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Color-changing bandages sense and treat bacterial infections

According to the World Health Organization, antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health. Sensing and treating bacterial infections earlier could help improve patients' recovery, as well curb the spread of antibiotic-resistant microbes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed color-changing bandages that can sense drug-resistant and drug-sensitive b

4h

Archaeological evidence for two separate dispersals of Neanderthals into southern Siberia [Anthropology]

Neanderthals were once widespread across Europe and western Asia. They also penetrated into the Altai Mountains of southern Siberia, but the geographical origin of these populations and the timing of their dispersal have remained elusive. Here we describe an archaeological assemblage from Chagyrskaya Cave, situated in the Altai foothills, where…

17h

Skibe i dansk farvand forurener mindre med svovl

Skibe i danske farvande udledte mindre svovl i 2019 end de to foregående år, viser en ny undersøgelse. En forklaring kan være nye scrubbere, der i stedet udleder svovlen i havet.

7h

China: why coronavirus is Xi's biggest crisis

FT's James Kynge says the outbreak puts the president under intense pressure

now

US National Academies launches search for evidence-based programmes to support scientist parents

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00246-7 The advisory organization wants to halt exodus of caregivers from research.

2min

2min

Spil kan få børn til at spise mere frugt og grønt

Man kan få børn til at spise større mængder frugt og grøntsager ved hjælp…

2min

The US Is Losing Its Fight Against Huawei

The Trump administration has spent years pressuring the UK to ban Chinese giant Huawei. It didn't work.

2min

Success and failure of ecological management is highly variable

What do we really know about reasons b to the success or failure of wildlife management efforts? A new study originating out of UVM suggests a disquieting answer: much less than we think.

3min

Amazon employees cite 'moral responsibility' to speak out on climate, despite risk of losing their jobs

More than 350 Amazon employees defied a company ban on unapproved external communications to call out what they see as the retail and technology giant's still-inadequate approach to the climate crisis.

3min

Handbook of graphene manufacturing published

Encompassing more than 1,500 references and the knowledge of 70 co-authors from EU-funded Graphene Flagship partners and associate members, the article aims to provide a single source of knowledge on graphene and related layered materials (GRMs).

3min

To make amino acids, just add electricity

New research from Kyushu University in Japan could one day help provide humans living away from Earth some of the nutrients they need to survive in space or even give clues to how life started.

3min

One step closer to tailored treatment of severe rheumatic diseases

A new research project from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark suggest that it is the composition of cells in the joint of the individual patient which determines whether the medicine is effective or not. The researcher behind the study, published in the journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR Open), is medical doctor and PhD Tue Wenzel Kragstrup from the Depa

5min

NRL researchers' golden touch enhances quantum technology

US Naval Research Laboratory scientists discover a new platform for quantum technologies by suspending two-dimensional (2-D) crystals over pores in a slab of gold.

5min

Poverty associated with suicide risk in children and adolescents

Between 2007 to 2016, nearly 21,000 children ages 5-19 years old died by suicide. New research shows the rate of suicides in this age group is 37 percent higher in counties with the highest levels of poverty compared with the rate in counties with the lowest levels of poverty.

5min

Graphene Flagship publishes handbook of graphene manufacturing

The EU-funded research project Graphene Flagship has published a comprehensive guide explaining how to produce and process graphene and related materials (GRMs). The article, Production and Processing of Graphene and Related Materials appears in the latest issue of the IOP Publishing journal, 2D Materials, and is available via open access.

5min

How Smart Roads Will Make Driving Easier, Safer, and Greener

Roads criss-cross the landscape, but while they provide vital transport links, in many ways they represent a huge amount of wasted space. Advances in “smart road” technology could change that, creating roads that can harvest energy from cars, detect speeding, automatically weigh vehicles, and even communicate with smart cars. “ Smart city” projects are popping up in countries across the world tha

6min

To make amino acids, just add electricity

New research from Kyushu University in Japan could one day help provide humans living away from Earth some of the nutrients they need to survive in space or even give clues to how life started.

6min

Save money by making your own dishwasher tablets

Say goodbye to smelly dishwashers. (alexraths via Deposit Photos/) Washing dishes is awful. It’s the kind of chore that never ends—pretty much every time you eat or drink, you make something dirty. Thankfully, a woman named Josephine Cochrane , who was really concerned about her fancy china getting chipped while being hand-washed, stepped up and invented the first dishwasher . More than 100 years

13min

NASA Is Adding a Space Hotel to the Space Station

Space Ritz NASA announced Monday that it’s chosen private space station manufacturer Axiom Space to build the first “commercial launch destination” — read: space hotel for the super wealthy — and attach it to the International Space Station. The goal is to help grow an economy in low-Earth orbit, according to NASA. According to an Axiom Space statement , the startup is planning to “launch a node

13min

Protein pores packed in polymers make super-efficient filtration membranes

A multidisciplinary team of engineers and scientists has developed a new class of filtration membranes for a variety of applications, from water purification to small-molecule separations to contaminant-removal processes, that are faster to produce and higher performing than current technology. This could reduce energy consumption, operational costs and production time in industrial separations.

16min

Success and failure of ecological management is highly variable

What do we really know about reasons attributed to the success or failure of wildlife management efforts? A new study originating out of UVM suggests a disquieting answer: much less than we think. A new study in the 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences' finds that ecological systems might contain a lot of inherit randomness that makes them difficult to manage.

21min

Space radar company chases persistent vision

The American start-up Capella says it's now ready to deploy its fleet of all-weather Earth observers.

24min

Iraqi discoveries help shed light on British Museum treasures

Work of trainees in Iraq has enabled new understanding of objects going on show in UK For decades they have been gathering dust in the collections of the British Museum , appreciated for their individual significance but in many cases shorn of much of their context owing to the circumstances of their discovery and retrieval during the buccaneering period of early archaeology. Now dozens of import

25min

Newspaper 'hierarchy' of injury glamorizes war

British newspapers are routinely glamorizing combat by creating a moral separation between combat and non-combat injuries, according to new research.

25min

Molecule modification could improve reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel could become safer and more efficient in future after researchers found a way to modify the structure of molecules to remove radioactive materials.

25min

Genetics contributes to mental health risks in adoptees

The adoption of children is a fundamental method of building families. However, adoptees may face subsequent adaptive challenges associated with family stress at the time of birth and during the adoption process.

25min

Airborne microbes link Great Barrier Reef and Australian continent

A team of researchers has discovered a link between two different ecosystems, continental Australia and the Great Barrier Reef, due to airborne microbes that travel from the former to the latter. The finding showed that the health of these two ecosystems are more interconnected than previously believed, hence holistic conservation efforts need to span different ecosystems.

25min

Disease-aggravating mutation found in a mouse model of neonatal mitochondrial disease

The new mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variant drastically speeds up the disease progression in a mouse model of GRACILE syndrome. This discovery provides a new tool for studies of mitochondrial diseases.

25min

Brain networks come 'online' during adolescence to prepare teenagers for adult life

New brain networks come 'online' during adolescence, allowing teenagers to develop more complex adult social skills, but potentially putting them at increased risk of mental illness, according to new research.

25min

NASA Recovers Function on Voyager 2 Spacecraft After Minor Glitch

A temporary malfunction aboard the interstellar spacecraft triggered an automatic fail-safe.

26min

Thomas Edison Invents… Cheap Concrete Furniture

Originally published in January 1912 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

27min

What Lichens Can Teach Us

A new IMAX film highlights their beauty and resilience — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

27min

Game-changing shampoo bars for your low-waste lifestyle

Stay clean with little to no plastic. (Depositphotos/) Shampoo bars are amazing: eco-friendly, free of any plastic packaging, easy-to-use, and long-lasting. Most shampoo bars are also free of additives that may harm your scalp, rough-up your hair, or introduce harmful things into our environment. Here are our favorite shampoo bars for all hair types. An old-school shampoo bar made entirely of veg

29min

The Iowans Who Think Their State Is Too White to Go First

Lynette Cooper cares deeply about politics, and every four years, she embraces the opportunities that come with living in Iowa. In the past two weeks alone, the 38-year-old nurse practitioner has been able to ask questions of candidates at a forum on racial justice; attend a rally for Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts; and drop by a town hall for former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete But

35min

An ultrafast microscope for the quantum world

Processes taking place inside tiny electronic components or in molecules can now be filmed at a resolution of a few hundred attoseconds and down to the individual atom.

38min

Common form of heart failure could be treated with already approved anticancer drug

Thanks to new research by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, a drug capable of reversing a common form of heart failure known as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) may soon be available. The researchers show that a drug already approved for the treatment of some forms of cancer can reverse HFpEF symptoms and improve the heart's ability to pump

38min

Researchers combine technologies to resolve plant pathogen genomes

With the help of new genomic sequencing and assembly tools, plant scientists can learn more about the function and evolution of highly destructive plant pathogens that refuse to be tamed by fungicides, antibacterial, and antivirals.

38min

Blind as a bat? The genetic basis of echolocation in bats and whales

Scientists reveal that similar genetic mutations led to the establishment of echolocation in both bats and whales.

38min

Mountain vegetation dries out Alpine water fluxes

Researchers confirm the paradox: rather than withering during droughts, plants at higher elevations absolutely thrive, as a study shows.

41min

Space super-storm likelihood estimated from longest period of magnetic field observations

A 'great' space weather super-storm large enough to cause significant disruption to our electronic and networked systems occurred on average once in every 25 years according to a new study.

41min

Hybrid technique to produce stronger nickel for auto, medical, manufacturing

Purdue University innovators have created a hybrid technique to fabricate a new form of nickel that may help the future production of lifesaving medical devices, high-tech devices and vehicles with strong corrosion-resistant protection.

1h

Stress test reveals graphene won't crack under pressure

Graphene is a paradox. It is the thinnest material known to science, yet also one of the strongest. Now, research from University of Toronto Engineering shows that graphene is also highly resistant to fatigue — able to withstand more than a billion cycles of high stress before it breaks.

1h

It's closeness that counts: how proximity affects the resistance of graphene

Graphene is seen as the wonder material of the future. Scientists can grow perfect graphene layers on square centimetre-sized crystals. Researchers from the University of Göttingen, together with the Chemnitz University of Technology and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Braunschweig, investigated the influence of the underlying crystal on graphene's electrical resistance. Contrary to prev

1h

Associations between work environment and rushed, missed care tasks in nursing homes

Associations between work environment (including staffing, culture and leadership) and self-reported missed or rushed tasks by care aides in nursing homes in Canada were analyzed in this observational study.

1h

Suicidal thoughts among US Army soldiers deployed to Afghanistan

Among nearly 4,000 US Army soldiers deployed in Afghanistan, 11.7% reported suicidal thoughts at some point in their lives, 3.0% within the past year and 1.9% within the past 30 days on questionnaires completed at the midpoint of their deployment in 2012.

1h

Higher maternal socioeconomics offer little protection against toxic prenatal stress

When pregnant women experience elevated anxiety, stress or depression, these prenatal stressors can alter the structure of the developing fetal brain and disrupt its biochemistry — even if these women have uncomplicated pregnancies and high socioeconomic status, according to Children's National Hospital research published online Jan. 29, 2020, in JAMA Network Open.

1h

Catholic hospital market share and reproductive care access

Nearly 2 of every 5 women of reproductive age in the US live in counties where Catholic hospitals have a high market share, according to a new analysis. Catholic hospitals do not provide certain reproductive health options, including contraception and infertility treatments. However, the study also found that Health Insurance Marketplace plans' provider networks include a lower share of Catholic h

1h

Scientists discover link between autism and cognitive impairment

Scientists have found how a single gene fragment impacts social behaviour and cognitive ability, revealing a common molecular mechanism for autism and Fragile X syndrome.

1h

This standard test for autism could be more reliable

A common test for autism is less reliable than previously assumed, researchers report. The standardized test, known as the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), assesses communication skills, social interaction, and play for children who may have autism or other developmental disorders. To digitize the test, researchers attached wearable technology, like an Apple Watch, to two clinicians

1h

25% of hospitalized kids get antibiotics they don’t need

For one-quarter of the patients in US children’s hospitals taking at least one antibiotic, the treatments are unnecessary or otherwise “suboptimal,” according to new research. The overuse of antibiotics poses an increasing threat to children who develop—or already have— drug-resistant infections that are difficult or impossible to treat. They can cause extended hospitalization, disability, and ev

1h

Støjekspert: »Sænk grænseværdien for motorvejsstøj«

PLUS. Hvis folks levevilkår skal være ens, skal der indføres særlige krav til støj fra landets motorveje, lyder det fra ekspert.

1h

Looming Potential Satellite Smashup Could Spawn Dangerous Debris Swarm

Thankfully, the probability of a collision is just 0.1 percent — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Temperatures at a Florida-Size Glacier Alarm Scientists

Researchers in Antarctica found unusually warm water beneath a massive glacier that is already melting and contributing to sea level rise.

1h

Authors questioning papers at nearly two dozen journals in wake of spider paper retraction

Talk about a tangled web. The retraction earlier this month of a 2016 paper in the American Naturalist by Kate Laskowski and Jonathan Pruitt turns out to be the tip of what is potentially a very large iceberg. This week, the researchers have retracted a second paper, this one in the Proceedings of the Royal … Continue reading

1h

The seabed is sinking under the weight of water from melting ice caps

Water flowing into the oceans from Greenland and Antarctica is pushing the seabed down 0.1 millimetres a year, but don’t get your hopes up – it won’t stop sea level rise

1h

For prairie flowers, fire is the ultimate matchmaker

A coneflower plant, which produces just one (or even no) flowers during most years (Stuart Wagenius/Chicago Botanic Garden/) Sometimes the best way to kindle a romance is with actual fire. After tracking flowers on a prairie in Minnesota for 21 years, scientists reported this week that the plants reproduce more successfully in the year following a carefully controlled burn. Come summer, many of t

1h

Does cognitive dissonance account for rising xenophobia?

Proximity to Nazi concentration camps plays a counterintuitive role in the xenophobia, political intolerance, and radical political parties spreading through Germany and the rest of Europe, research finds. Lead author Jonathan Homola, an assistant professor at Rice University, and fellow authors Miguel Pereira and Margit Tavits of Washington University were interested in understanding why some Eu

1h

Deciphering the Weird, Wonderful Genetic Diversity of Leaf Shapes

Researchers craft a new model for plant development after studying the genetics of carnivorous plants’ cup-shaped traps

1h

Cover of CHEOPS space telescope open

"Shortly after the launch on December 18, 2019, we tested the communication with the satellite. Then, on January 8, 2020, we started the commissioning, that is, we booted the computer, carried out tests, and started up all the components," explains Willy Benz, professor of astrophysics at the University of Bern and Principal Investigator of the CHEOPS mission. All the tests went outstandingly well

1h

Historical impacts of development on coral reef loss in the South China Sea

New research led by The University of Hong Kong, Swire Institute of Marine Science in collaboration with Princeton University and the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry highlights the historical impacts of development on coral reef loss in the South China Sea. The findings were recently published in the journal Global Change Biology.

1h

Avoid paying so people work

Unlike the case in many developed countries, the Russian government is ready to provide financial support to all people who are registered unemployed. That said, the amount of benefits paid is so small that most unemployed simply disregard it. Researchers from HSE University undertook a study of how the unemployed are treated in other countries and proposed measures for improving the situation on

1h

Tougher start could help captive-bred game birds

Tougher early lives could help captive-bred game birds develop survival skills for adulthood in the wild, new research suggests.

1h

Food packaging that's good enough to eat

These days, many people are concerned about plastic waste; however, the convenience, mechanical properties and cost of plastic food packaging are hard to beat. But now, a growing number of innovators and entrepreneurs are trying to make edible packaging and tableware from foods like seaweed, milk proteins and potato starch, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly

1h

Fungi as food source for plants

The number of plant species that extract organic nutrients from fungi could be much higher than previously assumed. This was discovered by researchers from the University of Bayreuth and the University of Copenhagen through isotope investigations on Paris quadrifolia, otherwise known as Herb Paris or True Lover's Knot. In 'The New Phytologist' journal, the scientists report on their surprising res

1h

How humans and AI can work together to create better businesses | Sylvain Duranton

Here's a paradox: as companies try to streamline their businesses by using artificial intelligence to make critical decisions, they may inadvertently make themselves less efficient. Business technologist Sylvain Duranton advocates for a "Human plus AI" approach — using AI systems alongside humans, not instead of them — and shares the specific formula companies can adopt to successfully employ AI

1h

Historical impacts of development on coral reef loss in the South China Sea

New research led by The University of Hong Kong, Swire Institute of Marine Science in collaboration with Princeton University and the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry highlights the historical impacts of development on coral reef loss in the South China Sea. The findings were recently published in the journal Global Change Biology.

1h

Newspaper 'hierarchy' of injury glamorises war

British newspapers are routinely glamorising combat by creating a moral separation between combat and non-combat injuries, according to new research published in the journal Media, War and Conflict.

1h

Likelihood of space super-storms estimated from longest period of magnetic field observations

A 'great' space weather super-storm large enough to cause significant disruption to our electronic and networked systems occurred on average once in every 25 years, according to a new joint study by the University of Warwick and the British Antarctic Survey.

1h

1h

iRobot has a butler prototype. Beer please.

submitted by /u/DrNugs [link] [comments]

1h

Why Kobe Mourning Is So Intense

My generation of sports fans learned early that the athletes we idolized were neither immortal nor invincible. I was 11 when Magic Johnson, my childhood hero, announced that he was retiring from the NBA after testing positive for HIV, then a seeming death sentence. Within a few years, Bo Jackson had suffered a career-ending injury, Mike Tyson had been convicted of rape, and O. J. Simpson was on t

1h

CHEOPS opens its eye to the sky

Since the launch of CHEOPS on 18 December 2019, the project has progressed smoothly and successfully through its planned operations and test activities.

1h

Image: Cosmic caller goes out with a bang

On 21 January, a foreign body crashed to Earth causing a cascade of bright light to trail through the sky.

1h

Video: Intense 'Beyond' mission for Luca

Italian ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano will return to Earth 6 February 2020, following his second long-duration mission on the International Space Station (ISS).

1h

Guardian angel of the eye

The lens of the human eye comprises a highly concentrated protein solution, which lends the lens its great refractive power. Protective proteins prevent these proteins from clumping together throughout a lifetime. A team of scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now uncovered the precise structure of the alpha-A-crystallin protein and, in the process, discovered an important

1h

A new method of artificial intelligence inspired by the functioning of the human brain

Researchers at the University of Liège (ULiège) have developed a new algorithm based on a biological mechanism called neuromodulation. This algorithm makes it possible to create intelligent agents capable of performing tasks not encountered during training. This result is presented this week in the magazine PLOS ONE.

1h

Take-home' exposures are public health hazard: BU and Harvard researchers

A new review by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health calls for recognition of 'take-home' exposures–exposures to toxic contaminants inadvertently brought home from a family member's work–as a public health hazard.

1h

To make amino acids, just add electricity

By finding the right combination of abundantly available starting materials and catalyst, Kyushu University researchers were able to synthesize amino acids with high efficiency through a reaction driven by electricity. Simpler and less resource intensive than current production methods, processes like this may one day be used in resource-restricted conditions to produce the amino acids necessary f

1h

Genetics contributes to mental health risks in adoptees

The adoption of children is a fundamental method of building families. However, adoptees may face subsequent adaptive challenges associated with family stress at the time of birth and during the adoption process.

1h

Scientists have identified the role of chronic inflammation as the cause of accelerated aging

Claudio Franceschi, a world-renowned scientist, professor at the University of Bologna (Italy) and head of the Research Laboratory for Systems Medicine of Healthy Aging at Lobachevsky University, together with other members of an international research team, has described the mechanisms underlying chronic inflammation and identified several risk factors leading to disease.

1h

A nanoscale lattice of palladium and yttrium makes for a superlative carbon-linking catalyst

A group of materials scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology has shown that a palladium-based intermetallic electride, Y3Pd2, can improve the efficiency of carbon-carbon cross-coupling reactions. Their findings point the way to a more sustainable world through catalysis.

1h

German government defends coal phase-out against critics

The German government approved a bill Wednesday that will codify the country's closure of coal-fired power stations, defending the plan against critics who say it's not ambitious enough.

1h

Historical impacts of development on coral reef loss in the South China Sea

New research led by The University of Hong Kong, Swire Institute of Marine Science in collaboration with Princeton University and the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry highlights the historical impacts of development on coral reef loss in the South China Sea. The findings were recently published in the journal Global Change Biology.

1h

Newspaper 'hierarchy' of injury glamorises war

British newspapers are routinely glamorising combat by creating a moral separation between combat and non-combat injuries, according to new research published in the journal Media, War and Conflict.

1h

Molecule modification could improve reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel could become safer and more efficient in future after researchers found a way to modify the structure of molecules to remove radioactive materials. The research is published in the influential Chemistry – A European Journal (7th January 2020) and is described by the editors of the journal as being of great significance.

1h

Are you 'at risk' of being a habitual tofu eater?

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS) in Japan and colleagues at Osaka University have found genetic variations in humans related to specific dietary habits. Published in Nature Human Behaviour, the genome-wide association study found 9 gene locations associated with eating and drinking foods like meat, tofu, cheese, tea, and coffee. Among them, three were also rel

1h

Space super-storm likelihood estimated from longest period of magnetic field observations

A 'great' space weather super-storm large enough to cause significant disruption to our electronic and networked systems occurred on average once in every 25 years according to a new joint study by the University of Warwick and the British Antarctic Survey.

1h

Brain networks come 'online' during adolescence to prepare teenagers for adult life

New brain networks come 'online' during adolescence, allowing teenagers to develop more complex adult social skills, but potentially putting them at increased risk of mental illness, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

1h

Researchers identify mechanism that triggers a rare type of muscular dystrophy

A study led by the IBB-UAB has identified the molecular mechanism through which a protein, when carrying genetic mutations associated with a rare disease known as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 1G, accelerates its tendency to form amyloid fibrils and finally triggers the appearance of the disease. The research, published in Cell Reports, will pave the way for the study of possible treatments

1h

NYUAD researchers develop new approach to more efficiently store and preserve human cells

Researchers from the Division of Engineering at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) have developed a new technique that utilizes filter paper to cryopreserve human cells, offering scientists an efficient alternative to conventional, long-term cryopreservation methods.

1h

Does lung damage speed pancreatic cancer?

High levels of CO2 in the body, due to chronic respiratory disorders, may exacerbate pancreatic cancer, making it more aggressive and resistant to therapy.

1h

Fungi as food source for plants

The number of plant species that extract organic nutrients from fungi could be much higher than previously assumed. This was discovered by researchers from the University of Bayreuth and the University of Copenhagen through isotope investigations on Paris quadrifolia, otherwise known as Herb Paris or True Lover's Knot. This forest-floor plant, which is widespread in Europe, is regarded in botany a

2h

Why Trump's Palestine map is important

Trump's Middle East plan is the first U.S. proposal to contain a map of a two-state solution. Considering Israel's close involvement, this map represents a Palestine 'Israel can live with'. But Palestinians are unlikely to agree to give up East Jerusalem—or much else. Caught between a napkin and a conspiracy "I say to Trump and Netanyahu: Jerusalem is not for sale," fulminated Palestinian preside

2h

Fungi as food source for plants

The number of plant species that extract organic nutrients from fungi could be much higher than previously assumed. This was discovered by researchers from the University of Bayreuth and the University of Copenhagen through isotope investigations on Paris quadrifolia, otherwise known as Herb Paris or True Lover's Knot. This forest-floor plant, which is widespread in Europe, is regarded in botany a

2h

The Age of Interstellar Visitors

It sounds almost like science fiction: a tiny world that formed around another star, visiting our cosmic neighborhood for us to study. And yet that’s exactly what has happened, twice now as of the last few months. It will only happen more often this decade. The first known interstellar object — meaning it formed outside of our solar system — dropped by in late 2017. Named 1I/ʻOumuamua, scientists

2h

Therapeutic microbes to tackle disease

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00201-6 Modified bacteria and carefully formulated microbial communities could form the basis of new living treatments.

2h

Could a bacteria-stuffed pill cure autoimmune diseases?

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00197-z Researchers are investigating how the community of microbes living in the gut might help people with multiple sclerosis, lupus and type 1 diabetes.

2h

Homing in on the molecules from microbes

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00195-1 Bioengineer Michael Fischbach wants to find out everything he can about the short-chain fatty acids produced by microbes.

2h

Diet should be a tool for researchers, not a treatment

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00202-5 Peter J. Turnbaugh explains why scientists can’t tell you what to eat to prevent disease.

2h

The hunt for a healthy microbiome

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00193-3 Despite evidence of the gut microbiome’s role in human health, researchers are still working out what shapes the community of microbes.

2h

Could the gut microbiome be linked to autism?

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00198-y Researchers are hoping to understand whether the microbes in our guts have a role in the disorder.

2h

The complex relationship between drugs and the microbiome

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00196-0 Scientists know that the microbiome has an effect on pharmaceuticals, and vice versa, but they are still trying to work out the various mechanisms involved.

2h

Rich data sets could end costly drug discovery

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00200-7 Eran Segal explains why deep phenotyping of study volunteers could transform therapy development.

2h

Highlights from studies on the gut microbiome

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00203-4 Researchers strive to understand how microbes affect health and disease.

2h

The gut microbiome

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00194-2 Microorganisms live in the human digestive system and affect our health — scientists are trying to work out how.

2h

Fighting cancer with microbes

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00199-x Targeting the microbiome could hold the key to combating a range of malignant diseases.

2h

Tougher start could help captive-bred game birds

Tougher early lives could help captive-bred game birds develop survival skills for adulthood in the wild, new research suggests.

2h

Compulsory cat microchipping is great in theory, but the system is flawed

When dog microchipping became a legal requirement in England and Wales in April 2016, calls to extend the law to other pets were rejected. However, compulsory microchipping is now back on the political agenda.

2h

Tougher start could help captive-bred game birds

Tougher early lives could help captive-bred game birds develop survival skills for adulthood in the wild, new research suggests.

2h

Compulsory cat microchipping is great in theory, but the system is flawed

When dog microchipping became a legal requirement in England and Wales in April 2016, calls to extend the law to other pets were rejected. However, compulsory microchipping is now back on the political agenda.

2h

Kevin's Season Ends Early | Gold Rush

Tony is down to one operation after Kevin is forced to shut down his plant. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Inst

2h

Why Trump's Palestine map is important

Trump's Middle East plan is the first U.S. proposal to contain a map of a two-state solution. Considering Israel's close involvement, this map represents a Palestine 'Israel can live with'. But Palestinians are unlikely to agree to give up East Jerusalem—or much else. Caught between a napkin and a conspiracy "I say to Trump and Netanyahu: Jerusalem is not for sale," fulminated Palestinian preside

2h

Why asking an AI to explain itself can make things worse

Creating neural networks that are more transparent can lead us to over-trust them. The solution might be to change how they explain themselves.

2h

How to Nail a Front Flip in a Monster Truck

Want to attempt this gravity-defying stunt in a 5-ton vehicle? Better know your physics.

2h

The History of Food Photos—From Still Lifes to Brunch 'Grams

Humans have been snapping pics of their plates for over 160 years—and photos of meals have revealed a lot about the people gathered at the table.

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Single-cell sequencing of CLL therapy: Shared genetic program, patient-specific execution

Researchers at the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine and partners in Budapest have studied the response to targeted leukemia therapy in unprecedented detail, using single-cell sequencing and epigenetic analysis. The paper published in Nature Communications uncovers a precise molecular program in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who start treatment with ibrutinib. While th

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Disease-aggravating mutation found in a mouse model of neonatal mitochondrial disease

The new mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variant drastically speeds up the disease progression in a mouse model of GRACILE syndrome. This discovery provides a new tool for studies of mitochondrial diseases.

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Mountain vegetation dries out Alpine water fluxes

ETH researchers confirm the paradox: rather than withering during droughts, plants at higher elevations absolutely thrive, as a study just published in the journal Nature Climate Change shows.

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Identified a determinant protein for tumor progression and metastasis in Rhabdomyos

LOXL2 increases the metastatic capacity of tumors from Rhabdomyoarcoma, a childhood cancer. The metastasic activity of LOXL2 is inside the cells and is independent of its classical function.

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Owners of high-status cars are on a collision course with traffic

Self-centred men who are argumentative, stubborn, disagreeable and unempathetic are much more likely to own a high-status car.

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Missing link in rare inherited skin disease exposed

Hokkaido University scientists are getting closer to understanding how a rare hereditary disease impairs the skin's barrier function, which determines how well the skin is protected.

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Neural effects of acute stress on appetite: a magnetoencephalography study

The authors showed that the acute mental stress induced by the anticipation of forthcoming events could suppress subjective level of appetite in humans and this suppression of the appetite appeared to be associated with the neural activity of the frontal pole involved in the thinking and planning of future actions. These findings provide valuable clues to gain a further understanding of the neural

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New encapsulation technique protects electronic properties of sensitive materials

As electronics grow smaller, researchers are searching for tiny components that function reliably in increasingly narrow configurations. Promising elements include the chemical compounds indium selenide (InSe) and gallium selenide (GaSe). In the form of ultra-thin layers, they form two-dimensional (2-D) semiconductors. But, so far, they have hardly been used because they degrade when they get in c

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Scientists create listeriosis-immune mice by turning off gene in myeloid cells

An international research team that includes specialists from ITMO University has conducted a series of experiments with the goal of studying the immune system and identifying the genes and proteins involved in the response to certain harmful bacteria. The scientists found that "turning off" a gene responsible for the production of the protein Beclin 1, or the gene that produces the FIP200 protein

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Astrophysicists construct approximations for the metric of spherically symmetric black holes

RUDN astrophysicists have proposed a new method for approximate calculation of the parameters of spherically symmetric black holes in the Einstein-Maxwell theory. By comparing the shadow radii of the black holes obtained via this method with exact numerical solutions, astrophysicists have revealed that the approximation they suggested shows a reasonable accuracy in the second order. This means tha

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Fourier's 200-year-old heat equation explains hydrodynamic heat propagation

Michele Simoncelli, a Ph.D. student at EPFL, Andrea Cepellotti, a former EPFL student now at Harvard, and Nicola Marzari, head of EPFL's Theory and Simulation of Materials laboratory, have developed a novel set of equations for heat propagation that goes beyond Fourier's law and explains why and under which conditions heat propagation can become fluid-like rather than diffusive. These "viscous hea

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Two traits may link major depression and alcohol dependence

New research may uncover key predictors for the combination of major depressive disorder and alcohol use dependence—information that could aid in both prevention and treatment. For people with psychiatric disorders, comorbidity—or the presence of two or more disorders in a single patient—is quite common. One of the most common comorbidities is alcohol use disorder and major depressive disorder. I

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Scientists create listeriosis-immune mice by turning off gene in myeloid cells

An international research team that includes specialists from ITMO University has conducted a series of experiments with the goal of studying the immune system and identifying the genes and proteins involved in the response to certain harmful bacteria. The scientists found that "turning off" a gene responsible for the production of the protein Beclin 1, or the gene that produces the FIP200 protein

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Bulgarians' patience runs dry over water crisis

Forced to "live without water, in the 21st century, in a European Union country": Bulgarian Yana Stoyanova is not bemoaning climate change, but the incompetence of the authorities which has left some 100,000 people with an acute water shortage.

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Improved mathematical model helps explain different lotus leaf types

A trio of researchers at Fudan University has improved a mathematical model to allow it to predict the shape of different leaf types on lotus plants. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their mathematical work and how they tested it with real world materials.

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Siemens-chef: »Jeg ser ikke nogen vej uden om brint«

PLUS. Trenden går i retning af elektrolyse ude ved vindmøllerne, forklarer innovationschef hos Siemens Gamesa Poul Skjærbæk.

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Spider glue turns moths' defenses against them

If you've ever tried to stick tape to a dusty surface, you know the dilemma most spiders face when trying to catch moths. Moth wings are covered in tiny scales that slough off at a touch, allowing moths to escape dangers such as spider webs. But some spiders have evolved a special glue that instantly soaks under the scales and down to the base of the wing, locking everything together into a solid

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Hope for enhanced UTI treatments to minimize bladder pain

The fight against Urinary Tract Infection pain, discomfort and a constant urge to urinate has taken a step forward with scientists identifying how the immune systems defence against bladder infection causes nerves to magnify sensations felt by patients. Flinders University researchers at SAHMRI in collaboration with Griffith University on the Gold Coast, have analysed how the immune system respond

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How to head off a Red Bull habit — study

Regular consumers of popular caffeinated energy drinks may need help kicking the habit. New research at Flinders University in Australia, published in the international journal PLOS One, put a form of cognitive incentive retraining — a form of computer-based training aimed at reducing decision-making biases in purchasing energy drinks — to the test on more than 200 regular consumers of energy dr

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After infection, lung immune cells remember for next time

After lungs recover from infection, alveolar macrophages (immune cells that live in the lungs and help protect the lungs against infection) are different in multiple ways and those differences last indefinitely, new research shows. How the lungs protect themselves when they are at their healthiest, like in young adult humans, is complex and only beginning to be understood. The researchers propose

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Spider glue turns moths' defenses against them

If you've ever tried to stick tape to a dusty surface, you know the dilemma most spiders face when trying to catch moths. Moth wings are covered in tiny scales that slough off at a touch, allowing moths to escape dangers such as spider webs. But some spiders have evolved a special glue that instantly soaks under the scales and down to the base of the wing, locking everything together into a solid

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Measuring a particle's spin in a rapidly rotating object

A team of researchers at the University of Melbourne has succeeded in measuring a single quantum spin in a rapidly rotating object for the first time. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes how they carried off the difficult feat and ways that their findings might be applied.

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Mathematical study of waves helps predict the spread of viruses in tissue

A mathematician from RUDN University investigated the properties of wave fronts in reaction-diffusion models. The results will help to study the spread of viruses in tissues and to predict the evolution of ecosystems. The article was published in the journal Nonlinearity.

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Diving into Denver's geese controversy

Last summer, nearly 2,000 Canada geese were killed across four of Denver's largest parks. Implemented to mitigate overpopulation, the move stirred great controversy in the city and culminated in a Washington Park protest as well as a signed petition calling for the city to immediately stop killing geese in Denver parks, among other requests.

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Diving into Denver's geese controversy

Last summer, nearly 2,000 Canada geese were killed across four of Denver's largest parks. Implemented to mitigate overpopulation, the move stirred great controversy in the city and culminated in a Washington Park protest as well as a signed petition calling for the city to immediately stop killing geese in Denver parks, among other requests.

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Researchers achieve ultrafast spin-orbit torque switching in ferrimagnetic devices

Spin-orbit torque (SOT) magnetization switching is a phenomenon induced by a spin current, which is in turn generated by a charge current. Eliciting this phenomenon could help to manipulate the magnetization in spintronic devices, potentially increasing their performance.

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Yale-NUS research shows airborne microbes link Great Barrier Reef and Australian continent

A team of researchers led by Yale-NUS College Professor of Science (Environmental Studies) Stephen Pointing has discovered a link between two different ecosystems, continental Australia and the Great Barrier Reef, due to airborne microbes that travel from the former to the latter. The finding showed that the health of these two ecosystems are more interconnected than previously believed, hence hol

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Study reveals new way to treat stroke using an already FDA-approved drug

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) is currently used to treat neutropenia due to chemotherapy and has been successfully used for patients who require bone marrow transplants. The study is the first to report on the neuroprotective effect of GCSF in vivo and showed that it improved neurological deficits that occur in the first few days following cerebral ischemia. GCSF improved long-term

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ASHG survey finds Americans strongly support human genetics research and potential

Americans are excited and optimistic about genetics and its emerging health applications, per a new survey by ASHG and Research!America. – Most Americans agree genetic knowledge will be important to their health- Americans agree more research is needed and increased federal funding for it is important.- Results confirm importance of confidentiality and security of research data, addressing America

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On the menu: Study says dining out is a recipe for unhealthy eating for most Americans

Study finds most restaurant meals eaten by Americans are of poor nutritional quality; minimal changes over 14 years.

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1 in 4 kids who get antibiotics in children's hospitals are prescribed drugs incorrectly

New research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that 1 in 4 of the children given antibiotics in US children's hospitals are prescribed the drugs inappropriately. The overuse of antibiotics poses an increasing threat to children who develop — or already have — drug-resistant infections.

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Stem cells, CRISPR and gene sequencing technology are basis of new brain cancer model

University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers created a new type of brain cancer model for glioblastoma using stem cells, CRISPR and gene sequencing.

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NUS Medicine researchers can reprogramme cells to original state for regenerative medicine

Scientists from NUS Medicine have found a way to induce totipotency in embryonic cells that have already matured into pluripotency. This has great potential to improve cell engineering capabilities for regenerative medicine therapeutics.

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Key to beating colorectal cancer hiding in plain sight?

Colorectal cancer, one of the most common cancers in the developed world, is intrinsically resistant to many drug therapies. In an attempt to identify novel treatment strategies, researchers led by Osaka University examined the contribution of serine racemase (SRR) to colorectal cancer metabolism. In a world first, the researchers showed that SRR is required for cancer cell proliferation, and that

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Great Barrier Reef water pollution threatens dolphins

Rare snubfin dolphins in Queensland's Fitzroy River and humpback dolphins in Port Curtis are under threat from exposure to increasing amounts of water contamination.

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Using Inertial Microfluidics to Extract Leukocytes from Blood

Download this poster from MicroMedicine to learn about a new automated microfluidics-based method for label-free sorting, separation, and concentration of white blood cells from whole blood.

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Running a lean operation on employee job satisfaction

Lean principles and lean management are business principles that aim to make manufacturing and other processes more efficient by only have the absolute requisite resources to hand at the right time in any given stage of the process. Thus, excess starting materials, equipment, and essentially redundant staff do not increase the burden on storage, systems, waste disposal, and other factors any one o

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CAR T treatments could have fewer side effects than other cancer immunotherapies

New cancer immunotherapies involve extracting a patient's T cells and genetically engineering them so they will recognize and attack tumors. This technique is a true medical breakthrough, with an increasing number of leukemia and lymphoma patients experiencing complete remissions since CAR T therapy was FDA approved in 2017.

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Great Barrier Reef water pollution threatens dolphins

Rare snubfin dolphins in Queensland's Fitzroy River and humpback dolphins in Port Curtis are under threat from exposure to increasing amounts of water contamination.

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Citizen scientists discover a new form of the Northern Lights

Working together with space researchers, Finnish amateur photographers have discovered a new auroral form. Named "dunes" by the hobbyists, the phenomenon is believed to be caused by waves of oxygen atoms glowing due to a stream of particles released from the Sun.

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Barramundi seek safe refuge after rains

Research to understand the movements of fish in Top End waterways has found that barramundi exhibit very accurate homing behavior, traveling up to 80 km to their "home" billabongs after wet season rains.

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Varannan människa dog innan femton års ålder

Omkring 25 procent av alla barn som fötts i historisk tid har dött under sitt första levnadsår, och drygt 45 procent innan de fyllt 15 år. Det framgår av en mängd arkeologiska och historiska analyser som ställs samman vid Our World in Data, som drivs av Oxfordekonomen Max Roser.

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Harvard’s Chemistry Dept. Chairman in FBI Custody

I suspect that most readers will have heard the news that Charles Lieber, nanoscale materials chemist and chair of Harvard’s chemistry department, was arrested yesterday by federal agents. He was accused of providing false statements to government agencies about his involvement with China’s “Thousand Talents” program and with the Wuhan University of Technology (no connection to the coronavirus st

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Five ‘power skills’ for becoming a team leader

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00178-2 Volunteering with an organization can improve communication and help you adapt to the unexpected, say Sarah Groover and Ruth Gotian.

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Boeing’s massive wing-folding 777x just flew for the first time

The Boeing 777x made its maiden flight in Everett, Washington on January 25. When it's on the ground, its wingtips fold upwards. (Boeing /) On Saturday, Boeing flew its newest passenger plane for the first time, and after it landed in Seattle, its wingtips did something new to the world of commercial aviation: they folded upwards as the plane was still rolling down the tarmac. When the new widebo

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Barramundi seek safe refuge after rains

Research to understand the movements of fish in Top End waterways has found that barramundi exhibit very accurate homing behavior, traveling up to 80 km to their "home" billabongs after wet season rains.

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Researchers capture first images of oxygen in cancer tumors during radiation therapy

Oxygen in cancer tumors is a known major factor in the success of radiation therapy, but currently there are no good ways to monitor tumor oxygenation during this treatment. With specialty cameras and injection of an oxygen probe drug, researchers at Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have demonstrated the first way to directly monitor the full range of oxygen distri

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Hermetically sealed semi-conductors

Researchers are searching for tiny components that function reliably in increasingly narrow electronic configurations. Promising elements include the chemical compounds indium selenide and gallium selenide. As ultra-thin layers, they form two-dimensional semi-conductors. So far, they have hardly been used because they degrade when they get in contact with air. A new technique, developed by Himani

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Give & take: Cancer chromosomes give the game away

As tumours develop, cancer cells gain and lose so-called 'chromosome arms', changing their response to drugs, a finding which may offer better personalised treatments for 17 types of cancer.

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Cycling to work? You may live longer

People who cycle to work have a lower risk of dying, a New Zealand study has found. The study, by researchers from the University of Otago, Wellington, the University of Melbourne and the University of Auckland, has just been published in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

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Unhealthy and unhappy — the mental toll of troubled relationships

Some forms of domestic violence double victims' risk of depression and anxiety disorders later in life, according to University of Queensland research.

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Helping prevent eco-interventions from backfiring

Drastic ecosystem interventions like eradicating an unwanted species can sometimes backfire, but new University of Queensland-led modelling may help to avoid these ecological hiccups.Dr Matthew Adams, from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said despite all good intentions, ecological interventions can have devastating consequences.

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'Kingdom Hearts III Re: Mind' Is the Antidote to Bad Endings

In a cultural moment where franchises like Star Wars and Game of Thrones don't know how to end well, Kingdom Hearts says: Why end at all?

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Brexit is happening: what does it mean for science?

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00215-0 Negotiators have less than a year to agree on how the United Kingdom will participate in European Union research programmes.

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How climate change is affecting gardens

According to Dr. Dave Kendal from the University of Tasmania, in the next 50 years, 20-50% of current plant species in botanic gardens and urban landscapes will likely confront temperatures those species have never experienced before.

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New coronavirus looks set to cause a pandemic – how do we control it?

The new coronavirus looks set to go global as case numbers rise, but the variable way it seems to be spreading offers hope for keeping it under control

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Doctors Need to Focus Less on a Patient's Weight

Extra pounds can lead to health problems, but dwelling on fat itself can increase stigma and shame — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How climate change is affecting gardens

According to Dr. Dave Kendal from the University of Tasmania, in the next 50 years, 20-50% of current plant species in botanic gardens and urban landscapes will likely confront temperatures those species have never experienced before.

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Quasi-periodic variability observed in two blazars

An international team of astronomers reports the detection of quasi-periodic variability in optical and gamma-ray light curves of two blazars, namely 3C 66A and B2 1633+38. The discovery could be helpful in advancing our knowledge about such behavior in blazars. The finding is detailed in a paper published January 16 on arXiv.org.

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A cubesat deployed a de-orbiting tether and now it's losing altitude 24 times faster than before

A company called Tethers Unlimited has deployed its de-orbiting tether in a successful test on the Prox-1 satellite. The satellite is one of four that are carrying the device, called the Terminator Tape. Rather than stay in space for years or decades and add to the growing problem of space debris, Prox-1 is using its Terminator Tape to slowly lower its orbit.

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Humans are good at thinking their way out of problems, but climate change is outfoxing us

There is growing evidence that Earth's systems are heading towards climate "tipping points" beyond which change becomes abrupt and unstoppable. But another tipping point is already being crossed—humanity's capacity to adapt to a warmer world.

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Climate crisis: How to make space for 2 billion trees on a crowded island like the UK

The UK's official climate advisor, the Committee on Climate Change (CCC), recently published a report outlining how to reduce the 12% of greenhouse gas emissions that come from land use by two thirds by 2050. Alongside recommending cutting meat and dairy consumption by 20%, the report calls for the annual creation of up to 50,000 hectares of broadleaf and conifer woodland for the next three decade

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Student-designed 3-D-printed model of stadium helps police prepare for Super Bowl

Miami-Dade Police are preparing for Super Bowl LIV with a highly detailed 3-D-printed model of Hard Rock Stadium, made by FIU students, that unleashed innovative opportunities for training.

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Microswimmers swim faster over slippery surfaces

Tiny self-propelling spheres, measuring only micrometers, move faster over a hydrophobic silicone surface than they do over hydrophilic glass. "Almost nobody had realized that the substrate matters," says Stefania Ketzetzi, the researcher who discovered the effect, researched it and explained it. She publishes about it in the journal Physical Review Letters.

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Disease-aggravating mutation found in a mouse model of neonatal mitochondrial disease

The new mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variant drastically speeds up the disease progression in a mouse model of GRACILE syndrome. This discovery provides a new tool for studies of mitochondrial diseases.

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Disease-aggravating mutation found in a mouse model of neonatal mitochondrial disease

The new mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variant drastically speeds up the disease progression in a mouse model of GRACILE syndrome. This discovery provides a new tool for studies of mitochondrial diseases.

3h

Intel Patches Zombieload Security Threat Again

Intel has released a patch for the Zombieload / MDS (microarchitectural data sampling) security flaws that it first announced last year. This is the third set of patches related to those flaws, though only one of the two fixes even rates “Medium” severity. The first flaw, CVE-2020-0548, is called Vector Register Sampling by Intel. VRS is a low-risk attack because it only applies to a subset of ma

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Scientists create sensors with traps for free radicals

Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University and partners from the Czech Republic and France have designed extremely sensitive sensors for free oxygen-containing radicals that are able to disrupt cell function. According to the researchers, these sensors are an alternative to traditional analytical chemical methods of analysis. The laboratory tests demonstrated that its sensitivity is higher by four

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Researchers find collaborative flood modeling process effective

Community collaboration and high-resolution maps are keys to effective flood risk management, according to civil engineers and social scientists at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions.

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Is Donald Trump anti-science? The data says yes

Is Donald Trump at war with science?

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Modified RNA has a direct effect on DNA

An article titled "m6A RNA modification as a new player in R-loop regulation," by the Dynamic Gene Regulation research group led by Arne Klungland at IMB, was published in the January edition of Nature Genetics.

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ACL tears can cause harmful changes to your brain

Structural changes in the brains of patients who undergo reconstruction to repair anterior cruciate ligament tears can hinder recovery and may contribute to performance deficits and re-injury, researchers say. Researchers know that some joint function is often permanently lost after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery and re-injury is common even with intensive physical therapy, but aren’t s

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Tysk avis: Huawei samarbejder med kinesiske efterretningstjenester

Ifølge et fortroligt dokument fra det tyske udenrigsministerium, har Huawei samarbejde med den kinesiske sikkerhedsmyndighed, rapporterer tyske Handelsblatt.

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Engineering a Repairable World

submitted by /u/eberkut [link] [comments]

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Modified RNA has a direct effect on DNA

An article titled "m6A RNA modification as a new player in R-loop regulation," by the Dynamic Gene Regulation research group led by Arne Klungland at IMB, was published in the January edition of Nature Genetics.

3h

Seniors struggle with technology, and often their kids won't help

Seniors may not enjoy the stereotype of struggling with technology, but undeniably many older people do have difficulty mastering their devices.

3h

Forskare om att coronaviruset kräver full uppmärksamhet

Isolerade miljonstäder i Kina och smittade i allt fler länder. Det nyupptäckta coronaviruset väcker stor uppmärksamhet, men hur farligt är det, och hur pålitlig är informationen? Mycket tyder på att viruset, med beteckningen 2019-nCoV, ursprungligen spridits från djur till människa. En lokal viltmarknad i staden Wuhan, 70 mil väster om Shanghai, pekas ut som den plats där det skett. Utbrottet är

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Digging into Earth's history: Taking a geological history of the Mojave desert

Across the dry, scrubby hills of the Mojave Desert, a group of Johns Hopkins scientists and students spent three weeks this month working to understand millions of years of Earth's history. Evidence of ancient ice ages, remnants of geochemical events that disturbed prehistoric oceans, and fossils of the oldest living organisms on the planet are compressed in the strata of exposed rocks—nature's re

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How to cope with extreme heat days without racking up the aircon bills

Summer in Australia is getting hotter. Extreme heat events, with daytime temperatures over 35 degrees Celsius, are becoming more common and we are getting more of these days in a row.

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Mixing chlorine and drinking water creates toxic byproducts

Mixing drinking water with chlorine, the United States’ most common method of disinfecting drinking water, creates previously unidentified toxic byproducts, according to a new study. “There’s no doubt that chlorine is beneficial; chlorination has saved millions of lives worldwide from diseases such as typhoid and cholera since its arrival in the early 20th century,” says lead author Carsten Prass

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Bluestar Genomics’ breakthrough study highlights promising data for multi-cancer detection from a single blood draw

Bluestar Genomics published a new study demonstrating the efficacy of their 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) signal detection technology for its use in breast, lung, pancreatic, and prostate cancer.

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Finer particulate matter (PM1) could increase cardiovascular disease risk

In addition to harmful gases such as carbon monoxide, air pollution contains tiny particles that have been linked to health problems, including cardiovascular disease and asthma. Most studies have analyzed the potential health effects of larger-sized particulate matter (PM), such as particles less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5). Now, researchers report in Environmental Science & Technology Letter

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Microplastics from ocean fishing can 'hide' in deep sediments

Microplastic pollution in the world's oceans is a growing problem, and most studies of the issue have focused on land-based sources, such as discarded plastic bags or water bottles. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have linked microplastics in China's Beibu Gulf with heavy fishing activities. Surprisingly, many of the particles were hidden in deep sediments on

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Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new insecticide compounds

For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have identified 10 compounds that might be responsible for the herb's effectiveness. But there's a twist: The insecticides are

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How to Get the Most Out of Your Smartphone's Encryption

Both iPhones and Androids are encrypted by default. But there are steps you can take to safeguard your data on backups and messaging apps.

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The bar at the end of whenever

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00237-8 An unusual destination.

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Locust alarm, scientific rigour and a debate over risky disease experiments

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00172-8 The latest science news, in brief.

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Image of the Day: Albatross Sentinels

Through their attraction to fishing vessels and their ability to fly great distances, the seabirds help uncover the presence of illegal fisheries.

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The 10,000-Year Clock Is a Waste of Time

It's less a monument to long-term thinking than a Gilded Age distraction.

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Color-changing bandages sense and treat bacterial infections

According to the World Health Organization, antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health. Sensing and treating bacterial infections earlier could help improve patients' recovery, as well curb the spread of antibiotic-resistant microbes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed color-changing bandages that can sense drug-resistant and drug-sensitive b

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Microplastics from ocean fishing can 'hide' in deep sediments

Microplastic pollution in the world's oceans is a growing problem, and most studies of the issue have focused on land-based sources, such as discarded plastic bags or water bottles. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have linked microplastics in China's Beibu Gulf with heavy fishing activities. Surprisingly, many of the particles were hidden in deep sediments on

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Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new insecticide compounds

For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have identified 10 compounds that might be responsible for the herb's effectiveness. But there's a twist: The insecticides are

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Cardiac Stem Cell Transplant

A new study helps put the state of stem cell research into context.

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Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new insecticide compounds

For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have identified 10 compounds that might be responsible for the herb's effectiveness. But there's a twist: The insecticides are

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Donald Down the Shore

WILDWOOD, N.J.—President Donald Trump casually referred to his reelection campaign as “probably the greatest movement in history” last night. He told the several thousand rally-goers inside the Wildwoods Convention Center—and the scores more partying outside and watching a simulcast—that this country “has tremendous potential if we don’t blow it.” At one point, Trump warned that Democrats want to

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Rescued owl was 'too fat to fly', Suffolk sanctuary says

The owl probably overindulged during a mild spell that left it with lots of prey, bird experts say.

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Mystery at Mars pole explained

In 1966, two Caltech scientists were ruminating on the implications of the thin carbon dioxide (CO2) Martian atmosphere first revealed by Mariner IV, a NASA fly-by spacecraft built and flown by JPL. They theorized that Mars, with such an atmosphere, could have a long-term stable polar deposit of CO2 ice that, in turn, would control global atmospheric pressure.

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Mountain vegetation dries out Alpine water fluxes

ETH researchers confirm the paradox: rather than withering during droughts, plants at higher elevations absolutely thrive, as a study just published in the journal Nature Climate Change shows.

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Voyager 2 engineers working to restore normal operations

Engineers for NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft are working to return the mission to normal operating conditions after one of the spacecraft's autonomous fault protection routines was triggered. Multiple fault protection routines were programmed into both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 in order to allow the spacecraft to automatically take actions to protect themselves if potentially harmful circumstances aris

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Pollination is better in cities than in the countryside

Flowering plants are better pollinated in urban than in rural areas. This has now been demonstrated experimentally by a team of scientists led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ). Although the scientists found a greater diversity of flying insects in the coun

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Scientists develop 'metalloenzyme' biosensor for monitoring ethylene levels in fruits

Scientists from an international group led by the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research in Japan have developed a simple way to monitor the level of ethylene, an important hormone, in plants. Ethylene is involved in many processes in plants, such as the ripening of fruits and the dropping of leaves in the autumn. The detection was done by an artificial metalloenzyme, meaning a protein—in this case

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Qubits made from strontium and calcium ions can be precisely controlled by technology that already exists

Of the many divergent approaches to building a practical quantum computer, one of the most promising paths leads toward ion traps. In these traps, single ions are held still and serve as the basic units of data, or qubits, of the computer. With the help of lasers, these qubits interact with each other to perform logic operations.

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Pollination is better in cities than in the countryside

Flowering plants are better pollinated in urban than in rural areas. This has now been demonstrated experimentally by a team of scientists led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ). Although the scientists found a greater diversity of flying insects in the coun

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New guidelines will improve treatment for patients with hyperthyroidism

Radioactive iodine is to be recommended as the frontline treatment for patients with thyroid gland overactivity caused by conditions such as Graves' disease, following an evidence review led by University of Birmingham researchers.

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SSI: Sandsynligvis langt flere smittede med corona-virus end rapporteret

PLUS. Antallet af dødsfald stiger langsommere end nye smittetilfælde, hvormed dødeligheden lige nu er faldende. En vaccine kan være klar til menneskeforsøg om tre måneder.

5h

The Easiest Reform for College Admissions

In the world of college admissions, few choices about how to weigh applicants are simple. How much weight should schools give to applicants’ athletic performance, to standardized-test scores, to the need for a diverse student body, to the donations of wealthy benefactors? These are all complicated questions. But Johns Hopkins University just presented the higher-education world with at least one

5h

Virtual Reality Has an Accessibility Problem

It’s been touted as an “empathy machine” that lets users see what it’s like to have a disability—but people with disabilities often can’t use it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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When ‘Ghost Kitchens’ Become Mystery Grubhub Listings

A takeout mix-up in San Francisco revealed a dirty secret of the food-delivery business: restaurants listed without their permission.

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The Tragedy and Mystery of the ‘Best Game of the Decade’

Now that the fifth and final chapter of *Kentucky Route Zero* is out, we know how it ends—and have more questions than ever.

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Comic Book Artists on Parenthood, Creativity, and Cry-Barfing

Having a kid doesn’t extinguish inspiration. Three cartoonists share how becoming parents radically transformed their art—and everything else.

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Inside SpinLaunch, the Space Industry’s Best Kept Secret

The company is building a massive centrifuge to accelerate rockets and send them screaming into space.

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Virtual Reality Has an Accessibility Problem

It’s been touted as an “empathy machine” that lets users see what it’s like to have a disability—but people with disabilities often can’t use it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Top tips for getting your science out there

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00239-6 Craig Cormick explains how scientists can get their arguments across to members of the public.

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Hösten 2019: Nya professorer berättar om sin forskning

Fysisk aktivitet både för att förebygga sjukdom och vid rehabilitering, hur gener bidrar till hjärnans sjukdomar, kemiska processer och molekylära ledtrådar för att bekämpa cancer, samverkan mellan livsstil, gener och tumörer, nya metoder för att beräkna konsekvenser av radioaktiv strålning – och kan vi använda socker för att avslöja tumörer? Det är ett axplock ur vad höstens nya professorer vid L

5h

Scientists find far higher than expected rate of underwater glacial melting

Tidewater glaciers, the massive rivers of ice that end in the ocean, may be melting underwater much faster than previously thought, according to a Rutgers co-authored study that used robotic kayaks.

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David Sabatini TORmented by steaming turds

David Sabatini is an absolute star scientist, and now he is being harassed. On PubPeer and Twitter. It is all very unfair.

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Kun fem nye landvindmøller rejst i hele 2019

PLUS. En tilvækst på blot fem kommercielle vindmøller på tilsammen 17 MW gør 2019 til året med lavest mængde ny vindkraftkapacitet siden 2007. Et atypisk år, vurderer både Wind Denmark og Dansk Energi.

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Will Elizabeth Warren's Stance against "Junk Science" Matter to Voters?

The presidential candidate wants new limits on government use of biased studies pushed by industry — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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AI-powered robot warehouse pickers are now ready to go to work

Covariant, a Berkeley-based startup, has come out of stealth and thinks its robots are ready for the big time.

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Will Elizabeth Warren's Stance against "Junk Science" Matter to Voters?

The presidential candidate wants new limits on government use of biased studies pushed by industry — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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AI is being used to select embryos for women undergoing IVF

An AI that selects embryos with the highest chance of resulting in a successful pregnancy has been used by thousands of women undergoing IVF in Australia

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Human genes have been added to pigs to create skin for transplants

The race to create pigs organs for human transplants is hotting up. Three teams have each added human genes to pigs to try to create rejection-proof skin

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Cracks in the Caribbean: "The Building Was Shaking Like Paper"

What's up with all the shaking in the Caribbean? It’s business as usual on a geologic timescale — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Britons evacuated due to coronavirus to be quarantined for 14 days

People returning from China could be placed at a military base, says health department Coronavirus: BA suspends China flights – live updates Britons returning from coronavirus-hit Wuhan will be placed in quarantine for 14 days. Officials are considering taking passengers to a military base once they arrive home, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said. Continue reading…

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Scientists find far higher than expected rate of underwater glacial melting

Tidewater glaciers, the massive rivers of ice that end in the ocean, may be melting underwater much faster than previously thought, according to a Rutgers co-authored study that used robotic kayaks. The findings, which challenge current frameworks for analyzing ocean-glacier interactions, have implications for the rest of the world's tidewater glaciers, whose rapid retreat is contributing to sea-l

6h

Danske lamper i 100 år: Teknologi er drivkraften bag dansk verdensry

PLUS. Kunstigt lys som glødepærer, sparepærer og LED-lys har skullet tæmmes for at give et behageligt lys. Det har udfordret designerne og fostret design i verdensklasse, fortæller lampeekspert i ny bog.

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The Clean Water Act was a staggering bipartisan achievement. Now Trump is gutting it | Blan Holman

This is the single largest loss of clean water protections that America has ever seen – and the timing couldn’t be worse It may be hard to remember these days, but the nation that led the world on to the stage of modern environmental protection was the United States. Starting in the early 70s, the US Congress enacted bold bipartisan laws to protect America’s wildlife, air and water. America’s ski

6h

Det betyder vagtlægeaftalen for nordjyske praksislæger

Ud over at bemande færre konsultationssteder kan de praktiserende læger i Nordjylland blandt andet se frem til en garantibetaling for nattevagter på 10.000 kr. Herudover får regions- og udbudsklinikkerne også en vagtforpligtelse.

6h

Theory vs. practice: How is liberalism criticized?

Liberalism as a political ideology has many detractors. Criticisms typically fall into two categories: objections to liberal theory and ideas, and objections to the practice. Political theorist Chandran Kukathas argues that many who criticize liberalism actually "depend on certain liberal understandings simply for the freedom to practice their own particular distinctive ways of living and for the

6h

Stop the Impeachment-Polling Madness

In a representative democracy, the will of the people always counts. Though elected officials are not obliged to vote in accordance with the will of their constituents, they are obliged to elicit and understand the opinions and circumstances of those whose best interest they serve. As for whether that necessitates incessant public-opinion polls on the president’s impeachment and removal—that's a

6h

Mer fett och mindre kolhydrater i studenternas diet

I 16 års tid har varje omgång av studenter i en kurs i näringslära vid Linnéuniversitetet rapporterat vad de ätit och druckit till forskarna som undervisat. Nu visar forskarna att studenterna med tiden ätit mer fett och mindre kolhydrater. Forskare som har undersökt en grupp studenters kostvanor från år 2002 till 2017 kan nu visa att trenden går mot att studenterna äter mer fett och mindre kolhyd

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Lægevagten i Region Nordjylland får markant færre konsultations­steder

De praktiserende læger i Region Nordjylland skal fra 1. marts bemande fem konsultationssteder i stedet for ni. Det er et af hovedtrækkene i en ny lægevagtsaftale, der officielt underskrives i dag.

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World Indoor Athletics and Chinese Grand Prix at risk over coronavirus outbreak

• Team GB expected to pull out of next month’s championships • F1 race on 19 April in Shanghai at risk, says virus expert The Chinese Grand Prix has joined the World Indoor Athletics Championships in Nanjing as being under threat unless the coronavirus is urgently brought under control. With the virus still spreading, World Athletics will make an announcement in the next 24 hours about whether the

6h

Showbiz apes find peace through painting in Florida retirement

One of them worked alongside Clint Eastwood, others acted in the remake of sci-fi classic "Planet of the Apes", while yet another was the darling favorite of Michael Jackson.

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Showbiz apes find peace through painting in Florida retirement

One of them worked alongside Clint Eastwood, others acted in the remake of sci-fi classic "Planet of the Apes", while yet another was the darling favorite of Michael Jackson.

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FE advarer: Virksomheder bør kigge på kvantekryptering

Rettidig omhu: Virksomheder bør allerede nu begynde at sikre deres data, så de også forbliver hemmelige om 10-15 år, hvor kvantecomputere måske vil være i stand til at bryde den nuværende kryptering.

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What is coronavirus and how worried should we be?

What are the symptoms caused by the virus from Wuhan in China, how is it transmitted from one person to another, and at what point should you see a doctor? Coronavirus: how to protect yourself from infection ‘Our worst nightmare’: UK family to be split up in coronavirus evacuations Coronavirus latest – live updates It is a novel coronavirus – that is to say, a member of the coronavirus family tha

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Immunförsvaret otillräckligt när klimatet förändras

Forskare har konstaterat ett samband mellan olika fågelarters immunförsvar och de skilda klimatförhållanden där de lever. Forskarna vid Lunds universitet drar slutsatsen att när klimatet förändras kommer vissa djur att utsättas för sjukdomar som de inte kan hantera. I studien visar forskarlaget att evolutionen under miljontals år har skräddarsytt immunförsvaret hos många fågelarter. Allt för att

6h

Getting Brexit done: Six huge science issues the UK must resolve

The UK is finally set to leave the European Union, but big questions on science, health and the environment remain

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UK and EU: Cherish what you have achieved and stay close

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00226-x As the United Kingdom leaves the European Union, a future research relationship must be built on continued collaboration — and compromise.

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Gold clay from self-assembly of 2D microscale nanosheets

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14260-5 Here, the authors report controlled growth of Au nanosheets on bilayer membranes and self-assembly of nanosheets leads to free-standing gold clay nanostructures. The gold nanostructures possess six orders of magnitude softer stiffness compared to bulk gold, higher plasticity and deformability.

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Publisher Correction: MLL-AF9 initiates transformation from fast-proliferating myeloid progenitors

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14428-4

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Chromatin mapping and single-cell immune profiling define the temporal dynamics of ibrutinib response in CLL

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14081-6 Ibrutinib, a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, provides effective treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here, the authors describe time-dependent molecular changes to malignant cells and to the immune system in patients undergoing ibrutinib therapy, with can be used for therapy monitoring.

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mTORC2-AKT signaling to ATP-citrate lyase drives brown adipogenesis and de novo lipogenesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14430-w mTORC2 activates Akt, a regulator of cell growth and metabolism, however, the role of mTORC2 in adipocytes is incompletely understood. Here the authors report that a mTORC2-Akt axis specifically activates ACLY to promote lipid synthesis and histone acetylation during brown adipocyte differentiation.

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Spatiotemporal contact between peroxisomes and lipid droplets regulates fasting-induced lipolysis via PEX5

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14176-0 Lipid droplets are organelles that regulate lipid metabolism but if organellar contacts play a role during lipolysis is unclear. Here, the authors show that peroxisomes and peroxisomal protein PEX5 play pivotal roles in the spatial and temporal regulation of fasting-induced lipolysis by translocating ATGL ont

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Author Correction: Extreme intratumour heterogeneity and driver evolution in mismatch repair deficient gastro-oesophageal cancer

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14602-8

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Disappearance of superconductivity due to vanishing coupling in the overdoped Bi$$_{2}$$2Sr$$_{2}$$2CaCu$$_{2}$$2O$$_{8+\delta }$$8+δ

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14282-4 The pairing mechanism of cuprate superconductors is still under debate. Here, Valla et al. report that mass renormalization in Bi$$_{2}$$ 2Sr$$_{2}$$ 2CaCu$$_{2}$$ 2O$$_{8+\delta }$$ 8+δ weakens with doping and disappears precisely where superconductivity disappears, eliminating phononic mechanism for pairing

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Publisher Correction: Schools of skyrmions with electrically tunable elastic interactions

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14419-5

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Organoids (in vitro brains) to study pediatric brain tumors

Hundreds of miniature brains were grown in the laboratories of the University of Trento to study the genetic mechanisms responsible for the most common brain cancer affecting children. The results of a collaborative research effort, coordinated by the University of Trento and carried out with Sapienza University and Ospedale pediatrico Bambino Gesù in Rome and Irccs Neuromed, were published today

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Pollination is better in cities than in the countryside

Flowering plants are better pollinated in urban than in rural areas. Researchers from central Germany have now published this result in Nature Communications. Despite a greater diversity of flying insects in the countryside, more bees in cities pollinated more flowers of test plants. The most industrious pollinators were bumble bees, most likely benefitting from the abundant habitats in the city.

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Siri, help me quit — what does your smart device say when you ask for help with addiction?

A new study published in Nature Partner Journal's Digital Medicine finds that the leading intelligent virtual assistants fail to understand questions about where to find help for substance misuse. Intelligent virtual assistants were frequently confused providing no response, and in one instance the response was for a recommendation on where to buy drugs. But the study's authors remain optimistic t

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Living longer is important, but those years need to be healthy ones

In a new Presidential Advisory, the American Heart Association outlines 2030 Impact Goals for the United States and globally, to help all people live healthier for more years of their life.The goals build on the Association's work of nearly a century in successfully fighting heart disease and stroke, recognizing that even as people are now living longer, they may not always be living many of those

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More bullets for PISTOL: linear and cyclic siloxane reporter probes for quantitative 1H MR oximetry

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57889-9 More bullets for PISTOL: linear and cyclic siloxane reporter probes for quantitative 1 H MR oximetry

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Evaluation of SPP1/osteopontin expression as predictor of recurrence in tamoxifen treated breast cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58323-w

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Dogs and the classic route of Guinea Worm transmission: an evaluation of copepod ingestion

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58191-4

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Markerless Measurement and Evaluation of General Movements in Infants

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57580-z

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Gut microbiota plasticity is correlated with sustained weight loss on a low-carb or low-fat dietary intervention

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58000-y

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Clinical Genome Data Model (cGDM) provides Interactive Clinical Decision Support for Precision Medicine

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58088-2

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Starbucks closes half of China stores as virus hits

Coffee chain expects shutdown of 2,000 outlets to ‘materially affect’ results

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Confidence in Democracy Is at the Lowest Point on Record

Citizens in stable democracies are supposed to be satisfied with the democratic process. Individual politicians or administrations may be unpopular. But if the public lacks commitment to democratic principles, or loses faith in democratic institutions, demagogues and opportunists may brush these aside. That’s why we were concerned when, four years ago, we found that support for democracy in the U

7h

Revealing the predictability of intrinsic structure in complex networks

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14418-6 The likelihood of linking within a complex network is of importance to solve real-world problems, but it is challenging to predict. Sun et al. show that the link predictability limit can be well estimated by measuring the shortest compression length of a network without a need of prediction algorithm.

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Vaccination with CD47 deficient tumor cells elicits an antitumor immune response in mice

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14102-4 CD47 is expressed on tumour cells and binds to SIRPα, expressed on myeloid cells, preventing phagocytosis. Here, the authors show that injection of tumour cells lacking CD47, or cells coated with an anti-CD47 antibody, into mice mounts a strong immune response, resulting in a reduction in tumour growth.

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Positive surface charge of GluN1 N-terminus mediates the direct interaction with EphB2 and NMDAR mobility

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14345-6 NMDA receptors undergo constant cycling into and out of the postsynaptic density. Here authors show that NMDAR's GluN1 subunit is required to maintain NMDARs at dendritic spine synapses by direct extracellular interaction with the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB2.

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Urban areas as hotspots for bees and pollination but not a panacea for all insects

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14496-6 Pollinators can persist in urban areas despite little natural habitat. Here the authors compare insect pollinators and pollination inside and outside of German cities, showing that urban areas have high diversity of bees but not other insects, and high pollination provisioning, relative to rural sites.

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Modeling medulloblastoma in vivo and with human cerebellar organoids

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13989-3 Group 3 medulloblastoma (MB) is considered one of the most aggressive forms of this cancer. Here, the authors show that Otx2 and c-MYC oncogenes can drive Group 3 MB formation in mouse and human cerebellar organoids while SMARCA4 overexpression or a EZH2-specific inhibitor can inhibit tumorigenesis.

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Elon Musk on longevity research:

From his interview with waitbutwhy.com https://waitbutwhy.com/2015/05/elon-musk-the-worlds-raddest-man.html ​ — I talked to him for a while about genetic reprogramming. He doesn’t buy the efficacy of typical anti-aging technology efforts, because he believes humans have general expiration dates, and no one fix can help that. He explained: “The whole system is collapsing. You don’t see someone who

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Miso Robotics unveils its next-gen robot kitchen assistant

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Does Science Support the ‘Wilderness’ in Wilderness Therapy?

Residential wilderness therapy programs pair counseling for troubled teens with a variety of outdoor activities, costing parents thousands of dollars. Without firmer evidence supporting the wilderness part, however, some experts say such programs are at best unproven, and at worst, a pricey dose of snake oil.

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Region Hovedstadens Psykiatri får ny professor i forebyggelse og tidlig behandling

Overlæge Maj Vinberg er ny professor og leder af forskningsenheden på Psykiatrisk Center Nordsjælland. Hun vil udvikle en forebyggelsesstrategi til børn og unge af forældre med alvorlig psykisk sygdom.

7h

Smart single mother bees learn from their neighbors

Solitary female bees inspect other nests for signs of danger before making decisions on where to build their own, a new London-based study suggests.

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Smart single mother bees learn from their neighbors

Solitary female bees inspect other nests for signs of danger before making decisions on where to build their own, a new London-based study suggests.

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Global dissatisfaction with democracy at record high, new report reveals

Dissatisfaction with democratic politics among citizens of developed countries has increased from a third to half of all individuals over the last quarter of a century, according to the largest international dataset on global attitudes to democracy ever made.

7h

The man who studied disruption—and saw his own theories get disrupted

What I learned from Clayton Christensen, the author of The Innovator’s Dilemma.

7h

Testar medicin på minikopia av människa

Att utveckla nya läkemedel är en lång och dyr process. De flesta lovande substanser faller bort på vägen på grund av biverkningar eller att de inte håller vad de lovar. För att snabba upp testerna av nya mediciner har forskare under många år utvecklat organ i miniatyr på små plastchip. Mänskliga celler sätts på chippen På chippen placeras mänskliga celler från det organ som studeras, till exempel

8h

AI Helps Warehouse Robots Pick Up New Tricks

Backed by machine learning luminaries, Covariant.ai's bots can handle jobs previously needing a human touch.

8h

Researchers to conduct major Japan ocean microplastics survey

Scientists will begin a two-year survey of microplastics in the coastal waters off Japan from April, a research group announced on Wednesday, with concern growing about the impact of plastics on the oceans.

8h

Branding in a hyperconnected world

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, Texas A&M, UNC-Chapel Hill, University of Wisconsin, and Columbia University published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines the changing role and management of brands in a hyperconnected world.

8h

Does news coverage of crashes affect perceived blame?

Despite an ever-rising number of pedestrian and bicyclist deaths on U.S. roads each year, there's no widespread public pressure to improve road safety—a situation influenced by how news articles about auto-pedestrian/bicyclist crashes are written, said Tara Goddard, Texas A&M assistant professor of urban planning.

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First release of genetically engineered moth could herald new era of crop protection

A newly published study reports a successful, first-ever open-field release of a self-limiting, genetically engineered diamondback moth, stating that it paves the way for an effective and sustainable approach to pest control.

8h

Nya sätt att se hur skogsskövling i tropikerna rubbar jordens kolcykel

Människans kraftigt ökade markanvändning i världens tropiska områden rubbar den globala kolcykeln mer än vad som tidigare varit känt. Genom att studera data från ett nytt satellitbildsystem kan forskarna även slå fast att biomassan i de tropiska skogarna minskar. Vegetationen runt om i världen fyller en mycket viktig funktion eftersom den absorberar 30 procent av människans koldioxidutsläpp och m

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First release of genetically engineered moth could herald new era of crop protection

A newly published study reports a successful, first-ever open-field release of a self-limiting, genetically engineered diamondback moth, stating that it paves the way for an effective and sustainable approach to pest control.

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Screening sweet peppers for organic farming

A study conducted out of The University of Georgia delved into the comparative yields of sweet pepper varieties produced under organic farming conditions.

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Screening sweet peppers for organic farming

A study conducted out of The University of Georgia delved into the comparative yields of sweet pepper varieties produced under organic farming conditions.

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Praise, rather than punish, to see up to 30% greater focus in the classroom

To improve behavior in class, teachers should focus on praising children for good behavior, rather than telling them off for being disruptive, according to a new study published in Educational Psychology.

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Takke-SMS kan give 10.000 flere bloddonationer om året

Der kan komme mere blod i blodbankerne, hvis bloddonorer modtager en takke-sms, når det donerede…

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Virus crisis hits global businesses in China

BA halts all routes to country as companies including Starbucks and Toyota scale back operations

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'Our worst nightmare': UK family to be split up in coronavirus evacuations

Sindy Siddle, who has a Chinese passport, told she cannot leave with her husband and child A British family trapped in the centre of the coronavirus outbreak are facing their “worst nightmare” after being told wife and mother Sindy Siddle will not be allowed on the plane evacuating them from the country. Siddle travelled to Hubei province with her husband, Jeff, and nine-year-old daughter, Jasmin

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Brexit Reveals a Whole New Set of Political Wounds

One evening last week, I found myself dining in the House of Lords just as the “European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill”—the law that will finalize Brexit—was wending its way through the final stages of the British legislative process. When I arrived, the debate was paused; at suppertime, formally speaking, the Lords “Adjourn During Pleasure.” The dining room was full, which is not always the

10h

Skeptical Science New Research for Week #4, 2020

Suggested suitable pairings The US EPA has just announced revised regulations for wetlands maintenance. Among other backward effects the freshly degraded rules will allow land developers and others to pretend that the world ends at their own property line, which is of course a fallacy. Homeowners are not permitted to truncate sanitary sewer lines at their property lines, and the commonsense conce

10h

Researchers develop first all-optical, stealth encryption technology at Ben-Gurion University

'Basically, the innovative breakthrough is that if you can't detect it, you can't steal it,' Professor Sadot says. 'Because an eavesdropper can neither read the data nor even detect the existence of the transmitted signal, our optical stealth transmission provides the highest level of privacy and security for sensitive data applications.'

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Hong Kong’s Perfect Crisis

HONG KONG—The protesters gathered in a suburb here over the weekend looked much like the hundreds of thousands who have flooded this city’s streets for months. Their faces were covered with masks; they spoke of anger at the government while some piled bricks, bicycles, and road signs into jumbled barricades meant to slow advancing police. At night, a few black-clad men tossed Molotov cocktails in

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Albatrosser afslører ulovlige fiskere

Sensorer på fuglene opsnapper signaler fra både, der forsøger at skjule sig.

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New study discovers inflammatory molecules controlling capillary loss

A study led by researchers at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine discovered that three major proinflammatory mediators — interlukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and thrombin — individually and especially when combined, directly drive capillary loss known to occur in diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and m

12h

Branding in a hyperconnected world

A hyperconnected world is changing the role and management of brands. New theories and models are needed to account for these changes.

12h

SUTD develops revolutionary reversible 4D printing with research collaborators

Researchers from SUTD worked with NTU to revolutionise 4D printing by making a 3D fabricated material change its shape and back again repeatedly without electrical components

12h

Fungal decisions can affect climate

Research shows fungi may slow climate change by storing more carbon.

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Praise, rather than punish, to see up to 30% greater focus in the classroom

To improve behavior in class, teachers should focus on praising children for good behavior, rather than telling them off for being disruptive, according to a new study published in Educational Psychology.

12h

First release of genetically engineered moth could herald new era of crop protection

For decades, the agriculture industry has been trying to find biological and environmentally friendly ways to manage the diamondback moth, which is widely resistant to insecticides. To combat this, a newly engineered strain of an insect pest performs well in US field trials conducted by Cornell University. Results show promise for future biotech crop protection applications and a potential solutio

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Deep data helps cities prepare for disaster

Urban emergency response experts are tapping unlikely sources of information

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Male moths genetically modified to kill females released in the wild

Genetically modified diamondback moths designed to replace pesticides by wiping out female moths have been released in New York state

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Coronavirus Live Updates: U.S. Evacuates Citizens from Hot Zone, as Death Toll Mounts

Chinese officials confirmed nearly 6,000 cases of the mysterious illness as foreign governments airlifted their citizens out of Wuhan, the outbreak’s epicenter.

12h

Snotsicles and snowdrifts: Extreme climate science

Scientists face some unique challenges working in the harsh conditions of the Antarctic.

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What a digital government looks like | Anna Piperal

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

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Towards a Conversational Agent that Can Chat About…Anything

submitted by /u/maxtility [link] [comments]

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Nanoparticle helps eat away deadly arterial plaque

submitted by /u/drunkles [link] [comments]

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Citizen science discovers a new form of the northern lights

Working together with space researchers, Finnish amateur photographers have discovered a new auroral form. Named 'dunes' by the hobbyists, the phenomenon is believed to be caused by waves of oxygen atoms glowing due to a stream of particles released from the sun.

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Amateur stargazers capture new form of northern lights

Aurora enthusiasts discover new phenomenon in Finland A new form of the northern lights has been captured by amateur enthusiasts, researchers have revealed. The phenomenon of glowing green lights rippling across the night sky, also known as the aurora borealis, have long captivated the public and experts alike. Continue reading…

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Vallensbæk planlægger bydel midt i motorvejsstøj

PLUS. 518 nye boliger i Vallensbæk Kommune skal bygges klos op ad Køge Bugt Motorvejen. Projektet er nu sat på pause, fordi en borgergruppe mener, at reglerne for støj overskrides.

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Rubber ‘leaves’ reveal the physics of the floating lotus

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00189-z Scientists explore why some lotus leaves lie smooth and flat, but others are deeply ruffled.

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UK Has a Plan to Corral Huawei. But Security Concerns Linger

Peripheral equipment can be vulnerable, and even partial network surveillance could pose a threat, experts warn.

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Mechanisms for Ca2+-dependent permeability transition in mitochondria [Letters (Online Only)]

In a recent study in cells lacking an assembled F-ATP synthase the conclusion was reached that this enzyme cannot form the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) (1). As in previous studies (2, 3) the key argument is that mitochondria still undergo cyclosporin A (CsA)-sensitive swelling and Ca2+-induced Ca2+release (1–3). The…

15h

Reply to Bernardi: The mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the ATP synthase [Letters (Online Only)]

The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) is a physiological phenomenon lacking a molecular basis. The phenomenon, described over 40 y ago, is that in response to elevated levels of Ca2+ ions in the mitochondrial matrix a nonspecific channel opens, water enters the mitochondria, their cristae swell, their membranes rupture, terminating…

15h

Is it too late to halt climate change? No, no, and no.

Disheartened, many are convinced there's no fighting climate change at this point. There's no single on/off switch, however, so we can still lessen its effects. It's up to us to make the crisis our leaders' priority. With unprecedented extreme weather buffeting basically everyone everywhere, with places like idyllic Kirbati disappearing beneath the rising seas, and with Australia on fire for good

15h

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HK stocks fall on coronavirus fears as foreigners leave Wuhan

Financial hub reopens as US and Japan evacuate nationals from city at centre of outbreak

15h

The World’s Most Traffic-Choked Cities, Ranked

Cities in Asia and South America dominate the “top” of the list. Los Angeles, the US's worst, finishes 31st.

15h

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Researchers Are Racing to Make a Coronavirus Vaccine. Will It Help?

New technology and better coordination have sped up development. But a coronavirus vaccine is still months — and most likely years — away.

16h

Did giant and large dsDNA viruses originate before their eukaryotic hosts? [Letters (Online Only)]

Guglielmini et al. (1) present phylogenetic trees of cellular organisms and Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDVs) based on two subunits of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) and conclude that NCLDVs originated before their eukaryotic hosts and contributed RNAP to eukaryotes. While the study might provide insights into NCLDV phylogeny, the main…

17h

Reply to Ku and Sun: Ancestors of modern giant and large eukaryotic dsDNA viruses infected proto-eukaryotes [Letters (Online Only)]

In Guglielmini et al. (1), we analyze the evolutionary relationships between Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDVs) and the cellular domains based on the two largest universal markers, that is, the two largest RNA polymerase subunits (RNAP). We conclude that NCLDVs diversified before the emergence of the last eukaryotic common ancestor…

17h

The Nernst effect in Corbino geometry [Physics]

We study the manifestation of the Nernst effect in the Corbino disk subjected to the normal external magnetic field and to the radial temperature gradient. The Corbino geometry offers a precious opportunity for the direct measurement of the magnetization currents that are masked by kinetic contributions to the Nernst current…

17h

The unreasonable effectiveness of deep learning in artificial intelligence [Neuroscience]

Deep learning networks have been trained to recognize speech, caption photographs, and translate text between languages at high levels of performance. Although applications of deep learning networks to real-world problems have become ubiquitous, our understanding of why they are so effective is lacking. These empirical results should not be possible…

17h

Conservative and disruptive modes of adolescent change in human brain functional connectivity [Neuroscience]

Adolescent changes in human brain function are not entirely understood. Here, we used multiecho functional MRI (fMRI) to measure developmental change in functional connectivity (FC) of resting-state oscillations between pairs of 330 cortical regions and 16 subcortical regions in 298 healthy adolescents scanned 520 times. Participants were aged 14 to…

17h

Mapping proteome-wide targets of protein kinases in plant stress responses [Plant Biology]

Protein kinases are major regulatory components in almost all cellular processes in eukaryotic cells. By adding phosphate groups, protein kinases regulate the activity, localization, protein–protein interactions, and other features of their target proteins. It is known that protein kinases are central components in plant responses to environmental stresses such as…

17h

Histamine receptor agonist alleviates severe cardiorenal damages by eliciting anti-inflammatory programming [Medical Sciences]

Heart failure and chronic kidney disease are major causes of morbidity and mortality internationally. Although these dysfunctions are common and frequently coexist, the factors involved in their relationship in cardiorenal regulation are still largely unknown, mainly due to a lack of detailed molecular targets. Here, we found the increased plasma…

17h

Observation of an apparent first-order glass transition in ultrafragile Pt-Cu-P bulk metallic glasses [Applied Physical Sciences]

An experimental study of the configurational thermodynamics for a series of near-eutectic Pt80-xCuxP20 bulk metallic glass-forming alloys is reported where 14 < x < 27. The undercooled liquid alloys exhibit very high fragility that increases as x decreases, resulting in an increasingly sharp glass transition. With decreasing x, the extrapolated…

17h

Serotonergic afferents from the dorsal raphe decrease the excitability of pyramidal neurons in the anterior piriform cortex [Neuroscience]

The olfactory system receives extensive serotonergic inputs from the dorsal raphe, a nucleus involved in control of behavior, regulation of mood, and modulation of sensory processing. Although many studies have investigated how serotonin modulates the olfactory bulb, few have focused on the anterior piriform cortex (aPC), a region important for…

17h

Insight into the multifunctional RNA synthesis machine of rabies virus [Commentaries]

Rabies virus (RABV) is the causative agent of a fatal neurological disease in humans and animals. It is transmitted to humans from infected animals, mainly domestic dogs, through their saliva by biting or by scratching. Rabies is controlled by vaccination of domestic dogs and cats, but RABV nevertheless kills more…

17h

Cystic fibrosis heterozygosity: Carrier state or haploinsufficiency? [Commentaries]

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common genetic disorder, caused by mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The CFTR gene encodes a transmembrane chloride channel, which is important for key physiological functions, such as production of sweat and mucus, as well as mucociliary clearance in the lungs…

17h

Antibiotic resistance by high-level intrinsic suppression of a frameshift mutation in an essential gene [Microbiology]

A fundamental feature of life is that ribosomes read the genetic code in messenger RNA (mRNA) as triplets of nucleotides in a single reading frame. Mutations that shift the reading frame generally cause gene inactivation and in essential genes cause loss of viability. Here we report and characterize a +1-nt…

17h

A precisely positioned MED12 activation helix stimulates CDK8 kinase activity [Biochemistry]

The Mediator kinase module regulates eukaryotic transcription by phosphorylating transcription-related targets and by modulating the association of Mediator and RNA polymerase II. The activity of its catalytic core, cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8), is controlled by Cyclin C and regulatory subunit MED12, with its deregulation contributing to numerous malignancies. Here, we…

17h

Tetraspanins TSP-12 and TSP-14 function redundantly to regulate the trafficking of the type II BMP receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans [Cell Biology]

Tetraspanins are a unique family of 4-pass transmembrane proteins that play important roles in a variety of cell biological processes. We have previously shown that 2 paralogous tetraspanins in Caenorhabditis elegans, TSP-12 and TSP-14, function redundantly to promote bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, are not…

17h

Organelle-specific targeting of polymersomes into the cell nucleus [Applied Biological Sciences]

Organelle-specific nanocarriers (NCs) are highly sought after for delivering therapeutic agents into the cell nucleus. This necessitates nucleocytoplasmic transport (NCT) to bypass nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). However, little is known as to how comparably large NCs infiltrate this vital intracellular barrier to enter the nuclear interior. Here, we developed nuclear…

17h

Central clock components modulate plant shade avoidance by directly repressing transcriptional activation activity of PIF proteins [Plant Biology]

Light-environment signals, sensed by plant phytochrome photoreceptors, are transduced to target genes through direct regulation of PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF) transcription factor abundance and activity. Previous genome-wide DNA-binding and expression analysis has identified a set of genes that are direct targets of PIF transcriptional regulation. However, quantitative analysis of promote

17h

Optimization of a Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein repeat vaccine using the tobacco mosaic virus platform [Immunology and Inflammation]

Plasmodium falciparum vaccine RTS,S/AS01 is based on the major NPNA repeat and the C-terminal region of the circumsporozoite protein (CSP). RTS,S-induced NPNA-specific antibody titer and avidity have been associated with high-level protection in naïve subjects, but efficacy and longevity in target populations is relatively low. In an effort to improve…

17h

RNA sequencing by direct tagmentation of RNA/DNA hybrids [Applied Biological Sciences]

Transcriptome profiling by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has been widely used to characterize cellular status, but it relies on second-strand complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis to generate initial material for library preparation. Here we use bacterial transposase Tn5, which has been increasingly used in various high-throughput DNA analyses, to construct RNA-seq libraries…

17h

Endothelial sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors promote vascular normalization and antitumor therapy [Medical Sciences]

Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1PR1) is essential for embryonic vascular development and maturation. In the adult, it is a key regulator of vascular barrier function and inflammatory processes. Its roles in tumor angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis are not well understood. In this paper, we show that S1PR1 is expressed and…

17h

Modeling the transport of nuclear proteins along single skeletal muscle cells [Cell Biology]

Skeletal muscle cells contain hundreds of myonuclei within a shared cytoplasm, presenting unique challenges for regulating gene expression. Certain transcriptional programs (e.g., postsynaptic machinery) are segregated to specialized domains, while others (e.g., contractile proteins) do not show spatial confinement. Furthermore, local stimuli, such as denervation, can induce transcriptional respon

17h

An RNA polymerase ribozyme that synthesizes its own ancestor [Biochemistry]

The RNA-based organisms from which modern life is thought to have descended would have depended on an RNA polymerase ribozyme to copy functional RNA molecules, including copying the polymerase itself. Such a polymerase must have been capable of copying structured RNAs with high efficiency and high fidelity to maintain genetic…

17h

Influence of Arctic sea-ice variability on Pacific trade winds [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

A conceptual model connecting seasonal loss of Arctic sea ice to midlatitude extreme weather events is applied to the 21st-century intensification of Central Pacific trade winds, emergence of Central Pacific El Nino events, and weakening of the North Pacific Aleutian Low Circulation. According to the model, Arctic Ocean warming following…

17h

QnAs with John Kutzbach [QnAs]

A professor emeritus of climate science at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, John Kutzbach was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2006 for his work on understanding past, present, and future climates. Kutzbach initially studied engineering, but serving as an aviation forecaster in the US Air Force in France…

17h

Ocean sentinel albatrosses locate illegal vessels and provide the first estimate of the extent of nondeclared fishing [Environmental Sciences]

With threats to nature becoming increasingly prominent, in order for biodiversity levels to persist, there is a critical need to improve implementation of conservation measures. In the oceans, the surveillance of fisheries is complex and inadequate, such that quantifying and locating nondeclared and illegal fisheries is persistently problematic. Given that…

17h

Ontogeny of the anuran urostyle and the developmental context of evolutionary novelty [Evolution]

Developmental novelties often underlie the evolutionary origins of key metazoan features. The anuran urostyle, which evolved nearly 200 MYA, is one such structure. It forms as the tail regresses during metamorphosis, when locomotion changes from an axial-driven mode in larvae to a limb-driven one in adult frogs. The urostyle comprises…

17h

Landscape context affects the sustainability of organic farming systems [Agricultural Sciences]

Organic agriculture promotes sustainability compared to conventional agriculture. However, the multifunctional sustainability benefits of organic farms might be mediated by landscape context. Assessing how landscape context affects sustainability may aid in targeting organic production to landscapes that promote high biodiversity, crop yields, and profitability. We addressed this using a meta-anal

17h

Correction to Supporting Information for Shen et al., Genetic deletion of vesicular glutamate transporter in dopamine neurons increases vulnerability to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in mice [SI Correction]

NEUROSCIENCE Correction to Supporting Information for “Genetic deletion of vesicular glutamate transporter in dopamine neurons increases vulnerability to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in mice,” by Hui Shen, Rosa Anna M. Marino, Ross A. McDevitt, Guo-Hua Bi, Kai Chen, Graziella Madeo, Pin-Tse Lee, Ying Liang, Lindsay M. De Biase, Tsung-Ping Su, Zheng-Xiong Xi,…

17h

How social network sites and other online intermediaries increase exposure to news [Social Sciences]

People can come across news and other internet offerings in a variety of ways, for example, by visiting their favorite websites, using search engines, or following recommendations from contacts on social media (1). These routes do not necessarily lead people to the same venues. While traditionally considered as an important…

17h

Microtubules regulate cardiomyocyte transversal Young’s modulus [Cell Biology]

The field of cardiomyocyte mechanobiology is gaining significant attention, due to accumulating evidence concerning the significant role of cellular mechanical effects on the integrated function of the heart. To date, the protein titin has been demonstrated as a major contributor to the cardiomyocytes Young’s modulus (YM). The microtubular network represents…

17h

Fire synchronizes flowering and boosts reproduction in a widespread but declining prairie species [Ecology]

Fire is an important determinant of habitat structure and biodiversity across ecosystems worldwide. In fire-dependent communities, similar to the North American prairie, fire suppression contributes to local plant extinctions. Yet the demographic mechanisms responsible for species loss have not been directly investigated. We conducted a 21-y longitudinal study of 778…

17h

Impact of past climate warming on genomic diversity and demographic history of collared lemmings across the Eurasian Arctic [Evolution]

The Arctic climate was warmer than today at the last interglacial and the Holocene thermal optimum. To reveal the impact of past climate-warming events on the demographic history of an Arctic specialist, we examined both mitochondrial and nuclear genomic variation in the collared lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus, Pallas), a keystone species…

17h

Correction for Santer et al., Quantifying stochastic uncertainty in detection time of human-caused climate signals [Corrections]

Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences Correction for “Quantifying stochastic uncertainty in detection time of human-caused climate signals,” by Benjamin D. Santer, John C. Fyfe, Susan Solomon, Jeffrey F. Painter, Céline Bonfils, Giuliana Pallotta, and Mark D. Zelinka, which was first published September 16, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1904586116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A….

17h

The role of forest conversion, degradation, and disturbance in the carbon dynamics of Amazon indigenous territories and protected areas [Environmental Sciences]

Maintaining the abundance of carbon stored aboveground in Amazon forests is central to any comprehensive climate stabilization strategy. Growing evidence points to indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLCs) as buffers against large-scale carbon emissions across a nine-nation network of indigenous territories (ITs) and protected natural areas (PNAs). Previous studies have…

17h

A qualitative solution with quantitative potential for the mouse hippocampal cortex flatmap problem [Neuroscience]

The hippocampal formation (HPF) is a focus of intense experimental investigation, particularly because of its roles in conscious memory consolidation, spatial navigation, emotion, and motivated behaviors. However, the HPF has a complex three-dimensional geometry resulting from extreme curvature of its layers, and this presents a challenge for investigators seeking to…

17h

High-complexity extracellular barcoding using a viral hemagglutinin [Microbiology]

While single-cell sequencing technologies have revealed tissue heterogeneity, resolving mixed cellular libraries into cellular clones is essential for many pooled screens and clonal lineage tracing. Fluorescent proteins are limited in number, while DNA barcodes can only be read after cell lysis. To overcome these limitations, we used influenza virus hemagglutinins…

17h

Simple spike dynamics of Purkinje cells in the macaque vestibulo-cerebellum during passive whole-body self-motion [Neuroscience]

Theories of cerebellar functions posit that the cerebellum implements internal models for online correction of motor actions and sensory estimation. As an example of such computations, an internal model resolves a sensory ambiguity where the peripheral otolith organs in the inner ear sense both head tilts and translations. Here we…

17h

Orchestration of human macrophage NLRP3 inflammasome activation by Staphylococcus aureus extracellular vesicles [Microbiology]

Release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is a common feature among eukaryotes, archaea, and bacteria. However, the biogenesis and downstream biological effects of EVs released from gram-positive bacteria remain poorly characterized. Here, we report that EVs purified from a community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain were internalized into human macrophages in vitro…

17h

Market integration accounts for local variation in generalized altruism in a nationwide lost-letter experiment [Social Sciences]

What explains variation in levels of prosocial behavior across communities? And are members of the ingroup and outgroup treated differently? According to evolutionary theories of generalized altruism, market integration should lead to greater levels of prosociality: Market exchange forces people to interact with unknown others, thus creating the conditions for…

17h

Diversity buffers winegrowing regions from climate change losses [Sustainability Science]

Agrobiodiversity—the variation within agricultural plants, animals, and practices—is often suggested as a way to mitigate the negative impacts of climate change on crops [S. A. Wood et al., Trends Ecol. Evol. 30, 531–539 (2015)]. Recently, increasing research and attention has focused on exploiting the intraspecific genetic variation within a crop…

17h

New insight into how cannabidiol takes effect in the brains of people with psychosis

Researchers from King's College London have shown that cannabidiol (CBD) alters the brain activity in people with psychosis during memory tasks, making it more similar to the activation seen in people without psychosis during the same tasks.

17h

Global dissatisfaction with democracy at record high, new report reveals

2019 had the 'highest level of democratic discontent' since detailed global recording began in 1995. Many large democracies now at their highest-ever recorded level for democratic dissatisfaction, including the UK, US, Brazil, Mexico and Australia.

17h

Drinking alcohol during pregnancy: #DRYMESTER the only safe approach

Drinking alcohol during pregnancy leads to poorer cognitive functioning in children, according to the most comprehensive review on the issue to date. The University of Bristol research published today [29 January] in the International Journal of Epidemiology, reviewed 23 published studies on the topic and found evidence that drinking in pregnancy could also lead to lower birthweight.

17h

Most innovative cancer drugs facing delays in reaching patients

Cancer patients have had to wait longer for innovative new cancer drugs than for more conventional treatments, suggesting the most exciting new therapies have not been successfully fast tracked, a new analysis reports.The researchers found that the higher the level of innovation of a cancer drug, the longer it was taking to pass through clinical trials, licensing and appraisal for availability on

17h

Smart single mother bees learn from their neighbors

Solitary female bees inspect other nests for signs of danger before making decisions on where to build their own, a new London-based study suggests.

17h

Spider Glue Turns Moths' Defenses Against Them

The glue cements the moth’s wing scales together like a wall of bricks. 00-Cyrtarachne-Spider_cropped.jpg Cytarachne akirai spiders like this one produce a specialized glue that sticks to moth wings, even though the wings are covered in scales that slough off when touched. Image credits: Sarah Han, University of Akron Rights information: This image may only be reproduced with this Inside Science

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The Coronavirus Is a Threat to the Global Drug Supply

The world's pharmaceutical supply chain is in danger as the virus spreads across China and jeopardizes travel and trade.

17h

How dangerous is the new coronavirus?

Scientists race to understand respiratory disease that has infected thousands in weeks

17h

Call to speed up ‘blue skies’ UK research agency

Policy Exchange says likely high failure rate of projects would be a ‘positive’

17h

The Atlantic Politics Daily: From the Trail to the Trial

It’s Tuesday, January 28. Mitch McConnell reportedly said during a private meeting that GOP members don’t have the votes to block impeachment-trial witnesses. In the rest of today’s newsletter: This is surely not how Kamala Harris or Cory Booker had planned to spend their January. Plus: Fearing the moderate. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (SAUL LOEB / JOE RAEDLE / GETTY / THE ATLANTIC ) From the Trail t

17h

How Do Bats Live With So Many Viruses?

They are considered the probable source of the coronavirus outbreak spreading from China. It turns out that they may have an immune system that lets them coexist with many disease-causing viruses.

17h

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: Early-life screen time linked to reduced physical activity in preschool children

Children aged two to three who spend more than three hours a day viewing screens such as tablets and televisions (TVs) grow up to be less physically active at age 5.5 years, compared to children who used screens for an hour or less each day, a study published in The Lancet Child and Adolescent Health journal has found.

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F.D.A. Warns Purell to Stop Claiming It Can Prevent Ebola or Flu

The Food and Drug Administration told the maker of Purell hand sanitizers to discontinue marketing campaigns that the agency complained also included claims for avoiding illness from other viruses.

17h

Author Correction: Metabolomic Changes of Human Proximal Tubular Cell Line in High Glucose Environment

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-57576-9

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Author Correction: Influence of high glucose on mesangial cell-derived exosome composition, secretion and cell communication

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58753-6

18h

Author Correction: Personality-dependent breeding dispersal in rural but not urban burrowing owls

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58513-6

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Author Correction: Characterization and printability of Sodium alginate -Gelatin hydrogel for bioprinting NSCLC co-culture

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58952-1

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Author Correction: Sensory primary cilium is a responsive cAMP microdomain in renal epithelia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58754-5

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Finally, Differentiable Physics is Here!

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Nanoparticle eats away at plaque in arteries

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Space Force's Rough Launch, Oversight for Facebook, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

18h

Using the logic of neuroscience to heal from a breakup

According to a study from anthropologist Dr. Helen Fisher, when humans fall in love, regions of the brain that are rich in dopamine (a neurotransmitter that plays a key role in feeling pleasure) light up and parts of the brain that are used in fear and social judgment are operating at lower rates. The surge and decline of hormones in our brains when we experience a breakup are also similar to tho

18h

Howard Chang (Stanford, HHMI) 3: LncRNA Function at the DNA Level: PVT1

https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/epigenomics-lncrnas In this talk, Dr. Howard Chang describes epigenomic approaches pioneered by his lab and the role of long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in regulating gene expression. In Part 1 of this series, Dr. Howard Chang introduces epigenomics, the study of DNA regulatory mechanisms that determine which genes are turned on or off in cells a

18h

Howard Chang (Stanford, HHMI) 2: LncRNA Function at the RNA Level: Xist

https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/epigenomics-lncrnas In this talk, Dr. Howard Chang describes epigenomic approaches pioneered by his lab and the role of long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in regulating gene expression. In Part 1 of this series, Dr. Howard Chang introduces epigenomics, the study of DNA regulatory mechanisms that determine which genes are turned on or off in cells a

18h

Howard Chang (Stanford, HHMI) 1: Epigenomic Technologies

https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/epigenomics-lncrnas In this talk, Dr. Howard Chang describes epigenomic approaches pioneered by his lab and the role of long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in regulating gene expression. In Part 1 of this series, Dr. Howard Chang introduces epigenomics, the study of DNA regulatory mechanisms that determine which genes are turned on or off in cells a

18h

Elliptical machines to help you reach your fitness goals

Get a leg up. ( Risen Wang via Unsplash/) Everyone knows the most difficult exercise in the world is making the decision to start exercising. If you can conquer that, you can conquer pretty much anything. A lot of us need a little something extra to make that mental switch, which is why the bells and whistles that come with these elliptical machines make them more than just exercise equipment. Th

18h

Copy and paste seamlessly across all your devices

You probably know how to sync your files—now learn how to sync your clipboards. (GaudiLab via Deposit Photos/) Many of us juggle more than one device during the day—phone, laptop, tablet, and sometimes even secondary phones and smartwatches. But you might have wondered if, and how, you can move text and images from one to the other. It can get really crazy, really fast. Apple, Google, and Microso

18h

Hacker Group Seizes Twitter, Facebook Accounts of 15 NFL Teams

Three, Two, One, Hack The National Football League really doesn’t value defense as much as it should — at least not when it comes to online security. On Sunday and Monday, a group calling itself OurMine hacked the official social media accounts of the NFL and 15 NFL teams, including the Super Bowl-bound San Francisco 49ers and the Kansas City Chiefs. Mack to the Lions OurMine didn’t control the N

18h

Kidney paired donation is an excellent option for transplant candidates

An analysis compared transplant recipients who received kidneys through national kidney paired donation and those who received kidneys from other living donors (such as relatives, friends or other paired exchange mechanisms). Despite a higher number of risk factors for poor outcomes in the kidney paired donation group, recipients in the two groups had similar rates of organ failure and mortality o

19h

A Rat With No Brain?

A unique rat who functioned extremely well despite having a highly abnormal brain.

19h

Black holes caught in the act of swallowing stars

Dozens of tidal disruption events found in galaxy surveys shed light on violent events

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Stephen Hawking thought black holes were 'hairy'. New study suggests he was right.

A recent study analyzed observations of gravitational waves, first observed in 2015. The data suggests, according to the researchers, that black holes aren't bounded by smooth event horizons, but rather by a sort of quantum fuzz, which would fit with the idea of Hawking radiation. If confirmed, the findings could help scientists better understand how general relativity fits with quantum mechanics

19h

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope Will Soon Retire. What Will Take Its Place?

The observatory fills a key role in collecting infrared observations.

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Listen to the Solar Wind With New Data From NASA's Parker Solar Probe

The data could help scientists answer why the sun's corona is so much hotter than its surface.

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The Ocean Is Getting so Acidic That It’s Dissolving Crabs’ Shells

Acid Test The world’s oceans absorb about 30 percent of the carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere. That means that as levels of CO2 in the atmosphere have increased, so too have levels in the seawater, leading to an increase in the water’s acidity . Over time, a new study has found, the effect has become so pronounced that the Pacific Ocean’s increasingly acidic water is dissolving the shel

19h

After Brexit, U.K. scientists face a long road to mend ties with Europe

Researchers’ desire to join EU funding program may be held hostage to other negotiations

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The best ways to steal signs in baseball

No that isn't a cuss sign. For decades, catchers and pitchers have used a coded system to communicate at the plate. But what happens when the opposite team cracks it? (Deposit Photos/) It’s as if the Astros wanted to get caught. During the 2017 MLB season, Houston set up a live monitor outside of its dugout, where players would watch to see what kind of pitch the opposing catcher was calling for

19h

'Curious and curiouser!' Meteorite chunk contains unexpected evidence of presolar grains

An unusual chunk in a meteorite may contain a surprising bit of space history, based on new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

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NASA's Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe mission enters design phase

A mission to study the interaction of the solar wind with the ancient cast-off winds of other stars, and the fundamental process of particle acceleration in space, has completed a critical NASA review and is now moving closer toward a scheduled launch in 2024. Southwest Research Institute is playing a major role in the Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP) spacecraft, managing the pay

19h

Does news coverage of crashes affect perceived blame?

Despite an ever-rising number of pedestrian and bicyclist deaths on US roads each year, there's no widespread public pressure to improve road safety — a situation influenced by how news articles about auto-pedestrian/bicyclist crashes are written, said Tara Goddard, Texas A&M assistant professor of urban planning.

20h

Screening sweet peppers for organic farming

A study conducted out of The University of Georgia delved into the comparative yields of sweet pepper varieties produced under organic farming conditions.

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Using virtual reality to help individuals with autism spectrum disorder

Novel interventions using virtual reality to aid individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) handle common scenarios may include helping youngsters navigate air travel.

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General population screening reduces life-threatening diabetic ketoacidosis, new research shows

JDRF Funded Research finds screening for islet autobodies reduce the occurrence of life threatening diabetic ketoacidosis in children with pre-symptomatic type 1 diabetes.

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Underwater robot reveals hidden base of Antarctica’s ‘doomsday’ glacier

Icefin robot swam more than 1 kilometer to reach Thwaites Glacier’s grounding line

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'Curious and curiouser!'

An unusual chunk in a meteorite may contain a surprising bit of space history, based on new research from Washington University in St. Louis. Presolar grains — tiny bits of solid interstellar material formed before the sun was born — are sometimes found in primitive meteorites. But a new analysis reveals evidence of presolar grains in part of a meteorite where they are not expected to be found.

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How virtual reality turns students into scientists | Jessica Ochoa Hendrix

Using low-cost virtual reality, education activist Jessica Ochoa Hendrix helps bring science to life in schools across the US. In this quick talk, she explains how a VR experience she developed invites students to explore underwater ecosystems as if they're marine biologists — and envision themselves in other careers they might not have otherwise imagined.

20h

The Coronavirus Outbreak is Most Dangerous for the Elderly

As 2019-nCoV, the coronavirus that emerged in China last month, continues to spread to over a dozen countries, it’s becoming increasingly clear that the elderly and chronically ill are at a greater risk than the general population. The coronavirus can cause symptoms ranging in severity from fever and fatigue to pneumonia and septic shock. But older people, and people who were already sick before

20h

How healthy is that microbe? New device can tell

A new portable tool can assess the health of microbes, screen for antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and analyze algae that live in coral reefs, researchers report. As reported in Scientific Reports , researchers initially developed the tool to assess algae, but it can also determine in the field or in laboratories how microbes and cells respond to environmental stresses, such as pollution and change

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Protein levels in urine after acute kidney injury predict future loss of kidney function

High levels of protein in a patient's urine shortly after an episode of acute kidney injury is associated with increased risk of kidney disease progression, providing a valuable tool in predicting those at highest risk for future loss of kidney function.

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Ethics and Human Research, January-February 2020

Exploitation in 'crowdsourced' research, oversight of right-to-try access to experimental drugs, and more.

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This new solar orbiter will peek at some of the sun’s most secretive spots

The Solar Orbiter’s cameras will brave the sun’s blinding light. (ESA/ATG medialab/) A European space probe will soon launch with the specific mission of doing exactly what every child learns never to do—stare directly at the sun. The intensity of the sun’s light blinds most camera systems, whether they’re squishy eyes or rigid iPhones. But the newest solar satellite’s peepers aren’t most camera

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Downloads of a Pandemic-Themed Game Surge As Coronavirus News Spreads

After the app's popularity spiked in China and the US, the makers of *Plague Inc.* warned players that it is “not a scientific model" of real outbreak situations.

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

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