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Sniffing out smell
Neuroscientists describe for the first time how relationships between different odors are encoded in the brain. The findings suggest a mechanism that may explain why individuals have common but highly personalized experiences with smell, and inform efforts better understand how the brain transforms information about odor chemistry into the perception of smell.
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New light-based method for faster 'green' production of building blocks for medicines
In industry, gaseous hydrocarbons such as ethane and methane are frequently changed into molecules that can act as building blocks for pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. Typically, these processes take place at high temperatures and pressures, and can also produce large amounts of pollutants. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have developed a new method for the immediate con
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Rising water temperatures could endanger the mating of many fish species
In a new meta-study, experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have published groundbreaking findings on the effects of climate change for fish stocks around the globe. As they report, the risks for fish are much higher than previously assumed, especially given that in certain developmental stages, they are especially sensitive to rising water
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Anaplasmosis bacterium tinkers with tick's gene expression to spread to new hosts
For the first time, scientists have shown that the bacterium that causes the tick-borne disease anaplasmosis interferes with tick gene expression for its survival inside cells and to spread to a new vertebrate host. Girish Neelakanta of Old Dominion University and colleagues report these findings in a study published July 2nd in PLOS Genetics.
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Crystal structure discovered almost 200 years ago could hold key to solar cell revolution
Solar energy researchers at Oregon State University are shining their scientific spotlight on materials with a crystal structure discovered nearly two centuries ago.
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Scientists dissociate water apart efficiently with new catalysts
University of Oregon chemists have made substantial gains in enhancing the catalytic water dissociation reaction in electrochemical reactors, called bipolar membrane electrolyzers, to more efficiently rip apart water molecules into positively charged protons and negatively charged hydroxide ions.
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Scientists reveal why tummy bugs are so good at swimming through your gut
Researchers have solved the mystery of why a species of bacteria that causes food poisoning can swim faster in stickier liquids, such as within guts.
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New light-based method for faster 'green' production of building blocks for medicines
In industry, gaseous hydrocarbons such as ethane and methane are frequently changed into molecules that can act as building blocks for pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. Typically, these processes take place at high temperatures and pressures, and can also produce large amounts of pollutants. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have developed a new method for the immediate con
8d
Rising water temperatures could endanger the mating of many fish species
In a new meta-study, experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have published groundbreaking findings on the effects of climate change for fish stocks around the globe. As they report, the risks for fish are much higher than previously assumed, especially given that in certain developmental stages, they are especially sensitive to rising water
8d
Anaplasmosis bacterium tinkers with tick's gene expression to spread to new hosts
For the first time, scientists have shown that the bacterium that causes the tick-borne disease anaplasmosis interferes with tick gene expression for its survival inside cells and to spread to a new vertebrate host. Girish Neelakanta of Old Dominion University and colleagues report these findings in a study published July 2nd in PLOS Genetics.
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Scientists reveal why tummy bugs are so good at swimming through your gut
Researchers have solved the mystery of why a species of bacteria that causes food poisoning can swim faster in stickier liquids, such as within guts.
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Johnson still well short of 24-hour virus test target
Regional and mobile sites fail to return results in more than quarter of cases
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College Kids Are Apparently Playing a Game Where They Try to Catch COVID [UPDATED]
Update: A number of observers have expressed skepticism about this story, and the media has yet to surface direct evidence of the alleged COVID parties. Here's our update about the controversy . The coronavirus that causes COVID-19 can be deadly, even to young people , with estimates of its overall mortality rate often hovering around one percent . But according to a city official in Tuscaloosa,
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The global AIDS meeting, the Woodstock of science gatherings, goes virtual amid COVID-19
Head of the International AIDS Society says conference organizers hope to retain its unique nature and influence online
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The Big Story: A Summer of Social Distance
The Atlantic staff writers James Hamblin and Kaitlyn Tiffany join the senior editor Paul Bisceglio for a conversation on the science of COVID-19, its spread, and our new social norms.
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The Guardian view on protecting the public: cover your face | Editorial
Scotland is right to mandate masks or similar coverings in shops. Wearing them can save lives Wicked. Horrific. An affront to British liberties. Proposals to make wearing seatbelts compulsory were angrily opposed in the early 1970s. Some warned that it might make motorists more reckless, or endanger unborn babies. MPs claimed there was no real evidence of the benefits. Others complained it would
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Hur ska framtidens fordon beskattas?
När användningen av fossila drivmedel minskar, minskar också statens intäkter från bensin- och dieselskatter. Hur ska vägtrafiken beskattas i en framtid när trafiken inte längre förorsakar utsläpp från förbränningsmotorer? Sverige har, i likhet med många andra länder, inlett en process för att minska och på sikt eliminera användningen av fossila drivmedel som ett led i att minska risken för en fo
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Gender bias about who's 'brilliant' spans the globe
People are more likely to see men rather than women as "brilliant," according to a new study measuring global perceptions linked to gender. The work concludes that these stereotyped views are an instance of implicit bias, revealing automatic associations that people cannot, or at least do not, report holding when asked directly. "Stereotypes that portray brilliance as a male trait are likely to h
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How prison and police discrimination affect black sexual minority men's health
Incarceration and police discrimination may contribute to HIV, depression and anxiety among Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men, according to a Rutgers led study.
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Dinosaur bone? Meteorite? These men's wedding bands are a real break from boredom.
Manly Bands was founded in 2016 to provide better options and customer service in men's wedding bands. Unique materials include antler, dinosaur bones, meteorite, tungsten, and whiskey barrels. The company donates a portion of profits to charity every month. Johnathan Ruggiero needed a wedding band. As a bigger guy he had trouble finding one to fit his size 17 finger. Then he ran into another iss
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Disaster Loans Entrench Disparities in Black Communities
Systemic inequities such as credit scores mean Black home and business owners receive fewer federal relief loans than white ones — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Study: Horror Movie Fans Were Better Prepared For the Pandemic
A team of psychologists sought out to learn who was coping well during the coronavirus pandemic, and found that an unusual group rose to the top: horror movie aficionados. Horror movie fans — and those who were deemed more "morbidly curious" by a personality test — seem to be less psychologically distressed by COVID-19, New Scientist reports . The study, which was shared online this week, doesn't
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Placebo-effekten: Derfor bliver du rask af falske piller
Placebo kan lindre smerter, stress og angst, men hvordan fungerer det?
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France Declares Open Season on Snails
Originally published in June 1909 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A Rare, Ultra-Bright Star Has Disappeared Without a Trace
Stars can do a lot of things. They can get warmer, expand, explode, and even collapse into a black hole. They can not, as a rule, simply disappear. However, that's what appears to have happened to an ultra-bright star in the constellation Aquarius. Astronomers went looking for this well-known star in late 2019 only to find that it was missing. The team has devised several possible explanations ,
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Typhoon changed earthquake patterns
Intensive erosion can temporarily change the earthquake activity (seismicity) of a region significantly.
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Artificial intelligence brings pancreatic cancer screening one step closer to reality
Lugano, Switzerland, 2 July 2020 – Artificial intelligence (AI) holds promise for enabling earlier detection of pancreatic cancer, which is crucial to saving lives. The potential of AI is showcased in a study to be presented at the ESMO World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, 1-4 July 2020.
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Plastic-tracking yacht adds splash of environmentalism to ocean racing
When he sets sail alone for a gruelling round-the-world yacht race this year Fabrice Amedeo will have a scientific mission to add to his sporting goal: collecting microplastics.
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Algae as living biocatalysts for a green industry
Many substances that we use every day only work in the right 3D structure. Natural enzymes could produce these in an environmentally friendly way – if they didn't need a co-substrate that is expensive to produce to date. A research team has now discovered exactly the necessary enzymes in unicellular green algae.
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Challenge Testing
OK, it's time to address the topic of challenge testing against the coronavirus epidemic. Let's define our terms: by this, I mean "deliberately exposing volunteers to infection by the virus in order to evaluate prophylactic treatments by comparison to controls". I will say at the outset that I am not in favor of this idea, so that might save some people the time of reading this post. I'll also sa
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Jagt vilde aber og dinosaurer i den danske natur: Sådan gør din telefon ferien eventyrlig
Få tre bud på underholdende augmentet-reality apps til hele familien.
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The Statues Brought Down Since the George Floyd Protests Began
In the widespread protests that followed the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police on May 25, statues of and memorials to Confederate soldiers and generals were vandalized or torn down. Some of the many statues of Christopher Columbus were targeted as well, as voices rose against historic and systemic racism and oppression. State and local governments then began acting to remove even more
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Hip-Hop Won't Stop Protecting Alleged Abusers
After more than a month of nationwide protests against police brutality, many entertainers are finding ways to speak out about racial injustice. This past week alone, the hip-hop world loudly celebrated Black voices at the BET Awards, in popular interview podcasts, and during Monday night's Verzuz battle. But the industry continues to be silent on its own transgressions: Those same platforms have
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New sequencing technology will help scientists decipher disease mechanisms
New technologies capable of sequencing single molecules in fine detail will help scientists better understand the mechanisms of rare nucleotides thought to play an important role in the progression of some diseases.
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Flexible material shows potential for use in fabrics to heat, cool
A new study finds that a material made of carbon nanotubes has a combination of thermal, electrical and physical properties that make it an appealing candidate for next-generation smart fabrics.
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Stellar fireworks celebrate birth of giant cluster
Astronomers created a stunning new image showing celestial fireworks in star cluster G286.21+0.17.
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Marine algae from the Kiel Fjord discovered as a remedy against infections and skin cancer
Using state-of-the-art approaches coupled with bio- and cheminformatics and machine learning, researchers have succeeded in discovering new, bioactive components of the Baltic Sea Baltic Sea seaweed Fucus vesiculosus and its fungal symbiont against infectious bacteria or skin cancer.
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Tests of hearing can reveal HIV's effects on the brain
New findings are shedding further light on how the brain's auditory system may provide a window into how the brain is affected by HIV.
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Blood tests can predict the risk of liver cirrhosis
Repeated measurements of the biomarker FIB-4 in the blood every few years can predict the risk of developing severe liver disease, according to a new study. The risk of liver cirrhosis increases if the levels of this biomarker rise between two testing occasions.
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Study supports link between COVID-19 and 'COVID Toes'
A new study provides evidence supporting a link between 'COVID toes' — red sores or lesions on the feet and hands in children and young adults — and COVID-19.
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Arctic plants may not provide predicted carbon sequestration potential
The environmental benefits of taller, shrubbier tundra plants in the Arctic may be overstated, according to new research.
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Algae as living biocatalysts for a green industry
Many substances that we use every day only work in the right 3D structure. Natural enzymes could produce these in an environmentally friendly way – if they didn't need a co-substrate that is expensive to produce to date. A research team has now discovered exactly the necessary enzymes in unicellular green algae.
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Carbon-loving materials designed to reduce industrial emissions
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, are advancing gas membrane materials to expand practical technology options for reducing industrial carbon emissions.
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The Birdsong That Took Over North America
The birds were singing something strange. Ken Otter and Scott Ramsay first noticed it in the early 2000s, when they were recording white-throated sparrows in Prince George, a city in western Canada. The birds are so ubiquitous across the country, and the male's song so distinct, that bird-watchers have put words to it: Oh sweet Canada, Canada, Canada . But the white-throated sparrows in Prince Ge
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How that preprint about a 'more contagious strain' of coronavirus changed in peer review
On May 5, 2020, news broke about a reportedly more contagious variant of SARS-CoV-2—the virus that causes COVID-19—based on a preliminary paper posted to the preprint server bioRxiv. The preprint stated that a variant of the virus with a particular mutation leading to an amino acid change, D614G, in its spike protein was "more transmissible" than other forms and represented an "urgent concern" for
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Researchers examine refugee children's academic, social, and emotional learning outcomes
Researchers at Global TIES for Children, an international research center based at NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU New York, examined a variety of post-migration risks faced by Syrian refugee children enrolled in Lebanese public schools and found that students being older than expected for the grade in which they were placed was most consistently and strongly associated with developmental and learning diffi
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Apgar score effective in assessing health of preterm infants
The vitality of preterm infants should be assessed with an Apgar score, a tool used to measure the health of newborns immediately after birth. That is the conclusion by researchers who in a large observational study examined the value of Apgar scores for preterm infants.
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Level of media coverage for scientific research linked to number of citations
An analysis of over 800 academic research papers on physical health and exercise suggests that the level of popular media coverage for a given paper is strongly linked to the attention it receives within the scientific community.
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How that preprint about a 'more contagious strain' of coronavirus changed in peer review
On May 5, 2020, news broke about a reportedly more contagious variant of SARS-CoV-2—the virus that causes COVID-19—based on a preliminary paper posted to the preprint server bioRxiv. The preprint stated that a variant of the virus with a particular mutation leading to an amino acid change, D614G, in its spike protein was "more transmissible" than other forms and represented an "urgent concern" for
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Algae as living biocatalysts for a green industry
Many substances that we use every day only work in the right 3-D structure. Natural enzymes could produce these in an environmentally friendly way—if they didn't need a co-substrate that is expensive to produce to date. A research team at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has discovered exactly the necessary enzymes in unicellular green algae. Better still: living algae can be used as biocatalysts for
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Scientists detect rapid changes in a black hole that may explain gamma-ray bursts
Some of the most massive and distant black holes in the universe emit an enormous amount of extraordinarily energetic radiation called gamma rays. This type of radiation occurs, for example, when mass is converted into energy during fission reactions that run nuclear reactors on Earth. But in the case of black holes, gamma radiation is even more energetic than that produced in nuclear reactors and
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Unprecedented ground-based discovery of two strongly interacting exoplanets
Several interacting exoplanets have already been spotted by satellites. But a new breakthrough has been achieved with, for the first time, the detection directly from the ground of an extrasolar system of this type.
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Most significant changes in UK air quality during lockdown have been in urban areas, review confirms
The lockdown led to a significant drop in some pollutants in the UK's towns and cities, mainly as a result of less traffic, a new report reveals.
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Researchers uncover an ancient Aboriginal archaeological site preserved on the seabed
For most of the human history of Australia, sea levels were much lower than they are today, and there was extra dry land where people lived.
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New candidate for raw material synthesis through gene transfer
Cyanobacteria hardly need any nutrients and use the energy of sunlight. Bathers are familiar with these microorganisms—often incorrectly called "blue-green algae"—as they often occur in waters. A group of researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has discovered that the multicellular species Phormidium lacuna can be genetically modified by natural transformation and could thus pro
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Magnonic nano-fibers opens the way towards new type of computers
Magnetism offers new ways to create more powerful and energy-efficient computers, but the realization of magnetic computing on the nanoscale is a challenging task. A critical advancement in the field of ultralow power computation using magnetic waves is reported by a joint team from Kaiserslautern, Jena and Vienna in the journal Nano Letters.
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Algae as living biocatalysts for a green industry
Many substances that we use every day only work in the right 3-D structure. Natural enzymes could produce these in an environmentally friendly way—if they didn't need a co-substrate that is expensive to produce to date. A research team at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has discovered exactly the necessary enzymes in unicellular green algae. Better still: living algae can be used as biocatalysts for
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New candidate for raw material synthesis through gene transfer
Cyanobacteria hardly need any nutrients and use the energy of sunlight. Bathers are familiar with these microorganisms—often incorrectly called "blue-green algae"—as they often occur in waters. A group of researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has discovered that the multicellular species Phormidium lacuna can be genetically modified by natural transformation and could thus pro
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Global threats: How lessons from COVID-19 can prevent environmental meltdown
COVID-19, climate emergencies, and mass extinction all share striking similarities, especially with regard to their 'lagged impacts.' In each, early intervention can prevent further damage.
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Study explains potential causes for 'happy hypoxia' condition in COVID-19 patients
A new research study provides possible explanations for COVID-19 patients who present with extremely low, otherwise life-threatening levels of oxygen, but no signs of dyspnea (difficulty breathing). This new understanding of the condition, known as silent hypoxemia or 'happy hypoxia,' could prevent unnecessary intubation and ventilation in patients during the current and expected second wave of co
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Carbon-loving materials designed to reduce industrial emissions
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, are advancing gas membrane materials to expand practical technology options for reducing industrial carbon emissions.
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Researchers examine refugee children's academic, social, and emotional learning outcomes
Researchers at Global TIES for Children, an international research center based at NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU New York, examined a variety of post-migration risks faced by Syrian refugee children enrolled in Lebanese public schools and found that students being older than expected for the grade in which they were placed was most consistently and strongly associated with developmental and learning diffi
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New technique in which drugs make bacteria glow could help fight antibiotic resistance
A new technique could help reduce antibiotic prescribing by predicting which drugs could be effective in fighting bacteria within minutes.
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New method measures temperature within 3-D objects
University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have made it possible to remotely determine the temperature beneath the surface of certain materials using a new technique they call depth thermography. The method may be useful in applications where traditional temperature probes won't work, like monitoring semiconductor performance or next-generation nuclear reactors.
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Moss protein corrects genetic defects of other plants
Almost all land plants employ an army of molecular editors who correct errors in their genetic information. Together with colleagues from Hanover, Ulm and Kyoto (Japan), researchers from the University of Bonn have now transferred one of these proofreaders from the moss Physcomitrium patens (previously known as Physcomitrella patens) into a flowering plant. Surprisingly, it performs its work there
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Stellar fireworks celebrate birth of giant cluster
Astronomers created a stunning new image showing celestial fireworks in star cluster G286.21+0.17.
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Prospective teachers misperceive Black children as angry
Prospective teachers appear more likely to misperceive Black children as angry than white children, which may undermine the education of Black youth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.
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Moss protein corrects genetic defects of other plants
Almost all land plants employ an army of molecular editors who correct errors in their genetic information. Together with colleagues from Hanover, Ulm and Kyoto (Japan), researchers from the University of Bonn have now transferred one of these proofreaders from the moss Physcomitrium patens (previously known as Physcomitrella patens) into a flowering plant. Surprisingly, it performs its work there
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Canadian sparrows are ditching traditional songs for a new tune
White-throated sparrows normally end their song with repeated triplets, but a new song ending in repeated double notes has been sweeping a population in Canada
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New sequencing technology will help scientists decipher disease mechanisms
New technologies capable of sequencing single molecules in fine detail will help scientists better understand the mechanisms of rare nucleotides thought to play an important role in the progression of some diseases.
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Gender gaps in STEM college majors emerge in high school
Although studies have shown that women are more likely than men to enter and complete college in U.S. higher education, women are less likely to earn degrees in science, technology, engineering and math fields.
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Invasive mosquito found in Finland could potentially transmit malaria
During collections for a study to map the distribution of mosquito species in Finland, Anopheles daciae, a species previously not known to occur in Finland was found at several locations in the south of the country. As this species is very closely related to known malaria vectors, it is assumed to also be capable of transmitting malaria.
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New sequencing technology will help scientists decipher disease mechanisms
New technologies capable of sequencing single molecules in fine detail will help scientists better understand the mechanisms of rare nucleotides thought to play an important role in the progression of some diseases.
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Invasive mosquito found in Finland could potentially transmit malaria
During collections for a study to map the distribution of mosquito species in Finland, Anopheles daciae, a species previously not known to occur in Finland was found at several locations in the south of the country. As this species is very closely related to known malaria vectors, it is assumed to also be capable of transmitting malaria.
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New platform gauges effects of plastic nanoparticles on human development and health
Plastic pollution is a critical environmental issue facing the world today, yet the impact of all the microplastics (MPs) and nanoplastics (NPs) that have seeped into the food and beverage supply on human health is an "undervalued avenue of research," according to the team behind a revealing new study released today in Stem Cells. This study outlines the new platform researchers designed that allo
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Global e-waste surging: Up 21% in 5 years
A record 53.6 million metric tons (Mt) of electronic waste was generated worldwide in 2019, up 21% in just five years, according to the UN's Global E-waste Monitor 2020.
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New Human Gene Therapy editorial: Concern following gene therapy adverse events
Response to the recent report of the deaths of two children receiving high doses of a gene therapy vector (AAV8) in a Phase I trial for X-linked myotubular myopathy (MTM). The news "is a tragic reminder of how difficult it is to predict outcomes in first-in-human studies
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Timing of SNAP benefits can reduce childhood injuries
A recently published study shows that families that receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits later in the month have fewer ER visits, likely because they can afford to feed their families at the end of the calendar month when other resources run low.
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Newer variant of COVID-19-causing virus dominates global infections
Research out today in the journal Cell shows that a specific change in the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus virus genome, previously associated with increased viral transmission and the spread of COVID-19, is more infectious in cell culture.
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Tiny mineral particles are better vehicles for promising gene therapy
University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have developed a safer and more efficient way to deliver a promising new method for treating cancer and liver disorders and for vaccination — including a COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna Therapeutics that has advanced to clinical trials with humans.
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New, more infectious strain of COVID-19 now dominates global cases of virus
Researchers have shown that a variation in the viral genome of Covid-19 improved its ability to infect human cells and helped it become the dominant strain circulating around the world today.
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New technique in which drugs make bacteria glow could help fight antibiotic resistance
A new technique could help reduce antibiotic prescribing by predicting which drugs could be effective in fighting bacteria within minutes.
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Did a Mutation Help the Coronavirus Spread? More Evidence, but Lingering Questions
Researchers claim that a predominating variant had a "fitness advantage." But many experts are not persuaded.
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A typhoon changed earthquake patterns, study shows
The Earth's crust is under constant stress. Every now and then this stress is discharged in heavy earthquakes, mostly caused by the slow movement of Earth's crustal plates. There is, however, another influencing factor that has received little attention so far: intensive erosion can temporarily change the earthquake activity (seismicity) of a region significantly. This has now been shown for Taiwa
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Once there's a COVID-19 vaccine, who'll get access?
When a COVID-19 vaccine becomes available, there will be a struggle around the world to get it to the public, an ethicist warns. With something in the order of 150 COVID-19 vaccine candidates now in different stages of testing and development, a global public health strategy needs to be thinking several steps ahead, beyond the science. Once a vaccine is proven safe and effective, how will it reac
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Hot flushes and night sweats linked to 70% increase in cardiovascular disease
New research has found that women who have hot flushes and night sweats after menopause are 70 per cent more likely to have heart attacks, angina and strokes.
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The lightest shielding material in the world
Researchers have succeeded in applying aerogels to microelectronics: Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers can effectively shield electromagnetic radiation over a wide frequency range – and they are unrivaled in terms of weight.
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Pandemic water activities, ranked from risky to riskiest
Try to host a holiday hand with only your pandemic crew. (Photo by Yulianto Poitier from Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . It's almost the Fourth of July, which means it's time to break out the grill and mini American flags and have fun in the
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Coronavirus: Testing sewage an 'easy win'
Wastewater analysis could provide localised Covid-19 test results much earlier than at present.
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How that preprint about a 'more contagious strain' of coronavirus changed in peer review
On May 5, 2020, news broke about a reportedly more contagious variant of SARS-CoV-2 based on a preprint posted to bioRxiv. On July 2, the journal Cell published a peer-reviewed version of the paper that offers additional experimental and clinical data about the D614G variant suggesting that it may be more infectious, but concludes that we still cannot be certain about whether the variant makes SAR
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How a mutation on the novel coronavirus has come to dominate the globe
Two variants of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), called G614 and D614, were circulating in mid-March. A new study shows that the G version of the virus has come to dominate cases around the world. They report that this mutation does not make the virus more deadly, but it does help the virus copy itself, resulting in a higher viral load, or "titer," in patients.
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New method measures temperature within 3D objects
University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have made it possible to remotely determine the temperature beneath the surface of certain materials using a new technique they call depth thermography. The method may be useful in applications where traditional temperature probes won't work, like monitoring semiconductor performance or next-generation nuclear reactors.
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Moss protein corrects genetic defects of other plants
Almost all land plants employ an army of molecular editors who correct errors in their genetic information. Together with colleagues from Hanover, Ulm and Kyoto (Japan), researchers from the University of Bonn have now transferred one of these proofreaders from the moss Physcomitrium patens (previously known as Physcomitrella patens) into a flowering plant. Surprisingly, it performs its work there
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Early marriage may lead to unsafe drinking behavior by those with higher genetic risk
Getting married early in life may increase the risk of problematic drinking behavior among people who are genetically predisposed to drink more, according to a forthcoming study led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University.
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Stemming the spread of misinformation on social media
New research reported in the journal Psychological Science finds that priming people to think about accuracy could make them more discerning in what they subsequently share on social media.
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Stellar fireworks celebrate birth of giant cluster
Astronomers created a stunning new image showing celestial fireworks in star cluster G286.21+0.17.
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Flexible material shows potential for use in fabrics to heat, cool
A new North Carolina State University study finds that a material made of carbon nanotubes has a combination of thermal, electrical and physical properties that make it an appealing candidate for next-generation smart fabrics.
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Good news and bad news: Changing trends in cardiovascular disease in Canada
An analysis of patient records in Canada provides important new insights into changing patterns of inpatient healthcare utilization. Between 2007 and 2016, standardized hospitalization rates declined for coronary artery and vascular disease, heart rhythm disorders, stroke, and heart failure but increased for some important conditions: acquired valvular heart disease; vascular cognitive impairment;
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What if Middle-earth was in Pakistan?
J.R.R. Tolkien hinted that his stories are set in a really ancient version of Europe. But a fantasy realm can be inspired by a variety of places; and perhaps so is Tolkien's world. These intriguing similarities with Asian topography show that it may be time to 'decolonise' Middle-earth. Mental decolonisation Where on earth was Middle-earth? Based on a few hints by Tolkien himself, we've always so
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In mouse study, black raspberries show promise for reducing skin inflammation
In a study done with mice, researchers found that a diet high in black raspberries reduced inflammation from contact hypersensitivity — a condition that causes redness and inflammation in the skin.
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Twenty-year study tracks a sparrow song that went 'viral
With the help of citizen scientists, researchers have tracked how one rare sparrow song went "viral" across Canada, traveling over 3,000 kilometers between 2000 and 2019 and wiping out a historic song ending. The study reports that white-throated sparrows from British Columbia to Ontario have ditched their traditional three-note-ending song in favor of a unique two-note-ending variant — althoug
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Scenes from a Black trans life | D-L Stewart
At the crossroads of life and livelihood, scholar D-L Stewart invites us into scenes from his own life as he resists and reflects on the dehumanizing narratives that shape the Black trans experience in the US. With each word of his captivating and poetic dissection, Stewart emphasizes the magnitude and urgency of the rallying cry "Black trans lives matter" — and calls on others to uphold that tru
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States with highest income inequality experienced a larger number of COVID-19 deaths
States with the highest level of income inequality had a larger number of COVID-19-related deaths compared with states with lower income inequality. For instance, New York state, with the highest income inequality, had a mortality rate of 51.7 deaths per 100,000. This is 125 times greater than Utah, the state with the lowest income inequality and which had a mortality of 0.41 per 100,000 at the en
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New sequencing technology will help scientists decipher disease mechanisms
New technologies capable of sequencing single molecules in fine detail will help scientists better understand the mechanisms of rare nucleotides thought to play an important role in the progression of some diseases.
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Apgar score effective in assessing health of preterm infants
The vitality of preterm infants should be assessed with an Apgar score, a tool used to measure the health of newborns immediately after birth. That is the conclusion by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden who in a large observational study examined the value of Apgar scores for preterm infants. The findings are published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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Significant association between income and survival after surgery for lung cancer
Patients with low income have a higher risk of death following surgery for lung cancer compared with patients with high income. The association remains even after taking prevalence of common comorbidities, and other factors that are known to influence the risk of death, into account. This is according to a study published in the journal Thorax by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.
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Blood tests can predict the risk of liver cirrhosis
Repeated measurements of the biomarker FIB-4 in the blood every few years can predict the risk of developing severe liver disease, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the Journal of Hepatology. The risk of liver cirrhosis increases if the levels of this biomarker rise between two testing occasions.
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Study supports link between COVID-19 and "COVID Toes"
There's considerable controversy over whether "COVID toes"–red sores or lesions on the feet and hands in children and young adults–are truly caused by COVID-19. A new study published in the British Journal of Dermatology provides evidence in support of the link.
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In mouse study, black raspberries show promise for reducing skin inflammation
In a study done with mice and published earlier this month in the journal Nutrients, researchers found that a diet high in black raspberries reduced inflammation from contact hypersensitivity — a condition that causes redness and inflammation in the skin.
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Oropharyngeal secretions may help reduce false negative COVID-19 test results
A new study published in the Journal of Dental Research demonstrates that testing of oropharyngeal secretions may reduce the number of false negative results from nasal swab testing of patients who have seemingly recovered from the disease.
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A scientific measure of dog years
How old is your tail-wagging bundle of joy in human years? According to the well-known "rule of paw," one dog year is the equivalent of 7 years. Now, in a study published July 2, in the journal Cell Systems, scientists say it's wrong. Dogs are much older than we think, and researchers devised a more accurate formula to calculate a dog's age based on the chemical changes in the DNA as organisms gro
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Gender gaps in STEM college majors emerge in high school
Although studies have shown that women are more likely than men to enter and complete college in U.S. higher education, women are less likely to earn degrees in science, technology, engineering and math fields.In new research, Kim Weeden, the Jan Rock Zubrow '77 Professor of the Social Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Cornell University, traces the discrepancy in college majors back
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Tesla Is Now Worth More Than ExxonMobil
Just a few years ago, electric cars were a niche market, and it was difficult to imagine how they could ever go truly mainstream. Now, in a striking reversal, the market valuation of electric automaker Tesla now exceeds that of ExxonMobil, one of the planet's largest fossil fuel megacorporations. CNN drew attention to the turnabout in a story drawing attention to Tesla's meteoric stock price, whi
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The Intersex Brain
It is evident that male and female sex characteristics exist on a spectrum, and treating them as fully binary categories invalidates the bodies and experiences of those who express a range of biological sex characteristics. […] But… what about the brain? Are there differences between the male brain and the female brain?
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The lightest electromagnetic shielding material in the world
Electric motors and electronic devices generate electromagnetic fields that sometimes have to be shielded in order not to affect neighboring electronic components or the transmission of signals. High-frequency electromagnetic fields can only be shielded with conductive shells that are closed on all sides. Often thin metal sheets or metallized foils are used for this purpose. However, for many appl
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Spintronics: Faster data processing through ultrashort electric pulses
Physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Lanzhou University in China developed a simple concept that could significantly improve magnetic-based data processing. Using ultrashort electric pulses in the terahertz range, data can be written, read and erased very quickly. This would make data processing faster, more compact and energy efficient. The researchers confirmed their
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White-Throated Sparrow's Trendy New Song Catches On
A new song type originated in western Canada and then spread East, replacing the sparrows' traditional song. sparrow-top-image.jpg A white-throated sparrow. Image credits: Scott M. Ramsay Rights information: This image may only be reproduced with this Inside Science article. Creature Thursday, July 2, 2020 – 11:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — When researchers first noticed white
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Unprecedented ground-based discovery of 2 strongly interacting exoplanets
Several interacting exoplanets have already been spotted by satellites. But a new breakthrough has been achieved with, for the first time, the detection directly from the ground of an extrasolar system of this type. An international collaboration including CNRS researchers has discovered an unusual planetary system, dubbed WASP-148, using the French instrument SOPHIE at the Observatoire de Haute-P
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Nitrous oxide may bring relief to veterans suffering from PTSD, new study suggests
A small pilot study provides an early glimpse of how some veterans struggling with PTSD may benefit from one simple, inexpensive treatment involving nitrous oxide, commonly known as laughing gas.
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"Targeting peptide" discovery offers hope as new, highly effective anti-inflammatory
A collaboration between the University of Toronto's Faculty of Dentistry and the National Jewish Health in Denver — the top-ranked respiratory research hospital in the US — has yielded a new drug discovery that could be useful to combat inflammation of all varieties and shows promise in fighting acute respiratory illnesses such as COVID-19.
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Social media and radiology — The good, the bad, and the ugly
Radiologists examine social media and report #SoMe can be useful in education, research, mentoring and career development.
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National survey on COVID-19 pandemic shows significant mental health impact
The findings of a nationwide survey assessing the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the emotional wellbeing of U.S. adults show 90 percent of survey respondents reported experiencing emotional distress related to the pandemic.
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Marine alga from the Kiel Fjord discovered as a remedy against infections and skin cancer
Using state-of-the-art approaches coupled with bio- and cheminformatics and machine learning, researchers at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have succeeded in discovering new, bioactive components of the Baltic Sea Baltic Sea seaweed Fucus vesiculosus and its fungal symbiont against infectious bacteria or skin cancer.
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New algorithm for personalized models of human cardiac electrophysiology
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Kazan Federal University, and George Washington University have proposed an algorithm for producing patient-specific mathematical models describing the electrical excitation of human heart cells. The study looks at two possible approaches — one using experimental records of electrical activity and the other based on gene expression
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Risk of ischemic stroke in patients with COVID-19 compared with influenza
This observational study compares the rate of ischemic stroke among patients with COVID-19 compared with influenza in two New York hospitals.
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Targeting deep areas of the skeletal muscles effectively alleviates postoperative pain
To address postoperative muscle pain in patients undergoing abdominal surgery, researchers developed a new method of effective pain control called needle electrical twitch obtaining intramuscular stimulation (NETOIMS).
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COVID-19 pandemic: Opportunity to reduce, eliminate low-value practices in oncology?
How the COVID-19 pandemic can reshape care in patients with cancer to focus on discouraging unnecessary in-person visits, testing and low-value treatments is discussed in this article.
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Effect of COVID-19, pandemics on global surgical outreach
How surgical global health programs are affected by the COVID pandemic and why global surgical outreach models may need to be rehashed are discussed in this article.
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Decontamination methods for reuse of filtering facepiece respirators
Studies describing various methods of decontamination to allow safe reuse of N95 respirators are summarized in this article.
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Evolution of loss of smell or taste in COVID-19
This survey-based study examines the clinical course of the loss of sense of smell and taste in a case series of mildly symptomatic patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection.
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Largest source of AATD stem cells collected
Researchers from the Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) at Boston University and Boston Medical Center (BMC) have assembled the largest repository of patient derived stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD).
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Twenty-year study tracks a sparrow song that went "viral" across Canada
With the help of citizen scientists, researchers have tracked how one rare sparrow song went "viral" across Canada, traveling over 3,000 kilometers between 2000 and 2019 and wiping out a historic song ending. The study, publishing July 2 in the journal Current Biology, reports that white-throated sparrows from British Columbia to Ontario have ditched their traditional three-note-ending song in fav
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Fantastic WiFi extenders and boosters for every space
Be able to surf the web from your backyard. (hamza tighza via Unsplash/) It's easy to take WiFi for granted until your devices refuse to connect to an available network. Though wireless internet access is more powerful than ever, many variables are still at play in determining whether you can stream movies or just barely squeak by while checking your email. Some buildings are constructed with met
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English councils warn latest Covid funding still falls short
Authorities say estimated £2.5bn package not enough to prevent service cuts and financial failures
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Greenland drilling campaign aims for bedrock to trace ice sheet's last disappearance
U.S. effort could also date controversial Hiawatha impact crater
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Canadian sparrows ditch their old song for catchier tune
Study finds British Columbia birds' dropped-end note of call has spread across country If you consider Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep to be the ultimate catchy tune, think again: the white-throated sparrows of British Columbia have devised a new song that has gone viral across Canada. For years, the small songbird's traditional descending whistle featured a three-note ending. But researchers have trac
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Därför luktar det sommar
Mustig jord, uppfriskande sommarregn och multnande löv – olika årstider bjuder på olika dofter. Mest luktar sommaren, till och med åskan har sin egen doft. Även snö luktar, men inte så mycket eftersom vår näsa fungerar sämre när det är kallt. Men varför luktar det? Få dagar är så förknippade med själsligt uppvaknande och nytändning som den första vårdagen. När solen äntligen visar sig och bländar
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Canada's Sparrows Are Singing a New Song. You'll Hear It Soon.
Over 20 years, scientists tracked the transformation of the traditional trill of a common bird from western Canada to Ontario.
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After many false starts, hydrogen power might now bear fruit
But it will fill in the gaps, rather than dominating the economy
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A pest's genome reveals its past
And shines light on how to deal with it in future
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Politics this week
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KAL's cartoon
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Business this week
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Twenty-year study tracks a sparrow song that went 'viral' across Canada
Most bird species are slow to change their tune, preferring to stick with tried-and-true songs to defend territories and attract females. Now, with the help of citizen scientists, researchers have tracked how one rare sparrow song went "viral" across Canada, traveling over 3,000 kilometers between 2000 and 2019 and wiping out a historic song ending in the process. The study, publishing July 2 in t
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How old is your dog in human years? Scientists develop better method than 'multiply by 7'
If there's one myth that has persisted through the years without much evidence, it's this: multiply your dog's age by seven to calculate how old they are in "human years." In other words, the old adage says, a four-year-old dog is similar in physiological age to a 28-year-old person.
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New way to see RNA could help fight pathogens
In genetics, DNA has always been the star of the show, but scientists are now uncovering the crucial roles of a lesser-known player: transfer RNA.
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Prospective teachers misperceive Black children as angry
Prospective teachers appear more likely to misperceive Black children as angry than white children, which may undermine the education of Black youth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.
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Twenty-year study tracks a sparrow song that went 'viral' across Canada
Most bird species are slow to change their tune, preferring to stick with tried-and-true songs to defend territories and attract females. Now, with the help of citizen scientists, researchers have tracked how one rare sparrow song went "viral" across Canada, traveling over 3,000 kilometers between 2000 and 2019 and wiping out a historic song ending in the process. The study, publishing July 2 in t
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How old is your dog in human years? Scientists develop better method than 'multiply by 7'
If there's one myth that has persisted through the years without much evidence, it's this: multiply your dog's age by seven to calculate how old they are in "human years." In other words, the old adage says, a four-year-old dog is similar in physiological age to a 28-year-old person.
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The Hidden Magnetic Universe Begins to Come Into View
Anytime astronomers figure out a new way of looking for magnetic fields in ever more remote regions of the cosmos, inexplicably, they find them. These force fields — the same entities that emanate from fridge magnets — surround Earth, the sun and all galaxies. Twenty years ago, astronomers started to detect magnetism permeating entire galaxy clusters, including the space between one galaxy and th
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New research examines links between religion and parental support from non-family members
"Be fruitful and multiply" says the Bible, and worldwide religious people tend to have more children than their secular counterparts. New research suggests that this "multiplying" may be the result of the higher levels of support from non-family members that church-going women receive, and that these greater levels of support are also associated with positive developmental outcomes for children.
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Gaia revolutionises asteroid tracking
ESA's Gaia space observatory is an ambitious mission to construct a three-dimensional map of our galaxy by making high-precision measurements of over one billion stars. However, on its journey to map distant suns, Gaia is revolutionising a field much closer to home. By accurately mapping the stars, it is helping researchers track down lost asteroids.
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New way to see RNA could help fight pathogens
In genetics, DNA has always been the star of the show, but scientists are now uncovering the crucial roles of a lesser-known player: transfer RNA.
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Spintronics: Faster data processing through ultrashort electric pulses
Physicists have developed a simple concept that could improve significantly magnetic-based data processing. Using ultrashort electric pulses in the terahertz range, data can be written, read and erased very quickly. This would make data processing faster, more compact and energy efficient. The researchers confirmed their theory by running complex simulations.
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Slow earthquakes in Cascadia are predictable
If there is one word you are not supposed to use when discussing serious earthquake science, it is "predict." Seismologists cannot predict earthquakes; instead they calculate how likely major earthquakes are to occur along a certain fault over a given period of time.
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Looping X-rays to produce higher quality laser pulses
Ever since 1960, when Theodore Maiman built the world's first infrared laser, physicists dreamed of producing X-ray laser pulses that are capable of probing the ultrashort and ultrafast scales of atoms and molecules.
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Astronomers Have Discovered the First Exposed Planetary Core
Most of what we know about planetary cores is conjecture, on account of the fact that we live on top of ours and have extremely limited access to all of the others. Since none of the planets whizzing around our own star are daring enough to expose their own, astronomers have been forced to use telescopes and planetary surveys, peering out into the void for a glimpse of cosmic libertinity. More se
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The lightest shielding material in the world
Empa researchers have succeeded in applying aerogels to microelectronics: Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers can effectively shield electromagnetic radiation over a wide frequency range – and they are unrivalled in terms of weight.
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Arctic plants may not provide predicted carbon sequestration potential
The environmental benefits of taller, shrubbier tundra plants in the Arctic may be overstated, according to new research involving the University of Stirling.
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Algae as living biocatalysts for a green industry
Many substances that we use every day only work in the right 3D structure. Natural enzymes could produce these in an environmentally friendly way – if they didn't need a co-substrate that is expensive to produce to date. A research team at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has discovered exactly the necessary enzymes in unicellular green algae.
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Typhoon changed earthquake patterns
Intensive erosion can temporarily change the earthquake activity (seismicity) of a region significantly. This has now been shown for Taiwan by researchers from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in cooperation with international colleagues. They report on this in the journal "Scientific Reports".
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New candidate for raw material synthesis through gene transfer
Cyanobacteria hardly need any nutrients and use the energy of sunlight. Bathers are familiar with these microorganisms as they often occur in waters. A group of researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has discovered that the multicellular species Phormidium lacuna can be genetically modified by natural transformation and could thus produce substances such as ethanol or hydrogen.
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A novel sperm selection technology to increase success rates of in vitro fertilization
Motile sperm are difficult to collect with a conventional cell sorter because they are vulnerable to physical damage. A Japanese research collaboration has developed a technique using a cell sorter with microfluidic chip technology to reduce cell damage and improve in vitro fertilization rates. This research is expected to increase in vitro fertilization rates to improve production of experimental
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New research examines links between religion and parental support from non-family members
'Be fruitful and multiply' says the Bible, and worldwide religious people tend to have more children than their secular counterparts. New research suggests that this 'multiplying' may be the result of the higher levels of support from non-family members that church-going women receive, and that these greater levels of support are also associated with positive developmental outcomes for children.
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Seven ways social distancing will change restaurants
COVID-19 has had a devastating effect on the restaurant industry. While a few restaurants have found ways to provide takeaway and dine-at-home offerings, the majority of businesses have shut up shop during lockdown.
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MIT Deletes Database That Taught AI to Be Racist, Sexist
Data Regression A machine learning algorithm is only as good as the data it's trained on. Unfortunately, a massive and popular training dataset from MIT taught a bunch of algorithms to use racist and misogynistic slurs. MIT just took down the offending database, 80 Million Tiny Images, for some much-needed sanitation, The Register reports . The dataset has been used to train image-recognition AI
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In the Arctic, spring snowmelt triggers fresh CO2 production
Studies have shown the Arctic is warming roughly twice as fast as the rest of the world, and its soil holds twice the amount of carbon dioxide as the atmosphere. New research finds that water from spring snowmelt infiltrates the soil and triggers fresh carbon dioxide production at higher rates than previously assumed.
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Climate change threat to tropical plants
Half of the world's tropical plant species may struggle to germinate by 2070 because of global warming, a new study predicts.
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Cause of abnormal groundwater rise after large earthquake
Increases in groundwater levels and volumes after large earthquakes have been observed around the world, but the details of this process have remained unclear due to a lack of groundwater data directly before and after an earthquake strikes. Fortunately, researchers from Kumamoto and Kwansei Gakuin Universities (Japan) and UC Berkley (US) realized that they had a unique research opportunity to ana
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Farewell smooth handfish: What can we learn from the world's first marine fish extinction?
Earlier this month, a group of Australian scientists confirmed a depressing landmark for our blue planet: The first marine fish of modern times has been declared extinct on the IUCN RedList. The smooth handfish (Sympterichthys unipennis) was one of 14 (now 13) species of handfish, beautifully patterned creatures with a distinctly "missing link" look about them. Residing only in south-eastern Austr
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UK to begin dismantling its quarantine policy
Britons will be told they can visit 70 overseas destinations without self-isolating for 14 days on return
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How Korean pop fans took on white supremacists – and won
Unusual methods of online protest have sprung up recently, and it's become harder to tell what's real and what's not, says Annalee Newitz
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Every dog year not equivalent to seven human years, scientists find
Study of DNA changes in labradors suggests puppies age much faster than older dogs Dogs do not simply age at seven times the rate of humans, scientists have found in a study that reveals young dogs might be "older" than previously thought. The findings suggest a one-year-old puppy is actually about 30 in "human years" – an age when humans, at least, might be expected to have stopped running riot
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Farewell smooth handfish: What can we learn from the world's first marine fish extinction?
Earlier this month, a group of Australian scientists confirmed a depressing landmark for our blue planet: The first marine fish of modern times has been declared extinct on the IUCN RedList. The smooth handfish (Sympterichthys unipennis) was one of 14 (now 13) species of handfish, beautifully patterned creatures with a distinctly "missing link" look about them. Residing only in south-eastern Austr
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Experts measure the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic
Between March 21 and 28, as the country enacted quarantine measures, the United States experienced a 3,000% jump in joblessness claims. By the end of March, a stock market drop had wiped out all gains from the previous three years.
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Understanding the circadian clocks of individual cells
Two new studies led by UT Southwestern scientists outline how individual cells maintain their internal clocks, driven both through heritable and random means. These findings, published online May 1 in PNAS and May 27 in eLife, help explain how organisms' circadian clocks maintain flexibility and could offer insights into aging and cancer.
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Arctic plants may not provide predicted carbon sequestration potential
The environmental benefits of taller, shrubbier tundra plants in the Arctic may be overstated, according to new research involving the University of Stirling.
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A path to new nanofluidic devices applying spintronics technology
Researchers in the ERATO Saitoh Spin Quantum Rectification Project in the JST Strategic Basic Research Programs have elucidated the mechanism of the hydrodynamic power generation using spin currents in micrometer-scale channels, finding that power generation efficiency improves drastically as the size of the flow is made smaller.
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Fluorine enables separation-free 'chiral chromatographic analysis'
Researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed a new platform for rapid chiral analysis, producing chromatogram-like output without the need for separation. The study was published in Cell Reports Physical Science.
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Grazing disputes in Kyrgyzstan reveal pasture access concerns for herders
In early June, livestock herders from two neighboring districts in Kyrgyzstan's Naryn oblast, or administrative region, clashed over disagreements regarding pasture access. Grazing disputes are not new, however, for herders in Kyrgyzstan, where glaciers in the Tien Shan mountains supply water for the herds which graze on the lush meadows of the country's highlands. Pastoralism is a long-held tradi
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COVID-19 leaving some Americans sick and hungry
The COVID-19 pandemic is not just making Americans sick, it's leaving many hungry as well, and experts who gathered for a Harvard Chan School forum on the problem said that legislation to relieve the pandemic's economic burden may be able to help.
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Ion conducting polymer crucial to improving neuromorphic devices
"Neuromorphic" refers to mimicking the behavior of brain neural cells. When one speaks of neuromorphic computers, they are talking about making computers think and process more like human brains-operating at high-speed with low energy consumption.
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Science fiction becomes fact — Teleportation helps to create live musical performance
A new study by the University of Plymouth explains for the first time how quantum supercomputers could be helpful in the world of making and performing music
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Thermophones offer new route to radically simplify array design, research shows
Scientists have pioneered a new technique to produce arrays of sound produced entirely by heat.
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Hot flushes and night sweats linked to 70% increase in cardiovascular disease
New research from The University of Queensland has found that women who have hot flushes and night sweats after menopause are 70 per cent more likely to have heart attacks, angina and strokes.
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Global e-waste surging: Up 21% in 5 years
The UN's 3rd Global eWaste Monitor reports 53.6 million metric tonnes (Mt) of e-waste was produced last year — substantially more than the weight of all adults in Europe. Global e-waste has risen 21% by weight in just five years, fueled by higher consumption rates of electric and electronic equipment, short life cycles, and few repair options. In 2030 the world is projected to produce about 50% m
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Cause of abnormal groundwater rise after large earthquake
Abnormal rises in groundwater levels after large earthquakes has been observed all over the world, but the cause has remained unknown due to a lack of comparative data before & after earthquakes. After the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes, a collaboration of scientists from Japan and the US analyzed stable isotope ratios of water samples collected before and after the disaster. This allowed them to clari
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Understanding the circadian clocks of individual cells
Two new studies led by UT Southwestern scientists outline how individual cells maintain their internal clocks, driven both through heritable and random means. These findings, published online May 1 in PNAS and May 27 in eLife, help explain how organisms' circadian clocks maintain flexibility and could offer insights into aging and cancer.
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Tiny mineral particles are better vehicles for promising gene therapy
University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers have developed a safer and more efficient way to deliver a promising new method for treating cancer and liver disorders and for vaccination—including a COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna Therapeutics that has advanced to clinical trials with humans.
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Five ways COVID-19 will change the food business
Eating at home more and sticking with online delivery or takeout are habits likely to persist even as pandemic measures ease, according to a University of Alberta expert.
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Discovery of a luminous galaxy reionizing the local intergalactic medium 13 billion years ago
Astronomers have discovered a luminous galaxy caught in the act of reionizing its surrounding gas only 800 million years after the Big Bang. The research, led by Romain Meyer, Ph.D. student at UCL in London, UK, has been presented today at the virtual annual meeting of the European Astronomical Society (EAS).
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Tiny mineral particles are better vehicles for promising gene therapy
University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers have developed a safer and more efficient way to deliver a promising new method for treating cancer and liver disorders and for vaccination—including a COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna Therapeutics that has advanced to clinical trials with humans.
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Stopping koala extinction is agonizingly simple, but here's why I'm not optimistic
On Tuesday, a year-long New South Wales parliamentary inquiry revealed the state's koalas are on track for extinction in the wild by 2050, without urgent government intervention.
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Image: Hubble spots feathered spiral
The spiral pattern shown by the galaxy in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is striking because of its delicate, feathery nature. These "flocculent" spiral arms indicate that the recent history of star formation of the galaxy, known as NGC 2775, has been relatively quiet. There is virtually no star formation in the central part of the galaxy, which is dominated by an unusually la
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Stopping koala extinction is agonizingly simple, but here's why I'm not optimistic
On Tuesday, a year-long New South Wales parliamentary inquiry revealed the state's koalas are on track for extinction in the wild by 2050, without urgent government intervention.
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Ion conducting polymer crucial to improving neuromorphic devices
"Neuromorphic" refers to mimicking the behavior of brain neural cells. When one speaks of neuromorphic computers, they are talking about making computers think and process more like human brains-operating at high-speed with low energy consumption.
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Giant leap in diagnosing liver disease
Scientists have created a novel microbiome-based diagnostic tool that, with the accuracy of the best physicians, quickly and inexpensively identifies liver fibrosis and cirrhosis over 90 percent of the time in human patients. The non-invasive method relies on an algorithm to analyze patient stool samples — which contains traces of what lives in the gut — and could lead to improved patient care a
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Treatments tested for invasive pest on allium crops
Researchers field-tested 14 active ingredients in insecticides, applied in a variety of methods, to understand the best treatment options against the Allium leafminer, a growing threat to onions, garlic and leeks.
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Study confirms ultra music festival likely stressful to fish
A new study found that the Ultra Music Festival was likely stressful to toadfish.
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Mystery of subterranean stoneflies unlocked
Researchers may have unlocked a mystery surrounding unique aquatic insects in the Flathead watershed.
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New system combines smartphone videos to create 4D visualizations
Researchers have demonstrated that they can combine iPhone videos shot 'in the wild' by separate cameras to create 4D visualizations that allow viewers to watch action from various angles, or even erase people or objects that temporarily block sight lines.
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Long-term culture of human pancreatic slices reveals regeneration of beta cells
Scientists have developed a method allowing for the long-term culture of 'pancreatic slices' to study the regeneration of the human pancreas in real time.
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Energy-saving servers: Data storage 2.0
A research team has developed a technique that will potentially halve the energy required to write data to servers and make it easier to construct complex server architectures.
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Political divide? Not much when it involves negative news
Here's positive news during these times of turmoil, strife and political divide: in some ways, conservatives and liberals are not that different.
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Flexible material shows potential for use in fabrics to heat, cool
A film made of tiny carbon nanotubes (CNT) may be a key material in developing clothing that can heat or cool the wearer on demand. A new North Carolina State University study finds that the CNT film has a combination of thermal, electrical and physical properties that make it an appealing candidate for next-generation smart fabrics.
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Video: Flight over Korolev Crater on Mars
This movie was created using an image mosaic made from single orbit observations from the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express, which was first published in December 2018. The mosaic combines data from the HRSC nadir and colour channels; the nadir channel is aligned perpendicular to the surface of Mars, as if looking straight down at the surface.
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Just add nano-materials for stronger, tougher diving fins
Adding microscopic nano-materials to carbon fibre composites has resulted in stronger, tougher fins for divers. A space material company teamed up with a market leader in the design and production of free-diving and spear-fishing equipment through ESA's Technology Transfer and Patent Office.
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Coronavirus: It is morally indefensible for a nation to keep life-saving drugs for itself
The world eagerly awaits new vaccines and drugs to combat COVID-19. To deal with a global pandemic, the production of new treatments needs to be scaled up towards supplying the whole world—and as quickly as possible. Borderless open and collaborative science and the free exchange of knowledge and data will get us to vaccines and cures faster than by any other way.
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The sun is setting on unsustainable long-haul, short-stay tourism, making regional travel bubbles the future
Unprecedented border closures and the domestic lockdown have paralyzed New Zealand's $40.9 billion a year tourism industry. In the process, the vulnerability of the sector to external shocks and the tenuous nature of tourism employment have been exposed.
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Lockdown returns: Some ask how far coronavirus measures can go before infringing on human rights
As of this morning, 10 "hot spot" postcodes in Melbourne's suburbs have gone back into Stage 3 coronavirus lockdown.
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The Veteran Who Could Be VP
Tammy Duckworth is up for a big promotion: Joe Biden's advisers are vetting her to be his running mate. In the meantime, she's focused on protecting the promotion of another lieutenant colonel. The senator from Illinois, who lost both her legs as a helicopter pilot in Iraq and was awarded the Purple Heart, has placed a hold—Senate-speak for preventing a vote—on hundreds of military promotions, sh
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What did 'all men are created equal' mean in 1776?
When Thomas Jefferson penned "all men are created equal," in the preamble to the Declaration of Independence, he did not mean individual equality, says historian Jack Rakove. Rather, what the Continental Congress declared on July 4, 1776 was that American colonists, as a people, had the same rights to self-government as other nations. Because they possessed this fundamental right, Rakove says, th
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'Ultrafast' insulin may be 4X speedier than the regular stuff
A new insulin formulation begins to take effect almost immediately after injection, researchers report. It may potentially work four times as fast as current commercial fast-acting insulin formulations. "…we wanted to develop a 'magic fairy dust' that you add into a vial that would help to fix the stability problem." The researchers focused on so-called monomeric insulin, which has a molecular st
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Climate change threat to tropical plants
Half of the world's tropical plant species may struggle to germinate by 2070 because of global warming, a new UNSW study predicts.
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New weapons for fighting Devil disease
Researchers at the University of Tasmania's Menzies Institute for Medical Research and the School of Medicine have added an arsenal of new tools (video link) to their repertoire for fighting the insidious Devil Facial Tumour Disease.
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Stretching your legs may help prevent diseases such as heart diseases and diabetes
New research published today in The Journal of Physiology shows that 12 weeks of easy-to-administer passive stretching helps improve blood flow by making it easier for your arteries to dilate and decreasing their stiffness.
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Understanding the circadian clocks of individual cells
Two new studies led by UT Southwestern scientists outline how individual cells maintain their internal clocks, driven both through heritable and random means. These findings, published online May 1 in PNAS and May 27 in eLife, help explain how organisms' circadian clocks maintain flexibility and could offer insights into aging and cancer.
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The Tour de France Is Going Virtual, and It Starts This Weekend
The coronavirus pandemic has changed the way we do things, big-time. The events, places, and activities we were used to enjoying have been canceled, closed, or in some cases, permanently shut down. Virtual versions of just about everything have sprung up: meetings, concerts , parties, classes, conventions. This week another event was added to the list of things gone virtual : the Tour de France.
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Thermophones offer new route to radically simplify array design, research shows
Scientists have pioneered a new technique to produce arrays of sound produced entirely by heat.
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These High-Powered Nootropics Can Help Your Brain Reach Its Max Potential
Every day millions of Americans use caffeine to give These High-Powered Nootropics Are Designed to Help Your Brain Reach Its Max Potentialthemselves a mental boost, and for good reason. Caffeine works by blocking the neurotransmitters in the brain that produce drowsiness. This keeps your neurons firing at full speed, which makes you feel awake. But what if you could do more for your brain than si
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A three-dimensional phase diagram of heavy-fermion compound with coexisting quantum phases
URu2Si2 is a metal that belongs to the family of heavy-fermion compounds in which several quantum phases (e.g., magnetism and superconductivity) can compete or coexist. These metals exhibit small energy scales that are easy to tune, a characteristic that makes them ideal for testing new physical ideas and concepts.
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Oat and rye bran fibres alter gut microbiota, reducing weight gain and hepatic inflammation
In a newly published experimental study, the consumption of dietary fibre from oat and rye brans supported the growth of beneficial gut microbiota, which in turn ameliorated cholesterol metabolism, enhanced gut barrier function and reduced hepatic inflammation. In addition, diets enriched with oat or rye bran were shown to attenuate weight gain. The effects of oat and rye were partly different, bu
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The protein that stands between us and autoimmunity
Researchers from Osaka University identified the epigenetic proteins Tet2 and Tet3 as key regulators of B cell function. They showed that these proteins suppress B cell function and conversely, that Tet2/Tet3 knockout mice develop a mild form of systemic lupus erythematosus due to hyperactivation of T cells. These findings could help develop a novel treatment for autoimmune diseases.
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Mothering in domestic violence: Protecting children behind closed doors
As emerging data shows an alarming rise of domestic violence during the pandemic, researchers at the University of South Australia are urging practitioners to look beyond clinical observations and focus on the strengths that mothers exercise to protect their children from domestic abuse.
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Antioxidant treatment in acute ischemic stroke may delay the onset of Alzheimer's dementia
There is a considerable overlap between vascular and Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk factors. In addition, incident stroke approximately doubles the risk of developing AD. Oxidative stress is significantly involved in the pathogenesis of AD and suffers a dramatic increase in the setting of acute ischemic stroke, especially in cardioembolic stroke, followed by lacunar stroke, as shown in a previous s
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A path to new nanofluidic devices applying spintronics technology
Japanese scientists have elucidated the mechanism of the hydrodynamic power generation using spin currents in micrometer-scale channels, finding that power generation efficiency improves drastically as the size of the flow is made smaller. They experimentally demonstrated the fluid power generation phenomenon in the laminar flow region and confirmed that in the laminar flow region, energy conversi
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Fluorine enables separation-free 'chiral chromatographic analysis'
Researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed a new platform for rapid chiral analysis, producing chromatogram-like output without the need for separation.
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Stimulating production of enzyme in roundworms found to increase lifespan
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in South Korea has found that stimulating production of a certain enzyme in roundworms can increase their lifespan. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the protein VRK-1 and what they learned about its impact on the longevity of roundworms.
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Robot vs alien: The freshwater fish saga
How do you get rid of an invasive fish that is taking over waterways across the globe? With robot predators designed to scare them, of course!
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Alltmer polariserat förtroende för forskning
Svenska folket har fortsatt högt förtroende för lärosäten och forskare. Samtidigt finns tydliga tecken på en pågående polarisering där faktorer som utbildningsnivåer och partisympatier påverkar förtroendet. Den faktor som har störst enskild påverkan är utbildningsnivå, där högutbildade uppvisar störst förtroendet, enligt en rapport från Vetenskap & Allmänhet. Förtroendet för Sveriges lärosäten oc
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Stimulating production of enzyme in roundworms found to increase lifespan
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in South Korea has found that stimulating production of a certain enzyme in roundworms can increase their lifespan. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the protein VRK-1 and what they learned about its impact on the longevity of roundworms.
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Robot vs alien: The freshwater fish saga
How do you get rid of an invasive fish that is taking over waterways across the globe? With robot predators designed to scare them, of course!
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Materials scientists drill down to vulnerabilities involved in human tooth decay
Researchers have cracked one of the secrets of tooth decay. The materials scientists are the first to identify a small number of impurity atoms in human enamel that may contribute to the material's strength but also make it more soluble. They also are the first to determine the spatial distribution of the impurities with atomic-scale resolution. The discovery could lead to a better understanding o
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How to find a better job online
There are plenty of focused strategies beyond a simple Google search. (Charles Deluvio/Unsplash/) The internet has transformed just about every part of life, and that includes the job hunt—there's no shortage of online job listings and recruitment apps. But beyond those obvious routes to gainful employment, you can enlist the help of technology even further in your job search: There are all kinds
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New weapons for fighting Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease
Researchers at the University of Tasmania's Menzies Institute for Medical Research and the School of Medicine have added an arsenal of new tools to their repertoire for fighting the insidious devil facial tumor disease.
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How to design continents for maximum tides
The shape and size of continents control the size of ocean tides on Earth-like planets, according to a new study that simulated the effects of random continental configurations on the energy of tides. The results have implications for Earth's early history as well as the search for habitable planets beyond the solar system.
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In the Arctic, spring snowmelt triggers fresh carbon dioxide production
Studies have shown the Arctic is warming roughly twice as fast as the rest of the world, and its soil holds twice the amount of carbon dioxide as the atmosphere. New research from San Diego State University finds that water from spring snowmelt infiltrates the soil and triggers fresh carbon dioxide production at higher rates than previously assumed.
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Climate change threat to tropical plants
Tropical plants closer to the equator are most at risk from climate change because it is expected to become too hot for many species to germinate in the next 50 years, UNSW researchers have found.
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New weapons for fighting Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease
Researchers at the University of Tasmania's Menzies Institute for Medical Research and the School of Medicine have added an arsenal of new tools to their repertoire for fighting the insidious devil facial tumor disease.
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Climate change threat to tropical plants
Tropical plants closer to the equator are most at risk from climate change because it is expected to become too hot for many species to germinate in the next 50 years, UNSW researchers have found.
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Surveys reveal significant shifts in consumer behavior during pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly altered how people shop, how much they buy, the trips they take outside their homes, and the number of tele-activities—like work, medicine and education—that have become commonplace. These changes were rapid and have tremendously impacted the economy, supply chains, and the environment.
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Black and Native American youth experience more family deaths, may hinder education
The premature death of a parent or sibling can have many direct effects on family members, including hindering their future health and education. University of Minnesota School of Public Health (SPH) researchers studied who among a group of young adults was most likely to have a sibling or parent die and how often students experiencing such deaths obtain a college education.
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Spintronics: Faster data processing through ultrashort electric pulses
Physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Lanzhou University in China developed a simple concept that could improve significantly magnetic-based data processing. Using ultrashort electric pulses in the terahertz range, data can be written, read and erased very quickly. This would make data processing faster, more compact and energy efficient. The researchers confirmed their
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Ceftolozane/tazobactam: New treatment option for severe infections, but no proof of superiority
Ceftolozane/tazobactam: new treatment option for severe infections, but no proof of superiority New antibiotic broadens the treatment options for severe infections and resistances. However, there is no evidence of advantages or disadvantages in comparison with other antibiotics.
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New platform gauges effects of plastic nanoparticles on human development and health
A study released today in STEM CELLS outlines a new platform researchers designed that allowed them to investigate the potentially harmful effects of microplastics and nanoplastics.
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How old is your dog in human years? Scientists develop better method than 'multiply by 7'
By mapping molecular changes in the genome over time, UC San Diego researchers developed a formula to more accurately compare dog age to human age — a tool that could also help them evaluate how well anti-aging products work.
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Coronavirus damages the endocrine system
People with endocrine disorders may see their condition worsen as a result of COVID-19, according to a new review published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.
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Patients may be exposed to hormone-disrupting chemicals in medication, medical supplies
Health care providers may unintentionally expose patients to endocrine- disrupting chemicals (EDCs) by prescribing certain medications and using medical supplies, according to a perspective published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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Controlled human infection models and SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development
Infecting volunteers with COVID-19 may provide valuable insights for future rounds of vaccine testing, but would require very strict controls and is unlikely to advance the current slate of vaccines in advanced development, argues a group of infectious disease experts. Though model development would be laborious, it could ultimately be advantageous, allowing researchers to answer a broader range o
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In the Arctic, spring snowmelt triggers fresh CO2 production
Studies have shown the Arctic is warming roughly twice as fast as the rest of the world, and its soil holds twice the amount of carbon dioxide as the atmosphere. New research from San Diego State University finds that water from spring snowmelt infiltrates the soil and triggers fresh carbon dioxide production at higher rates than previously assumed.
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Astronomers observe nova V659 Sct during outburst
Using the TIGRE telescope, astronomers have conducted spectroscopic observations of recently discovered nova known as V659 Sct during multiple phases of its outburst. Results of this observational campaign, presented in a paper published June 24 on the arXiv pre-print server, shed more light on the properties of this event.
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Nanogaps between gold electrodes emit lots of light
Physicists have observed surprisingly strong light and high heat from nanogaps between plasmonic electrodes, particularly those made of gold. Seeing the light emerge from a nanoscale experiment didn't come as a big surprise to the physicists, but it got their attention when that light was 10,000 times brighter than they expected. Condensed matter physicist Doug Natelson of Rice University and col
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What Trump's Twitter and Clinton's Sax Have in Common
In some ways, Trump's use of social media follows a history of politicians sidestepping media gatekeepers that dates back to FDR. In others, he's a complete anomaly.
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Researchers visualize new states of ribosome translation with cryo-EM
The stages in which ribosomes synthesize life-sustaining proteins have been revealed in unprecedented real-time detail by UMass Medical School structural biologists Andrei Korostelev, Ph.D., and Anna Loveland, Ph.D. Their new study of this fundamental molecular mechanism, captured using state-of-the-art, time-resolved, cryo-electron microscopy was published by the journal Nature on July 1.
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Amerikansk selskab vil sælge ballonrejser til kanten af rummet
Næsten emissionsfri næsten-rumfart er slagnummeret for nyt selskab, der vil tilbyde både forskere og turister ture til 30 kilometers højde uden brug af raketter.
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Researchers visualize new states of ribosome translation with cryo-EM
The stages in which ribosomes synthesize life-sustaining proteins have been revealed in unprecedented real-time detail by UMass Medical School structural biologists Andrei Korostelev, Ph.D., and Anna Loveland, Ph.D. Their new study of this fundamental molecular mechanism, captured using state-of-the-art, time-resolved, cryo-electron microscopy was published by the journal Nature on July 1.
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Researchers map law of variations in plant roots
It has long been one of the best kept secrets in the underground world: What determines the variation in form and function of plant roots? An international team of researchers, led by scientists from Wageningen University & Research and the German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research in Halle-Jena-Leipzig, has revealed the strategies that roots use to invest in their tissues: do-it-yoursel
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Researchers observe branched flow of light for the first time
A team of researchers from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology has observed branched flow of light for the very first time. The findings are published in Nature and are featured on the cover of the July 2, 2020 issue.
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Researchers fabricate polyacrylonitrile-derived carbon films and fibers at high temperature
Superman can squeeze a lump of coal and turn it into a sparkling diamond—in comic books, anyway. There is some scientific validity to this fictional feat. Coal and diamonds are both composed of carbon. The two materials differ in their microscopic arrangement of atoms, and that leads to quite a difference in appearance, conductivity, hardness and other properties.
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Horror movie fans are better at coping with the coronavirus pandemic
Good news for fans of zombie movies and people with an interest in the dark side of life: they may be more psychologically resilient to the covid-19 pandemic
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Researchers map law of variations in plant roots
It has long been one of the best kept secrets in the underground world: What determines the variation in form and function of plant roots? An international team of researchers, led by scientists from Wageningen University & Research and the German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research in Halle-Jena-Leipzig, has revealed the strategies that roots use to invest in their tissues: do-it-yoursel
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Mini-marsquakes measured by InSight lander show effects of sun and wind
Compared with our own planet Earth, Mars might seem like a "dead" planet, but even there, the wind blows and the ground moves. On Earth, we study the ambient seismic noise rippling mainly due to ocean activity to peek underground at the structure of the Earth's interior. Can we do the same on Mars, without an ocean?
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Fans love musicians' personalities as much as their music
Why do you like the music you do? You would think that it is because of the music itself. But that's only half the story. Surprisingly, the other half of the story doesn't have much to do with music at all. A new Big Data study from Bar-Ilan University and Columbia Business School found that the musician's personality plays a large role, as well, in listener preferences.
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Inkomstklyftan ökar mellan land och stad
Levnadsstandarden i glesbygden sjunker i relation till riket som helhet samtidigt som levnadsstandarden ökar mycket kraftigt i centrala Stockholm. Den regionala ojämlikheten fortsätter att öka och sannolikt även den politiska polariseringen visar en ny rapport. I rapporten undersöker forskaren Martin Nordin skillnader i levnadsstandard mellan land och stad för perioden 1990–2017. Disponibel inkom
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Forget any false sense of security: we are still at the start of the global pandemic | Jeremy Farrar
Until every country is protected, we are all at risk. Only effective vaccines and treatments will allow us to eradicate coronavirus • Dr Jeremy Farrar is director of the Wellcome Trust Six months on from the first cases of Covid-19 emerging in Wuhan, many of us in Britain will be feeling a mixture of relief and trepidation as England's lockdown eases . The loosening of restrictions, alongside war
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How NASA's new rover will search for signs of ancient life on Mars
Perseverance to scour unmapped crater for organic debris, magnetic signatures
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HiMirror Slide Review: A Smart Mirror for Your Makeup or Beauty Routine
This tablet-mirror hybrid can analyze your skin, keep track of your skincare products, and is a handy way to follow makeup tutorials on YouTube.
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Women's Roller Derby Has a Plan for Covid, and It Kicks Ass
While baseball, basketball, and other sports struggle to adapt, an international team of skater-experts has figured out a safer way to play.
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Nasa Mars rover: Perseverance launch pushed back again
The launch of Nasa's Mars rover Perseverance is delayed again to 30 July at the earliest.
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Homeopathy is Impazable
A study by Russian researcher purports to find that a treatment, Impaza, increases penis length during copulation in rats, while the water placebo group and sildenafil (Viagra) did not. The authors conclude: "This effect, together with an absence of motivational actions, suggests that Impaza may be the most valuable treatment for erectile dysfunction." The study was originally published in the In
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'Hybrid' Quantum Networking Demonstrated for First Time
By exploiting the wave-and-particle-like nature of light, a new technique offers the best of both worlds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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'Hybrid' Quantum Networking Demonstrated for First Time
By exploiting the wave-and-particle-like nature of light, a new technique offers the best of both worlds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A College Degree Is No Guarantee of a Good Life
" How to Build a Life " is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. I magine a young man, a senior in high school. His academic performance has never been over the top, but he's done well enough. Among his classmates, the assumption is that all of them will go to college. However, just as his parents are about to send the deposit check to a college where he
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Believe the Polls This Time
Recent polls could hardly be more reassuring for voters who want to be done with Donald Trump. "Biden Builds Largest Lead This Year," a CNN headline declared. "Biden Hits 55%–41% Against Trump in Biggest National Poll Lead Yet," reported The Daily Beast . "Republicans should be petrified by the polls," a Washington Post opinion piece asserted. Yet the polls also frighten Democrats who, four years
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Oklahomans Just Embarrassed Trump a Second Time
For the second time in two weeks, Oklahomans have made President Donald Trump look bad. First there was the sparsely attended Tulsa rally . Now Sooner State voters have opted to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. There's an immediate, narrow problem for the White House, and a broader, more strategic one. In the short term, the very tight "yes" vote imperils a plan to turn Medicaid fun
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Another experimental covid-19 vaccine has shown promising early results
The news: An experimental covid-19 vaccine being developed by Pfizer and BioNTech provoked immune responses in 45 healthy volunteers, according to a preprint paper on medRXiv . The levels of antibodies were up to 2.8 times the level of those found in patients who have recovered. The study randomly assigned 45 people to get either one of three doses of the vaccine or a placebo. But there were side
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Coronavirus vaccine tracker: How close are we to a vaccine?
More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
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Water-filled windows could keep your home cool and save energy
Windows filled with water rather than argon gas could save energy in most of the world, partly because they can provide a cheap source of hot water
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Amazon fires at 13-year high for June
This early peak indicates a potentially devastating dry season ahead – perhaps even worse than 2019.
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Do Americans Understand How Badly They're Doing?
I returned to Paris with my family three months after President Emmanuel Macron had ordered one of the world's most aggressive national quarantines, and one month after France had begun to ease itself out of it. When we exited the Gare Montparnasse into the late-spring glare, after a season tucked away in a rural village with more cows than people as neighbors, it was jarring to be thrust back in
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DTU skal lede EU's største forskningsprojekt i jagten på fremtidens superbatterier
PLUS. Et nyt EU-projekt skal sætte fart på udviklingen ved at finde helt nye måder at opfinde batterier på, for det går i øjeblikket for langsomt i forhold til den grønne omstilling.
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I am a paramedic working for NHS test and trace but I've yet to make a single call
I am being paid to sit and refresh my computer screen every 15 minutes. The 'world-beating' system is a shambles NHS test and trace was meant to be world-beating, but in my experience it's been a shambles. I am a paramedic who has been working for the service since it launched, but I have yet to make a single call. Last week I got an email from NHS Professionals , the largest NHS staff bank in th
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Australia Locks Down 300,000 in Melbourne Area After Coronavirus Surge
The authorities have locked down 300,000 people in areas around Melbourne heavily populated by immigrants, reinforcing the coronavirus's outsized impact on disadvantaged communities.
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WIRED's Ultimate Summer Reading List
Summer is as much a season as a mindset—a sunny thing to escape to. Here are some weird, wild books to help get you there.
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4th of July Sales (2020): 32 Best Mattress and Tech Deals This Weekend
From mattresses to laptops, we'll meet all of your stay-at-home holiday tech needs here.
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Your Firework Smoke Could Be Tainted With Lead
It may be the most unpatriotic toxicology study ever, but so be it: Metals give fireworks their color, but some manufacturers are slipping in toxins.
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Why Does the Phrase 'Woman Scientist' Even Exist?
It's ungrammatical—plus, it suggests we're an exotic species. But it can also remind people that STEM isn't just for men — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Lövsalsfåglars två olika byggsätt uppkom parallellt i evolutionen
För att locka honor till parning bygger lövsalsfågeln en jättelik lövsal där han dansar och visar upp sina finaste föremål. Detta saknar motstycke i djurvärlden, men trots det har förmågan uppkommit två gånger oberoende av varandra, visar en dna-studie. Förutsättning har varit att arten lever i en miljö med föda i överflöd, menar forskarna bakom studien. Djurvärldens största byggnadsverk konstrue
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Parents Can't Wait Around Forever
Given that bars and restaurants in many parts of the United States are beginning to reopen, while the prospects for school remain hazy almost everywhere, you might think that scientific evidence about kids and the coronavirus is nonexistent. The truth is that we are still somewhat in the dark, but not completely. Here's what we know, what we kind of know, and what we need to do to know more. Back
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The Dentist Will See You Now: But Will You See the Dentist?
Dental practices are taking measures to keep patients safe. Some people are wary, however — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Dentist Will See You Now: But Will You See the Dentist?
Dental practices are taking measures to keep patients safe. Some people are wary, however — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Remdesivir/drug pricing: no right formula
For now, Gilead's preferred pricing formula reflects the implicit value provided
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Newly discovered form of carbon is more resilient than diamond
A computer simulation found a pentagon-shaped carbon molecule that would be as hard as diamond and could tolerate temperatures of almost 4000°C without breaking down
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CNIO team develop a technology to improve effectiveness of stem cells in regenerative medicine
Stem cells have been holding great promise for regenerative medicine for years. However, one of the main limitations in the application of these therapies is the quality of the stem cells that can be generated in the laboratory. Now, a team from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has developed a new, simple and fast technology that enhances in vitro and in vivo the potential of ste
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Brancheforening: Udledninger fra kølemidler bliver overset af regeringen
PLUS. Manglende regler for håndtering af HFC-kølemidler, der blandt andet bruges i varmepumper, resulterer i et udslip på 0,5 Mt CO2.
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These insects preserved in amber are still glowing 99 million years later
Insects from the mid-Cretaceous period preserved in amber were found in present-day northern Myanmar. (NIGPAS/) Fossils can tell scientists a lot about prehistoric life, but they can't say everything. When it comes to understanding our animal and plant forebears, there's a lot we'll probably never learn from fossils, like what colors ancient animals were. However, in rare cases, researchers get l
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An influential osteoporosis study is "likely fraudulent" — but not retracted
Alison Avenell first came across The Yamaguchi Osteoporosis Study (YOPS) when she was working on a 2014 Cochrane Review on bone fractures. She cited the study but felt something was off about it. "I suppose, together with my collaborators over the years, we developed sort of antennae for rather suspicious looking studies," Avenell, of the … Continue reading
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Coronavirus Live Updates
The United States set a single-day case record for the fifth time in a little over a week. Heading into the Fourth of July holiday, officials warn residents to stay home.
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What kind of face mask gives the best protection against Covid-19?
Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply
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Vestager advarer mod predictive policing
Borgerretsorganisationer har efterlyst et reelt forbud på predictive policing.
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Europa har spærret næsten alle vandløb for fiskenes vandring
Undersøgelse afdækker et stort problem for fiskenes overlevelse: Langt flere dæmninger og gamle spærringer end hidtil antaget stopper deres livsnødvendige vandringer.
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In the Future, Lab Mice Will Live in Computer Chips, Not Cages
As Covid-19 shuttered laboratories across the U.S., many researchers were forced to euthanize the animals they study. As a rodent surgeon in an animal research lab that faced this dilemma, I've become convinced that there is a safer, more effective way to model human disease — simulating biological systems.
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Improving plasma sprayed Raney-type nickel–molybdenum electrodes towards high-performance hydrogen evolution in alkaline medium
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67954-y
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Loss of protozoan and metazoan intestinal symbiont biodiversity in wild primates living in unprotected forests
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67959-7
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Dual frequency sound absorption with an array of shunt loudspeakers
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67810-z
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Selective whole genome amplification of Plasmodium malariae DNA from clinical samples reveals insights into population structure
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67568-4
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Botswana reports mysterious deaths of hundreds of elephants
Hundreds of elephants have died mysteriously in Botswana's famed Okavango Delta, the wildlife department said Thursday, ruling out poaching as the tusks were found intact.
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Botswana reports mysterious deaths of hundreds of elephants
Hundreds of elephants have died mysteriously in Botswana's famed Okavango Delta, the head of the wildlife department said Thursday, ruling out poaching as the tusks were found intact.
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Author Correction: A strong and ductile medium-entropy alloy resists hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17295-1
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There's Still A Lot You Don't Know | Shark Week 2020
All these years later, there's still a lot to learn about sharks. Shark Week 2020 starts August 9 on Discovery Channel. Learn more at SharkPickles.com Stream Full Episodes from Shark Week: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitte
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Earthquakes trigger landslides. Can landslides also trigger earthquakes?
Landslides after Taiwan's deadliest typhoon unleashed years of unusual earthquake activity
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Välfärdsklyftan ökar i Sverige
Pengarna som återstår när skatten är betald kallas för den disponibla inkomsten, och används för att mäta levnadsstandard. Bland boende i centrala Stockholm har denna ökat från 15 till 50 procent över rikssnittet sedan 1990. På den glesaste glesbygden där 15 procent av befolkningen finns har den istället sjunkit med fem procent jämfört med riket, och ligger på 10 procent under snittet.
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Här växer megastäder fram
"Mänsklighetens framtid är urban." Så står det i FN:s senaste urbaniseringsrapport. Och det saknas inte data som stödjer detta. För nästan 15 år sedan blev mer än halva jordens befolkning urban, och i över hundra länder lever mer än 70 procent av befolkningen i städer. Staden representerar i någon mening framtiden – den är i regel modernare än landsbygden, där finns alltid det senaste och nyaste o
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Phil Evans: Briton to take top weather satellite agency job
Phil Evans, formerly at the UK Met Office, will be the new director general of Eumetsat.
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Learn from the pandemic to prevent environmental catastrophe, scientists argue
The dynamics of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic share "striking similarities" with the twin environmental crises of global heating and species extinction, argue a team of scientists and policy experts from the UK and US.
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Learn from the pandemic to prevent environmental catastrophe, scientists argue
The dynamics of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic share "striking similarities" with the twin environmental crises of global heating and species extinction, argue a team of scientists and policy experts from the UK and US.
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Learn from the pandemic to prevent environmental catastrophe, scientists argue
COVID-19 is comparable to climate and extinction emergencies. All share features such as lagged impacts, feedback loops, and complex dynamics. Delayed action in the pandemic cost lives and economic growth, just as it will with environmental crises – but on a scale 'too grave to contemplate', say scientists from UK and US.
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Spørg Fagfolket: Har skyerne fået tiltrængt fred under lock-down?
En læser synes, at skyerne ser flottere ud, når der ikke er fly på himlen. Skyldes det, at de ikke bliver forstyrret af flyaktivitet? Det svarer DMI på.
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Brazilian Amazon sees worst June in 13 years for forest fires
Amazon forest fires in Brazil increased by 19.5 percent in June compared to the same month last year, making it the worst June in 13 years, authorities revealed on Wednesday.
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Common fireworks release toxic metals into the air
Some of America's favorite Independence Day fireworks emit lead, copper, and other toxins, a new study suggests. These metals, which are used to give fireworks their vibrant color, also damage human cells and animal lungs.
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Putting zinc on bread wheat leaves
An estimated 17.3% of people worldwide are at risk of inadequate zinc intake; zinc deficiency is a major human health concern. Increasing Zn concentration in wheat grains is highly important, and management strategies to enhance grain Zn concentration can play an important role in fighting nutrient deficiency.
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Putting zinc on bread wheat leaves
An estimated 17.3% of people worldwide are at risk of inadequate zinc intake; zinc deficiency is a major human health concern. Increasing Zn concentration in wheat grains is highly important, and management strategies to enhance grain Zn concentration can play an important role in fighting nutrient deficiency.
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Men more likely than women to be seen as brilliant
Men are more likely than are women to be seen as "brilliant," finds a new study measuring global perceptions linked to gender. The work concludes that these stereotyped views are an instance of implicit bias, revealing automatic associations that people cannot, or at least do not, report holding when asked directly.
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Buy Professor Seeberger's Artemi-Tea to survive COVID-19!
Science communication by press release. No paper is published, no data available, but a Max Planck Institute director is eager to announce a possible cure for COVID-19: artemisia extracts, by his own company.
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Wise words? The advice that I can't forget
From my nan telling me not to lick my finger when turning a page to dubious showering guidance, why do some things stick in our brain? It's funny, the things that stick in your mind for ever. When I was little, my brother and I would usually go to our grandparents' house after school. We would be given our tea in front of the telly, which we would sit and watch while Grandad read the Express and
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Boom för melatonin
En dubblering på mindre än tre år. Så ser trenden ut när det gäller förskrivning av sömnhormonet melatonin – trots dåliga kunskaper om biverkningar på lång sikt.
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Scots Gaelic could die out within a decade, study finds
Language is used routinely only by a diminishing number of elderly islanders A casual visitor to Scotland might assume that the Gaelic language is thriving, with every police car carrying the word poileas and every ambulance ambaileans . Yet in the few places where it is spoken, the language is in a profound, potentially terminal crisis. Without radical action, Scots Gaelic will be dead within a
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Coronavirus Victoria: everything we know about Melbourne's Covid-19 clusters
The city is undergoing a suburban testing blitz after premier Daniel Andrews revealed hotspots in suburbs were largely caused by extended families Follow live updates in Friday's Australia coronavirus blog Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus email Australia Covid-19 active cases and hotspots map and stats Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications On 2 Ju
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FTC settles false advertising suit against low-level light therapy marketer with $22 million judgment
Per a settlement with the FTC, the marketers of Willow Curve, a low-level light therapy device costing hundreds of dollars, will have to stop making deceptive claims that the device treats chronic, severe pain and associated inflammation. Any health claims made for the device must be supported by "competent and reliable scientific evidence".
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US Coronavirus Cases Smash Daily Record as Global Infections Soar
Over 50,000 new cases in the US in a single day.
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Research news tip sheet: Story ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
The latest Johns Hopkins Medicine research achievements and clinical advances, covering topics not related to COVID-19 or the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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New method reveals how the Parkinson's disease protein damages cell membranes
In sufferers of Parkinson's disease, clumps of α-synuclein (alpha-synuclein), sometimes known as the 'Parkinson's protein', are found in the brain. These destroy cell membranes, eventually resulting in cell death. Now, a new method developed at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, reveals how the composition of cell membranes seems to be a decisive factor for how small quantities of α-synucl
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Putting zinc on bread wheat leaves
Applying zinc to the leaves of bread wheat can increase wheat grain zinc concentrations and improve its nutritional content.
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Mini-'Marsquakes' measured by InSight lander show effects of sun and wind
Analysis of seismometer data from the InSight Martian lander revealed that different types and frequencies of ambient low-magnitude "microtremors" on Mars were associated with different sources, and some reflected daily variations in wind and solar irradiance, either in distant locations or near the lander. These findings will contribute to future projects seeking to model and monitor the Martian
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Men more likely than women to be seen as brilliant
Men are more likely than are women to be seen as "brilliant," finds a new study measuring global perceptions linked to gender. The work concludes that these stereotyped views are an instance of implicit bias, revealing automatic associations that people cannot, or at least do not, report holding when asked directly.
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Inquiry Prompted by Trump's Hurricane Dorian Claim Is Being Blocked, Investigator Says
The Commerce Department is impeding findings into whether it coerced the top NOAA official to support President Trump's inaccurate claim that Dorian would hit Alabama, the department's inspector general said.
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Hubble at 30: a view into our cosmos – podcast
Thirty years ago, the Hubble space telescope was shuttled into orbit, and has since provided us with astonishing images and insights into the universe. Earlier this year, Hannah Devlin spoke to one of the astronauts who helped launch Hubble, Kathy Sullivan. The first American woman to walk in space, Sullivan describes her journey to becoming an astronaut, why Hubble was such a vital mission and w
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Hubble at 30: a view into our cosmos
Thirty years ago, the Hubble space telescope was shuttled into orbit, and has since provided us with astonishing images and insights into the universe. Earlier this year, Hannah Devlin spoke to one of the astronauts who helped launch Hubble, Kathy Sullivan. The first American woman to walk in space, Sullivan describes her journey to becoming an astronaut, why Hubble was such a vital mission and wh
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Independence Day: a star-spangled superspreader event
US public health experts warn of heightened risk of virus transmission during July 4 celebrations
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Fed's Bullard says risk of financial crisis remains
St Louis president warns of wave of bankruptcies without public health measures
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Global stocks rise as investors welcome strong US jobs report
US employers added 4.8m new jobs in June, beating market expectations
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Hundreds of elephants found dead in Botswana
Some 350 elephant carcasses have been spotted in Botswana's Okavango Delta since May.
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Unforced Variations: July 2020
This month's open thread for climate science topics.
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Surgeons Successfully Reattach Man's Penis Nearly a Day After It Was Cut Off
The longest time on record for this kind of operation.
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Screen identifies DYRK1B network as mediator of transcription repression on damaged chromatin [Cell Biology]
DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) trigger transient pausing of nearby transcription, an emerging ATM-dependent response that suppresses chromosomal instability. We screened a chemical library designed to target the human kinome for new activities that mediate gene silencing on DSB-flanking chromatin, and have uncovered the DYRK1B kinase as an early respondent to…
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Stem cell lineage survival as a noisy competition for niche access [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Understanding to what extent stem cell potential is a cell-intrinsic property or an emergent behavior coming from global tissue dynamics and geometry is a key outstanding question of systems and stem cell biology. Here, we propose a theory of stem cell dynamics as a stochastic competition for access to a…
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Male reproductive aging arises via multifaceted mating-dependent sperm and seminal proteome declines, but is postponable in Drosophila [Evolution]
Declining ejaculate performance with male age is taxonomically widespread and has broad fitness consequences. Ejaculate success requires fully functional germline (sperm) and soma (seminal fluid) components. However, some aging theories predict that resources should be preferentially diverted to the germline at the expense of the soma, suggesting differential impacts of…
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Dynamic neural and glial responses of a head-specific model for traumatic brain injury in Drosophila [Neuroscience]
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the strongest environmental risk factor for the accelerated development of neurodegenerative diseases. There are currently no therapeutics to address this due to lack of insight into mechanisms of injury progression, which are challenging to study in mammalian models. Here, we have developed and extensively characterized…
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Cofactor-enabled functional expression of fruit fly, honeybee, and bumblebee nicotinic receptors reveals picomolar neonicotinoid actions [Agricultural Sciences]
The difficulty of achieving robust functional expression of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has hampered our understanding of these important molecular targets of globally deployed neonicotinoid insecticides at a time when concerns have grown regarding the toxicity of this chemotype to insect pollinators. We show that thioredoxin-related transmembrane protein 3…
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Intercepting second-messenger signaling by rationally designed peptides sequestering c-di-GMP [Microbiology]
The bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) regulates a wide range of cellular functions from biofilm formation to growth and survival. Targeting a second-messenger network is challenging because the system involves a multitude of components with often overlapping functions. Here, we present a strategy to intercept c-di-GMP signaling pathways by…
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Nur77 controls tolerance induction, terminal differentiation, and effector functions in semi-invariant natural killer T cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
Semi-invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are self-reactive lymphocytes, yet how this lineage attains self-tolerance remains unknown. iNKT cells constitutively express high levels of Nr4a1-encoded Nur77, a transcription factor that integrates signal strength downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) within activated thymocytes and peripheral T cells. The function of…
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Inner Workings: Was Jupiter born beyond the current orbits of Neptune and Pluto? [Astronomy]
Ancient people named the planet Jupiter well. Both its brilliance and its slow, regal movement across the sky evoked a king among gods. Today we know much more about the influence of Jupiter, a planet boasting more than twice as much mass as the solar system's other planets put together….
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