on China, plus record high valuations, means high-end sector is among the most exposed

3h

New aspects of globular glial tauopathy could help in the design of more effective drugs

This study, led by Dr. Isidre Ferrer, has described that protein inclusions that damage neurons and glial cells are responsible for the pathology showed by globular glial tauopathy patients. Likewise, these inclusions are composed of different types of proteins, and not only by tau. Moreover they can travel through neurons and glial cells spreading the damage.

3h

How to take a picture of a light pulse

Until now, complex experimental equipment was required to measure the shape of a light pulse. Now, it can be done in a tiny crystal with the size of less than a milimeter. This can be used to study new materials or even even to reliably and quickly detect diseases by examining tiny blood samples.

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Superfast insights into cellular events

Even more detailed insights into the cell will be possible in future with the help of a new development in which Goethe University was involved: Together with scientists from Israel, the research group led by Professor Harald Schwalbe has succeeded in accelerating a hundred thousand-fold the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for investigating RNA.

3h

Poll: 71% of Americans say their overall health and wellness is good or excellent

A survey assessing Americans' health-related behaviors and attitudes found 71% rate their overall health and wellness as good (54%) or excellent (17%). Americans were asked about their work, sleep and exercise habits, as well as their concerns regarding politics, the environment, access to healthcare and more. The findings show Americans making good personal health choices, but also highlight soci

3h

Wrong and ineffective: Companies target toilet breaks to improve productivity

Productivity growth in the UK has stalled since 2008. The puzzle has become so tricky that toilet makers are getting in on the act of suggesting solutions. The company StandardToilet has designed a tilted toilet, whose seat slopes downward at a 13 degree angle. Its goal is to stop users lingering too long on the lav. After about five minutes, sitting on a tilted toilet will put a strain on users'

3h

Sea level rise to cause major economic impact in the absence of further climate action

The Paris Agreement, adopted in 2015 by 175 parties, aims to limit global warming to well below 2°C compared to pre-industrial levels. However, the period 2010-2020 was the planet's hottest decade on record and the long-term trend is upward. Sea level rise is one of the most severe impacts of climate change, with rising waters amplifying coastal floods, threatening coastal communities, infrastruct

3h

British public doesn't know what microplastics are

Members of the British public are still largely unfamiliar with microplastics and how they relate to everyday domestic plastic usage, a new study has revealed.

3h

A new model has been developed that simulates the accumulation of lipids in membranes

Cholesterol is crucial to the formation of the cell membranes of mammals and is part of many life processes. One of the most controversial concepts in biophysics is the hypothesis of the so-called lipid rafts: areas of high concentrations of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids in membranes. These lipid rafts, also known as lipid microdomains, are areas of the cell membrane in which lipids and chole

3h

Mathematician discovers conditions for stabilization of higher-order differential inequalities

A RUDN University mathematician (Russia) and a colleague have determined the conditions for stabilization of differential inequalities that have a high order. This result will allow mathematicians to obtain restrictions on the solutions of equations that describe some physical processes, such as diffusion processes and convection processes. The paper is published in the journal Asymptotic Analysis

3h

Hovsa: Teleselskab deler kunders private sms-beskeder med politiet

Der er, så vidt vides, kun tale om et enkelt selskab, der har lækket sms'er.

3h

Tests suggest our ancestors could've eaten super hard food

Tests with orangutan teeth suggest our early human ancestors ate more hard plant foods than previously thought. Scientists often look at microscopic damage to teeth to infer what an animal was eating. This new research—using experiments looking at microscopic interactions between food particles and enamel—demonstrates that even the hardest plant tissues scarcely wear down primate teeth. The resul

3h

The Utter Ridiculousness of the U.S. Senate

On the second day of President Donald Trump's Senate impeachment trial, Chief Justice John Roberts told a joke—though not intentionally. Presiding over the trial, the chief justice saw the House impeachment manager Representative Jerry Nadler snipe at the president's defense team over the falsehoods the president's defense lawyers had put forward, and Roberts then watched as the White House couns

3h

Defying Vertigo to Capture Aerial Photos From a Hang Glider

A photographer overcame her altitude anxieties to capture canvas-worthy aerials of the French countryside.

3h

Study finds ethics can be taught—in finance, at least

Testing investment advisers on their knowledge of ethics can lead to better behavior, new research shows.

3h

Quantum computers offer another look at classic physics concepts

"Think what we can do if we teach a quantum computer to do statistical mechanics," posed Michael McGuigan, a computational scientist with the Computational Science Initiative at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory.

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Rewilding could prevent Arctic permafrost thaw and reduce climate change risks

The wide-scale introduction of large herbivores to the Arctic tundra to restore the "mammoth steppe" grassland ecosystem and mitigate global warming is economically viable, suggests a new paper from the University of Oxford.

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NASA forest structure mission releases first data

NASA's Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation mission (GEDI) released its first publicly available data on January 21, 2020, giving researchers access to measurements of forests around the world.

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World's Biggest 3D Printed Building Opens in Dubai

Just a few years ago, the idea of a house being spit out by a 3D printer would've sounded absurd to most of us. But not only have houses been 3D printed in multiple countries, entire communities of printed homes are being built—and it doesn't stop there. While the world's tallest 3D printed building has been standing in Suzhou, China since 2015, it now has a rival of sorts; the world's biggest 3D

3h

Elbiler har flere uheld – men det er oftest 'bilkabuler'

PLUS. Både herhjemme og i resten af Europa er der tendens til, at nye elbilejere bliver overraskede over accelerationen.

3h

Coronavirus

As the world knows, we face an emerging virus threat in the Wuhan coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak. The problem is, right now there are several important things that we don't know about the situation. The mortality rate, the ease of human-human transmission, the rate of mutation of the virus (and how many strains we might be dealing with – all of these need more clarity. Unfortunately, we've alre

3h

Thousands of Ancient Aboriginal Sites Probably Damaged in Australian Fires

The sites are rich in cultural history, but the blazes might also reveal some unknown ones, say archaeologists — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Discovery of a new liquid-liquid interfacial deformation by partial miscibility

The international collaborative team has discovered for the first time in the scientific development that "partially miscibility", in which the two liquids do not mix completely with finite solubility, is capable of deforming the liquid-liquid interface. This interfacial deformation originates due to the spontaneous motion driven by phase separation between the soluble species, and is a phenomenon

3h

White lupin: The genome of this legume has finally been sequenced

White lupin is a particularly abstemious crop, requiring very little fertiliser and producing high-protein seeds of great nutritive quality. The plant has just yielded the secrets of its genome thanks to the collaboration of eleven laboratories. Knowing the plant's genome could accelerate programmes for lupin selection and help make this legume a major asset in future plant-based protein productio

3h

'Net' is closing in on more viable biological control options for fall armyworm menace

The 'net' is closing in on more viable biological control agents to fight the scourge of the fall armyworm which is already wreaking havoc in most African countries as well as more than a dozen Asian countries. CABI teamed up with colleagues from the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture and the Plant Protection and Regulatory Services Directorate in Ghana to conduct research which is an

3h

Physicists develop a new experimental model for 'lipid rafts' in human cells

Lipid Raft describes sections of a cell membrane that are responsible for signaling and molecular exchange. Previous experiments that should recreate this can only simulate cells that do not come very close to human cells. A team of physicists with the participation of Saar-Uni has now succeeded in designing an experiment that reproduces the conditions of human cells much better. Their findings we

3h

Sea level rise to cause major economic impact in the absence of further climate action

Rising sea levels, a direct impact of the Earth's warming climate, is intensifying coastal flooding. The findings of a new study show that the projected negative economy-wide effects of coastal flooding are already significant until 2050, but are then predicted to increase substantially towards the end of the century if no further climate action on mitigation and adaptation is taken.

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A new model has been developed that simulates the accumulation of lipids in membranes

A team of physicists has designed an experiment that simulates the formation of a new type of lipid raft on a nanometric scale. The researchers has also discovered a new role of cholesterol that will help to understand the development of some diseases and cell processes.

3h

Asfotase alfa in hypophosphatasia in childhood/adolescence: Survival benefit for infants

Asfotase alfa in hypophosphatasia in childhood and adolescence: Survival benefit for infants. More infants survive congenital metabolic disorder under enzyme replacement therapy. Due to lack of data it is unclear whether older children, adolescents and adults also benefit.

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Hidden past of Earth's oldest continents unearthed

New international research led by the University of St Andrews presents a novel way to understand the structure and formation of our oldest continents.

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New clues of the Zanclean megaflood found in the Alboran Sea

New research has identified a body of sediments that may have been deposited by a giant flood ending the Messinian Salinity Crisis. These sediments were transported by a massive flow of water and were deposited along the lee side of a submarine volcano located in the eastern Alboran basin.

3h

How to take a picture of a light pulse

Until now, complex experimental equipment was required to measure the shape of a light pulse. A team from TU Wien (Vienna), MPI Garching and LMU Munich has now made this much easier.

3h

More attention to idioms helps second-language learners

Idiomatic expressions like "kick the bucket" or "send someone packing" constitute a special element of a language, and one that is difficult to learn. This is because the meanings of these idioms cannot be derived directly from the meanings of the separate words. On 28 January, the linguist Ferdy Hubers of Radboud University will defend his doctoral dissertation on the process by which such idioms

3h

Waves of ice inside a droplet

A droplet falling on a surface that is considerably supercooled has been found to freeze in a way never observed before. Instead of the well-known growth of crystals, a colder surface results in moving circular ice fronts. These fronts move out of the center to the edge of the freezing drop. Scientists of the University of Twente and the Max Planck Center for Complex Fluid Dynamics have demonstrat

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Mistanke afkræftet: To personer i Malmø er ikke smittet med coronavirus

Prøvesvar fra Skåne Universitetshospital viser mandag, at de to mistænkte tilfælde i Malmø ikke var coronavirus, som frygtet.

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Researcher develops a new, gut-healthy peanut butter

Health-conscious Americans interested in probiotics have had to add them to their diet through pills or capsules, yogurt and other fermented dairy products, or certain cheeses.

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Chemist creates efficient catalyst for organic sulfides synthesis

A RUDN chemist has obtained a new compound—a dumbbell-shaped phosphate-bridged molybdenum cluster. The cluster accelerates the reaction of the formation of sulfides from oxides and can be used in pharmaceutical and cosmetic manufacturing. The article was published in Inorganic Chemistry.

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More rain and less snow means increased flood risk

By analyzing more than two decades of data in the western US, scientists have shown that flood sizes increase exponentially as a higher fraction of precipitation falls as rain, offering insight into how flood risks may change in a warming world with less snow.

3h

New type of curved acoustic beams to provide manipulations with nanoparticles

Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University and Tomsk State University jointly with their colleagues from Spain modeled and experimentally confirmed the existence of a new type of curved acoustic wave beams — acoustical hooks. They constitute a curved acoustical stream with an important property to bend at a distance less than a wavelength. Thereby, they could become a promising tool to provide ul

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Algae shown to improve gastrointestinal health

A green, single-celled organism called Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as a model species for topics spanning algae-based biofuels to plant evolution. While algae have been used as dietary nutraceuticals that provide beneficial oils, vitamins, proteins, carbohydrates and antioxidants, the benefits of consuming C. reinhardtii were previously unexplored. Researchers have now completed the first

3h

Researchers advance solar material production

A WSU team has developed a more efficient, safer, and cost-effective way to produce cadmium telluride (CdTe) material for solar cells or other applications, a discovery that could advance the solar industry and make it more competitive.

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A math teacher's plea: Let's keep pi irrational

Computers have helped mathematical research accelerate in multiple directions and increased the presence of mathematics in everyday life.

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Researchers use chicken poop to dope graphene to make a point

A trio of researchers, two from the University of Chemistry and Technology, Praha 6, the other the University of Toronto, has demonstrated that chicken feces can be used to make graphene a better catalyst. In their paper published in the journal ACS Nano, Lu Wang, Zdenek Sofer and Martin Pumera argue that researchers churning out papers describing newly found dopants for graphene are not contribut

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Assessing risk of chemicals to wildlife is huge challenge that requires new approach

Computer modeling and long-term ecological monitoring will be essential to assess the environmental risks of the rapidly growing number of chemicals across the world, according to a new review paper in the journal Science.

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How Earth climate models help picture life on unimaginable worlds

In a generic brick building on the northwestern edge of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center campus in Greenbelt, Maryland, thousands of computers packed in racks the size of vending machines hum in a deafening chorus of data crunching. Day and night, they spit out 7 quadrillion calculations per second. These machines collectively are known as NASA's Discover supercomputer and they are tasked with r

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Image: Hubble sees dusty galaxy with supermassive center

This peculiar galaxy, beautifully streaked with tendrils of reddish dust, is captured here in wonderful detail by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

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Video: Copying vs. transforming information

New research by Complexity Postdoctoral Fellow Artemy Kolchinsky and Bernat Corominas-Murtra presents an important distinction for information theory—copying vs. transforming.

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Study shows some urban gardens contain too much organic matter

If you're a gardener, you've heard it a thousand times: Add compost to improve the soil, feed the microbes that release nutrients and grow better plants.

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Combined data approach could accelerate development of new materials

Researchers in Japan have developed an approach that can better predict the properties of materials by combining high throughput experimental and calculation data together with machine learning. The approach could help hasten the development of new materials, and was published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.

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What's Wrong with Physics

A physicist slams hype about multiverses, string theory and quantum computers and calls for more diversity in his field. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why private micro-networks could be the future of how we connect

Forget amassing likes or cultivating your online persona. Apps like Cocoon are all about being your true self with just a select few people.

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In a rare sighting, astronomers observe burst of activity as a massive star forms

Here on Earth, we pay quite a lot of attention to the sun. It's visible to us, after all, and central to our lives. But it is only one of the billions of stars in our galaxy, the Milky Way. It's also quite small compared to other stars—many are at least eight times more massive.

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A template for silk growth: Peptides bring control on many levels

Applications of silk fibers have ballooned in recent years. Traditionally attractive in textiles for its compact strength and luxurious soft sheen, silk has potential applications including filtration membranes and coatings to preserve foods, substrates for implantable electronics, and high-sensitivity biosensors. These technologies exploit not just the mechanical properties, but also the material

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Big data at the nanoscale

An international team of scientists, including physicists from the University of Luxembourg, have reported a comprehensive view-point on how machine learning approaches can be used in Nanoscience to analyze and extract new insights from large data sets, and accelerate material discovery, and to guide experimental design. Moreover, they discuss some of the main physical challenging behind the reali

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If it's below 40 degrees in South Florida, the forecast calls for falling iguanas

As temperatures were dipping this week, the National Weather Service issued freeze warnings for much of Florida and Georgia, adding a warning in South Florida for "falling iguanas." University of Florida wildlife ecologist Frank Mazzotti explains the physiology of cold iguanas and why many people in Florida aren't shedding tears for the iguana-cicles lying around the region.

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Strict adherence to traditional masculinity associated with more severe PTSD in vets

To help service members perform better in the field, military training emphasizes the importance of certain traits associated with traditional masculinity, including suppression of emotion and self-reliance. But when veterans return home, strict adherence to these traits can become detrimental, leading to more severe post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and making it more difficult to treat, ac

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Tiny, ancient meteorites suggest early Earth's atmosphere was rich in carbon dioxide

Tiny meteorites that fell to Earth 2.7 billion years ago suggest that the atmosphere at that time was high in carbon dioxide, which agrees with current understanding of how our planet's atmospheric gases changed over time.

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Remember what science owes to child refugees

Nature, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00171-9 Callous policies in Brexit's wake will ill serve a nation that claims to cherish innovators — learn from 1930s Britain, says Georgina Ferry.

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If it's below 40 degrees in South Florida, the forecast calls for falling iguanas

As temperatures were dipping this week, the National Weather Service issued freeze warnings for much of Florida and Georgia, adding a warning in South Florida for "falling iguanas." University of Florida wildlife ecologist Frank Mazzotti explains the physiology of cold iguanas and why many people in Florida aren't shedding tears for the iguana-cicles lying around the region.

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How smart were our ancestors? Turns out the answer isn't in brain size, but blood flow

How did human intelligence evolve? Anthropologists have studied this question for decades by looking at tools found in archaeological digs, evidence of the use of fire and so on, and changes in brain size measured from fossil skulls.

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Do robots and snails deserve human rights?

In 1999, Sony launched Aibo, a line of robotic dogs designed to provide companionship to Japanese families. It could follow its owner around the house, wag its tail and respond to commands—all without the vet bills, bathroom breaks and sneeze-inducing fur of a regular house pet. Sensors and cameras on its body allowed it to learn the layout of a home so that, over time, it could navigate rooms jus

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More rain, less snow increases flooding

As the world warms and precipitation that would have generated snowpack instead creates rain, the western U.S. could see larger floods, according to new Stanford research.

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Is workplace equality the economy's hidden engine?

In 1960, 94 percent of doctors and lawyers were white men. Today that number has fallen to 60 percent, and the economy has benefited dramatically because of it.

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Flying solo: Solar Orbiter will take first-ever direct images of solar poles

Solar Orbiter will orbit our nearest star, the sun, observing it up close. It will take the first-ever direct images of its poles, while also studying the inner heliosphere—the bubble-like region around the sun created by the stream of energized, charged particles released in the solar wind.

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Researchers hope to make needle pricks for diabetics a thing of the past

Patients with diabetes have to test their blood sugar levels several times a day to make sure they are not getting too high or too low. Studies have shown that more than half of patients don't test often enough, in part because of the pain and inconvenience of the needle prick.

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Rolls-Royce vil bygge 15 små plug-and-play atomreaktorer i Storbritannien

Rolls Royce leder et konsortium, der vil producere små, modulære atomreaktorer, der kan leveres til samling af almindelige lastbiler og hvor det første sæt vil gå online i 2029.

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Boris Johnson's 'global talent visa' ignores economics – and ethics | Simon Jenkins

Britain does not need more scientists. Yet the PM wants to poach them from poorer countries and turn away everyone else Now we know. Boris Johnson's exclusive "global talent visa" , to be launched in February, is aimed at "the world's scientists and mathematicians". It will prove, he says, that post-Brexit "the UK is open to the most talented minds in the world" – so long as they are scientists. A

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Researchers discover a unique orbital texture in single-layer of 3-D material

New physical behavior, such as Mott insulating behavior, unconventional superconductivity and quantum spin liquid behavior, occurs when electrons inside a material interact with each other. When electrons are confined to lower dimensions such as 2-D planes, these effects can become even stronger.

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Climate costs lowest if warming is limited to 2 degrees Celsius

Using computer simulations of a model by U.S. Nobel Laureate William Nordhaus, researchers have weighted climate damage from increasing weather extremes, decreasing labor productivity and other factors against the costs of cutting greenhouse gas emission by phasing out coal and oil. Interestingly, the most economically cost-efficient level of global warming turns out to be 2 degrees Celsius, the l

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Seven mysterious sounds science has yet to solve

What was that? (Joan Wong/) Pings. Buzzes. Rumbles. Booms. Hums. Bumps in the night. Sounds of unknown origin can be more than unsettling; they can inspire decades of mythos and fear—and obsessive scientific inquiry. Some cases of enigmatic noise are now closed, like the southern Pacific "bloops" detected by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrophones in 1997 and finally, in 2005,

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Research shows the sexes have equal spatial cognition skills

Men are not better than women at spatial cognition — such as map reading — is the principal finding from ground-breaking work by researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software, hosted at University of Limerick (UL), Ireland.

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Skåningar har mer käksmärta än norrlänningar

Käksmärtor är vanligare i storstadsområden – och underdiagnostiserat. Ett annat munproblem är syraskador på tänderna, något som åtta av tio sydsvenskar har. Och orsaken är frätande magsyra och frukt, snarare än läsk, enligt forskning vid Malmö universitet. ​Elva procent av vuxna skåningar har käksmärtor – dubbelt så många som i Norrland. Och nästan 80 procent av befolkningen i Sydsverige uppvisar

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Family caregivers aren't hearing 'do you need help?'

Health care workers don't often ask family caregivers if they need support in managing older adults' care, according to a new study. Researchers say most caregivers surveyed for the study report that health care workers listen to them (88.8%) and ask about their understanding of older adults' treatments (72.1%). But a much smaller proportion (28.2%) say health care workers always or usually ask t

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DARPA May Have Found the Secret to Flying Aircraft Carriers

Dynetics, a defense and aerospace company, has announced that it successfully tested its X-61A Gremlin Air Vehicle in November of 2019. The flight, which lasted for one hour and 41 minutes, demonstrated a number of the drone aircraft's capabilities. The drone successfully completed the entire test but was destroyed after its main parachute failed to deploy. Dynetics intends to continue testing wi

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Wuhan mayor says city's governance 'not good enough' as coronavirus spreads – video

The mayor of Wuhan, the city where China's coronavirus outbreak originated, said on Monday the city's management of the virus wasn't good enough, adding that he felt the city's ability to deal with the crisis needed improvement. Zhou Xianwang admitted in the interview that the authorities were too slow in how they released information about the virus due to legal requirements, and said he would b

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Coronavirus is good for bitcoin

Why a mass global pandemic is just the means to a better end if you're a cryptocurrency investor.

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English Sparkling Wines Challenge the Supremacy of Champagne, France—Thanks to Climate Change

As average temperatures rise and extreme weather events become more common, vintners are forced to adapt year to year

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TV-satellit i fare for at eksplodere i kredsløb

Ødelagte battericeller truer med at sprænge en ældre amerikansk satellit i luften og forstyrre andre kommunikationssatellitter i samme kredsløb. Boeing vurderer, at sandsynligheden for flere lignende batterifejl er meget lille.

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An Italian Flash Mob Just Pushed Back Europe's Populist Tide

BOLOGNA, Italy—About a week ago, 30,000 people showed up to a piazza in this elegant city, known for its porticoes and tortellini, for a free concert. The event had been organized by the Sardines, a nascent civic-minded uprising that has been holding peaceful demonstrations to contest the nativist rhetoric of Matteo Salvini, Italy's opposition leader and the head of its right-wing League party, a

5h

Bernie Can't Win

"Left but not woke" is the Bernie Sanders brand. If anybody failed to recognize it before, nobody can miss it now. Last week, the mega-podcaster Joe Rogan endorsed Sanders. The Sanders campaign tweeted a video of the Rogan endorsement from Sanders's own account. That tweet then triggered an avalanche of disapproval from other voices in the Democratic coalition. Rogan is not an ally to the cultura

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New coronavirus may be much more contagious than initially thought

The new coronavirus is spreading faster than SARS – and it may be because it can be passed on before a person shows any sign of symptoms

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A skull suggests humans have been getting piercings for 12,000 years

The teeth of a man who lived in prehistoric Africa are worn in a way that suggests he had three facial piercings, the second oldest such find in the world

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New portable tool analyzes microbes in the environment

Imagine a device that could swiftly analyze microbes in oceans and other aquatic environments, revealing the health of these organisms – too tiny to be seen by the naked eye – and their response to threats to their ecosystems. Researchers have created just such a tool, a portable device that could be used to assess microbes, screen for antibiotic-resistant bacteria and analyze algae that live in c

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Security risk for e-scooters and riders

New research finds e-scooters have risks beyond the perils of potential collisions. Computer science experts have published the first review of the security and privacy risks posed by e-scooters and their related software services and applications.

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New portable tool analyzes microbes in the environment

Imagine a device that could swiftly analyze microbes in oceans and other aquatic environments, revealing the health of these organisms – too tiny to be seen by the naked eye – and their response to threats to their ecosystems. Researchers have created just such a tool, a portable device that could be used to assess microbes, screen for antibiotic-resistant bacteria and analyze algae that live in c

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Check out the most complete 3D brain map ever made

The map traces the 250-micrometer fruit fly hemibrain–about a third of the total organ. Through the map, researchers hope to better grasp the fly's nervous system. You can now explore the biggest high-resolution brain connectivity map in any animal, thanks to researchers from Google and the Janelia Research Campus in Virginia. The vibrant brain-wiring diagram, also known as a connectome , outline

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Image of the Day: Biodegradable Nerve Guide

A polymer tube regenerates damaged nerves in monkeys, restoring near full functionality.

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Consciousness

submitted by /u/newworld-ai [link] [comments]

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Tinder Swipes Right on AI to Help Stop Harassment

The dating app says its new machine learning tool can help flag potentially offensive messages and encourage more users to report inappropriate behavior.

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The Best Dyson Vacuums (2020): V11, V7 Trigger, and More

It's easy to get sucked into the brand's vast catalog. Here are the ones that floored us.

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AI License Plate Readers Are Cheaper—So Drive Carefully

Police can add computer-vision software to ordinary security cameras for as little as $50 a month.

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Seventy-Five Years After Auschwitz, Anti-Semitism Is on the Rise

On January 27, 1945, Soviet troops liberated Auschwitz. The date is now consecrated as International Holocaust Remembrance Day, as the world vowed never to allow murderous anti-Semitism to recur. Yet 75 years later, attacking Jews has once again become socially acceptable in many countries—across the left-right ideological spectrum, and among different groups that blame Jews for their grievances

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Britons in Wuhan decry 'pathetic' UK government coronavirus advice

There are up to 300 UK citizens thought to be stuck at epicentre of outbreak British citizens trapped in Wuhan, the Chinese city at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak, say the UK government's response has been slow and unclear, and its travel advice pathetic. Up to 300 British citizens are thought to be stuck in Hubei province, where Wuhan is located and where most of the 80 deaths associated

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Footage shows people clamouring to get face masks at factory in Jiujiang – video

Footage has emerged of people clamouring for face masks at the gates of a factory in Jiujiang, in Jiangxi province, China, as experts warned that up to 100,000 people may already be infected with the novel coronavirus around the world. The city lies 230km (142 miles) south-east of Wuhan, where the virus is believed to have originated at a local seafood market Coronavirus: China premier Li Keqiang

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Does Information Have Mass?

There is more mass in the universe, stuff generating gravity, than we can see. This observation lead to the conclusion that there must be "dark matter" in the universe – stuff out there that we cannot see but is exerting its gravitational effect. At least some physicists believe that this stuff may not be a new type of matter, but may be information itself. How do we know how much "gravity" there

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Trump Targets a New Group of Immigrants

Last week, Politico reported that the Trump administration was considering adding seven new countries to its travel ban. A majority of them—Eritrea, Sudan, Tanzania, and Nigeria, which is by far the most populous of the seven—are in Africa. The rationalization appears to involve terrorism. In the "counterterrorism" section of a January 17 speech , Chad Wolf, the acting secretary of the Department

5h

Scientists are moving at record speed to create new coronavirus vaccines—but they may come too late

Even in the best-case scenario, developing, testing, and mass-producing a new vaccine takes many months

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Rotfyllda tänder lagade med komposit behöver oftare behandlas på nytt

Rotfyllda tänder som restaurerats med materialet komposit får oftare lagas på nytt eller dras ut inom fem år, jämfört med tänder som lagats med krona. Det visar forskaren Victoria Dawson, som däremot inte hittar några belägg för att komposit skulle utgöra någon risk för hälsotillståndet vid tandens rotspets.

6h

People Neurology: Bennet versus Ann feud captured live!

In a People Neurology exclusive, contentious footage of Dr. Ann McKee and Dr. Bennet Omalu was captured at the 5th Annual Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Conference. Dr. Omalu was not invited due to their long-standing animosity, but he crashed the party anyway during Dr. McKee's highly anticipated Keynote. While she was presenting quantitative proteomic analysis of the postmortem brain tissue o

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Know What? Your Phone Can Send Photos

Originally published in April 1895 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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These twin rovers might explore the moon together one day

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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People Don't Learn to Trust Bots

AI elicits better cooperation through deception — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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You've Probably Never Heard of Robotic Process Automation, but …

It's a kind of software designed to make repetitive work value-driven and complex — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

I Monitor My Teens' Electronics, and You Should Too

Kids should have no expectation of privacy on devices given to them by their parents, for better and for worse.

6h

Apple's iPad Turns 10: A Look Back at Its First Decade

Here's what WIRED writers have had to say about Apple's tablet in the 10 years since its arrival.

6h

Pepe the Frog Foretold the Fraught World of Modern Memes

The new documentary Feels Good Man traces the frog's evolution from an indie comic to one of the world's most polarizing symbols.

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Today's Cartoon: Invasion of Privacy

Who's watching the baby watchers?

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How to Raise Media-Savvy Kids in the Digital Age

Experts tips and tricks for helping your younglings think critically about what they see on TV and social media.

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I Thought My Kids Were Dying. They Just Had Croup.

The old-fashioned-sounding illness is mostly harmless. So why does it cause so much parental panic?

6h

We Can End Our Endless Wars

Once again, the United States risks being drawn into an unnecessary war in the Middle East. Donald Trump's impulsive and reckless escalation of conflict with Iran, most recently his decision to order the killing of Qassem Soleimani, illustrates the danger of electing the most corrupt and unqualified president in our nation's history—a man who has little idea of what it means to put the nation's i

6h

Dear Therapist: My Boyfriend Has an Engagement Ring Meant for Someone Else

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I have been with my boyfriend for about a year and a half. Before me, he was in a long-term, serious relationship in which he bought an engagement ring and was making plans to marry his ex. Clearly their relat

6h

You've Probably Never Heard of Robotic Process Automation, but …

It's a kind of software designed to make repetitive work value-driven and complex — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NHS may use people's phone data to predict mental health issues

A National Health Service trust has partnered with telecomms firm Telefonica to trial an algorithm that can identify people at risk of mental health crisis. A next step could see mobile phone data being used to make predictions

6h

What is the coronavirus and how worried should we be about it?

What are the symptoms caused by the virus from Wuhan in China, how is it transmitted from one person to another, and how is it related to Sars? Britain under pressure to evacuate UK nationals Where has the virus spread? Coronavirus latest – live updates It is a novel coronavirus – that is to say, a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses,

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This Is a Trial of the Constitution Itself

This story was updated on January 27, 2020 at 11:00am. The Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump is under way. Senators now face the monumental question of whether to remove the president from office—and yet, something bigger is at stake here. The Constitution's fundamental design is on trial too. This is clear from the articles of impeachment themselves. Start with the first article

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People Don't Learn to Trust Bots

AI elicits better cooperation through deception — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fejl i Forsvarets it-system suger ansattes løn ned i sort hul: Overarbejdstimer og nattillæg forsvinder

It-systemet blev implementeret i oktober 2019 og skulle blandt andet danne overblik over arbejdstimer for 24.000 ansatte i Forsvaret.

7h

Elnettets tarif-opgør er på vej: Operatører vil flytte dit forbrug

PLUS. Fremover kan nogle kunder få rabat, hvis de er fleksible, mens tunge energi­forbrugere kan slippe for at tælle kilowatt-timer.

7h

Techtopia #139: Blåskæg hacker fly

Hackeren Chris Roberts, alias Blåskæg, arbejder i den gode sags tjeneste for at gøre opmærksom på, hvor dårligt virksomheder og infrastruktur er beskyttet mod hacking.

7h

Kvinnor mer sjukskriva när föräldrar dör

Att förlora en förälder påverkar oss – både i form av ökad risk att dö och en ökad chans att få barn. Nu har forskare också undersök hur en förälders sista levnadsår påverkar de vuxna barnens arbetsliv. I regel sjunker inkomsten något under åren före förälderns död.

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Duplicated study of apologizers leads to a retraction — and an apology

The Journal of Consumer Research has retracted a 2019 paper because it overlapped significantly with a study previously published in Chinese by the same authors. But whether both authors agreed to the previous submission is a subject of some confusion on the part of one of them. The journal, published by Oxford Academic, added "RETRACTED" … Continue reading

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How Capitalism Broke Young Adulthood

With Senator Bernie Sanders rising in the Democratic-primary polls, it is becoming not just thinkable but even plausible that the United States could, for the first time, elect a self-described socialist to the White House. Instead of relying on the party's graying voters, Sanders has galvanized a younger coalition by promising a profound expansion of the welfare state, which would include free h

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Business revolution: What is the membership economy?

"I think that the membership economy is having as big an impact on business as the industrial revolution," says Silicon Valley consultant Robbie Kellman Baxter. Memberships or subscriptions fundamentally change the relationship between the consumer and the brand by delivering what Baxter calls a "forever promise." The famous example of Blockbuster vs. Netflix illustrates this perfectly. Subscript

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Kæmpe hul i dansk software til fjerninstallering: »Jeg indkalder hele virksomheden med det samme«

En sårbarhed har potentielt åbnet for, at alle og enhver kunne installere hvad som helst hos danske IXP's kunder. Den er, så vidt vides, ikke blevet udnyttet.

7h

Hastigheten för cyklister behöver inte begränsas

Bara på kortare sträckor, i vissa situationer, kan det av trafiksäkerhetsskäl vara motiverat att dämpa cyklisters hastighet. I övrigt bör hastigheten inte begränsas, varken genom mera lagstiftning eller cykelbanans utformning. I en ny rapport från VTI har forskare studerat cyklisters hastighet, samt vilka konsekvenser hastigheten har för trafiksäkerhet och andra samhällsmål. Cyklisters hastighet

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Why private micro-networks could be the future of how we connect

Forget amassing likes or cultivating your online persona. Apps like Cocoon are all about being your true self with just a select few people.

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Fourth Spy at Los Alamos Knew A-Bomb's Inner Secrets

Historians recently uncovered another Soviet spy in the U.S. atomic bomb program. Fresh disclosures show he worked on the device's explosive trigger.

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Tears for the Magnificent and Shrinking Everglades, a 'River of Grass'

Florida's freshwater wonder is threatened like never before with a rising sea level as restoration efforts lag.

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Drivhus opsamler CO₂ fra udeluften og giver større høst

Norsk institutt for bioøkonomi, Nibio, tester et anlæg, der henter CO₂ fra luften for at øge planteproduktionen.

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Coronavirus: Britain under pressure to evacuate UK nationals

UK embassy in Beijing says it is working on option for British nationals to leave China Coronavirus latest – live updates Britain's embassy in Beijing has said it is "working to make available an option" for British nationals to leave the Chinese province at the centre of the coronavirus as the UK's response was contrasted with that of other countries with active evacuation plans. As other countr

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Integrative analysis reveals RNA G-quadruplexes in UTRs are selectively constrained and enriched for functional associations

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14404-y G-quadruplexes (G4s) are secondary structures that can form in both DNA and RNA from guanine-rich sequences which are enriched in untranslated regions (UTRs). Here, Lee et al. find that putative G4-forming sequences are evolutionarily constrained, enriched for RNA-binding protein interactions and enriched for

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Earthquake slip surfaces identified by biomarker thermal maturity within the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake fault zone

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14447-1 In this study, the authors investigate thermal alteration of organic biomarkers to detect paleo earthquakes in the Japan Trench. The study shows that large earthquakes like the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake can slip through different types of sediment rather than being restricted to the weakest layers.

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Soil structure is an important omission in Earth System Models

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14411-z The effect of soil structure is not included in most Earth System Models. The authors here introduce and evaluate the consequences at local and global scale of modifying hydraulic properties of soils in response to biological activity—a process significantly changing soil structure.

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White blood cell and cell-free DNA analyses for detection of residual disease in gastric cancer

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14310-3 Identifying patients that will respond to a particular therapy remains a key challenge in precision oncology. Here, in gastric cancer, the authors show that circulating tumour DNA can predict recurrence, provided that the signal from white blood cells is filtered out.

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Nuthatches vary their alarm calls based upon the source of the eavesdropped signals

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14414-w Animals can obtain information on predation risk directly from observing predators or indirectly from the alarm calls of others. Here, the authors show that red-breasted nuthatches encode information on risk in their own alarm calls differently depending on the source of the information.

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Microscaled proteogenomic methods for precision oncology

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14381-2 Connecting genomics and proteomics allows the development of more efficient and specific treatments for cancer. Here, the authors develop proteogenomic methods to defining cancer signaling in-vivo starting from core needle biopsies and with application to a HER2 breast cancer focused clinical trial.

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Global projections of future urban land expansion under shared socioeconomic pathways

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14386-x Shared socioeconomic pathways (SSPs) is a crucial scenario describing the potential of future socio-economic development. The authors here investigate long-term effects of various government policies suggested by different SSPs on urban land and reveal the impact of future urban expansion on other land and fo

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Paris Climate Agreement passes the cost-benefit test

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13961-1 Relative economic benefits of achieving temperature targets have not properly accounted for damages at higher temperatures. Here the authors integrate dynamic cost-benefit analysis with a damage-cost curve and show that the Paris Climate Agreement constitutes the economically optimal policy pathway for the fu

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Consequences of Zika virus attack on glial cells

Few studies have identified the effects of zika virus infection on astrocytes, as well as their association with developmental alterations, including brain malformations and microcephaly. Published in Scientific Reports, a new article sought to unravel the virus reactions on laboratory-created astrocytes, comparing them to the same cells present in the brain tissue of animals and fetuses infected

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'Blob' research shows ecological effects that halted fishing and hiked whale entanglements

An ecological pileup of unprecedented changes in the ocean off the West Coast beginning about 2014 led to record entanglements of humpback and other whales, putting the region's most valuable commercial fishery at risk, new research shows.

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Study connects marine heat wave with spike in whale entanglements

Climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of marine heat waves — warm water anomalies that disrupt marine ecosystems — and this is creating new challenges for fisheries management and ocean conservation. A new study shows how the record-breaking marine heat wave of 2014 to 2016 caused changes along the US West Coast that led to an unprecedented spike in the numbers of whales that b

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New portable tool analyzes microbes in the environment

Imagine a device that could swiftly analyze microbes in oceans and other aquatic environments, revealing the health of these organisms – too tiny to be seen by the naked eye – and their response to threats to their ecosystems. Rutgers researchers have created just such a tool, a portable device that could be used to assess microbes, screen for antibiotic-resistant bacteria and analyze algae that l

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Seismic biomarkers in Japan Trench fault zone reveal history of large earthquakes

Researchers used a novel technique to study the faults in the Japan Trench, the subduction zone where the magnitude 9.1 Tohoku-Oki earthquake struck in 2011. Their findings reveal a long history of large earthquakes in this fault zone, where they found multiple faults with evidence of more than 10 meters of slip during large earthquakes.

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Climate costs smallest if warming is limited to 2°C

Using computer simulations of a model by US Nobel Laureate William Nordhaus, they weight climate damages from, for instance, increasing weather extremes or decreasing labor productivity against the costs of cutting greenhouse gas emission by phasing out coal and oil. Interestingly, the economically most cost-efficient level of global warming turns out to be the one more than 190 nations signed as

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New treatment kills off infection that can be deadly to cystic fibrosis patients

The findings, which are published in the journal Scientific Reports, show that scientists from Aston University, Mycobacterial Research Group, combined doses of three antibiotics — amoxicillin and imipenem-relebactam and found it was 100% effective in killing off the infection which is usually extremely difficult to treat in patients with cystic fibrosis. The infection results in severe decline i

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Genomics experts dispute nine genes linked to congenital heart condition

The Clinical Genome Resource's (ClinGen) expert panel has critically reevaluated the scientific evidence for all 17 reported genes linked to long QT syndrome, disputing nine of the genes and revealing only three of the genes to be definitively associated with the most common form of the disease.

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Revving up the engine

Research using heart cells from squirrels, mice and people identifies an evolutionary mechanism critical for heart muscle function.

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Coronavirus fears rattle shares and oil market

Wall Street shares fall as travel, luxury and mining sectors hit by concerns over impact on global economy

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Alone where seals bark in the mist

Nature, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00179-1 Mary-Anne Lea travels to remote coastal regions to study marine animals for insights into conserving their species.

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Ground state anomalies in SmB6

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58172-7 Ground state anomalies in SmB 6

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Machine Learning and Network Analyses Reveal Disease Subtypes of Pancreatic Cancer and their Molecular Characteristics

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58290-2

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How odor cues help to optimize learning during sleep in a real life-setting

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57613-7

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Kinetics of the radiative and nonradiative recombination in polar and semipolar InGaN quantum wells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58295-x

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Slow sand filtration of raw wastewater using biochar as an alternative filtration media

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57981-0

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'Chuffed to be chosen': participants attend first UK climate assembly

Sir David Attenborough thanked the 110 people gathered in Birmingham for giving up their time On the 16th floor of Birmingham's Park Regis hotel, glass walls provide sweeping views of the city skyline, along with a long backlog of cars on the motorway outside – but transport is just one of many issues the 110 people gathered here will have to grapple with as they decide how the UK should respond

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New understanding of mental illness may improve access to treatment

One-size-fits all therapies may be the best place to start when treating mental health conditions, according to genetic analyses that link many conditions to a common cause

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Seismic biomarkers in Japan Trench fault zone reveal history of large earthquakes

In the aftermath of the devastating Tohoku-Oki earthquake that struck off the coast of Japan in March 2011, seismologists were stunned by the unprecedented 50 meters of shallow displacement along the fault, which ruptured all the way to the surface of the seafloor. This extreme slip at shallow depths exacerbated the massive tsunami that, together with the magnitude 9.1 earthquake, caused extensive

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New portable tool analyzes microbes in the environment

Imagine a device that could swiftly analyze microbes in oceans and other aquatic environments, revealing the health of these organisms—too tiny to be seen by the naked eye—and their response to threats to their ecosystems.

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Study connects marine heat wave with spike in whale entanglements

Climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of marine heat waves—warm water anomalies that disrupt marine ecosystems—and this is creating new challenges for fisheries management and ocean conservation. A new study shows how the record-breaking marine heat wave of 2014 to 2016 caused changes along the U.S. West Coast that led to an unprecedented spike in the numbers of whales that becam

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New portable tool analyzes microbes in the environment

Imagine a device that could swiftly analyze microbes in oceans and other aquatic environments, revealing the health of these organisms—too tiny to be seen by the naked eye—and their response to threats to their ecosystems.

8h

Study connects marine heat wave with spike in whale entanglements

Climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of marine heat waves—warm water anomalies that disrupt marine ecosystems—and this is creating new challenges for fisheries management and ocean conservation. A new study shows how the record-breaking marine heat wave of 2014 to 2016 caused changes along the U.S. West Coast that led to an unprecedented spike in the numbers of whales that becam

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Habitat compression and ecosystem shifts as potential links between marine heatwave and record whale entanglements

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14215-w Climate-driven extreme events may have strong local impacts on marine organisms and fisheries. Here the authors report increased whale entanglements in the northeast Pacific following a marine heatwave, and propose compression of coastal upwelling habitat as the potential driver.

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Photosynthesis-inspired H2 generation using a chlorophyll-loaded liposomal nanoplatform to detect and scavenge excess ROS

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14413-x Hydrogen can be used to reduce the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but its delivery to diseased tissues is challenging due to its low solubility. Here the authors develop a photosynthesis-inspired FRET nanocomplex to detect and scavenge local excess of ROS in the tissue using photocatalytic hy

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Genetically stable poliovirus vectors activate dendritic cells and prime antitumor CD8 T cell immunity

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13939-z Experimental PVSRIPO oncolytic virus therapy of glioblastoma has shown long-term efficacy in a subset of patients. Here the authors engineer the virus to enable incorporation of tumor-specific antigens, and show proof-of-principle evidence that this modification increases anti-tumor immunity and extends survi

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Topological ultranodal pair states in iron-based superconductors

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14357-2 Experiments indicate an abrupt change in the pairing gap near the nematic transition in the FeSe1−xSx iron-based superconductor. Here, Setty et al. propose to explain them via a novel spin-1/2 paired state with topologically protected zero-energy excitations over a finite area nodal surface.

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Resolving the puzzle of single-atom silver dispersion on nanosized γ-Al2O3 surface for high catalytic performance

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13937-1 Detailed atom-level anchoring mechanism of Ag species on γ-Al2O3 is largely unknown for the widely used Ag/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. Here, the authors demonstrate that single-Ag atom can be only anchored by the terminal hydroxyls on the (100) surfaces of γ-Al2O3 through consuming two or three terminal hydroxyls.

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Overcoming MCL-1-driven adaptive resistance to targeted therapies

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14392-z Two complementary studies in Nature Communications define a critical role for the anti-apoptotic protein MCL-1 as a driver of adaptive survival in tumor cells treated with oncogene targeted therapies, providing a rationale for combining these agents with newly developed MCL-1 inhibitors in the clinic.

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Geometric cues stabilise long-axis polarisation of PAR protein patterns in C. elegans

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14317-w In the C. elegans zygote, (anterior) aPAR and (posterior) pPAR proteins are key to polarity maintenance, what factors determine the selection of the polarity axis remains unclear. Here authors formulate a reaction-diffusion model in realistic cell geometry and find that long-axis polarisation is promoted by c

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Is the Medication You're Taking Worth Its Price?

The quality-adjusted life year (QALY) is an economic calculation used around the world to help determine which treatments citizens can obtain under public health care. Here in the United States, the QALY has largely been avoided. But with health care costs skyrocketing, that is starting to change.

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»Beslutningen har rumlet inden i mig i et halvt års tid«

Efter fem år som lægefaglig direktør på Sygehus Lillebælt stopper Mads Koch Hansen til sommer for at etablere sin egen virksomhed.

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The great e-scooter hack

New research out of UTSA finds e-scooters have risks beyond the perils of potential collisions. Computer science experts at UTSA have published the first review of the security and privacy risks posed by e-scooters and their related software services and applications.

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Australians in China's coronavirus region may not be able to be evacuated

Strict travel restrictions mean an unknown number of Australians may be stranded in the coronavirus hotspot The Australian government does not know how many of its citizens are caught in the vast quarantine lock-down imposed across China , as it and governments around the world scramble to try to evacuate their nationals. But it appears increasingly unlikely foreign countries will be allowed to s

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UK unveils new visa scheme for scientists after Brexit

Britain on Sunday announced a new fast-track visa scheme for top scientists, researchers and mathematicians as it prepares a new immigration system for life outside the European Union.

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Magnitude 6.3 earthquake strikes Solomon Islands

A 6.3-magnitude earthquake hit the Solomon Islands on Monday, the US Geological Survey said, but no tsunami warning was issued.

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Earth's most biodiverse ecosystems face a perfect storm

A combination of climate change, extreme weather and pressure from local human activity is causing a collapse in global biodiversity and ecosystems across the tropics, new research shows.

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Earth's most biodiverse ecosystems face a perfect storm

A combination of climate change, extreme weather and pressure from local human activity is causing a collapse in global biodiversity and ecosystems across the tropics, new research shows.

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How can we counter misinformation from "chemo truthers"?

Denial of the benefits of chemotherapy is very prevalent in "natural health" movements. This denial is based on fear mongering, pseudoscience, and conspiracy theories and thus shares many similarities with the antivaccine movement. How can the misinformation spread by "chemo truthers" be countered on social media?

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Inside the Lab That's Turning Moon Water Into Rocket Fuel

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Can you solve it? Toot toot for world palindrome day!

Celebrate a calendrical rarity UPDATE: Read the solution here. On Sunday, a numerical event will take place that happens only once every thousand years. The date will be a palindrome in every single country of the world. In other words, the digits will be the same when written forwards or backwards in whichever date format you choose. Continue reading…

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China braced for economic hit from coronavirus

Extended lunar new year break to hit travel, consumption and manufacturing

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China coronavirus: mayor of Wuhan admits mistakes

Zhou Xianwang says public information should have been released more quickly Chinese premier Li Keqiang visits Wuhan – latest updates The mayor Wuhan, the Chinese city at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak, has acknowledged criticism over his handling of the crisis, admitting that information was not released quickly enough. Zhou Xianwang wore a mask for protection as he told Chinese state br

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Wuhan Mayor Offers to Resign as Death Toll Rises

China extended the Lunar New Year holiday to help contain the mysterious virus, which is now spreading around the world. Of the nearly 3,000 people who have so far contracted the disease, the vast majority live in China.

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Docs Given Updated Opioid Habit

Researchers dialed down the default number of opioids in two hospitals' prescription systems—and doctors ended up prescribing fewer pills. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Sydney schools ask students returning from China to stay away amid coronavirus fears

Several private schools are demanding medical certificates for children who have been to coronavirus-affected areas of China Several Sydney private schools have banned students who have recently visited China from returning to school without medical certificates, as concerns grow about the spread of coronavirus. Pymble Ladies College in Sydney's north has told parents in a text message they shoul

13h

Researchers identify opportunities to advance genomic medicine

New study highlights milestones in the history of genetic discoveries; equitable and fair access required to address disparities.

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Study reveals similar survival of African-American and white men with prostate cancer in an equal-access health care system

Among men with prostate cancer who received care from the Veterans Affairs (VA) Health System, an equal-access health care system, African-American men did not have more advanced disease at the time of diagnosis or die earlier than white men, unlike trends seen in the greater US population of patients with prostate cancer. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal

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Burden of health care costs greatest among low-income Americans

Health care costs have been steadily rising, but how a great a burden that places on American housholds is difficult for both the public and industry experts to fully calculate. A new study shows that while higher income American households pay the most to finance the nation's health care system, the burden of payments as a share of income is greatest among households with the lowest incomes.

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Survival of preterm babies improves by 25% after quality-improvement program

The rate of survival of very preterm babies in Canada increased 25% after the national Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality (EPIQ) program was introduced in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across the country, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

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The Kobe I Knew Became a Champion for Others

My first real interaction with Kobe Bryant started over a disagreement. The legendary Los Angeles Lakers shooting guard had made some dismissive comments in 2014 about the case of Trayvon Martin , the African American teenager who had been shot to death in Florida by the neighborhood-watch volunteer George Zimmerman two years before. Martin's death and Zimmerman's subsequent acquittal on second-d

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Deutsche payments, coronavirus, US against carbon tax

Deutsche Bank payments to Saudi royal adviser probed by German prosecutors

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Wuhan seafood market may not be source of novel virus spreading globally

Description of earliest cases suggests outbreak began elsewhere

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As Coronavirus Fears Intensify, Effectiveness of Quarantines Is Questioned

Amid news the coronavirus is spreading at an accelerating rate, concern is growing that China's lockdown of cities may not only have come too late but could even make the situation worse.

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Coronavirus: how to protect yourself from infection

World Health Organization recommends people take simple precautions against virus to reduce exposure and transmission Death toll jumps to 80 in China – latest updates The spread of the coronavirus across China and to at least 10 other countries including the US, South Korea and Japan has prompted experts and health authorities to offer advice on how to reduce the chances of contracting the illnes

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Docs Given Updated Opioid Prescribing Habit

Researchers dialed down the default number of opioids in two hospitals' prescription systems—and doctors ended up prescribing fewer pills. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Docs Given Updated Opioid Prescribing Habit

Researchers dialed down the default number of opioids in two hospitals' prescription systems—and doctors ended up prescribing fewer pills. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fritidssejlere frygter Lynetteholmen: Skal dele smal udsejling med kæmpeskibe

PLUS. Amatørernes egen udsejling fra København spærres fra 2022. Dermed er Lynetteholmen ikke længere en ø.

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Climate Change: Tough questions at first UK assembly

Members of the public from a range of backgrounds gather for the UK's first climate change assembly.

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Update day 2020!

Following more than a decade of tradition ( at least ), I've now updated the model-observation comparison page to include observed data through to the end of 2019. As we discussed a couple of weeks ago, 2019 was the second warmest year in the surface datasets (with the exception of HadCRUT4), and 1st, 2nd or 3rd in satellite datasets (depending on which one). Since this year was slightly above th

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Global Talent visa: New system to keep UK 'open to talented scientists'

Boris Johnson hails the UK as "open to the most talented minds" with quicker route in for scientists.

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