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Study analyses potential global spread of new coronavirus

Experts in population mapping at the University of Southampton have identified cities and provinces within mainland China, and cities and countries worldwide, which are at high-risk from the spread of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

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Nanoparticle chomps away plaques that cause heart attacks

Michigan State University and Stanford University scientists have invented a nanoparticle that eats away—from the inside out—portions of plaques that cause heart attacks.

13h

Nedslidt sjællandsk østbane kan blive revet op og erstattet med busser

Transportministeren og Region Sjælland vil nu undersøge, om man kan erstatte jernbanen mellem Køge og henholdsvis Faxe Ladeplads og Rødvig med busser, der skal køre i eget trace.

5h

Assume Every Website You Visit Tattles to Facebook

Of the 1,081 apps and websites that have been sharing my "activity" with Facebook, Tinder is the chattiest. In the last 180 days, it has reported 685 of my "interactions" with its app to Facebook, according to Facebook's new Off-Facebook Activity tool, which CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced in a company blog post this morning. The tool lets any Facebook user go into her settings and see a list of ap

2min

Climate change politics outweigh science for coastal Floridians

Science plays second fiddle to politics in public attitudes about climate change and mitigation policies among coastal area Florida residents most likely to be affected, according to a new book. "Are these homeowners aware or concerned about their risk? Do they support policies and laws designed to mitigate the pace and extent of climate change that would, in turn, slow sea level rise?" are some

4min

100 years after development, TB vaccines vary in ability to stimulate immune components

New research from the Precision Vaccines Program at Boston Children's Hospital shows that BCG vaccines for tuberculosis prevention vary widely in their ability to activate components of the immune system. These findings highlight important differences between BCG formulations and the need for a large clinical study comparing them.

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Ocean Heat Waves Linked to Rise in Whale Entanglements

Whales searching for food near California during recent marine heat events became ensnared in fishing gear — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Problems in social science are being used to discredit climate science

A US conference may be using the reproducibility crisis in the social sciences in an attempt to discredit climate science, and scientists question whether to attend and push back

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Researchers Transplant Lab-Grown Heart Muscle Cells Into Patient

On Monday, researchers from Japan's Osaka University announced the successful completion of a first-of-its-kind heart transplant. Rather than replacing their patient's entire heart with a new organ, these researchers placed degradable sheets containing heart muscle cells onto the heart's damaged areas — and if the procedure has the desired effect, it could eventually eliminate the need for some e

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Optical resonators turn transparency on and off

In the quantum realm, under some circumstances and with the right interference patterns, light can pass through opaque media. This feature of light is more than a mathematical trick; optical quantum memory, optical storage, and other systems that depend on interactions of just a few photons at a time rely on the process, called electromagnetically induced transparency, also known as EIT. Because

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Research offers promise for treating schizophrenia

Psychologists show that targeting one particular symptom of schizophrenia has a positive effect on other symptoms.

24min

Rethinking land conservation to protect species that will need to move with climate change

A new study finds that many species of animals and plants likely will need to migrate under climate change, and that conservation efforts will also need to shift to be effective.

24min

The Hottest Known Planet Continuously Melts its Own Atmosphere

As we peer out into the universe in search of other worlds, we've spotted many gas giants orbiting close to their home stars. These so-called "hot Jupiters" have extreme environments, but the planet KELT-9b is in a class of its own. This is the hottest exoplanet ever discovered, and we're just now understanding what that means. A new analysis of KELT-9b shows that molecules in its atmosphere are

25min

Protein pores packed in polymers make super-efficient filtration membranes

A multidisciplinary team of engineers and scientists has developed a new class of filtration membranes for a variety of applications, from water purification to small-molecule separations to contaminant-removal processes, that are faster to produce and higher performing than current technology. This could reduce energy consumption, operational costs and production time in industrial separations.

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Harrington Seed Destructor kills nearly 100 percent of US agronomic weed seeds in lab study

In the battle against herbicide-resistant weeds, farmers are increasingly eager to add non-chemical control methods to their management toolbox. Impact mills, which destroy weed seeds picked up by a combine, have been shown to kill 70-99% of weed seeds in soybeans, wheat, and other small-statured cropping systems. And a recent Weed Science study from the University of Illinois shows even seeds tha

30min

Researchers develop method to assess geographic origins of ancient humans

Working with lead isotopes taken from tooth enamel of prehistoric animals, researchers at the University of Arkansas have developed a new method for assessing the geographic origins of ancient humans.

32min

Harrington Seed Destructor kills nearly 100 percent of US agronomic weed seeds in lab study

In the battle against herbicide-resistant weeds, farmers are increasingly eager to add non-chemical control methods to their management toolbox. Impact mills, which destroy weed seeds picked up by a combine, have been shown to kill 70-99% of weed seeds in soybeans, wheat, and other small-statured cropping systems. And a recent Weed Science study from the University of Illinois shows even seeds tha

32min

A better building block for creating new materials

When chemists or engineers want to make a new type of material, they head to the laboratory and start "cooking." Much like trying to improve upon a food recipe, the process involves trying new chemical ingredients or adjusting cooking times and temperatures. But what if instead of relying on a time-consuming process without guarantees of success, scientists could simply "snap" different chemical "

32min

What's in your water? Researchers identify new toxic byproducts of disinfecting drinking water

Mixing drinking water with chlorine, the United States' most common method of disinfecting drinking water, creates previously unidentified toxic byproducts, says Carsten Prasse from Johns Hopkins University and his collaborators from the University of California, Berkeley and Switzerland.

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Worst Locust Swarms in Decades Hit East Africa

Hundreds of millions of desert locusts are swarming in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Somalia—some of the biggest numbers seen in more than 25 years. Unusually wet weather in the area toward the end of 2019 has contributed to the massive outbreak, driving an explosion of locusts that are destroying crops and threatening the food security across the region. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organizati

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Assessing geographic origins of ancient humans

Working with lead isotopes taken from tooth enamel of prehistoric animals, researchers have developed a new method for assessing the geographic origins of ancient humans.

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Researchers generalize Fourier's heat equation, explaining hydrodynamic heat propagatio

Researchers have developed a novel set of equations for heat propagation that explain why and how heat propagation can become fluid-like, rather than diffusive. These "viscous heat equations" show how heat conduction is not only governed by thermal conductivity, but also by thermal viscosity. The theory is in striking agreement with pioneering experimental results in graphite published last year

44min

A better building block for creating new materials

Researchers describe a new way to synthesize organic 'Legos', a chemical framework that can be easily modified and controlled to create new materials with unique properties.

44min

How to Levitate Objects With Sound (and Break Your Mind)

The bizarre technology is called acoustic levitation, and it's poised to deliver advances in pharmacology, chemistry more broadly, and even robotics.

51min

Harrington Seed Destructor kills nearly 100 percent of US agronomic weed seeds in lab study

In the battle against herbicide-resistant weeds, farmers are increasingly eager to add non-chemical control methods to their management toolbox. Impact mills, which destroy weed seeds picked up by a combine, have been shown to kill 70-99% of weed seeds in soybeans, wheat, and other small-statured cropping systems. And a recent Weed Science study from the University of Illinois shows even seeds tha

1h

What's in your water?

Mixing drinking water with chlorine, the United States' most common method of disinfecting drinking water, creates previously unidentified toxic byproducts, says Carsten Prasse from Johns Hopkins University and his collaborators from the University of California, Berkeley and Switzerland.

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Bad to the bone: Specific gut bacterium impairs normal skeletal growth and maturation

Bone mass accrual is regulated by the gut microbiome as well as by diet and exercise. In a new report, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina showed that a specific gut bacterium, segmented filamentous bacteria, influences particular immune responses in the gut and liver. These immune response changes lead to increased bone resorbing osteoclast and suppressed bone forming osteobla

1h

Six patients with rare blood disease are doing well after gene therapy clinical trial

UCLA researchers are part of an international team that reported the use of a stem cell gene therapy to treat nine people with the rare, inherited blood disease known as X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, or X-CGD. Six of those patients are now in remission and have stopped other treatments. Before now, people with X-CGD – which causes recurrent infections, prolonged hospitalizations for trea

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Protein pores packed in polymers make super-efficient filtration membranes

A multidisciplinary team of engineers and scientists has developed a new class of filtration membranes for a variety of applications, from water purification to small-molecule separations to contaminant-removal processes, that are faster to produce and higher performing than current technology. This could reduce energy consumption, operational costs and production time in industrial separations.

1h

Scientists create listeriosis-immune mice by turning off gene in myeloid cells

An international research team which includes specialists from ITMO University has conducted a series of experiments to study the immune system and identify the genes and proteins involved in the response to certain harmful bacteria. The scientists found that "turning off" genes responsible for the production of the proteins Beclin 1 or FIP200 resulted in the test animals becoming nearly completel

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Bone marrow-on-a chip provides new research directions for Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome

A new research tool that mimics the behavior of diseased bone marrow provides a new strategy for understanding the bone marrow disease, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), and hopefully, developing new treatments.

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Biomarkers of brain function may lead to clinical tests for hidden hearing loss

A pair of biomarkers of brain function — one that represents 'listening effort,' and another that measures ability to process rapid changes in frequencies — may help to explain why a person with normal hearing may struggle to follow conversations in noisy environments. The researchers hoped the study could inform the design of next-generation clinical testing for hidden hearing loss, a condition

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Immunologist Wendy Havran Dies

Havran described gamma-delta T cells' direct function in epithelial repair.

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Four dead authors, a duplicate publication and questions: Solve this one!

A study spanning dozens of years, four deceased authors and a retraction for duplicate publication. Sounds like a recipe for an episode of that new show about medical detectives (not epidemiologists; detectives with guns). We'd like to be able to explain, but, well, we can't. What we do know is that the authors of a … Continue reading

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Why Mark Zuckerberg's Oversight Board May Kill His Political Ad Policy

With the release of bylaws, Facebook is a step closer to having a Supreme Court of content that can overrule even its CEO.

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Hey Google, are my housemates using my smart speaker?

Surveys show that consumers are worried that smart speakers are eavesdropping on their conversations and day-to-day lives. Now researchers have found that people are also concerned about something else: friends, family and others who may have access to these devices.

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Zinc lozenges did not shorten the duration of colds

Administration of zinc acetate lozenges to common cold patients did not shorten colds in a randomized trial.

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As seen in movies, new meta-hologram can be used as a communication tool

Scientists have developed a multiplexed meta-hologram device operating at visible light. The newly developed technique can transmit information to multiple users from different locations. This can be employed in many hologram applications such as performance, exhibitions, automobiles and more.

1h

New knowledge on how different brain cell types contribute to our movements

Researchers have mapped how different nerve cells in the brain area striatum process information to plan and execute our movements at just the right time and with the right vigor. The results show that different cell types in the striatum receive signals from completely different parts of the cerebral cortex and thus respond to different types of information.

1h

Major Asia gene study to help doctors battle disease

'Under-representation of Asian populations in genetic studies has meant that medical relevance for more than half of the human population is reduced,' one researcher said.

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Concordian examines the link between cognition and hearing or vision loss

Concordia researcher Natalie Phillips and her colleagues found that poor hearing especially was linked to declines in memory and executive function in otherwise relatively healthy, autonomous, community-dwelling older adults.Their paper, published in the journal Scientific Reports, asks if social factors — loneliness, depression and so on — also play a role in cognitive decline.

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Gene therapy success in chronic septic granulomatosis

American and British teams published yesterday in Nature Medicine the conclusive results of a gene therapy trial conducted in the United States and Great Britain in 9 patients with X-linked Chronic Septic Granulomatosis (X-CGD), a rare and severe immune dysfunction. Genethon, which contributed to the research that led to these trials and sponsored initial clinical studies, is pleased with these re

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Researchers develop method to assess geographic origins of ancient humans

Working with lead isotopes taken from tooth enamel of prehistoric animals, researchers at the University of Arkansas have developed a new method for assessing the geographic origins of ancient humans.

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Critically injured soldiers have high rates of mental health disorders

U.S. combat soldiers who suffered a moderate or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) are more likely than soldiers with other serious injuries to experience a range of mental health disorders, according to a new retrospective study by University of Massachusetts Amherst health services researchers.

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Tiny meteorites shed light on Earth's early atmosphere

Very old samples of small meteorites show that they could have reacted with carbon dioxide on their journey to Earth, researchers report. Previous work suggested the meteorites ran into oxygen, contradicting theories and evidence that the Earth's early atmosphere was virtually devoid of oxygen . "Our finding that the atmosphere these micrometeorites encountered was high in carbon dioxide is consi

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Salamander's genome may unravel regeneration mystery

A new way to circumvent the axolotl salamander's complex genome has helped identify at least two genes involved in regeneration, researchers report. Lose a limb, part of its heart, or even a large portion of its brain? No problem for the axolotl salamander: It just grows them back. "It regenerates almost anything after almost any injury that doesn't kill it," says Parker Flowers, postdoctoral ass

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Proposed House Bill Would Delay NASA's Return to the Moon

Although still a long way from becoming law, the legislation is reigniting a debate over the space agency's plans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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These Are the Symptoms of Coronavirus

As the deadly coronavirus 2019-nCoV spreads throughout the world , doctors are getting a better understanding of what symptoms and warning signs to keep an eye out for. Some extreme cases involve patients coughing up blood or going into septic shock, Foreign Policy reports . More typically, however, symptoms remain milder — potentially letting some cases slip under the radar and worsening the out

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Er du hundeallergiker? Du kan måske alligevel få en (hun)hund

Nogle allergikere reagerer kun på hanhunde, viser undersøgelse.

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Stopping the Coronavirus: Have We Learned the Lessons from SARS?

The parallel dos and don'ts for the two viruses are striking — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Doomed Project of American Dirt

American Dirt , the much discussed new novel from the author Jeanine Cummins, opens with a perfunctory slaughter. While the Mexican bookseller Lydia (most often referred to as Mami) escorts her 8-year-old son Luca to the restroom in his grandmother's Acapulco home, members of a local cartel kill every other member of their family. After unleashing a torrent of bullets—during a quinceañera barbecu

1h

I Often Remember What Kobe Bryant Told Me

Kobe Bryant spent the greater part of his adult lifetime in one of the most traffic-clogged areas of the country. He lived in Orange County and worked in Los Angeles—the Lakers' practice facility is near the airport; the Staples Center is downtown. Sitting in a classic Southern California traffic jam—it has taken me up to three hours to drive the 40-odd miles between Staples and Kobe's neighborho

1h

Nacre wouldn't be so tough with curvy layers

Some layered structures in nature—such as nacre, deer antlers, and conch shells—are super tough, but it's not universal, warn researchers. Nacre —the iridescent part of mollusk shells—is a poster child for biologically inspired design . Despite being made of brittle chalk, the intricately layered microstructure of nacre gives it a remarkable ability to resist the spread of cracks, a material prop

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High school GPAs are stronger predictors of college graduation than ACT scores

Students' high school grade point averages are five times stronger than their ACT scores at predicting college graduation, according to a new study published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

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Makers of "Plague Inc." Game: Get Your Coronavirus Info Elsewhere

Game studio Ndemic Creations has a message for players of its popular "Plague Inc." title: get your information on China's coronavirus elsewhere. The objective of the game, which Ndemic Creations released in 2012, is to create a new pathogen and infect the world with it before the simulated humans can develop a cure. The London-based studio's game became such a hit that the Centers for Disease Co

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Seven Unexploded WWII Bombs Found at German Tesla Factory Site

Kaboom! German munitions experts had to defuse seven unexploded World War II bombs at the site where Tesla wants to build its new Gigafactory, CNBC reports . German news site Deutsche Welle reports that the ordinance was "relatively small" and dropped by the US Air Force during the second World War. The operation was reportedly routine for German authorities and the operation was completed "witho

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Stopping the Coronavirus: Have We Learned the Lessons from SARS?

The parallel dos and don'ts for the two viruses are striking — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Global firms halt China travel as coronavirus spooks markets

Fears grow over global economic fallout with airline shares hit and commodity prices tumbling Coronavirus outbreak: live updates Businesses are stopping staff travel to China and urging workers inside the country to stay out of the office as concerns grow about the continued spread of the coronavirus from the central city of Wuhan to the rest of China and beyond. HSBC, which has the biggest prese

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Artificial intelligence predicts treatment outcome for diabetes-related vision loss

A new approach that uses artificial intelligence to analyze retinal images could one day help doctors select the best treatment for patients with vision loss from diabetic macular edema. This diabetes complication is a major cause of vision loss among working-age adults.

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For cheaper solar cells, thinner really is better

Researchers have outlined a pathway to slashing costs further, this time by slimming down the silicon cells themselves.

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Nanoparticle chomps away plaques that cause heart attacks

Scientists have invented a nanoparticle that eats away — from the inside out — portions of plaques that cause heart attacks.

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Second of its kind 'sharpshooter' leafhopper from Brazil 'strikes' with its coloration

When, in 2014, Brazilian researchers stumbled across a red-eyed leafhopper feeding inside bromeliads, growing in the restingas of southeastern Brazil, they were certain it was a one-of-a-kind discovery. Several years later, however, fieldwork in a mountainous area in the region ended up with the description of the second known case of a bromelicolous leafhopper. Thanks to its striking coloration,

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Tiny salamander's huge genome may harbor the secrets of regeneration

If scientists can find the genetic basis for the axolotl's ability to regenerate, they might be able to find ways to restore damaged tissue in humans. But they have been thwarted in the attempt by another peculiarity of the axolotl — it has the largest genome of any animal yet sequenced, 10 times larger than that of humans.

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19th-century bee cells in a Panamanian cathedral shed light on human impact on ecosystems

About 120 clusters of 19th-century orchid bee nests were found during restoration work on the altarpiece of Basilica Cathedral in Casco Viejo (Panamá). Having conducted the first pollen analysis for these extremely secretive insects, the researchers identified the presence of 48 plant species, representing 23 families. The findings give a precious insight into the role of natural ecosystems, their

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High school GPAs are stronger predictors of college graduation than ACT scores

Students' high school grade point averages are five times stronger than their ACT scores at predicting college graduation, according to a new study.

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Air pollution impacts can be heart-stopping

There is an increased risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest even from short-term exposure to low concentrations of dangerously small particulate matter PM2.5, an international study has found, noting an association with gaseous pollutants such as those from coal burning, wildfires/bushfires and motor vehicles. The authors call for a tightening of standards worldwide; the findings also point to th

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'Scrambled' cells fix themselves

Human cells have a defense mechanism that protects them from microbial attacks, a Canadian-led team of international researchers has discovered.

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Third Reich's legacy tied to present-day xenophobia and political intolerance

Who—or what—is to blame for the xenophobia, political intolerance and radical political parties spreading through Germany and the rest of Europe? A new study from Rice University and Washington University in St. Louis shows a major factor is people's proximity to former Nazi concentration camps.

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Astronaut craves salsa and surf after record 11 months aloft

After nearly 11 months in orbit, the astronaut holding the record for the longest spaceflight by a woman can't wait to dig into some salsa and chips, and swim and surf in the Gulf of Mexico.

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The Killer Neural Wiring That Links Eyes and Wings in 2 Predators

An ancient ancestor's visual system helps dragonflies and jewel wing damselflies capture prey in very different ways.

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Brain-wide functional architecture remodeling by alcohol dependence and abstinence [Neuroscience]

Alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence are key factors in the development of alcohol use disorder, which is a pervasive societal problem with substantial economic, medical, and psychiatric consequences. Although our understanding of the neurocircuitry that underlies alcohol use has improved, novel brain regions that are involved in alcohol use and…

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Oligodendroglial connexin 47 regulates neuroinflammation upon autoimmune demyelination in a novel mouse model of multiple sclerosis [Neuroscience]

In multiple sclerosis plaques, oligodendroglial connexin (Cx) 47 constituting main gap junction channels with astroglial Cx43 is persistently lost. As mice with Cx47 single knockout exhibit no demyelination, the roles of Cx47 remain undefined. We aimed to clarify the effects of oligodendroglia-specific Cx47 inducible conditional knockout (icKO) on experimental autoimmune…

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TrkB hyperactivity contributes to brain dysconnectivity, epileptogenesis, and anxiety in zebrafish model of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex [Neuroscience]

Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is a rare genetic disease that manifests with early symptoms, including cortical malformations, childhood epilepsy, and TSC-associated neuropsychiatric disorders (TANDs). Cortical malformations arise during embryonic development and have been linked to childhood epilepsy before, but the underlying mechanisms of this relationship remain insufficiently understood. Ze

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Imaging breast cancer using hyperpolarized carbon-13 MRI [Medical Sciences]

Our purpose is to investigate the feasibility of imaging tumor metabolism in breast cancer patients using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of hyperpolarized 13C label exchange between injected [1-13C]pyruvate and the endogenous tumor lactate pool. Treatment-naïve breast cancer patients were recruited: four triple-negative grade 3 cancers; two invasive ductal…

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Structure of a rabies virus polymerase complex from electron cryo-microscopy [Microbiology]

Nonsegmented negative-stranded (NNS) RNA viruses, among them the virus that causes rabies (RABV), include many deadly human pathogens. The large polymerase (L) proteins of NNS RNA viruses carry all of the enzymatic functions required for viral messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription and replication: RNA polymerization, mRNA capping, and cap methylation. We…

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Precise CRISPR/Cas9 editing of the NHE1 gene renders chickens resistant to the J subgroup of avian leukosis virus [Microbiology]

Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an important concern for the poultry industry. Replication of ALV-J depends on a functional cellular receptor, the chicken Na+/H+ exchanger type 1 (chNHE1). Tryptophan residue number 38 of chNHE1 (W38) in the extracellular portion of this molecule is a critical amino acid for…

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Coordination of host and symbiont gene expression reveals a metabolic tug-of-war between aphids and Buchnera [Microbiology]

Symbioses between animals and microbes are often described as mutualistic, but are subject to tradeoffs that may manifest as shifts in host and symbiont metabolism, cellular processes, or symbiont density. In pea aphids, the bacterial symbiont Buchnera is confined to specialized aphid cells called bacteriocytes, where it produces essential amino…

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A molecularly engineered antiviral banana lectin inhibits fusion and is efficacious against influenza virus infection in vivo [Microbiology]

There is a strong need for a new broad-spectrum antiinfluenza therapeutic, as vaccination and existing treatments are only moderately effective. We previously engineered a lectin, H84T banana lectin (H84T), to retain broad-spectrum activity against multiple influenza strains, including pandemic and avian, while largely eliminating the potentially harmful mitogenicity of the…

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Ras acts as a molecular switch between two forms of consolidated memory in Drosophila [Neuroscience]

Long-lasting, consolidated memories require not only positive biological processes that facilitate long-term memories (LTM) but also the suppression of inhibitory processes that prevent them. The mushroom body neurons (MBn) in Drosophila melanogaster store protein synthesis-dependent LTM (PSD-LTM) as well as protein synthesis-independent, anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM). The formation of ARM inh

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Nociceptin attenuates the escalation of oxycodone self-administration by normalizing CeA-GABA transmission in highly addicted rats [Neuroscience]

Approximately 25% of patients who are prescribed opioids for chronic pain misuse them, and 5 to 10% develop an opioid use disorder. Although the neurobiological target of opioids is well known, the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the development of addiction-like behaviors in some but not all individuals are…

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Physiological responses to gravity in an insect [Physiology]

Gravity is one of the most ubiquitous environmental effects on living systems: Cellular and organismal responses to gravity are of central importance to understanding the physiological function of organisms, especially eukaryotes. Gravity has been demonstrated to have strong effects on the closed cardiovascular systems of terrestrial vertebrates, with rapidly responding…

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HSD3B1 genotype identifies glucocorticoid responsiveness in severe asthma [Physiology]

Asthma resistance to glucocorticoid treatment is a major health problem with unclear etiology. Glucocorticoids inhibit adrenal androgen production. However, androgens have potential benefits in asthma. HSD3B1 encodes for 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 (3β-HSD1), which catalyzes peripheral conversion from adrenal dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to potent androgens and has a germline missense-encod

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LINGO1 is a regulatory subunit of large conductance, Ca2+-activated potassium channels [Physiology]

LINGO1 is a transmembrane protein that is up-regulated in the cerebellum of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and Essential Tremor (ET). Patients with additional copies of the LINGO1 gene also present with tremor. Pharmacological or genetic ablation of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels also result in tremor and motor…

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Multifeature analyses of vascular cambial cells reveal longevity mechanisms in old Ginkgo biloba trees [Plant Biology]

Aging is a universal property of multicellular organisms. Although some tree species can live for centuries or millennia, the molecular and metabolic mechanisms underlying their longevity are unclear. To address this, we investigated age-related changes in the vascular cambium from 15- to 667-y-old Ginkgo biloba trees. The ring width decreased…

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Insect herbivory antagonizes leaf cooling responses to elevated temperature in tomato [Plant Biology]

As global climate change brings elevated average temperatures and more frequent and extreme weather events, pressure from biotic stresses will become increasingly compounded by harsh abiotic stress conditions. The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) promotes resilience to many environmental stresses, including attack by arthropod herbivores whose feeding activity is often stimulated…

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Effective fisheries management instrumental in improving fish stock status [Population Biology]

Marine fish stocks are an important part of the world food system and are particularly important for many of the poorest people of the world. Most existing analyses suggest overfishing is increasing, and there is widespread concern that fish stocks are decreasing throughout most of the world. We assembled trends…

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Correction for Gunnar et al., Pubertal stress recalibration reverses the effects of early life stress in postinstitutionalized children [Corrections]

PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES, PHYSIOLOGY Correction for "Pubertal stress recalibration reverses the effects of early life stress in postinstitutionalized children," by Megan R. Gunnar, Carrie E. DePasquale, Brie M. Reid, and Bonny Donzella, which was first published November 11, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1909699116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 23984–23988). The authors…

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Correction for Chernov-Rogan et al., TRPA1 modulation by piperidine carboxamides suggests an evolutionarily conserved binding site and gating mechanism [Corrections]

PHARMACOLOGY Correction for "TRPA1 modulation by piperidine carboxamides suggests an evolutionarily conserved binding site and gating mechanism," by Tania Chernov-Rogan, Eleonora Gianti, Chang Liu, Elisia Villemure, Andrew P. Cridland, Xiaoyu Hu, Elisa Ballini, Wienke Lange, Heike Deisemann, Tianbo Li, Stuart I. Ward, David H. Hackos, Steven Magnuson, Brian Safina, Michael…

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Juvenile ornamentation in American coots Three newly hatched American coot chicks. Ornamental traits, such as bright-colored plumage, are known to benefit courtship and increase mating success in animals. However, the evolutionary advantage of juvenile ornamentation is unclear. To explore links between juvenile ornamentation and evolutionary fitness, Bruce Lyon and Daizaburo…

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Can we extrapolate from a Cmah-/-Ldlr-/- mouse model a susceptibility for atherosclerosis in humans? [Biological Sciences]

We read with great interest the paper of Kawanishi et al. in PNAS (1). Humans lack a functional cytidine monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH) controlling the synthesis of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). The possible role of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies—present in all human sera and resulting from diet-containing Neu5Gc—in the activation of endothelial cells…

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Reply to Soulillou et al.: Difficulties in extrapolating from animal models exemplify unusual human atherosclerosis susceptibility and mechanisms via CMAH loss [Biological Sciences]

Soulillou et al. (1) address our report (2) regarding intrinsic and extrinsic atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) in mice with human-like loss of Cmah (cytidine monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase)––eliminating N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) production. While our findings may help explain the unusual human propensity for ASCVD, extrapolation from animal models to human

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Clarifying the effect of library batch on extracellular RNA sequencing [Biological Sciences]

We read with great interest the recent paper of Zhou et al. (1) which describes a promising low-input protocol for measuring secreted RNA in blood. Zhou et al. (1) apply this technology to 96 samples of serum from cancer patients (28 with recurrence, 68 without) and 32 samples of serum…

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Reply to Hartl and Gao: Lack of between-batch difference in the distributions of measured extracellular RNA levels [Biological Sciences]

We thank Drs. Hartl and Gao for pointing out the difference in read lengths between the cancer and normal samples (1). Indeed, Illumina discontinued their 50-base pair (bp) sequencing kits after we finished sequencing the cancer samples, forcing us to switch to 75-bp sequencing kits on the normal samples. The…

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Finding the tail end: The discovery of RNA splicing [Profiles]

Major findings are sometimes hidden in small details. At least that was the case when, in a PNAS article, molecular biologist Phillip Sharp and his research team described a little strand of RNA that led to an understanding of how proteins are synthesized in cells (1). Fig. 1. Members of…

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Anaerobic bacteria need their vitamin B12 to digest estrogen [Applied Biological Sciences]

Often described as nature's most beautiful cofactor (1), vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is a complex and fascinating organometallic molecule that, although made only by some prokaryotes, has key functional roles in microbes, animals, and humans (2). Its two major biological forms, methylcobalamin (MeCbl) and adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl), have a central cobalt atom…

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Present-day drivers do not explain biodiversity patterns in mammals [Ecology]

Mammals are an obvious choice for analyses of global biodiversity patterns. They are not too diverse, disproportionately well studied, and even nonspecialists will be interested in the results. They are also fairly good indicators of overall vertebrate diversity (1). Moreover, the limited ability of most mammals to cross oceanic barriers…

2h

Life-history models reconstruct mammalian evolution [Ecology]

While ecologists sometimes bemoan the complexities of the discipline, several of the overarching patterns of nature can be boiled down to surprisingly simple terms. One of the most intriguing of these is Damuth's law (1) that population density is scaled with body mass raised to the power of −3/4 irrespective…

2h

Shoot meristem maintenance and immune response signaling converge at the G protein {beta} subunit [Plant Biology]

The shoot apical meristem (SAM) harbors a set of pluripotent stem cells that divide continuously to provide cells for the development of all aboveground plant parts (1). A concoction of hormonal and peptide signals and transcription factors, along with mechanical cues, play a role in stem cell maintenance, which requires…

2h

What music makes us feel: At least 13 dimensions organize subjective experiences associated with music across different cultures [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

What is the nature of the feelings evoked by music? We investigated how people represent the subjective experiences associated with Western and Chinese music and the form in which these representational processes are preserved across different cultural groups. US (n = 1,591) and Chinese (n = 1,258) participants listened to…

2h

Global trends toward urban street-network sprawl [Sustainability Science]

We present a global time series of street-network sprawl—that is, sprawl as measured through the local connectivity of the street network. Using high-resolution data from OpenStreetMap and a satellite-derived time series of urbanization, we compute and validate changes over time in multidimensional street connectivity measures based on graph-theoretic and geographic…

2h

Trop2 is a driver of metastatic prostate cancer with neuroendocrine phenotype via PARP1 [Cell Biology]

Resistance to androgen deprivation therapy, or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), is often accompanied by metastasis and is currently the ultimate cause of prostate cancer-associated deaths in men. Recently, secondary hormonal therapies have led to an increase of neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC), a highly aggressive variant of CRPC. Here, we identify…

2h

Apex structures enhance water drainage on leaves [Applied Biological Sciences]

The rapid removal of rain droplets at the leaf apex is critical for leaves to avoid damage under rainfall conditions, but the general water drainage principle remains unclear. We demonstrate that the apex structure enhances water drainage on the leaf by employing a curvature-controlled mechanism that is based on shaping…

2h

News Feature: Small-scale fusion tackles energy, space applications [Applied Physical Sciences]

Efforts are underway to exploit a strategy that could generate fusion with relative ease. On July 14, 2015, nine years and five billion kilometers after liftoff, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft passed the dwarf planet Pluto and its outsized moon Charon at almost 14 kilometers per second—roughly 20 times faster than…

2h

CK1{alpha}, CK1{delta}, and CK1&epsiv; are necrosome components which phosphorylate serine 227 of human RIPK3 to activate necroptosis [Biochemistry]

Necroptosis is a regulated necrotic cell death pathway, mediated by a supermolecular complex called the necrosome, which contains receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 and 3 (RIPK1, RIPK3) and mixed-lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL). Phosphorylation of human RIPK3 at serine 227 (S227) has been shown to be required for downstream MLKL binding…

2h

A long-distance rRNA base pair impacts the ability of macrolide antibiotics to kill bacteria [Biochemistry]

While most of the ribosome-targeting antibiotics are bacteriostatic, some members of the macrolide class demonstrate considerable bactericidal activity. We previously showed that an extended alkyl-aryl side chain is the key structural element determining the macrolides' slow dissociation from the ribosome and likely accounts for the antibiotics' cidality. In the nontranslating…

2h

Missing regions within the molecular architecture of human fibrin clots structurally resolved by XL-MS and integrative structural modeling [Biochemistry]

Upon activation, fibrinogen forms large fibrin biopolymers that coalesce into clots which assist in wound healing. Limited insights into their molecular architecture, due to the sheer size and the insoluble character of fibrin clots, have restricted our ability to develop novel treatments for clotting diseases. The, so far resolved, disparate…

2h

Polymeric sheet actuators with programmable bioinstructivity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Stem cells are capable of sensing and processing environmental inputs, converting this information to output a specific cell lineage through signaling cascades. Despite the combinatorial nature of mechanical, thermal, and biochemical signals, these stimuli have typically been decoupled and applied independently, requiring continuous regulation by controlling units. We employ a…

2h

Resting state structure of the hyperdepolarization activated two-pore channel 3 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Voltage-gated ion channels endow membranes with excitability and the means to propagate action potentials that form the basis of all neuronal signaling. We determined the structure of a voltage-gated sodium channel, two-pore channel 3 (TPC3), which generates ultralong action potentials. TPC3 is distinguished by activation only at extreme membrane depolarization…

2h

Innate immune receptor NOD2 mediates LGR5+ intestinal stem cell protection against ROS cytotoxicity via mitophagy stimulation [Cell Biology]

The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) agonist muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a peptidoglycan motif common to all bacteria, supports leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5)+ intestinal stem cell (ISC) survival through NOD2 activation upon an otherwise lethal oxidative stress-mediated signal. However, the underlying protective mechanisms remai

2h

The nutrient sensor OGT regulates Hipk stability and tumorigenic-like activities in Drosophila [Cell Biology]

Environmental cues such as nutrients alter cellular behaviors by acting on a wide array of molecular sensors inside cells. Of emerging interest is the link observed between effects of dietary sugars on cancer proliferation. Here, we identify the requirements of hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) for Drosophila…

2h

Single-cell tracking demonstrates copper chaperone Atox1 to be required for breast cancer cell migration [Cell Biology]

Copper ions are needed for several hallmarks of cancer. However, the involved pathways, mechanisms, and copper-binding proteins are mostly unknown. We recently found that cytoplasmic Antioxidant 1 copper chaperone (Atox1), which is up-regulated in breast cancer, is localized at the lamellipodia edges of aggressive breast cancer cells. To reveal molecular…

2h

CTCF mediates chromatin looping via N-terminal domain-dependent cohesin retention [Cell Biology]

The DNA-binding protein CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and the cohesin complex function together to shape chromatin architecture in mammalian cells, but the molecular details of this process remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a 79-aa region within the CTCF N terminus is essential for cohesin positioning at CTCF binding sites and…

2h

Controlled phage therapy by photothermal ablation of specific bacterial species using gold nanorods targeted by chimeric phages [Chemistry]

The use of bacteriophages (phages) for antibacterial therapy is under increasing consideration to treat antimicrobial-resistant infections. Phages have evolved multiple mechanisms to target their bacterial hosts, such as high-affinity, environmentally hardy receptor-binding proteins. However, traditional phage therapy suffers from multiple challenges stemming from the use of an exponentially repli

2h

Water level changes, subsidence, and sea level rise in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Being one of the most vulnerable regions in the world, the Ganges–Brahmaputra–Meghna delta presents a major challenge for climate change adaptation of nearly 200 million inhabitants. It is often considered as a delta mostly exposed to sea-level rise and exacerbated by land subsidence, even if the local vertical land movement…

2h

Probabilistic reanalysis of storm surge extremes in Europe [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Extreme sea levels are a significant threat to life, property, and the environment. These threats are managed by coastal planers through the implementation of risk mitigation strategies. Central to such strategies is knowledge of extreme event probabilities. Typically, these probabilities are estimated by fitting a suitable distribution to the observed…

2h

Lifetimes of interstellar dust from cosmic ray exposure ages of presolar silicon carbide [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

We determined interstellar cosmic ray exposure ages of 40 large presolar silicon carbide grains extracted from the Murchison CM2 meteorite. Our ages, based on cosmogenic Ne-21, range from 3.9 ± 1.6 Ma to ∼3 ± 2 Ga before the start of the Solar System ∼4.6 Ga ago. A majority of…

2h

Generalists are more specialized in low-resource habitats, increasing stability of ecological network structure [Ecology]

Linking mechanistic processes to the stability of ecological networks is a key frontier in ecology. In trophic networks, "modules"—groups of species that interact more with each other than with other members of the community—confer stability, mitigating effects of species loss or perturbation. Modularity, in turn, is shaped by the interplay…

2h

Predicting high-risk opioid prescriptions before they are given [Economic Sciences]

Misuse of prescription opioids is a leading cause of premature death in the United States. We use state government administrative data and machine learning methods to examine whether the risk of future opioid dependence, abuse, or poisoning can be predicted in advance of an initial opioid prescription. Our models accurately…

2h

Global warming accelerates uptake of atmospheric mercury in regions experiencing glacier retreat [Environmental Sciences]

As global climate continues to warm, melting of glaciers releases a large quantity of mercury (Hg) originally locked in ice into the atmosphere and downstream ecosystems. Here, we show an opposite process that captures atmospheric Hg through glacier-to-vegetation succession. Our study using stable isotope techniques at 3 succession sites on…

2h

Climate change and the opportunity cost of conflict [Environmental Sciences]

A growing empirical literature associates climate anomalies with increased risk of violent conflict. This association has been portrayed as a bellwether of future societal instability as the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events are predicted to increase. This paper investigates the theoretical foundation of this claim. A seminal microeconomic…

2h

Quantitative detection of iodine in the stratosphere [Environmental Sciences]

Oceanic emissions of iodine destroy ozone, modify oxidative capacity, and can form new particles in the troposphere. However, the impact of iodine in the stratosphere is highly uncertain due to the lack of previous quantitative measurements. Here, we report quantitative measurements of iodine monoxide radicals and particulate iodine (Iy,part) from…

2h

Extreme offspring ornamentation in American coots is favored by selection within families, not benefits to conspecific brood parasites [Evolution]

Offspring ornamentation typically occurs in taxa with parental care, suggesting that selection arising from social interactions between parents and offspring may underlie signal evolution. American coot babies are among the most ornamented offspring found in nature, sporting vividly orange-red natal plumage, a bright red beak, and other red parts around…

2h

Anaerobic peroxisomes in Mastigamoeba balamuthi [Evolution]

The adaptation of eukaryotic cells to anaerobic conditions is reflected by substantial changes to mitochondrial metabolism and functional reduction. Hydrogenosomes belong among the most modified mitochondrial derivative and generate molecular hydrogen concomitant with ATP synthesis. The reduction of mitochondria is frequently associated with loss of peroxisomes, which compartmentalize pathways tha

2h

Metabolic dysregulation in the Atp7b-/- Wilson's disease mouse model [Medical Sciences]

Inactivating mutations in the copper transporter Atp7b result in Wilson's disease. The Atp7b−/− mouse develops hallmarks of Wilson's disease. The activity of several nuclear receptors decreased in Atp7b−/− mice, and nuclear receptors are critical for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Therefore, we anticipated that Atp7b−/− mice would exhibit altered progression of diet-induced…

2h

RAP80 and BRCA1 PARsylation protect chromosome integrity by preventing retention of BRCA1-B/C complexes in DNA repair foci [Medical Sciences]

BRCA1 promotes error-free, homologous recombination-mediated repair (HRR) of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs). When excessive and uncontrolled, BRCA1 HRR activity promotes illegitimate recombination and genome disorder. We and others have observed that the BRCA1-associated protein RAP80 recruits BRCA1 to postdamage nuclear foci, and these chromatin structures then restrict the amplitude of…

2h

Predicting research trends with semantic and neural networks with an application in quantum physics [Physics]

The vast and growing number of publications in all disciplines of science cannot be comprehended by a single human researcher. As a consequence, researchers have to specialize in narrow subdisciplines, which makes it challenging to uncover scientific connections beyond the own field of research. Thus, access to structured knowledge from…

2h

A scalable pipeline for designing reconfigurable organisms [Systems Biology]

Living systems are more robust, diverse, complex, and supportive of human life than any technology yet created. However, our ability to create novel lifeforms is currently limited to varying existing organisms or bioengineering organoids in vitro. Here we show a scalable pipeline for creating functional novel lifeforms: AI methods automatically…

2h

Membrane molecular crowding enhances MreB polymerization to shape synthetic cells from spheres to rods [Systems Biology]

Executing gene circuits by cell-free transcription−translation into cell-sized compartments, such as liposomes, is one of the major bottom-up approaches to building minimal cells. The dynamic synthesis and proper self-assembly of macromolecular structures inside liposomes, the cytoskeleton in particular, stands as a central limitation to the development of cell analogs genetically…

2h

Iranian Students Denied Entry to US

Despite having valid visas to attend universities, more than a dozen would-be graduate students have been detained at the airport and sent back to Iran in recent months.

2h

Daily briefing: Biotech magnate funds free drugs for ultra-rare diseases

Nature, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00231-0 Foundation will have to tackle high cost of producing treatments for diseases that affect fewer than ten individuals. Plus: Isaac Asimov at 100 and a coronavirus update.

2h

'Scrambled' cells fix themselves

Human cells have a defense mechanism that protects them from microbial attacks, a Canadian-led team of international researchers has discovered.

2h

6 fast ways to protect your computer from scammers, according to the FTC

In the first half of 2019, there were an estimated 3,800 data breaches that exposed over 4.1 billion financial, healthcare, and government records. According to cybersecurity experts, there is no such thing as a 100% safe internet. Fortunately, there are ways to make it harder for scammers and hackers to steal your information. VPNs, better password practices, and knowing how to spot a non-encryp

2h

High school GPAs are stronger predictors of college graduation than ACT scores

Students' high school grade point averages are five times stronger than their ACT scores at predicting college graduation, according to a new study published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

2h

New study identifies bumble bees' favorite flowers to aid bee conservation

Many species of North American bumble bees have seen significant declines in recent decades. Bumble bees are essential pollinators for both native and agricultural plants, and their ability to fly in colder temperatures make them especially important pollinators at high elevation. Bumble bee declines have been attributed to a handful of factors, including lack of flowers. Not all flowers are used

2h

Ledende overlæge på stor medicinsk afdeling siger op

Henrik Ancher Sørensen stopper som ledende overlæge på afdeling, der har haft store problemer med bl.a. overbelægning.

2h

New study identifies bumble bees' favorite flowers to aid bee conservation

Many species of North American bumble bees have seen significant declines in recent decades. Bumble bees are essential pollinators for both native and agricultural plants, and their ability to fly in colder temperatures make them especially important pollinators at high elevation. Bumble bee declines have been attributed to a handful of factors, including lack of flowers. Not all flowers are used

2h

Red Sea huge source of air pollution, greenhouse gases: study

Hydrocarbon gases bubbling from the bottom of the Red Sea are polluting the atmosphere at a rate equivalent to the emissions of some large fossil fuel exporting countries, researchers said Tuesday.

2h

Just 14% of young people vape

While teen vaping rates have increased in recent years, most middle and high school students don't vape or smoke and very few vape or smoke daily, researchers report. A new study in Nicotine & Tobacco Research , finds that over 80% of youth do not use any tobacco and over 86% don't vape—and among the minority who do vape, most are not regular users. Further, most youth who vape are also current o

3h

Animal DNA is full of viral invaders and now we've caught them at it

We know viruses invaded animals' genomes in the ancient past, but only now have we actually witnessed it happening and the DNA being passed to offspring

3h

Tesla Offers Free Charging in China During Coronavirus Outbreak

Free Ride Tesla has notified owners in China that they'll be able to charge their vehicles for free for the duration of the nation's coronavirus epidemic . "To make it easier for you to travel during the coronavirus outbreak, effective today we will temporarily open all Tesla vehicles to be free to charge at the Supercharging station until the epidemic is resolved," Tesla wrote to owners, accordi

3h

Pneumonia recovery reprograms immune cells of the lung

Researchers have determined that after lungs recover from infection, alveolar macrophages (immune cells that live in the lungs and help protect the lungs against infection) are different in multiple ways and those differences persist indefinitely.

3h

'Scrambled' cells fix themselves

In the human body, cells shield themselves from disease-causing microbes by scrambling their lipids into liquids, according to new research by an international team headed by the Montreal Clinical Research Institute and Université de Montréal.

3h

Third Reich's legacy tied to present-day xenophobia and political intolerance

Who — or what — is to blame for the xenophobia, political intolerance and radical political parties spreading through Germany and the rest of Europe? A new study from Rice University and Washington University in St. Louis shows a major factor is people's proximity to former Nazi concentration camps.

3h

Best urban design for reducing road injuries

City design combining more public transport and rail networks with smaller, low speed blocks are the best to reduce road transport injuries, according to a new global study co-authored by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. The research aims to highlight the importance of urban design and planning as a key factor in reducing transport related injuries across the wor

3h

Hungry for hutia? Our taste for Bahamas' 'most peaceable rodent' shaped its diversity

The Bahamian hutia, a large Caribbean rodent with a blissed-out disposition, presents a curious case study in how human food preferences can drive biodiversity, sometimes shaping it over 1,000 years.

3h

Rethinking land conservation to protect species that will need to move with climate change

All plants and animals need suitable conditions to survive. That means a certain amount of light, a tolerable temperature range, and access to sources of food, water and shelter.

3h

How active shooter incidents off campus lead to guns on campus

A new study finds that active shooter incidents off campus and politics are key factors that led state legislators to pass laws allowing concealed weapons on college and university campuses between 2004 and 2016.

3h

Upper-plate earthquakes caused uplift along New Zealand's Northern Hikurangi Margin

Earthquakes along a complex series of faults in the upper plate of New Zealand's northern Hikurangi Subduction Margin were responsible for coastal uplift in the region, according to a new evaluation of local marine terraces.

3h

Hungry for hutia? Our taste for Bahamas' 'most peaceable rodent' shaped its diversity

The Bahamian hutia, a large Caribbean rodent with a blissed-out disposition, presents a curious case study in how human food preferences can drive biodiversity, sometimes shaping it over 1,000 years.

3h

Rethinking land conservation to protect species that will need to move with climate change

All plants and animals need suitable conditions to survive. That means a certain amount of light, a tolerable temperature range, and access to sources of food, water and shelter.

3h

Crab-shell and seaweed compounds spin into yarns for sustainable and functional materials

Researchers from Aalto University, the University of São Paulo and the University of British Columbia have found a way to make a new kind of fibre from a combination of chitin nanoparticles, extracted from residual blue crab shells and alginate, a compound found in seaweed. This new bio-based material is sturdy and has antimicrobial properties.

3h

Can A.I. blood analysis predict Alzheimer's progress?

Artificial intelligence analysis of blood samples can predict and explain neurodegenerative disease progression, researchers report. The technique could one day help doctors choose more appropriate and effective treatments for patients. Researchers used an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm to analyze the blood and postmortem brain samples of 1,969 patients with Alzheimer's and Huntington's d

3h

How Archaeologists Know Where to Dig

Archaeologists use luck, skill and technology to find new sites — and sometimes, all three.

3h

AI could deceive us as much as the human eye does in the search for extraterrestrials

An artificial neural network has identified a square structure within a triangular one in a crater on the dwarf planet Ceres, with several people agreeing on this perception. The result of this intriguing visual experiment, carried out by a Spanish neuropsychologist, calls into question the application of artificial intelligence to the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI).

3h

Researchers foresee the ongoing use of cash

Are the countries of the Eurozone ready to drop cash in hand? In light of a study of the UPV and UV, the answer is no. The work concludes that in these countries, there are still many years left of paying with cash. And, in Spain, this seems to be the case even more. These and other conclusions have recently been published in Cuadernos de Economía.

3h

Second of its kind 'sharpshooter' leafhopper from Brazil 'strikes' with its colouration

When, in 2014, Brazilian researchers stumbled across a never-before-seen red-eyed leafhopper feeding inside the rosettes of bromeliads, growing in the restingas of southeastern Brazil, they were certain it was a one-of-a-kind discovery. Described as new-to-science species, as well as genus (Cavichiana bromelicola) and added to the sharpshooter tribe Cicadellini, it became the first known case of a

3h

The Coronavirus Questions that Scientists are Racing to Answer

Although scientists have learned a lot so far, there is still much they do not know about the novel virus spreading in China and other countries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

U.S. Accuses Harvard Scientist of Concealing Chinese Funding

Prosecutors say Charles M. Lieber, the chair of Harvard's chemistry department, lied about contacts with China's Thousand Talents Program, a state-run initiative that seeks to draw foreign-educated talent.

3h

Second of its kind 'sharpshooter' leafhopper from Brazil 'strikes' with its colouration

When, in 2014, Brazilian researchers stumbled across a never-before-seen red-eyed leafhopper feeding inside the rosettes of bromeliads, growing in the restingas of southeastern Brazil, they were certain it was a one-of-a-kind discovery. Described as new-to-science species, as well as genus (Cavichiana bromelicola) and added to the sharpshooter tribe Cicadellini, it became the first known case of a

3h

Here's the Growing Coronavirus Death Toll in One Chilling Graph

Last month, a pneumonia-like coronavirus dubbed 2019-nCoV emerged in Wuhan, China. Since then, it's spread to every populous continent and infected thousands around the world — though the vast majority of confirmed cases and all deaths still fall within China. The coronavirus claimed its first life on January 10, and since then the death toll has climbed at an alarming and accelerating rate. All

3h

How active shooter incidents off campus lead to guns on campus

A new study finds that active shooter incidents off campus and politics are key factors that led state legislators to pass laws allowing concealed weapons on college and university campuses between 2004 and 2016.

3h

Hungry for hutia? Our taste for Bahamas' 'most peaceable rodent' shaped its diversity

Hungry for hutia? Humans' taste for this Bahamian rodent shaped its diversity over 1,000 years — an example of how what we like to eat can chart the course of a species.

3h

The International Space Station Is Getting a Commercial Module

Axiom Space will provide at least one habitable segment to help spur commercial activity in orbit — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Heal the land, secure our future | David Pocock's 2020s vision

Regnerative agriculture can revolutionise the continent. That's not a pie-in-the-sky utopia, but something we can all bring about How should we stare down the challenges of a new decade? Where will we find hope and solutions? This is the first piece in a new series in which we ask prominent Australians to write about one thing they think could improve the nation in the 2020s We need a revolution

3h

Artificial intelligence predicts treatment outcome for diabetes-related vision loss

A new approach that uses artificial intelligence to analyze retinal images could one day help doctors select the best treatment for patients with vision loss from diabetic macular edema. This diabetes complication is a major cause of vision loss among working-age adults.

3h

Upper-plate earthquakes caused uplift along New Zealand's Northern Hikurangi Margin

Earthquakes along a complex series of faults in the upper plate of New Zealand's northern Hikurangi Subduction Margin were responsible for coastal uplift in the region, according to a new evaluation of local marine terraces.

3h

Crab-shell and seaweed compounds spin into yarns for sustainable and functional materials

Biobased fibres are made from two renewable marine resources and with promise in advanced applications, in wovens and medical materials, among others. The threads draw strength from the crab chitin component and flexibility from seaweed alginate.

3h

Naming a Kid for a Fictional Character Is High Stakes

Once upon a time, there were three sisters named Meg, Jo, and Amy, but they're not the sisters you're thinking of. For starters, the oldest sister's name is actually Laurie Jo (full name Laurie Jo Lesser Hodgson), while Meg (Lesser Roberts) and Amy (Lesser Courage) are twins. They are not the characters from Louisa May Alcott's famous book about sisters, Little Women , but they were named for tho

3h

How Ancient Light Reveals the Universe's Contents

In early 2003, Chuck Bennett learned the precise contents of the cosmos. By then, most cosmologists had concluded that the universe contains much more than meets the eye. Observations of pinwheeling galaxies suggested that scaffolds of invisible matter held their stars together, while a repulsive form of energy drove galaxies apart. To learn more, Bennett and his Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Pr

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Virtual assistants provide disappointing advice when asked for first aid, emergency info

Virtual assistants don't yet live up to their considerable potential when it comes to providing users with reliable and relevant information on medical emergencies, according to a new study from University of Alberta researchers.

4h

Rethinking land conservation to protect species that will need to move with climate change

A new study finds that many species of animals and plants likely will need to migrate under climate change, and that conservation efforts will also need to shift to be effective.

4h

New knowledge on how different brain cell types contribute to our movements

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have mapped how different nerve cells in the brain area striatum process information to plan and execute our movements at just the right time and with the right vigour. The results, presented in the journal Cell Reports, show that different cell types in the striatum receive signals from completely different parts of the cerebral cortex and thus respond to diff

4h

Novel insight into chromosome 21 and its effect on Down syndrome

A UCL-led research team has, for the first time, identified specific regions of chromosome 21, which cause memory and decision-making problems in mice with Down syndrome, a finding that provides valuable new insight into the condition in humans.

4h

Instant hydrogen production for powering fuel cells

Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing and Tsinghua University, Beijing investigate real-time, on-demand hydrogen generation for use in fuel cells, which are a quiet and clean form of energy.

4h

New mathematical model for amyloid formation

Scientists report on a mathematical model for the formation of amyloid fibrils. The model sheds light on how the aggregation process can occur in a catalytic manner, something that has not been previously well understood.

4h

Tiny magnetic structures enhance medical science

Magnetic nanostructures have interesting properties that enhance novel applications in medical diagnosis and allow the exploration of new therapeutic techniques.

4h

Gaming monitors designed to level you up

Become enveloped in the world. (Fredrick Tendong via Unsplash/) For years, gamers had to be content using monitors meant for spreadsheets and Word docs to indulge in their passion, but as esports gain popularity and games themselves become more and more dense and immersive, it's clear more power is needed. These monitors will turn gaming from a form of entertainment to a full-on sensory experienc

4h

China Announces Plan to Ban Single-Use Plastics

Waste Not Earlier this month, China announced a five-year plan to ban single-use plastic waste in the entire country. The proposal would prohibit the sale of disposable foam, plastic tableware, and many other products, according to The New York Times . Sources familiar with the plans told the Times that plastic garbage will be banned in large cities including Beijing and Shanghai by the end of 20

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A new type of medicine, custom-made with tiny proteins | Christopher Bahl

Some common life-saving medicines, such as insulin, are made of proteins so large and fragile that they need to be injected instead of ingested as pills. But a new generation of medicine — made from smaller, more durable proteins known as peptides — is on its way. In a quick, informative talk, molecular engineer and TED Fellow Christopher Bahl explains how he's using computational design to crea

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Wuhan expats: 'People are getting ill all around us'

US citizens set to be evacuated but other expatriates wait for details of exit plans

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Kommuner blander plast, glas og metal: Nu kan glasset ikke længere genbruges i Danmark

PLUS. Reiling Glasrecycling har stoppet samarbejdet med det lokale affaldsselskab AffaldPlus, efter selskabet begyndte at blandte plast, metal og glas. Kvaliteten er nu blevet for lav og AffaldPlus må afsætte glasaffaldet til genanvendelse i Polen.

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Social scientists battle bots to glean insights from online chatter

Nature, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00141-1 Automated production of social-media posts can confound research studies.

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Scientists Must Stand Up for Internationalism

Nationalistic trends across the world threaten the cross-border cooperation that underlies scientific progress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Timeline of the Spitzer Space Telescope's 16 Years of Science

Spitzer has far outlived expectations, continuing to reveal the wonders of the universe even as its instruments began shutting down.

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School smarts more than reading and maths

Academic and cognitive skill training goes both ways, research suggests.

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It's not just you: Restaurants have gotten too loud. But there are some fixes.

With restaurants getting louder than ever, a team of acoustic specialists tries to clear the table of conversation-killing din. (The Voorhes/) Comal, a bustling Oaxacan-inspired restaurant in Berkeley, California, has all the ingredients for the kind of ear-splitting ambience that's become familiar in modern eateries: packed bar, open kitchen, high ceilings, and concrete walls. But when I join a

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Research offers promise for treating schizophrenia

Research by a University of Georgia psychologist shows that targeting one particular symptom of schizophrenia has a positive effect on other symptoms.

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Biomarkers of brain function may lead to clinical tests for hidden hearing loss

A pair of biomarkers of brain function — one that represents 'listening effort,' and another that measures ability to process rapid changes in frequencies — may help to explain why a person with normal hearing may struggle to follow conversations in noisy environments, according to a new study led by Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers. The researchers hoped the study could inform the design o

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Novel molecules display potent and selective action against ovarian tumor cells

Compounds based on palladium, a metal belonging to the same group as platinum, have been developed by researchers from Brazil, the UK and Italy. In vitro tests show action against tumor cells that are resistant to treatment currently used.

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Better classify breast cancer with 34 more biomarkers

A new imaging approach for breast cancer uses 35 biomarkers to identify different cell types in breast tumors and their surrounding areas. The current standard tests single markers. The new approach, which appears in Nature , increases the precision of tumor analysis and classification—and improves personalized diagnostics for breast cancer patients. Breast cancer progression can vary significant

4h

The right city design can cut injuries on the road

City design that combines more public transport and rail networks with smaller, low speed blocks are the best for reducing road transport injuries, according to a new global study. The research, which appears in The Lancet Planetary Health , identifies the best and worst performing city designs with respect to road injuries. Researchers from Australia, Spain, and the United States compared maps o

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Tiny magnetic structures enhance medical science

Small magnetic objects, which have been used successfully in technological applications such as data storage, are showing promise in the biomedical field. Magnetic nanostructures have interesting properties that enhance novel applications in medical diagnosis and allow the exploration of new therapeutic techniques.

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New mathematical model for amyloid formation

Amyloids are aggregates consisting of stacks of thousands of proteins bound tightly together. Their formation is involved in several widespread disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and Type II diabetes.

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Red Sea releasing large quantities of polluting gases

Previously unknown source pumps out as much ethane and propane as Kuwait.

4h

How and why butterflies keep their wings cool

They're delicate, often beautiful, and also complex.

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Humans not always to blame for genetic diversity loss

Differences in African lions likely caused by ecological factors, study shows.

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Astronomers chance upon a 'vampire' star feeding frenzy

New project makes good use of data from an old telescope.

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Illustrating a book of bits

Students compile an encyclopaedia of genes

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Scientists Must Stand Up for Internationalism

: Nationalistic trends across the world threaten the cross-border cooperation that underlies scientific progress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Proposed House bill pushes NASA's crewed moon landing back to 2028

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Young California ranchers are finding new ways to raise livestock and improve the land

As California contends with drought, wildfires and other impacts of climate change, a small yet passionate group of residents are attempting to lessen these effects and reduce the state's carbon emissions. They are ranchers—but not the kind that most people picture when they hear that term.

4h

AI could deceive us as much as the human eye does in the search for extraterrestrials

An artificial neural network has identified a square structure within a triangular one in a crater on the dwarf planet Ceres, with several people agreeing on this perception. The result of this intriguing visual experiment, carried out by a Spanish neuropsychologist, calls into question the application of artificial intelligence to the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI).

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Tiny salamander's huge genome may harbor the secrets of regeneration

If scientists can find the genetic basis for the axolotl's ability to regenerate, they might be able to find ways to restore damaged tissue in humans. But they have been thwarted in the attempt by another peculiarity of the axolotl — it has the largest genome of any animal yet sequenced, 10 times larger than that of humans.

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Researchers foresee the ongoing use of cash

Are the countries of the Eurozone ready to drop cash in hand? In light of a study of the UPV and UV, the answer is no. The work concludes that in these countries, there are still many years left of paying with cash. And, in Spain, this seems to be the case even more. These and other conclusions have recently been published in Cuadernos de Economía.

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NICU babies have greater risk of mental health issues

Children who spend time in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at birth have a higher risk of mental health issues later, regardless of their birth weight, say McMaster University researchers.

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Major Asia gene study to help doctors battle disease

'Under-representation of Asian populations in genetic studies has meant that medical relevance for more than half of the human population is reduced,' one researcher said.

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Towards better anti-cancer drugs

The Bayreuth biochemist Dr. Claus-D. Kuhn and his research team have deciphered how the important human oncogene CDK8 is activated in cells of healthy individuals. Their findings, which have now been published in the journal 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A.', explain why promising anti-CDK8 drugs are only effective under laboratory conditions but likely not in humans. Gained

4h

Humanity's collective history revealed through religious rituals and practices

Penn doctoral student David Yaden practices mindfulness, a simple habit he uses to re-center himself after stressful situations. It's also one that's backed by science, having been analyzed and written about for decades. The same is true for yoga, another intervention borne out of a religious practice that has become mainstream.

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A "Trillion Trees" is a great idea—that could become a dangerous climate distraction

Reforestation is critical for lots of reasons, but it's no substitute for cutting emissions.

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Some kids in rural areas start carrying handguns as early as 12

Roughly one-third of young boys and 1 in 10 girls in rural communities have carried a handgun, according to a new study. And, many of those kids started carrying as early as the sixth grade. "This is one of the first longitudinal studies of rural adolescent handgun carrying across multiple states in the US. It provides evidence that youth handgun carrying in these settings is not uncommon," says

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Mouse brain region processes sound and motion at the same time

New insight on how information relating to sound and movement is processed in the brain has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.

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New book offers a global and historic understanding of the term 'race'

Race is not just skin color but is actually a collection of other elements, such as language, access to resources and life experiences, that come together to form what people think of as race, said Alexa Alice Joubin, a professor of English and women's, gender and sexuality studies at the George Washington University.

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The Most Exciting Films at Sundance Were Made by Women

A few days into my movie-crammed expedition to the 2020 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, I had an idle thought that I realized was a surprising one: I had yet to watch a film directed by a man. That's the result of careful and inclusive programming efforts from America's premier independent-film festival, which has been a crucial launchpad for many filmmakers and stars over the decades.

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The future of hazelnuts: The economic value of subseasonal forecasts

A weather forecast may not allow time to make decisions that minimize the economic impacts of an extreme event, while a seasonal forecast is not precise enough to predict it. Thus, a spring frost—an event that can affect a small area and that can occur in a very short time—can lead to significant economic damages for the agribusiness players.

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Mouse brain region processes sound and motion at the same time

New insight on how information relating to sound and movement is processed in the brain has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.

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Stalking Starlink's 'black sheep' DarkSat

By now, you've no doubt heard of (or seen) Starlink. SpaceX's mega-satellite constellation has become a permanent fixture in our skies as of late, with several routine passes on any given week. But have you seen the supposed 'black sheep' of the flock, DarkSat?

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Molecule modification could improve reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel could become safer and more efficient in future after researchers found a way to modify the structure of molecules to remove radioactive materials.

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Nanoparticle eats away at plaque in arteries

A new "Trojan Horse" nanoparticle can eat away portions of the plaques that cause heart attacks, researchers report. The discovery could be a potential treatment for atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death in the United States. The nanoparticle homes in on atherosclerotic plaque due to its high selectivity to a particular immune cell type—monocytes and macrophages. Once inside the macrophages i

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Zinc lozenges did not shorten the duration of colds

Administration of zinc acetate lozenges to common cold patients did not shorten colds in a randomized trial published in BMJ Open.

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The future of hazelnuts: the economic value of subseasonal forecasts

Cold spells can bring significant costs to agribusiness. Using sub-seasonal forecasts to predict extreme events 2-6 weeks in advance can bring an economic value up to 60% to the players of the hazelnut agribusiness. The results of a research by CMCC Foundation.

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Eating disorders linked to exercise addiction

New research shows that exercise addiction is nearly four times more common amongst people with an eating disorder.

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Second of its kind 'sharpshooter' leafhopper from Brazil 'strikes' with its colouration

When, in 2014, Brazilian researchers stumbled across a red-eyed leafhopper feeding inside bromeliads, growing in the restingas of southeastern Brazil, they were certain it was a one-of-a-kind discovery. Several years later, however, fieldwork in a mountainous area in the region ended up with the description of the second known case of a bromelicolous leafhopper, recently published in the open-acce

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New study identifies bumble bees' favorite flowers to aid bee conservation

Research in the Sierra Nevada region of California illustrates the varying flower choices of bumble bees: the five most common bumble bee species studied each selected a different assortment of flowers, and each selected at least one flower species not selected by the others. The findings are already being put to use in forest restoration efforts to increase and improve quality of bumble bee habit

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Abnormal imaging findings key to EVALI diagnosis in vapers

Pulmonary imaging is important in the diagnosis of the acute lung injury associated with vaping, known as electronic cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI), according to a new special review article. The report outlines what is currently known about this condition and discusses remaining questions.

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Weight loss surgery improves breathing issues in obese patients

Bariatric surgery and weight loss appear to reverse some of the negative effects of obesity on the respiratory system, according to a new study.

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Presence of blood clot associated with rapid aortic aneurysm growth

The presence of a blood clot on the wall of the aorta in people with abdominal aortic aneurysms is associated with more rapid, potentially dangerous growth in the aneurysm, according to a major new study. Researchers said the findings could help identify which patients need more aggressive treatment and more frequent follow-up imaging after their initial diagnosis.

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Iron nanorobots show their true mettle

Drug-coated iron nanowires that can be guided to the site of a tumor using an external magnetic field before activating a three-step cancer-killing mechanism could provide an effective option for cancer therapy.

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Feral horses are destroying fragile post-fire habitat in the Australian Alps

On Friday I flew in a helicopter over the fire-ravaged Kosciuszko National Park. I was devastated by what I saw. Cherished wildlife species are at grave risk of extinction: those populations the bushfires haven't already wiped out are threatened by thousands of feral horses trampling the land.

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Feral horses are destroying fragile post-fire habitat in the Australian Alps

On Friday I flew in a helicopter over the fire-ravaged Kosciuszko National Park. I was devastated by what I saw. Cherished wildlife species are at grave risk of extinction: those populations the bushfires haven't already wiped out are threatened by thousands of feral horses trampling the land.

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Time For Better Microbiome Research

The microbiome needs no introduction – it has been several years since you could pick up a biomedical research journal and not run into an article on possible connections of human gut bacteria and disease. There were thousands of such papers last year alone. But it's a very hard field to work in. You can establish correlations between certain gut profiles and some diseases, but causality is anoth

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An egg a day not tied to risk of heart disease

The controversy about whether eggs are good or bad for your heart health may be solved, and about one a day is fine. A team of researchers found the answer by analyzing data from three large, long-term multinational studies.

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Decoding the Brain Goes Global With the International Brain Initiative

Few times in history has mankind ever united to solve a single goal. Even the ultimate moonshot in history—putting a man on the moon—was driven by international competition rather than unification. So it's perhaps fitting that mankind is now uniting to understand the organ that fundamentally makes us human: our brain. First envisioned in 2016 through a series of discussions on the "grand challeng

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The Outsize Influence of Your Middle-School Friends

Early in 2010, the year we moved to Hong Kong, our three boys were 11, eight, and six. When we sat them down to tell them we'd be moving there for a few years, we tried to sell it as a challenging adventure. Their responses were mixed. Jake was anxious. Alex, our baby, was excited. But Matthew, our middle son, was inconsolable. He was having none of it. "What about my friends!" he cried. We tried

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Pulling out weeds is the best thing you can do to help nature recover from fire

Many Australians feel compelled to help our damaged wildlife after this season's terrible bushfires. Suggested actions have included donating money, leaving water out for thirsty animals, and learning how to help the injured. But there is an equally, if not more, important way to assist: weeding.

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Why we should be wary of blaming 'overpopulation' for the climate crisis

The annual World Economic Forum in Davos brought together representatives from government and business to deliberate how to solve the worsening climate and ecological crisis. The meeting came just as devastating bush fires were abating in Australia. These fires are thought to have killed up to one billion animals and generated a new wave of climate refugees. Yet, as with the COP25 climate talks in

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Is workplace rudeness on the rise?

You don't have to look hard to see uncivil behavior these days, whether in political discourse, in college classrooms or on airplanes. One study found that rudeness is even contagious, like the common cold.

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Mouse brain region processes sound and motion at the same time

New insight on how information relating to sound and movement is processed in the brain has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.

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Non-invasive electrostimulation leads to improved memory in mice

The study, led by the Neuropharmacology Laboratory-NeuroPhar, is the result of the collaboration between groups at the DCEXS and the DTIC.

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Squid brains approach that of dogs

We are closer to understanding the incredible ability of squid to instantly camouflage themselves thanks to research from The University of Queensland. Dr. Wen-Sung Chung and Professor Justin Marshall, from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute, completed the first MRI-based mapping of the squid brain in 50 years to develop an atlas of neural connections.

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UL study reveals 'identical' survival for kidney dialysis patients using different treatments

University of Limerick, Ireland, study reveals 'identical' survival rates for kidney dialysis patients using different forms of treatment.

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Repeat floods can weaken our aging levees

Repeated flooding events have a cumulative effective on the structural integrity of earthen levees, research finds. This suggests that the increase in extreme weather events associated with climate change could pose significant challenges for the nation's aging levee system. "Traditionally, levee safety inspections are based on visible signs of distress on the surface," says Rowshon Jadid, a PhD

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Microplastic pollution: Scientists are still learning how it harms wildlife

Plastic pollution is a growing global concern. Large pieces of plastic have been found almost everywhere on Earth, from the most visited beaches to remote, uninhabited islands. Because wildlife are regularly exposed to plastic pollution, we often ask what effects plastics have on the animals.

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Pulling out weeds is the best thing you can do to help nature recover from fire

Many Australians feel compelled to help our damaged wildlife after this season's terrible bushfires. Suggested actions have included donating money, leaving water out for thirsty animals, and learning how to help the injured. But there is an equally, if not more, important way to assist: weeding.

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Hate cancel culture? Blame algorithms

"Cancel culture" has become so pervasive that even former President Barack Obama has weighed in on the phenomenon, describing it as an overly judgmental approach to activism that does little to bring about change.

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Putting a nanomachine to work

A team of chemists at LMU has successfully coupled the directed motion of a light-activated molecular motor to a different chemical unit—thus taking an important step toward the realization of synthetic nanomachines.

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Research links sea ice retreat with tropical phenomena, including a new kind of El Nino

Two researchers present evidence today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that the accelerating melt of Arctic sea ice is linked to weather patterns near the equator in the Pacific Ocean.

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Chemist creates new catalysts for click reactions

A chemist from RUDN University has created a series of catalysts for click chemistry. These reactions are widely used in the synthesis of biologically active substances, as well as in biological and medical research. New catalysts produce a yield of 99 percent. They are based on cyclodextrin and copper ions. The paper was published in the journal Molecules.

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Chemist creates cheap catalysts for the production of vanillin

A chemist from RUDN University has created cheap and effective catalysts for the production of vanillin using spinel nanoparticles with copper oxide nanoparticles. Hydrogen peroxide was used as an oxidizing agent. The method allows the use of moderate temperatures and reduced reaction times. The paper was published in the journal Molecules.

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Rebuilding from the ashes of disaster: What Australia can learn from India

A key question facing us all after Australia's unprecedented bushfires is how will we do reconstruction differently? We need to ensure our rebuilding and recovery efforts make us safer, protect our environment and improve our ability to cope with future disasters. Australia could learn from the innovative approach India adopted in 2001 after the nation's second-most-devastating earthquake.

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More than skin deep, beauty salons are places of sharing and caring

What happens when people visit beauty and hair salons? Are trips to the salon simply about shaping how one looks on the outside, or can these spaces involve something deeper?

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Studying the geometry of a common skin disease

In a recent study from Hiroshima University, researchers turned to mathematics to predict hive patterns in humans.

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Durian skin biocomposite for take-out containers and 3-D printing

Researchers at the International Islamic University Malaysia have developed biodegradable food packaging container featuring the skin of the durian fruit that can also be used as 3-D printing filament.

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Chesapeake Bay Foundation to sue EPA, seeking crackdown on Pennsylvania pollution

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation said Monday it is preparing a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency, following Maryland in seeking to force a federal crackdown on Pennsylvania for the pollution it sends downstream to the estuary.

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Studying the geometry of a common skin disease

In a recent study from Hiroshima University, researchers turned to mathematics to predict hive patterns in humans.

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Squid brains approach those of dogs

We are closer to understanding the incredible ability of squid to instantly camouflage themselves thanks to research from The University of Queensland.

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How can we teach kids critical thinking skills?

Few people doubt the value of developing students' thinking skills. A 2013 survey in the United States found 93% of employers believe a candidate's "demonstrated capacity to think critically, communicate clearly, and solve complex problems is more important than [their] undergraduate major."

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It's time to start using ecological forecasts to manage ecosystems

Drastic interventions in an ecosystem, like deciding whether to eradicate an unwanted species, can have unforeseen, and sometimes even undesirable, consequences on the rest of the species present in that ecosystem.

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Squid brains approach those of dogs

We are closer to understanding the incredible ability of squid to instantly camouflage themselves thanks to research from The University of Queensland.

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It's time to start using ecological forecasts to manage ecosystems

Drastic interventions in an ecosystem, like deciding whether to eradicate an unwanted species, can have unforeseen, and sometimes even undesirable, consequences on the rest of the species present in that ecosystem.

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Stopping sperm in its tracks: latest progress in the hunt for a male contraceptive

Researchers at the University of Dundee have developed an unrivalled, fully automated robotic screening system which allows them to rapidly test the effect of drugs and other chemicals on human sperm. The research team at Dundee, led by Professor Chris Barratt and Dr Paul Andrews, are working towards finding a safe and effective male contraceptive.

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Iron nanorobots show their true mettle

Multifunctional iron nanowires selectively obliterate cancer cells with a triple-punch combination attack.

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Increasing tropical land use is disrupting the carbon cycle

An international study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden shows that the rapid increase in land use in the world's tropical areas is affecting the global carbon cycle more than was previously known. By studying data from a new satellite imaging system, the researchers also found that the biomass in tropical forests is decreasing.

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Studying the geometry of a common skin disease

In a recent study from Hiroshima University, researchers turned to mathematics to predict hive patterns in humans.

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Making sense of flexible sensor systems

A team of researchers from Osaka University and Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research developed the world's thinnest and lightest magnetic sensor matrix sheet system that visualizes the two-dimensional distribution of magnetism on various surfaces, with a sensitivity ten times higher than that of conventional systems. The researchers consider applications of the 'skin-like' magn

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We built a better house for the 48 million Americans with hearing loss

What would you put in your dream home? A pool? A wine cellar? For the 48 million Americans with some degree of hearing loss , practical considerations can trump showy add-ons. Instead of installing a basement ball pit, for instance, you might add a doorbell that vibrates your phone when someone's there. We've used simple tweaks—and theoretical gizmos based on emerging tech—to build a house that d

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Coworking demystified: Behind the working world revolution

Coworking spaces have been growing in all the world's major cities for 15 years. But what makes them so popular? Why and when did they appear? Who are their members?

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Nanoscopy through a plasmonic nanolens

Imaging at the scale of a single molecule has gained much recent research interest in diverse fields of molecular biology, physics and nanotechnology. Researchers have used super-resolution microscopy to access subdiffraction resolution, but the technique does not apply for plasmonic nanoparticle dimer structures that form intense areas of field enhancement also known as plasmonic hot spots, due t

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New Theory Could Solve Universe's Biggest Paradox

A British theoretical physicist has developed a theory that could solve one of the universe's biggest mysteries: why its rate of expansion is accelerating rather than slowing down, as predicted by the known laws of physics. The theory, known as "massive gravity," would modify Einstein's theory of general relativity to account for this rate disparity. And the physicist behind it, Claudia de Rham o

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As seen in movies, new meta-hologram can be used as a communication tool

Junsuk Rho and his research team developed a multiplexed meta-hologram device operating at visible light. The newly developed technique can transmit information to multiple users from different locations. This can be employed in many hologram applications such as performance, exhibitions, automobiles and more.

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Study examines genetic testing in diverse young breast cancer patients over a decade

Researchers examined racial and ethnic differences in genetic testing frequency and results among diverse breast cancer patients diagnosed at age 50 or younger from January 2007 to December 2017. They found that among 1,503 diverse young breast cancer patients, less than half (46.2 percent) completed hereditary breast and ovarian cancer genetic testing. However, the percentage of women who complet

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More than a knee injury: ACL tears cause harmful changes in our brain structure

It's known that some joint function is often permanently lost after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and re-injury is common even with intensive physical therapy, but it's unclear why.

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Artificial intelligence helps experts forecast icebergs

This year will see a relatively low number of icebergs drifting into busy shipping regions in the north-west Atlantic, according to a combination of control systems and artificial intelligence forecasting models developed by experts at the University of Sheffield.

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Increasing tropical land use is disrupting the carbon cycle

An international study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden shows that the rapid increase in land use in the world's tropical areas is affecting the global carbon cycle more than was previously known. By studying data from a new satellite imaging system, the researchers also found that the biomass in tropical forests is decreasing.

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From quarks to quails: Can the different sciences be unified?

The world around us is populated by a vast variety of things—ranging from genes and animals to atoms, particles and fields. While these can all be described by the natural sciences, it seems some can only be understood in terms of biology while others can only be explored using chemistry or physics. And when it comes to human behavior, disciplines like sociology or psychology are the most useful.

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Cathay Pacific to sharply reduce flights to mainland China

Decision reflects Hong Kong government plan and 'market demand'

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The roughening of a platinum electrode

Smooth platinum electrodes roughen and wear when subjected to repeated cycles of oxidation and reduction, which causes nanometer scale mounds to grow. Leiden chemists Leon Jacobse and Mark Koper, together with physicist Marcel Rost, discovered the exact details, using a unique tunneling microscope.

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In search for keys to regeneration, scientists ask a lot of the axolotl

The type of salamander called axolotl, with its frilly gills and widely spaced eyes, looks like an alien and has other-worldly powers of regeneration. Lose a limb, part of the heart or even a large portion of its brain? No problem: They grow back.

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Scientists zero in on endgame for nasty bacteria

Medications were once discovered by finding active ingredients in traditional remedies or by serendipitous discovery. A relatively new approach is to understand how disease and infection are controlled at the molecular level, designing new therapies based on this knowledge.

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Scientists drill for first time on remote Antarctic Glacier

Teams from the US and UK have successfully completed scientific fieldwork in one of the most remote and hostile areas of West Antarctica—coinciding with the 200th anniversary of the discovery of the continent. This research will help scientists determine whether Thwaites Glacier may collapse in the next few decades and affect future global sea-level rise.

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Marine heat wave linked with spike in whale entanglements

Climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of marine heat waves — warm water anomalies that disrupt marine ecosystems — and this is creating new challenges for fisheries management and ocean conservation. A new study shows how the record-breaking marine heat wave of 2014 to 2016 caused changes along the US West Coast that led to an unprecedented spike in the numbers of whales that b

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In search for keys to regeneration, scientists ask a lot of the axolotl

The type of salamander called axolotl, with its frilly gills and widely spaced eyes, looks like an alien and has other-worldly powers of regeneration. Lose a limb, part of the heart or even a large portion of its brain? No problem: They grow back.

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Scientists zero in on endgame for nasty bacteria

Medications were once discovered by finding active ingredients in traditional remedies or by serendipitous discovery. A relatively new approach is to understand how disease and infection are controlled at the molecular level, designing new therapies based on this knowledge.

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How will AI shape the future of storytelling?

Technology will change the way that humans tell and experience stories in the future. Palmer presents an idea for AI film that watches the viewer and changes the narrative based on their emotional responses to chaotic events. By acting as a feedback loop, the AI will make storytellers aware of their implicit bias and become conscious of subconscious behaviors.

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Slime Molds Have Been Oozing around Earth for at Least 100 Million Years

Stunning new fossil reveals that at least one slime mold—an "intelligent" giant amoeba—has been with us since at least the Cretaceous and looks identical to one… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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DTU-test demonstrerer salt som solvarmelager

PLUS. Saltbatterier kan både anvendes som korttids- og langtidslagre for solvarmeanlæg i énfamilieshuse og sandsynligvis også for solceller og varmepumper, viser ph.d.-projekt.

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From the archive

Nature, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00147-9 How Nature reported a controversy in 1970 over the harm caused by fallout from nuclear testing, and a 1920 call to end the trade in exotic bird plumage.

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UK government approves Huawei 5G deal despite security fears

Chinese telecomms firm Huawei will be allowed to provide technology for key parts of the UK's super-fast 5G infrastructure, prime minister Boris Johnson has said, despite opposition from the US

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How do men and women store fat differently? Ask the fruit fly

When it comes to determining how women and men store fat differently, it turns out fruit flies may hold the key.

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Oscars 2020: 20 Nominated Movies You Can Stream Right Now

You have just a few short days until the Academy Awards. Here's what you can catch up on from the comfort of your couch.

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Oh Sure, Big Tech Wants Regulation—on Its Own Terms

At Davos and beyond, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Co. are talking a big game about regulation, but in ways that protect their bottom line.

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How do men and women store fat differently? Ask the fruit fly

When it comes to determining how women and men store fat differently, it turns out fruit flies may hold the key.

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The most beautiful solar cells are inspired by nature

Organic solar cells are usually less effective than silicon solar cells. But there is still a market for them—and they're beautiful and exciting.

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The long-term effects of wildfires

The recent massive wildfires in Australia have killed more than 30 people and an estimated 1 billion animals, and burned 2,500 homes and millions of acres. And the human toll is expected to rise even after the blazes wind down. According to Harvard scientist Loretta Mickley, senior research fellow in atmospheric chemistry at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering (SEAS), long-term expos

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Image: Spacewalk to service the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano (middle) and NASA astronaut Drew Morgan (left) work on get-ahead tasks during the fourth spacewalk to service the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS).

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Antarctica melting: Journey to the 'doomsday glacier'

Scientists are studying why the Thwaites Glacier is melting quicker than previously thought.

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Skal den næste lægeformand være en kvinde?

Lægeforeningen skal have ny formand, men hvem skal efterfølge Andreas Rudkjøbing? Dagens Medicin giver et bud – og meget peger på en kvinde.

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Hey Google, are my housemates using my smart speaker?

Surveys show that consumers are worried that smart speakers are eavesdropping on their conversations and day-to-day lives. Now University of British Columbia researchers have found that people are also concerned about something else: friends, family and others who may have access to these devices.

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China health threats likely to increase due to heatwaves

The coronavirus had caused many deaths in China this month, and a new study has shown increasingly severe and frequent heatwaves could lead to serious health emergencies in future due to climate change.Study found deadly heatwaves like the one in north-east China in 2018 have already gone from being one-in-500-year events to one-in-60-year events.Persistent extreme night-time heat and intense rain

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Fully Autonomous Weapons Pose Unique Dangers to Humankind

Nations racing to acquire weapons that choose their own targets are ignoring the apocalyptic scenarios that can unfold when rivals catch up — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Two new outbursts detected from the magnetar 1E 1048.1−5937

Using NASA's Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory, astronomers have identified two new outbursts from the magnetar 1E 1048.1−5937. The newly detected events could shed more light on the nature of this source. The finding is detailed in a paper published January 17 on arXiv.org.

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En miljon sillgrisslor dog i värmevåg

För fem år sedan flöt tiotusentals döda sillgrisslor iland längs USA:s västkust. Under flera års tid har många forskare arbetat för att förstå vad som hände. Nu står det klart att en långlivad värmebölja under ytan missgynnade de fetaste planktonen, vilket gjorde fisken magrare, vilket i sin tur gjorde att sillgrisslorna svalt.

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Artillery Seeks Robot Ammo Haulers « Breaking Defense

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The Rise of Smart Camera Networks, and Why We Should Ban Them

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Scientists short-circuit maturity in insects, opening new paths to disease prevention

New research shows, contrary to previous scientific belief, a hormone required for sexual maturity in insects cannot travel across the blood-brain barrier unless aided by a transporter protein. The finding may soon allow scientists to prevent disease-spreading mosquitoes from maturing, or to boost reproduction in beneficial bumblebees.

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What you want Nature to do next

Nature, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00227-w We asked readers what we should focus on in the next decade. Here is what you said.

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American Law Does Not Take Rape Seriously

When Harvey Weinstein arrives at the Superior Court of New York each day, frail, aged, sometimes hobbling on a walker , he settles into a courtroom crowded with spectators and freighted with a legacy of distrust. On the prosecutor's side sit two women alleging that the Hollywood producer sexually assaulted them; four others who would buttress their claims that he is a sexual predator; and, in spi

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The New Black Body

(Thomas Barwick / Getty) For as long as I can remember, my stomach has been partitioned into the north belly and the south belly, divided by the belly-button border. North Belly, a.k.a. N. Beezy, is the more tyrannical of the two. Depending on her mood, she will ruin any clean-lined look I'm going for. On bad days, N. Beezy sticks her head over the balcony of my waistband, soaking in the good wea

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Dödlig mutation gjorde tuberkulosbakterie resistent mot antibiotika

Forskare har listat ut hur tuberkulosbakterier som bär på en mutation som egentligen borde döda dem bär sig åt för att överleva. Samma knep som håller bakterien vid liv gör den också resistent mot en viktig sorts antibiotika. Det är ett stort problem att många tuberkulosbakterier har utvecklat resistens mot antibiotika. Tuberkulos (TB) dödar minst 1,5 miljoner människor per år. En normal behandli

6h

Kroppsideal styr användningen av illegal dopning

Kroppsideal styr män och kvinnors bruk av illegala dopningspreparat. Det visar en studie av personer i gym- och fitnesskulturer. Trots väl kända risker är dopning fortfarande relativt utbrett. För att förstå drivkrafterna bakom användning av dopningspreparat har forskare vid Göteborgs universitet och Linnéuniversitetet genomfört intervjuer av brukare och etnografiska studier i gym- och fitnesskul

6h

Sällsynt cancerform vanligare i norr

Lymfkörtelcancern Waldenströms makroglobulinemi är en ovanlig cancersjukdom. Men den är tre gånger så vanlig i Sverige som i världen i övrigt, och ännu vanligare i norra Sverige. En avhandling vid Umeå universitet visar att överlevnaden har ökat under 2000-talet. – Det är troligt att kronisk eller långvarig retning av immunsystemet bidrar till att sjukdomen utvecklas. Men det kan också finnas en

6h

How Jim Crow lives on in skewed housing laws

Racial discrimination is alive and well in many American neighborhoods half a century after Jim Crow—albeit in less visible, more insidious forms—according to a new article. In the article in the Michigan Law Review , Deborah Archer, associate professor of clinical law at New York University Law, points to local laws that encourage or require landlords to evict or exclude tenants who have had con

6h

Endangered cheetahs can return to Indian forests – court

The world's fastest land animal was hunted into extinction in the country more than 70 years ago.

6h

Nambi Narayanan: The fake spy scandal that blew up a rocket scientist's career

Falsely charged with selling secrets to Pakistan, Nambi Narayanan's life was knocked off course.

6h

Kinesisk byggeplads vækker undren: Kan man bygge et hospital på 10 dage?

For at kunne modtage et stigende antal smittede med corona-virus har Kina sat sig for at bygge et hospital på 10 dage. Men kan det lade sig gøre?

7h

Walnuts may slow cognitive decline in at-risk elderly

Eating walnuts may help slow cognitive decline in at-risk groups of the elderly population, according to a study conducted by researchers in California and Spain.

7h

Chemists propose new reagents for the removal of lead from wastewater

RUDN University chemists together with colleagues from other countries have synthesized new compounds that effectively bind lead ions and can be used to remove it from wastewater and even from living organisms—that is, to play the role of an antidote for lead poisoning. The article is published in the journal Crystals.

7h

New Coronavirus Facts and Misinformation

It's important to properly calibrate your concern over new potential threats. Fear is an adaptive trait that focuses our attention and energy on avoiding danger. Too little fear, and we walk into avoidable risk; too much, and we waste time and energy without reason, perhaps even causing unnecessary harm. Proper calibration requires an objective, factual, and balanced approach. Keep that in mind w

7h

Team turns banana peels and other trash into 'flash graphene'

A new process can turn bulk quantities of just about any carbon source into valuable graphene flakes. A banana peel, turned into graphene, could help facilitate a massive reduction of the environmental impact of concrete and other building materials. "This is a big deal," says James Tour, chair in chemistry as well as a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering at

7h

Almost all middle school teachers say they're super stressed

94% of middle school teachers experience high levels of stress, researchers report. Reducing the burden of teaching so many teachers experience is critical to improve student success—both academically and behaviorally—say the researchers. The new study, which expands on work looking at stress among elementary school teachers, provides additional evidence that teacher stress might lead to negative

7h

How to Misinform Yourself About the Coronavirus

A few minutes before 11 p.m. on January 20, Eric Feigl-Ding was pretty much just another guy on the internet. Sure, he is a Harvard-affiliated public-health researcher who lives in Washington, D.C., and has multiple degrees, but his Twitter account was nothing special. He had about 2,000 followers—a modest count on the scale that reaches into the millions—and his average tweet got about one retwe

7h

Unmasked man pulled off metro in China amid coronavirus crisis – video

Footage has emerged appearing to show a man being forcibly removed from the Guangzhou metro by security staff for not wearing a face mask, after the South China province implemented a mandatory order to wear them amid the coronavirus crisis. Chinese companies are working overtime to produce masks amid soaring demand caused by the country's coronavirus outbreak. Coronavirus outbreak – latest updat

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We're still not sure where the Wuhan coronavirus really came from

Markets that mix meat with livestock can help spread disease, but that's not the whole story. (DepositPhoto/) As a new coronavirus spreads across the globe , scientists are working to understand where it came from. In the earliest days of the outbreak, the prevailing theory held that the virus came from a Chinese "wet market." These marketplaces sell living animals along with meat and produce, an

7h

Why Venice is actually a textbook case for flood prevention

When the worst floods since 1966 submerged the city of Venice in November 2019, the blame was laid on its incomplete mobile flood gates. They have been under construction since 2003 but were not ready in time to save the Italian city. But elsewhere in the Venetian lagoon, there was a different story to tell. In 1966, the coastal sides of Lido and Pellestrina islands also flooded, but this time the

7h

Image of the Day: Reversing Arthritis

A combination of two drugs appears to restore cartilage in rats.

7h

Syddanmark sender hjerteanalyser til USA

Region Syddanmark indgår aftale med amerikansk firma om at lave avancerede analyser af patienter med mulige behandlingskrævende forsnævringer på hjertets kranspulsårer.

7h

Due-Process Rights Don't Apply in an Impeachment Trial

Of all the arguments of President Donald Trump's impeachment defense, one of the least compelling is the claim that impeachment proceedings have violated his right to due process. Trump's lawyers hammered away at this theme both in the response to articles of impeachment they filed with the Senate on January 20 and during their opening remarks in the Senate trial over the weekend. The problem wit

7h

An Unanswered Question at the Heart of the U.S.'s Nuclear Arsenal

Nobody knows how long the plutonium "pits" in the cores of bombs last, and the answer could cost—or save—billions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Efter 23 års pause: Nu skal der brændsel i fusionsreaktor

Nyt brændsel skal afgøre, om ombygningen af JET-reaktoren i England er vejen frem for fusionsenergi.

8h

Plane Deicer Lasts Several Thousand Hours

Originally published in April 1945 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

The Deceptively Simple Number Sparking Coronavirus Fears

When a new disease emerges, health organizations turn to a seemingly simple number to gauge whether the outbreak will spread. It's called the basic reproduction number—R0, pronounced R- nought —and though useful for decision makers, it's a nightmare for public communication. In brief, R0 is the average number of people who will catch the disease from a single infected person, in a population that

8h

Why I Fear a Moderate Democratic Nominee

Posts kept coming from Black Matters US, from its accounts stationed at seemingly every corner of the internet in 2016. Twitter. Instagram. YouTube. Facebook. Tumblr. Google+. A news site. Google Ads. PayPal for donations. A podcast offering "strong Black voices." Black Matters US posted a steady diet of images, of sayings, of articles, of videos that made black people feel good about being black

8h

Dinosaur tracks seem to show giant sauropods wading on two front legs

Sauropod dinosaurs grew to 25 metres or more in length and weighed several tonnes – but footprints in Texas seem to suggest they sometimes walked on just two legs

8h

An Unanswered Question at the Heart of the U.S.'s Nuclear Arsenal

Nobody knows how long the plutonium "pits" in the cores of bombs last, and the answer could cost—or save—billions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

The US Space Force Has a Rough Launch on the Internet

From controversy over camo print to Star Trek comparisons, the new military branch can't buy a break online.

8h

The 15 Best TV and Soundbar Deals for the Super Bowl (2020)

TVs are on sale because of the Super Bowl. We've rounded up our favorite discounted sets, soundbars, and streamers.

8h

CollegeHumor Helped Shape Online Comedy. What Went Wrong?

The company grew from a scrappy startup to a digital media player. Now it's clinging to life after mass layoffs.

8h

Bruten handled – en kort fadäs eller ett långvarigt bekymmer?

En isfläck på gatan, en snäv sväng, ett oknutet skosnöre. Det är lätt att ramla och bryta handleden, faktum är att handledsfrakturen är den vanligaste typen av benbrott. Visst känns det jobbigt och visst gör det ont. Men de flesta räknar såklart med att snart bli bra igen. Men blir man verkligen bra igen?

8h

Scientists Solve a Deadly TB Mystery

Tools used to reconstruct the rise of drug-resistant tuberculosis could also be applied in real time to ward off would-be epidemics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Taking Psychedelics Improves Mood, says Yale Researchers

submitted by /u/tahutahut [link] [comments]

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Solar Orbiter will give us our best views of the sun's top and bottom

The Solar Orbiter spacecraft, set to launch on 7 February, will give us our first clear views of the sun's poles and help unravel the mystery of the solar wind

8h

The Disturbing Campaign Against Poland's Judges

Anek Skarzynski / AFP / Getty Last summer, a very unusual scandal unfolded in Poland—or rather, a very ordinary scandal, but with some unusual protagonists. A journalist at a Polish news website, Onet.pl , exposed the existence of an organized online trolling campaign designed to discredit public figures. An everyday occurrence, of course. Except that this time, the smear campaign was aimed at a

9h

Svensk undersøgelse: Hundredtusinder af passagerer vil tage nattog til udlandet

PLUS. Ifølge den svenske trafikstyrelse kan en rute fra Malmø til Køln startes op inden for et par år. Tog fra Skåne vil også komme danskere til gode.

9h

Svindel med Dankort rammer rekordlavt niveau

På et år er svindel med Dankort halveret. Kontaktløs funktion og to-faktor-godkendelse af køb har ifølge Nets gjort det sværere at svindle.

9h

Can an anti-HIV combination or other existing drugs outwit the new coronavirus?

Chinese scientists are testing widely used antivirals in patients in Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak

9h

Professor modtager stor pris for forskning af fedt i blodet

Professor og overlæge Børge Nordestgaard har netop modtaget Marie & August Krogh Prisen 2020 på 1,5 mio. kr., der uddeles af Novo Nordisk Fonden og LVS.

9h

Trump's Defense Against Subpoenas Makes No Legal Sense

Perhaps nothing can persuade Republican senators to convict President Donald Trump, but on Friday, as Representative Zoe Lofgren deftly explained why Trump's blanket defiance of every House subpoena and request for witnesses was an impeachable obstruction of Congress, the mood in the room noticeably shifted. I had the good fortune to be sitting in the Senate gallery to witness this myself. Republ

9h

Prisen for Mærsk Tårnet overskredet med 53 procent

Ifølge DR har Københavns Universitets nye laboratoriebygning kostet 1,95 mia. kr. – knap 700 mio. kr. mere end budgetteret. Afhængigt af flere voldgiftssager kan slutprisen blive markant lavere – eller endnu dyrere.

9h

Coronavirus: Foreign Office finalising plans to evacuate Britons

FCO urgently exploring options for British nationals to leave Hubei province, says No 10 Latest news on the co ronavirus – live updates The government is finalising plans to evacuate UK nationals from the Chinese province at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak, Downing Street has said, with plans expected to be announced imminently. "The Foreign Office is urgently exploring options for British

9h

Substrate induced nanoscale resistance variation in epitaxial graphene

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14192-0 Measurement of charge transport in epitaxial graphene is challenging. Here, the authors quantitatively investigate local transport properties of graphene prepared by polymer assisted sublimation growth using scanning tunneling potentiometry and report local sheet resistances with a variation of up to 270% at

10h

Boosting the catalysis of gold by O2 activation at Au-SiO2 interface

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14241-8 The development of sintering resistant supported Au catalysts with high activity still remains a challenge. Here the authors construct a Au-SiO2 interface by depositing SiO2 thin layer onto Au/TiO2 catalyst which shows very high activity in CO oxidation even after calcination at 800 °C.

10h

Synchronously wired infrared antennas for resonant single-quantum-well photodetection up to room temperature

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14426-6 Applications of metasurfaces for optoelectronic devices require wiring to each isolated antenna for biasing and current flow. Here, the authors report optimal wire interconnects design for controlling the optical properties and present antenna-enhanced mid-infrared photodetection incorporating a single quantu

10h

Blood-triggered generation of platinum nanoparticle functions as an anti-cancer agent

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14131-z Platinum based drugs like cisplatin are common chemotherapy treatments for cancer. Here, the authors report on the in situ formation of platinum nanoparticles in patients and demonstrated how platinum nanoparticles can be synthesized using patients' blood and provide effective drug delivery and cancer treatme

10h

Fingerprint of rice paddies in spatial–temporal dynamics of atmospheric methane concentration in monsoon Asia

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14155-5 The role of paddy rice agriculture in the spatial and temporal dynamics of atmospheric methane concentration remains unclear. Here, Zhang et al. show that regions with dense rice paddies have high satellite-based column averaged CH4 concentrations (XCH4), and that seasonal dynamics of XCH4 mirror those of pad

10h

HSP90A inhibition promotes anti-tumor immunity by reversing multi-modal resistance and stem-like property of immune-refractory tumors

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14259-y Nanog can confer resistance to cancer immunotherapy by promoting AKT activity. Here, the authors demonstrate that HSP90A is a Nanog target that stabilizes the AKT coactivator TCL1, thereby activating AKT, and that HSP90A inhibition can enhance the anti-tumor efficacy of adoptive T cell transfer and checkpoint

10h

Studying biomolecular folding and binding using temperature-jump mass spectrometry

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14179-x Native mass spectrometry allows monitoring the folding and interactions of multiple coexisting species but its temporal resolution is traditionally limited. Here, the authors develop a temperature-jump electrospray source for mass spectrometry that enables fast kinetics experiments at different temperatures.

10h

Tunable anomalous Hall conductivity through volume-wise magnetic competition in a topological kagome magnet

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14325-w The kagome magnet Co3Sn2S2 has complex magnetic behaviour and a topological band structure that yields a large anomalous Hall effect. Guguchia et al. find phase separation between ferro- and anti-ferromagnetic orders and that the volume-wise competition controls the anomalous Hall conductivity

10h

Beating the heat in the living wings of butterflies

Columbia engineers and Harvard biologists discover that butterflies have specialized behaviors and wing scales to protect the living parts of their wings. The nanostructures found in the wing scales could inspire the design of radiative-cooling materials to help manage excessive heat conditions; the sensory network in the wings could inspire the design of advanced flying machines.

10h

Near Real-Time Wildfire Progression Monitoring with Sentinel-1 SAR Time Series and Deep Learning

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56967-x

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Estimation of intracardiac shunts in young children with a novel indicator dilution technology

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58347-2

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Rethinking Measures of Functional Connectivity via Feature Extraction

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57915-w

10h

Catalexit: funds for science could suffer

Nature, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00188-0

10h

Isaac Asimov: centenary of the great explainer

Nature, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00176-4 The indefatigably curious chemist and science-fiction icon championed rationality for the common good in 20 million published words. By David Leslie

10h

Innovative plant breeding could deliver crop revolution

Nature, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00186-2

10h

Genentech was not the first biotech company

Nature, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00187-1

10h

Coronavirus in the US: how many people have it and how serious is the risk?

Five people have been diagnosed with the new strain of the virus, and more cases are likely – but the risk to the public is low Five cases of the novel coronavirus infection have now been confirmed in the US, while experts have warned about 100,000 people could already be infected globally. Related: Coronavirus: Britain under pressure to evacuate UK nationals Continue reading…

10h

Beating the heat in the living wings of butterflies

A new study from Columbia Engineering and Harvard identified the critical physiological importance of suitable temperatures for butterfly wings to function properly, and discovered that the insects exquisitely regulate their wing temperatures through both structural and behavioral adaptations.

10h

Beating the heat in the living wings of butterflies

A new study from Columbia Engineering and Harvard identified the critical physiological importance of suitable temperatures for butterfly wings to function properly, and discovered that the insects exquisitely regulate their wing temperatures through both structural and behavioral adaptations.

10h

With Specialty Drugs, the Costs Are More Than Financial

Specialty drugs, peddled exclusively by only a subset of pharmacies, are ambiguously classified and financially costly, and can severely limit the autonomy of the patients who take them. It's time the government stepped in to curb the power of those who profit most from their manufacture and sale.

10h

Microsoft and Dell donate to fight coronavirus outbreak

Big US companies have pledged millions to support relief efforts for deadly epidemic

10h

Scientists short-circuit maturity in insects, opening new paths to disease prevention

New research from UC Riverside shows scientists may soon be able to prevent disease-spreading mosquitoes from maturing. Using the same gene-altering techniques, they may also be able help boost reproduction in beneficial bumblebees.

10h

Scientists short-circuit maturity in insects, opening new paths to disease prevention

New research from UC Riverside shows scientists may soon be able to prevent disease-spreading mosquitoes from maturing. Using the same gene-altering techniques, they may also be able help boost reproduction in beneficial bumblebees.

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Scientists short-circuit maturity in insects, opening new paths to disease prevention

New research from UC Riverside shows, contrary to previous scientific belief, a hormone required for sexual maturity in insects cannot travel across the blood-brain barrier unless aided by a transporter protein. The finding may soon allow scientists to prevent disease-spreading mosquitoes from maturing, or to boost reproduction in beneficial bumblebees.

10h

Stort ordförråd extra viktigt för barn med cochleaimplantat

Ordförrådet är det som har allra störst betydelse när det gäller utvecklingen av läsförståelse hos barn med cochleaimplantat (CI), visar forskning från Luleå tekniska universitet. Forskare har under tre års tid följt läs- och språkutvecklingen hos 45 barn med kraftig hörselnedsättning eller dövhet. Barnen hör med hjälp av cochleaimplantat. – Vi vet sedan tidigare att barn med kraftig hörselnedsät

10h

Walnuts may slow cognitive decline in at-risk elderly

Eating walnuts may help slow cognitive decline in at-risk groups of the elderly population, according to a study conducted by researchers in California and Spain.

11h

Seeds of hope: Young volunteers replant Tunisia forests

Around 40 young Tunisian volunteers gather on a bare hill in the central region of Siliana. Their weekend mission—revive a burned forest by planting Aleppo pine shoots.

11h

Glass frogs reappear in Bolivia after 18 years

A rare species of frog native to the eastern slopes of the Bolivian Andes has been spotted in the South American country for the first time in 18 years, the investigation team that made the discovery told AFP.

11h

Virksomheder frygter, at staten vil overtage ultrapræcis navigation

PLUS. Flere virksomheder er bekymrede for, at Styrelsen for Dataforsyning og Effektivisering vil udvide en testplatform til et gratis landsdækkende referencenet, der vil udkonkurrere de private satellitbaserede referencenet. Det afviser styrelsen dog klart.

11h

Planering för hemarbetet sliter ut kvinnor

Återhämtningen kanske är ett motionspass klockan 5.30–6.00 på morgonen, innan barnen väcks. Sedan är hela dagen inrutad. Oro för hemmet följer med till jobbet, och oro för jobbet följer med till hemmet. Så beskriver Ulf Ericsson, biträdande professor i arbetsvetenskap vid Högskolan Kristianstad, en kvinnas situation i studien han har genomfört tillsammans med tre forskarkolleger.

11h

Glass frogs reappear in Bolivia after 18 years

A rare species of frog native to the eastern slopes of the Bolivian Andes has been spotted in the South American country for the first time in 18 years, the investigation team that made the discovery told AFP.

11h

Första virusfallen kartlagda

Oron för coronaviruset sprider sig över världen, men många av de smittade människor som behövt sjukhusvård har även lidit av underliggande sjukdom. Det visar analysen av de första fallen som nu är klar.

11h

US stocks rebound after virus fears dent mood

Asian equities play catch-up from previous day's global sell-off

11h

'Wuhan jiāyóu': chants of solidarity spread across city at epicentre of coronavirus – video

Shouts of 'jiāyóu' can be heard echoing between Wuhan's high-rise apartment blocks as people take to their balconies to shout what translates literally as "add oil", meaning 'keep up the fight', to their neighbours. It is day six of life under lockdown for the Chinese city's 11 million residents, who have found themselves at the centre of the outbreak of coronavirus. Continue reading…

11h

AI-analyzed blood test can predict the progression of neurodegenerative disease

A new study shows artificial intelligence (AI) analysis of blood samples can predict and explain disease progression, which could one day help doctors choose more appropriate and effective treatments for patients.

12h

European Manifesto Against Pseudo-Therapies

A new organization in Spain is trying to protect patients from becoming victims of pseudoscience. They have prepared a manifesto.

12h

Method detects defects in 2-D materials for future electronics, sensors

To further shrink electronic devices and to lower energy consumption, the semiconductor industry is interested in using 2-D materials, but manufacturers need a quick and accurate method for detecting defects in these materials to determine if the material is suitable for device manufacture. Now a team of researchers has developed a technique to quickly and sensitively characterize defects in 2-D m

13h

Airborne measurements point to low EPA methane estimates in south central US

Approximately twice as much methane is seeping into the atmosphere than the Environmental Protection Agency estimates from oil and gas facilities in the south central U.S., according to a series of measurements taken by meteorologists using NASA aircraft.

13h

New study shows why women have to be likeable, and men don't

A new study in The Economic Journal finds that likeability is an influencing factor in interactions between women, as well as interactions between men and women, but not in all-male interactions.

13h

Global warming is happening here and now

An excerpt from the book Cranky Uncle vs. Climate Change , released Feb 25. Signs of global warming are being observed all over our planet. Thermometers measure surface warming. Buoys sunk to ocean depths measure heat building up in our oceans. Ice is melting across our planet, with ice sheets crumbling and glaciers retreating. Spring is coming earlier. Sea levels are rising. Species are migratin

13h

With the En-ROADS climate simulator, you can build your own solutions to global warming

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections Killer hurricanes, devastating wildfires, melting glaciers, and sunny-day flooding in more and more coastal areas around the world have birthed a fatalistic view cleverly dubbed by Mary Annaïse Heglar of the Natural Resources Defense Council as " de-nihilism ". One manifestation: An increasing number of people appear to have grown doubtful about the

13h

'It's astounding to find out she died violently'

A team of experts appear to have solved a mystery that has confounded academics – and the public – for decades.

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China's Xi Jinping pledges to defeat 'devil' coronavirus

Hong Kong cuts transport links with mainland in attempt to limit spread of disease

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Hong Kong Restricts Travel From Mainland China as Infections Exceed 4,500

The number of known cases of the new virus increased by nearly 60 percent overnight. A shortage of test kits has led experts to warn that the real number may be higher.

15h

New study shows why women have to be likeable, and men don't

A new study in The Economic Journal finds that likeability is an influencing factor in interactions between women, as well as interactions between men and women, but not in all-male interactions.

15h

Better primary care needed to help young stroke survivors return to work

The role of primary care needs to be improved to help young stroke survivors return to work, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London and the University of Cambridge.

15h

Mayo medical student jump-starts curriculum to identify human trafficking

As human trafficking evolves as a health concern, medical schools are starting to include the topic in education. However, it's still in the early stages, says a Mayo Clinic study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. The research was led by third-year medical student at Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine, Jennifer Talbott, who suggested that human trafficking training be included in th

15h

Weighing more than your twin at birth may predict better achievement at school

Research has shown that children who are born at a low birthweight are less likely to do well in school and more likely to live in lower-income neighborhoods as adults. A new study of twins looked at the effect of birthweight on children's cognitive and socioemotional outcomes at 4 years old, taking into account families' socioeconomic status (SES).

15h

Synthesis considers how being smart helps you at school and school helps you become smarter

Academic achievement plays an important role in children's development because academic skills, especially in reading and math, affect many outcomes, including educational attainment, performance and income at work, health, and longevity. A new synthesis looked at the relation between academic achievement (reading, math) and cognitive abilities (working memory, reasoning, executive function), and

15h

Antianxiety and antidepressant effects from a single dose of psychedelic drug persist years later in cancer patients

Following up on their landmark 2016 study, researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine found that a one-time, single-dose treatment of psilocybin, a compound found in psychedelic mushrooms, combined with psychotherapy appears to be associated with significant improvements in emotional and existential distress in cancer patients.

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Report from Wuhan, Airbus deal, UK's Huawei heat

The FT's Tom Hancock reports from Wuhan on how China is coping with the coronavirus

15h

Antarctica melting: Climate change and the journey to the 'doomsday glacier'

Thwaites Glacier, also known as the "doomsday glacier", is reported to be melting quicker than previously thought – scientists are now trying to find out why.

15h

Japanese researchers conduct world's 1st transplant of iPS heart muscles

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Lab turns trash into valuable graphene in a flash

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Electricity turns Garbage into Graphene

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Facebook has trained an AI to navigate without needing a map

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Renewable energy patents 'increase 28%'

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Musketered skaber mystik om SMS-læk: »Jeg kan ikke garantere, det ikke sker igen«

Det er stadig ikke klarhed omkring, hvilken 'teknisk fejl' der sendte op mod 1000 danskeres private SMS'er i hænderne på politiet.

15h

Efter advarsel fra DTU: Brandfolk vil blive ude af P-huse

PLUS. Tvivl om brandspredningen i P-huse kan føre til, at danske brandfolk må nøjes med slukning udefra ved brande i alle slags parkeringshuse.

16h

Driven by Earth's orbit, climate changes in Africa may have aided human migration

New research describes a dynamic climate and vegetation model that explains when regions across Africa, areas of the Middle East, and the Mediterranean were wetter and drier and how the plant composition changed in tandem, possibly providing migration corridors throughout time.

17h

Science at the interface: Bioinspired materials reveal useful properties

Researchers explore new materials with physical properties that can be custom-tailored to suit particular needs. The work is inspired by mechanisms in nature, where the complex three-dimensional structure of surrounding proteins influences the electrochemical properties of metals at their core.

17h

Science at the interface: Bioinspired materials reveal useful properties

Researchers explore new materials with physical properties that can be custom-tailored to suit particular needs. The work is inspired by mechanisms in nature, where the complex three-dimensional structure of surrounding proteins influences the electrochemical properties of metals at their core.

17h

Study examines prostate cancer treatment decisions

A five-year follow-up study of more than 2,000 US men who received prostate cancer treatment is creating a road map for future patients regarding long-term bowel, bladder and sexual function in order to clarify expectations and enable men to make informed choices about care.

17h

New study debunks myth of Cahokia's Native American lost civilization

An archaeologist has dug up ancient human feces, among other demographic clues, to challenge the narrative around the legendary demise of Cahokia, North America's most iconic pre-Columbian metropolis.

17h

Sainsbury's pledges £1bn to cut emissions to zero by 2040

The retailer says it can hit "net zero" by 2040 with action on food waste, packaging and water use.

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'We need to get out': New Zealanders in Wuhan plead for help to evacuate

Ardern government under pressure to repatriate citizens trapped in Chinese city stricken by coronavirus outbreak New Zealand families trapped in Wuhan during China's coronavirus outbreak have made public and emotional pleas for their evacuation. Opposition leader Simon Bridges has echoed their call, putting pressure on the New Zealand government to repatriate its citizens. Continue reading…

18h

Probe of the Kobe Bryant Crash Will Examine If Fog Played a Role

The helicopter was flying under "special visual flight rules" that allow pilots to fly through low-visibility conditions.

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Are your houseplants bad for the environment?

Gardeners, botanists and environmental campaigners share ways to keep your horticultural hobby sustainable

19h

New study highlights prevalence of PTSD among obstetricians and gynaecologists

A new University of Liverpool led study, published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology today (Tuesday, 28 January 2020), has revealed the prevalence of work-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among obstetricians and gynaecologists.

20h

Shortness of breath and cough increase as first symptom of lung cancer

GPs are being urged to consider shortness of breath and cough as potential predictors of lung cancer, after a study found they were becoming more common as the first symptom in diagnosis.

20h

NHS staff shortages mean patients miss out on early bowel cancer diagnosis

Around 1,100 people in England could miss out on the chance of an early stage bowel cancer diagnosis through screening each year because of NHS staff shortages, according to new calculations released by Cancer Research UK.

20h

Action needed to ensure research is carried out ethically in global health emergencies

Governments, funders, and research bodies must take action to ensure that research is undertaken ethically during global health emergencies, says a new report from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics.

20h

Profiling Immune Cell Populations in the Tumor Microenvironment

Discover how to determine immune cell population presence and proportions with a workflow that gives population-level and single-cell-level perspectives on each sample.

20h

Coronavirus: first death in Beijing as US issues new China travel warning – live updates

Death toll rises to 82 as mayor of Wuhan admits authorities were too slow in releasing information about virus. Follow the latest news Wuhan mayor admits mistakes What is the coronavirus and how worried should we be about it? Coronavirus: how to protect yourself from infection 1.10am GMT The Global Times has also reported that Beijing has suspended 28 bus routes to neighbouring cities in an attem

20h

Humans not always to blame for genetic diversity loss in wildlife

Conservationists should be wary of assuming that genetic diversity loss in wildlife is always caused by humans, as new research published today by international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) reveals that, in the case of a population of southern African lions (Panthera leo), it's likely caused by ecological rather than human factors.

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Humans not always to blame for genetic diversity loss in wildlife

Conservationists should be wary of assuming that genetic diversity loss in wildlife is always caused by humans, as new research published today by international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) reveals that, in the case of a population of southern African lions (Panthera leo), it's likely caused by ecological rather than human factors.

20h

An AI Virus Warning System, Mac Malware, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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General Motors will invest $2.2 billion to build EVs in Detroit

submitted by /u/Abscess2 [link] [comments]

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A research team builds robots from living cells

submitted by /u/NateTheGreat26 [link] [comments]

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The Lancet Planetary Health: Discriminatory redlining practices in the 1930s associated with present-day rates of emergency department visits due to asthma

Current rates of emergency department visits due to asthma are around 2.4 times higher in areas that were redlined – deprioritised for mortgage investment- in the 1930s, than in areas rated as the least risky investments (63.5 versus 26.5 visits per 10,000 residents per year), according to an observational study from eight Californian cities, published in The Lancet Planetary Health journal.

20h

5 meta-skills to supercharge every aspect of your life

Meta-skills are talents that inform every domain of life and govern your ability to improve other skills. There are many meta-skills out there, but feeling, seeing, dreaming, making, and learning are likely the most important when trying to remain competitive in the modern world. Automation is going to reduce the demand for specialists; mastering these skills will make you a stronger individual i

20h

Kobe Bryant, an Unforgiving Innovator of the NBA

The basketball star, who died Sunday in a helicopter crash, was constantly eclipsing the game's limits.

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21h

The New Question Hanging Over the Impeachment Trial

In the clattering corridors of the Capitol today, the hunt for the startling fact that could change the arc of the impeachment story was on in earnest, but Senator John Kennedy, Republican of Louisiana, wasn't much help. A clutch of reporters surrounded him at around noon, asking whether he believed John Bolton's assertion in a forthcoming memoir that appears to confirm President Donald Trump's a

21h

Defying Company Policy, Over 300 Amazon Employees Speak Out

Hundreds of Amazon workers banded together in protest following reports that the company threatened to fire their colleagues over climate change comments.

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Publisher Correction: Sex-specific Effects of Music Listening on Couples' Stress in Everyday Life

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58620-4

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Author Correction: Acute and chronic hypoxia differentially predispose lungs for metastases

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58616-0

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Author Correction: Anisotropic magnetocaloric effect in Fe3−xGeTe2

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58154-9 Author Correction: Anisotropic magnetocaloric effect in Fe 3−x GeTe 2

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Author Correction: Whole genome sequencing reveals the impact of recent artificial selection on red sea bream reared in fish farms

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58614-2

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Publisher Correction: High-frequency oscillations in scalp EEG mirror seizure frequency in pediatric focal epilepsy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58621-3

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Author Correction: Weakly bound molecules as sensors of new gravitylike forces

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58617-z

21h

The platypus is headed for extinction, warn Australian scientists

Platypuses are nocturnal, semiaquatic animals that are endemic to Australia and Tasmania. A new study suggests that the species could lose half its population over the next 50 years, due mainly to drought, human development and climate change. In 2019, the United Nations reported that some 1 million species of plants and animals are at risk of extinction. The platypus is at greater risk of extinc

21h

One Small Fix Would Curb Stingray Surveillance

The technology needed to limit stingrays is clear—but good luck getting telecoms on board.

21h

The Atlantic Politics Daily: What John Bolton Says He Knows

It's Monday, January 27. The Trump administration is working on an expanded travel ban, now eyeing African immigrants. And today, the Supreme Court issued an order allowing the administration to impose restrictions on immigrants it considers more likely to rely on federal aid. An outpouring followed Kobe Bryant's death: Here's our staff writer Jemele Hill's reflection, and our deputy editor Ross

21h

Method detects defects in 2D materials for future electronics, sensors

To further shrink electronic devices and to lower energy consumption, the semiconductor industry is interested in using 2D materials, but manufacturers need a quick and accurate method for detecting defects in these materials to determine if the material is suitable for device manufacture. Now a team of researchers has developed a technique to quickly and sensitively characterize defects in 2D mat

21h

Take better pictures by thinking like an old-school photographer

It's not about quantity. It's about quality. (Alfonso Reyes via Unsplash/) Film photographers were lucky : the cost and time it took to shoot film meant they had no choice but to get good. They only had 36 photos per $10 roll of film—which meant any photo they took was one less shot they'd get to take later—and to even see if they got what they wanted, they had to spend another $10 for prints . E

21h

US stocks notch biggest drop since October

Tech-heavy Nasdaq falls 1.9% as fast-spreading coronavirus rattles markets

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YouTube Mods Forced to Sign Doc Acknowledging They Might Get PTSD

Dirty Trick On December 16, 2019, The Verge published an investigation about how moderating content for YouTube left many workers with mental health issues, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Four days later, Accenture, the firm running the moderation site at the center of the investigation, asked employees to sign a document acknowledging that the job could cause PTSD — a likely bi

22h

Could heart disease actually be contagious?

A newly published hypothesis suggests that some noncommunicable diseases can actually be transmitted between people via their microbiomes. A new analysis even found that your microbiome can convey more information than your genes about your chance of developing various health conditions. By being exposed to an unhealthy cluster of microbes, healthy people could put themselves at risk of "catching

22h

Lab turns trash into valuable graphene in a flash

Scientists are using high-energy pulses of electricity to turn any source of carbon into turbostratic graphene in an instant. The process promises environmental benefits by turning waste into valuable graphene that can then strengthen concrete and other composite materials.

22h

Albatrosses Outfitted With GPS Trackers Detect Illegal Fishing Vessels

By utilizing the majestic birds to monitor huge swaths of the sea, law enforcement and conservationists could keep better tabs on illicit activities

22h

Buildings can become a global CO2 sink if made out of wood instead of cement and steel

A material revolution replacing cement and steel in urban construction by wood can have double benefits for climate stabilization. First, it can avoid greenhouse gas emissions from cement and steel production. Second, it can turn buildings into a carbon sink as they store the CO2 taken up from the air by trees that are harvested and used as engineered timber.

22h

UK to Recruit Top Scientists in New Visa Program

The fast-track Global Talent visa will have no cap on the number of researchers able to come to the UK.

22h

Study examines prostate cancer treatment decisions

A five-year follow-up study of more than 2,000 US men who received prostate cancer treatment is creating a road map for future patients regarding long-term bowel, bladder and sexual function in order to clarify expectations and enable men to make informed choices about care.

22h

Research leads to life changing improvement for some people living with depression

UCalgary researchers have completed a study investigating the effects of two different methods of deep brain stimulation (DBS), short pulse and long pulse, for treatment-resistant depression. The findings showed that both methods of stimulation were equally safe and effective in reducing depressive symptoms. Some study participants have experienced a massive positive change in their lives.

22h

Surviving Mars

Settling humans on Mars needs pragmatism at least as much as vision — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Parkinson's disease may start before birth

People who develop Parkinson's disease before age 50 may have been born with disordered brain cells that went undetected for decades, according to new research. The research points to a drug that potentially might help correct these disease processes.

22h

Oceanographers predict increase in phytoplankton by 2100

A neural network-driven Earth system model has led oceanographers to a surprising conclusion: phytoplankton populations will grow in low-latitude waters by the end of the 21st century.

22h

Current model for storing nuclear waste is incomplete

The materials the United States and other countries plan to use to store high level nuclear waste will likely degrade faster than anyone previously knew, because of the way those materials interact, new research shows. The findings show that corrosion of nuclear waste storage materials accelerates because of changes in the chemistry the nuclear waste solution, and because of the way the materials

22h

Researchers identify opportunities to advance genomic medicine

New study highlights milestones in the history of genetic discoveries; equitable and fair access required to address disparities.

22h

Researchers advance solar material production

A team has developed a more efficient, safer, and cost-effective way to produce cadmium telluride (CdTe) material for solar cells or other applications, a discovery that could advance the solar industry and make it more competitive.

22h

Algae shown to improve gastrointestinal health

A green, single-celled organism called Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as a model species for topics spanning algae-based biofuels to plant evolution. While algae have been used as dietary nutraceuticals that provide beneficial oils, vitamins, proteins, carbohydrates and antioxidants, the benefits of consuming C. reinhardtii were previously unexplored. Researchers have now completed the first

22h

More rain and less snow means increased flood risk

By analyzing more than two decades of data in the western US, scientists have shown that flood sizes increase exponentially as a higher fraction of precipitation falls as rain, offering insight into how flood risks may change in a warming world with less snow.

22h

Sea level rise to cause major economic impact in the absence of further climate action

Rising sea levels, a direct impact of the Earth's warming climate, is intensifying coastal flooding. The findings of a new study show that the projected negative economy-wide effects of coastal flooding are already significant until 2050, but are then predicted to increase substantially towards the end of the century if no further climate action on mitigation and adaptation is taken.

22h

How to take a picture of a light pulse

Until now, complex experimental equipment was required to measure the shape of a light pulse. Now, it can be done in a tiny crystal with the size of less than a milimeter. This can be used to study new materials or even even to reliably and quickly detect diseases by examining tiny blood samples.

22h

Benefits of conservation efforts may not yet be fully visible

Last year, a UN report on global biodiversity warned one million species are at risk of extinction within decades, putting the world's natural life-support systems in jeopardy. But new work offers new hope that in some cases, conservation measures may not necessarily be failing, it is just too early to see the progress that is being made.

23h

Cutting road transport pollution could help plants grow

Cutting emissions of particular gases could improve conditions for plants, allowing them to grow faster and capture more carbon, new research suggests.

23h

Buildings can become a global CO2 sink if made out of wood instead of cement and steel

A material revolution replacing cement and steel in urban construction by wood can have double benefits for climate stabilization. First, it can avoid greenhouse gas emissions from cement and steel production. Second, it can turn buildings into a carbon sink as they store the CO2 taken up from the air by trees that are harvested and used as engineered timber.

23h

Chinese Outbreak Fear Spurs Worldwide Face Mask Shortage

As the deadly coronavirus spreads across the globe , it's triggering shortages of face masks across Asia , Australia , and even major North American cities including NYC , Chicago , and Toronto . At press time, the virus has claimed the lives of 80 people, with 2,800 cases confirmed across China. China has put tens of millions of residents under quarantine. In the face of all that, face mask shor

23h

In a Recent Simulation, a Coronavirus Killed 65 Million People

In October 2019, a group of 15 business people, government officials, and health experts gathered around a table in New York to plan out the global response to a worldwide outbreak of a never-before-seen — and completely fictional — coronavirus. It was a training exercise with disturbing similarities, in retrospect, to 2019-nCoV — the Chinese virus that has swiftly gone global this month. Three a

23h

How Helpful Are Face Masks In Preventing The Spread Of Disease?

As China continues to report a growing number of cases of Wuhan coronavirus, images of people wearing face masks have become ubiquitous. How effective are these masks in stopping the virus' spread?

23h

An old plant virus inspires the design of a modern vaccine to fight against malaria

WRAIR scientists demonstrated that a novel, second-generation malaria vaccine candidate based on the tobacco mosaic virus may offer protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Malaria, infecting approximately 228 million individuals in 2018, remains a meaningful threat to public health, regional stability and deploying Service Members. This research shows that the TMV coat protein can also b

23h

Hundreds of UCLA students publish encyclopedia of 1,000 genes linked to organ development

A research team including 245 UCLA undergraduates has published an encyclopedia of more than 1,000 genes, including 421 genes whose functions were previously unknown. The research, conducted in fruit flies, should be useful to scientists studying genes involved in sleep, vision, memory and many other processes in humans.

23h

Discovery could help slow down progression of Parkinson's disease

A collaboration between scientists at Rutgers University and Scripps Research leads to the discovery of a small molecule that may slow down or stop the progression of Parkinson's disease

23h

A way to look younger is right under your nose, UCLA-led study finds

Rhinoplasty, or cosmetic nose surgery, may make a woman look up to three years younger, according to a new study led by researchers at UCLA that used a type of artificial intelligence known as machine learning.

23h

Method detects defects in 2D materials for future electronics, sensors

To further shrink electronic devices and to lower energy consumption, the semiconductor industry is interested in using 2D materials, but manufacturers need a quick and accurate method for detecting defects in these materials to determine if the material is suitable for device manufacture. Now a team of researchers has developed a technique to quickly and sensitively characterize defects in 2D mat

23h

Airborne measurements point to low EPA methane estimates in south central US

Approximately twice as much methane is seeping into the atmosphere than the Environmental Protection Agency estimates from oil and gas facilities in the south central U.S., according to a series of measurements taken by meteorologists using NASA aircraft.

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Tarantula Nebula spins web of mystery in Spitzer image

The Tarantula Nebula, seen in this image by the Spitzer Space Telescope, was one of the first targets studied by the infrared observatory after its launch in 2003, and the telescope has revisited it many times since. Now that Spitzer is set to be retired on Jan. 30, 2020, scientists have generated a new view of the nebula from Spitzer data.

23h

AI can jump-start radiation therapy for cancer patients

Artificial intelligence can help cancer patients start their radiation therapy sooner — and thereby decrease the odds of the cancer spreading — by instantly translating complex clinical data into an optimal plan of attack.

23h

Nanoparticle chomps away plaques that cause heart attacks

Michigan State University and Stanford University scientists have invented a nanoparticle that eats away — from the inside out — portions of plaques that cause heart attacks.

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Kellogg pledges to phase out glyphosate in oats, wheat by 2025

US cereal giant Kellogg has set a goal of phasing out the controversial weedkiller glyphosate from its oat and wheat supply chain by 2025, the company confirmed Monday.

23h

Finely tuned nervous systems allowed birds and mammals to adopt smoother strides

Since the 1900s, neuroscientists have known that the peripheral nervous systems of tetrapods (four-footed animals) vary greatly, but how these differences affect the way that animals walk, run, or move has not been well understood. Now, a study published in the Journal of Experimental Biology on January 27, authored by a New York Institute of Technology anatomy professor, suggests that neuromuscul

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Kellogg pledges to phase out glyphosate in oats, wheat by 2025

US cereal giant Kellogg has set a goal of phasing out the controversial weedkiller glyphosate from its oat and wheat supply chain by 2025, the company confirmed Monday.

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Finely tuned nervous systems allowed birds and mammals to adopt smoother strides

Since the 1900s, neuroscientists have known that the peripheral nervous systems of tetrapods (four-footed animals) vary greatly, but how these differences affect the way that animals walk, run, or move has not been well understood. Now, a study published in the Journal of Experimental Biology on January 27, authored by a New York Institute of Technology anatomy professor, suggests that neuromuscul

23h

Study points to 'unintended consequences' of heavy data surveillance in rugby

A 'Big Brother' data culture in rugby driven by performance management threatens to create heightened distrust, anxiety and insecurity among players, according to a new study.

23h

Nearly all middle school teachers are highly stressed, study finds

Hormonal changes, different schools, more teachers and changing expectations are just some of the challenges families face when a child enters middle school. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have found that 94% of middle school teachers experience high levels of stress, which could contribute to negative outcomes for students. Researchers say that reducing the burden of teaching ex

23h

New study debunks myth of Cahokia's Native American lost civilization

A University of California, Berkeley, archaeologist has dug up ancient human feces, among other demographic clues, to challenge the narrative around the legendary demise of Cahokia, North America's most iconic pre-Columbian metropolis.

23h

ISS Crew Repairs $2 Billion Dark Matter Detector

A decade ago, NASA, CERN, and dozens of other institutions banded together to build the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) at a cost of $2 billion. This advanced instrument has helped scientists study dark matter from its perch on the International Space Station, but components have started failing in recent years. The AMS was never intended to be serviceable, but after a series of spacewalks, ast

23h

New bacteriophage fully characterized and sequenced

Researchers have identified a new bacteriophage that can infect and destroy bacteria in the genus Pantoea, for which few bacteriophage have been identified and characterized. Details of the isolation, characterization, and full genome sequencing of this new bacteriophage are published in the new Genome Introduction section of PHAGE: Therapy, Applications, and Research.

23h

NASA's Aqua satellite reveals Tropical Cyclone Esami's dissipation

Tropical Cyclone Esami formed in the Southern Indian Ocean and just three days later, visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite confirmed the storm had dissipated.

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NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Diane's quick fade

Tropical Cyclone Diane formed late on January 24 and by the next day it was reduced to a remnant low-pressure system in the Southern Indian Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at its remnants on Jan. 27.

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Prescribed fires help native plants find mates, reproduce and flourish: study

For a prairie plant, a fiery love life isn't just fun—it's essential.

23h

Getting to the root of plant survival

When facing a volatile climate, nature searches for a way to survive. For plants, that often means spreading new roots deeper and wider in search of water, particularly in times of drought. While scientists have recognized the process of root emergence for decades, how intercellular communication may drive this phenomenon was previously unknown.

23h

Political Islamophobia may look differently online than in person

Islamophobia was rampant on social media during the midterm elections, but researchers say future Muslim candidates running for office should know that the hatred they see online may be different than what they experience on the campaign trail.

23h

NASA catches the dying remnants of Tropical Cyclone 12P

Tropical Cyclone 12P formed in the Southern Pacific Ocean on January 25 and two days later, NASA's Aqua satellite observed the storm's demise.

23h

Genetic marking discovery improves fruit quality, bolsters climate defenses

Transferring genetic markers in plant breeding is a challenge, but a team of grapevine breeders and scientists at Cornell University have come up with a powerful new method that improves fruit quality and acts as a key defense against pests and a changing climate.

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New bacteriophage fully characterized and sequenced

Researchers have identified a new bacteriophage that can infect and destroy bacteria in the genus Pantoea, for which few bacteriophage have been identified and characterized. Details of the isolation, characterization, and full genome sequencing of this new bacteriophage are published in the new Genome Introduction section of PHAGE: Therapy, Applications, and Research.

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Prescribed fires help native plants find mates, reproduce and flourish: study

For a prairie plant, a fiery love life isn't just fun—it's essential.

23h

Getting to the root of plant survival

When facing a volatile climate, nature searches for a way to survive. For plants, that often means spreading new roots deeper and wider in search of water, particularly in times of drought. While scientists have recognized the process of root emergence for decades, how intercellular communication may drive this phenomenon was previously unknown.

23h

Genetic marking discovery improves fruit quality, bolsters climate defenses

Transferring genetic markers in plant breeding is a challenge, but a team of grapevine breeders and scientists at Cornell University have come up with a powerful new method that improves fruit quality and acts as a key defense against pests and a changing climate.

23h

Recreational fishers catching more sharks and rays

Recreational fishers are increasingly targeting sharks and rays, a situation that is causing concern among researchers.

23h

Driven by Earth's orbit, climate changes in Africa may have aided human migration

In 1961, John Kutzbach, then a recent college graduate, was stationed in France as an aviation weather forecaster for the U.S. Air Force. There, he found himself exploring the storied caves of Dordogne, including the prehistoric painted caves at Lascoux.

23h

Effects of contact between minority and majority groups more complex than once believed

For more than 50 years, social scientists and practitioners have suggested that having members of different groups interact with each other can be an effective tool for reducing prejudice. But emerging research points to a more complex and nuanced understanding of the effects of contact between groups, say Linda Tropp at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Tabea Hässler, leader of a multi-

23h

Recreational fishers catching more sharks and rays

Recreational fishers are increasingly targeting sharks and rays, a situation that is causing concern among researchers.

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Getting to the root of plant survival

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have been able to identify hormones and proteins that interact to regulate root emergence. Deeper understanding of this communication loop may eventually lead to the ability to control when and how many additional roots a plant can form – which would be a key weapon in battling dry conditions caused by climate change.

23h

Political Islamophobia may look differently online than in person

Islamophobia was rampant on social media during the midterm elections, but researchers say future Muslim candidates running for office should know that the hatred they see online may be different than what they experience on the campaign trail.

23h

Patterns of thinning of Antarctica's biggest glacier are opposite to previously observed

Using the latest satellite technology from the European Space Agency (ESA), scientists have been tracking patterns of mass loss from Pine Island — Antarctica's largest glacier.

23h

New look at odd holes involved in taste, Alzheimer's, asthma

Large holes in our cells have been implicated in depression, Alzehimer's disease, asthma, and even taste. Now, we know what two kinds of these pores look like, potentially creating new opportunities to discover effective treatment options.

23h

10 essential new skills you can start learning today

These 10 skills training bundles will have you mastering a new talent. Subjects range from music producing and graphic design to electrical engineering and stock trading. Each skill training bundle is currently at least 95% off. New year, new you. Too often, we get to the end of another 12 months and realize that maybe we didn't accomplish as much as we'd have liked over the past 365 days. Well,

23h

Albatrosses strapped with sensors help spy on illegal fishing boats

Attach a radar sensor to an albatross and you have a bird spy. Researchers deployed 169 of them in the Indian Ocean and found that a quarter of fishing vessels may be operating illegally

23h

We finally know why stress turns your hair white

Gray hairs seem to accumulate when we're stressed but until recently scientists have been unable to pin down a mechanism for how this happens. In 1902, the British Medical Journal reported an unusual case of rapid hair whitening. A 22-year-old woman "witnessed a tragedy of a woman's throat being cut and the victim falling dead at her feet," according to a physician at the London Temperance Hospit

23h

What exactly makes for an endangered species?

"What makes for an endangered species classification isn't always obvious," says John A. Vucetich , professor at Michigan Technological University. Read on as he explains: Lions and leopards are endangered species. Robins and raccoons clearly are not. The distinction seems simple until one ponders a question such as: How many lions would there have to be and how many of their former haunts would

23h

Neanderthals made epic trek from Europe to Siberia 60,000 years ago

Nature, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00183-5 Stone tools found in a Siberian cave hint at a rugged intercontinental journey.

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Unwanted import: Canadian air pollution invades New York

Nature, Published online: 27 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00184-4 Air quality in the United States' most populous city reached unhealthy levels thanks to incoming smoke from wildfires and agricultural burning.

23h

Experts Warn of Possible Sustained Global Spread of New Coronavirus

If the virus cannot be contained, it could start regularly circulating in the population like other common respiratory viruses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Prairie plants need fiery romance

In a new study, researchers found that prescribed, expert-controlled fires are critically important to successful reproduction in prairie plants. Fires cause prairie plants to flower at the same time, which increases mating opportunities and seed production.

1d

Histamine: an unexpected defender against heart and kidney damage

Chronic kidney disease and heart failure are closely associated in a phenomenon known as 'cardiorenal syndrome.' Here, a University of Tsukuba research team found elevated levels of histamine in a mouse model of cardiorenal damage, and showed that enhancement of the effects of histamine could alleviate both heart and kidney damage in these mice. These results provide a potential strategy for treat

1d

Organic farm advantages in biodiversity and profits depend on location

A large-scale meta-analysis found that organic agriculture sites had 34% more biodiversity and 50% more profits than conventional agriculture sites, even though the organic sites had 18% lower crop yields. The analysis, led by WSU graduate student journal club members, synthesized data from 148 studies around the world spanning 60 different types of crops.

1d

'Lethal' mutation made tuberculosis bacteria resistant to important antibiotic

Antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis is a common and serious problem globally. In a new article, researchers from Uppsala University describe how tuberculosis bacteria that carries a mutation that in theory should kill them manages to stay alive. The researchers discovered that the same trick that kept the bacteria alive also made them resistant to a very important type of antibiotic.

1d

Switching grape varieties can help save world's wine-growing regions: UBC study

Hotter temperatures threaten global wine production, with multiple studies now forecasting that more than half of regions suitable to planting wine grapes could be lost to climate change. But swapping out grapes for more drought and heat tolerant varieties can offer a way forward for winemakers, finds new research from the University of British Columbia and other collaborating institutions.

1d

Finely tuned nervous systems allowed birds and mammals to adopt smoother strides

A study suggests that neuromuscular adaptations in mammals and birds may have allowed them to become more nimble than reptiles and amphibians.

1d

New gene correction therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Duchenne type muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common hereditary muscular disease among children, leaving them wheelchair-bound before the age of 12 and reducing life expectancy. Researchers have developed a gene therapy that may provide permanent relief for those suffering from DMD.

1d

Earth's most biodiverse ecosystems face a perfect storm

A combination of climate change, extreme weather and pressure from local human activity is causing a collapse in global biodiversity and ecosystems across the tropics, new research shows. The study mapped over 100 locations where tropical forests and coral reefs have been affected by climate extremes such as hurricanes, floods, heatwaves, droughts and fires.

1d

John Bolton Knows What He's Doing

John Bolton, Donald Trump's former national security adviser, announced the title of his forthcoming memoir last night: The Room Where It Happened , a reference to the Oval Office, the scene of some of the misdeeds he is likely to attribute to the president. (I had hoped for something jauntier, perhaps ' Stached in the Cabinet .) Accompanying that announcement was a story in The New York Times te

1d

Massive effort to document the genetics of European forests bears fruit

Data could help conservationists and commercial foresters

1d

New gene correction therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Duchenne type muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common hereditary muscular disease among children, leaving them wheelchair-bound before the age of 12 and reducing life expectancy. Researchers have developed a gene therapy that may provide permanent relief for those suffering from DMD.

1d

Discovery sheds new light on how cells move

Through experiments, researchers found that the force each cell applies to the surface beneath it — in other words, traction — is the dominant physical factor that controls cell shape and motion as cells travel as a group.

1d

Seabird 'cops' spy on sneaky fishing vessels

Albatrosses with radar detectors find suspicious ships

1d

With high fiber diets, more protein may mean more bloating

People who eat high fiber diets are more likely to experience bloating if their high fiber diet is protein-rich as compared to carbohydrate-rich, according to a study.

1d

How cells sort and recycle their components

What can be reused and what can be disposed of? Cells also face this tricky task. Researchers have now discovered a cellular machine, called FERARI, that sorts out usable proteins for recycling.

1d

Keto diet works best in small doses, mouse study finds

A ketogenic diet — which provides 99 percent of calories from fat and only 1 percent from carbohydrates — produces health benefits in the short term, but negative effects after about a week, researchers found in a study of mice.

1d

AI to help monitor behavior

Algorithms based on artificial intelligence do better at supporting educational and clinical decision-making, according to a new study.

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Children to bear the burden of negative health effects from climate change

The grim effects that climate change will have on pediatric health outcomes was the focus of a recent article.

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A sustainable alternative to crude oil

A research team has developed a new polyamide family which can be produced from a byproduct of cellulose production — a successful example for a more sustainable economy with bio-based materials.

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Stone tools reveal intrepid travels of the Neanderthals

Siberian cave yields trove of blades linked to eastern Europe.

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Diversification can buffer vineyards against climate change

Researchers model the impact of sticking to the tried and true.

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The power, and occasional pitfalls, of symbolic mathematical thinking

Robyn Arianrhod traces the history of all those x's and y's .