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Engineered symbionts activate honey bee immunity and limit pathogens

Honey bees are essential pollinators threatened by colony losses linked to the spread of parasites and pathogens. Here, we report a new approach for manipulating bee gene expression and protecting bee health. We engineered a symbiotic bee gut bacterium, Snodgrassella alvi , to induce eukaryotic RNA interference (RNAi) immune responses. We show that engineered S. alvi can stably recolonize bees an

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Dine lunger heler sig selv, hvis du kvitter smøgerne

Røg er gift for lungerne. Men nogle celler skjuler sig for giften, viser undersøgelse.

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Virksomheder i fælles opråb: Danmark kan blive Power-to-X-frontløber

17 organisationer og virksomheder opfordrer regeringen til at understøtte en ambitiøs indfasning af Power-to-X-teknologier i Danmark.

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Science and the World Economy

What determines the rate of scientific 'growth'?

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Materials Older Than the Solar System Found in Two Meteorites

Earlier in January, an international team of researchers announced the discovery of dust grains five to seven billion years old in a meteorite that landed in Australia in 1969. That makes the grains the oldest solid materials ever found on Earth — with an age that predates even our solar system itself by around two billion years. Now, just weeks later, a different team of researchers has announce

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Engineered Microbe in Bees' Guts Fends off Deadly Varroa Mite

The genetically modified bacteria spark an RNAi response in the parasite that leads to self-destruction—and perhaps a path to combatting colony collapse disorder.

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Developing: Coronavirus Catches Influencers

Nothing — no piece of matter, no moment in contemporary history, no point on the space/time continuum — has been or will be immune to it. This is simply the way the world is now: with a fixed point of inevitability. And this was nothing if not inevitable: The inevitable finally happened. View this post on Instagram f**k the corona virus A post shared by Logan Paul (@loganpaul) on Jan 28, 2020 at

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The Absurd Theatrics of the Border Wall

In November 2017, eight imposing edifices were built in Otay Mesa, near Tijuana. Some were topped with slick steel and spiky barbed wire; others featured bollard-style columns affixed to 30-foot-high slabs of metal and concrete. These were the winning prototypes of President Donald Trump’s border-wall design contest. The requirements were straightforward: Design an impenetrable wall built to stre

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The U.S. is barring foreign nationals who’ve traveled to China, due to Wuhan virus. Experts disagree.

The WHO doesn't recommend limiting travel or trade. (DepositPhoto/) The Trump Administration announced Friday that it would temporarily ban foreign nationals who have traveled to China in the last 14 days, with the exception of permanent residents and the immediate family members of American citizens. Those individuals with the exception, along with U.S. citizens themselves, will be subject to a

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Watch Out for Coronavirus Phishing Scams

At least one email campaign is preying on fears by claiming to offer info about the Wuhan coronavirus.

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Coronavirus sends Asian stock markets into a spiral

Mining companies and groups exposed to travel and leisure among worst hit

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Science<>corona
China’s coronavirus crisis empties Macau’s mega casinos

US operators Wynn, MGM and Sands hit as visitors vanish from world’s biggest gambling hub

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Coronavirus: US bars foreign nationals who have recently travelled to China

CDC says situation in China ‘serious’ but risk to US public low Temporary ban for non-Americans travelling from China What is the coronavirus and how worried should we be? The Trump administration has declared a public health emergency over the coronavirus outbreak and announced it will temporarily bar entry to the US for people traveling from China unless they are Americans or immediately relate

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Twitch Is Slowly Losing Some Major Streamers

Ninja recently left the platform for Microsoft's Mixer. Others are following in his path.

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CDC Quarantines 195 US Citizens Who Fled China Outbreak

In order to prevent a devastating 2019-nCoV coronavirus outbreak in America, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued quarantine orders for 195 U.S. citizens who recently fled the situation in China. “The CDC, under statutory authority of the Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary, has issued federal quarantine orders to all 195 United States citizens who repatriate

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Google says its new chatbot Meena is the best in the world

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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9 future ecosystems reimagined through technology

submitted by /u/maryflowers1 [link] [comments]

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New technique turns junk into valuable graphene

Graphene is a lattice of carbon atoms arranged in a chicken-wire formation, a structure that makes it very useful for a wide range of applications. However, it's been very difficult and expensive to make. This new technique cuts down on the cost and difficulty by flash heating any carbon-based material, such as used coffee grounds or plastic waste. Recent technology developed at Rice University i

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The 2019 Novel Coronavirus Outbreak: What It Is and How We're Dealing With It

A deadly new virus has spread from China around the world, raising fears of a global epidemic.

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U.S. to Quarantine 195 Americans Evacuated from Wuhan

CDC officials raised the possibility that the coronavirus could become a pandemic, but hoped it would not be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Louis Nirenberg, ‘One of the Great Mathematicians,’ Dies at 94

Winner of the math world’s equivalent of a Nobel, he puzzled out equations describing the vibrating of strings, the flow of heat and the movement of water.

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Lamar Alexander Just Gave Democrats What They Wanted

Democrats placed their hopes on Senator Lamar Alexander, and last night, the Tennessean brushed those hopes into the dustbin. Alexander announced that he would not vote to call witnesses in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, effectively ruling out any chance of introducing new evidence or extending the trial. But if Democrats didn’t get what they’d hoped for, Alexander gave t

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Neanderthal Genes Hint at Much Earlier Human Migration From Africa

Modern humans may have left the continent as long 200,000 years ago, a new analysis suggests.

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Scientists boost gene-editing tools to new heights in human stem cells

Scientists have developed a new TREE method (an acronym short for transient reporter for editing enrichment, or TREE), which allows for bulk enrichment of DNA base-edited cell populations — and for the first time, high efficiency in human stem cell lines.

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New Research: People Without Symptoms Can Spread Coronavirus

In a grim development, scientists believe they’ve identified a case in which a patient transmitted the coronavirus 2019-nCoV to another person — before they started to have any symptoms. Last week, a man in Germany was briefly sick with what ended up being the coronavirus, Stat News reports , but he had never traveled to any of the areas impacted by the viral outbreak. But, he told medical staff,

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Super Bowl Ads Dramatically Boost Sales of Prescription Drugs

New research reveals how much ads for a toenail fungus medication helped boost sales. Football-Picture.jpg Image credits: Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock Sports Friday, January 31, 2020 – 16:00 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — On Sunday when people gather to watch the Super Bowl, they will cheer and chat, but many will only pay casual attention to the actual game. When the ads come on, however

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Mutation's role in blood cancers revealed by ideal team-up

Researchers from CSHL and MSKCC have determined that a mutation affecting the important process of RNA splicing can manipulate the 'quality control' in your cell. The resulting conditions characterize many deadly blood cancers.

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A tsetse fly's bite can be fatal: New research takes a step toward ending that

When an infected tsetse fly bites humans or other mammals to feed on their blood, microscopic parasites (African trypanosomes) in the fly's saliva are transferred. The unfortunate recipient of the bite, once infected, often faces severe health consequences, even death.

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A tsetse fly's bite can be fatal: New research takes a step toward ending that

When an infected tsetse fly bites humans or other mammals to feed on their blood, microscopic parasites (African trypanosomes) in the fly's saliva are transferred. The unfortunate recipient of the bite, once infected, often faces severe health consequences, even death.

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Native Americans Abandoned Cahokia's Massive Mounds — But the Story Doesn't End There

The archaeological site is famous for its 1400 A.D. abandonment. But new research suggests people soon moved back in.

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The Biggest Apple Maps Change Is One You Can't See

Apple’s “new” version of the app is less a rollout of fresh features than an important step toward the company's own mapping independence.

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Accelerating chemical reactions without direct contact with a catalyst

A Northwestern University research team has revealed a new approach to conducting chemical reactions—one that doesn't require direct contact with a catalyst.

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Scientists boost gene-editing tools to new heights in human stem cells

Scientists have developed a new TREE method (an acronym short for transient reporter for editing enrichment, or TREE), which allows for bulk enrichment of DNA base-edited cell populations — and for the first time, high efficiency in human stem cell lines.

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Ep. 43: A Reality Check on Regenerative Agriculture

Proponents of a new farming technique called regenerative agriculture argue that it can restore the earth, combat climate change, and alleviate the economic needs of farmers in debt. Now, farmers and researchers alike are putting claims about what this method can actually accomplish to the test.

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Coronavirus Research Is Moving at Top Speed—With a Catch

Scientists are posting their papers on the China outbreak as fast as they can write them, skipping traditional journals.

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7 subjects that should be taught in U.S. schools

Too often, schools teach toward tests that measure IQ and academic aptitude, not other life-critical skills and drives. Only 17 states require high school students to take a personal finance class, despite how vital such knowledge is to future security. From religion to behavioral science, we detail seven subjects that should be taught in all U.S. schools. As the saying goes, school prepares stud

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Space station's cosmic detector working after 4 spacewalks

The cosmic detector that required a series of difficult spacewalking repairs is back in action.

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As our planet gets greener, plants are slowing global warming

Chi Chen, a Boston University graduate researcher, and Ranga Myneni, a BU College of Arts & Sciences professor of earth and environment, released a new paper that reveals how humans are helping to increase the Earth's plant and tree cover, which absorbs carbon from the atmosphere and cools our planet. The boom of vegetation, fueled by greenhouse gas emissions, could be skewing our perception of ho

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Could Searching for Alien Life Attract Hostile Extraterrestrials?

As we beam our existence out into the universe, we’re making a bold assumption that any aliens who pick it up won’t use their superior technology to kill us all. That’s a cautionary point in “ The Contact Paradox ,” a rousing new essay collection about the search for extraterrestrial intelligence — better known as SETI — from Astronomy Now editor Keith Cooper. There’s a sense that SETI is already

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Accelerating chemical reactions without direct contact with a catalyst

Northwestern University researchers demonstrate a chemical reaction produced through an intermediary created by a separate chemical reaction, findings that could impact environmental remediation and fuel production.

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Yale researchers identify protein that could help neutralize deadly bite of the tsetse fly

Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have identified a family of surface proteins that could be promising new vaccine candidates to help control African sleeping sickness, a devastating disease passed on by the bite of infected tsetse flies.

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Safe potassium-ion batteries

Scientists have developed a nonflammable electrolyte for potassium and potassium-ion batteries, for applications in next-generation energy-storage systems beyond lithium technology. Scientists explain that the novel electrolyte based on an organic phosphate makes the batteries safer and also allows for operation at reduced concentrations, which is a necessary condition for large-scale applications

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Exploring strangeness and the primordial Universe

Within quark-gluon plasma, strange quarks are readily produced through collisions between gluons.

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The scent of a rose improves learning during sleep

Fragrances like rose scent can easily help to better consolidate memory during sleep.

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These close-up photos of the sun could help us forecast space weather

View this post on Instagram ☀️ You're looking at the highest resolution observation of the Sun's surface ever taken! ☀️ Collected over a period of 10 minutes, the footage from the Daniel K Inouye Telescope shows features as small as 18 miles in size. So, what does all this activity actually represent? The vicious movement of heat on a near-unimaginable scale. The National Solar Observatory (NSO)

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A Virus With a Deadly Boring Name

Since it first appeared in Wuhan, China, late last year, a newly discovered coronavirus has sickened more than 9,800 people, killed at least 213, caused a run on face masks , and shut down travel throughout China. All this has happened, and the virus still doesn’t have an official name. The virus’s temporary designation—2019-nCoV—is neither catchy nor pithy. Headlines routinely refer to this viru

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Can Parkinson’s be prevented as it stealthily develops?

Young Parkinson's disease patients may have just provided a vital clue for prevention. Misbehaving neurons that eventually produce the disease may be present at birth. A drug already on the market looks to be able to arrest Parkinson's progress. Parkinson's disease comes with slowness, rigidity, tremors, and loss of balance due to an insufficiency of the dopamine that coordinates muscle movement.

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Smart Bandage Detects Infections, Auto-Releases Antibiotic

A colorful new weapon has emerged in the war on antibiotic resistance . On Wednesday, researchers in China published a study in the journal ACS Central Science detailing their creation of a new kind of smart bandage. At first, when you apply it to a wound, the bandage is green. But if it detects a bacterial infection, the bandage turns yellow — and releases a built-in antibiotic to treat the infe

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Spongy crystals grab drinkable water from thin air

Highly absorbent materials called metal-organic frameworks can extract drinkable water out of thin air, research finds. The discovery could potentially lead to technologies that supply potable water to the driest areas on the planet. For many of the world’s poor, one of the greatest environmental threats to health remains lack of access to safe water. The new research leverages metal-organic fram

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Study finds first major discovery in hydroformylation in 50 years

In a new study published in Science, an AAAS publication, LSU chemistry professor emeritus George Stanley and fellow LSU researchers from the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Biological Sciences discovered a new cationic cobalt bisphosphine hydroformylation catalyst system that is highly active and extremely robust.

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How to Die—and Grieve—in 2020

This week: The trouble with Death Twitter, Princess Diana's long shadow, and GM's all-electric Hummer.

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What Everyone’s Missing About Iowa

DES MOINES, Iowa—For a few nights every four years, the hotel bar at this downtown Marriott becomes the hottest spot in American politics. And sure enough, J. D. Scholten, a Democrat who is making his second run for the House seat held since 2003 by the anti-immigrant Republican Steve King , spent part of last night here. At this point, with the first votes of the 2020 Democratic presidential pri

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The New Coronavirus Outbreak: What We Know So Far

A virus that originated in Wuhan, China, has sickened thousands in the country and spread to numerous other nations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What the Earliest Toilets Say About How Human Civilization Has Evolved

Latrines have been around for thousands of years. Though they haven't exactly always been sanitary.

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Watching bat coronaviruses with next-generation sequencing

On January 21, the first case of the Wuhan coronavirus, named 2019-nCoV, was diagnosed in the United States. The virus has killed at least 17 people in China and sickened hundreds, primarily in Asian countries. Coronaviruses (CoVs) in bats have been linked to that outbreak, as well as outbreaks of diseases like SARS and MERS. Next-generation sequencing may be used to monitor the virus and how it s

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Hyper-Intelligent AI Hive Mind Claims to Predict Super Bowl Winner

Super Predictor You can probably walk up to any football fan right now and get their opinion on which team will win Sunday’s Super Bowl LIV. But if you’re looking for a really educated guess on the game’s outcome, you’ll want to ask Stanford computer scientist Louis Rosenberg, the founder of Unanimous A.I. , a startup that combines the opinions of a lot of humans with artificial intelligence to m

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Ancient well may be the world's oldest wooden architectural structure

An oak-lined well unearthed in the Czech Republic is made of wood felled more than 7000 years ago – and some of the timber might have been recycled from an earlier structure

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Microplastic pollution reduces animal life at the bottom of lakes

High concentrations of microplastics roughly halved the number of animals that are important to the ecosystems in lakes, ponds and canals

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Thought to text – thought controled phone

Thought to Text – Are you all ready to be Wizards? Well, kinda. [brain dump] “Thought to text” Tech – Where does it go?? Google, Microsoft, Facebook, and more are working on a device that will do “thought to text”… can you imagine? If you can type with your thoughts? If you can think a word and it pops on the screen. This device will scan your brain 100 times a second. When you think of somethi

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Mega-constellation firms meet European astronomers

Scientists put their concerns about giant satellite networks directly to the companies involved.

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Novel coronavirus receptors show similarities to SARS-CoV, according to new analysis

Previous studies have shown how the SARS virus (SARS-CoV) interacts with animal and human hosts in order to infect them. The mechanics of infection by the Wuhan coronavirus appear to be similar.

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Modeling study estimates spread of 2019 novel coronavirus

New modeling research estimates that up to 75,800 individuals in the Chinese city of Wuhan may have been infected with 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) as of Jan. 25, 2020. The authors caution that given the lack of a robust and detailed timeline of records of suspected, probable, and confirmed cases and close contacts, the true size of the epidemic and its pandemic potential remains unclear.

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Wreckage of ship tied to Bermuda Triangle found off Florida

Scientists have found the wreckage of a cargo steamship that became associated with the Bermuda Triangle when it disappeared in 1925 off the Atlantic Coast of Florida.

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Global science team on red alert as Arctic lands grow greener

New research techniques are being adopted by scientists tackling the most visible impact of climate change—the so-called greening of Arctic regions.

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Ultra-high energy events key to study of ghost particles

Physicists at Washington University in St. Louis have proposed a way to use data from ultra-high energy neutrinos to study interactions beyond the standard model of particle physics. The 'Zee burst' model leverages new data from large neutrino telescopes such as the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica and its future extensions.

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Seeking better guidelines for inventorying greenhouse gas emissions

In the face of a changing climate, the process of accounting greenhouse gas emissions is becoming ever more critical. Governments around the world are striving to hit reduction targets using Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines to limit global warming. To have a chance of hitting these targets, they need to know how to accurately calculate and report emissions and removals.

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New research highlights how plants are slowing global warming

A new paper reveals how humans are helping to increase the Earth's plant and tree cover, which absorbs carbon from the atmosphere and cools our planet. The boom of vegetation, fueled by greenhouse gas emissions, could be skewing our perception of how fast we're warming the planet.

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The most human algorithm

A team from the research group SEES:lab of the Department of Chemical Engineering of the Universitat Rovira I Virgili and ICREA has made a breakthrough with the development of a new algorithm that makes more accurate predictions and generates mathematical models that also make it possible to understand these predictions. The results of this research have just been published in the journal Science

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How the immune system becomes blind to cancer cells

Researchers have described the activation of a key protein used by tumor cells to stop the body's immune response.

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First view of hydrogen at the metal-to-metal hydride interface

University of Groningen physicists have visualized hydrogen at the titanium/titanium hydride interface using a transmission electron microscope. Using a new technique, they succeeded in visualizing both the metal and the hydrogen atoms in a single image, allowing them to test different theoretical models that describe the interface structure. The results were published on Jan. 31 in the journal Sc

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China coronavirus: labs worldwide scramble to analyse live samples

Nature, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00262-7 Scientists need the pathogen to probe the biology of the emerging infection and to develop tests, drugs and vaccines.

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Pasta makers for crafty carb lovers

Fresh pasta is so much better. (Jorge Zapata via Unsplash/) When you’re craving comfort food, a pasta dish offers so many tantalizing ways to get your fix. Layered in sauce, covered with cheese, or anointed simply with olive oil and garlic, homemade pasta delivers flavor and texture that you just can’t get from a box. A pasta maker quickly turns dough into consistently cut spaghetti, fettuccine,

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Red alert as Arctic lands grow greener

New research techniques are being adopted by scientists tackling the most visible impact of climate change – the so-called greening of Arctic regions. The latest drone and satellite technology is helping an international team of researchers to better understand how the vast, treeless regions called the tundra is becoming greener.

3h

Ultra-high energy events key to study of ghost particles

Physicists propose a new way to leverage data from ultra-high energy neutrinos from large neutrino telescopes such as the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica. So far, all nonstandard interaction studies at IceCube have focused only on the low-energy atmospheric neutrino data.

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Whole genome of the Wuhan coronavirus, 2019-nCoV, sequenced

The Institut Pasteur has sequenced the whole genome of the coronavirus known as '2019-nCoV', becoming the first institution in Europe to sequence the virus since the start of the outbreak.

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Ultra-high energy events key to study of ghost particles

Physicists propose a new way to leverage data from ultra-high energy neutrinos from large neutrino telescopes such as the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica. So far, all nonstandard interaction studies at IceCube have focused only on the low-energy atmospheric neutrino data.

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The Most Optimistic Show on TV Is Over

This story contains spoilers for the series finale of The Good Place . Technically, The Good Place , NBC’s freewheeling sitcom about the afterlife, ended its run last night. The hour-long series finale tied up loose plot threads, celebrated its characters’ relationships with one another, and dropped some heartening twists. For any show, even one as esoteric as The Good Place , hitting these bench

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Airlines Are Suspending Flights to China Amid Outbreak

American, United, and Delta airlines have announced that they are suspending all flights to and from China due to concerns over the recent coronavirus outbreak , The Verge reports . British Airways also suspended all China flights earlier this week. Thursday night, the US Department of State increased the China Travel Advisory to a Level 4, restricting all non-essential travel, shortly after the

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A Bayesian machine scientist to aid in the solution of challenging scientific problems

Closed-form, interpretable mathematical models have been instrumental for advancing our understanding of the world; with the data revolution, we may now be in a position to uncover new such models for many systems from physics to the social sciences. However, to deal with increasing amounts of data, we need "machine scientists" that are able to extract these models automatically from data. Here,

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Enhancement of service life of polymer electrolyte fuel cells through application of nanodispersed ionomer

In polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), protons from the anode are transferred to the cathode through the ionomer membrane. By impregnating the ionomer into the electrodes, proton pathways are extended and high proton transfer efficiency can be achieved. Because the impregnated ionomer mechanically binds the catalysts within the electrode, the ionomer is also called a binder. To yield good ele

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Near-infrared and visible light dual-mode organic photodetectors

We report a dual-mode organic photodetector (OPD) that has a trilayer visible light absorber/optical spacer/near-infrared (NIR) light absorber configuration. In the presence of NIR light, photocurrent is produced in the NIR light–absorbing layer due to the trap-assisted charge injection at the organic/cathode interface at a reverse bias. In the presence of visible light, photocurrent is produced

4h

Complex multiphase organohydrogels with programmable mechanics toward adaptive soft-matter machines

Many biological organisms can tune their mechanical properties to adapt to environments in multistable modes, but the current synthetic materials, with bistable states, have a limited ability to alter mechanical stiffness. Here, we constructed programmable organohydrogels with multistable mechanical states by an on-demand modular assembly of noneutectic phase transition components inside microrga

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Single-cell analysis reveals different age-related somatic mutation profiles between stem and differentiated cells in human liver

Accumulating somatic mutations have been implicated in age-related cellular degeneration and death. Because of their random nature and low abundance, somatic mutations are difficult to detect except in single cells or clonal cell lineages. Here, we show that in single hepatocytes from human liver, an organ exposed to high levels of genotoxic stress, somatic mutation frequencies are high and incre

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Noncontact catalysis: Initiation of selective ethylbenzene oxidation by Au cluster-facilitated cyclooctene epoxidation

Traditionally, a catalyst functions by direct interaction with reactants. In a new noncontact catalytic system (NCCS), an intermediate produced by one catalytic reaction serves as an intermediary to enable an independent reaction to proceed. An example is the selective oxidation of ethylbenzene, which could not occur in the presence of either solubilized Au nanoclusters or cyclooctene, but procee

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One-step regression and classification with cross-point resistive memory arrays

Machine learning has been getting attention in recent years as a tool to process big data generated by the ubiquitous sensors used in daily life. High-speed, low-energy computing machines are in demand to enable real-time artificial intelligence processing of such data. These requirements challenge the current metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, which is limited by Moore’s law approaching its e

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The physiological effects of noninvasive brain stimulation fundamentally differ across the human cortex

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive method to modulate brain activity and behavior in humans. Still, stimulation effects substantially vary across studies and individuals, thereby restricting the large-scale application of TMS in research or clinical settings. We revealed that low-frequency stimulation had opposite impact on the functional connectivity of sensory and cognitiv

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Nano- and microplastics affect the composition of freshwater benthic communities in the long term

Given the societal concern about the presence of nano- and microplastics in the environment, our nescience with respect to in situ effects is disturbing. Data on long-term implications under ecologically realistic conditions are particularly important for the risk assessment of nano- and microplastics. Here, we evaluate the long-term (up to 15 months) effects of five concentrations of nano- and m

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A curious formulation robot enables the discovery of a novel protocell behavior

We describe a chemical robotic assistant equipped with a curiosity algorithm (CA) that can efficiently explore the states a complex chemical system can exhibit. The CA-robot is designed to explore formulations in an open-ended way with no explicit optimization target. By applying the CA-robot to the study of self-propelling multicomponent oil-in-water protocell droplets, we are able to observe an

4h

Resolving hydrogen atoms at metal-metal hydride interfaces

Hydrogen as a fuel can be stored safely with high volumetric density in metals. It can, however, also be detrimental to metals, causing embrittlement. Understanding fundamental behavior of hydrogen at the atomic scale is key to improve the properties of metal-metal hydride systems. However, currently, there is no robust technique capable of visualizing hydrogen atoms. Here, we demonstrate that hy

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Molecular mechanism of SHP2 activation by PD-1 stimulation

In cancer, the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway suppresses T cell stimulation and mediates immune escape. Upon stimulation, PD-1 becomes phosphorylated at its immune receptor tyrosine–based inhibitory motif (ITIM) and immune receptor tyrosine–based switch motif (ITSM), which then bind the Src homology 2 (SH2) domains of SH2-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2), initiating T cell inactivation. The SHP

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A scalable photonic computer solving the subset sum problem

The subset sum problem (SSP) is a typical nondeterministic-polynomial-time (NP)–complete problem that is hard to solve efficiently in time with conventional computers. Photons have the unique features of high propagation speed, strong robustness, and low detectable energy level and therefore can be promising candidates to meet the challenge. Here, we present a scalable chip built-in photonic comp

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A fivefold Formula node is a path to dodecagonal quasicrystal approximants in coordination polymers

Aperiodic formations continue to focus interest in areas ranging from advanced scientific theories to practical everyday applications. Starting from diverse and tightly bonded intermetallic compounds, this world showed an important breakthrough toward the so-called soft systems of meso/macroscale: liquid crystals, thin films, polymers, proteins, etc. This work opens a route for making bulk quasic

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First view of hydrogen at the metal-to-metal hydride interface

University of Groningen physicists have visualized hydrogen at the titanium/titanium hydride interface using a transmission electron microscope. Using a new technique, they succeeded in visualizing both the metal and the hydrogen atoms in a single image, allowing them to test different theoretical models that describe the interface structure. The results were published on 31 January in the journal

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Practical, simple clothes hangers for a neat closet

The life changing magic of non-plastic, non-wire hangers. (Priscilla Du Preez via Unsplash/) If you want to organize your closet Marie Kondo style, you’ll want to hang long, dark, and heavier items on the left, and then short and lighter items on the right. That way, it creates an effect of lightness in your closet. But first: you’ll want some hangers that are as nice as the clothes you put on th

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Seeking better guidelines for inventorying greenhouse gas emissions

Governments around the world are striving to hit reduction targets using Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines to limit global warming. Yale researchers say those guidelines are "woefully out of date" and in need of improvement.

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Climate change: UK sacks its UN conference president

The UK government sacks the woman it appointed to run the crucial UN climate summit in November.

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Ultra-high energy events key to study of ghost particles

Physicists propose a new way to leverage data from ultra-high energy neutrinos from large neutrino telescopes such as the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica. So far, all nonstandard interaction studies at IceCube have focused only on the low-energy atmospheric neutrino data.

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Global science team on red alert as Arctic lands grow greener

New research techniques are being adopted by scientists tackling the most visible impact of climate change – the so-called greening of Arctic regions.The latest drone and satellite technology is helping an international team of researchers to better understand how the vast, treeless regions called the tundra is becoming greener.

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Flight out of Wuhan: landing to mix of concern and uncertainty

Having defied logistical obstacles to leave, evacuees now face two weeks in quarantine

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195 Quarantined in California After Fleeing Coronavirus Epicenter

The U.S. government took the rare step with American evacuees flown home from Wuhan, China, and said it would quarantine others returning from recent travel in the region.

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US Army Considering Rifle That Only Fires When Hit Is Guaranteed

Target Acquired The U.S. Army is currently evaluating a smart rifle that will only fire if its software determines that the shot is guaranteed to hit its target. The system, a collaboration between arms developers SIG Sauer and Smart Shooter, is a submission to the Army’s call for fire control systems to accompany its futuristic Next-Generation Squad Weapon, according to Military.com — and if the

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Meet the Guy Who Invented the Oomphalapompatronium

Don't know what that is? That's OK—we'll explain.

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How musicians like Radiohead and Massive Attack are making their tours less stressful on the environment

The bigger the venue and the band's itinerary, the heftier the carbon footprint of the tour. (Deposit /) The live-entertainment industry is a dominating force in music—just look at all the people flipping out over the My Chemical Romance tour this week. Fans bought 57.7 million concert tickets worldwide in 2019. By 2023, the global accounting firm PWC estimates live music ticket sales will genera

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Cozy throw blankets to up your home’s hygge quotient

Keep it cozy. (Taylor Hernandez via Unsplash/) The Danish word ‘ hygge ’ doesn’t have a direct translation in English, but describes that uniquely Scandinavian feeling of coziness and comfort, even when you’ve got less than 10 hours of daylight. To achieve those cool and cozy vibes at home, you can invest in candles, chic loungewear, and a few throw blankets soft enough to feel like a hug. Excell

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Britons on evacuation flight from Wuhan tell of relief and confusion

Some forced to leave behind loved ones due to short notice after China lifted restrictions Coronavirus: live updates Britons who were on board the evacuation flight from Wuhan have spoken of the confusion surrounding their departure , with some still having to leave loved ones behind. The flight, carrying 87 Britons and 27 foreign nationals from the coronavirus-hit Chinese city, touched down at R

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Amid Nike Controversy, Track's Governing Body Sets New Rules For Shoes

Concerns have swirled for years over whether Nike's Vaporfly line of shoes gives athletes an unfair advantage. The new rules appear to ban one Vaporfly model, but another will reportedly qualify. (Image credit: Jed Leicester/AP)

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Alle moderne mennesker bærer rundt på neandertaler-DNA

For første gang nogensinde har forskere fundet neandertaler-DNA i afrikanere.

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A Brutal ‘Dead Star’ Is Stuck In a Whirlpool of Warped Spacetime

Drag And Drop A pulsar — the dead remains of a star that detonated in a supernova — in a distant galaxy just proved Einstein right, yet again, by demonstrating one of his predictions for the behavior of the universe. The pulsar orbits a white dwarf star that spins so rapidly that it actually drags spacetime around it like a fork twirling up a bite of spaghetti, a bizarre phenomenon called frame d

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Task force recommends US$50-million fund to bring African Americans into physics and astronomy

Nature, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00286-z The American Institute of Physics aims to double the number of black undergraduates in the field.

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Daily briefing: Genetically engineered gut microbes can protect honey bees

Nature, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00282-3 Microbes produce RNA that targets deadly bee mites and the virus they carry. Plus, the WHO has declared the coronavirus a global emergency and we hear the voice of a 3,000-year-old mummy.

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The Spitzer Space Telescope Signs Off

We honor the spacecraft’s 16-year journey with five beautiful images from the telescope. 2_spitzer_ssc2007-03a1_1024.jpg The Helix nebula, imaged here in 2007, resembles a giant eye. Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/K. Su (Univ. of Arizona) Space Friday, January 31, 2020 – 13:15 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — The telescope that discovered the largest ring of Saturn , detect

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"Unprecedented" Locust Invasion Approaches Full-Blown Crisis

The spreading swarms, triggered by cyclone rains, threaten crops in East Africa — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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To change your personality, don’t go it alone

Most people have an aspect of their personality they’d like to change, but it may be difficult to do so without help, according to a new study. Contrary to the once-popular idea that people’s personalities are more or less set in stone, research has proven that personalities do change throughout a person’s lifespan, often in line with major life events. For example, there’s evidence that people t

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The secret to regeneration? Scientists say it lies in the axolotl genome.

All salamanders are gifted at regeneration, but the axolotl takes this capability to the extreme. In addition to growing back its limbs, axolotl can grow back organs like their eyes and even their brains. Research on how they do this has been slow due to the creature's massive genome, but scientists recently uncovered two genes that play an important role. Few creatures have captured the attentio

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The Good Place Was a Metaphor All Along

This article contains spoilers through the series finale of The Good Place. The architects of The Good Place are two men named Michael. One, played by Ted Danson, is a demon in a skin suit whose job is to devise preposterous and subtly cruel scenarios with which to provoke maximum silliness among the four oddball characters in his care. The other is Michael Schur, The Good Place ’s creator and sh

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Microsoft's plan to store data for 10,000 years

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Nasa Is Adding A Space Hotel To The Space Station

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A New Wrinkle And Danger In How Automation Will Obsolete Jobs

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5 top designers imagine the workplace of 2040

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New research looks at type 1 diabetes and changes in the environment

Studies have shown a rapid increase in new cases of type 1 diabetes worldwide. However, scientists and researchers have struggled to identify a direct cause. Many have questioned if changes in the environment or lifestyle have impacted the disease. In a newly released review paper published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, faculty from the Colorado School of Public Health at the Anschutz Me

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Religiousness linked to improved quality of life for people with HIV

Adults living with HIV in Washington, D.C., were more likely to feel higher levels of emotional and physical well-being if they attended religious services regularly, prayed daily, felt 'God's presence,' and self-identified as religious or spiritual, according to research published online Jan. 29, 2020, in Psychology of Religion and Spirituality.

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Teens Are Exploiting a Stupid Loophole in Flavored Vape Ban

In an effort to curb underage use and amidst growing epidemic of a “vaping-related illness,” the Food and Drug Administration banned all fruit and mint-flavored nicotine vaping pods, including the offerings by market leader Juul, at the beginning of this year. But teens are exploiting a glaring loophole in the ban, The New York Times reports : any flavors — banana ice, cherry crush, vivid vanilla

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Taylor Swift’s Adulthood Blues

What fans will hunger to know, after watching the new Netflix documentary Miss Americana , is whether Taylor Swift prefers carnitas or carne asada. “Do you eat burritos?” Swift asks her producer, Joel Little, at one point in the movie. Little giggles and asks who on Earth doesn’t eat burritos. Swift answers that she didn’t until two years prior—“I just had never tried one.” Cut to her inserting a

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‘People need to see big patterns.’ U.S. ecological observatory’s new science chief looks ahead

Paula Mabee to lead the National Ecological Observatory Network in wake of management upheaval

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Our face mask future: Do they really help beat flu, coronavirus and pollution?

Huge numbers of people are wearing face masks – in Japan and South Korea there have been reports of stores selling out. But experts are divided on how effective they are As the death toll from coronavirus steadily rises, east Asian countries such as Taiwan have stepped up production of surgical face masks to meet demand. In the Chinese city of Wuhan, at the centre of the outbreak, it is mandatory

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New guideline aims to transform evaluation and care of children and adolescents with ADHD

The Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics is releasing a groundbreaking guideline for the diagnosis and care of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders in children and youth in a supplement to its February 2020 issue.

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Institut Pasteur isolates strains of coronavirus 2019-nCoV detected in France

As well as sequencing the whole genome of coronavirus 2019-nCoV, the Institut Pasteur continued to work on the samples taken from the first confirmed cases. The quality of these initial samples enabled rapid cell-culture isolation of the new virus. The Institut Pasteur's scientists now have access to the virus responsible for the infection. The isolation of the virus paves the way for new diagnost

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Spitzer Space Telescope Ends Operations After Scanning the Cosmos for 16 Years

Looking back on the groundbreaking discoveries of NASA's little telescope that could

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How supercomputers are helping us link quantum entanglement to cold coffee

Theoretical physicists from Trinity College Dublin have found a deep link between one of the most striking features of quantum mechanics—quantum entanglement—and thermalisation, which is the process in which something comes into thermal equilibrium with its surroundings.

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Coronavirus: how far will it spread?

Scientists are looking at a range of factors to model the outbreak

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Another Example of How Health Care Disparities Kill

Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is treated less aggressively if you’re not white and male — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Simplifying simple sequence repeats

Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are regions of DNA with high diversity, and they have long been a mainstay for botanists examining the genetic structure of plant populations. However, as the cost of sequencing DNA continues to plummet and genetic technologies advance, newer techniques for mapping genetic diversity such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) or RAD-seq have begun to rival the traditional

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Billionaire Yusaku Maezawa Calls Off TV Search for Moon Trip ‘Life Partner’

Yusaku Maezawa had posted an advertisement seeking a woman to go with him on a SpaceX flight around the moon. He said he canceled the search for “personal reasons” and apologized.

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Isaac Asimov’s Throwback Vision of the Future

When Isaac Asimov’s Foundation trilogy won the Hugo Award for best all-time science-fiction series, in 1966, no one was more surprised than the author. The books contained “no action,” Asimov complained years later, adding, “I kept waiting for something to happen, and nothing ever did.” As a young reader, I devoured the Foundation books, the short-story collection I, Robot , and other works by As

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Study Reports First Case of Coronavirus Spread by Asymptomatic Person

A woman from China infected a person in Germany before she began displaying symptoms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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China and coronavirus

Now a global public health emergency, the outbreak is also wreaking economic damage

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Simplifying simple sequence repeats

Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are regions of DNA with high diversity, and they have long been a mainstay for botanists examining the genetic structure of plant populations. However, as the cost of sequencing DNA continues to plummet and genetic technologies advance, newer techniques for mapping genetic diversity such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) or RAD-seq have begun to rival the traditional

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Nanospirals that form as molten metals solidify could be key to new materials—and invisibility

Humans have been cooling metal mixtures from liquid to solid for thousands of years. But surprisingly, not much is known about exactly what happens during the process of solidification. Particularly puzzling is the solidification of eutectics, which are mixtures of two or more solid phases.

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Stora möjligheter med medarbetardriven innovation

Medarbetardriven innovation kan skapa mycket mervärde för företag. Men för att lyckas krävs aktiva chefer som ger tydlig återkoppling och som uppmuntrar och ger utrymme för kreativt arbete. På detta sätt kan man ta tillvara på och utnyttja mångfalden i en organisation, menar Izabelle Bäckström, forskare i industriell ekonomi vid Lunds tekniska högskola, i en ny avhandling. Hennes arbete fokuserar

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Osäkra villkor för unga egenföretagare med utländsk bakgrund

Osäker inkomst och svaga social nätverk. Det är verkligheten för många andra generationens egenföretagare med utländsk bakgrund. Därför är det tveksamt att förbehållslöst argumentera för egenföretagande som en bra väg till integration och avancemang i samhället, menar forskare inom social arbete. Politiker har ofta satt stor tilltro till att egenföretagandet ska utgöra en kraft för att andra gene

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What the happiest cold-weather countries on the planet know about winter

There's no such thing as "too cold." Only lousy winter gear. (Vadymvdrobot via Deposit Photos/) You wake up in the dark. You drive to work in the dark. And following a long, hard day at the office, you go back home in the—you guessed it—dark. In between, Old Man Winter greets you with an icy slap in the face every time you go outdoors. Ah—’tis the season. As daylight wanes and darkness pays a vis

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What the Axolotl's Limb-Regenerating Capabilities Have to Teach Us

Studying the mechanisms that regrow lost limbs in the aquatic creatures might help burn victims and more.

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Five Ways to Prepare for SuperbOwl Sunday

No matter which team you’re hooting for this Super Bowl Sunday, you can celebrate SuperbOwls and citizen science.

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AI still doesn’t have the common sense to understand human language

Natural-language processing has taken great strides recently—but how much does AI really understand of what it reads? Less than we thought.

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Black history month is not just a time to celebrate marches and martyrs

February 1st marks the start of Black History Month. While many people are familiar with iconic figures such as Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks and Harriet Tubman, there are many other lesser known African-Americans, whose achievements should also be recognized.

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Young people putting music to the crisis: The role of music as a political expression

Songs that Sing the Crisis: Music, Words, Youth Narratives and Identities in Late Modernity is the title of a special issue of the journal Young (Nordic Journal of Youth Research) to be published on 1 February, now available online, that reflects on the role of music as an expression of the crisis. It contains case studies of musical genres rap, punk, folk metal, black metal, fado, reggaeton and m

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How supercomputers are helping us link quantum entanglement to cold coffee

Theoretical physicists from Trinity College Dublin have found a deep link between one of the most striking features of quantum mechanics — quantum entanglement — and thermalisation, which is the process in which something comes into thermal equilibrium with its surroundings.

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Simplifying simple sequence repeats

Simple sequence repeats (or microsatellites) continue to be widely used in a variety of biological disciplines, including forensics, paternity testing, population genetics, genetic mapping, and phylogeography. New research in Applications in Plant Sciences presents optimized protocols to identify microsatellites from genomic and transcriptomic data, providing guidance on what depth of sequencing i

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Migraine rats, medical facts

Migraine mechanisms are still far from being fully understood. Escalating data from animal models are 'fact-checking' the neurophysiological and behavioral correlates of the migraine experience in humans, and how they may be affected by current anti-migraine drugs or might translate into new therapies.

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Another Example of How Health Care Disparities Kill

Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is treated less aggressively if you’re not white and male — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Could there be an 'exercise pill' in the future?

A group of scientists found that boosting the protein Sestrin in mice and flies mimicked the effects of exercise. One hypothesis is that the protein activates metabolic pathways that result in certain biological benefits. Researchers hope these findings could eventually help scientists combat muscle wasting in humans due to physical limitation. "I'm so tired, I wish I could just download these mi

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The best ski helmets for protecting the only brain you’ll get

Keep your head safe on the slopes. (Steve Johnston via Unsplash/) Skiers of all levels should wear a helmet to protect their brains from concussions and worse. And while protection for your noggin is the primary objective, an excellent helmet is also well ventilated and warm. Here, we’ve highlighted some of the very best brands on the market: Giro, Smith, and Oakley. All of these helmets come hig

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Bionic jellyfish can swim three times faster

Researchers implanted tiny controllers in live jellyfish that use electric pulses to direct the animals’ movement. Some people need a cup of coffee to really get moving. For jellyfish, a jolt of electricity apparently does the trick. Scientists have implanted tiny controllers in live jellyfish that use electric pulses to direct the animals’ movement. With the electrical aids, the animals swam at

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Low-dose metronomic cyclophosphamide complements the actions of an intratumoral C-class CpG TLR9 agonist to potentiate innate immunity and drive potent T cell-mediated anti-tumor responses

Intratumoral injection of SD-101 induces significant anti-tumor immunity in preclinical and clinical studies, especially when combined with PD-1 blockade.

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Toward a portable concussion detector that relies on an infrared laser

With no way to reliably tell whether an athlete has a concussion, many may be playing with an undiagnosed injury. Likewise, 2 million people die every year because we don't have an early warning when brain cells are dying–and another 4 million experience cognitive disabilities.

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AI-medicin klar til kliniske forsøg på mennesker

På kun et år er det lykkedes en britisk start-up-firma og japansk medicinalfirma at få et præparat mod OCD klar til kliniske forsøg. Opskriften er kunstig intelligens.

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Republicans Are Prepared to Go Down With Trump

Just four years ago, the GOP’s leaders were almost uniformly reacting to Trump with horror. Today, Republican officeholders have made their calculation: They will either go down with President Donald Trump, or they will rise with him. The GOP has in recent years been the more disciplined of America’s two major political parties, and although Trump likes to complain that his fellow Republicans are

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In China, Drones Are Yelling at People About Coronavirus [UPDATED]

It’s not clear who’s operating them, but drones in China are reportedly searching for people walking around without masks and using loudspeakers to loudly urge them to stay home. A video on the stated-owned newspaper Global Times shows a woman dressed as a police officer talking into a walkie talkie, seemingly broadcasting messages through a drone to warn of imminent danger due to the coronavirus

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Institut Pasteur sequences the whole genome of the Wuhan coronavirus, 2019-nCoV

On January 24, 2020, the French Ministry of Health confirmed the first three cases of patients affected by the Wuhan coronavirus. On January 29, 2020, the Institut Pasteur, which is responsible for monitoring respiratory viruses in France, sequenced the whole genome of the coronavirus known as '2019-nCoV', becoming the first institution in Europe to sequence the virus since the start of the outbre

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UC study shows dramatic increase in naloxone dispensing in Ohio

A new study by pharmacy researchers at the University of Cincinnati shows a 2,328% increase in the number of naloxone prescriptions dispensed in Ohio. The increase occurred since 2015 when the Ohio General Assembly approved a law that allows pharmacists to dispense naloxone — the life-saving medicine given to those who overdose on drugs such as heroin — without a prescription.Researchers also fo

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Virtual crossmatching improves quality of life for kidney transplant patients

Virtual antibody crossmatching is a safe and efficient way of selecting kidney transplant recipients. Two years after implementing the process, the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) division of transplant surgery, Charleston, concluded that the technique was just as accurate and sensitive as physical crossmatch, the current gold standard, and much quicker.

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Lung cancer screening decision aid delivered through tobacco quitlines improves informed decision-making

Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have shown that a decision aid delivered through tobacco quitlines effectively reaches a screening-eligible population and results in informed decisions about lung cancer screening.

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Spike in colorectal cancer from age 49 to 50 suggests many undiagnosed before screenings

A year-by-year age analysis of colorectal cancer rates among US adults finds a significant increase in new diagnoses from ages 49 to 50, indicating that many latent cases of the disease are likely going undiagnosed until routine screenings begin at 50. Most of the cases discovered were invasive, meaning they were likely lingering for some time before diagnosis, according to the study in JAMA Netwo

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Do state regulations affect adult use of e-cigarettes?

National data from 895,000 adults were used to examine how state regulations regarding electronic cigarettes were associated with their use among US adults.

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Effect of state law allowing pharmacists to dispense naloxone without prescription

Naloxone is a medication used to reverse an opioid overdose, and this study looked at how an Ohio law that allowed pharmacists to dispense naloxone without a prescription was associated with dispensing rates.

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Rates of new colorectal cancer cases as people turn 50, historically begin screening

Cancer registries representing about 28% of the US population were used to examine how new cases of colorectal cancer increased from age 49 to 50, the age when many people of average risk for the disease historically began screening, although screening age recommendations vary.

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Jump in employment seen among Medicaid expansion enrollees, especially the most vulnerable

Getting covered by health insurance may have a major impact on a low-income person's ability to get a job or enroll in school, according to a new study that gives the first direct look at the relationship between the two.The percentage of low-income people enrolled in Michigan's Medicaid expansion program who had jobs or were enrolled in school jumped six points in one year. That outpaced employme

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Cleveland clinic study clarifies genetic autism risk in PTEN patients

Cleveland Clinic researchers have identified for the first time an explanation of why patients with identical PTEN mutations often have vastly different clinical presentations. In a new study published in JAMA Network Open, a team of researchers led by Charis Eng, MD, PhD, discovered that copy number variations may act as genomic modifiers that influence the risk of autism spectrum disorder and/or

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10 essential purchases that'll help you hit your reading goals

Studies have shown that reading not only increases intelligence and sharpens emotional capabilities, it can also help reduce the risk of dementia. Different types of reading triggers an increase in blood flow to different sections of the brain, so as long as you're reading something, your brain is being exercised. When setting reading goals, it's important to remember that it's not the destinatio

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Dictators hate political cartoons — so I keep drawing them | Rayma Suprani

"A political cartoon is a barometer of freedom," says Rayma Suprani, who was exiled from her native Venezuela for publishing work critical of the government. "That's why dictators hate cartoonists." In a talk illustrated with highlights from a career spent railing against totalitarianism, Suprani explores how cartoons hold a mirror to society and reveal hidden truths — and discusses why she keeps

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Male authors boost research impact through self-hyping studies

Nature, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00266-3 Sensationalistic terms in titles or abstracts of articles produce more citations than do articles without such words — and men are more likely to use them.

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TriEye’s Infrared Camera Helps Autonomous Cars See Through Haze

The Israeli startup TriEye believes it can move cars closer to self-driving with a short-wave infrared, or SWIR, camera as part of the car’s arsenal of sensors. A SWIR camera can see better than traditional optical cameras when there’s rain, fog, dust, or smoke. TriEye’s breakthrough isn’t the invention of SWIR technology cameras – they exist today – but in reducing the potential cost by “1,000x,

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Could resetting our internal clocks help control diabetes?

The circadian clock system allows the organisms to adjust to periodical changes of geophysical time. Today, increasing evidence show that disturbances in our internal clocks stemming from frequent time zone changes, irregular working schedules or ageing, have a significant impact on the development of metabolic diseases including type-2 diabetes. Using a molecule extracted from lemon peel, researc

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Common form of heart failure could be treated with already approved anticancer drug

Thanks to new research, a drug capable of reversing a common form of heart failure known as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) may soon be available. The researchers show that a drug already approved for the treatment of some forms of cancer can reverse HFpEF symptoms and improve the heart's ability to pump blood in an HFpEF animal model.

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Elon Musk Just Dropped a Heavily Auto-Tuned Song on SoundCloud

SoundCloud Crap SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk just dropped a generic-sounding EDM song on SoundCloud. Seriously. No, we’re not making this up. Musk dropped a link to the heavily Auto-Tuned track on his Twitter late last night. The jam, titled “Don’t Doubt ur Vibe” was published by “Emo G Records” and sounds, well, like the kind of royalty-free music you’d put over a text-heavy video on Instagram

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The Lancet: Modelling study estimates spread of 2019 novel coronavirus

New modelling research, published in The Lancet, estimates that up to 75,800 individuals in the Chinese city of Wuhan may have been infected with 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) as of Jan. 25, 2020.

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Highly active HIV antibody restricts development of viral resistance

A research team led by Univ.-Prof. Dr. Florian Klein of the Institute of Virology of the University Hospital Cologne and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) has identified a new highly active antibody targeting HIV. Whereas the development of viral resistance limits the efficacy of previously described HIV antibodies, the newly identified antibody 1-18 can continuously suppress viral r

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Study: Tasting no-calorie sweetener may affect insulin response on glucose tolerance test

New research led by University of Illinois professor of food science and human nutrition M. Yanina Pepino, left, suggests that just tasting something sweet, such as the artificial sweetener sucralose, may affect individuals' responses on glucose tolerance tests.

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Congenital heart disease more deadly in low-income countries

Even though mortality from congenital heart disease (CHD) has declined over the last three decades as diagnosis and treatments have advanced, a new study shows that the chances for a child to survive a CHD diagnosis significantly differs based on the country where he or she is born.

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Team Bernie Isn’t Fazed by the Bros

Updated at 11:56 a.m. ET on January 31 AMES, IOWA—National news outlets have published a series of news articles and commentary recently devoted to the idea that Senator Bernie Sanders’s supporters are singularly cruel. This week, The New York Times dedicated 3,000 words to the subject, delineating the threats and insults sent by Sanders’s “internet army” since 2016 to its opponents online. The W

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Design your own doctoral project

Nature, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00268-1 Instead of looking for PhD positions, designing your own project offers advantages and challenges, says Jesko Becker.

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University apologizes for saying xenophobia is 'common reaction' to coronavirus spread

University of California, Berkeley said on Instagram that spread of the illness may lead to ‘fears about interacting with those who might be from Asia’ Coronovirus – latest updates The University of California, Berkeley apologized on Thursday evening for an Instagram posting that listed xenophobia and “fears about interacting with those who might be from Asia” as a common reaction to the spread o

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Pinpointing rare disease mutations

Scientists have compiled mouse and human cell knockout data to categorise genes based on how essential they are for survival and organism development. The research creates a resource that can be used by other scientists to further investigate candidate genes potentially involved in developmental disorders. The work could help identify new mutations causing rare genetic diseases.

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Do less and get stronger: Science proves you can lift less with better results

Weightlifters could do less and get stronger by changing the amount they lift each session, according to new research. Sports scientists from the University of Lincoln, UK, compared the weight lifting amounts of athletes using a traditional one rep max method with athletes who adjusted their loads at each session, and found all those who tailored their weights became stronger despite lifting less

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Characterization of unique PMEPA1 gene splice variants (isoforms d and e) from RNA Seq profiling pro

In addition to 4 reported PMEPA1 isoforms, one novel isoform PMEPA1-e was identified with RNA Seq analysis of hormone-responsive VCa P, LNCa P cells and human prostate cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset.

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Study: Brexit referendum did not lead to more radical Euroskepticism elsewhere

Following the result of the UK Brexit referendum in June 2016 many Euroskeptic parties across Europe celebrated, contending that the vote could pave the way for similar referendums in other countries. This was explored in a paper, Eager to leave? Populist radical right parties' responses to the UK's Brexit vote, the lead author of which was Dr. Stijn van Kessel, Senior Lecturer in European Politic

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2 Billion-Year-Old Cells, Wildfires, and Ancient Mummy Sounds

A month worth of cool science stories, summed up. 2 Billion-Year-Old Cells, Wildfires, and Ancient Mummy Sounds Video of 2 Billion-Year-Old Cells, Wildfires, and Ancient Mummy Sounds Earth Friday, January 31, 2020 – 10:30 Alistair Jennings, Contributor (Inside Science) — In this monthly science recap, Alistair Jennings from Inside Science sums up some of the most interesting science from the pa

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As Coronavirus Spreads, So Do Misinformation and Xenophobia

Despite calls from health officials for scientific fact over speculation, public discourse on the global spread of a new coronavirus has so far been heavy on rumors and light on science. Many people have leveled blame at social media platforms, where posts pushing misinformation and xenophobia abound.

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The Books Briefing: The Artists Who Melodize Our Lives

Musicians are often able to wield language and sound in ways that transcend what can be communicated in writing. These unique sensibilities make the artists compelling and challenging biographical subjects. Many biographers have written about the enigmatic trumpeter Miles Davis, but it is Davis’s own autobiography (written with Quincy Troupe) that is best able to describe the inspiration for his

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The Conservatives Trying to Ditch Fake News

J onah Goldberg, the conservative author and longtime fixture at National Revie w, used to have a go-to metaphor he’d deploy whenever he found himself defending one of his noisier compatriots in the right-wing media. “I had this whole spiel about how the conservative movement is like a symphony,” he told me in a recent interview. “You need the fine woodwinds like Yuval Levin or Irving Kristol , b

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Expert: Taxes beat bans for promoting reusable bags

A modest tax on single-use plastic and paper bags, rather than an outright ban, would do a better job getting consumers into the habit of using reusable bags, one expert says. Though it may seem that they’ve always been part of American consumerism and convenience, plastic shopping bags first showed up in grocery stores in the 1970s. And in 2009, Americans used an estimated 100 billion plastic ba

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EU strammer 5G-sikkerhed: Men Huawei udelukkes ikke

PLUS. EU vil udelukke højrisiko-leverandører fra core-netværket i de kommende 5G-netværk, mens følsomt udstyr i mobilmaster er tilladt. I Danmark er det kun teleselskabet 3 der stadig benytter sig af Huawei i corenetværket.

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Heat kills: We need consistency in the way we measure these deaths

One of the most confronting impacts of climate change is the risk of more deaths from hot weather. Heat stress can exacerbate existing health conditions including diabetes, kidney disease and heart disease. Older people are particularly vulnerable.

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New cobalt complex could reduce the cost of hydroformylation

A team of researchers from Louisiana State University and ExxonMobil Chemical has found a way to replace the rhodium catalysts used in the hydroformylation process. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their process and how it compares economically with current methods.

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Not-so-dirty birds? Not enough evidence to link wild birds to food-borne illness

When food makes people sick, some blame birds because they hang around farms, and their feces can contain E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter, three common pathogens that can cause food-borne illness.

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Exploring the school-age social, emotional, and behavioral health landscape

How you interact, how you feel, and how you act: The three basic tenants of social, emotional, and behavioral health are simple concepts, yet they can be some of the strongest predictors of well-being as children grow into adulthood. While a large number of children and adolescents meet the diagnostic criteria for mental health disorders, only a fraction actually receive needed services—and it oft

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Efficient cryopreservation of genetically modified rat spermatozoa

Rat spermatozoa are two to four times larger than that of other animal species and are easily damaged by changes in pH, osmotic pressure, and temperature. Because these animals are very frequently used in medical research, a cryopreservation method was developed nearly 20 years ago. However, rat spermatozoa motility after thawing is extremely poor, and unless artificial insemination is performed a

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DNA extracted in museum samples can reveal genetic secrets

DNA in preserved museum specimens can allow scientists to explore the history of species and humanities impact on the ecosystem, but samples are typically preserved in formaldehyde which can damage DNA and make very difficult to recover.

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Scientists Zero in on the Novel Coronavirus's Incubation Period

Recent announcements from Chinese officials and German doctors suggest that some patients may spread 2019-nCoV during its incubation period, which may last up to 14 days before symptoms emerge.

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Nu digitaliseras allt som tryckts i Sverige

Efterfrågan på digitalt material ökar från både forskning och allmänhet. Därför går Kungliga biblioteket, KB, och universitetsbiblioteken i Lund, Stockholm, Göteborg, Umeå och Uppsala ihop för att snabba på digitaliseringen av allt som tryckts i Sverige. Allt finns inte samlat på KB, utan är utspritt på lärosäten landet runt. Alla arbetar på sitt sätt med att digitalisera materialet, i olika takt

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Robot dog to replace human at Montreal construction site

submitted by /u/ciscosis [link] [comments]

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China develops rapid Coronavirus test that works in under 15 minutes

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Jennifer Doudna, Crispr inventor, on the ethics of editing humans

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Watch: End poverty in America

submitted by /u/laughinghammock [link] [comments]

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Not-so-dirty birds? Not enough evidence to link wild birds to food-borne illness

When food makes people sick, some blame birds because they hang around farms, and their feces can contain E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter, three common pathogens that can cause food-borne illness.

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Efficient cryopreservation of genetically modified rat spermatozoa

Rat spermatozoa are two to four times larger than that of other animal species and are easily damaged by changes in pH, osmotic pressure, and temperature. Because these animals are very frequently used in medical research, a cryopreservation method was developed nearly 20 years ago. However, rat spermatozoa motility after thawing is extremely poor, and unless artificial insemination is performed a

7h

Success and failure of ecological management is highly variable

What do we really know about reasons attributed to the success or failure of wildlife management efforts? A new study suggests a disquieting answer: much less than we think. A new study finds that ecological systems might contain a lot of inherit randomness that makes them difficult to manage.

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Guardian angel of the eye

The lens of the human eye comprises a highly concentrated protein solution, which lends the lens its great refractive power. Protective proteins prevent these proteins from clumping together throughout a lifetime. A team of scientists has now uncovered the precise structure of the alpha-A-crystallin protein and, in the process, discovered an important additional function.

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Branding in a hyperconnected world

A hyperconnected world is changing the role and management of brands. New theories and models are needed to account for these changes.

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Novel coronavirus receptors show <>coronasimilarities to SARS-CoV, according to new analysis

The recent emergence of Wuhan coronavirus (2019-nCoV) has put the world on high alert for transcontinental transmission, reminiscent of the outbreak of SARS — also a coronavirus — in 2002-2003. Previous studies have shown how the SARS virus (SARS-CoV) interacts with animal and human hosts in order to infect them. The mechanics of infection by the Wuhan coronavirus appear to be similar.

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Inherited DNA-repair gene mutations in African American men with prostate cancer

Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 4: Pathogenic or likely pathogenic alterations in these 14 DNA repair genes were less likely to be detected in African Americans as compared to Caucasians.

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Fewer scars in the central nervous system

Researchers have discovered the influence of the coagulation factor fibrinogen on the damaged brain.

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MIT professors keep the ideas flowing

From getting the most out of your ketchup bottle to the ethics of academic donations

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Your brain on Mars: How scientists will track astronauts' mental performance on missions

A journey to Mars is not going to be easy and there are a number of problems that need to be solved before we go. One interesting problem is how do we monitor the astronauts themselves. Of course, it is easy to monitor their heart rate and blood pressure, but is it possible to monitor what is going on inside their heads?

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Nesting nanotubes to create 1-D van der Waals heterostructures

An international team of researchers has found a new way to create 1-D heterostructures—by nesting nanotubes. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they nested the nanotubes and the shapes they were able to create. Yury Gogotsi and Boris Yakobson with Drexel University and Rice University have published a Perspective piece on the work done by the team in the same

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Chemists simplify the synthesis of antitumor compounds

A RUDN chemist in collaboration with colleagues from N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry and N.K. Koltsov Institute of Developmental Biology (IDB), RAS have developed a new method for the synthesis of isoxazole derivatives—substances that destabilize the process of cell division and potentially may become the basis for new anticancer drugs. The new method is based on the use of easily ava

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This Is the Most Detailed Picture of the Sun’s Surface Yet

Bubbling convection cells, each about the size of Texas, rise and fall across the sun's surface.

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Doctors on TikTok Try to Go Viral

They have M.D.s, but are they up for this challenge?

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To save honey bees, tinker with their microbiomes?

A new strategy would use genetically engineered strains of bacteria to protect honey bees from a deadly trend known as colony collapse. An increasing number of honey bee colonies in the US have seen the dwindling of their adult bees. According to a national survey, beekeepers lost nearly 40% of their honey bee colonies last winter, the highest rate reported since the survey began 13 years ago. Ac

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Inoculation theory: The vaccine for climate disinformation

Australia's recent bushfire crisis will be remembered for many things—not least, the tragic loss of life, property and landscape. But one other factor made it remarkable: the deluge of disinformation spread by climate deniers.

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Media 'impartiality' on climate change is ethically misguided and downright dangerous

In September 2019, the editor of The Conversation, Misha Ketchell, declared The Conversation's editorial team in Australia was henceforth taking what he called a "zero-tolerance" approach to climate change deniers and skeptics. Their comments would be blocked and their accounts locked.

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The 8 Best Smartwatches (2020): Apple Watch, Samsung, Wear OS

Which smartwatch should you buy? From the Apple Watch to the Samsung Galaxy Watch Active 2, here are our favorites.

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How do woodpeckers avoid brain injury?

Slamming a beak against the trunk of a tree would seem like an activity that would cause headaches, jaw aches and serious neck and brain injuries. Yet woodpeckers can do this 20 times per second and suffer no ill effects.

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Manufacturing microbes tweaked to live long and prosper

Nature, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00217-y Bacteria churn out chemical bounty after researchers tinker with genes for longevity and cell division.

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Anti-carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule antibody for fluorescence visualization

Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 4: The research team's aim was to investigate mAb 6G5j binding characteristics and to validate fluorescence targeting of colorectal tumors and metastases in patient derived orthotopic xenograft models with fluorescently labeled 6G5j.

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Not-so-dirty birds? Not enough evidence to link wild birds to food-borne illness

Despite the perception that wild birds in farm fields can cause food-borne illness, a WSU study has found little evidence linking birds to E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter outbreaks.

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Army research may improve stroke, TBI treatment

New Army research provides a better understanding of the swelling that occurs in the brain during a stroke, which could contribute to new treatment strategies for stroke patients and have potential implications for traumatic brain injuries.

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Exploring the school-age social, emotional, and behavioral health landscape

Through a four-year federally funded project, UConn researchers looked at school districts across the country to better understand how social, emotional, and behavioral health screening tools are being employed, and what factors influence their use.

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Exploring strangeness and the primordial Universe

Physicists believe that in the Universe's first ten microseconds free quarks and gluons filled all of spacetime, forming a new phase of matter named 'quark-gluon plasma' (QGP). Experimental and theoretical work at CERN was instrumental in the discovery of this hot soup of primordial matter, which is recreated today in accelerator-based lab experiments. To discover QGP in such experiments, the obse

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Image: Hubble spies bar, baby stars

The galaxy depicted in this image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is a barred spiral known as NGC 7541, in the constellation of Pisces (the Fishes).

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How do woodpeckers avoid brain injury?

Slamming a beak against the trunk of a tree would seem like an activity that would cause headaches, jaw aches and serious neck and brain injuries. Yet woodpeckers can do this 20 times per second and suffer no ill effects.

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Humans are hardwired to dismiss facts that don't fit their worldview

Something is rotten in the state of American political life. The U.S. (among other nations) is increasingly characterized by highly polarized, informationally insulated ideological communities occupying their own factual universes.

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Study identifies the first potentially invasive species to reach the Antarctica on drifting marine algae

Drifting algae in the Austral Ocean can bring invasive species to the Antarctic coasts, according to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports. The new study describes the first scientific evidence of a potentially invasive and colonial species –the marine bryozoan Membranipora membranacea- which reaches the Antarctic latitude islands in macroalgae that drift in the marine environment.

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Study identifies the first potentially invasive species to reach the Antarctica on drifting marine algae

Drifting algae in the Austral Ocean can bring invasive species to the Antarctic coasts, according to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports. The new study describes the first scientific evidence of a potentially invasive and colonial species –the marine bryozoan Membranipora membranacea- which reaches the Antarctic latitude islands in macroalgae that drift in the marine environment.

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Making simulated cosmic dust—in the microwave

Cosmic dust is the key to the chemical evolution of stars, planets, and life itself, but its composition is not well understood, and we can't currently collect samples for analysis. A few examples have arrived on Earth as interplanetary dust particles and comet dust, in meteorites, but their complicated history means they may not be representative.

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Calculating Hawking radiation at the event horizon of a black hole

A RUDN University physicist has developed a formula for calculating Hawking radiation on the event horizon of a black hole, which allows physicists to determine how this radiation would be changed with quantum corrections to Einstein's theory of gravity. This formula will allow researchers to test the accuracy of different versions of the quantum gravity theory by observing black holes, and compri

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Compulsory super contributions: There's no 'one-size-fits-all' percentage

Among the topics being investigated by the government's retirement incomes review is whether compulsory super contributions should be lifted from 9.5% to 12%.

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Image: Lake George, Uganda

World Wetlands Day is celebrated internationally each year on 2 February. It marks the anniversary of the signing of the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, known as the Ramsar Convention, in Ramsar, Iran, on 2 February 1971.

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Biochemist discovers a promising enzyme to fight cancer cells

A RUDN University biochemist has studied the stimulating effect of chemical substances on the catabolic enzyme PAO (polyamine oxidase). The results could contribute to the development of drugs against cancer. The article is published in the journal Amino Acids.

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Estuarine and coastal environments play a crucial role in microplastic concentrations

Every year, about 8 million metric tons of plastic are put into the world's oceans. Of particular concern are microplastics, materials found in the marine environment that occur in sizes below five millimeters and are the most abundant form of marine debris observed at the ocean surface.

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Why is there an uptick of human trafficking during major events?

Human trafficking can occur at any time and at any place throughout the world, but major festivals and events including the Super Bowl are known to result in an increase of human trafficking activity. Anti-trafficking expert Sandy Skelaney has organized victim outreach efforts during the previous two Super Bowl games hosted in Miami. Skelaney is an adjunct lecturer who teaches sex trafficking cour

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Biochemist discovers a promising enzyme to fight cancer cells

A RUDN University biochemist has studied the stimulating effect of chemical substances on the catabolic enzyme PAO (polyamine oxidase). The results could contribute to the development of drugs against cancer. The article is published in the journal Amino Acids.

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Chemist synthesizes iron coordination polymer with nicotinic acid derivative

RUDN chemist synthesized iron (II) 3-D coordination polymer, the first coordination compound of iron, assembled from substituted nicotinic acid H2cpna. This compound can be used in production of catalysts, necessary for oxidative functionalization of saturates. This is the process essential for petroleum refining. The article was published in Crystals.

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Endoplasmic reticulum found to contact at least two membraneless compartments and influence their behavior

A team of researchers at the University of Colorado has found that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) makes contact with at least two membraneless compartments in cells and influences their behavior. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their work with live-cell fluorescence microscopy of human cells and what they found.

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Endoplasmic reticulum found to contact at least two membraneless compartments and influence their behavior

A team of researchers at the University of Colorado has found that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) makes contact with at least two membraneless compartments in cells and influences their behavior. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their work with live-cell fluorescence microscopy of human cells and what they found.

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Mountains influence the impact of earthquakes

According to the research of Professor Mark van der Meijde, mountains influence the impact of earthquakes. It was already known that the topography of an area has an influence on earthquakes, but the major influence at the local level is new. Mountains can reduce the power of quakes, but also direct them to certain places, making them more powerful than expected.

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How hard is it to scramble Rubik's Cube?

Rubik's Cube has been one of the world's favorite puzzles for 40 years. Several different methods have been devised for solving it, as explained in countless books. Expert "speedcubers" can solve it in a matter of seconds.

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Survival of Australian species hinges on working together

When faced with unfavorable environmental conditions, rodent species are likely to form social groups and work cooperatively, according to a new study by researchers at The University of Western Australia.

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Rust offers a cheap way to filter arsenic-poisoned water

When water flows deep underground, it often dissolves inorganic substances from mineral deposits in the earth's crust. In many regions, these deposits contain arsenic, a naturally occurring element that is colorless, tasteless and odorless. Although its presence is barely noticeable, prolonged exposure to arsenic-contaminated water can lead to gangrene, disease and many types of cancer, resulting

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Survival of Australian species hinges on working together

When faced with unfavorable environmental conditions, rodent species are likely to form social groups and work cooperatively, according to a new study by researchers at The University of Western Australia.

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New potato varieties have lower levels of probable carcinogen

Mary Ellen Camire has some good news about french fries.

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The first potentially invasive species to reach the Antarctica on drifting marine algae

Drifting algae in the Austral Ocean can bring invasive species to the Antarctic coasts, according to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports. The new study describes the first scientific evidence of a potentially invasive and colonial species -the marine bryozoan Membranipora membranacea- which reaches the Antarctic latitude islands in macroalgae that drift in the marine environment.

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Safe potassium-ion batteries

Australian scientists have developed a nonflammable electrolyte for potassium and potassium-ion batteries, for applications in next-generation energy-storage systems beyond lithium technology. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists write that the novel electrolyte based on an organic phosphate makes the batteries safer and also allows for operation at reduced concentrations, which is a neces

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Biophysics: Orientation of protein patterns

During embryogenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the first cell division occurs transverse to the long axis of the fertilized egg. In a new study, biophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown how this axis is reliably selected.

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DNA extracted in museum samples can reveal genetic secrets

DNA in preserved museum specimens can allow scientists to explore the history of species and humanities impact on the ecosystem, but samples are typically preserved in formaldehyde which can damage DNA and make very difficult to recover. Researchers have used a vortex fluidic device (VFD) to speed up DNA extraction from an American lobster preserved in formaldehyde — with the results providing a

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Efficient cryopreservation of genetically modified rat spermatozoa

Researchers at Kumamoto University have developed a new technique to improve the efficiency of rat sperm cryopreservation, a process that is usually extremely difficult. Their technique makes it possible to produce more than 300 offspring from one male rat through in vitro fertilization using frozen sperm. It can be used to maintain specific strains of genetically modified rats that are in high de

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The scent of a rose improves learning during sleep

Fragrances like rose scent can easily help to better consolidate memory during sleep, as researchers at the University of Freiburg — Medical Center show / Experiment with school classes confirms and simplifies a highly regarded study.

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Exploring strangeness and the primordial Universe

Within quark-gluon plasma, strange quarks are readily produced through collisions between gluons. In analysis published in EPJ ST, Dr Johann Rafelski presents how our understanding of this characteristic strangeness production signature has evolved over the span of his long career.

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Drug class provides cardiovascular benefit for all patients with type 2 diabetes

All type 2 diabetes patient subgroups are likely to achieve cardiovascular protection from the use of SGLT2 inhibitors, according to a large multi-study review published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Heavy D's 6×6 With Tracks for SEMA | Diesel Brothers

Heavy D puts the petal to the metal on his next SEMA build: a 6×6 with a custom full-track assembly that can handle any terrain in style. Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twit

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Rivers are warming at the same rate as the atmosphere

Researchers at EPFL and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) have found that the temperature of Swiss rivers is rising steadily. This situation is straining ecosystems and could limit the use of this water in Switzerland's nuclear and hydropower industries.

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Scientists improve understanding of Mount St. Helens eruption recovery

Through research in the blast zone of Mount St. Helens, Evergreen State College scientists have discovered that plants are influencing the ecosystem's recovery.

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Turning up the heat on antibacterial-resistant diseases

Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a proposed treatment for diseases like antibacterial-resistant infections and cancer, but despite over a decade of research, scientists have been unable to find a safe and effective chemical agent to use in the process. Now, a team of researchers has designed a new type of organic compound that could be used as an effective therapeutic agent.

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Over 20,000 hectares of the oldest Ukrainian forests are set to become natural monuments

Just before the New Year holidays, WWF-Ukraine submitted a package of documents to the Trans-Carpathian and Ivano-Frankivsk Regional Environmental Departments to complete the process of granting more than 20,000 ha of virgin Ukrainian forests protected natural monument status. Although the first 20,000 hectares of these virgin forests found in the Trans-Carpathian and Ivano-Frankivsk Regions have

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New potato varieties have lower levels of probable carcinogen

Mary Ellen Camire has some good news about french fries.

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Turning up the heat on antibacterial-resistant diseases

Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a proposed treatment for diseases like antibacterial-resistant infections and cancer, but despite over a decade of research, scientists have been unable to find a safe and effective chemical agent to use in the process. Now, a team of researchers has designed a new type of organic compound that could be used as an effective therapeutic agent.

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The F-35 Is Still Broken and the F-35A Can’t Shoot Straight

Credit: US Air Force Americans don’t agree on much these days, but thankfully there’s one fact coming out of government reports that’s pretty incontrovertible: However awesome the F-35 might be in theory — whatever heights of achievement it might one day achieve — the plane as it exists today is in pretty sorry shape. Bloomberg’s Anthony Capaccio recently got a chance to preview the annual report

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Fremtidens superbatterier kan være lavet af havvand

PLUS. Danske forskere har udviklet bedre Na-ion-batterier ved at tilsætte mangan i nyt elektrodemateriale.

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Maximum Commute? 12,000 Feet Down

Originally published in September 1899 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Investigating dynamics of democratic elections using physics theory

Sometimes, physics theories and constructs can also be used to study seemingly unrelated phenomena, such as social behaviors or dynamics. While human beings are not necessarily similar to specific physical particles, theories or techniques that physicists typically use to analyze behavioral patterns in atoms or electrons may aid the general understanding of large-scale social behaviors as long as

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Seminal fluid, not just sperm, can influence offspring's survival

It’s not just about the sperm: the semen of male fish carries unidentified substances that influence how quickly the offspring develop and even how well they can swim

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Marrow cells switch jobs to repair injured bones

After an injury, mature bone marrow stromal cells morph to perform in ways similar to their bone-healing stem cell cousins, according to new research in mice. Conventional thinking is that bone regeneration is left to a small number of mighty cells called skeletal stem cells, which reside within larger groups of bone marrow stromal cells. But the new findings recast that thinking. Bone fracture i

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Young people putting music to the crisis: the role of music as a political expression

On February 1, 2020, the journal Young is publishing a special issue on youth, music and crisis involving Mònica Figueras, José Sánchez-García and Carlos Feixa, researchers from the Youth, Society and Communication Research Group (JOVIS.com) at the Department of Communication.

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Another AI-Generated Drug?

I see that there’s press coverage today of “the first AI-generated drug” to go into human trials. Some will recall this similar claims have been made before , so what exactly are we looking at? The compound is DSP-1181, from a collaboration between Sumitomo and the startup Exscientia (out of Dundee). It’s a long-acting 5-HT1a agonist, from what I can see (page 15 of that document). The coverage s

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Small molecule may slow down Parkinson’s disease

A newly discovered small molecule may offer a way to slow down or stop the progression of Parkinson’s disease, researchers say. A key feature of Parkinson’s disease, a protein named α-synuclein, accumulates in an abnormal form in brain cells causing them to degenerate and die. However, it has been difficult to target α-synuclein because it does not have a fixed structure and keeps changing its sh

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Why concerns of a teenage vaping epidemic may be overblown

The latest US vaping figures show that while experimentation with e-cigarettes is on the rise, regular use is still quite rare among teenagers

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This Utah Ranch Has a “Command Center” for Paranormal Research

Skinwalker Ranch About 500 miles away from Area 51 is another heavily guarded compound associated with alien activity — and Motherboard just got a chance to venture inside its gates. On Thursday, the site published a story detailing its journalist’s experience visiting Skinwalker Ranch and meeting the scientists there who are trying to nail down what’s causing all the strange phenomena. Storied H

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Litter-Robot 3 Connect Review: A Worthwhile But Pricey Cat Toilet

The tricked-out litter box answers one of life's great questions: What if my kitty's toilet was a robot?

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IU study looks at the effect of Medicaid expansion on the SUD treatment workforce

Medicaid expansion has led to substantial increases in Medicaid reimbursement for substance use treatment, it has not specifically led to a detectable increase in hiring attempts to increase the substance use disorder and behavioral health treatment workforce, according to a study by Indiana University researchers.

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Astronomer bekræfter: Her trækker roterende stjerner rumtiden rundt

Undersøgelser af en radiopulsar, der er i tæt omløb med en hvid dværg, viser, hvordan rumtiden 'trækkes med rundt', når de to kompakte objekter roterer om hinanden. En dansk fysiker har bidraget til opdagelsen.

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After a stroke, the brain ‘drowns’ in its own fluid

During a stroke, the glymphatic system—normally associated with the beneficial task of waste removal—goes awry and floods the brain, triggering edema and drowning brain cells, new research in mice shows. Cerebral edema, swelling that occurs in the brain, is a severe and potentially fatal complication of stroke. The research may “point the way to potential new strategies that could improve stroke

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The Bilingual Brain — the power of linguistics

Albert Costa explores how bilingualism remains freighted with prejudice

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Classical Music Has a ‘God Status’ Problem

Sarah Hubbard knew something was off about her interactions with a piano professor at the Berklee College of Music—they had a “haunting and unsettling” quality, she remembers. Hubbard, who studied violin at Berklee until she graduated in 2016, remembers that sometimes when they crossed paths, he seemed to be “deliberately trying to prolong” their interaction, and sometimes the professor, Bruce Th

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What is coronavirus and how worried should we be?

What are the symptoms caused by the virus from Wuhan in China, how is it transmitted from one person to another, and at what point should you see a doctor? Coronavirus: how to protect yourself from infection Coronavirus – latest updates It is a novel coronavirus – a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of

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Snow is the only thing keeping some plants and animals from freezing to death

Voles are just some of the winter residents of this exclusive ecosystem. (DepositPhoto/) On a snowy winter’s day, you may see few, if any animals. Deciduous trees have shed their leaves, and shrubs will be bare but for the last chilly remnants of their spring and summer glory. Aside from the occasional sound of birds’ wings or a sighting of a foraging deer, a snowy landscape may seem as silent an

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Animals Need Digital Privacy Too

Humans are not the only living things beset by hidden cameras and tracked by portable devices.

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Not to Ruin the Super Bowl, but the Sea Is Consuming Miami

*Huzzah* for tailgates and overeating stadium food. *Boo* the fact that climate change is an existential threat to Miami.

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Climate Change Is Netflix's *Ragnarok*

The newest superhero coming-of-age drama updates—and infantilizes—Nordic mythology for our age of environmental disaster.

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Image of the Day: Marijuana for Endometriosis?

THC, the psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, improved symptoms associated with the inflammatory disease in a mouse model.

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Fishing for fun takes a massive bite out of marine life

Nature, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00211-4 Hobbyists’ harvest of sharks and rays has soared, and catch-and-release is no solution.

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Scientists Snap Closest-Ever View of the Sun

Image by NASA Researchers have snapped the best-resolution view of the sun ever, courtesy of the Daniel K. Inouye 4-meter solar telescope. The image, which resolves features as small as 18 miles wide (30km), is an unprecedented glimpse of what the surface of the sun really looks like. Typical images of the sun look like this, as captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), in geosynchrono

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Global stocks slide on coronavirus and growth fears

S&P 500 falls 1.7% to be negative for 2020 while oil comes under pressure

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First UK cases of coronavirus as pair treated in Newcastle hospital

Government says NHS can contain virus after 2 members of same family are taken to specialist unit

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Want to make college more equitable? Start with the board

Most students are familiar with their university's chancellor or president. But what about the people who make up their school's board of trustees?

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How U.S. Christians imagine God contributes to discriminatory hiring practices

How people visualize God can have real consequences to life on Earth, Stanford research has found.

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Det händer i hjärnan vid social ångest

När människor får skatta hur de mår uppger ungefär 15 procent att de besväras av social ångest. Men för att få en diagnos måste ångesten påverka livet på ett handikappande vis. – De flesta tycker att det tar emot att prata inför en grupp, men personer med social ångest kan exempelvis avstå från att söka eller hoppa av en utbildning för att man måste hålla föredrag. Eller undvika att ta ett karriär

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Nonflammable electrolyte for high-performance potassium batteries

Australian scientists have developed a nonflammable electrolyte for potassium and potassium-ion batteries, for applications in next-generation energy-storage systems beyond lithium technology. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists write that the novel electrolyte based on an organic phosphate makes the batteries safer and also allows for operation at reduced concentrations, which is a neces

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How individuals decide between self-interest and commitment to a group

In conflicts that occur simultaneously within and between groups, who would, when and why put aside their own interest to stand up for the interest of the social group he or she belongs to? Recent findings from game theoretical research allow a better understanding of such situations and could help speed up the resolution of conflicts.

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From Antarctica to space: Telemedicine at the limit

ESA is working with Argentina to test telemedicine device Tempus Pro in the harsh conditions of Antarctica as Europe prepares for its next phase of human exploration in space.

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NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope ends mission of astronomical discovery

After more than 16 years studying the universe in infrared light, revealing new wonders in our solar system, our galaxy and beyond, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope's mission has come to an end.

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More countries publishing ecosystem accounts, considering environment in economic decisions

New research shows that an increasing number of countries are publishing ecosystem accounts, helping to embed nature in economic and financial decisions.

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A quantum of solid: A glass nanoparticle in the quantum regime

Researchers in Austria have used lasers to levitate and cool a glass nanoparticle into the quantum regime. Although it is trapped in a room-temperature environment, the particle's motion is solely governed by the laws of quantum physics. The team of scientists from the University of Vienna, the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) published their new stu

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The Man Who Saw Tomorrow’s Disruption—and Gave Me Hope for Journalism

Newsrooms, like so many other workplaces, were hit hard by the financial crisis of 2008. I was working as an editor for a division of Canwest, Canada’s largest newspaper and broadcasting company at the time, when it declared bankruptcy the following year. By 2011, I felt the way many other journalists felt at the time: exhausted by an ever-increasing workload, frustrated by the lack of risk takin

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Crispr scientist on the ethics of editing humans

Her gene-editing tool could cure disease and change the human race. But what happens if it falls into the wrong hands?

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Alphabet Has a Second, Secretive Quantum Computing Team

Google's parent touted its quantum supremacy achievement last year. It doesn't talk about a group at X working on software.

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Super Bowl 2020: Watch the Best Ads Here

Hate football but love Squarespace? Watch all the ads now so you can skip the Big Game.

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I Know Some Algorithms Are Biased–because I Created One

Doing so was inadvertent, but it taught me an important lesson — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hälsan allt mer ojämlik i norra Sverige

Högutbildade personer med hög inkomst har bättre hälsa än andra. Och hälsoklyftorna ökar. Det visar en studie i norra Sverige där personer med olika inkomst och utbildning själva fått beskriva sin hälsa. Skillnaderna i hälsa ökar mellan olika grupper. Mest ökar hälsoskillnader som hänger samman med inkomst. – Sammantaget ser vi en utveckling med bestående eller ökade hälsoklyftor där personer med

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Here’s how we could go carbon neutral in 25 years

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Boarding with Facial Recognition at JFK instead of boarding pass

Today I flew out of JFK and while boarding the plane there was no boarding pass / passport check but instead Cameras scanning the passengers faces. I have seen this before at customs/immigrations … does anyone have any details on this? I have not seen this be done at any other Gate at JFK or at any other Airport. Is this currently being tested or being rolled out to more gates as we speak? Just

11h

Mark Z. Jacobson's 100% Renewables (100% WWS) Roadmap to Nowhere

submitted by /u/jiribin80 [link] [comments]

11h

I Know Some Algorithms Are Biased–because I Created One

Doing so was inadvertent, but it taught me an important lesson — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Sweating Robot Beats the Heat

By leaking water, a soft robotic gripper cools itself more efficiently than humans do — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sweating Robot Beats the Heat

By leaking water, a soft robotic gripper cools itself more efficiently than humans do — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

How Ancient Light Reveals the Universe’s Contents – Facts So Romantic

Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine’s Abstractions blog . A photograph of the infant cosmos reveals the precise amounts of dark matter and dark energy in the universe, leaving precious little room for argument. Dillon Berger In early 2003, Chuck Bennett learned the precise contents of the cosmos. By then, most cosmologists had concluded that the universe contains much more than meets t

11h

Rökning under graviditeten ökar risken för frakturer hos spädbarn

Barn till mammor som röker under graviditeten löper en ökad risk att drabbas av frakturer under sitt första levnadsår. Ju mer mamman har rökt, desto mer ökar risken för frakturer. Det visar en studie från Örebro universitet. En grupp forskare vid Örebro universitet och Universitetssjukhuset i Örebro har tittat på vilken effekt mödrars rökning under tidig graviditet har på barn när det gäller risk

11h

Turbo på udvikling af Corona-vaccine

Forskere over hele verden knokler for at komme op med en beskyttelse mod den nye corona-virus. Men der går formentlig mindst et år, før en hurtig vaccine er klar.

11h

PODCAST: Firmaer dropper storrumskontoret – det er ineffektivt

Medarbejdere med total frihed præsterer bedre, viser Harvard-studie. Fysikere bruger relativitetsteorien til at optimere boarding-tid på fly. Mindre nordlys: solcyklus 25 bliver svag.

11h

The Founders Set an Extremely High Bar for Impeachment

The statistics on impeachment are quite stark. Since 1789, 20 federal officials have been impeached by the House; only eight of them were convicted after a Senate trial. None of those, quite obviously, were presidents. And President Donald Trump is unlikely to be the first: In the face of a mountain of evidence regarding his conduct toward Ukraine and his blatant stonewalling of the House impeach

11h

Why Texans Don’t Want Any More Californians

Across a frightened nation divided by politics and culture, a fragile harmony is ascendant, as Americans in small towns and large cities alike cry out in trembling unison: Hey, where did all these Californians come from? Talk of a “ California Exodus ” is sweeping the country—and so are anxieties about its effects on the rest of the West. In October, the Boise mayoral candidate Wayne Richey propo

11h

Ny jysk motorvej vil trække 116 boliger over støjgrænsen

PLUS. Over 100 midtjyske boliger risikerer at blive nabo til en ny motorvej, hvor beboerne vil blive udsat for sundhedsfarlige støjniveauer.

12h

Memory hack: Derren Brown teaches the method of loci

Psychological illusionist Derren Brown shares some of his go-to methods for quick and simple memorization, including the famous method of loci. One way to easily recall to-do lists is to attach tasks to the items you encounter along a walk you know well, like your route home from the subway station. By linking a bizarre and memorable image to something we want to recall later, we make it easier t

12h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Byte Video Sharing, and Motorola’s Razr Reboot

On this week’s show we talk about Vine's rebirth as Byte and the new Razr reboot, which now comes with (of course) a folding screen.

12h

Coronavirus/cruise lines: the weaker vessels

The industry faces choppy waters that will continue beyond the current epidemic

12h

First cases of new coronavirus confirmed in the UK as disease spreads

Two members of the same family have tested positive for coronavirus in England, the UK Department of Health has confirmed

12h

Minskade inkomstskillnader senaste året

Sedan 2011 har den ekonomiska standarden ökat med 14 procent i Sverige, efter justering för inflationen. Men nu avmattas inkomstökningen, rapporterar SCB. Den har bara ökat med 0,8 procent det senaste året.

12h

The European Union’s Double Crisis of Legitimacy

After two years of chaos and prevarication, the United Kingdom is finally leaving the European Union. Back in 2016, some observers predicted that Brexit would prove the frailty of the EU. The leaders of the remaining 27 European countries would be unable to find a common negotiating position. Big corporations—like the extremely powerful German carmakers—would put enormous pressure on leading poli

12h

Researchers describe unique genetic identity of primordial lung progenitors

For the first time, researchers describe the genetic program behind primordial lung progenitors — embryonic cells that give rise to all the cells that form the lining of the respiratory system after birth.

12h

Get easily out of breath? It may be because you were small at birth, study finds

Babies born with low birth weights are more likely to have poor cardiorespiratory fitness later in life than their normal-weight peers. That is according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal JAHA. The findings underscore the importance of prevention strategies to reduce low birth weights even among those carried to at term delivery.

12h

Choice of anesthesia may affect breast cancer metastases

A new study led by Stony Brook University Cancer Center researchers to be published in Nature Communications suggests that the choice of anesthesia may change the metastatic process of breast cancer by affecting the cytokine and microenvironment.

12h

Got slime? Using regenerative biology to restore mucus production

Mucus production is essential to health, and an imbalance can be life-threatening. Doctors and medical researchers have long sought the origins of goblet cells and have been eager to control processes that regenerate them and maintain balanced populations. Pitt bioengineer Lance Davidson published an article in Nature Communications that reveals that tissue mechanics can drive the regeneration of

12h

Researchers identify possible new combination treatment for advanced melanoma

Immunotherapy drug in combination with an infusion of anti-tumor immune cells may produce a stronger immune response that could help fight advanced melanoma.

12h

Phantom genes keep diabetes at bay

Until now, the purpose of a specific of what we might call 'phantom genes' was largely unknown. New research suggests that they help to ensure a healthy metabolism and could be involved in the development of lifestyle diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D).

12h

A dog oviduct-on-a-chip model of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58507-4

12h

Accumulation and trafficking of zinc oxide nanoparticles in an invertebrate model, Bombyx mori, with insights on their effects on immuno-competent cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58526-1 Accumulation and trafficking of zinc oxide nanoparticles in an invertebrate model, Bombyx mori , with insights on their effects on immuno-competent cells

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Structural basis for Glycan-receptor binding by mumps virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58559-6

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The Quantitative-Phase Dynamics of Apoptosis and Lytic Cell Death

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58474-w

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Impacts of Mist Spray on Rice Field Micrometeorology and Rice Yield under Heat Stress Condition

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58578-3

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Wisbech bees killed by 'morons' in hive attack

Conservationists believe as many as 10,000 endangered black bees died.

12h

Essex beaver flood defences 'stood up well' in winter rain

The two dam-builders are the first beavers to live in the wild in Essex for 400 years.

12h

Teens Find a Big Loophole in the New Flavored Vaping Ban

The policy allows mint, dessert and fruit flavors to continue to be sold in disposable e-cigarettes, prompting many teens to switch from Juul to those devices.

13h

Investors flee Hong Kong stocks as coronavirus death toll rises

China-focused shares in the city have experienced their worst week in almost 2 years

13h

Elucidating target specificity of the taccalonolide covalent microtubule stabilizers employing a combinatorial chemical approach

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14277-w Taccalonolide microtubule stabilizers covalently bind β-tubulin and overcome taxane resistance mechanisms. Here, the authors synthesized fluorogenic taccalonolide probes and investigated the specificity of taccalonolide binding to β-tubulin and the molecular interactions between drug and target,

13h

The in vivo genetic program of murine primordial lung epithelial progenitors

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14348-3 The identity of the earliest murine in vivo lung epithelial progenitors (marked by NKX2-1 expression) is unclear. Here, the authors use single-cell RNA sequencing to define the genetic program of these lung primordial progenitors, which will improve in vitro lung specification of pluripotent stem cells.

13h

Millimeters long super flexible Mn5Si3@SiO2 electrical nanocables applicable in harsh environments

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14244-5 Though high performance electrical interconnects are required for micro/nano electronics, existing metallic nanowires lack structural and electrical stability. Here, the authors report soft manganese-based silicide nanowires with high electrical and structural performance in harsh environments.

13h

Monitoring spatiotemporal changes in chaperone-mediated autophagy in vivo

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14164-4 Chaperone mediated autophagy (CMA) is selective but its activity in different tissue types has been unclear due to a lack of tools. Here, the authors generate transgenic mice expressing a CMA reporter that provides spatial and temporal in vivo data, uncovering differences in CMA in distinct tissues.

13h

Distinct effects of general anesthetics on lung metastasis mediated by IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway in mouse models

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-14065-6 The effects of anesthetics on cancer metastasis are largely unknown. Here, the authors show in two preclinical mouse models that surgical resection of primary tumours under anesthesia with sevoflurane leads to more lung metastases than with propofol and that such distinct effects are associated with change of

13h

Quasiparticle tunnel electroresistance in superconducting junctions

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14379-w The non-volatile switching of tunnel electroresistance in ferroelectric junctions provides the basis for memory and neuromorphic computing devices. Rouco et al. show tunnel electroresistance in superconductor-based junctions that arises from a redox rather than ferroelectric mechanism and is enhanced by super

13h

Early life experiences selectively mature learning and memory abilities

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14461-3 The mechanisms underlying the maturation of learning and memory abilities are poorly understood. Here, authors show that episodic learning produces persistent neuronal activation, BDNF-dependent increase in excitatory synapse markers (synaptophysin and PSD-95), and significant maturation of AMPA receptor syna

13h

Direct C–H difluoromethylation of heterocycles via organic photoredox catalysis

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14494-8 Heterocycles containing difluoromethyl groups are molecules with potential application in pharmaceutical, agricultural and materials science. Here, the authors show an organophotocatalytic difluoromethylation of heterocycles using O2 as green oxidant and preliminarily study the products’ bioactivity.

13h

Brexit: Aftaler om forskning, data og satellitter blafrer i vinden

Storbritannien og EU får rygende travlt i løbet af 2020, hvor en række aftaler om forskningsmidler, roamingpriser, satellitsystemer og dataregler skal forhandles på plads.

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Book Review: The Amazing Brain Cells That Link Mind and Body

In “The Angel and the Assassin: The Tiny Brain Cell That Changed the Course of Medicine,” Donna Jackson Nakazawa sheds light on our brain’s microglia. These tiny cells, once dismissed as relatively unimportant, are now understood to protect the brain’s immune system and help shape our neural circuits.

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Hospitalssenge blev sparet væk – men stram økonomistyring af nye sygehuse får ros

Projektstyringen af de nye supersygehuse er en overraskende succeshistorie, vurderer professor. Men den økonomiske spændetrøje, som Sundhedsministeriet har sat byggerierne i, kan have konsekvenser på sigt, vurderer CBS-ekspert.

13h

Læger: Sengereduktioner presser patienter ud på gangene

Patienter på Nordsjællands Hospital risikerer at ende på gangene og afdelinger, hvor personalet ikke har speciale i deres sygdom. Presset på sengene er stort, og når det nye hospitalsbyggeri er færdigt, kan problemet at vokse yderligere, fortæller læger. Vi kommer med hjælp, siger sundhedsministeren.

13h

Blödarsjuka börjar behandlas med genterapi

Skånes universitetssjukhus har inom ramarna för en internationell studie tillsammans med Lunds universitet, under januari börjat behandla blödarsjuka (hemofili) med genterapi. Förhoppningen är att den nya behandlingen på sikt avsevärt ska kunna underlätta vardagen för många svårt blödarsjuka.

13h

3rd Fenix Research Infrastructure webinar: Guidance on submitting applications

The goal of this webinar is to provide information on the available mechanisms to access the ICEI resources, and in particular: on when and how to submit a request for resources, the evaluation process, and the allocation rules. More information can be found at: https://bit.ly/2RQrs4l Useful links ICEI project website: https://fenix-ri.eu/ Fenix Infrastructure: https://fenix-ri.eu/infrastructure

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Samme gigtsygdom kan kræve forskellig behandling

Ny forskning viser, at to patienter med samme gigtsygdom kan have brug for forskellig medicin. Opdagelsen er et skridt på vejen mod skræddersyet behandling.

13h

Kommuner og læger slår alarm: Hver fjerde hospitalsseng er nu forsvundet

Hver fjerde hospitalsseng er forsvundet, og det er mere end forventet. Nordsjællands Hospital er særligt hårdt ramt, og herfra breder problemerne sig ud til kommunerne, som nu slår alarm. Eksperter mener, at Christiansborg har forsømt det nære sundhedsvæsen og håber, at politikerne har en plan B.

14h

Emergency declared for bushfire-threatened Canberra

Authorities in Canberra on Friday declared the first state of emergency in almost two decades as a bushfire bore down on the Australian capital.

14h

Release contaminated Fukushima water into sea: Japan panel

Radioactive water from the stricken nuclear plant in Fukushima should be released into the ocean or vaporised into the air, an expert panel advised the Japanese government on Friday.

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As forests burn around the world, drinking water is at risk

Fabric curtains stretch across the huge Warragamba Dam to trap ash and sediment expected to wash off wildfire-scorched slopes and into the reservoir that holds 80% of untreated drinking water for the Greater Sydney area.

14h

Karta visar coronavirusets spridning

Bakom den interaktiva kartan står forskare vid amerikanska Johns Hopkins University. Förutom antalet smittade i Kina och utanför Kina redovisas även antalet registrerade döda.

14h

Robotic submarine snaps first-ever images at foundation of notorious Antarctic glacier

During an unprecedented scientific campaign on an Antarctic glacier notorious for contributions to sea-level, researchers took first-ever images at the glacier's foundations on the ocean floor. The area is key to Thwaites Glacier's potential to become more dangerous, and in the coming months, the research team hopes to give the world a clearer picture of its condition.

14h

Study provides first look at sperm microbiome using RNA sequencing

A new collaborative study published by a research team from the Wayne State University School of Medicine, the CReATe Fertility Centre and the University of Massachusetts Amherst provides the first in-depth look at the microbiome of human sperm utilizing RNA sequencing with sufficient sensitivity to identify contamination and pathogenic bacterial colonization.

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Study provides first look at sperm microbiome using RNA sequencing

A new collaborative study published by a research team from the Wayne State University School of Medicine, the CReATe Fertility Centre and the University of Massachusetts Amherst provides the first in-depth look at the microbiome of human sperm utilizing RNA sequencing with sufficient sensitivity to identify contamination and pathogenic bacterial colonization.

14h

Zoo improvements should benefit all animals

and include a wide range of "enrichment" techniques, researchers say.

14h

National survey: Students' feelings about high school are mostly negative

Ask a high school student how he or she typically feels at school, and the answer you'll likely hear is "tired," closely followed by "stressed" and "bored."

14h

Zoo improvements should benefit all animals

and include a wide range of "enrichment" techniques, researchers say.

14h

A miracle cancer prevention and treatment? Not necessarily as the analysis of 26 articles by legendary Hans Eysenck shows.

A recent investigation at King's College London has revealed major problems in the scientific career of one of psychology's most published scientists, Hans Eysenck.

15h

Hjernen ”bliver kvalt” i egen væske ved slagtilfælde

Det glymfatiske system, der normalt renser hjernen for affaldsstoffer og ophobede proteiner, ser ud til…

15h

Flight carrying British nationals out of Wuhan touches down

Arrival at military base coincides with first confirmed cases of coronavirus in UK

16h

Har læger fået mere tillid til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed? Seks læger gør status

I dag er det to år siden, at tillidspakken blev lagt frem, så lægers tillid til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed skulle blive bedre. Lægerne bag #detkuhaværetmig gør status.

16h

Volcano Awareness Video Mania

Oh, right, Volcano Awareness Month happened while all those exciting earthquakes had us distracted! — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

How Will Brits Remember Brexit Day?

Britain’s final days of European Union membership have mirrored much of the divisiveness and rancor that dominated the Brexit saga. Throughout that ordeal, Britons sparred over what to do, how to do it, and whether it was the right course of action at all. This time, the argument isn’t about Brexit, but about how the country’s first few moments outside the bloc, which begin tonight at 11 p.m. loc

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Singapore Closes Its Border With China

The city-state said it would stop issuing visas to people with Chinese passports and deny entry to foreigners who had visited China in the past 14 days.

17h

Photos of the Week: Sealed Knot, Holy Dip, Night Monkey

A piano dangling over Munich, paragliders over Colombia, swimming horses in India, an earthquake in Turkey, presidential campaigning in Iowa, mustard fields in Bangladesh, memorials to Kobe Bryant in the U.S. and Spain, the Australian Open in Melbourne, a firefighter protest in Paris, and much more.

17h

Sign Languages Display Distinct Ancestries

Well more than 100 distinct sign languages exist worldwide, with each having features that made it possible for researchers to create an evolutionary tree of their lineages.

17h

IBM new broom, Amazon delivers, Brexit day

IBM has named a new chief executive to take over from Ginni Rometty

17h

Could a Mars Fantasy Ruin NASA’s Space Exploration?

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Could resetting our internal clocks help control diabetes?

The circadian clock system allows the organisms to adjust to periodical changes of geophysical time. Today, increasing evidence show that disturbances in our internal clocks stemming from frequent time zone changes, irregular working schedules or ageing, have a significant impact on the development of metabolic diseases including type-2 diabetes. Using a molecule extracted from lemon peel, researc

17h

Zoo improvements should benefit all animals

and include a wide range of 'enrichment' techniques, researchers say.

17h

Discovery takes pressure off blood measurements

Monash University researchers are developing a revolutionary, portable blood pressure monitoring device that provides data continuously to patients.

17h

Horseback riding combined with cognitive exercises can help children with ADHD and autism spectrum

A combination of therapeutic horseback riding and brain-building exercises can help children with neurodevelopmental disorders improve their motor skills, according to a new study. Combining lessons about horse anatomy, riding equipment, and the basics of riding with music therapy, eye tracking exercises and hand-eye coordination tasks shows the first evidence of both short and long-term benefits

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The race to the deep – Science Weekly podcast

Sixty years ago, explorers first descended the 11,000 metres to the Challenger Deep of the Mariana Trench, the deepest known point in the ocean. In the intervening decades we have discovered more about this mysterious and peculiar environment and its inhabitants. Nicola Davis speaks to Dr Jon Copley about the race to the ocean floor and what is lurking down there in the deep. Continue reading…

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The race to the deep – Science Weekly podcast

Sixty years ago, explorers first descended the 11,000 metres to the Challenger Deep of the Mariana Trench, the deepest known point in the ocean. In the intervening decades we have discovered more about this mysterious and peculiar environment and its inhabitants. Nicola Davis speaks to Dr Jon Copley about the race to the ocean floor and what is lurking down there in the deep.. Help support our ind

18h

A man lies dead in the street: the image that captures the Wuhan coronavirus crisis

‘These days, many have died,’ says bystander as image shows workers in protective suits and masks taking body away Coronavirus – latest updates It is an image that captures the chilling reality of the coronavirus outbreak in the Chinese city of Wuhan: a grey-haired man wearing a face mask lies dead on the pavement, a plastic shopping bag in one hand, as police and medical staff in full protective

18h

Coronavirus outbreak: what’s next?

Nature, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00236-9 Experts weigh up the best- and worst-case scenarios as the World Health Organization declares a global health emergency.

18h

Sign Languages Display Distinct Ancestries

Well more than 100 distinct sign languages exist worldwide, with each having features that made it possible for researchers to create an evolutionary tree of their lineages. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Varmeste januar nogensinde: Er det klimaforandringernes skyld?

Årets første måned er blevet 1,6 grader varmere i løbet af de sidste 30 år.

19h

Automatisering strammer nettet om kontanthjælpsmodtagere

Automatisk kontrol leverer flere sager til kommunerne – men meget få bliver til egentlige mistanker. Forvaltningseksperter efterlyser proportionerne.

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Coronavirus outbreak: Britons fly out of Wuhan as death toll passes 200

Flight carrying 83 British people and 27 foreign nationals will land in the UK on Friday as US tells citizens ‘don’t go to China’ Coronavirus – latest updates A plane carrying more than 100 British and other EU nationals trapped in Wuhan, the city at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak, has left for the UK after Chinese spouses and partners were given permission to travel. The chartered flight

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Inside the California Military Base a Coronavirus Evacuee Tried to Flee

The 195 Americans who flew from China to California were first told they must clear medical tests that could take 72 hours or many days. Now they are all being quarantined for two weeks.

20h

Removing a single neuron in a vertebrate brain forever abolishes an essential behavior [Neuroscience]

The giant Mauthner (M) cell is the largest neuron known in the vertebrate brain. It has enabled major breakthroughs in neuroscience but its ultimate function remains surprisingly unclear: An actual survival value of M cell-mediated escapes has never been supported experimentally and ablating the cell repeatedly failed to eliminate all…

20h

Role of a DEF/Y motif in histone H2A-H2B recognition and nucleosome editing [Biochemistry]

The SWR complex edits the histone composition of nucleosomes at promoters to facilitate transcription by replacing the two nucleosomal H2A-H2B (A-B) dimers with H2A.Z-H2B (Z-B) dimers. Swc5, a subunit of SWR, binds to A-B dimers, but its role in the histone replacement reaction was unclear. In this study, we showed…

20h

Magnetic resonance imaging of glycogen using its magnetic coupling with water [Medical Sciences]

Glycogen plays a central role in glucose homeostasis and is abundant in several types of tissue. We report an MRI method for imaging glycogen noninvasively with enhanced detection sensitivity and high specificity, using the magnetic coupling between glycogen and water protons through the nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE). We show in…

20h

Reconceptualizing public engagement by land-grant university scientists [Commentaries]

Those in the Rose et al. (1) study share a common land-grant heritage and the charter and obligations it carries. As faculty members in tenure track, they also are incentivized by similar rewards and constraints. Accordingly, their perceptions can provide insight into ways that these institutions can better honor their…

20h

Coronavirus cases in China exceed Sars as public anger rises

US warns citizens not to travel to China after WHO declares global emergency

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Plastic pollution: 'Hidden' chemicals build up in seabirds

Chemicals in plastics can build up in seabirds at levels thousands of times higher than normal.

22h

The DOJ Is Finally Suing US Telecom Providers for Robocalls

The defendants have allegedly connected hundreds of millions of fraudulent robocalls to US residents.

22h

Closure of Russia-China border sparks trade fears

Move intended to stop spread of coronavirus risks hitting bilateral trade worth $110bn last year

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Tænkeboks: Sådan stables kasserne med terningerne

Her får du løsningen på opgaven fra sidste uge!

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Poorer countries suffer most from global health crises, we need help to handle coronavirus | Dr Claude Posala

Pacific nations, still reeling from a devastating measles outbreak, have watched news out of Wuhan in panic As Pacific Islanders watched updates about the coronavirus outbreak over the past few weeks, unease soon gave way to panic. Still reeling in shock from a measles outbreak in Samoa , Pacific Islanders’ fears were stoked as it became apparent that even large, well-developed countries were str

22h

The Atlantic Politics Daily: Democrats Are Still Searching for a Savior

It’s Thursday, January 30. The World Health Organization declared the Coronavirus outbreak a public health emergency. “To succeed, Trump will have to trust the kind of government experts he has disdained to date,” writes the former Ebola Czar Ron Klain. On Capitol Hill, the impeachment trial’s Q&A period ends tonight before a vote on new witnesses tomorrow. In the rest of today’s newsletter: Adam

22h

NASA Just Said a Heartbreaking Final Goodbye to The Spitzer Space Telescope

"An example of the very best that people can achieve."

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Love in the Time of PCR

(Image credit: CellPress) Renowned geneticist George Church caused a stir last month with his idea for a brand new dating app, in which users submit their DNA for sequencing as a critical part of their profile. Church’s app, “digiD8”, doesn’t connect tech-savvy singles who love all-things-90’s, as the name implies, but rather matches users based […]

22h

Missing link in rare inherited skin disease exposed

Hokkaido University scientists are getting closer to understanding how a rare hereditary disease impairs the skin's barrier function, which determines how well the skin is protected.

22h

How the human brain solves complex decision-making problems

A new study on meta reinforcement learning algorithms helps us understand how the human brain learns to adapt to complexity and uncertainty when learning and making decisions. A research team succeeded in discovering both a computational and neural mechanism for human meta reinforcement learning, opening up the possibility of porting key elements of human intelligence into artificial intelligence

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Giving some pregnant women progesterone could prevent 8,450 miscarriages a year — experts

Researchers at the University of Birmingham and Tommy's National Centre for Miscarriage Research say giving progesterone to women with early pregnancy bleeding and a history of miscarriage could lead to 8,450 more babies being born each year.

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Planning a visit to China? Tips to avoid coronavirus

Highly infectious illness prompts government warning to avoid all but essential trips

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My travels through a China in lockdown

FT correspondent Yuan Yang charts the impact of the coronavirus on friends, family and daily life

23h

Ecofriendly catalyst for converting methane into useful gases using light instead of heat

Scientists have developed a catalyst to convert abundant methane gas into more useful synthesis gas. Unlike conventional catalysts, this catalyst operates at much lower temperatures by using light, thus saving a tremendous amount of energy in the methane conversion process, and shows much better performance with high stability.

23h

The Lancet: Cervical cancer could be eliminated in countries worst affected by the disease, and 62 million women's lives could be saved by 2120

Over the next 100 years, more than 74 million cervical cancer cases and 60 million deaths could be averted, and the disease eliminated in the 78 countries with the highest disease burden, according to two modelling studies published in The Lancet.

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Cervical cancer could be eliminated within a century

Cervical cancer could be eliminated worldwide as a public health issue within the next century. This is the conclusion of two studies published today in The Lancet by an international consortium of researchers codirected by Professor Marc Brisson from Université Laval's Faculty of Medicine and the CHU de Québec-Université Laval Research Centre. The researchers are even more optimistic about North

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Intravenous drugs can often rapidly restore normal heart rhythm without sedation, shocks

A study published in The Lancet found that two ways of quickly restoring normal heart rhythm in patients with acute atrial fibrillation in the emergency department are equally safe and effective.

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A host's genes likely influence the spread of antibiotic resistance

New findings in mSphere suggest that the genetic makeup of the host organism can influence the transfer of plasmids. By identifying the host factors that facilitate or stop plasmid transfer, the researchers hope to identify new ways to stop the spread of antibiotic resistance, which kills tens of thousands of people every year in the United States alone.

23h

A new treatment strategy against MERS

First identified in 2012, the MERS-coronavirus is capable of causing severe pneumonia. There are no effective treatments for MERS. Researchers have now identified a cellular recycling process known as autophagy as a potential target in the fight against MERS. Autophagy-inducing substances – including licensed drugs – were shown to be capable of reducing the viral replication rate.

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Larry Fitzgerald rides with the Waymo Driver

submitted by /u/leonerdo_ [link] [comments]

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Autonomous vehicles could benefit health if cars are electric and shared

A new ISGlobal study analyzes the potential health impact of self-driving cars — the transport of the future.

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Author Correction: Widespread distribution of supraglacial lakes around the margin of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58950-3

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An attack on stomach bacteria cuts the risk of one of the deadliest cancers

Nature, Published online: 29 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00234-x Eradication of the microbe that causes gastric ulcers has a potentially life-saving side effect.

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'Weathering With You' Is an Environmental Power Fantasy

The new anime film, from the creators of Your Name, puts the power to stop climate change into individuals' hands. That's where the real make-believe lies.

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NEJM paper retracted for “inaccuracies in the analytic database and data analyses”

Until yesterday, the New England Journal of Medicine had retracted only 24 papers. Now that tally is 25. As our Ivan Oransky reports at Medscape: The original paper found that “ambulatory blood-pressure measurements were a stronger predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality than clinic blood-pressure measurements,” the authors wrote. It made a bit of a splash, and … Continue reading

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Keep your online accounts safe by logging out

You logged into Instagram on your mom's phone once on vacation. Now she's filling your Story with blurry photos of rabbits in the garden. Time to kick her out. (Oleg Magni via Unsplash/) Staying logged into your favorite apps and services makes sense most of the time—you really don’t want to be entering your password every single time you check Twitter. The problem is that having your apps unlock

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Daily briefing: Highest-resolution images ever taken of the Sun show roiling plasma

Nature, Published online: 30 January 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00259-2 Unprecedented video of the Sun’s churning surface, huge swarms of locusts are ravaging East Africa and a call to reconsider the ‘business as usual’ baseline for climate change.

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Robotic submarine snaps first-ever images at foundation of notorious Antarctic glacier

These are the first-ever images taken at the foundations of the glacier that inspires more fear of sea-level rise than any other – Thwaites Glacier. The grounding line is integral to Thwaites' fate and that of the world's coastlines.

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Shriners affiliation, fertility research, and microbiome paper

January has been an exciting month at The Jackson Laboratory (JAX). With this surplus of news, we wanted to share three major stories from the past week, including a research affiliation with Shriners Hospitals for Children, a Genes & Development fertility paper, and a Cell microbiome paper.

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A New Form Of Northern Lights Discovered In Finland – By Amateur Sky Watchers

It was the members of a Facebook group who noted that the auroras they'd seen didn't look like any that had been previously catalogued. So physicists asked them to take a few carefully timed photos. (Image credit: Kari Saari/University of Helsinki)

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WHO Declares The Coronavirus Outbreak a Public Health Emergency

The World Health Organization (WHO) has now formally declared that the ongoing outbreak of the coronavirus 2019-nCoV is a “public health emergency of international concern.” On January 23, the WHO said the outbreak wasn’t yet a global emergency , but still considered it highly alarming. Thus far, the vast majority of confirmed cases and all confirmed fatalities occurred within mainland China . Bu

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Squishy Cephalopod Was Almost a Pterosaur's Lunch

The fossil of an ancient squid relative tells paleontologists something new about the reptile that tried to feed on it. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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WHO declares coronavirus a global health emergency

Organization’s head says move no reflection on China and warns against travel bans to country Latest updates: more than 200 dead as Britain evacuates citizens The Wuhan coronavirus outbreak is a public health emergency of international concern, the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared, but he warned governments not to impose travel or trade restrictions on China. Dr Tedros Adh

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This tech subscription box can rewire your brain for the better

Creation Crate is a tech subscription box that sends monthly projects, with all the components, right to your door. Each project in the curriculum teaches new lessons in electronics and C++ programming. The projects get more challenging as you learn. Working with your hands changes your brain's neurochemistry to reduce stress and increase learning. It's also a great way to prepare kids for a STEM

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Want to change your personality? It may not be easy to do alone

Most people want to change an aspect of their personality, but left to their own devices, they may not be successful in changing, research shows.

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National survey: Students' feelings about high school are mostly negative

In a nationwide survey of 21,678 US high school students, researchers from the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and the Yale Child Study Center found that nearly 75% of the students' self-reported feelings related to school were negative.

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WHO declares coronavirus outbreak an international health emergency

Cases of human-to-human transmission of the Wuhan coronavirus have been confirmed in several countries, and the World Health Organization has declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern

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Tech-friendly gloves for a modern life without frozen fingers

Texting need not lead to numb fingers. (Maik Fischer via Unsplash/) In our digital world, our hands and fingers are needed more than ever, even in freezing temperatures. Gloves are a key winter accessory to brave transport during the colder months, as well as for winter sport or working outside. Here are some of the best tech-powered winter gloves to keep your extremities well-protected: Unisex w

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SpaceX Launches Fourth Batch of Starlink Internet Satellites

After a series of weather-related delays, SpaceX has successfully launched another batch of Starlink internet satellites. This payload of 60 satellites brings SpaceX’s total count to 240, putting it even farther in the lead as the world’s largest satellite operator. Naturally, SpaceX also recovered the first stage booster for later use, possibly on another Starlink launch — the company hopes to h

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Can exercise improve video game performance?

Time spent playing video games is often seen as time stolen from physical activities. Research has shown that exercise has many physical and cognitive benefits. But what if exercise could benefit video game performance as well? A new study led by neuroscientist Dr. Marc Roig and his research team from the School of Physical & Occupational Therapy at McGill University, found, for the first time, th

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The Coronavirus Global Health Emergency, an Amazon Rival, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Fossilized Tooth Captures a Pterosaur’s Failed Squid Meal

The unlikely fossil sheds new light on the flying reptile’s dining habits.

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Study provides first look at sperm microbiome using RNA sequencing

A new collaborative study published by a research team from the Wayne State University School of Medicine, the CReATe Fertility Centre and the University of Massachusetts Amherst provides the first in-depth look at the microbiome of human sperm utilizing RNA sequencing with sufficient sensitivity to identify contamination and pathogenic bacterial colonization.

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Coronavirus: what other public health emergencies has the WHO declared?

Five previous emergencies declared since 2009 with some still active The Wuhan coronavirus is just the latest disease that the World Health Organization (WHO) has labelled as a “public health emergency of international concern” (PHEIC). In the past 10 years there have been five other such announcements, covering four diseases. However, the Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome (Mers) coronavirus, f

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Scientists Release Genetically Engineered Moths for First Time

The diamondback moth is a huge pest. It eats a variety of crops, but is largely resistant to insecticides, resulting in upwards of $5 billion in losses every year. That could soon change, though, as an international team of researchers has created a strain of genetically engineered diamondback moths that could suppress the pest population in a sustainable way — and they just released them into th

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Mexico’s Monarch Defender Found Dead

Details of Homero Gómez González’s death are not yet known.

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Someone Hacked Dozens of United Nations Servers

Cyber Threat The United Nations was the target of a sophisticated hack in the summer of 2019, according to a confidential internal report obtained by The New Humanitarian . The report claims that the hack affected dozens of UN servers and compromised staff records, health insurance, and commercial contract data. But most workers affected by the hack are only hearing about it now. Spy Games The ha

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Outbreak of virus from China declared global emergency

After rejecting the label twice, the World Health Organization now calls spread of new coronavirus a Public Health Emergency of International Concern

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The Coronavirus Is Now Officially a Global Emergency

The World Health Organization declared the China outbreak an international threat, raising questions about many countries' health infrastructure.

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Nicoya Launches Alto, the World’s First Digital Benchtop SPR System, to Accelerate Drug Discovery

Nicoya, a leading provider of advanced analytical instruments for the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, today announced the launch of Alto, the world’s first fully-automated, high-throughput benchtop surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system.

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How to make your bed the perfect temperature

Customize your sleep climate. (Tania Mousinho via Unsplash/) Even if the ambient temperature of your room is comfortable, when you get into bed it can be a different story. The right combination of blankets and sheets for a soothing slumber can be challenging, especially if you have sore muscles, or a partner who prefers an Arctic chill to a warm embrace. These heating and cooling systems for you

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A quantum of solid

Researchers in Austria use lasers to levitate and cool a glass nanoparticle into the quantum regime. Although it is trapped in a room temperature environment, the particle's motion is solely governed by the laws of quantum physics.

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Self-learning heat­ing control system saves energy

Can buildings learn to save all by themselves? Researchers think so. In their experiments, they fed a new self-learning heat­ing control system with temperature data from the previous year and the current weather forecast. The 'smart' control system was then able to assess the building's behavior and act with good anticipation. The result: greater comfort, lower energy costs.

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Immune systems not prepared for climate change

Researchers have for the first time found a connection between the immune systems of different bird species, and the various climatic conditions in which they live. The researchers believe that as the climate changes, some birds may be exposed to diseases that they are not equipped to handle.

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'Spring forward' to daylight saving time brings surge in fatal car crashes

A study of 732,000 accidents over two decades has found that the annual switch to daylight saving time is associated with a 6% increase in fatal car crashes that week.

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If it takes a hike, riders won't go for bike sharing

Even a relatively short walk to find the nearest bicycle is enough to deter many potential users of bike sharing systems, new Cornell research suggests.

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WHO declares international emergency over coronavirus

Symbolic move underlines need for global co-ordination to contain outbreak

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National affaldsplan udsættes til »senere på året«

Den nationale affaldsplan der skal ensarte det danske affaldssystem skulle have været sendt i høring i januar 2020, men er nu udskudt på ubestemt tid.

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Are corrugated pipe ‘doors’ too confusing for bats?

Corrugated metal pipes installed at cave and mine entrances to help bats enter their roosts may actually deter bats, research finds. When entrances to caves and mines—essential roosting places for bats—are blocked to prevent people from going inside, the gates often include a pipe to allow bats to access their roosts. However, many of the pipes feature corrugated rings for added strength. Through

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360-degree cameras that make your videos an immersive sensory explosion

Capture more. (Amazon /) There is just no excuse for shaky, grainy, nausea-inducing vacation home movies anymore. If your last ski trip isn’t represented with an immersive 4K panoramic cinema experience, it didn’t actually happen. The bar is high because all the tech you need can fit in the palm of your hand. Smartphone cameras are impressive on their own, but adding these simple, compact 360 cam

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Lost in translation: Organic matter cuts plant-microbe links

Soil scientists from Cornell and Rice Universities have dug around and found that although adding carbon organic matter to agricultural fields is usually advantageous, it may muddle the beneficial underground communication between legume plants and microorganisms.

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Pre-eruption seismograms recovered for 1980 Mount St. Helens event

Nearly 40 years ago, analog data tapes faithfully recorded intense seismic activity in the two months before the historic eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State in May 1980. It took some lengthy and careful restoration efforts–including a turn in a kitchen oven for some of the tapes–to recover their data.

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Nanotechnology: Putting a nanomachine to work

A team of chemists has successfully coupled the directed motion of a light-activated molecular motor to a different chemical unit — thus taking an important step toward the realization of synthetic nanomachines.

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Pre-eruption seismograms recovered for 1980 Mount St. Helens event

Nearly 40 years ago, analog data tapes faithfully recorded intense seismic activity in the two months before the historic eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State in May 1980. It took some lengthy and careful restoration efforts—including a turn in a kitchen oven for some of the tapes—to recover their data.

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Experiencing police brutality increases mistrust in medical institutions, impacts health

There is plenty of data showing that police brutality leads to mistrust of police and law enforcement. Researchers from Lehigh University and the University of Minnesota set out to see if experience with police brutality might affect health by causing mistrust in medical institutions.

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In Cuba, cleaner rivers follow greener farming

When the Soviet Union collapsed in the early 1990's, food production on the island of Cuba was disrupted—as the supply of Russian fertilizers, pesticides, tractors, and oil dried up. Under the stress of an imminent food crisis, the island quickly rebuilt a new form of diversified farming—including many urban organic gardens—that depended less on imported synthetic chemicals. Over the last two deca

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If it takes a hike, riders won't go for bike sharing

Even a relatively short walk to find the nearest bicycle is enough to deter many potential users of bike sharing systems, new research suggests.

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The first roadmap for ovarian aging

Infertility likely stems from age-related decline of the ovaries, but the molecular mechanisms that lead to this decline have been unclear. Now, scientists have discovered, in unprecedented detail, how ovaries age in non-human primates. The findings reveal several genes that could be used as biomarkers and point to therapeutic targets for diagnosing and treating female infertility and age-associat

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Nanotechnology: Putting a nanomachine to work

A team of chemists has successfully coupled the directed motion of a light-activated molecular motor to a different chemical unit — thus taking an important step toward the realization of synthetic nanomachines.

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Here's how good liars get away with it

Being able to get away with a few white lies can be a useful skill. Giving your boss a plausible explanation as to why you're late to work, for example, can be fairly handy — why do they have to know you just pressed snooze a few too many times? Some of us get better results than others, of course, when we tell fibs. But those who think they're better at lying than average seem to have a few thin

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Bizarre Cosmic Dance Offers Fresh Test for General Relativity

Scientists have detected relativistic frame dragging, a prediction of Einstein’s greatest theory, around a distant pair of exotic stars — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bizarre Cosmic Dance Offers Fresh Test for General Relativity

Scientists have detected relativistic frame dragging, a prediction of Einstein’s greatest theory, around a distant pair of exotic stars — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A White Dwarf Swirling Space-Time Around It Allows Astronomers Brand New Insights

A concept called frame-dragging from Einstein's relativity gives scientists a new look into a whirling white dwarf.

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Users get failing grade on cannabis benefits and risks

When researchers quizzed cannabis users about their beliefs on whether the drug is effective in treating certain medical conditions, the majority of the 500 people surveyed failed the test. “There is a big discrepancy between what the empirical evidence is saying and what people believe,” says lead author Daniel Kruger, a research associate professor of community health and health behavior in the

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US yield curve inversion raises growth concerns

Coronavirus sparks bond market rally and triggers recession signal

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WHO Declares Coronavirus Outbreak a Global Health Emergency

The declaration was made because of the risk the virus poses to countries outside China, where limited person-person spread has occurred — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Fractured Future of Browser Privacy

Better anti-tracking measures have become the norm for Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and other modern browsers. But they still disagree on how exactly they should work.

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How to Make a Mass Extinction

Journalist and author Peter Brannen talks about his book The Ends of the World: Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth’s Past Mass Extinctions. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Advanced medical imaging combined with genomic analysis could help treat cancer patients

Melding the genetic and cellular analysis of tumors with how they appear in medical images could give physicians new insights into how to best treat patients, especially those with brain cancer, according to a new study led by TGen. Published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, this study suggests that the tumor microenvironment — essentially all the cells both in and surrounding a tumor — play

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GW study identifies need for disaster preparedness training for dermatologists

A new survey from dermatology and emergency medicine researchers at the George Washington University suggests that the dermatology community is inadequately prepared for a biological disaster and would benefit from a formal preparedness training program.

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Artists Who Paint With Their Feet Have Unique Brain Patterns

Neuroscientists determined that certain "sensory maps" in the brain become more refined when people use their feet like hands

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Your next TV could have a new mode that automatically eradicates the ‘soap opera effect’

Your next TV may have an automatic mode to get rid of the "soap opera effect." (UHD Alliance/) Turning on a new TV for the first time is a gamble. Even if you’re setting up a high-end display, it’s hard to know what kind of picture to expect right out of the box. Default motion smoothing settings could give your favorite movies the dreaded “soap opera effect” that made Tom Cruise so mad. Or, mayb

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100 Years Ago in Photos: A Look Back at 1920

A century ago, the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified—guaranteeing women the right to vote. In Europe, two short-lived but consequential wars were under way, the Polish-Soviet War and the Irish War of Independence. The 1920 Olympic Games were held in Belgium, an unsolved bombing on Wall Street killed 38 people, Senator Warren G. Harding of Ohio was elected as America’s 29t

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How to Make a Mass Extinction

Journalist and author Peter Brannen talks about his book The Ends of the World: Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth’s Past Mass Extinctions. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Giving cryptocurrency users more bang for their buck

A new cryptocurrency-routing scheme co-invented by MIT researchers can boost the efficiency — and, ultimately, profits — of certain networks designed to speed up notoriously slow blockchain transactions.

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Given how little effect you can have, is it rational to vote?

For far too long, the accepted wisdom among scholars of politics has been that the interests of the individual and the interests of society are not in harmony when it comes to voting. The American economist Anthony Downs, in his foundational book An Economic Theory of Democracy (1957), argued that a truly rational individual, who knows that her vote is highly unlikely to tip the outcome in favour

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NASA to add 'space hotel' to ISS, in privatization push

NASA awarded a contract to startup Axiom Space to attach a "habitable commercial module" to the International Space Station. The project will also include a research and manufacturing module. The move is a major step in NASA's years-long push to privatize. NASA and startup Axiom Space plan to attach a "space hotel" to the International Space Station, a major step in the years-long push to privati

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Can the Dutch save the world from the danger of rising sea levels?

submitted by /u/nirjhari [link] [comments]

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Neanderthal ancestry also in African populations

After sequencing the Neanderthal genome, scientists discovered all present day non-African individuals carry some Neanderthal ancestry in their DNA. Now, researchers present evidence of Neanderthal ancestry in African populations too, and its origin provides new insights into human history.

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W.H.O. Declares Global Emergency as Wuhan Coronavirus Spreads

The announcement came as nearly 10,000 cases have been reported worldwide.

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Coronavirus Anger Boils Over in China and Doctors Plead for Supplies

A man was detained after beating up a doctor in Wuhan, and medical staff members are wearing raincoats to protect against infection.

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OGT launches breakthrough CytoSure NGS panel for constitutional cytogenetics

Robust panel enables accurate and comprehensive constitutional genetic aberration screening in one assay

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5 Lessons From the Death of Frankfurt Motor Show

The world’s most important auto show – Frankfurt – is dead. The VDA organizing group (Verband der Automobilindustrie, or Association of the German Automotive Industry) has pulled the plug on the odd-years-only IAA (Internationale Automobil-Ausstellung, or International Motor Show). Frankfurt was in trouble when the likes of Toyota, Renault, Peugeot, Nissan, Fiat, and Ferrari pulled out in advance

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China has arrested at least eight people for “spreading rumors” about the coronavirus epidemic online, state-run media has confirmed . Unconfirmed reports suggest the number of people in jail on the same charge could be far higher. But while stopping the spread of misinformation about the coronavirus could play a key role in containing it, it’s unclear whether these people went to jail because th

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Experiencing police brutality increases mistrust in medical institutions, impacts health

There is plenty of data showing that police brutality leads to mistrust of police and law enforcement. Researchers from Lehigh University and the University of Minnesota set out to see if experience with police brutality might affect health by causing mistrust in medical institutions. Through an analysis of data gleaned from a survey of 4,000 people living in urban areas about their experiences wi

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US birth weights drop due to rise in cesarean births, inductions

US birth weights have fallen significantly in recent decades due to soaring rates of cesarean deliveries and inductions which have shortened the average pregnancy by a week, new research shows.

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Study finds vaping prevention program significantly reduces use in middle school students

In response to the youth vaping crisis, experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) developed CATCH My Breath, a program to prevent electronic cigarette use among fifth – 12th grade students. Research published in Public Health Reports reveals the program significantly reduces the likelihood of e-cigarette use among students who complete the curriculum.

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Bats inspire detectors to help prevent oil and gas pipe leaks

Engineers have developed a new scanning technique inspired by the natural world that can detect corroding metals in oil and gas pipelines. By mimicking how bats use differing wavelengths of ultrasound to detect objects, hunt, and avoid predators, engineers have developed a new system that combines two separate types of radiation, fast neutrons and gamma rays, to detect corrosion — a major cause o

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Bats inspire detectors to help prevent oil and gas pipe leaks

Engineers have developed a new scanning technique inspired by the natural world that can detect corroding metals in oil and gas pipelines. By mimicking how bats use differing wavelengths of ultrasound to detect objects, hunt, and avoid predators, engineers have developed a new system that combines two separate types of radiation, fast neutrons and gamma rays, to detect corrosion — a major cause o

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CDC Confirms First Known Person-to-Person Spread of New Coronavirus in U.S.

The case involved the husband of an infected woman who recently traveled to China — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sarcophagus dedicated to sky god among latest ancient Egypt trove

Egypt's antiquities ministry on Thursday unveiled the tombs of ancient high priests and a sarcophagus dedicated to the sky god Horus at an archaeological site in Minya governorate.

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Research zeroing in on electronic nose for monitoring air quality, diagnosing disease

Research at Oregon State University has pushed science closer to developing an electronic nose for monitoring air quality, detecting safety threats and diagnosing diseases by measuring gases in a patient's breath.

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Political scientist releases definitive research on the first century of women voters

In new research fittingly published in the year marking the 100th anniversary of women's right to vote in the U.S., two political scientists trace the evolution of women's voting behavior, turnout and candidate choice.

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Two stars with an odd wobble are stretching space and time around them

Einstein’s theory of relativity predicts that fast-spinning objects stretch space and time around them, and we’ve watched that effect make a pair of stars wobble

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This tiny glass bead has been quantum chilled to near absolute zero

A glass bead has been brought down to its coldest possible quantum state using a new method that may one day allow us to observe an object in two places at once

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Genetically modified microbiome could protect honeybees from disease

Modifying bacteria found in the guts of bees could help protect the insects against lethal infections affecting hives worldwide

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If it takes a hike, riders won't go for bike sharing

Even a relatively short walk to find the nearest bicycle is enough to deter many potential users of bike sharing systems, new Cornell research suggests.

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How HIV develops resistance to key drugs discovered

The mechanism behind how HIV can develop resistance to a widely-prescribed group of drugs has been uncovered by new research from the Crick and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, with the findings opening the door to the development of more effective treatments.

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A quantum of solid

Researchers in Austria use lasers to levitate and cool a glass nanoparticle into the quantum regime. Although it is trapped in a room temperature environment, the particle's motion is solely governed by the laws of quantum physics. The team of scientists from the University of Vienna, the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) published their new study in

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Astronomers witness the dragging of space-time in stellar cosmic dance

An international team of astrophysicists led by Australian Professor Matthew Bailes, from the ARC Centre of Excellence of Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav), has shown exciting new evidence for 'frame-dragging'– how the spinning of a celestial body twists space and time — after tracking the orbit of a stellar pair for almost two decades. The data, which is further evidence for Einstein's theo

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Imaging study of key viral structure shows how HIV drugs work at atomic level

Salk scientists have discovered how a powerful class of HIV drugs binds to a key piece of HIV machinery. By solving, for the first time, three-dimensional structures of this complex while different drugs were attached, the researchers showed what makes the therapy so potent. The work, which appeared in Science on Jan. 30, 2020, provides insights that could help design or improve new treatments for

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New clues into the genetic origins of schizophrenia

The first genetic analysis of schizophrenia in an ancestral African population, the South African Xhosa, appears in the Jan. 31 issue of the journal Science. An international group of scientists conducted the research, including investigators from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and New York State Psychiatric Institute, as well as the University of Cape Town and the University

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Patterns in the brain shed new light on how we function

Patterns of brain connectivity take us a step closer to understanding the key principles of cognition.

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Brain drowns in its own fluid after a stroke

Cerebral edema, swelling that occurs in the brain, is a severe and potentially fatal complication of stroke. New research, which was conducted in mice and appears in the journal Science, shows for the first time that the glymphatic system – normally associated with the beneficial task of waste removal — goes awry during a stroke and floods the brain, triggering edema and drowning brain cells.

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In Cuba, cleaner rivers follow greener farming

For the first time in more than 50 years, a joint team of Cuban and US scientists studied the water quality of twenty-five Cuban rivers and found little damage after centuries of sugarcane production. They also found nutrient pollution in Cuba's rivers much lower than the Mississippi River. Cuba's shift to conservation agriculture after the collapse of the Soviet Union — and reduced use of fertil

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Machine learning technique speeds up crystal structure determination

A computer-based method could make it less labor-intensive to determine the crystal structures of various materials and molecules, including alloys, proteins and pharmaceuticals. The method uses a machine learning algorithm, similar to the type used in facial recognition and self-driving cars, to independently analyze electron diffraction patterns, and do so with at least 95% accuracy.

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Machine learning automates identification of crystal structures in new materials

Providing a method for eliminating some of the guesswork from crystal structure determination, a machine learning-based approach to determining crystal symmetry and structure from unknown samples may greatly improve the speed and accuracy of this process.

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Cooling a 'massive' solid-state nanoparticle into its quantum ground state

In a study probing the boundary between the classical and quantum worlds, researchers laser-cooled a tiny glass nanoparticle with the density of a solid object to a quantum state.

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Pulsar-white dwarf binary system confirms general relativistic frame-dragging

A century after it was first theorized, researchers have detected the effects of Lense-Thirring precession — an effect of relativistic frame-dragging — in the motion of a distant binary star system, a new study reports.

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Genetics of schizophrenia in South African Xhosa informs understanding for all human populations

In the first genetic analysis of schizophrenia in an ancestral African population, the South African Xhosa, researchers report that individuals with schizophrenia are more likely to carry rare damaging genetic mutations than those who are well.

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Bacteria engineered to protect bees from pests and pathogens

Scientists from The University of Texas at Austin report in the journal Science that they have developed a new strategy to protect honey bees from a deadly trend known as colony collapse: genetically engineered strains of bacteria. This is the first time anyone has improved the health of bees by genetically engineering their microbiome.

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Schizophrenia genetics analyzed in South African Xhosa

Schizophrenia genetics was studied in the Xhosa population because Africa is the birthplace of all humans, yet ancestral African populations are rarely part of genetics research. Schizophrenia affects about 1% of the world's people and is a leading cause of disability. This study revealed that Xhosa individuals with schizophrenia are significantly more likely to carry rare, damaging genetic mutati

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1 patient clarifies mystery of why ‘stealth virus’ turns deadly

A rare genetic change may explain why some people die from cytomegalovirus, a common virus that’s often asymptomatic, researchers report. Sometimes called the “stealth virus,” cytomegalovirus (CMV), which can turn the nuclei of human cells into kidney-shaped blobs, affects up to 90% of adults. But for the vast majority of individuals, whose immune systems function normally, it’s harmless—or at wo

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Warren Pledges to Fight Disinformation, but Her Arsenal Is Limited

When it comes to stopping the spread of false information in the 2020 election, everyone is at the mercy of Big Tech.

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Some Salamanders Can Regrow Lost Body Parts. Could Humans One Day Do the Same?

In recent decades, the idea of human regeneration has evolved from an 'if' to a 'when'

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CDC Confirms First US Person-to-Person Coronavirus Transmission

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed the first person-to-person transmission of the coronavirus in the United States, CNBC reports — the first reported direct infection in North America. The newly-infected patient is the husband of a woman who took a flight back from Wuhan, China — the epicenter of the outbreak — inadvertently bringing the virus with her. The transmissio

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The Particular Urgency of Sundance’s ‘Issue’ Films

PARK CITY, Utah—The 2020 election loomed large over the first half of the Sundance Film Festival, as movies with galvanizing political messages dominated the lineup. Issue-focused films are nothing new, but at a festival that thrives on the spirit of niche filmmaking, the prevalence of stories and programming about ripped-from-the-headlines causes made for an energizing change of pace. Given the

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Neoadjuvant checkpoint blockade for cancer immunotherapy

Cancer immunotherapies that target the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1):programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) immune checkpoint pathway have ushered in the modern oncology era. Drugs that block PD-1 or PD-L1 facilitate endogenous antitumor immunity and, because of their broad activity spectrum, have been regarded as a common denominator for cancer therapy. Nevertheless, many advanced tumors demonstrate

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News at a glance

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