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Trump Administration Moves to Ease Rules Against Killing Birds

A proposed regulation would codify a legal opinion in 2017 that declared the 'incidental' killing of birds during the course of business as no longer subject to punishment.

2h

Dine lunger heler sig selv, hvis du kvitter smøgerne

Røg er gift for lungerne. Men nogle celler skjuler sig for giften, viser undersøgelse.

11h

Virksomheder i fælles opråb: Danmark kan blive Power-to-X-frontløber

17 organisationer og virksomheder opfordrer regeringen til at understøtte en ambitiøs indfasning af Power-to-X-teknologier i Danmark.

13h

Artificial Intelligence Will Do What We Ask. That's a Problem.

The danger of having artificially intelligent machines do our bidding is that we might not be careful enough about what we wish for. The lines of code that animate these machines will inevitably lack nuance, forget to spell out caveats, and end up giving AI systems goals and incentives that don't align with our true preferences. A now-classic thought experiment illustrating this problem was posed

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Face mask shortage hits Europe and US as coronavirus spreads

Manufacturers increasing production to meet surging demand beyond Asia

2min

Democrats Never Found Their Hero

As the final sliver of daylight faded over the Capitol dome last night, it was clear that Democrats' long, frustrated quest for a deus to save them from Donald Trump would produce no machina after all. Instead there was only Rep. Adam Schiff, the party's tireless point man in the impeachment trial, who stood in the well of the Senate making an 11th-hour argument that Trump's political-dirt-for-mi

4min

The Worst Climate Scenarios May No Longer Be the Most Likely

Some climate scientists argue using such scenarios could make climate targets sound less achievable than they are — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9min

Research team finds possible new approach for sleeping sickness drugs

Using ultra-bright X-ray flashes, a team of researchers has tracked down a potential target for new drugs against sleeping sickness: The scientists have decoded the detailed spatial structure of a vital enzyme of the pathogen, the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. The result provides a possible blueprint for a drug that specifically blocks this enzyme and thus kills the parasite, as the team led by Chr

9min

McGill researchers lay foundation for next generation aortic grafts

A new study by researchers at McGill University has measured the dynamic physical properties of the human aorta, laying the foundation for the development of grafts capable of mimicking the native behavior of the human body's largest artery.

13min

MSU researcher aids discovery of new cellular mechanism

Montana State University's Ed Schmidt played a key role on an international team that recently discovered a previously unknown mechanism cells can use to protect themselves from oxidative damage.

13min

Improvements in care could save the lives of more acute bowel obstruction patients

Delay in Transit, published by the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD), reviewed 686 cases of patients aged 16 and over, in an attempt to improve the high mortality rates for the condition which are currently at around 10% in cases where surgery is needed.

13min

Smoke two of these and call me in the morning? Not quite, study finds

Researchers surveyed cannabis users about beliefs on marijuana's effectiveness in treating certain medical conditions. The results reveal a big discrepancy.

13min

What makes fear decrease

In uncanny situations, the mere presence of an unknown person can have a calming effect. This is shown in a study by a team of Würzburg scientists who do research on anxiety disorders.

13min

A multicentric study identifies a new biomarker for vascular dementias

Lipocalin 2 strongly emerges as a possible new biomarker for vascular dementia. The increase of this protein in the cerebrospinal fluid has been validated in four groups of patients from four European countries, becoming a strong candidate for vascular dementia diagnosis. Moreover, the study indicates that lipocalin 2 discriminates vascular dementia from Alzheimer's with high precision, something

13min

HIV outcomes improved by state-purchased insurance plans, study finds

Increasing enrollment in the plans could save millions in healthcare costs and even reduce HIV transmission, the researchers say.

13min

Less chemotherapy may have more benefit in rectal cancer

GI Cancers Symposium: Colorado study of 48 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy, found that patients receiving lower-than-recommended doses in fact saw their tumors shrink more than patients receiving the full dose.

13min

New research establishes how first exposure to flu virus sets on our immunity for life

The first type of influenza virus we are exposed to in early childhood dictates our ability to fight the flu for the rest of our lives, according to a new study from a team of infectious disease researchers at McMaster University and Université de Montréal.

13min

Letting your child pick their snack may help you eat better, study suggests

Giving in to your kid's desire for an unhealthy snack may improve your own eating choices, a new University of Alberta study shows.

13min

Physics of giant bubbles bursts secret of fluid mechanics

A study inspired by street performers making gigantic soap bubbles led to a discovery in fluid mechanics: Mixing different molecular sizes of polymers within a solution increases the ability of a thin film to stretch without breaking.

13min

'Spring forward' to daylight saving time brings surge in fatal car crashes

A study of 732,000 accidents over two decades has found that the annual switch to daylight saving time is associated with a 6% increase in fatal car crashes that week.

13min

When "Reasonable" Trumps "Rational"

Research shows that people sometimes ignore their own self-interest in making decisions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13min

Airborne measurements point to low EPA methane estimates in south central US

Approximately twice as much methane is seeping into the atmosphere than the Environmental Protection Agency estimates from oil and gas facilities in the south central U.S., according to a series of measurements taken by meteorologists using NASA aircraft.

21min

Orientation of protein patterns

During embryogenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the first cell division occurs transverse to the long axis of the fertilized egg. In a new study, biophysicists at LMU have now shown how this axis is reliably selected.

23min

Researchers make critical advances in quantifying methane released from the Arctic Ocean

A new study, lead by researchers at Stockholm University and published in Science Advances, now demonstrate that the amount of methane presently leaking into the atmosphere from the Arctic Ocean is much lower than previously claimed in recent studies. Methane is well known as a major contributor to global warming. Understanding the natural sources of this gas, especially in the fast-warming Arctic

23min

Orientation of protein patterns

During embryogenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the first cell division occurs transverse to the long axis of the fertilized egg. In a new study, biophysicists at LMU have now shown how this axis is reliably selected.

24min

If you think the economy is fair, inequality doesn't seem so bad

People who think the economic system is fair and legitimate react less negatively to extreme manifestations of economic inequality, such as homelessness, according to the new research. These differences in reaction are even detectable at the physiological level, the researchers report. The research offers new insights into why we have varying reactions to inequality . "Research has shown that peo

24min

Minimize travel hell with these apps and tools

Just… don't. (David-Pull.Hotmail.com via Depositphotos/) Airports are like an endless stream of waiting, scrambling to do a thing really quickly, then more waiting for the next step… all so you can have the pleasure of sitting on a cramped plane for four hours. Thankfully, the age of the internet can make this process—from airport to accommodation—at least 5 percent less terrible. Keep your i

27min

A Cruise Ship Was Stranded at Sea Due to Coronavirus Risk

A cruise ship carrying 6,000 passengers was stranded off the coast of Italy for hours while medical workers investigated a potential case of the dangerous coronavirus 2019-nCoV onboard. The trouble began when a 54-year-old woman from Macau, an administrative region of China that was one of the first places to which the virus spread, developed a fever and respiratory trouble, according to BBC corr

30min

Trees might be 'aware' of their size

Trees are known for their great, but not unlimited, trunk height and diameter. They have evolved to develop a heavy above-ground biomass, but this integral feature poses a challenge to the trunk's stability.

30min

'Remainers' and 'Leavers' more united than divided, study finds

Talk of deep-rooted division in society following the fall-out of the Brexit referendum in the UK may be overblown, according to a new study. Contrary to popular belief, 'Leavers' and 'Remainers' agree on much more than they disagree on, say researchers from the universities of Bath and Essex.

30min

Trees might be 'aware' of their size

Trees are known for their great, but not unlimited, trunk height and diameter. They have evolved to develop a heavy above-ground biomass, but this integral feature poses a challenge to the trunk's stability.

30min

Newest solar telescope produces first images

The National Science Foundation's Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope has released its first images. They reveal unprecedented detail of the sun's surface and preview the world-class products to come from this preeminent 4-meter solar telescope.

33min

When "Reasonable" Trumps "Rational"

Research shows that people sometimes ignore their own self-interest in making decisions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

35min

New research could aid cleaner energy technologies

New research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, could aid cleaner energy technologies.

38min

Cooperation after eye contact: Gender matters

Researchers from the UB published an article in the journal Scientific Reports which analyses, through the prisoner's dilemma game, the willingness of people to cooperate when in pairs. A total of 374 people took part in this activity, which was carried out in FiraTàrrega 2017, an international performing arts market. The results show each gender keeps a different cooperation pattern after making

38min

Immune systems not prepared for climate change

Researchers have for the first time found a connection between the immune systems of different bird species, and the various climatic conditions in which they live. The researchers at Lund University in Sweden believe that as the climate changes, some birds may be exposed to diseases that they are not equipped to handle.

38min

Vision may be the real cause of children's problems

Do you have poor motor skills or struggle to read, write or solve math problems? Maybe it's really because of how your brain interprets what it sees.

38min

Rapid weather swings increase flu risk

New research from a team of Florida State University scientists shows that rapid weather variability as a result of climate change could increase the risk of a flu epidemic in some highly populated regions in the late 21st century.

38min

New research shows sustainability can be a selling point for new ingredients

The first UK consumer study on the use of Bambara Groundnut as an ingredient in products has shown that sharing information on its sustainable features increased consumers' positive emotional connection to food.

38min

Trees struggle when forests become too small

As forest areas shrink and become fragmented, many tree species face problems. They often rely on animals that can no longer disperse their seeds effectively.

38min

Self-learning heat­ing control system saves energy

Can buildings learn to save all by themselves? Empa researchers think so. In their experiments, they fed a new self-learning heat­ing control system with temperature data from the previous year and the current weather forecast. The 'smart' control system was then able to assess the building's behavior and act with good anticipation. The result: greater comfort, lower energy costs.

38min

Maino and the emergence of hip-hop as a source of mental resilience

Born in Brooklyn, New York, the rap artist Maino (Jermaine John Colman) takes his experiences not only from growing up in the famous borough, but also the 10 long years he spent behind bars at Riker's Island Penitentiary. A new dialogue paper, by two academics and co-founders of HIP HOP PSYCH (HHP) in Forensic Science International: Mind and Law, published by Elsevier, review Maino's time behind b

38min

Can wood construction transform cities from carbon source to carbon vault?

A new study by researchers and architects at Yale and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research predicts that a transition to timber-based wood products in the construction of new housing, buildings, and infrastructure would not only offset enormous amounts of carbon emissions related to concrete and steel production — it could turn the world's cities into a vast carbon sink.

38min

Autonomous microtrap for pathogens

Antibiotics are more efficient when they can act on their target directly at the site of infestation, without dilution. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, American scientists describe a synthetic chemical trap that propels itself to its place of action in the body fluid and then lures the bacteria into its interior to poison them. One of the main functionalities of the microdevice is the communicat

38min

Research team finds possible new approach for sleeping sickness drugs

Using ultra-bright X-ray flashes, a team of researchers has tracked down a potential target for new drugs against sleeping sickness: The scientists have decoded the detailed spatial structure of a vital enzyme of the pathogen, the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. The result provides a possible blueprint for a drug that specifically blocks this enzyme and thus kills the parasite, as the team reports in

38min

When "Reasonable" Trumps "Rational"

Research shows that people sometimes ignore their own self-interest in making decisions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

39min

How The Good Place Built Its Trippy Visual Architecture

This article contains spoilers through Season 4, Episode 12 of The Good Place . When The Good Place airs its final episode tonight, it will be the end of one of the most daring thought experiments in TV history. Over four seasons of the NBC sitcom , in which Eleanor Shellstrop (played by Kristen Bell) navigates the topsy-turvy afterlife, viewers have had their brains teased with philosophical dil

44min

German Nurse Accused of Poisoning Five Infants With Morphine

The babies, who ranged in age from a day to a month old, started experiencing respiratory difficulties about the same time, leading a hospital to investigate.

44min

High and low exercise intensity found to influence brain function differently

A new study shows for the first time that low and high exercise intensities differentially influence brain function. Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (Rs-fMRI), a noninvasive technique that allows for studies on brain connectivity, researchers discovered that low-intensity exercise triggers brain networks involved in cognition control and attention processing, while high-i

54min

Wearable health tech gets efficiency upgrade

North Carolina State University engineers have demonstrated a flexible device that harvests the heat energy from the human body to monitor health. The device is more efficient than other flexible harvesters that use body heat as the sole energy source.

54min

Researchers make critical advances in quantifying methane released from the Arctic Ocean

A new study, lead by researchers at Stockholm university and published in Science Advances, now demonstrate that the amount of methane presently leaking to the atmosphere from the Arctic Ocean is much lower than previously claimed in recent studies.

54min

MRI tool can diagnose difficult cases of ovarian cancer

Researchers have developed a new MRI tool that can identify cases of ovarian cancer which are difficult to diagnose using standard methods.

54min

'Remainers' and 'Leavers' more united than divided, study finds

New research suggests those who voted to leave and those who voted to remain have much more in common than is typically assumed.

54min

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Bats inspire detectors to help prevent oil and gas pipe leaks

Engineers have developed a new scanning technique inspired by the natural world that can detect corroding metals in oil and gas pipelines.By mimicking how bats use differing wavelengths of ultrasound to detect objects, hunt, and avoid predators, engineers have developed a new system that combines two separate types of radiation, fast neutrons and gamma rays, to detect corrosion — a major cause of

54min

Your gums reveal your diet

Sweet soft drinks and lots of sugar increase the risk of both dental cavities and inflammation of the gums — known as periodontal diseases — and if this is the case, then healthy eating habits should be prioritized even more. This is the conclusion of a research result from Aarhus University.

54min

Sustainable 3D-printed super magnets

Magnetic materials play important roles in electrical products. These materials are usually manufactured by means of established production techniques and use of rare earth metals. Several research teams are working on alternative, more environmentally friendly production methods.

57min

Beating the heat in the living wings of butterflies

Engineers and biologists discover that butterflies have specialized behaviors and wing scales to protect the living parts of their wings. The nanostructures found in the wing scales could inspire the design of radiative-cooling materials to help manage excessive heat conditions; the sensory network in the wings could inspire the design of advanced flying machines.

57min

General Motors Announces High-Performance, All-Electric Hummer

The Hummer EV Detroit carmaker General Motors revealed today that it's working on resurrecting the Hummer brand with an all-electric Hummer that features some monstrous specs. According to the press release , the truck will go from 0 to 60 mph in just three seconds thanks to an up to 1,000 horsepower drivetrain generating up to 11,500 pound feet of torque. The company will be fully revealing the

57min

Birds, insects, animal poo: citizen science search for data to make sense of bushfire devastation

Scientists call on the public as they scramble to understand the impact of unprecedented fires across Australia Australians are being asked to join a mass citizen science program to photograph how the nation's habitats and wildlife are responding in the wake of the unprecedented bushfire crisis. The scale of the bushfires that have so far burned about 11m hectares across the country has ecologist

57min

Politics this week

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58min

Business this week

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58min

KAL's cartoon

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58min

An American chemist is suspected of illegal dealings with China

He denies the allegations, but is under arrest

1h

There is more to a butterfly's wing than meets the eye

Far from being dead tissue, wings are sophisticated living organs

1h

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NIH's new cluster hiring program aims to help schools attract diverse faculty

Initiative to use untested method for increasing the ranks of minority scientists on campus

1h

Trees might be 'aware' of their size

Birch trees adjust their stem thickness to support their weight.

1h

Sustainable 3D-printed super magnets

Magnetic materials play important roles in electrical products. These materials are usually manufactured by means of established production techniques and use of rare earth metals. Several research teams are working on alternative, more environmentally friendly production methods.

1h

Understanding long-term trends in ocean layering

Geophysicists and climate physicists are investigating how upper-ocean stratification has changed over a period of 60 years.

1h

Citizen science discovers a new form of the northern lights

Working together with space researchers, amateur photographers have discovered a new auroral form. Named 'dunes' by the hobbyists, the phenomenon is believed to be caused by waves of oxygen atoms glowing due to a stream of particles released from the sun.

1h

2020 Democrats Are Already Giving Up on Congress

L ast summer, Senator Elizabeth Warren unveiled legislation to wipe out as much as $50,000 in student-loan debt for tens of millions of Americans. Pushing the $640 billion measure through even a Democratic-controlled Congress would be a punishing task, but the presidential hopeful had secured a big Capitol Hill backer in Representative James Clyburn of South Carolina, a power broker in a key earl

1h

Vegetarians may have a lower risk of urinary tract infections

Vegetarianism may be linked to a lower risk of urinary tract infection, according to researchers who say it reduces exposure to harmful bacteria

1h

Neanderthals never lived in Africa, but their genes got there anyway

Neanderthals never lived in Africa, but traces of their DNA persist in the genomes of people of African ancestry today, and the amount of Neanderthal DNA in people of European ancestry has been underestimated

1h

Daylight saving time linked to an increase in traffic accidents

Fatal accidents in the US increase by 6 per cent in the week that follows the spring transition to daylight saving time, possibly due to sleep deprivation and lack of alertness

1h

Synchronized swimming: Biology on a micro-scale

Researchers model interactions between unique fluids and tiny structures.

1h

Robot sweat regulates temperature, key for extreme conditions

Just when it seemed like robots couldn't get any cooler, researchers have created a soft robot muscle that can regulate its temperature through sweating.

1h

Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new insecticide compounds

For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice. Now, researchers have identified 10 compounds that might be responsible for the herb's effectiveness. But there's a twist: The insecticides are produced by symbiotic microbes that live within the plant's

1h

Finer particulate matter (PM1) could increase cardiovascular disease risk

In addition to harmful gases such as carbon monoxide, air pollution contains tiny particles that have been linked to health problems, including cardiovascular disease and asthma.

1h

Color-changing bandages sense and treat bacterial infections

Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health. Sensing and treating bacterial infections earlier could help improve patients' recovery, as well curb the spread of antibiotic-resistant microbes. Now, researchers have developed color-changing bandages that can sense drug-resistant and drug-sensitive bacteria in wounds and treat them accordingly.

1h

Researchers combine X-rays and laser light to image sprays

Researchers have developed a new laser-based method that provides an unprecedented view of sprays such as the ones used for liquid fuel combustion in vehicle, ship and plane engines. The technique could provide new insights into these atomizing sprays, which are also used in a variety of industrial processes such as painting and producing food powders and drugs.

1h

Synchronized swimming: Biology on a micro-scale

Researchers model interactions between unique fluids and tiny structures.

1h

Movement study could be significant in helping understand brain rehabilitation

A new study could be particularly important for those working in rehabilitation and helping people to recover after neurological conditions.

1h

Antibiotic-resistance in Tanzania is an environmental problem

WSU study finds that environmental transmission rather than antibiotic use explains the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in people, domestic animals and wildlife.

1h

Robot sweat regulates temperature, key for extreme conditions

Just when it seemed like robots couldn't get any cooler, researchers have created a soft robot muscle that can regulate its temperature through sweating.

1h

People may lie to appear honest

if events that turned out in their favor seem too good to be true, according to new research.

1h

Nanotechnology: Putting a nanomachine to work

A team of chemists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich has successfully coupled the directed motion of a light-activated molecular motor to a different chemical unit — thus taking an important step toward the realization of synthetic nanomachines.

1h

Solving the riddle of strigolactone biosynthesis in plants

Researchers from Kobe University's Graduate School of Agricultural Science have discovered the orobanchol synthase responsible for converting the strigolactone (SL) carlactonoic acid, which promotes symbiotic relationships with fungi, into the SL orobanchol, which causes root parasitic weeds to germinate. By knocking out the orobanchol synthase gene using genome editing, they succeeded in artifici

1h

Mechanism for improvement of photoluminescence intensity in phosphor material

A research team consisting of Toyohashi University of Technology, Nagoya Institute of Technology, and the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) have clarified the mechanism by which the crystal structure of a red phosphor material obtained by adding P2O5 and Eu2O3 to a silicate (Ca2SiO4)-based material at various heat treatment temperatures changes in photoluminescence intensity due to d

1h

Sustainable 3D-printed super magnets

Magnetic materials play important roles in electrical products. These materials are usually manufactured by means of established production techniques and use of rare earth metals. Several research teams at TU Graz are working on alternative, more environmentally friendly production methods.

1h

Trees might be 'aware' of their size

Birch trees adjust their stem thickness to support their weight.

1h

Fossil foraminifer in marine sediment reveals sea surface water temperature 800,000 years ago

Japanese researchers found that the sea surface water temperature in the northwestern Pacific fluctuated drastically from approximately 800,000 to 750,000 years ago, based on oxygen isotope analyses for fossil foraminifers from an uplifted marine succession in the Chiba composite section on Honshu Island, Japan. A comparison with the results obtained from deep-sea sediment cores suggests that the

1h

The first roadmap for ovarian aging

Infertility likely stems from age-related decline of the ovaries, but the molecular mechanisms that lead to this decline have been unclear. Now, scientists from the US and China have discovered, in unprecedented detail, how ovaries age in non-human primates. The findings reveal several genes that could be used as biomarkers and point to therapeutic targets for diagnosing and treating female infert

1h

Genetic screen offers new drug targets for Huntington's disease

Using a genetic screen that was previously impossible in the mammalian brain, MIT neuroscientists have identified hundreds of genes that are necessary for neuron survival. They also used the approach to identify genes that contribute to the toxic effects of mutant protein that causes Huntington's disease.

1h

ASU scientists boost gene-editing tools to new heights in human stem cells

David Brafman's Arizona State University lab has developed a new TREE method (an acronym short for transient reporter for editing enrichment, or TREE), which allows for bulk enrichment of DNA base-edited cell populations — and for the first time, high efficiency in human stem cell lines.

1h

Salk scientists link rapid brain growth in autism to DNA damage

Researchers at the Salk Institute have discovered a unique pattern of DNA damage that arises in brain cells derived from individuals with a macrocephalic form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The observation, published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, helps explain what might go awry in the brain during cell division and development to cause the disorder.

1h

Researchers build a better lung model

Using a combination of pluripotent stem cells (cells that can potentially produce any cell or tissue type) and machine learning (artificial intelligence that allows computers to learn automatically), researchers have improved how they generate lung cells.

1h

UNC Lineberger discovery would allow researchers to fine-tune CAR-T activity

In a study published in Cancer Cell, researchers reported new findings about the regulation of co-stimulatory molecules that could be used to activate cancer-killing immune cells – chimeric antigen receptor T-cells, or CAR-T — or decrease their activity.

1h

Health: Daily smoking and drinking may be associated with advanced brain age

Daily drinking and smoking may be associated with modest increases in relative brain age compared to those who drink and smoke less, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.

1h

Brain's 'GPS system' toggles between present and possible future paths in real time

In a study of rats navigating a simple maze, neuroscientists at UC San Francisco have discovered how the brain may generate such imagined future scenarios. The work provides a new grounding for understanding not only how the brain makes decisions but also how imagination works more broadly, the researchers say.

1h

Health: Vegetarian diet linked with lower risk of urinary tract infections

A vegetarian diet may be associated with a lower risk of urinary tract infections (UTIs), a study in Scientific Reports suggests.

1h

New study identifies Neanderthal ancestry in African populations and describes its origin

After sequencing the Neanderthal genome, scientists discovered all present day non-African individuals carry some Neanderthal ancestry in their DNA. Now, researchers at Princeton University present evidence of Neanderthal ancestry in African populations too, and its origin provides new insights into human history.

1h

Modern Africans and Europeans may have more Neanderthal ancestry than previously thought

Neanderthal DNA sequences may be more common in modern Africans than previously thought, and different non-African populations have levels of Neanderthal ancestry surprisingly similar to each other, finds a study publishing Jan. 30 in the journal Cell. Researchers arrived at these findings by developing a new statistical method, called IBDmix, to identify Neanderthal sequences in the genomes of mo

1h

Study links daylight saving time to 28 fatal car accidents per year in the US

Several US states have considered doing away with the practice of changing the clocks forward or back in favor of permanent Daylight Saving Time (DST), while experts around the world suggest permanent Standard Time is a better alternative for health and wellbeing. A study appearing Jan. 30 in the journal Current Biology puts forth evidence of another downside of DST: it increases the risk of fatal

1h

Putrid compound may have a sweet side gig as atherosclerosis treatment

A compound associated with the smell of death may have potential as a treatment for atherosclerosis and other chronic inflammatory diseases.

1h

Author Correction: Structural basis for the drug extrusion mechanism by a MATE multidrug transporter

Nature, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1762-6

1h

Going Viral for the Wrong Reasons

What is a publication to do when readers misuse its content?

1h

An end to parasitic worms | Ellen Agler

Parasitic worms date back thousands of years, causing diseases that limit human potential. But today, effective treatment against them requires just a few pills, taken once or twice a year. With 1.7 billion people at risk of infection, Ellen Agler and her team at the END Fund are imagining a world without disease caused by worms. Learn about how they're seeking to lower treatment costs, amplify pr

1h

How Infrared Telescopes Like Spitzer Help Astronomers See the Invisible

Infrared light opens up new vistas to astronomers, revealing features of planets and galaxies previously invisible.

1h

Pete Buttigieg's Coded Use of American Heartland

Yesterday afternoon, Pete Buttigieg found himself on the receiving end of a good old-fashioned ratioing —that quantifiable flood of Twitter rage when a bad take elicits far more (negative) replies than likes or retweets. The backlash likely took the Buttigieg campaign by surprise, given that the tweet in question might have seemed like anodyne boilerplate at first glance. In the face of unprecede

1h

En legobit kan trigga hållbart tänkande i förskolan

Varför inte börja med en legobit? Var kommer den ifrån och vilka barn får leka med den? Mer invecklad än så behöver inte hållbar utveckling vara – åtminstone i det första skedet. Att göra förskolan hållbar är en stor uppgift, precis som inom vilken annan verksamhet som helst. Det krävs en annan syn och ett nytt tankesätt. Bästa vägen är att ta ett steg i taget. Det anser utvecklingspedagogen Pern

1h

Neil deGrasse Tyson: How the 24/7 news cycle compromises science

Journalists writing about science have become more science fluent over the past 20 years, but the need to be first and the practice of giving equal exposure to opposing views regardless of scientific evidence (e.g. climate change) has been detrimental to the public's understanding of the facts. Reporting on science from the "frontier" doesn't provide the full picture because it doesn't give scien

1h

Africans carry surprising amount of Neanderthal DNA

People on every continent, including Africa, have a genetic legacy from our extinct cousins

1h

Scientists boost gene-editing tools to new heights in human stem cells

During the past decade, the gene editing tool CRISPR has transformed biology and opened up hopeful avenues to correct deadly inherited diseases. Last fall, scientists began the first human clinical trials using CRISPR to combat diseases like cancer. They remove some of a person's cells, CRISPR edit the DNA, and then inject the cells back in, where hopefully, they will cure the disease.

1h

Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new insecticide compounds

For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice. Now, researchers have identified 10 compounds that might be responsible for the herb's effectiveness. But there's a twist: The insecticides are produced by symbiotic microbes that live within the plant's

1h

Microplastics from ocean fishing can 'hide' in deep sediments

Microplastic pollution in the world's oceans is a growing problem, and most studies of the issue have focused on land-based sources, such as discarded plastic bags or water bottles. Now, researchers have linked microplastics in China's Beibu Gulf with heavy fishing activities. Surprisingly, many of the particles were hidden in deep sediments on the ocean floor, which could have led scientists to u

1h

Finer particulate matter (PM1) could increase cardiovascular disease risk

In addition to harmful gases such as carbon monoxide, air pollution contains tiny particles that have been linked to health problems, including cardiovascular disease and asthma.

1h

Color-changing bandages sense and treat bacterial infections

Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health. Sensing and treating bacterial infections earlier could help improve patients' recovery, as well curb the spread of antibiotic-resistant microbes. Now, researchers have developed color-changing bandages that can sense drug-resistant and drug-sensitive bacteria in wounds and treat them accordingly.

1h

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Neanderthal genes found for first time in African populations

Findings suggest human and Neanderthal lineages more closely intertwined that once thought African populations have been revealed to share Neanderthal ancestry for the first time, in findings that add a new twist to the tale of ancient humans and our closest known relatives. Previously it was believed that only non-African populations carried Neanderthal genes due to interbreeding that took place

1h

Going vegetarian may lower risk of UTIs in women, study finds

Giving up meat could reduce levels of certain E coli bacteria strains in bowel, say scientists Ditching meat may reduce the risk of urinary tract infections, at least in women, research suggests. Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, are common and painful, with more than 150 m cases around the world every year. Continue reading…

1h

Wilbur Ross says coronavirus outbreak could bring back jobs to the US

Commerce secretary says 'I think it will help accelerate the return of jobs to North America, some to the US' The US commerce secretary, Wilbur Ross, said in an interview on Thursday that the coronavirus outbreak could bring back jobs to America. In controversial comments on morning TV, Ross remarked that the deadly illness that has broken out in China and is spreading internationally could lead

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Here's how we could go carbon neutral in 25 years

The real trick is putting biowaste to work.

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Space might be the perfect place to grow human organs

Researchers are finding that space might be an ideal environment for growing freestanding organs. Three-dimensional printers have now assembled candy, clothing, and even mouse ovaries . But in the next decade, specialized bioprinters could begin to build functioning human organs in space. It turns out, the minimal gravity conditions in space may provide a more ideal environment for building organ

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New research offers global drylands solution to climate change

A new study published in the Journal for Geographical Research: Biogeosciences, led by a University of Derby academic, has shed new light on how microorganisms move through dryland landscapes attached to wind-blown dust and then alter the surfaces that they land on.

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Matches on and off the field: Nigerian wives pick a side

There are about 100 million active soccer fans in Nigeria and the majority actively follow Europe's UEFA Champions League and the UK's Premier League. Domestic leagues in Nigeria have produced star players like Segun Odegbami and Rashidi Yekini. But globalisation and packaging of the sport, and interest in watching Nigerian players in foreign clubs, make overseas leagues particularly attractive.

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The highs and lows of the opium trade in southern Africa

The reach of European empires and of Indian Ocean trade networks drew southern Africa into the global politics of opium around the turn of the twentieth century. Between the late 1880s and early 1920s and there was a shift from economies of supply to regimes of control.

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Teachers less likely to take phones away from white, privileged children

For many children today, before they even start school they are already digitally literate. They know how to use a phone, make videos and take photographs. This is to be welcomed given government research has found that 82% of all advertised openings require some level of digital skills.

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New study reveals why people react differently to economic disparities

We react less negatively to extreme manifestations of economic disparity, such as homelessness, if we think the economic system is fair and legitimate, and these differences in reactivity are even detectable at the physiological level, finds a team of psychology researchers. The research, which appears in the journal Nature Communications, offers new insights into why we have varying reactions to

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Scientists boost gene-editing tools to new heights in human stem cells

During the past decade, the gene editing tool CRISPR has transformed biology and opened up hopeful avenues to correct deadly inherited diseases. Last fall, scientists began the first human clinical trials using CRISPR to combat diseases like cancer. They remove some of a person's cells, CRISPR edit the DNA, and then inject the cells back in, where hopefully, they will cure the disease.

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Modern Africans and Europeans may have more Neanderthal ancestry than previously thought

Neanderthal DNA sequences may be more common in modern Africans than previously thought, and different non-African populations have levels of Neanderthal ancestry surprisingly similar to each other, finds a study publishing January 30 in the journal Cell. Researchers arrived at these findings by developing a new statistical method, called IBDmix, to identify Neanderthal sequences in the genomes of

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New report shows income inequality within couples is increasing in Germany

The partner pay gap (PPG) refers to the difference in the wages between cohabiting partners, most often husbands and wives.

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Africans Have More Neanderthal DNA than Previously Thought

A new analysis of more than 2,500 human genomes indicates that modern Eurasians who acquired Neanderthal DNA during past interbreeding migrated back to Africa and spread those sequences.

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Genetically engineered moths can knock down crop pests, but will they take off?

Company succeeds in first field trial of an insect modified to control an agricultural pest

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Researchers discover a new way to control infrared light

In the 1950s, the field of electronics began to change when the transistor replaced vacuum tubes in computers. The change, which entailed replacing large and slow components with small and fast ones, was a catalyst for the enduring trend of miniaturization in computer design. No such revolution has yet hit the field of infrared optics, which remains reliant on bulky moving parts that preclude buil

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How does coronavirus spread and how can you protect yourself?

Viruses can be spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Hand-washing is a first line of defence The Wuhan coronavirus outbreak is a new illness and scientists are still assessing how it spreads from person to person, but similar viruses tend to spread via cough and sneeze droplets . Continue reading…

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Mental model theory and conjunction fallacy

submitted by /u/Robosidd [link] [comments]

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Ny SST-vejledning lægger op til at forbyde lange fastholdelser

Lange fastholdelser over en time vil snart være ulovligt. Sundhedsstyrelsen dikterer i en ny vejledning, at fastholdelser højst må vare en time. Bedre end ingenting, men stadig for lang tid, siger Dansk Psykiatrisk Selskab.

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John Bolton Spoke Up When Other Republicans Didn't

Give John Bolton his due. By writing a book that apparently corroborates the core argument of those seeking to impeach and remove President Donald Trump, the former national security adviser has shown genuine moral courage. The literature on moral courage helps explain why: It's because Bolton is an ideological fanatic. His fervent belief in supporting America's allies and confronting its adversa

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Spørg Fagfolket: Er supermaterialet grafen farligt at indånde?

En læser vil gerne vide, om materialet grafen kan nedbrydes i naturen eller om det ender som endnu en omgang forurenende nanopartikler. Ingeniørens nano-blogger er klar med et grundigt svar.

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Robotic finger can sweat like a human to cool down

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Researchers transplant lab-grown heart muscle cells into patient

submitted by /u/quantumcipher [link] [comments]

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Billionaire Cancels Reality Show to Find Girlfriend For Moon Trip

Heart Breaker Earlier this month, Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa — the man who bought the first SpaceX Starship round trip ticket to the Moon back in 2018 — announced he will be looking for a travel companion and "life partner" as part of a Japanese reality TV show called "Full Moon Lovers," run by streaming service AbemaTV. But on Thursday, Maezawa had to break the hearts of over 20,000 wom

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Guess what? We go to libraries more often than movies.

Of all public cultural destinations, libraries are the most often visited. Libraries' expanded offerings make them more attractive than ever, especially to lower-income groups. Women are far more likely than men to visit a library. Amazingly, when it comes to getting up off our butts and engaging in cultural activities out in the world, Americans, by far, most frequently choose to go… to the libr

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How coronavirus hits markets | Charts that Count

FT's Brooke Fox explains how viral outbreaks affect trading

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Low-calorie sweeteners do not mean low risk for infants

Researchers discovered consuming low-calorie sweeteners like aspartame and stevia while pregnant increased body fat in their offspring and disrupted their gut microbiota.

2h

Jordens äldsta meteoritkrater funnen i Australien

Formationen Yarrabubba i västra Australien har länge varit intressant för geologer som studerar jordens historia. På drygt två miljarder år hinner vind och vatten och geologiska krafter radera ut de flesta spåren av även ett stort meteoritnedslag. Inget återstår av den ursprungliga cirkelformade kraterringen, utom spår av det som tidigare var upphöjningen i kraterns mitt. Nu har några forskare ana

2h

Special solar panels could work when the sun goes down

A special kind of solar cell could work at night, researchers say. In fact, the specially designed photovoltaic cell could generate up to 50 watts of power per square meter (about 10.75 square feet) under ideal conditions at night, about a quarter of what a conventional solar panel can generate in daytime, according to a concept paper in ACS Photonics . Jeremy Munday, professor in the electrical

2h

Ketamine use is underreported — likely due to unknown exposure — among EDM partygoers

Nearly 37% of electronic dance music (EDM) party attendees test positive for ketamine use when samples of their hair are tested — despite only 14.6% disclosing that they have used the drug in the past year.

2h

Researchers combine X-rays and laser light to image sprays

Researchers have developed a new laser-based method that provides an unprecedented view of sprays such as the ones used for liquid fuel combustion in vehicle, ship and plane engines. The technique could provide new insights into these atomizing sprays, which are also used in a variety of industrial processes such as painting and producing food powders and drugs.

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Bill proposes ban on plastic waste exports

Plastic waste exports to developing countries to be banned or restricted under new law.

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Butt emissions: Study finds even extinguished cigarettes give off toxins

Researchers have discovered that a used cigarette butt – even one that is cold to the touch – can give off the equivalent of 14% of the nicotine that an actively burning cigarette emits. They are calling this newly discovered form of cigarette exposure "after smoke" or butt emissions.

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'Green' schools may put kids in touch with environment

"Green" school buildings can help students better understand the role that humans have in and on the environment, a small study suggests. Nearly 40% of the world's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions come from buildings, according to the United Nations Environment Program. As non-renewable resources become more scarce, some school districts are turning away from coal and oil toward alternativ

2h

Meteorites reveal high carbon dioxide levels on early Earth

Tiny meteorites no larger than grains of sand hold new clues about the atmosphere on ancient Earth, according to scientists.

2h

Researchers combine X-rays and laser light to image sprays

Researchers have developed a new laser-based method that provides an unprecedented view of sprays such as the ones used for liquid fuel combustion in vehicle, ship and plane engines. The technique could provide new insights into these atomizing sprays, which are also used in a variety of industrial processes such as painting and producing food powders and drugs.

2h

7 Business Models Reshaping How We Work, Live, and Create Value

Some of the most potent innovation taking place today does not involve breakthrough technologies, but rather the creation of fundamentally new business models. For most of history, these models were remarkably stable, dominated by a few key ideas, upgraded by a few major variations on these themes. In the 1920s, it was the "bait and hook" models, where customers are lured in with a low-cost initi

2h

New insights into how the human brain solves complex decision-making problems

A research team, led by Professor Sang Wan Lee at KAIST jointly with John O'Doherty at Caltech, succeeded in discovering both a computational and neural mechanism for human meta reinforcement learning, opening up thea possibility offor porting key elements of human intelligence into artificial intelligence algorithms.

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Coral genes go with the flow further than expected

Simulations reveal unexpected connections in the Red Sea basin that could help marine conservation.

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HKUST researchers find that regulating lipid metabolism in neurons helps axon regeneration

Regenerative medicine is the study of repairing tissue and organ function that is lost due to injury, aging, or disease. Although many tissues and organs can be restored via either drug treatment or surgical transplantation, repairing the damaged central nervous system (CNS) is still a daunting medical problem.

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Seth Rogen Is Working on a Movie About a Killer Meme

It's an adaption of the Boom! Studios comic 'Memetic.'

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Figuring out what the Milky Way looks like is akin to a murder mystery

How can we get a picture of the whole Milky Way if we are inside it? Good sleuthing is needed to combine all the clues, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

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Researchers discover high levels of selenium in wheat grown in selenium-rich areas

RUDN doctors have found an increased level of selenium and other significant microelements in wheat bread and wheat from selenium-rich areas. Thanks to this, bread and wheat can be used as a source of selenium for people with selenium deficiency. The article was published in the journal Biological Trace Element Research.

2h

"Mini Brains" Are Not like the Real Thing

Snags hinder efforts to create small cellular models of the human cortex — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers discover high levels of selenium in wheat grown in selenium-rich areas

RUDN doctors have found an increased level of selenium and other significant microelements in wheat bread and wheat from selenium-rich areas. Thanks to this, bread and wheat can be used as a source of selenium for people with selenium deficiency. The article was published in the journal Biological Trace Element Research.

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Researchers find evidence for metallic hydrogen at 425 gigapascals

A team of researchers, two with the French Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and a third with the Soleil synchrotron, have found evidence of a phase change for hydrogen at a pressure of 425 gigapascals. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Paul Loubeyre, Florent Occelli and Paul Dumas describe testing hydrogen at such a high pressure and what they learned from it.

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"Mini Brains" Are Not like the Real Thing

Snags hinder efforts to create small cellular models of the human cortex — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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To get kids to eat their veggies, play a game

Board games, card games, and even computer games can get children to eat more fruits and vegetables, but they can also encourage children to eat more unhealthy snacks, according to new research. The researchers reviewed 43 studies from the around the world that investigate the use of games and "gamification" meant to influence the eating habits of children. "The games that work combine aspects of

2h

SUTD's novel approach allows 3D printing of finer, more complex microfluidic networks

The biomedical industry, involving the engineering of complex tissue constructs and 3D architecture of blood vessels, is one of the key industries to benefit from SUTD's new development.

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NEJM: transcatheter aortic valve replacement shows similar safety outcomes as open-heart surgery

A new study from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai and other centers nationwide shows that patients who underwent a minimally invasive transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR), had similar key 5-year clinical outcomes of death and stroke as patients who had traditional open-heart surgery to replace the valve.

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Synchronized swimming: Biology on a micro-scale

Researchers model interactions between unique fluids and tiny structures.

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Understanding long-term trends in ocean layering

Tohoku University geophysicist Toshio Suga collaborated with climate physicist Ryohei Yamaguchi of Korea's Pusan National University to investigate how upper-ocean stratification has changed over a period of 60 years.

2h

"Mini Brains" Are Not like the Real Thing

Snags hinder efforts to create small cellular models of the human cortex — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Deep Is That Literature?

The literature of synthetic chemistry is large, and it goes back well over a century. Those of us who know the field sometimes despair of the state that literature is in – it can be pretty messy – but we really shouldn't. It's actually far more orderly than many other fields, and it has a lot of aspects that make it intrinsically more "organizable", not least the backbone of chemical structures t

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Self-propelled, onion-like microvehicle can attract, trap, and destroy biological threats

Antibiotics are more efficient when they can act on their target directly at the site of infestation, without dilution. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, American scientists describe a synthetic chemical trap that propels itself to its place of action in the body fluid and then lures the bacteria into its interior to poison them. One of the main functionalities of the microdevice is the communicat

2h

Celltyperna i hjärnan bidrar olika till planering av rörelser

Forskare vid Karolinska Institutet har kartlagt hur nervcellerna i hjärnområdet striatum bearbetar information för att kunna planera så att vi utför rörelser i precis rätt ögonblick och med rätt kraft. Resultaten visar att olika celltyper i striatum får signaler från helt olika delar av hjärnbarken och därmed reagerar på olika typer av intryck. Mycket av vårt beteende styrs av sensoriska signaler

2h

Mindfulness suddar ut gamla rädslor

Några minuters meditationsövningar varje dag genom en vanlig mindfulness-app får hjärnan att sudda ut inlärda, men irrelevanta, rädslor. Enligt forskarna bakom studien pekar resultaten på att mindfulness skulle kunna göra behandlingar av ångest och posttraumatisk stress mer effektiva. I studien deltog 29 personer, varav hälften under några veckors tid gjort mindfulnessövningar via en vanliga smar

2h

Self-propelled, onion-like microvehicle can attract, trap, and destroy biological threats

Antibiotics are more efficient when they can act on their target directly at the site of infestation, without dilution. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, American scientists describe a synthetic chemical trap that propels itself to its place of action in the body fluid and then lures the bacteria into its interior to poison them. One of the main functionalities of the microdevice is the communicat

2h

New method to investigate the impact of climate change on ozone levels

The oxygen in the air that we breathe is O2. Two oxygen atoms joined together to form a diatomic molecule. It is essential to life. However, there is another form of oxygen where three oxygen atoms join together to make an O3 molecule. We call this triatomic oxygen, ozone. Ozone is present in the upper atmosphere and protects the planet to some extent from harmful ultraviolet radiation from the Su

2h

Mathematicians create a method for studying the properties of porous materials

Mathematicians from RUDN University have studied the properties of compositional operators in spaces with mixed Lebesgue norms. Their work will help describe the diffusion of liquids in materials with cracks and in porous materials. Such spaces are also useful for obtaining estimates for solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation. The article was published in Mathematical Notes.

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Chemist proposes new method for green synthesis of xanthene derivatives

A RUDN chemist has proposed a new method for the synthesis of xanthene derivatives, which are used as the basis for drug manufacturing—from antidepressants to antiviral and antitumor drugs. The method is based on the example of the synthesis of 1,8-dioxoctahydroxantene and its derivatives. To that end, a safe and stable catalyst based on iron oxide was created on the surface of porous silicon oxid

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Biophysicists find 'extra' component in molecular motor

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have discovered an additional component in ATP synthase, a molecular machine that produces the energy-conserving compound in all cellular organisms. The new unique features of the ATP synthase structure are described in detail in a paper in Scientific Reports.

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Biophysicists find 'extra' component in molecular motor

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have discovered an additional component in ATP synthase, a molecular machine that produces the energy-conserving compound in all cellular organisms. The new unique features of the ATP synthase structure are described in detail in a paper in Scientific Reports.

2h

Mest högupplösta bilderna av solen någonsin

Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope på Hawaii har tagit detaljbilder av solen i den högsta upplösningen hittills. Bilderna avslöjar att solens yta är kornig, där varje korn är lika stort som Frankrike ungefär.

2h

There Is No Christian Case for Trump

An editorial last month in the evangelical world's flagship publication, Christianity Today , argued that Donald Trump should be removed from office. The editorial, the last one written by the editor in chief Mark Galli before his planned retirement, heartened those evangelicals who have been unsettled by their co-religionists' enthusiastic support for Trump. But the editorial upset many others,

3h

Feeling salty about climate change? Let's talk about desalination

With bushfires dominating the media landscape, discussions about addressing carbon emissions are everywhere. But there is another area we need to address: how we will adapt to a changing climate.

3h

The Atlantic Ocean's fingerprint on the climate of the Middle East

The Atlantic Ocean acts as a key pacemaker for Middle East surface air temperature (ME-SAT) multidecadal variability in summer. This is the important result of a study published on NPJ Climate and Atmospheric Science unveiling and demonstrating the existence of a North Atlantic-Middle East teleconnection, that is, a remote influence of the Atlantic multidecadal variability on the decadal variabili

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Burned pine forests are home to twice as many bees

Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, new research shows. For many forests, fire is as essential as rainfall. But while several studies have outlined the benefits of human-controlled prescribed burns on forest ecosystems, scientists understood little about how prescribed burns

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Record heat forecast for coming years

The coming five years are anticipated to be warmest period on record, Britain's Met Office said Thursday, warning of an outside chance of Earth breaching the Paris deal 1.5C temperature rise cap before 2024.

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Twitch Streamer Commissions Custom $3,500 Mechanical Keyboard

We're no strangers to expensive mechanical keyboards around here, but a popular Twitch streamer just showed all his subscribers how deep the keyboard rabbit hole can go. Turner "Tfue" Tenney just got his hands on his new custom keyboard , which is a one-of-its-kind creation that cost him about $3,500. The project came to be when Tfue met Tae Ha Kim, who builds fully custom keyboards under the nam

3h

NASA Working to Fix Voyager 2 From 11.5 Billion Miles Away

NASA's twin Voyager probes have been on a mission of exploration for decades, and they've performed admirably. Both probes have now left the solar system, providing the first direct measurements of the universe outside our little corner of it. Keeping a 42-year-old space probe working is no simple feat, though. Engineers are working to restore normal operations on Voyager 2 after automated fault

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Trapped Britons set to fly out of Wuhan on Friday

200 evacuees from coronavirus hotspot face two weeks of quarantine on return to UK

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Immune responses to tuberculosis mapped across 3 species

A new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis offers a genetic road map detailing the similarities and differences in immune responses to TB across three species — mice, macaques and humans. According to the researchers, the insight into the immune pathways that are activated in diverse models of TB infection will serve as a valuable tool for scientists studying and wor

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Bushfires and climate change bring plant-stored mercury back into our environment

Climate change and bushfire may exacerbate recent mercury pollution and increase exposure to the poisonous neurotoxin, according to our study published in the Journal of Paleolimnology.

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Astronomers investigate broadband variability of the blazar Markarian 501

An international team of astronomers has studied variable broadband emission of the gamma-ray blazar Markarian 501 during a period of its high X-ray activity. The research, published January 21 on the arXiv preprint server, could lend better understanding of emission mechanisms in blazars.

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Car crash news can sway who seems at fault

The way news articles report car crashes influences readers' interpretation of what happened and who bears responsibility for the crash, new research shows. "Adopting simple improvements in crash reporting offers a potentially powerful tool to shift public awareness of traffic crashes from unfortunate, isolated events to a preventable public health issue," says Tara Goddard, an assistant professo

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The New Video of One of the Scariest Places on Earth

The "grounding line" of Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica is, without hyperbole, one of the most important places on one of the most important objects in the natural world. And scientists now have video of it for the first time. Earlier this week, researchers published the first images of the place where this behemoth glacier, which is both one of the world's largest and most vulnerable, sits o

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Kids learn best when you add a problem-solving boost to 'back-to-basics' instruction

Last year there was substantial hand-wringing over Australia's declining results in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) tests. Ideas for how to reverse this decline were coming from far and wide, thick and fast.

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Gawker's nemesis is working on a social network offering access to the rich

Business and technology leaders are being asked to spend $100,000 buying in to the service.

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Amatørfotografer og rumforskere opdager ny type nordlys

PLUS. Hidtil ukendte former for nordlys minder om formationer i strandklitter. Det viser nye resultater fra Finland, som potentielt åbner for en ny forståelse af interaktionen mellem det ydre rum og atmosfæren.

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Möjligt cancerläkemedel slår två flugor i en smäll

Tänk om en och samma molekyl kunde döda cancerceller via två helt olika mekanismer – och därigenom döda cellerna mer effektivt. Forskare vid Umeå universitet har tagit fram just en sådan prototyp som kan bli ett framtida läkemedel mot vissa former av cancer. – Genom att jobba tvärvetenskapligt över många ämnesdiscipliner inom både medicin och naturvetenskap har vi kunnat angripa cancerproblematik

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Researchers turbocharge hydrogen fuel cells with novel ion-conducting copolymer

Renewed investments in hydrogen fuel cell technologies and infrastructure by companies like Amazon; nations like China; and automakers like Toyota, Honda, and Hyundai, are sparking sales and fresh interest in the vast possibilities of polymer-electrolyte fuel cells. The fresh interest could revolutionize transportation and fill streets with vehicles whose only effluent is water vapor.

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Largest aromatic ring size record broken with 162 π electrons

A team of researchers at Oxford University has broken the record for the largest aromatic molecule ring size ever synthesized with a ring that has 162 π electrons. In their paper published in the journal Nature Chemistry, the group describes how they created their ring and possible applications.

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Synchronized swimming: Biology on a micro-scale

Specialized stringy fluids flow through the human joints and help constitute substances such as mucus. These fluids contain long, flexible molecules like polymers or proteins, giving them the ability to stretch and absorb shock.

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When old films go viral: how coronavirus gave Contagion an unexpected afterlife

Steven Soderbergh's 2011 thriller about the spread of a deadly virus has been back in the iTunes Top 10 – so is this epidemic another thing we can blame on Gwyneth Paltrow? Conventional wisdom has it that audiences flock to escapism in troubled times, but an unexpected new entry on the UK iTunes movie rental chart suggests otherwise. Nestling among the current hits is a film made nine years ago t

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Success Kid's Mom Won't Stand for Steve King's 'Meme' Ad

Laney Griner, the mother behind the meme, sent the Iowa congressperson a cease-and-desist.

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How the term 'Anthropocene' jumped from geoscience to hashtags

Disastrous fires, ongoing drought, and heat extremes have refocused Australians' attention on the human contribution to climate change.

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Employees want genuine corporate social responsibility, not greenwashing

Described as the "moral face of globalization," corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives focused on solving societal and environmental concerns are increasingly expected by society, especially younger generations.

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Novel method for reading complete genomes from limited amounts of biological material

An improved method for reading and interpreting genomes from organisms that are difficult to investigate has been developed at Uppsala University. A team of researchers, led by Dr. Anna Rosling, has applied this method to decipher the genetic information of fungi present in the environment, which can be relevant, for example, for plant growth.

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Sustainable 3D-printed super magnets

From wind turbines and electric motors to sensors and magnetic switching systems, permanent magnets have many electrical applications. The production of these magnets usually involves sintering or injection molding. But due to the increasing miniaturization of electronics and the more exacting requirements, this places on magnetic components in terms of geometry, these conventional manufacturing m

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Improving aerodynamics during entire flight, not just takeoff and landing

Currently in use on the wings of airplanes are little fins near the leading edge or just upstream of control surfaces to help control the aircraft during takeoff or landing. But these vortex generator vanes and other similar solutions are fixed in place across the entire flight, creating a cruise penalty from the drag. A promising new idea for a device was tested at the University of Illinois that

3h

Bats inspire detectors to help prevent oil and gas pipe leaks

Engineers have developed a new scanning technique inspired by the natural world that can detect corroding metals in oil and gas pipelines.

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Solving the riddle of strigolactone biosynthesis in plants

Strigolactones (SLs) are a class of chemical compounds found in plants that have roles as plant hormones and rhizosphere signaling molecules. They regulate plant architecture and promote germination of root parasitic weeds that have detrimental effects on plant growth and production.

3h

Coral genes go with the flow further than expected

The southern Red Sea is more readily connected with the Indian Ocean than with the northern Red Sea, according to simulations carried out at KAUST. This helps explain genetic patterns seen in the Red Sea and highlights the need for a collaborative regional approach to marine conservation.

3h

Novel method for reading complete genomes from limited amounts of biological material

An improved method for reading and interpreting genomes from organisms that are difficult to investigate has been developed at Uppsala University. A team of researchers, led by Dr. Anna Rosling, has applied this method to decipher the genetic information of fungi present in the environment, which can be relevant, for example, for plant growth.

3h

Movement study could be significant in helping understand brain rehabilitation

Researchers from the University of Plymouth (UK) and Technical University of Munich (Germany) say their study could be particularly important for those working in rehabilitation and helping people to recover after neurological conditions.

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Understanding long-term trends in ocean layering

Water layering is intensifying significantly in about 40 percent of the world's oceans, which could have an impact on the marine food chain. The finding, published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, could be linked to global warming.

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Why Australia's severe bushfires may be bad news for tree regeneration

Blackened tree stems are all that remain in many post-fire images of eastern Victoria. The charred, often leafless trees are a testament to the severity of this season's bushfires, which have had a devastating impact on the state's biodiversity.

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Report: The role of faith-based organizations in responding to modern slavery

Faith-based charities working with survivors of modern slavery should adopt a standard on freedom of belief, religion and thought, a new report has recommended.

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Two satellites just avoided a head-on smash: How close did they come to disaster?

It appears we have missed another close call between two satellites—but how close did we really come to a catastrophic event in space?

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Solving the riddle of strigolactone biosynthesis in plants

Strigolactones (SLs) are a class of chemical compounds found in plants that have roles as plant hormones and rhizosphere signaling molecules. They regulate plant architecture and promote germination of root parasitic weeds that have detrimental effects on plant growth and production.

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Coral genes go with the flow further than expected

The southern Red Sea is more readily connected with the Indian Ocean than with the northern Red Sea, according to simulations carried out at KAUST. This helps explain genetic patterns seen in the Red Sea and highlights the need for a collaborative regional approach to marine conservation.

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Why Australia's severe bushfires may be bad news for tree regeneration

Blackened tree stems are all that remain in many post-fire images of eastern Victoria. The charred, often leafless trees are a testament to the severity of this season's bushfires, which have had a devastating impact on the state's biodiversity.

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Who you know can open (or close) your mind to inequality

Positive contact between advantaged and disadvantaged groups might mask existing group disparities and therefore perpetuate rather than challenge structural inequalities, new research suggests. For more than 50 years, social researchers and policymakers have believed that having members of different groups interact with each other can be an effective tool for reducing prejudice and building mutua

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Has greater workplace equality sparked economic growth?

Conservatively, 25% of the growth in United States' gross domestic product (GDP) between 1960 and 2010 is attributable to greater gender and racial balance in the workplace, report researchers. That number could even be as high as 40%. "There's a huge literature in labor economics on discrimination and wages and labor force participation," says Charles I. Jones, professor of economics at the Stan

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En svampspor kan avslöja ett helt genom

Forskare vid Uppsala universitet har utvecklat ett nytt sätt att studera mikroorganismer. Den nya metoden gör det möjligt att utifrån väldigt lite material få en överblick över hela organismens dna. I studien har forskarna använt sporer från en särskild svamp de studerar men metoden kan också användas för andra små och svårstuderade organismer. Idag finns kraftfulla metoder för att sekvensera den

4h

BAU wow wow

How should we discuss scenarios of future emissions? What is the range of scenarios we should explore? These are constant issues in climate modeling and policy discussions, and need to be reassessed every few years as knowledge improves. I discussed some of this in a post on worst case scenarios a few months ago, but the issue has gained more prominence with a commentary by Zeke Hausfather and Gl

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The Robots Are Coming. Prepare for Trouble.

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Ethics, efficiency, and artificial intelligence

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Alien Nations: Why Life on Other Planets Will Resemble Ours

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Artificial intelligence, geopolitics, and information integrity

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Fuel cell drone to inspect pipelines – 50 miles at a time

submitted by /u/Sophie_Cook_AR [link] [comments]

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Those who believe that the economic system is fair are less troubled by poverty, homelessness, and extreme wealth

We react less negatively to extreme manifestations of economic disparity, such as homelessness, if we think the economic system is fair and legitimate, and these differences in reactivity are even detectable at the physiological level, finds a team of psychology researchers.

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Penn researchers identify cancer cell defect driving resistance to CAR T cell therapy

Some cancer cells refuse to die, even in the face of powerful cellular immunotherapies like CAR T cell therapy, and new research is shedding light on why.

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Medicinrådet anbefaler immunterapi til aggressiv brystkræft

Patienter med brystkræft af typen triple-negativ, som er kendt for at være særligt aggressiv, vil fremover få tilbudt immunterapien Tecentriq kombination med kemoterapi som standardbehandling.

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Pill with tiny needle for painless injections passes first human trial

A pill with a tiny needle that painlessly injects drugs directly into the intestine could replace conventional injections

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The Most Crowd-Pleasing Films Coming Out of Sundance

Every year, the Sundance Film Festival celebrates new voices in independent cinema, debuting films from emerging artists and giving Hollywood a preview of the future. But an audience hit at Sundance won't necessarily translate to mainstream theaters. As the festival enters its final days, studios are beginning their annual spending spree on its biggest titles, hoping to invest in a project that s

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Strep throat is figuring out how to beat our go-to antibiotics

Efforts to craft a vaccine may grow more urgent. (DepositPhotos/) A new and unnerving Strep A threat is on the horizon: a version of the bacteria that's partly or wholly resistant to penicillin and other antibiotics. Streptococcus A is perhaps most infamous for being the most common cause of strep throat—a painful inflammation most common among children that can last weeks and cause serious compl

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Inouye's moment of truth

New telescope produces the goods with this close-up of the Sun.

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Bionic heart beats like the real thing

Researchers see it as a model for testing artificial valves and cardiac devices.

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Gut bacteria could shape your persona

Sociable types have more of the right type, study finds.

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Plants safely store toxic mercury. Bushfires and climate change bring it back

The risk and impact are greatest in contaminated areas, research suggests.

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Rachmaninoff rocked, according to a computer model

Novelty and influence comparison says he was the most innovative.

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Exclusive: Brooks' Hyperion Elite Could Beat Nike's Vaporflys

Proprietary foam and a carbon fiber plate could make one of the year's most anticipated new racing shoes a record-breaker.

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Study: 90-sec scan shows promise evaluating chest pain in Emergency Dept observation unit

A new pilot study has found that a resting 90-second magnetocardiography (MCG) scan shows promise in evaluating emergency department observation unit (EDOU) chest pain patients for Coronary Artery Stenosis. The study, published in the International Journal of Cardiology Heart and Vasculature, also indicates that CardioFlux MCG, has potential to rule patients out for Coronary Artery Disease.

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Image of the Day: Bionic Heart

A bioengineered heart made of pig and synthetic tissues beats like the real thing.

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A novel quantum couple

Magnetic field moves electrons into concentric circles.

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Efter brandadvarsel: P-huse bliver dyrere at forsikre

PLUS. Efter flere redningsberedskaber har sagt, at de ikke tør sende mandsskab ind til brande i p-huse, fordi de frygter kollaps, vurderer brancheforeningen Forsikring & Pension at præmierne vil stige.

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What is coronavirus and how worried should we be?

What are the symptoms caused by the virus from Wuhan in China, how is it transmitted from one person to another, and at what point should you see a doctor? Coronavirus: how to protect yourself from infection It is a novel coronavirus – that is to say, a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of those infect

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Super accurate sensor could lead to producing even smaller chips

Electrical engineer Stefanos Andreou built a sensor with an extraordinary accuracy of less than the size of an atom.

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The Brain Cells That Guide Animals – Issue 81: Maps

It may seem absurd to compare a tiny fruit fly's brain to that of a majestic elephant. Yet it is the dream of many neuroscientists to find deep rules that very different brains share. As Gilles Laurent, a neuroscientist at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt, Germany, who has studied a variety of animals, from locusts to turtles, has said , "Neural responses can be described

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These Maps Reveal Earth's Unspoiled Places – Issue 81: Maps

An underreported aspect of the climate crisis is that archaeological sites, cultural landscapes, biodiversity, and distributions of flora and fauna—much of which modern people will never even know about—are disappearing at an alarming rate. I'm an archaeologist, and while I don't know how to solve the climate crisis, I do know what I want to contribute to our shared legacy: a comprehensive digita

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We Are All Ancient Mapmakers – Issue 81: Maps

In the first half of the sixth century B.C., a Greek man named Anaximander, born in Turkey, sketched the world in a way no one had previously thought to do. It featured a circle, divided into three equal parts. He labeled those parts Europe, Asia, and Libya, and separated them by the great waterways of the Nile, the Phasis river, and the Mediterranean. To call it a map would perhaps be a bit over

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The Hidden Warning of Fall Colors – Issue 81: Maps

Drifting above North America in the autumn of 2014, a NASA satellite named Terra partook in some high-altitude leaf peeping. In an aerial photograph snapped that September, swaths of orange and red saturate the green landscape, as if igniting the planet in a smokeless blaze. If an alien spacefarer were to happen upon this annual scene, it might mistake the spectacle for an intentional signal—a ba

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Have We Solved the Black Hole Information Paradox?

Maybe—and as a bonus, we may soon have a new understanding of nature at a qualitatively different and deeper level than ever — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Lighthouse: How extreme isolation transforms the body and mind

Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson play two characters who experience extreme isolation in the film The Lighthouse, which has a drastic effect on their minds

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Solar Orbiter mission to track the sun's active regions, improve space weather prediction

Our understanding of space weather, its origin on the sun, and its progression and threat to Earth, comes with critical gaps—gaps that the European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter hopes to help fill after its upcoming launch.

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Extent of discrimination in discipline of students with disabilities unclear

Federal legislation and regulation currently require U.S. schools to monitor for whether students with disabilities who are also racial or ethnic minorities are being inappropriately disciplined. Yet a new analysis of existing studies led by Paul Morgan, professor of education in the Department of Education Policy Studies in Penn State's College of Education, finds that it is actually unknown whet

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Hydrogel coating is first to prevent ice formation in 3 different ways

Materials scientists at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and colleagues in China have developed a coating that prevents ice from forming. The way it works is inspired by a natural mechanism that keeps blood from freezing in several species of fish that live near Antarctica.

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Oysters as catch of the day? Perhaps not, if ocean acidity keeps rising

When it comes to carbon emissions, people tend to focus more on what happens in the atmosphere and on land. But about a quarter of carbon emissions dissolve into oceans, lowering the water's pH and causing ocean acidification.

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Citizen scientists get snappy to monitor bushfire-ravaged environment

Forget Instagram—UNSW Sydney researchers are urging citizen scientists to use their mobile phones for a good cause: to monitor the recovery of bushfire-affected plants and animals for the Environment Recovery Project which will inform future research.

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Oysters as catch of the day? Perhaps not, if ocean acidity keeps rising

When it comes to carbon emissions, people tend to focus more on what happens in the atmosphere and on land. But about a quarter of carbon emissions dissolve into oceans, lowering the water's pH and causing ocean acidification.

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Biological diversity as a factor of production

Can the biodiversity of ecosystems be considered a factor of production? A group of researchers under the direction of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are studying the economic benefits that farmers and foresters can obtain by focusing on several species instead of just one. The benefits that biodiversity brings to society are also being studied in an extensive literature review.

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Greta Thunberg to trademark 'Fridays for Future'

The climate change activist said people had tried to sell products and make money in the movement's name.

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What's in Kale (or a Pear) That Seems to Lower Alzheimer's Risk?

Particular antioxidants in fruits and vegetables may lower chances of getting the disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We Don't Have Enough Face Masks

Wendover Brown runs a boutique business in San Francisco selling hand-sewn face masks. Her patterned products are called "Vogmasks" (pronounced vogue masks ). They are meant to look more like clothing than medical devices—cosmetically palatable respirators for people trying to avoid air pollution or allergens. Most months, Brown says, she sells a few thousand. Last week she was shocked to get an

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Coronavirus Is Coming—And Trump Isn't Ready

We all knew the moment would come. It could have been over Iran or North Korea, a hurricane or an earthquake. But it may be the new coronavirus out of China that tests whether President Donald Trump can govern in a crisis—and there is ample reason to be uneasily skeptical. The U.S. government has the tools, talent, and team to help fight the coronavirus abroad and minimize its impact at home. But

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Every Student Needs 200 Cubic Feet of Air

Originally published in April 1895 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Biological diversity as a factor of production

Can the biodiversity of ecosystems be considered a factor of production? A group of researchers under the direction of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are studying the economic benefits that farmers and foresters can obtain by focusing on several species instead of just one. The benefits that biodiversity brings to society are also being studied in an extensive literature review.

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The role of temporal fluctuations for the swing feel in jazz music

In 1931, Duke Ellington and Irving Mills dedicated a song to the phenomenon of swing, which they called "It Don't Mean a Thing, If It Ain't Got That Swing." Yet, to this day, the question of what, exactly, makes a jazz performance swing has not really been clarified. A team drawn from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen and the University of Göttingen recently

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Have We Solved the Black Hole Information Paradox?

Maybe—and as a bonus, we may soon have a new understanding of nature at a qualitatively different and deeper level than ever — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What's in Kale (or a Pear) That Seems to Lower Alzheimer's Risk?

Particular antioxidants in fruits and vegetables may lower chances of getting the disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What's in Kale (or a Pear) That Seems to Lower Alzheimer's Risk?

Particular antioxidants in fruits and vegetables may lower chances of getting the disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Diagnostik og behandling af modermærkekræft foregår på højt og ensartet niveau

Regioner og afdelinger præsterer generelt over de fastsatte standarder for modermærkekræft, viser årsrapport fra Dansk Melanom Database

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Overlevelsen ved lungekræft stiger fortsat

Mere end hver fjerde lungekræftpatient kan tilbydes operation, og mere end hver tredje tilbydes behandling med henblik på helbredelse, viser årsrapport fra Dansk Lunge Cancer Register

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Dekan: Det er vigtigt, vi får en god proces

Arbejdet med fakultetets målplan for 2021-24 går i gang i råd og udvalg. Dekan Jesper…

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The Coronavirus Is Now Infecting People Who Haven't Traveled to China

Public health experts worry the outbreak is entering a dangerous new phase as cases of local transmission in other countries accumulate.

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Mark Warner Takes on Big Tech and Russian Spies

A former telecoms entrepreneur, the Virginia senator says that saving the industry (and democracy) might mean blowing up Big Tech as we know it.

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Moral och bildning viktigt i Maria Sandels författarskap

Maria Sandel skildrade kvinnliga fabriksarbetares vardag, men skrev också om tabubelagda ämnen som pedofili, prostitution och barnamord. Inte bara klassolidaritet, utan också bildning och moral är viktiga teman. Det fanns ett skäl till det. Maria Sandel (1870–1927) brukar kallas Sveriges första kvinnliga proletärförfattare. Hon föddes i en fattig arbetarfamilj och fick själv börja jobba efter bar

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The US government claims I'm a 'domestic terrorist'. Am I? | Ken Ward

I shut down an oil pipeline as part of a peaceful protest. The government thinks this is violent extremism In the early hours of 11 October 2016, I closed a safety valve on an oil pipeline in Skagit county, Washington. I was acting as part of the "Valve Turners" direct action against climate change. Five of us, in locations across four states, succeeded in shutting down all five pipelines carryin

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Wuhan coronavirus grown by scientists in Melbourne – video

Scientists at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity in Melbourne have grown the novel coronavirus from a patient sample, which they plan to share internationally under advice from the World Health Organization to provide data to fight the outbreak. The virus has also been grown in cell culture in China, but the breakthrough in Melbourne will allow accurate investigation and diagn

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Chef for landets største gynækologiske afdeling skifter spor

Efter 11 år som ledende overlæge og chef for de gynækologisk-obstetriske afdelinger på OUH, Odense og Svendborg, vil Bjarne Rønde Kristensen nu bruge en stor del af sin tid på at opbygge et nyt tilbud til voldsramte kvinder – og på at skaffe verdenskongres til Danmark.

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Vejdirektoratet: Hærvejsmotorvej vil ødelægge unik og uforstyrret natur

PLUS. Flere naturperler bliver de store tabere, hvis en ny midtjysk motorvej bliver til virkelighed, viser en netop offentliggjort VVM-undersøgelse.

6h

The Case Against Impeachment Has Nothing to Do With Impeachment

Throughout the caricature of an impeachment trial under way in the Senate, Democrats and the occasional Republican have been urging—begging, actually—Mitch McConnell and his like-minded Republican senators to be fair and/or patriotic and/or honorable when hearing what is a quite damning case of abuse of office, and then to vote their consciences and/or uphold the Constitution and/or save democrac

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QUINT workflow for rodent brain atlas-based image analysis

Here we present the Quint workflow for quantification and spatial analysis of histological features in rodent brains based on the segmentation of 2D brain section images and registration to a reference atlas. The workflow utilizes several open source software developed with support from the Human Brain Project. From: HumanBrainProject

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Journal expresses concern about possible animal abuse in trauma paper

A journal has issued an expression of concern over a 2018 paper which involved strapping 21 anesthetized minipigs to sleds and running them into a wall at speeds of up to 25 miles per hour. The study, "Experimental study of thoracoabdominal injuries suffered from caudocephalad impacts using pigs," came from the Third Military Medical University … Continue reading

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Fast action will be key to containing new coronavirus from China

As the new virus that emerged in China spreads rapidly around the world, the reaction of national and international health agencies will be key to stopping it

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Telenor tavs om sms-skandale: Her er det, vi ved indtil videre

Telenor blev ad mindst to omgange informeret om, at noget var helt galt med udleveringen af teledata. Ikke desto mindre fortsatte lækket.

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Endnu en succes: Sådan ser det ud, når SpaceX affyrer satellit-tog

For fjerde gang er det lykkedes rumfartsvirksomheden at sende 60 satellitter i kredsløb i ét hug.

6h

The American Dirt Controversy Is Painfully Intramural

Imagine if a controversial novel about a treacherous border crossing triggered a papal homily, or even a presidential tweet. Either scenario would suggest that public leaders are reckoning with the migrant crisis anew, thanks to a risk-taking work of fiction. Novels can have this power. Jeanine Cummins's new novel American Dirt does not. The controversy the novel has provoked is not the controver

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Jersey 'drowned landscape' could yield Ice Age insights

Archaeologists plan an ambitious survey of part of the seabed off Jersey where Neanderthals once lived.

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Vården missar andra hälsoproblem hos patienter med depression

Personer med svårbehandlad depression lider ofta av samsjuklighet, exempelvis personlighetssyndrom eller ångestsjukdomar. Forskare vid Lunds universitet har jämfört olika metoder för att utreda patienter med depression. Det visar sig att den metod som är praxis inom specialistpsykiatrin inte fångar upp samsjuklighet i tillräcklig utsträckning.

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Så tar malariaparasiter upp socker

Upptäckten om hur malariaparasiter tar upp socker kan leda till bättre läkemedel mot malaria. Socker är en grundläggande energikälla för de flesta levande organismer – och helt nödvändig för malariaparasiten Plasmodium falciparum. Liksom hos andra celler sker transporten av socker in i cellen genom ett transportprotein. Proteinet agerar som en dörr för sockret genom cellmembranet. Forskare från S

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Montana's Original Sin

Let's play a game beloved by judges and lawyers: Dueling Hypotheticals. HYPOTHETICAL ONE : In 1889, Congress offers statehood to an American territory, but only on condition that its constitution will set up public schools "free from sectarian control." It promises to do so, and Montana is born. Nearly a century later, in 1972, a citizens' convention comes together to write a new constitution. Th

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Pårørende kan bidrage til at nedbringe tvang i psykiatrien

Pårørende kan spille en stor rolle i psykiatriens arbejde med at forebygge og nedbringe tvang end hidtil antaget. Det viser international forskning, skriver chefanalytiker i Bedre Psykiatri.

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The tight junction protein TJP1 regulates the feeding-modulated hepatic circadian clock

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14470-2 The circadian clock regulates rhythms of physiology and metabolism in response to environmental cues such as food intake. Here, the authors show that tight junction protein 1 (TJP1) interacts with period 1 and modulates its nuclear translocation in a mTOR-dependent manner.

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The combination of asymmetric hydrogenation of olefins and direct reductive amination

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14475-x Asymmetric hydrogenation (AH) and direct reductive amination (DRA) are both frequently utilized in chemical industry. Here, the authors combine these two transformations to efficiently convert in one step prochiral olefins into chiral amino compounds.

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Error-mitigated quantum gates exceeding physical fidelities in a trapped-ion system

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14376-z Quantum error mitigation promises to improve expectation values' estimation without the resource overhead of quantum error correction. Here, the authors test probabilistic error cancellation using trapped ions, decreasing single- and two-qubit gates' error rates by two and one order of magnitude respectively.

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Dust tides and rapid meridional motions in the Martian atmosphere during major dust storms

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14510-x The authors here present the diurnal tides of dust within the southern Martian atmosphere. The dust tides imply a fast meridional exchange of heat and materials on Mars and allow water content near the summer pole to be rapidly transported to the middle latitudes in the nighttime which is then lifted by dayti

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Carbon dioxide electroreduction on single-atom nickel decorated carbon membranes with industry compatible current densities

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14402-0 Here the authors deploy Ni single atom-decorated carbon membranes as integrated gas diffusion electrodes to construct an extremely stable three-phase interface for CO2 electroreduction, producing CO with a partial current density of 308.4 mA cm–2 and a Faradaic efficiency of 88% for up to 120 h.

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Imaging brain activity during complex social behaviors in Drosophila with Flyception2

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14487-7 In vivo recordings of free-moving Drosophila neural activity are limited to clearly-separated flies in a stable focal plane. Here the authors improved on their Flyception imaging system to remove these constraints, and image neural activity in the male fly brain during various stages of the mating sequence.

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Macrophages directly contribute collagen to scar formation during zebrafish heart regeneration and mouse heart repair

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14263-2 Macrophages mediate the fibrotic response after a heart attack by extracellular matrix turnover and cardiac fibroblasts activation. Here the authors identify an evolutionarily-conserved function of macrophages that contributes directly to the forming post-injury scar through cell-autonomous deposition of coll

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Molecular signatures of aneuploidy-driven adaptive evolution

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13669-2 Aneuploidy (abnormal chromosome number) can enable rapid adaptation to stress conditions, but it also entails fitness costs from gene imbalance. Here, the authors experimentally evolve yeast while forcing maintenance of aneuploidy to identify the mechanisms that promote tolerance of aneuploidy.

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Double trouble: A drug for alcoholism can also treat cancer by targeting macrophages

The deadly nature of cancer stems from its ability to spread and grow inside the host. Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are host macrophages recruited by the tumor, which promote tumor progression. A team of researchers from Tokyo University of Science and other institutes have discovered that the protein FROUNT may be linked to TAM regulation. By inhibiting FROUNT using an anti-alcoholism drug

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New target identified for repairing the heart after heart attack

An immune cell is shown for the first time to be involved in creating the scar that repairs the heart after damage.

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Partisan polarization helps Congress pass bills

While political polarization in the United States is the worst it has been in years, new research from Michigan State University and the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research suggests that having a partisan — and sometimes divisive — Congress might be more productive than if bipartisan groups were the norm.

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The Atlantic Ocean fingerprint on the climate of the Middle East

The fluctuation in sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic basin has an influence on the summer temperatures variability in the Middle East, and the current warming trend observed over the region could persist as the North Atlantic remains anomalously warm, adding to the global warming effects. Insights and perspectives from a pivotal study on NPJ Climate and Atmospheric Science, with the c

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Trafikforsker: Ministerens busser på Østbanen bliver ikke billigere end tog

PLUS. Transportministeren og Region Sjælland mener, at det er billigere at fjerne 50 km af regionens nedslidte jernbane og erstatte den med busser end at renovere sporene. Men argumenterne holder ikke, siger trafikforsker, der forventer højere pris og faldende passagertal.

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For 16 Years, These Infrared Eyes Revealed the Cosmos's Secrets

NASA's Spitzer space telescope spotted 7 Earth-size worlds orbiting another star, a new ring around Saturn and many more wonders in space.

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In Paris, a Mathematician Confronts the Political Odds

Is a scientist in politics incongruous? Cédric Villani, Fields Medal winner and mayoral candidate, doesn't think so.

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Reversed Doppler effect based on hybridized acoustic Mie resonances

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58370-3

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Contrasting functional structure of saproxylic beetle assemblages associated to different microhabitats

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58408-6

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Design and characterization of an acoustic composite lens with high-intensity and directionally controllable focusing

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58092-6

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Co-existence of PrPD types 1 and 2 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of the VV subgroup: phenotypic and prion protein characteristics

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58446-0 Co-existence of PrP D types 1 and 2 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of the VV subgroup: phenotypic and prion protein characteristics

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p53 dynamics in single cells are temperature-sensitive

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58267-1

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Partisan polarization helps Congress pass bills: study

While political polarization in the United States is the worst it has been in years, new research from Michigan State University and the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research suggests that having a partisan—and sometimes divisive—Congress might be more productive than if bipartisan groups were the norm.

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New predatory dinosaur added to Australia's prehistory

Evidence of agile, carnivorous two-legged dinosaurs known as noasaurids have been found across the now dispersed land masses that once formed the ancient southern supercontinent of Gondwana, but never in Australia—until now.

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Bionic Jellyfish Swim Faster, More Efficiently

submitted by /u/JigglymoobsMWO [link] [comments]

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Color-changing bandages sense and treat bacterial infections

submitted by /u/quantumcipher [link] [comments]

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When Will We Have Orbiting Colonies?

The SpaceX Starship could open the door to mass commercialization of space. As any NASA enthusiast will tell you, there are tons of things we could do in space if the cost wasn't so high. There will be more satellites including ones for collecting solar power to beam down to earth. There will be manufacturing facilities utilizing the unique properties of microgravity for the production of alloys,

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A Nobel Laureate Retracted Her High-Profile Paper. Bravo!

This January, Nobel Laureate Frances Arnold retracted a paper on enzyme catalysts, after finding the work couldn't be replicated. Some critics seized the opportunity to discredit the entire scientific community, but they miss the point: In science, a flawed experiment can be as valuable as the perfect study.

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Video: Sådan lyser Solen svarende til en milliard brintbomber

Når Hawaiis nyeste teleskop DKIST kigger på Solen kræver det enorme mængder køling, men resultatet er de hidtil skarpeste billeder af vor solsystems energiressource.

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Researchers discover a genetic mechanism that affects birth defects, some cancers

Scientists have understood for some time that proper embryonic development depends in large part on transcriptional repressors, proteins that prevent genes from being expressed at inappropriate times. Steven Vokes, associate professor of molecular biosciences at the University of Texas at Austin, and his team focus on a set of proteins called GLI (glioma-associated oncogene) and how they control g

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Researchers discover a genetic mechanism that affects birth defects, some cancers

Scientists have understood for some time that proper embryonic development depends in large part on transcriptional repressors, proteins that prevent genes from being expressed at inappropriate times. Steven Vokes, associate professor of molecular biosciences at the University of Texas at Austin, and his team focus on a set of proteins called GLI (glioma-associated oncogene) and how they control g

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Study identifies reasons for drinking in UK serving and ex-serving military personnel

A study, led by the University of Liverpool and King's College London, has identified the reasons why UK serving and ex-serving military personnel drink, in research based on military personnel self-reporting a stress or emotional problem.

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KU Leuven researchers discover new piece of the puzzle for Parkinson's disease

Biomedical scientists at KU Leuven have discovered that a defect in the ATP13A2 gene causes cell death by disrupting the cellular transport of polyamines. When this happens in the part of the brain that controls body movement, it can lead to Parkinson's disease.

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Australia heatwave renews bushfire worries

Australia was bracing for a heatwave to sweep across the country's fire-ravaged southeast in the coming days, with the forecast stoking fears the soaring temperatures could inflame bushfires.

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G20 funds fossil fuels $30 bn a year under the radar: analysis

Rich nations are funnelling cash through government-backed financial institutions to provide $30 billion to fossil fuel projects each year that "run counter to the Paris Agreement", a new analysis showed Thursday.

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Microscopic partners could help plants survive stressful environments

Tiny, symbiotic fungi play an outsized role in helping plants survive stresses like drought and extreme temperatures, which could help feed a planet experiencing climate change, report scientists at Washington State University.

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Microscopic partners could help plants survive stressful environments

Tiny, symbiotic fungi play an outsized role in helping plants survive stresses like drought and extreme temperatures, which could help feed a planet experiencing climate change, report scientists at Washington State University.

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Antibiotic-resistance in Tanzania is an environmental problem

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are prevalent in people, wildlife and the water in northeastern Tanzania, but it's not antibiotic use alone driving resistance. Instead, researchers at Washington State University found transmission of bacteria in the environment is the most important factor.

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Cells' springy coils pump bursts of RNA

In your cells, it's almost always spring. Or at least springy.

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Emerging organic contaminant levels greatly influenced by stream flows, seasons

Flow rates and time of year must be taken into account to better understand the potential risks posed by emerging organic contaminants in rivers and streams, according to Penn State researchers who studied contaminant concentrations and flow characteristics at six locations near drinking water intakes in the Susquehanna River basin.

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Meteorites reveal high carbon dioxide levels on early Earth

Tiny meteorites no larger than grains of sand hold new clues about the atmosphere on ancient Earth, according to scientists.

9h

Cells' springy coils pump bursts of RNA

In your cells, it's almost always spring. Or at least springy.

9h

Skorpioner är mästare på kärlek

Med en våldsamt skakande timslång dans uppvaktar skorpionhannen sin utvalda hona. Om hon samtycker tar de varandras klor och fortsätter dansen tillsammans. Bara döden kan skilja dem åt.

10h

AI – möjlighet och hinder för FNs globala mål

Avskaffa extrem fattigdom, minska ojämlikheter och orättvisor, främja fred och lösa klimatkrisen. Detta hade FNs medlemsländer i åtanke när de år 2015 enades om 17 globala mål att uppfylla till 2030.

10h

China's currency breaches key level on mounting virus fears

Stocks and commodities fall again as impact of illness on economy and companies spreads

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Australsk delstat undersøger klimaforandringers rolle i brande

New South Wales igangsætter en uafhængig undersøgelse for at blive klogere på årsagen til voldsom brandsæson.

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Why Britain Brexited

T he United Kingdom will soon begin the most radical national experiment of the 21st century so far: Brexit. Having won a landslide election victory on a promise to "get Brexit done," Boris Johnson will finally make good on 2016's referendum result. Britain will leave the European Union, with no easy way back or guarantees about what will come next. Having voted twice for Brexit, the country is f

11h

Coronavirus Live Updates: Emergency Declaration Is Considered as Toll Rises

The World Health Organization will decide today whether to declare the epidemic an international public health emergency. Chinese officials say 170 people have died.

11h

Legislative Alchemy 2019: Chiropractors seek scope of practice expansion, including authority to prescribe drugs

In 2019, chiropractors continued their push for practice expansion, including prescription privileges, as well as co-opting the opioid crisis to mandate physician recommendations for "chiropractic care".

11h

Facebook's slow growth, Fed holds, Boeing loss

Facebook posts the slowest pace of quarterly growth since its 2012 flotation

12h

Coronavirus: The US laboratory developing a vaccine

US scientists have told the BBC they could have a vaccine ready for use before the end of the year.

12h

Cells' springy coils pump bursts of RNA

Models by Rice University chemists calculate the chemical and mechanical energies involved in 'bursty' RNA production in cells. Their models show how RNA polymerases create supercoils of DNA allowing production of RNA that goes on to produce proteins.

12h

Computer servers now able to retrieve data much faster

Computer scientists at the University of Waterloo have found a novel approach that significantly improves the storage efficiency and output speed of computer systems.

12h

Biological diversity as a factor of production

Can the biodiversity of ecosystems be considered a factor of production? A group of researchers under the direction of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are studying the economic benefits that farmers and foresters can obtain by focusing on several species instead of just one. The benefits that biodiversity brings to society are also being studied in an extensive literature review.

12h

New clinical practice guideline for complex ADHD in children and adolescents

New clinical guidelines call strongly for providing psychosocial supports for children and adolescents with complex attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Developed by the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (SDBP), the guideline provides a framework for diagnosing and treating complex ADHD in these age groups.

12h

People may lie to appear honest

if events that turned out in their favor seem too good to be true, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Australske forskere dyrker coronavirus på vej mod vaccine

Ud fra en smitteprøve er det lykkedes et hold forskere at dyrke coronavirusset i et laboratorie med succes.

12h

AI-designed drug to enter human clinical trial for first time

Molecule designed by machine to treat OCD developed in just 12 months

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Russia closes China border to block spread of coronavirus

Outbreak wreaks havoc on global tech supply chain as infection rate continues to rise

14h

Anti-solar cells: A photovoltaic cell that works at night

What if solar cells worked at night? That's no joke. In fact, a specially designed photovoltaic cell could generate up to 50 watts of power per square meter under ideal conditions at night, about a quarter of what a conventional solar panel can generate in daytime, according to a recent concept article.

14h

Superfast insights into cellular events

Even more detailed insights into the cell will be possible in future with the help of a new development: Scientists have succeeded in accelerating a hundred thousand-fold the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for investigating RNA.

14h

Faulty Antibodies Undermine Widespread Research

Two papers reveal that many commonly used research antibodies don't bind as believed, highlighting the need to validate these reagents before use.

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Anti-solar cells: A photovoltaic cell that works at night

What if solar cells worked at night? That's no joke. In fact, a specially designed photovoltaic cell could generate up to 50 watts of power per square meter under ideal conditions at night, about a quarter of what a conventional solar panel can generate in daytime, according to a recent concept article.

14h

Microscopic partners could help plants survive stressful environments

Tiny, symbiotic fungi play an outsized role in helping plants survive stresses like drought and extreme temperatures, which could help feed a planet experiencing climate change, report scientists.

14h

Tesla Reports Strong Results, but Challenges Loom Ahead

The electric automaker posted $105 million in fourth-quarter profit on $7.4 billion in revenue. It delivered a record 112,000 vehicles.

14h

Sun's surface seen in remarkable new detail

A telescope on top of a Hawaiian volcano acquires remarkable pictures of our convulsing star.

14h

Two satellites in close shave over US city of Pittsburgh

Experts said a collision would have created a debris field, risking damage to other satellites.

14h

We Must Reckon with Japan's 60-Foot-Tall Gundam Robot

submitted by /u/drunkles [link] [comments]

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If this era of automation mirrors the past, we're in trouble

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Waymo's self-driving cars will carry packages for UPS in Phoenix

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Hollywood is replacing artists with AI, and its future is bleak.

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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GM to invest $2.2B in Detroit to build electric vehicles

submitted by /u/rouges [link] [comments]

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World First: Genetically Engineered Moth Is Released Into an Open Field

submitted by /u/funnyboyjazz [link] [comments]

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We Have Fifteen Years to Save the Amazon Rainforest from Becoming Savannah

submitted by /u/MayonaiseRemover [link] [comments]

15h

Could you make a living space ship using these 2 technologies combined?

Ok so here is how we can make graphene in bulk. This is a very cost effective way to do so. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-1938-0 We would then mix that graphene into the mixture of sand / algea and gelatin https://www.cell.com/matter/fulltext/S2590-2385(19)30391-1 Apparently gelatin is strengthened by adding graphene to it. https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2011/sm/c1sm0

15h

Will future space travel all automated?

Since human error causes simple airplane and helicopter crashes how would they accomplishment the 9 month direct flight to Mars? submitted by /u/CallMeTinaNotTim [link] [comments]

15h

Designing a hybrid electrode toward high energy density with a staged Li+ and PF6- deintercalation/intercalation mechanism [Chemistry]

Existing lithium-ion battery technology is struggling to meet our increasing requirements for high energy density, long lifetime, and low-cost energy storage. Here, a hybrid electrode design is developed by a straightforward reengineering of commercial electrode materials, which has revolutionized the "rocking chair" mechanism by unlocking the role of anions in…

15h

Sum frequency generation, calculation of absolute intensities, comparison with experiments, and two-field relaxation-based derivation [Chemistry]

The experimental sum frequency generation (SFG) spectrum is the response to an infrared pulse and a visible pulse and is a highly surface-sensitive technique. We treat the surface dangling OH bonds at the air/water interface and focus on the absolute SFG intensities for the resonant terms, a focus that permits…

15h

Remethylation of Dnmt3a-/- hematopoietic cells is associated with partial correction of gene dysregulation and reduced myeloid skewing [Medical Sciences]

Mutations in the DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) gene are the most common cause of age-related clonal hematopoiesis (ARCH) in older individuals, and are among the most common initiating events for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The most frequent DNMT3A mutation in AML patients (R882H) encodes a dominant-negative protein that reduces methyltransferase…

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Transformation of speech sequences in human sensorimotor circuits [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

After we listen to a series of words, we can silently replay them in our mind. Does this mental replay involve a reactivation of our original perceptual dynamics? We recorded electrocorticographic (ECoG) activity across the lateral cerebral cortex as people heard and then mentally rehearsed spoken sentences. For each region,…

15h

An 'Untitled Goose Game' Tribute Unleashes Chaos on Your Desktop

An enterprising developer has brought chaotic goose energy to Windows with Desktop Goose.

15h

Coronavirus outbreak hits mining shares after iron ore falls

Expected hit to Chinese demand weighs on prices of Australian natural resources

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The scientist leading the coronavirus vaccine race

Pharmaceutical companies work to repurpose existing genetic technology

16h

Designing a puncture-free tire

Some golf carts and lawnmowers have airless tires, but we still have long way to go before they are on every vehicle that comes off the assembly line. Aerospace engineers have developed an algorithm to find an optimal design for a puncture-free with both strength and elasticity needed for a comfortable, shock-free ride like conventional pneumatic tires.

16h

San Francisco Joins the Move to Ban Cars From a Major Street

New York has cleared Times Square and 14th Street, while Oslo is banishing drivers from its city center.

16h

Demand for drone delivery in e-retail is high, ability to meet that demand low

Consumers want what they want, and they want it now. Drone delivery has long been talked about as an option to satisfy consumer delivery demands, but how realistic is it? New research looks at how possible and desirable it is to use drones for delivery for e-retailers considering cost and effectiveness in certain population areas and in certain locations.

16h

Monitoring intermediates in CO2 conversion to formate by metal catalyst

The production of formate from CO2 is considered an attractive strategy for the long-term storage of solar renewable energy in chemical form.

16h

As Coronavirus Explodes in China, Countries Struggle to Control Its Spread

The time to prevent more epidemics is now, and countries are trying to seize the moment.

17h

Climate forecast says we may break the record for warmest year by 2025

The world is likely to break the record for the hottest year before 2025, according to the UK Met Office, which says there is an outside chance temperatures briefly overshoot the toughest target of the Paris climate deal

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Researchers discover how cellular senescence leads to neurodegeneration

Although a link has been established between chronic inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases, there have been many open questions regarding how cellular senescence, a process whereby cells that stop dividing under stress spew out a mix of inflammatory proteins, affects these pathologies. Researchers report that senescence in astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the brain, leads to damagi

17h

Prescribed burns benefit bees

Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, according to new research.

17h

Speedy recovery: New corn performs better in cold

Around the world, each person eats an average of 70 pounds of corn each year, with even more grown for animal feed and biofuel. And as the global population continues to boom, increasing the amount of food grown on the same amount of land becomes increasingly important. A group of researchers have taken a step closer to this goal by developing a new type of corn that recovers much more quickly aft

17h

Scientists find record warm water in Antarctica, pointing to cause behind troubling glacier melt

A team of scientists has observed, for the first time, the presence of warm water at a vital point underneath a glacier in Antarctica — an alarming discovery that points to the cause behind the gradual melting of this ice shelf while also raising concerns about sea-level rise around the globe.

17h

Monitoring intermediates in CO2 conversion to formate by metal catalyst

The production of formate from CO2 is considered an attractive strategy for the long-term storage of solar renewable energy in chemical form.

17h

Gut reaction: How immunity ramps up against incoming threats

A new study has revealed how the gut's protective mechanisms ramp up significantly with food intake, and at times of the day when mealtimes are anticipated based on regular eating habits. Researchers found that eating causes a hormone called VIP to kickstart the activity of immune cells in response to potentially incoming pathogens or 'bad' bacteria. The researchers also found that immunity increa

17h

Coronavirus live updates: death toll jumps to 170 amid evacuation delays for foreign nationals

WHO says whole world must be on alert for Wuhan virus as UK citizens in Hubei told they will not be flown out on Thursday. Follow the latest news and live updates Whole world must be ready to deal with coronavirus, says WHO Japan and US fly citizens home as China death toll jumps 1.15am GMT I'm just catching up on the remainder of that Australian press conference a short time ago. The health mini

17h

Coronavirus poses challenge for China's centralised system

Response to crisis exposes disadvantages of Xi Jinping's highly centralised administration

17h

Scientists develop a concept of a hybrid thorium reactor

Russian scientists have proposed a concept of a thorium hybrid reactor in that obtains additional neutrons using high-temperature plasma held in a long magnetic trap. This project was applied in close collaboration between Tomsk Polytechnic University, All-Russian Scientific Research Institute Of Technical Physics (VNIITF), and Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of SB RAS. The proposed thorium hy

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Prominent Harvard Chemist Arrested For Concealing Ties to China

The Department of Justice also released the names of two Chinese researchers who allegedly acted against US interests.

18h

Author Correction: Ferromagnetic excess moments and apparent exchange bias in FeF2 single crystals

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58757-2 Author Correction: Ferromagnetic excess moments and apparent exchange bias in FeF 2 single crystals

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Author Correction: Iron induces insulin resistance in cardiomyocytes via regulation of oxidative stress

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58752-7

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Author Correction: A global mass budget for positively buoyant macroplastic debris in the ocean

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58755-4

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Publisher Correction: High Entropy Alloys Mined From Binary Phase Diagrams

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58758-1

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Author Correction: Efficient derivation of knock-out and knock-in rats using embryos obtained by in vitro fertilization

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58515-4

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Duterte's Graveyard

Editor's Note: This film contains some graphic imagery. During his campaign for the Philippine presidency in 2016, Rodrigo Duterte ran on a platform of a "relentless" war on drugs that promised to purge the country of narcotics-related violence. Once in office, Duterte encouraged vigilante death squads and police task forces to commit extrajudicial m urders of suspected drug users and dealers. In

18h

See the most detailed images ever taken of the sun – video

New images taken by the Inouye solar telescope in Hawaii show the sun's surface in unprecedented detail thanks to its 30km resolution – more than twice that of other solar observatories Telescope captures most detailed pictures yet of the sun Continue reading…

18h

Move your digital photos between services without losing a pixel

It's like picking these up and putting them in another box… only it's not. (Volodymyr Nikitenko via Deposit Phoyo/) Photos and videos are likely to be some of your most precious digital possessions. They represent snapshots of loved ones, special places, memorable events , incredible trips , and even some moments that will have you laughing for years to come . We take a lot of these with our sm

18h

The Atlantic Politics Daily: Texas Isn't Purple Just Yet

It's Wednesday, January 29. The CDC has confirmed another U.S. case of coronavirus. "Based on what's known so far, the virus is dangerous," James Hamblin writes, "but not unprecedentedly so." On Capitol Hill, the question-and-answer portion of the impeachment trial started on Wednesday. Meanwhile, Republicans seem poised to block the testimony of new witnesses— including John Bolton . In the rest

19h

Buck researchers discover how cellular senescence leads to neurodegeneration

Although a link has been established between chronic inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases, there have been many open questions regarding how cellular senescence, a process whereby cells that stop dividing under stress spew out a mix of inflammatory proteins, affects these pathologies. Publishing in PLOS One, researchers at the Buck Institute report that senescence in astrocytes, the most ab

19h

Infectious disease experts warn of outbreak risks in US border detention centers

Over the past year, at least seven children have died from diseases including influenza while being detained by the US Department of Homeland Security's Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency. Infectious disease experts at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) called for protections like influenza vaccinations to prevent serious outbreaks.

19h

Here's how to watch the Super Bowl without cable as it streams in 4K for the first time

On a 4K TV, you'd have enough resolution to see that this definitely isn't a picture of the Super Bowl. (Pixabay/) This year marks the first time that the Super Bowl will stream in 4K ultra-high definition (UHD). That statement comes with a caveat as the actual production will happen in 1080p and then upscale for compatible devices. Here's the official word from Fox : "produced natively in 1080p

19h

Google Says Its Chatbot Is Capable of Near-Human Conversation

Better Tay If you've ever tried to have a conversation with a chatbot, you know that even today's state-of-the-art systems aren't exactly eloquent , regularly doling out nonsensical or painfully generic responses. Now, though, Google has created Meena, a chatbot it says is better than any other it's tested — a claim the company supports using a new metric it developed specifically to measure an A

19h

Two Defunct Satellites Barely Miss Each Other Above Earth

If they do collide, they will smash into one another at more than 30,000 miles per hour, leading to a cloud of debris circling the Earth.

19h

Medicaid expansion reduce cancer, saves black lives

Expanding Medicaid in North Carolina could sharply lessen the burden of colon cancers in the state and save the lives of thousands of Black men as well as improving access to care for men of all races, UConn Health and University of North Carolina researchers report in the 27 January issue of PLOS One.

19h

Robot sweat regulates temperature, key for extreme conditions

Just when it seemed like robots couldn't get any cooler, Cornell University researchers have created a soft robot muscle that can regulate its temperature through sweating.

19h

Antibiotic-resistance in Tanzania is an environmental problem

WSU study finds that environmental transmission rather than antibiotic use explains the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in people, domestic animals and wildlife.

19h

Brain Organoids are Farther From Consciousness Than You Might Think

Despite some claims, lab-grown brains don't properly mimic the function of real human brains.

19h

Electrode-Wearing Jellyfish Might One Day Explore the Ocean For Us

By implanting electrodes in jellyfish, researchers can prompt the nerve-less creatures to swim three times faster than normal.

19h

Shanghai traders brace for return to work after outbreak

Markets staff to reopen China's financial centre while most businesses remain shut

19h

A mummy murder has been solved after 2,600 years

The mummy Takabuti has inspired a great deal of speculation since it was first unwrapped in 1835. Takabuti died when she was between 20 and 30, leading researchers to wonder about her cause of death. New techniques have enabled researchers to determine that Takabuti died from a stab wound to the back, among other interesting findings. 2,600 years on and investigators have finally discovered the c

19h

Hawaii Is a Test Bed to See if Renewables Can Meet Peak Energy Demands

More agile solar and storage installations could help replace fossil fuel-burning peaker plants — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Face Mask Hoarders May Raise Risk of Coronavirus Outbreak in the U.S.

Stores are selling out of masks, and health care workers risk infection if they cannot get the protective gear.

19h

RIP Spitzer, the Coolest Heat Telescope in the Solar System

For 16 years, NASA's trusty scope revealed a hidden infrared universe. Now it's up to the James Webb Space Telescope to pick up where it left off.

19h

A Spinning Rocket Slinger, a Bionic Jellyfish, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

19h

Emerging organic contaminant levels greatly influenced by stream flows, seasons

Flow rates and time of year must be taken into account to better understand the potential risks posed by emerging organic contaminants in rivers and streams, according to Penn State researchers who studied contaminant concentrations and flow characteristics at six locations near drinking water intakes in the Susquehanna River basin.

19h

Microscopic partners could help plants survive stressful environments

Tiny, symbiotic fungi play an outsized role in helping plants survive stresses like drought and extreme temperatures, which could help feed a planet experiencing climate change, report scientists at Washington State University.

19h

Low-calorie sweeteners do not mean low risk for infants

Researchers discovered consuming low-calorie sweeteners like aspartame and stevia while pregnant increased body fat in their offspring and disrupted their gut microbiota.

19h

The health of foundation species promotes the stability of the ecosystems that depend on them

Anyone who's read 'The Lorax' will recognize that certain species serve as the foundation of their ecosystems. When the truffula trees disappear, so to do the swomee-swans and bar-ba-loots. However, the same is not necessarily true the other way around.

19h

Plants manipulate their soil environment to assure a steady supply of nutrients

Dissolved carbon in soil can quench plants' ability to communicate with soil microbes, allowing plants to fine-tune their relationships with symbionts. Experiments show how synthetic biology tools can help understand environmental controls on agricultural productivity.

19h

Worried About Catching The New Coronavirus? In The U.S., Flu Is A Bigger Threat

At least 8,000 people have died from the flu in the U.S. this season. The good news: Easy steps you can take now to protect against the flu may also help you steer clear of the new coronavirus. (Image credit: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images)

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Scientists Find Imperfections In 'Minibrains' That Raise Questions For Research

Brain organoids grown in the lab look a lot like developing human brains. But a new study finds some important differences that could affect how scientists use them. (Image credit: Muotri Lab/UCSD)

19h

Daily briefing: Prominent chemist Charles Lieber charged with fraud

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00247-6 US Department of Defense says Lieber hid his lucrative involvement in China's Thousand Talents programme. Plus: 5G is Nature Electronics' 2020 technology of the year, and first lab to grow the coronavirus outside China will share it with international researchers.

20h

Coronavirus: Track the virus' spread with this world map tool

A new strain of coronavirus has spread from China to at least 19 countries, including the U.S. It remains unclear how bad the outbreak will become, but the World Health Organization has stopped short of calling it a global health emergency. The new coronavirus is less deadly but more contagious than SARS. A new strain of coronavirus has killed more than 130 people and infected over 6,000 others a

20h

Inouye Solar Telescope Shows Highest Resolution Images of the Sun

A new telescope in Hawaii takes aim at our nearest star and its mysteries.

20h

Report highlights perils of the digital gig economy

From hidden costs and poor wages to the pressures of being constantly available and lack of career development, many workers feel there is no way out of the digital "gig economy", according to a new report published on Wednesday.

20h

The Highest Def Photo of the Sun Looks Like Caramel Popcorn

Say Cheese Scientists just released the highest resolution images of the Sun's surface ever taken, obtained with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) in Hawaii, the largest solar telescope in the world. "This telescope will improve our understanding of what drives space weather and ultimately help forecasters better predict solar storms," director of the US Natio

20h

Faced with high smog levels, Milan to ban cars on Sunday

Milan will ban cars from driving within the city on Sunday, a measure aimed at tackling high pollution levels, even as authorities consider new measures, such as prohibiting smoking at bus stops.

20h

NASA Will Shut Down the Spitzer Space Telescope Thursday

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has been an essential tool in understanding the cosmos for the last 16 years, but it's about to take its final bow. Spitzer still works, but the cost of operating it is getting too high to justify the scientific return. NASA will shut down the observatory on Jan. 30 , paving the way for new projects like the long-delayed James Webb Space Telescope. Spitzer launched

20h

Berlin's panda twins ready for public debut

Two panda cubs born at Berlin Zoo last year charmed local media on Wednesday, a day before their debut in front of the general public.

20h

This Exoplanet's Atmosphere Is So Hot It Splits Molecules In Two

The day side of this scorching world rips hydrogen molecules apart — only to reform on the night side.

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Berlin's panda twins ready for public debut

Two panda cubs born at Berlin Zoo last year charmed local media on Wednesday, a day before their debut in front of the general public.

20h

The State Of A Potential Vaccine For The New Coronavirus

Several teams are working on a vaccine to protect against the new coronavirus. Although a vaccine is many months off, new technologies have helped build potential vaccines in record time.

20h

Two defunct satellites speed toward possible collision

Two decommissioned satellites sped towards each other Wednesday at a combined speed of almost 33,000 miles (53,000 kilometers) an hour, raising the risk of a collision that would send thousands of pieces of debris hurtling through space.

20h

Less snow and more rain could lead to bigger floods

As the world warms and precipitation that would have generated snowpack instead creates rain, the western US could see larger floods, according to new research. An analysis of over 400 watersheds from 1980 to 2016 shows that rainfall-driven winter floods can be more than 2.5 times as large as those driven by snowmelt. The researchers also found that flood sizes increase exponentially as a higher

20h

Sharp-edged wings cut turbulence for little drones

A new type of wing could make small fixed-wing drones far more stable and efficient, researchers report. The new wing replaces the smooth contour found on the leading edges of most airplane wings with a thick flat plate and a sharp leading edge. Counterintuitive as it may seem, it turns out that the design has distinct aerodynamic advantages at the scale of small drones. In a paper in Science Rob

20h

Anti-solar cells: A photovoltaic cell that works at night

What if solar cells worked at night? That's no joke, according to Jeremy Munday, professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UC Davis. In fact, a specially designed photovoltaic cell could generate up to 50 watts of power per square meter under ideal conditions at night, about a quarter of what a conventional solar panel can generate in daytime, according to a concept pap

20h

Butt emissions: Study finds even extinguished cigarettes give off toxins

Our researchers here at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have discovered that a used cigarette butt – even one that is cold to the touch – can give off the equivalent of 14% of the nicotine that an actively burning cigarette emits. They are calling this newly discovered form of cigarette exposure "after smoke" or butt emissions.

20h

Designing a puncture-free tire

Some golf carts and lawnmowers have airless tires, but we still have long way to go before they are on every vehicle that comes off the assembly line. University of Illinois aerospace engineer Kai James developed an algorithm to find an optimal design for a puncture-free with both strength and elasticity needed for a comfortable, shock-free ride like conventional pneumatic tires.

20h

Meteorites reveal high carbon dioxide levels on early Earth

Tiny meteorites no larger than grains of sand hold new clues about the atmosphere on ancient Earth, according to scientists.

20h

NASA shutting down space telescope, infrared eyes to cosmos

NASA is pulling the plug on one of its great observatories—the Spitzer Space Telescope—after 16 years of scanning the universe with infrared eyes.

20h

Scientists find record warm water in Antarctica, pointing to cause behind troubling glacier melt

A team of scientists has observed, for the first time, the presence of warm water at a vital point underneath a glacier in Antarctica—an alarming discovery that points to the cause behind the gradual melting of this ice shelf while also raising concerns about sea-level rise around the globe.

20h

Coupled quantum dots may offer a new way to store quantum information

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have for the first time created and imaged a novel pair of quantum dots—tiny islands of confined electric charge that act like interacting artificial atoms. Such "coupled" quantum dots could serve as a robust quantum bit, or qubit, the fundamental unit of information for a quantum computer. Moreover, the

20h

Prescribed burns benefit bees

Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, according to new research from North Carolina State University.

20h

Monitoring intermediates in CO2 conversion to formate by metal catalyst

Plants take in energy from sunlight to transform atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) into sugars and then other materials for growth and metabolic functions. Mimicking this photochemical reaction to efficiently convert CO2 into fuels and industrially important chemicals would support a sustainable energy future and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

20h

Prescribed burns benefit bees

Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, according to new research from North Carolina State University.

20h

The health of foundation species promotes the stability of the ecosystems that depend on them

Anyone who's read "The Lorax" will recognize that certain species serve as the foundation of their ecosystems. When the truffula trees disappear, so to do the swomee-swans and bar-ba-loots. However, the same is not necessarily true the other way around.

20h

Better than reality: NASA scientists tap virtual reality to make a scientific discovery

NASA scientists using virtual reality technology are redefining our understanding about how our galaxy works.

20h

The health of foundation species promotes the stability of the ecosystems that depend on them

Anyone who's read "The Lorax" will recognize that certain species serve as the foundation of their ecosystems. When the truffula trees disappear, so to do the swomee-swans and bar-ba-loots. However, the same is not necessarily true the other way around.

20h

Drug lord's hippos make their mark on foreign ecosystem

Four hours east of Medellin in northern Colombia's Puerto Triunfo municipality, the sprawling hacienda constructed by infamous drug lord Pablo Escobar of "Narcos" fame has become a tourist attraction. When Escobar's empire crashed, the exotic animals housed at his family's zoo, including rhinos, giraffes and zebras, were safely relocated to new homes… except for the hippopotamuses.

20h

Drug lord's hippos make their mark on foreign ecosystem

Four hours east of Medellin in northern Colombia's Puerto Triunfo municipality, the sprawling hacienda constructed by infamous drug lord Pablo Escobar of "Narcos" fame has become a tourist attraction. When Escobar's empire crashed, the exotic animals housed at his family's zoo, including rhinos, giraffes and zebras, were safely relocated to new homes… except for the hippopotamuses.

20h

Cheap nanoparticles stimulate immune response to cancer in the lab

University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have developed nanoparticles that, in the lab, can activate immune responses to cancer cells. If they are shown to work as well in the body as they do in the lab, the nanoparticles might provide an effective and more affordable way to fight cancer.

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Researchers rank 'smartest' schools of fish when it comes to travel formations

The concert of motion that fish schools are famous for isn't merely an elaborate display of synchronized swimming. Their seemingly telepathic collective movement is part of a time-tested strategy for improving the group's chances for survival as a whole, from defense against predators to food-finding and mating.

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Speedy recovery: New corn performs better in cold

Nearly everyone on Earth is familiar with corn. Literally.

20h

New way of recycling plant-based plastics instead of letting them rot in landfill

Scientists have developed new way to break down plant-based plastics into their original building blocks, potentially allowing products to be recycled repeatedly without a loss in the quality of the plastic.

20h

Smaller detection device effective for nuclear treaty verification, archaeology digs

Most nuclear data measurements are performed at accelerators large enough to occupy a geologic formation a kilometer wide, like the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center located on a mesa in the desert. But a portable device that can reveal the composition of materials quickly on-site would greatly benefit cases such as in archaeology and nuclear arms treaty verification.

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Demand for drone delivery in e-retail is high, ability to meet that demand low

Consumers want what they want, and they want it now. Drone delivery has long been talked about as an option to satisfy consumer delivery demands, but how realistic is it? New research in the INFORMS journal Transportation Science looks at how possible and desirable it is to use drones for delivery for e-retailers considering cost and effectiveness in certain population areas and in certain locatio

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Gut reaction: How immunity ramps up against incoming threats

A new study has revealed how the gut's protective mechanisms ramp up significantly with food intake, and at times of the day when mealtimes are anticipated based on regular eating habits.Researchers found that eating causes a hormone called VIP to kickstart the activity of immune cells in response to potentially incoming pathogens or 'bad' bacteria. The researchers also found that immunity increas

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The Global Reef Expedition: Kingdom of Tonga

The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation has published their findings from extensive coral reef surveys conducted in the Kingdom of Tonga. Released today, the Global Reef Expedition: Kingdom of Tonga Final Report contains critical information on the health and resiliency of coral reef ecosystems in Tonga, and provides scientists, policymakers, and stakeholders with invaluable information the

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AI Might Make Us Mistakenly Think We've Found Aliens, Says Study

While some researchers search for biological signs of life beyond Earth, others are scouring the cosmos for technosignatures — evidence of the kind of technological activity we might expect from an advanced alien civilization. This evidence could take a range of forms. It might be a series of radio signals, signs of pollution in an exoplanet's atmosphere, or even an engineered structure. A new st

20h

This Robot Has Hands That 'Sweat' When It Gets Hot

Robots: They're (finally) just like us. Sweaty and a little shaky when working too hard.

20h

Speedy recovery: New corn performs better in cold

Nearly everyone on Earth is familiar with corn. Literally.

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Study finds economic assistance in Afghanistan largely failed to reduce support for the Taliban

A Dartmouth-led study finds that two common economic interventions in Afghanistan designed to improve economic livelihoods and win the "hearts of minds" of civilians was ineffective in reducing support for the Taliban in the long run.

21h

Can chickpea genes save mustard seeds from blight disease?

During visits to fields in Assam, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh, India, plant biologists Muthappa Senthil-Kumar and Urooj Fatima found mustard plants infested with Alternaria blight disease. They also noticed that an adjacent field of chickpeas were completely uninfected.

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Can chickpea genes save mustard seeds from blight disease?

During visits to fields in Assam, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh, India, plant biologists Muthappa Senthil-Kumar and Urooj Fatima found mustard plants infested with Alternaria blight disease. They also noticed that an adjacent field of chickpeas were completely uninfected.

21h

Nitrogen fertilizers finetune composition of individual members of the tomato microbiota

After conducting a field trial at a tomato farm near Ravenna, Italy, a team of plant pathologists and agronomists found that nitrogen fertilizers shape the composition and predicted functions of the plant microbiota. The microbiota refers to the community of microorganisms found in the interface between the soil and the roots of a plant. Similarly to the human digestive tract, the microbiota can h

21h

Nitrogen fertilizers finetune composition of individual members of the tomato microbiota

After conducting a field trial at a tomato farm near Ravenna, Italy, a team of plant pathologists and agronomists found that nitrogen fertilizers shape the composition and predicted functions of the plant microbiota. The microbiota refers to the community of microorganisms found in the interface between the soil and the roots of a plant. Similarly to the human digestive tract, the microbiota can h

21h

NSF's newest solar telescope produces first images, most detailed images of the sun

Just released first images from the National Science Foundation's Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope reveal unprecedented detail of the sun's surface and preview the world-class products to come from this preeminent 4-meter solar telescope. NSF's Inouye Solar Telescope will enable a new era of solar science and a leap forward in understanding the sun and its impacts on our planet.

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One quarter of bacterial pathogens can spread antibiotic resistance directly to peers

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that at least 25 percent of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria found in clinical settings are capable of spreading their resistance directly to other bacteria. At the same time, the study shows that, despite common beliefs, the use of antibiotics does not significantly affect the rate at which the genes responsible for resistance are

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Team creates game-based virtual archaeology field school

Before they can get started at their field site—a giant cave studded with stalactites, stalagmites and human artifacts—15 undergraduate students must figure out how to use their virtual hands and tools. They also must learn to teleport.

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Is Red Meat Killing Us or Making Us Stronger?

For years, experts have been telling us to cut back on red meat. Now, a new analysis says there's no reason to. What's a health-conscious consumer to do? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Early North Americans may have been more diverse than previously suspected

Ancient skulls from the cave systems at Tulum, Mexico, suggest that the earliest populations of North America may have already had a high level of morphological diversity, according to a new study.

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The 'firewalkers' of Karoo: Dinosaurs and other animals left tracks in a 'land of fire'

In southern Africa, dinosaurs and synapsids, a group of animals that includes mammals and their closest fossil relatives, survived in a 'land of fire' at the start of an Early Jurassic mass extinction, according to a new study.

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Identifying factors associated with reports of accidental opioid poisoning in dogs

Dogs that are smaller, younger, non-neutered, or live in US counties with high opioid prescription rates are at higher risk of being the subjects of phone calls about accidental opioid poisoning to a poison control center.

21h

Want to Prevent Another Coronavirus Epidemic?

Then treat it as the deadly biological threat it is — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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One quarter of bacterial pathogens can spread antibiotic resistance directly to peers

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that at least 25 percent of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria found in clinical settings are capable of spreading their resistance directly to other bacteria. At the same time, the study shows that, despite common beliefs, the use of antibiotics does not significantly affect the rate at which the genes responsible for resistance are

21h

We Should Deescalate the War on the Coronavirus

Fear, finger-pointing, and militaristic action against the virus are predictable, but unproductive. We may be better off adjusting to a new normal of periodic outbreaks.

21h

UCLA researchers find chronic inflammation contributes to cancer metastasis

The study reveals a detailed epigenetic mechanism for how interleukin-1-beta, a common cytokine that helps fight infections during inflammation, plays a critical role in cancer metastasis.

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Scientists find record warm water in Antarctica, pointing to cause behind troubling glacier melt

A team of scientists has observed, for the first time, the presence of warm water at a vital point underneath a glacier in Antarctica — an alarming discovery that points to the cause behind the gradual melting of this ice shelf while also raising concerns about sea-level rise around the globe.

21h

Monitoring intermediates in CO2 conversion to formate by metal catalyst

The production of formate from CO2 is considered an attractive strategy for the long-term storage of solar renewable energy in chemical form.

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Speedy recovery: New corn performs better in cold

Around the world, each person eats an average of 70 pounds of corn each year, with even more grown for animal feed and biofuel. And as the global population continues to boom, increasing the amount of food grown on the same amount of land becomes increasingly important. A group of researchers have taken a step closer to this goal by developing a new type of corn that recovers much more quickly aft

21h

Prescribed burns benefit bees

Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, according to new research from North Carolina State University.

21h

The Retrograde Shame of The Biggest Loser

W hen The Biggest Loser debuted on NBC in 2004, George W. Bush was about to be elected to a second term, The Apprentice was a brand-new hit, and Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie were fronting one of TV's most popular reality shows. Amid all this nebulous cultural toxicity of moguls and heiresses, a series in which contestants were isolated from their families, weighed shirtless on national televisi

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Nanoparticles Pave the Way for a Million-Mile EV Battery

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Google claims its new chatbot Meena is the best in the world

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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The Greatest Discoveries from the Spitzer Space Telescope

As NASA's orbiting infrared observatory shuts down, we look back at some of its most important finds.

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Smaller detection device effective for nuclear treaty verification, archaeology digs

Most nuclear data measurements are performed at accelerators large enough to occupy a geologic formation a kilometer wide. But a portable device that can reveal the composition of materials quickly on-site would greatly benefit cases such as in archaeology and nuclear arms treaty verification. Research published this week used computational simulations to show that with the right geometric adjustm

21h

Who receives advanced stroke care? It may depend on traffic

When someone has an acute stroke, access to specialized care may be dependent on traffic conditions that most adversely affect socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods.

21h

Scientists Want to Explore Ocean With "Cyborg Jellyfish"

A team of Stanford and Caltech scientists attached low-power microelectronics to the undersides of jellyfish to create "biohybrid robots" that swim three times as fast as normal ones. The idea is to one day allow "cyborg jellyfish," equipped with sensors, to explore the vast depths of our planet's oceans — rather than relying on unwieldy and inefficient submarines, Scientific American reports . I

21h

New bio-inspired wing design for small drones

Taking a cue from birds and insects, researchers have come up with a new wing design for small drones that helps them fly more efficiently and makes them more robust to atmospheric turbulence.

21h

What a pair! Coupled quantum dots may offer a new way to store quantum information

Researchers have for the first time created and imaged a novel pair of quantum dots — tiny islands of confined electric charge that act like interacting artificial atoms. Such "coupled" quantum dots could serve as a robust quantum bit, or qubit, the fundamental unit of information for a quantum computer.

21h

Australian Lab Cultures New Coronavirus as Infections Climb

With more than 6,000 cases of the 2019-nCoV virus confirmed, researchers are hoping that studying the pathogen in the lab will help stop the outbreak.

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Want to Prevent Another Coronavirus Epidemic?

Then treat it as the deadly biological threat it is — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Four hacks for challenging closets

Keep all of your spaces tidy. (Burgess Milner via Unsplash/) Name an exercise class or sporting activity and there's likely a wardrobe that goes with it. Grippy socks for ballet barre class. Road shoes and indoor shoes for biking. Arm warmers and compression pants for running. It's not just style and clever marketing—though you only have to look at the term "athleisure" to see evidence of both. T

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The best picture ever taken of the sun reveals its bizarre surface

The best picture of the sun is more than five times more detailed than the previous highest-resolution images, revealing weird structures on our star's surface

21h

Scientists discover how malaria parasites import sugar

Researchers have established how sugar is taken up by the malaria parasite, a discovery with the potential to improve the development of antimalarial drugs.

21h

New injection technique may boost spinal cord injury repair efforts

Researchers describe a new method for delivering neural precursor cells to spinal cord injuries in rats, reducing the risk of further injury and boosting the propagation of potentially reparative cells.

21h

An ultrafast microscope for the quantum world

Processes taking place inside tiny electronic components or in molecules can now be filmed at a resolution of a few hundred attoseconds and down to the individual atom.

21h

More than a knee injury: ACL tears cause harmful changes in our brain structure

It's known that some joint function is often permanently lost after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and re-injury is common even with intensive physical therapy, but it's unclear why.

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Stereo receivers and amplifiers that make your music better

Can you hear me now? (Tom Jablonski via Unsplash/) True music lovers not only consider the songs and artists they adore, but also how that music is played. There are myriad of enthusiast types: vinyl diehards, streamers, ironic tape cassette revivalists, and more. Luckily, there are almost just as many stereo receiver and amplifier options. If you need to give your turntable, phone, or home theat

21h

Coronavirus could spur 10% fall in global equities, says SocGen

Such a drop would represent trillions wiped off worldwide stocks

21h

Scientists find far higher than expected rate of underwater glacial melting

Tidewater glaciers, the massive rivers of ice that end in the ocean, may be melting underwater much faster than previously thought, according to a new study that used robotic kayaks. The findings, which challenge current frameworks for analyzing ocean-glacier interactions, have implications for the rest of the world's tidewater glaciers, whose rapid retreat is contributing to sea-level rise.

22h

Revolutionary reversible 4D printing with research collaborators

Researchers worked to revolutionize 4D printing by making a 3D fabricated material change its shape and back again repeatedly without electrical components.

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Potential global spread of new coronavirus

Experts in population mapping have identified cities and provinces within mainland China, and cities and countries worldwide, which are at high-risk from the spread of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

22h

Cadillac Super Cruise Adds Auto Lane Change

Enhanced Super Cruise will include automated lane change, which will allow the hands-free system to change lanes on the highway when requested by the driver and certain conditions are met. Cadillac hopes to gain back some respect for its technical prowess with a new version of the Super Cruise self-driving technology later this year. It will automate the task of changing lanes: Just tap the turn

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An Operating System for R&D

Download this eBook to learn about how digitizing the lab is necessary to keep pace with modern science, makes the day-to-day of research easier, and can be done simply while integrating with existing practices.

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Scientists find far higher than expected rate of underwater glacial melting

Tidewater glaciers, the massive rivers of ice that end in the ocean, may be melting underwater much faster than previously thought, according to a new study that used robotic kayaks. The findings, which challenge current frameworks for analyzing ocean-glacier interactions, have implications for the rest of the world's tidewater glaciers, whose rapid retreat is contributing to sea-level rise.

22h

New toxic byproducts of disinfecting drinking water

Mixing drinking water with chlorine, the United States' most common method of disinfecting drinking water, creates previously unidentified toxic byproducts.

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An Earth-sized planet found in the habitable zone of a nearby star

A few months ago a group of NASA exoplanet astronomers, who are in the business of discovering planets around other stars, called me into a secret meeting to tell me about a planet that had captured their interest. Because my expertise lies in modeling the climate of exoplanets, they asked me to figure out whether this new planet was habitable – a place where liquid water might exist. These NASA

22h

Soft finger-like robots can sweat to cool down just like humans

Soft finger-like gripper robots have been engineered to sweat when hot and are able to cool down almost three times more efficiently than humans

22h

Cyborg jellyfish that swim at triple speed could help protect oceans

Jellyfish have been equipped with embedded electronics that let researchers remotely control their motion, and the next version could add sensors for monitoring ocean conditions

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Scientists Are Desperately Working on a Coronavirus Vaccine

The U.S. government has announced that it's fast-tracked the development of a vaccine for 2019-nCoV, the coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China and has since started spreading around the world. Officials have tentatively laid out an ambitious timeline: The goal is to launch a clinical trial in three months, according to CNBC . While that seems like a long time compared to how quickly the vir

22h

Study finds black and Hispanic patients face more barriers when making doctor appointments

Discrimination may cause black and Hispanic patients to wait longer for a scheduled primary care appointment, according to a new Tulane University study published in JAMA Network Open.

22h

Researchers develop new bio-inspired wing design for small drones

Taking a cue from birds and insects, Brown University researchers have come up with a new wing design for small drones that helps them fly more efficiently and makes them more robust to atmospheric turbulence.

22h

Study finds economic assistance in Afghanistan largely failed to reduce support for the Taliban

A Dartmouth-led study finds that two common economic interventions in Afghanistan designed to improve economic livelihoods and win the "hearts of minds" of civilians was ineffective in reducing support for the Taliban in the long run. The study is the first to examine how cash transfers and vocational training administered by a humanitarian organization affect combatant support in an active confli

22h

Can chickpea genes save mustard seeds from blight disease?

During visits to fields in Assam, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh, India, plant biologists Muthappa Senthil-Kumar and Urooj Fatima found mustard plants infested with Alternaria blight disease. They also noticed that an adjacent field of chickpeas were completely uninfected.

22h

New study examines the accuracy of plastic surgery videos on social media

In the era of 'Dr. Google,' social media is a tremendous influence on patients interested in cosmetic surgery, and with more than two billion users — representing almost one-third of the internet — YouTube has emerged as an essential platform for reaching people interested in plastic surgery.

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Unique new antiviral treatment made using sugar

New antiviral materials made from sugar have been developed to destroy viruses on contact and may help in the fight against viral outbreaks. This new development from a collaborative team of international scientists shows promise for the treatment of herpes simplex (cold sore virus), respiratory syncytial virus, hepatitis C, HIV, and Zika virus to name a few. The team have demonstrated success tre

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Releasing artificially-infected mosquitoes could reduce global dengue cases by 90%

Releasing mosquitoes infected with a type of bacteria that prevents them transmitting dengue could cut cases of the disease by as much as 90%.

22h

Mixed chimerism improves long-term kidney transplant outlook

Mixed chimerism – the continued mixing of donor and recipient blood cells following a transplant of blood progenitor cells – could improve outcomes for kidney transplant recipients, according to a new clinical study in about 50 patients.

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Ordering in? Plants are way ahead of you

Dissolved carbon in soil can quench plants' ability to communicate with soil microbes, allowing plants to fine-tune their relationships with symbionts. Experiments show how synthetic biology tools developed at Rice University can help understand environmental controls on agricultural productivity.

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Do DIY DNA kits revive a harmful perceived link between genetics and race?

When genetic-ancestry kits first emerged, social scientists worried they would revive an old and harmful view that genetics determined race and a person's abilities. But as research from Wendy Roth of the University of Pennsylvania shows, this fear is only partly justified. On average, these tests don't reinforce the idea of essentialism, but how much participants know about genetics going in matt

22h

Molecular motors direct the fate of stem cells

Scientists at the University of Groningen and the University Medical Center Groningen used molecular motors to manipulate the protein matrix on which bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells are grown. Rotating motors altered the protein structure, which resulted in a bias of the stem cells to differentiate into bone cells (osteoblasts). Without rotation, the stem cells tended to remain multipot

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Engineers design bionic 'heart' for testing prosthetic valves, other cardiac devices

Engineers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a bionic 'heart' that offers a more realistic model for testing out artificial valves and other cardiac devices.

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The Guardian view on China and the coronavirus: scrutiny, not stigma | Editorial

It's right to scrutinise the official response to the outbreak, but that does not justify spreading wild rumours or discriminating against Chinese people The coronavirus outbreak that began in Wuhan has shown how far and fast a disease can travel in our globalised age. It has also shown us how quickly fear, misinformation and blame can spread, only hindering the fight against the pneumonia-causing

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Scientists build robot hand that can sweat

Fingers made of hydrogels layers have pores that ooze water to cool down Never mind their cold, hard logic and tireless dedication to the task at hand – the most unappealing aspect of robots to come may well be their personal hygiene. In a demonstration of how to build machines that do not overheat, researchers have created a robot hand that regulates its temperature naturally – by breaking into

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Australian Lab First to Grow New Virus Outside China

The team plans to share the virus with groups around the world to spur development of diagnostics and vaccines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Four compact steamers to easily smooth out your clothes

No wrinkles, no crinkles. (DepositPhotos/) When you've got an interview, a first date, or a special event, the last thing you want to deal with is a wrinkled shirt or pants. While ironing is an option, it can be time-consuming and take up precious space. A hand-held steamer is a great alternative. Not only does it de-wrinkle your clothes, but it also kills germs, eliminates odors, removes allerge

22h

A Bionic Jellyfish Swims With Manic Speed (for a Jellyfish)

Researchers equip jellyfish with electronics to turbocharge their swimming pace. It's a fascinating new way to approach robotics.

22h

Low-cost scalable discretization, prediction, and feature selection for complex systems

Finding reliable discrete approximations of complex systems is a key prerequisite when applying many of the most popular modeling tools. Common discretization approaches (e.g., the very popular K -means clustering) are crucially limited in terms of quality, parallelizability, and cost. We introduce a low-cost improved quality scalable probabilistic approximation (SPA) algorithm, allowing for simu

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The effects of corrective information about disease epidemics and outbreaks: Evidence from Zika and yellow fever in Brazil

Disease epidemics and outbreaks often generate conspiracy theories and misperceptions that mislead people about the risks they face and how best to protect themselves. We investigate the effectiveness of interventions aimed at combating false and unsupported information about the Zika epidemic and subsequent yellow fever outbreak in Brazil. Results from a nationally representative survey show tha

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Regulation of calcification site pH is a polyphyletic but not always governing response to ocean acidification

The response of marine-calcifying organisms to ocean acidification (OA) is highly variable, although the mechanisms behind this variability are not well understood. Here, we use the boron isotopic composition ( 11 B) of biogenic calcium carbonate to investigate the extent to which organisms' ability to regulate pH at their site of calcification (pH CF ) determines their calcification responses to

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Poly(amino acids) as a potent self-adjuvanting delivery system for peptide-based nanovaccines

To be optimally effective, peptide-based vaccines need to be administered with adjuvants. Many currently available adjuvants are toxic, not biodegradable; they invariably invoke adverse reactions, including allergic responses and excessive inflammation. A nontoxic, biodegradable, biocompatible, self-adjuvanting vaccine delivery system is urgently needed. Herein, we report a potent vaccine deliver

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Intratumoral delivery of CCL25 enhances immunotherapy against triple-negative breast cancer by recruiting CCR9+ T cells

CCR9 + T cells have an increased potential to be activated and therefore may mediate strong antitumor responses. Here, we found, however, that CCL25, the only chemokine for CCR9 + cells, is not expressed in human or murine triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs), raising a hypothesis that intratumoral delivery of CCL25 may enhance antitumor immunotherapy in TNBCs. We first determined whether this

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Defect-induced activity enhancement of enzyme-encapsulated metal-organic frameworks revealed in microfluidic gradient mixing synthesis

Mimicking the cellular environment, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising for encapsulating enzymes for general applications in environments often unfavorable for native enzymes. Markedly different from previous researches based on bulk solution synthesis, here, we report the synthesis of enzyme-embedded MOFs in a microfluidic laminar flow. The continuously changed concentrations of MOF p

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On the functional relationship between biodiversity and economic value

Biodiversity's contribution to human welfare has become a key argument for maintaining and enhancing biodiversity in managed ecosystems. The functional relationship between biodiversity ( b ) and economic value ( V ) is, however, insufficiently understood, despite the premise of a positive-concave bV relationship that dominates scientific and political arenas. Here, we review how individual links

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Soil organic matter attenuates the efficacy of flavonoid-based plant-microbe communication

Plant-microbe interactions are mediated by signaling compounds that control vital plant functions, such as nodulation, defense, and allelopathy. While interruption of signaling is typically attributed to biological processes, potential abiotic controls remain less studied. Here, we show that higher organic carbon (OC) contents in soils repress flavonoid signals by up to 70%. Furthermore, the magn

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Structure and mechanism of bactericidal mammalian perforin-2, an ancient agent of innate immunity

Perforin-2 (MPEG1) is thought to enable the killing of invading microbes engulfed by macrophages and other phagocytes, forming pores in their membranes. Loss of perforin-2 renders individual phagocytes and whole organisms significantly more susceptible to bacterial pathogens. Here, we reveal the mechanism of perforin-2 activation and activity using atomic structures of pre-pore and pore assemblie

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Modified cyclodextrins as broad-spectrum antivirals

Viral infections kill millions of people and new antivirals are needed. Nontoxic drugs that irreversibly inhibit viruses (virucidal) are postulated to be ideal. Unfortunately, all virucidal molecules described to date are cytotoxic. We recently developed nontoxic, broad-spectrum virucidal gold nanoparticles. Here, we develop further the concept and describe cyclodextrins, modified with mercaptoun

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Aneuploidy and a deregulated DNA damage response suggest haploinsufficiency in breast tissues of BRCA2 mutation carriers

Women harboring heterozygous germline mutations of BRCA2 have a 50 to 80% risk of developing breast cancer, yet the pathogenesis of these cancers is poorly understood. To reveal early steps in BRCA2 -associated carcinogenesis, we analyzed sorted cell populations from freshly-isolated, non-cancerous breast tissues of BRCA2 mutation carriers and matched controls. Single-cell whole-genome sequencing

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Unidirectional rotating molecular motors dynamically interact with adsorbed proteins to direct the fate of mesenchymal stem cells

Artificial rotary molecular motors convert energy into controlled motion and drive a system out of equilibrium with molecular precision. The molecular motion is harnessed to mediate the adsorbed protein layer and then ultimately to direct the fate of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). When influenced by the rotary motion of light-driven molecular motors grafted on surfac

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Retinoid X receptor alpha is a spatiotemporally predominant therapeutic target for anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity

To uncover the genetic basis of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (AIC), we recently established a genetic suppressor screening strategy in zebrafish. Here, we report the molecular and cellular nature of GBT0419 , a salutary modifier mutant that affects retinoid x receptor alpha a (rxraa) . We showed that endothelial, but not myocardial or epicardial, RXRA activation confers AIC protection. We

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Active particles as mobile microelectrodes for selective bacteria electroporation and transport

Self-propelling micromotors are emerging as a promising micro- and nanoscale tool for single-cell analysis. We have recently shown that the field gradients necessary to manipulate matter via dielectrophoresis can be induced at the surface of a polarizable active ("self-propelling") metallodielectric Janus particle (JP) under an externally applied electric field, acting essentially as a mobile flo

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Shipborne eddy covariance observations of methane fluxes constrain Arctic sea emissions

We demonstrate direct eddy covariance (EC) observations of methane (CH 4 ) fluxes between the sea and atmosphere from an icebreaker in the eastern Arctic Ocean. EC-derived CH 4 emissions averaged 4.58, 1.74, and 0.14 mg m –2 day –1 in the Laptev, East Siberian, and Chukchi seas, respectively, corresponding to annual sea-wide fluxes of 0.83, 0.62, and 0.03 Tg year –1 . These EC results answer conc

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Low-power microelectronics embedded in live jellyfish enhance propulsion

Artificial control of animal locomotion has the potential to simultaneously address longstanding challenges to actuation, control, and power requirements in soft robotics. Robotic manipulation of locomotion can also address previously inaccessible questions about organismal biology otherwise limited to observations of naturally occurring behaviors. Here, we present a biohybrid robot that uses onb

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These sweaty robots cool themselves faster than humans

Micropores help them vent liquid to cool down

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When Dinosaurs Left Tracks in a Land Consumed by Lava and Fire

Dozens of footprints left by dinosaurs and other creatures were left in what is now South Africa before the Gondwana supercontinent broke up.

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Human Mutation Rates Steady Across Groups—Except in the Amish

Researchers determined that the incidence of new genetic mutations is comparable in people of different ancestries, but lower in Amish people.

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Fossil Footprints Reveal Ecosystem In Midst Of A Mass Extinction

Tracks show dinosaurs and mammal ancestors surviving amid devastation.

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Four Of North America's Oldest Human Skulls Don't Look Much Alike

Analysis of their variation suggests the story of the First Americans is more complex than once thought

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Biophysicists find 'extra' component in molecular motor

Researchers discovered an additional component in ATP synthase, a molecular machine that produces the energy-conserving compound. They obtained a first-ever high-resolution structure of the C ring from spinach chloroplasts. As the 3D computer model of it was taking shape, the biophysicists spotted additional circle-shaped elements inside the C ring.While the discovery is interesting in and of itse

22h

Nitrogen fertilizers finetune composition of individual members of the tomato microbiota

Nitrogen is one of the most important nutrients as is a key component for healthy crop production globally. Because the microbiota is crucial to the plant's ability to take in nitrogen, scientists are very interested in identifying ways to ensure this transfer.

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What a pair! Coupled quantum dots may offer a new way to store quantum information

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have for the first time created and imaged a novel pair of quantum dots — tiny islands of confined electric charge that act like interacting artificial atoms. Such "coupled" quantum dots could serve as a robust quantum bit, or qubit, the fundamental unit of information for a quantum computer.

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Scientists learn how plants manipulate their soil environment to assure a cheap, steady supply of nutrients

The next time you're thinking about whether to cook dinner or order a pizza for delivery, think of this: Plants have been doing pretty much the same thing for eons.

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Identifying factors associated with reports of accidental opioid poisoning in dogs

Dogs that are smaller, younger, non-neutered, or live in U.S. counties with high opioid prescription rates are at higher risk of being the subjects of phone calls about accidental opioid poisoning to a poison control center. Mohammad Howard-Azzeh and colleagues at the University of Guelph, Ontario, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on January 29, 2020.

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