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Researchers call for worldwide biosurveillance network to protect from diseases
Given the importance for the health of a global population, a team of scientists recommend a 'decentralized' disease surveillance system, enabled by modern pathogen-detection methods, which builds in-country capacity for addressing challenges. Utilizing portable molecular screening that is both cost-effective and relatively easy to use, this network would take a more fundamentally proactive approa
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A new role for a tiny linker in transmembrane ion channels
In the molecular-level world of ion channels—passageways through membranes that carry signals in a cell's environment and allow it to respond—researchers have debated about the role of a small piece of the channel called a linker, says computational biophysicist Jianhan Chen at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.
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A new role for a tiny linker in transmembrane ion channels
In the molecular-level world of ion channels—passageways through membranes that carry signals in a cell's environment and allow it to respond—researchers have debated about the role of a small piece of the channel called a linker, says computational biophysicist Jianhan Chen at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.
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Hone Your Mind with this Speed Reading & Memory Mastery Bundle
Have you ever had a moment where somebody asks you about some fact in a book you read, and you come up blank? You're not alone , and it can be a frustrating experience. Yet, we often forget that these aren't innate abilities. They're skills, and they're ones you can improve by learning speed reading and memory techniques, built on neuroscience and research. If you'd like to read more and remember
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NASA Will 'Pause' Attempts to Deploy InSight's Heat Probe on Mars
The InSight lander has been trying to deploy its heat probe instrument for months, but it's going to take a break. This probe was supposed to dig down to take the planet's temperature, but NASA has only made progress when nudging the probe along with the lander's robotic arm. The latest data suggests the probe isn't moving anymore, so NASA has decided to "pause" this part of the mission and use t
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CT of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) versus CT of influenza virus pneumonia
An open-access American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) article investigating the differences in CT findings between coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia and influenza virus pneumonia found that most lesions from COVID-19 were located in the peripheral zone and close to the pleura, whereas influenza virus was more prone to show mucoid impaction and pleural effusion. The more important role of C
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New study outlines best practices for delivering care via telehealth
Researchers describe how the SAMHSA-developed principles of trauma-informed care can be used during telehealth encounters in primary care and other specialties to help mitigate the isolating, traumatic effects of COVID-19.
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A new role for a tiny linker in transmembrane ion channels
In a study of large-conductance potassium (BK) channela, Jianhan Chen and colleagues UMass Amherst and Washington University report in eLife that their experiments have revealed 'the first direct example of how non-specific membrane interactions of a covalent linker can regulate the activation of a biological ion channel.'
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A memory game could help us understand brain injury
A Boston University team created a memory game for mice in order to examine the function of two different brain areas that process information about the sensation of touch and the memory of previous events.
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The Perils of 'With Us or Against Us'
When I was 21, the United States experienced a national trauma: the planes crashing into the World Trade Center, the nearly 3,000 people killed in that day's terrorist attacks, the ruins left smoldering for months at Ground Zero, and the unnerving knowledge that sooner or later, al-Qaeda would almost certainly strike again. Thoughtful deliberation is never so difficult as in such moments. Like te
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New Gene Editing Tool Corrects Mutations in Mitochondrial DNA
An enzyme pulled from toxic bacteria can enter the organelle and perform single-nucleotide DNA swaps.
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A lopsided pair of dead stars could reveal some of the universe's secrets
Two dead stars, one larger than the other, will one day collide—and tell us valuable things about the universe. (Courtesy of Arecibo Observatory/University of Central Florida – William Gonzalez and Andy Torres./) Picture a pair of collapsed stars, light-years away, locked in a "dance" of death: a final embrace that will end in their collision. In about 500 million years, astronomers anticipate th
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How Astronomers Learned to 'Listen' to Gravitational Waves
Since confirming the existence of ripples in the fabric of space-time some five years ago, the LIGO/Virgo collaboration has advanced gravitational-wave research by leaps and bounds.
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Scientists Detect "Ringing" in the Earth's Atmosphere
Air Bell According to a new study by an international team of researchers, the Earth's entire atmosphere vibrates much like a ringing bell — a low-pitched fundamental tone alongside higher-pitched "overtones." The discovery could help scientists better predict weather patterns and understand the makeup of our atmosphere. "This finally resolves a longstanding and classic issue in atmospheric scien
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An Enzyme That Increases With Exercise Can Improve Memory In Mice, And Maybe People
When scientists revved up the production of an enzyme called GPLD1 in older mice, it stimulated nerve growth in their brains and the animals navigated a maze better. (Image credit: Owen Franken/Getty Images)
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Magnetic memory states go exponential
Researchers showed that relatively simple structures can support exponential number of magnetic states – much greater than previously thought – and demonstrated switching between the states by generating spin currents. The ability to stabilize and control exponential number of discrete magnetic states in a relatively simple structure constitutes a major contribution to spintronics and may pave the
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New evidence of long-term volcanic, seismic risks in northern Europe
An ancient European volcanic region may pose both a greater long-term volcanic risk and seismic risk to northwestern Europe than scientists had realized, geophysicists report in a study in the Geophysical Journal International. The densely populated area is centered in the Eifel region of Germany, and covers parts of Belgium, the Netherlands, France and Luxembourg.
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Spacewatch: Nasa asteroid mission passes key milestone
Design review stage passed for craft intended to visit iron-and-nickel mini-world in 2026 Nasa's mission to explore a metal-rich asteroid passed a key milestone in its development this week. The critical design review makes sure everyone is satisfied that the spacecraft will work as expected. Now that the review has been passed, engineers can begin making the various bits of spacecraft hardware i
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Better reskilling can future-proof jobs in the age of automation. Enter SkillUp's new coalition.
Outplacement is an underperforming $5 billion dollar industry. A new non-profit coalition by SkillUp intends to disrupt it. More and more Americans will be laid off in years to come due to automation. Those people need to reorient their career paths and reskill in a way that protects their long-term livelihood. SkillUp brings together technology and service providers, education and training provi
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NOAA Officials Feared Firings After Trump's Hurricane Claims, Inspector General Says
The report found White House pressure led to NOAA's rebuke of forecasters who contradicted Mr. Trump's inaccurate claim that Hurricane Dorian would hit Alabama.
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Study finds food safety practices benefit small farmers
The costs of implementing food safety practices to prevent foodborne illnesses have been viewed as a threat to the financial well-being of small farms, which must pay a higher percentage of their annual sales than larger farms to meet safety standards.
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CU researchers identify key role of immune cells in brain development
Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have identified how specific brain cells interacting during development could be related to neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases, including some that occur later in life.
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Food safety investments open new markets, boost revenue for small farmers
A new Cornell University study finds that when small-scale farmers are trained in food safety protocols and develop a farm food safety plan, new markets open up to them, leading to an overall gain in revenue.
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New study supports remdesivir as COVID-19 treatment
The news about remdesivir, the investigational anti-viral drug that has shown early promise in the fight against COVID-19, keeps getting better.
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A complex gene program initiates brain changes in response to cocaine
Researchers used single-nucleus RNA sequencing to compare transcriptional responses to acute cocaine in 16 unique cell populations from the brain nucleus accumbens. The atlas is part of a major study that used multiple cutting-edge technologies to describe a dopamine-induced gene expression signature that regulates the brain's response to cocaine. The study shows neurobiological processes that con
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Salmonella biofilm protein causes autoimmune responses — Possible link with Alzheimer's
Scientists from the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and Temple University (Philadelphia, US) have demonstrated that a Salmonella biofilm protein can cause autoimmune responses and arthritis in animals.
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Vanguard 1: Earth's Oldest Artificial Satellite That's Still in Orbit
America's second satellite stopped communicating with Earth in 1964, but it will stay in orbit for centuries.
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Essential bike maintenance tips everyone should know
If you're someone who just started cycling, you'll want to know how to keep your bike in tip-top shape. (Roman Koester/Unsplash/) Even the most inexperienced cyclists know you can't ride a bike with two flat tires, no brakes, a janky chain, and pieces that are a bump or two away from scattering across the pavement. If you're not taking care of your ride, you risk disappointment and disaster every
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China Says There's a New Disease That's Even Deadlier Than COVID
China's embassy in the former Soviet republic of Kazakhstan has put out a statement warning of an "unknown pneumonia" that is reportedly even deadlier than the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, the South China Morning Post reports . "The death rate of this disease is much higher than the novel coronavirus," read the warning to Chinese citizens in Kazakhstan, as quoted by the SCMP . "The country's
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Science education community should withdraw from international tests, study says
The science community should withdraw from involvement in international tests such as PISA because they have forced schools to adopt "narrow" curricula and pedagogies, a study says.
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Bats offer clues to treating COVID-19
Bats are often considered patient zero for many deadly viruses affecting humans, including Ebola, rabies, and, most recently, the SARS-CoV-2 strain of virus that causes coronavirus.
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Study looks at life inside and outside of seafloor hydrocarbon seeps
Microbial cells are found in abundance in marine sediments beneath the ocean and make up a significant amount of the total microbial biomass on the planet. Microbes found deeper in the ocean, such as in hydrocarbon seeps, are usually believed to have slow population turnover rates and low amounts of available energy, where the further down a microbe is found, the less energy it has available.
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Native bees also facing novel pandemic
Move over, murder hornets. There's a new bee killer in town.
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Discovery reveals how plants make cellulose for strength and growth
New research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine reveals how plants create the load-bearing structures that let them grow—much like how building crews frame a house.
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Endangered California condors in Sequoia National Park for the first time in 50 years
For the first time in nearly 50 years, California condors have been spotted at Sequoia National Park, wildlife officials announced.
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Scientists Discover Enzyme That Could Result In A Drug Substitute For Exercise
Scientists have discovered an enzyme that is elevated in people and mice who exercise a lot. They hope the discovery could lead to medicine that would have some of the benefits of exercise.
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Bats offer clues to treating COVID-19
Bats are often considered patient zero for many deadly viruses affecting humans, including Ebola, rabies, and, most recently, the SARS-CoV-2 strain of virus that causes coronavirus.
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Native bees also facing novel pandemic
Move over, murder hornets. There's a new bee killer in town.
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Discovery reveals how plants make cellulose for strength and growth
New research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine reveals how plants create the load-bearing structures that let them grow—much like how building crews frame a house.
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Endangered California condors in Sequoia National Park for the first time in 50 years
For the first time in nearly 50 years, California condors have been spotted at Sequoia National Park, wildlife officials announced.
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Improved cochlear implant device allows safe MRI in children without discomfort
A study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago found that children with a MED-EL Synchrony cochlear implant device can undergo MRI safely, with no discomfort and reduced need for sedation or anesthesia. Findings were published in the peer-reviewed journal Laryngoscope.
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Neonatal exposure to antigens of commensal bacteria promotes broader immune repertoire
Researchers have added fresh evidence that early exposure to vaccine-, bacterial- or microbiota-derived antigens has a dramatic effect on the diversity of antibodies an adult mammal will have to fight future infections by pathogens. This antibody diversity is called the clonal repertoire — basically different single cells with distinct antibody potential that can multiply into a large clone of ce
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Penn Jillette: The year that shattered America's illusions
Add event to your calendar The year 2020 will go down in history as one that shook our inner and outer worlds. In this Big Think Live session, magician, author, and cultural critic Penn Jillette will discuss the giant upheavals of 2020 through the lens of what he knows best: illusions. Which social, personal, and governmental illusions have been shattered this year, and how (and what) should we r
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How museums help communities heal | Honor Harger
While on lockdown, the galleries of Singapore's iconic ArtScience Museum were empty — but online, the museum was abuzz. Honor Harger shares how they're engaging deeply with its visitors through streamed talks, performances and workshops that investigate the COVID-19 landscape and uplift marginalized voices. (This virtual conversation, hosted by TED's current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rod
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SARS-CoV-2 Can Infect Human Brain Organoids
The results are a proof-of-concept that the novel coronavirus can replicate in neurons, but it's too soon to say whether this occurs in people with COVID-19.
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Fair justice systems need open data access
Researchers are developing an A.I. platform that provides users with access to the information and insights hidden inside federal court records, regardless of their data and analytic skills.
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Study says inhalers OK to use amid COVID-19 concerns
Researchers find that the benefits of inhalers for asthma sufferers outweigh the risks of contracting coronavirus, following concerns raised after WHO warned that steroids could reduce immunity.
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What happens when food first touches your tongue
A new study might explain why humans register some tastes more quickly than others, potentially due to each flavor's molecular size. The research also provided explanation as to why humans register taste more quickly when food or drink moves over their tongues quickly, as compared to when they are held in their mouth steadily.
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Contracting COVID-19: lifestyle and social connections may play a role
Current research indicates that unhealthy lifestyle choices, including smoking and lack of exercise, along with emotional stressors like social isolation and interpersonal conflicts are important risk factors for developing upper respiratory infections. It is possible these same factors also increase the risk of contracting COVID-19.
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Unraveling the mystery of wheat herbicide tolerance
In a new study, scientists take advantage of wheat's flexible genetic makeup to identify chromosomal regions that help detoxify synthetic auxin herbicides.
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Chatbots can ease medical providers' burden, offer guidance to those with COVID-19 symptoms
Research finds that chatbots — software applications that conduct online chats via text or text-to-speech — working for reputable organizations can ease the burden on medical providers and offer trusted guidance to those with symptoms.
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Rochester community initiative increases teenage use of effective contraception
Study finds that teenagers in Rochester utilize Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC) at a rate five times higher than the United States as a whole.
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Researchers explore new approaches to support work practices in homeless shelters
Researchers from Bentley University, in partnership with Pine Street Inn, New England's largest homeless shelter, have been exploring the ideas of process modeling to better understand and improve triage practices at homeless shelters.
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Expansion stress enhances growth and migration of breast cancer cells
Expansion stress can have an alarming impact on breast cancer cells by creating conditions that could lead to dangerous acceleration of the disease, an interdisciplinary team of University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers has found.
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New study predicts coral bleaching and coral-eating starfish invasions months in advance
A new study by the Marine Laboratory at the University of Guam may help researchers predict coral bleaching months earlier than current tools, and, for the first time, may help predict invasion events of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish. The study was published on May 8 in Scientific Reports.
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On an Interstellar Flight, Language Itself Would Evolve
Local Dialect In science fiction, there's something called a generation ship: a spacecraft that ferries humankind on a multiple-generation-long journey to brand new star systems or even galaxies. The idea has also been touted here in the real world by those hell-bent on traversing the stars. But there's a major problem with the concept, and we're not talking about the countless generations doomed
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UC Berkeley reopening in doubt after 47 coronavirus cases tied to fraternity parties
Cases make it 'harder to imagine bringing our campus community back' as planned, university says Plans for the fall semester at the University of California, Berkeley, are in question after 47 new Covid-19 cases tied to fraternity parties emerged in the past week. University officials warn the outbreak could jeopardize the ability to move forward with in-person classes in the months ahead. "We ha
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The Coronavirus Can Be Airborne Indoors, W.H.O. Says
The agency also explained more directly that people without symptoms may spread the virus. The acknowledgments should have come sooner, some experts said.
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Discovery reveals how plants make cellulose for strength and growth
The discovery unveils the molecular machinery that plants use to weave cellulose chains into cable-like structures called 'microfibrils.'
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Safer CRISPR gene editing with fewer off-target hits
The CRISPR system is a powerful tool for the targeted editing of genomes, with significant therapeutic potential, but runs the risk of inappropriately editing "off-target" sites. However, a new study shows that mutating the enzyme at the heart of the CRISPR gene editing system can improve its fidelity.
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Scientists urge caution, further assessment of ecological impacts above deep sea mining
A new study argues that deep-sea mining poses significant risks, not only to the area immediately surrounding mining operations but also to the water hundreds to thousands of feet above the seafloor, threatening vast midwater ecosystems. Further, the scientists suggest how these risks could be evaluated more comprehensively to enable society and managers to decide if and how deep-sea mining should
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Bats offer clues to treating COVID-19
Bats carry many viruses, including COVID-19, without becoming ill. Biologists are studying the immune system of bats to find potential ways to 'mimic' that system in humans.
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Native bees also facing novel pandemic
There is growing evidence that another 'pandemic' has been infecting bees around the world for the past two decades, and is spreading: a fungal pathogen known as Nosema.
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Our itch to share helps spread COVID-19 misinformation
A study contains bad news and good news about Covid-19 misinformation — and a new insight that may help reduce the problem.
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Distorted passage of time during the COVID-19 lockdown
A survey conducted in the U.K. suggests that social and physical distancing measures put in place during the Covid-19 pandemic significantly impacted people's perception of how quickly time passed compared to their pre-lockdown perceptions.
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Structural analysis of COVID-19 spike protein provides insight into its evolution
Researchers have characterized the structure of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein as well as its most similar relative in a bat coronavirus. The structures provide clues about how the spike evolved and could help inform vaccine design.
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LIVE TOMORROW| Penn Jillette: The year that shattered America's illusions
Add event to your calendar The year 2020 will go down in history as one that shook our inner and outer worlds. In this Big Think Live session, magician, author, and cultural critic Penn Jillette will discuss the giant upheavals of 2020 through the lens of what he knows best: illusions. Which social, personal, and governmental illusions have been shattered this year, and how (and what) should we r
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Safer CRISPR gene editing with fewer off-target hits
The CRISPR system is a powerful tool for the targeted editing of genomes, with significant therapeutic potential, but runs the risk of inappropriately editing "off-target" sites. However, a new study shows that mutating the enzyme at the heart of the CRISPR gene editing system can improve its fidelity.
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5G wireless networks have few health impacts, finds study using zebrafish model
Findings from a new study into the effects of radiofrequency radiation generated by the wireless technology that will soon be the standard for cell phones suggest few health impacts.
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Saliva Tests: How They Work and What They Bring to COVID-19
Universities and healthcare facilities are planning to use spit tests to conduct large-scale screening.
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Dyster FN-prognose: Vi risikerer at overskride vigtigt klimamål indenfor de næste 5 år
Den globale gennemsnitstemperatur kan stige med 1,5 grader inden 2025.
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Science education community should withdraw from international tests
The science community should withdraw from involvement in international tests such as PISA because they have forced schools to adopt 'narrow' curricula and pedagogies, a study says.
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Biologists trace plants' steady mitochondrial genomes to a gene found in viruses, bacteria
CSU biologists have traced the stability of plant mitochondrial genomes to a particular gene – MSH1 – that plants have but animals don't. Their experiments, described in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could lend insight into why animal mitochondrial genomes tend to mutate.
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This tool is saving universities millions of dollars in journal subscriptions
As universities look for savings, new software helps reimagine deals with publishers
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Researchers find rise in broken heart syndrome during COVID-19 pandemic
Researchers have found a significant increase in patients experiencing stress cardiomyopathy, also known as broken heart syndrome, during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Global wildlife surveillance could provide early warning for next pandemic
Researchers propose a decentralized, global wildlife biosurveillance system to identify — before the next pandemic emerges — animal viruses that have the potential to cause human disease.
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5G wireless networks have few health impacts, finds study using zebrafish model
Findings from a new study into the effects of radiofrequency radiation generated by the wireless technology that will soon be the standard for cell phones suggest few health impacts.
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Slash CO2, Then Wait–and Wait–for Temperatures to Drop
Climate action today will take decades to manifest in global temperatures because of "climate inertia" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Engineers design a reusable, silicone rubber face mask
Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have designed a new silicone rubber face mask that they believe could stop viral particles as effectively as N95 masks. Unlike N95 masks, the new masks can be easily sterilized and used many times.
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Bodies donated to science 'left to be eaten by rats at Paris centre'
Inquiry to examine claims remains were found strewn around and dismembered Authorities in France will investigate claims that human corpses donated for science were left to rot and be eaten by rats at a university research facility, the Paris prosecutor's office has said. An investigation into "violations of the integrity of a corpse" was handed over to magistrates by prosecutors who handled the
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Robo-Chemist: The Latest Version
So let's talk robotic chemistry experimentation – that always calms everyone right down, doesn't it? This new paper in Nature from a group in Liverpool is (at heart) a pretty straightforward implementation of modern reaction optimization, with the added feature that it's being done by a mobile robot, rolling around the lab in the dark for about 20 hours a day. The motorized chemist itself is show
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Discovery reveals how plants make cellulose for strength and growth
The discovery unveils the molecular machinery that plants use to weave cellulose chains into cable-like structures called 'microfibrils.'
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New in the Hastings Center Report: Health, race, and society during Covid-19
The latest issue is devoted to essays that examine how the pandemic has highlighted connections between health and social structures–concerning not just access to health care but also conditions of living that affect health, from inequality to political and environmental conditions.
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Dissecting fruit flies' varying responses to life-extension diet
Changes in a few small molecules in a cell's metabolism might indicate whether a calorie-restricted diet will extend, shorten, or not effect lifespan, a fruit fly study shows. Metabolomics may reveal how calorie-restricted diets affect aging, and how genes and environment influence these responses.
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Cherned up to the maximum
In topological materials, electrons can display behaviour that is fundamentally differentfrom that in 'conventional' matter, and the magnitude of many such 'exotic' phenomena isdirectly proportional to an entity known as the Chern number. New experiments establishfor the first time that the theoretically predicted maximum Chern number can be reached — and controlled — in a real material.
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Movement ecology bears fruits: ATLAS supports map-based navigation of wild bats
Hebrew University and Tel Aviv University researchers collaborated on tracking wild bats' foraging habits in their natural habitat. They found evidence that the animals navigate using an advanced cognitive map.
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Streamlining acute malnutrition treatment brings same recovery in children at lower cost
A new streamlined approach to treating acute malnutrition is as effective as standard treatment but will free up funds to reach more children with life-saving care, according to new research published in PLOS Medicine.
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Arctic Ocean 'regime shift'
Stanford scientists find the growth of phytoplankton in the Arctic Ocean has increased 57 percent over just two decades, enhancing its ability to soak up carbon dioxide. While once linked to melting sea ice, the increase is now propelled by rising concentrations of tiny algae.
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Global wildlife surveillance could provide early warning for next pandemic
In a perspective article published July 9 in Science, a team of wildlife biologists, infectious disease experts, and others propose a decentralized, global wildlife biosurveillance system to identify — before the next pandemic emerges — animal viruses that have the potential to cause human disease.
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Advanced technology sheds new light on evolution of teeth
The evolution of our teeth began among ancient armoured fishes more than 400 million years ago. In the scientific journal Science, an international team led by researchers from Uppsala University presents ground-breaking findings about these earliest jawed vertebrates. Using powerful X-ray imaging, they show that unique fossils found near Prague contain surprisingly modern-looking teeth.
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Socio-economic, environmental impacts of COVID-19 quantified
How is COVID-19 impacting people and the planet and what are the implications for a post-pandemic world? This world-first study led by the University of Sydney quantifies the socio-economic losses and environmental gains.
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Scientists trace the origin of our teeth from the most primitive jawed fish
An international team of scientists led by Uppsala University (Sweden), in collaboration with the ESRF, the European Synchrotron (France), the brightest X-ray source, has digitally 'dissected', for the first time, the most primitive jawed fish fossils with teeth found near Prague more than 100 years ago. The results, published today in Science, show that their teeth have surprisingly modern featur
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Fair justice systems need open data access
Northwestern University researchers are developing an A.I. platform that provides users with access to the information and insights hidden inside federal court records, regardless of their data and analytic skills.
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Conditions ripe for active Amazon fire, Atlantic hurricane seasons
Warmer than average sea surface temperatures in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean so far in 2020 have set the stage for an active hurricane season and elevated the risk of fires in the southern Amazon, according to scientists at NASA and the University of California, Irvine.
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Aquaculture's role in nutrition in the COVID-19 era
Aquaculture, the relatively young but fast-growing industry of farming of fish and other marine life, now produces around half of all seafood consumed by humans. A new paper from American University published today examines the economics of an aquaculture industry of the future that is simultaneously environmentally sustainable and nutritious for the nearly 1 billion people worldwide who depend on
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Lead fallout from Notre Dame fire was likely overlooked
A new study used soil samples collected from neighborhoods around the cathedral to estimate local amounts of lead fallout from the fire.
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Will We Recognize Life on Mars When We See It?
If NASA's Perseverance rover finds life on the Red Planet, there's a good chance our first extraterrestrial encounter will be a little ambiguous.
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Aquaculture's role in nutrition in the COVID-19 era
Aquaculture, the relatively young but fast-growing industry of farming of fish and other marine life, now produces around half of all seafood consumed by humans. A new paper from American University published today examines the economics of an aquaculture industry of the future that is simultaneously environmentally sustainable and nutritious for the nearly 1 billion people worldwide who depend on
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Study of giant ant heads using simple models may aid bio-inspired designs
Researchers use a variety of modelling approaches to study form and function. By using a basic biomechanical model for studying body form and center of mass stability in ants, new research identifies the benefits of "simple models" and hope that it can be used for bio-inspired designs.
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Study of giant ant heads using simple models may aid bio-inspired designs
Researchers use a variety of modelling approaches to study form and function. By using a basic biomechanical model for studying body form and center of mass stability in ants, new research identifies the benefits of "simple models" and hope that it can be used for bio-inspired designs.
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Monumental patience
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News at a glance
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No room for error
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Exercising your mind
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Changing course
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Poised for tissue repair
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Microbial management
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Teeth and jaws
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Engineering a toxin
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Food for thought
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Knowing their way around
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A very high Chern number
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Early warning signs
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Monkeying with the piano
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Structure and selectivity engineering of the M1 muscarinic receptor toxin complex
Muscarinic toxins (MTs) are natural toxins produced by mamba snakes that primarily bind to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (MAChRs) and modulate their function. Despite their similar primary and tertiary structures, MTs show distinct binding selectivity toward different MAChRs. The molecular details of how MTs distinguish MAChRs are not well understood. Here, we present the crystal structure o
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Blood factors transfer beneficial effects of exercise on neurogenesis and cognition to the aged brain
Reversing brain aging may be possible through systemic interventions such as exercise. We found that administration of circulating blood factors in plasma from exercised aged mice transferred the effects of exercise on adult neurogenesis and cognition to sedentary aged mice. Plasma concentrations of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)–specific phospholipase D1 (Gpld1), a GPI-degrading enzyme deriv
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Light-mediated strong coupling between a mechanical oscillator and atomic spins 1 meter apart
Engineering strong interactions between quantum systems is essential for many phenomena of quantum physics and technology. Typically, strong coupling relies on short-range forces or on placing the systems in high-quality electromagnetic resonators, which restricts the range of the coupling to small distances. We used a free-space laser beam to strongly couple a collective atomic spin and a microm
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Observation and control of maximal Chern numbers in a chiral topological semimetal
Topological semimetals feature protected nodal band degeneracies characterized by a topological invariant known as the Chern number ( C ). Nodal band crossings with linear dispersion are expected to have at most , which sets an upper limit to the magnitude of many topological phenomena in these materials. Here, we show that the chiral crystal palladium gallium (PdGa) displays multifold band cross
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Proton transport enabled by a field-induced metallic state in a semiconductor heterostructure
Tuning a semiconductor to function as a fast proton conductor is an emerging strategy in the rapidly developing field of proton ceramic fuel cells (PCFCs). The key challenge for PCFC researchers is to formulate the proton-conducting electrolyte with conductivity above 0.1 siemens per centimeter at low temperatures (300 to 600°C). Here we present a methodology to design an enhanced proton conducto
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Cognitive map-based navigation in wild bats revealed by a new high-throughput tracking system
Seven decades of research on the "cognitive map," the allocentric representation of space, have yielded key neurobiological insights, yet field evidence from free-ranging wild animals is still lacking. Using a system capable of tracking dozens of animals simultaneously at high accuracy and resolution, we assembled a large dataset of 172 foraging Egyptian fruit bats comprising >18 million localiza
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The ontogeny of a mammalian cognitive map in the real world
How animals navigate over large-scale environments remains a riddle. Specifically, it is debated whether animals have cognitive maps. The hallmark of map-based navigation is the ability to perform shortcuts, i.e., to move in direct but novel routes. When tracking an animal in the wild, it is extremely difficult to determine whether a movement is truly novel because the animal's past movement is u
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Changes in phytoplankton concentration now drive increased Arctic Ocean primary production
Historically, sea ice loss in the Arctic Ocean has promoted increased phytoplankton primary production because of the greater open water area and a longer growing season. However, debate remains about whether primary production will continue to rise should sea ice decline further. Using an ocean color algorithm parameterized for the Arctic Ocean, we show that primary production increased by 57% b
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HEM1 deficiency disrupts mTORC2 and F-actin control in inherited immunodysregulatory disease
Immunodeficiency often coincides with hyperactive immune disorders such as autoimmunity, lymphoproliferation, or atopy, but this coincidence is rarely understood on a molecular level. We describe five patients from four families with immunodeficiency coupled with atopy, lymphoproliferation, and cytokine overproduction harboring mutations in NCKAP1L , which encodes the hematopoietic-specific HEM1
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Estimating the burden of SARS-CoV-2 in France
France has been heavily affected by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic and went into lockdown on 17 March 2020. Using models applied to hospital and death data, we estimate the impact of the lockdown and current population immunity. We find that 2.9% of infected individuals are hospitalized and 0.5% of those infected die (95% credible interval: 0.3 to 0.9%),
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Marginal dentition and multiple dermal jawbones as the ancestral condition of jawed vertebrates
The dentitions of extant fishes and land vertebrates vary in both pattern and type of tooth replacement. It has been argued that the common ancestral condition likely resembles the nonmarginal, radially arranged tooth files of arthrodires, an early group of armoured fishes. We used synchrotron microtomography to describe the fossil dentitions of so-called acanthothoracids, the most phylogenetical
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The day I left the lab
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Biological functions of lymphatic vessels
The general functions of lymphatic vessels in fluid transport and immunosurveillance are well recognized. However, accumulating evidence indicates that lymphatic vessels play active and versatile roles in a tissue- and organ-specific manner during homeostasis and in multiple disease processes. This Review discusses recent advances to understand previously unidentified functions of adult mammalian
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Human CNS barrier-forming organoids with cerebrospinal fluid production
Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a vital liquid, providing nutrients and signaling molecules and clearing out toxic by-products from the brain. The CSF is produced by the choroid plexus (ChP), a protective epithelial barrier that also prevents free entry of toxic molecules or drugs from the blood. Here, we establish human ChP organoids with a selective barrier and CSF-like fluid secretion in self-con
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Contact area-dependent cell communication and the morphological invariance of ascidian embryogenesis
Marine invertebrate ascidians display embryonic reproducibility: Their early embryonic cell lineages are considered invariant and are conserved between distantly related species, despite rapid genomic divergence. Here, we address the drivers of this reproducibility. We used light-sheet imaging and automated cell segmentation and tracking procedures to systematically quantify the behavior of indiv
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Inferring change points in the spread of COVID-19 reveals the effectiveness of interventions
As coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is rapidly spreading across the globe, short-term modeling forecasts provide time-critical information for decisions on containment and mitigation strategies. A major challenge for short-term forecasts is the assessment of key epidemiological parameters and how they change when first interventions show an effect. By combining an established epidemiological m
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Cherned up to the maximum
In topological materials, electrons can display behavior that is fundamentally differentfrom that in 'conventional' matter, and the magnitude of many such 'exotic' phenomena is directly proportional to an entity known as the Chern number. New experiments establish for the first time that the theoretically predicted maximum Chern number can be reached—and controlled—in a real material.
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Movement ecology bears fruits: ATLAS supports map-based navigation of wild bats
When wild Egyptian fruit bats set out at night to forage in Israel's Hula Valley, they do so using advanced spatial memory and a flexible cognitive mapping of the fruit trees and other goals scattered in their foraging area. They seldom search randomly and their foraging patterns cannot be explained by simpler navigation mechanisms, a research team headed by Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Profes
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Advanced technology sheds new light on evolution of teeth
The evolution of human teeth began among ancient armored fishes more than 400 million years ago. In the scientific journal Science, an international team led by researchers from Uppsala University presents groundbreaking findings about these earliest jawed vertebrates. Using powerful X-ray imaging, they show that unique fossils found near Prague contain surprisingly modern-looking teeth.
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Vulnerability for at-risk populations identified in US influenza data
A next-generation system for monitoring influenza outbreaks performs well overall, but reveals a critical lack of sufficient data to accurately monitor influenza in the most at-risk communities. Samuel V. Scarpino of Northeastern University in Boston, MA, and colleagues from the University of Texas at Austin present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.
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Socio-economic, environmental impacts of COVID-19 quantified
The first comprehensive study of the pandemic shows consumption losses amount to more than US$3.8 trillion, triggering full-time equivalent job losses of 147 million and the biggest-ever drop in greenhouse gas emissions.
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Fair justice systems need open data access
Although U.S. court documents are publicly available online, they sit behind expensive paywalls inside a difficult-to-navigate database.
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A 'regime shift' is happening in the Arctic Ocean, scientists say
Scientists at Stanford University have discovered a surprising shift in the Arctic Ocean. Exploding blooms of phytoplankton, the tiny algae at the base of a food web topped by whales and polar bears, have drastically altered the Arctic's ability to transform atmospheric carbon into living matter. Over the past decade, the surge has replaced sea ice loss as the biggest driver of changes in uptake o
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Protein from blood of exercising mice rejuvenates brains of 'couch potato' mice
Study could lead to a pill that confers the benefits of physical activity on cognition
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The biggest flipping challenge in quantum computing
To realize their dreams, developers must learn to tame the noise that jostles their machines' delicate quantum bits
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Teeth and jaws
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Engineering a toxin
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Food for thought
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Knowing their way around
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A very high Chern number
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Movement ecology bears fruits: ATLAS supports map-based navigation of wild bats
When wild Egyptian fruit bats set out at night to forage in Israel's Hula Valley, they do so using advanced spatial memory and a flexible cognitive mapping of the fruit trees and other goals scattered in their foraging area. They seldom search randomly and their foraging patterns cannot be explained by simpler navigation mechanisms, a research team headed by Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Profes
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Vulnerability for at-risk populations identified in US influenza data
A next-generation system for monitoring influenza outbreaks performs well overall, but reveals a critical lack of sufficient data to accurately monitor influenza in the most at-risk communities. Samuel V. Scarpino of Northeastern University in Boston, MA, and colleagues from the University of Texas at Austin present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.
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This Ancient Sea Creature Builds Its Body With a Whisper, not a Scream
Unlike vertebrate embryo cells, which signal to each other over long distances, sea squirt embryo cells talk only to those they're closest to.
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Dissecting fruit flies' varying responses to life-extension diet
Changes in a few small molecules involved in a cell's metabolism seem to indicate whether a restricted "life extension" diet will actually extend, shorten, or have no effect on lifespan, a study of fruit flies has found.
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Safer CRISPR gene editing with fewer off-target hits
The CRISPR system is a powerful tool for the targeted editing of genomes, with significant therapeutic potential, but runs the risk of inappropriately editing "off-target" sites. However, a new study publishing July 9, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Feng Gu of Wenzhou Medical University, China, and colleagues, shows that mutating the enzyme at the heart of the CRISPR gene editing
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Dissecting fruit flies' varying responses to life-extension diet
Changes in a few small molecules involved in a cell's metabolism seem to indicate whether a restricted "life extension" diet will actually extend, shorten, or have no effect on lifespan, a study of fruit flies has found.
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Safer CRISPR gene editing with fewer off-target hits
The CRISPR system is a powerful tool for the targeted editing of genomes, with significant therapeutic potential, but runs the risk of inappropriately editing "off-target" sites. However, a new study publishing July 9, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Feng Gu of Wenzhou Medical University, China, and colleagues, shows that mutating the enzyme at the heart of the CRISPR gene editing
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How the coronavirus pandemic is changing virtual science communication
Nature, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02075-0 Researchers flocked to join Skype a Scientist after COVID-19 closed their labs. The squid biologist who founded it explains how the science-communication platform has adapted.
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NASA Pumps Funding Into Startup That Says It Can Harvest Oxygen From Lunar Regolith
Dusty Cloud NASA just awarded substantial funding to Pioneer Astronautics, a company that claims it can gather up lunar regolith and turn it into usable oxygen. Pioneer Astronautics is one of four companies to win funding through a newly-established Phase II round of NASA's Small Business Innovation Research program, TechCrunch reports . The company will split the total $17 million pot with three
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'Palm Springs' Is a Timely Comedy About Being Stuck in the Now
In Hulu's new romantic comedy, every day feels the same. Sound familiar?
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Neo-Nazis Are Running Out of Places to Hide Online
Telegram booting far right groups from their hub disproves the idea that rampant Neo-Nazi terrorist recruitment is inevitable in the internet age
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Defeating COVID-19: The Science Behind a New ELISA for COVID-19 Seroconversion Detection
The recent and rapid spread of the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, has necessitated the development of new assays that are capable of detecting the presence of this virus in patient samples or evidence of recent infection. One strategy being developed are assays to detect the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in patient sera.
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Teva presents latest data on AJOVY® ▼ (fremanezumab) at EHF Congress
Teva Pharmaceutical Europe B.V. has presented results from a pooled analysis of three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 3 studies assessing AJOVY® ▼ (fremanezumab), indicated for the preventative treatment of migraine in adults, which demonstrate clinically significant reductions in headache and migraine-related disability in the majority of patients studied.
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Invasive ticks are spreading without any males
The invasive population of Asian longhorned ticks in the United States likely began with three or more self-cloning females from northeastern Asia, according to a new study. Asian longhorned ticks outside the US can carry debilitating diseases. In the US and elsewhere they can threaten livestock and pets. The new study in the journal Zoonoses and Public Health sheds new light on the origin of the
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Vibrant, ammonia-free dyes for at-home hair color
Do it yourself. (Annie Gray via Unsplash/) If going to the salon every time you need to touch up your bright hair color—or every time a new whim strikes—sounds costly and inconvenient, box dyes are your best bet. The following brands offer a range of saturated colors, and are free of ammonia or other ingredients that strip hair of its softness. Vibrant and long-lasting. (Amazon/) A leading name i
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116 år med benzin og diesel er slut: Volkswagen-fabrik skal kun producere elbiler
Peugeot, Fiat og Renault skruer også voldsomt op for produktionen af elbiler.
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Covid-19 news: UK government missed coronavirus testing target
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Aquaculture's role in nutrition in the COVID-19 era
A new paper from American University examines the economics of an aquaculture industry of the future that is simultaneously environmentally sustainable and nutritious for the nearly 1 billion people worldwide who depend on it.
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Daily briefing: Genetic evidence of Native American ancestry among Polynesian people
Nature, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02078-x People from Polynesia and South America mingled around 800 years ago — though it's not clear who visited whom. Plus: mounting evidence suggests coronavirus is airborne, and precise gene edits made to mitochondrial DNA for the first time.
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Activating the opportunity marketplace and investing in the workforce of the future
This virtual panel session from MIT Technology Review's EmTech Next conference takes an in-depth look at Deloitte and MIT Sloan Management Review's recently released research on Opportunity Marketplaces. This content was produced by Deloitte. It was not written by MIT Technology Review's editorial staff. Right now, businesses are facing a three-dimensional challenge—survival while remaining compe
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Do we really date based on our own ideals?
Two separate scientific studies suggest that our "ideals" don't really match what we look for in a romantic partner. Results of studies like these can change the way we date, especially in the online world. "You say you want these three attributes and you like the people who possess these attributes. But the story doesn't end there," says Paul Eastwick, co-author of the study and professor in the
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Elon Musk Brags That Tesla Is "Very Close" to Full, Level 5 Self Driving
For years, we've been promised a near future in which cars drive themselves as well as a human motorist — while their occupants scroll through Twitter or browse Netflix in a cozy cabin with comfy seats. That dream, formally known as Level 5 autonomy, is probably still many years out — but Tesla CEO Elon Musk believes it could be right around the corner. In a video message recorded for the opening
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Bats offer clues to treating COVID-19
Bats carry many viruses, including COVID-19, without becoming ill. Biologists at the University of Rochester are studying the immune system of bats to find potential ways to "mimic" that system in humans.
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A new look at deep-sea microbes
Microbes found deeper in the ocean are believed to have slow population turnover rates and low amounts of available energy. But a new examination of microbial communities found deeper in seafloor sediments and around hydrocarbon seepage sites has found they have more energy available and a higher population turnover. The deeper sediments in the seepages are most likely heavily impacted by the mate
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Study of giant ant heads using simple models may aid bio-inspired designs
Researchers have developed a simple model to study how ants balance their large heads relative to their body size. Such models may have useful applications in bio-inspired designs.
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What happens when food first touches your tongue
A new study might explain why humans register some tastes more quickly than others, potentially due to each flavor's molecular size.The research also provided explanation as to why humans register taste more quickly when food or drink moves over their tongues quickly, as compared to when they are held in their mouth steadily.
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Feeling with the heart
A person's sensitivity to external stimuli depends not only on the state of their nervous system, but also on their cardiac cycle. Usually we do not notice our heartbeat, paying attention to it only in unusual situations, such as in moments of excitement before a performance or while experiencing arrhythmia. The brain actively suppresses the perception of our heartbeat, but as a result, our percep
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Native bees also facing novel pandemic
There is growing evidence that another "pandemic" has been infecting bees around the world for the past two decades, and is spreading: a fungal pathogen known as Nosema.
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Women who deliver by C-section are less likely to conceive subsequent children
Women who deliver their first child by cesarean section (C-section) are less likely to conceive a second child than those who deliver vaginally, despite being just as likely to plan a subsequent pregnancy, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The team followed more than 2,000 women for three years after they delivered their first child.
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Study says inhalers ok to use amid COVID-19 concerns
University of Huddersfield researchers find that the benefits of inhalers for asthma sufferers outweigh the risks of contracting coronavirus, following concerns raised after WHO warned that steroids could reduce immunity.
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AI enables efficiencies in quantum information processing
A new machine learning framework could pave the way for small, mobile quantum networks.
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Radio-over-fiber compression poised to advance 5G wireless networks
Although new 5G networks can offer much faster and more efficient wireless data transfer, the fiber optic networks currently used to connect wireless devices to the internet cannot easily support the increased load. A new study shows that a compression scheme for radio-over-fiber links could help solve this problem for a variety of 5G formats.
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The restoration of forests with active rapid 'Ohi'a death infections may be possible
For the first time, researchers have shown that native 'ohi'a seedlings can survive for at least a year in areas that have active mortality from Rapid 'ohi'a Death, or ROD, a fungal disease that is devastating to this dominant and culturally important tree in Hawaiian forests. This information can be useful to land managers and homeowners as they prioritize conservation actions.
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Cosmic cataclysm allows precise test of general relativity
In 2019, the MAGIC telescopes detected the first Gamma Ray Burst at very high energies. This was the most intense gamma-radiation ever obtained from such a cosmic object. But the GRB data have more to offer: with further analyses, the MAGIC scientists could now confirm that the speed of light is constant in vacuum—and not dependent on energy. So, like many other tests, GRB data also corroborate Ei
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Expert: Fraud via voting by mail is very unlikely
The current controversy over voting by mail offers a chance to examine the benefits and drawbacks of mail-in ballots, says political scientist Anthony Fowler. There is a bitter partisan debate unfolding on whether more Americans should cast their votes through the mail during a time when going out may be hazardous to people's health . The debate is provoking online disinformation and conspiracy t
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The restoration of forests with active rapid 'Ohi'a death infections may be possible
For the first time, researchers have shown that native 'ohi'a seedlings can survive for at least a year in areas that have active mortality from Rapid 'ohi'a Death, or ROD, a fungal disease that is devastating to this dominant and culturally important tree in Hawaiian forests. This information can be useful to land managers and homeowners as they prioritize conservation actions.
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Warming Brings Muggier Weather to Jacksonville, Threatening Most Vulnerable
By Ayurella Horn-Muller (Climate Central) and Brendan Rivers (WJCT) An airman assigned to the 557th Expeditionary RED HORSE drinks water while working on a construction site. SENIOR AIRMAN DAMON KASBERG / U.S. AIR FORCE Listen to the Story Here Hear this story airing on 89.9 FM WJCT. Diallo-Sekou Seabrooks was working a job as a concrete finisher last summer when he started feeling dizzy and lay
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Trump's Loss at the Supreme Court Is a Win for His Candidacy
The Supreme Court rebuked Donald Trump, the arrogant president. The Supreme Court has prepared a world of trouble for Donald Trump, the dirty businessman. But the Supreme Court has done a tremendous favor to Donald Trump, the candidate for reelection. Trump's legal arguments to protect his business records from subpoena were always miserably flimsy, when not actively crazy. On Trump's behalf, the
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The Euclid space telescope is coming together
ESA's Euclid mission has reached another milestone on its journey towards launch. Its two instruments are now built and fully tested. These have been delivered to Airbus Defence and Space in Toulouse, France, where they are now being integrated with the telescope to form the mission's payload module.
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Global viruses: Promoting old hatreds
In 2015, anthropologist Cathrine Thorleifsson traveled to England and Hungary to conduct fieldwork in order to study why so many of the people living there voted for right wing populist and radical parties. In her book, titled "National Responses to Crises in Europe," (2019) she shows how local influences in the extremist circles she visited were taking advantage of global crises in order to promo
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Ocean acidification and human health
While ocean acidification was initially perceived as a threat only to the marine realm, the authors of a new publication argue that it is also an emerging human health issue.
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Cycad stem cuttings need wound sealants for successful propagation
The need to cover an open wound on cycad stem cuttings has been confirmed by the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam in a study published in the Tropical Conservation Science journal on April 27. And the scientists have shown that the list of products that effectively fulfill this purpose is not restrictive.
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Our itch to share helps spread COVID-19 misinformation
To stay current about the COVID-19 pandemic, people need to process health information when they read the news. Inevitably, that means people will be exposed to health misinformation, too, in the form of false content, often found online, about the illness.
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The restoration of forests with active rapid 'Ohi'a death infections may be possible
Positive news for 'ohi'a restoration in Hawai'i! A new USGS study indicates that 'ohi'a seedlings planted into sites with active Rapid 'Ohi'a Death (ROD) infections can survive for at least one year. ROD is a newly emerging disease that has killed at least 1 million 'ohi'a – a tree that is foundational to the Hawaiian landscape and culture. Its loss is detrimental to endangered birds and plants, e
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Trust me if you can
Each year, wind turbines are responsible for the death of hundreds of thousands of airborne animals such as bats. To find a constructive way out of this "green-green" dilemma, companies building and running wind turbines might have to work together with environmental experts and conservationists. Yet lack of trust between them can hinder effective collaboration. Scientists of the Leibniz-IZW show:
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How fear transforms into anxiety
University of New Mexico researchers identify for the first time the brain-wide neural correlates of the transition from fear to anxiety.
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Living close to green space benefits gut bacteria of urban, formula-fed infants
Living close to natural green space can mitigate some of the changes in infant gut bacteria associated with formula feeding, according to new research published in the journal Environment International. "Not every infant can be breastfed," said Anita Kozyrskyj, pediatrics professor at the University of Alberta. "This is one of the first pieces of evidence for a nature-related intervention that cou
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Cycad stem cuttings need wound sealants for successful propagation
The need to cover an open wound on cycad stem cuttings has been confirmed by the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam in a study published in the Tropical Conservation Science journal on April 27. And the scientists have shown that the list of products that effectively fulfill this purpose is not restrictive.
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Skateboard tools to adjust your trucks, wheels, and more
Keep your skateboard steady on any terrain. (Shawn Henry via Unsplash/) Whether you're a downhill cruiser, skatepark regular, or cautious beginner, your skateboard would likely benefit from an adjustment. Instead of lugging a loose socket wrench and Phillips head screwdriver, just throw a quality multipurpose skateboard tool in your backpack or back pocket. Here are our portable and affordable pi
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Overharvesting threatens 'Himalayan Viagra' fungus: IUCN
A parasitic fungus that grows inside the ghost moth caterpillar and then kills its host by bursting through its head is itself threatened with extinction, the IUCN said Thursday, as demand surges for Chinese medicine's "Himalayan Viagra".
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Overharvesting threatens 'Himalayan Viagra' fungus: IUCN
A parasitic fungus that grows inside the ghost moth caterpillar and then kills its host by bursting through its head is itself threatened with extinction, the IUCN said Thursday, as demand surges for Chinese medicine's "Himalayan Viagra".
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The lockdown walk that inspired an experiment
Nature, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02074-1 Why do garden plants suddenly become invasive? One scientist couple turned their balcony into a lab to find out.
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Coronavirus: Dirty air 'on the rise again' in UK cities
As Britain eases out of its Covid-19 lockdown, nitrogen vehicle emissions look to be going back up.
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Noise-cancelling windows halve traffic sounds even when they're open
A grid of speakers fixed to a window can cut the noisiness of urban traffic in half, reducing the sound coming through an open window by up to 10 decibels
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Dolphins and whales separately evolved the same speedy swimming bones
A fossil of an ancient giant tusked dolphin lacks the extra vertebrae and short pectoral bones that make fast swimmers of dolphins and baleen whales, which later independently evolved these traits
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Almost all lemur species are now officially endangered
Verreaux's sifaka was once a common lemur species across the south of Madagascar, but is now listed as critically endangered, the last classification before extinction
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Chinook salmon declines related to changes in freshwater conditions
A new University of Alaska-led study provides the first evidence that declines in many of Alaska's chinook salmon populations can be attributed in part to climate-driven changes in their freshwater habitats.
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Soil carbon research reduces uncertainty in predicting climate change impacts
DOE and USDA researchers use new global models to study how environmental controllers affect soil organic carbon, changes in which can alter atmospheric carbon concentrations and affect climate. Predictions could benefit industry mitigation plans.
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Born to be a cannibal: Genes for feeding behaviour in mandarin fish identified
Some mandarin fish species (Sinipercidae) are pure fish-eaters, which feed exclusively on living juvenile fish—also of their own species. A research team led by the Chinese Huazhong Agricultural University (HZAU) and the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) has described the genome of four mandarin fish species and thus also identified genes for cannibalistic eating b
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Nearly all Madagascar's lemur species 'face extinction'
Almost all species of lemur, the small saucer-eyed primates native to Madagascar, face extinction, an international conservation body warned on Thursday, adding to its growing list of animals and plants under threat.
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Best cooperative board games for when you want to work together
Teamwork is fun, too. (Amazon/) Board games are a great source of renewable entertainment for groups, but it can be exhausting always playing head to head. Cooperative games flip the dynamic—rather than playing to win against one another, players work together to beat the game itself. Don't be fooled, just because you're not competing against other players, doesn't mean these picks are easy. Here
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Chinook salmon declines related to changes in freshwater conditions
A new University of Alaska-led study provides the first evidence that declines in many of Alaska's chinook salmon populations can be attributed in part to climate-driven changes in their freshwater habitats.
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Born to be a cannibal: Genes for feeding behaviour in mandarin fish identified
Some mandarin fish species (Sinipercidae) are pure fish-eaters, which feed exclusively on living juvenile fish—also of their own species. A research team led by the Chinese Huazhong Agricultural University (HZAU) and the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) has described the genome of four mandarin fish species and thus also identified genes for cannibalistic eating b
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Nearly all Madagascar's lemur species 'face extinction'
Almost all species of lemur, the small saucer-eyed primates native to Madagascar, face extinction, an international conservation body warned on Thursday, adding to its growing list of animals and plants under threat.
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Cosmic cataclysm allows precise test of general relativity
In 2019, the MAGIC telescopes detected the first Gamma Ray Burst at very high energies. This was the most intense gamma-radiation ever obtained from such a cosmic object. But the GRB data have more to offer: with further analyses, the MAGIC scientists could now confirm that the speed of light is constant in vacuum – and not dependent on energy. So, like many other tests, GRB data also corroborate
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Gene yields insights into the causes of neurodegeneration
Cornell researchers including Fenghua Hu, associate professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and member of the Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, are taking a closer look at the factors that cause Alzheimer's, FTLD and similar diseases. Hu's latest study, "A role of the frontotemporal lobar degeneration risk factor TMEM106B in myelination," was published June 23 i
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Cycad stem cuttings need wound sealants for successful propagation
The need to cover an open wound on cycad stem cuttings has been confirmed by the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam in a study published in the Tropical Conservation Science journal on April 27. And the scientists have shown that the list of products that effectively fulfill this purpose is not restrictive.
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Research news tip sheet: Story ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
The latest Johns Hopkins Medicine research achievements and clinical advances covering topics not related to COVID-19 or the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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Chinook salmon declines related to changes in freshwater conditions
A new University of Alaska-led study provides the first evidence that declines in many of Alaska's chinook salmon populations can be attributed in part to climate-driven changes in their freshwater habitats.
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Overzealous cell membrane guardians could increase the risk of cancer
Researchers at the UiO and OUS have discovered how destructive changes occur in our genome. This could lead to cancer. Their results have been published in the journal Nature Cell Biology.
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Attendance, grades, advanced courses best predict if HISD students will go to college
The best way to predict whether Houston ISD students will go to college is to examine a combination of attendance rates, grades, and credits in advanced courses, according to a study by Rice University's Houston Education Research Consortium (HERC), part of the Kinder Institute for Urban Research.
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Applying rock dust to croplands could absorb up to 2 billion tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere
Adding crushed rock dust to farmland could draw down up to two billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air per year and help meet key global climate targets, according to a major new study led by the University of Sheffield.
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X-ray scattering shines light on protein folding
KAIST researchers have used an X-ray method to track how proteins fold, which could improve computer simulations of this process, with implications for understanding diseases and improving drug discovery. Their findings were reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) on June 30.
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Study sheds light on how cancer spreads in blood
A new study sheds light on proteins in particles called extracellular vesicles, which are released by tumor cells into the bloodstream and promote the spread of cancer. The findings suggest how a blood test involving these vesicles might be used to diagnose cancer in the future, avoiding the need for invasive surgical biopsies.
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Climate change: Heavy rain after drought may cause fish kills
Due to climate changes, many regions are experiencing increasingly warmer and dryer summers, followed by heavy rain. New study shows this is a fatal combination that can cause massive fish kills in lakes within a few hours.
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Extreme rainfall events cause top-heavy aquatic food webs
Scientists across seven different sites throughout Central and South America replicated the extreme rainfall events predicted by climate change science. Using the insect larvae that live in the water trapped by bromeliad plants as a model ecosystem, they found that food webs became top-heavy with predators when there were large day-to-day variations in rainfall.
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Hepatitis C drugs help combat Covid-19 in trials
US official Anthony Fauci says sofosbuvir and daclatasvir results are 'provocative and encouraging'
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Overzealous cell membrane guardians could increase the risk of cancer
Researchers at the UiO and OUS have discovered how destructive changes occur in our genome. This could lead to cancer. Their results have been published in the journal Nature Cell Biology.
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X-ray scattering shines light on protein folding
KAIST researchers have used an X-ray method to track how proteins fold, which could improve computer simulations of this process, with implications for understanding diseases and improving drug discovery. Their findings were reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) on June 30.
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Unraveling the mystery of wheat herbicide tolerance
Genetically speaking, the loaf of bread you stress-baked during the COVID-19 shutdown is more complex than you think. Wheat's 16 billion genes, organized in not one but three semi-independent genomes, can overlap or substitute for one another, making things extremely tricky for geneticists trying to enhance desirable traits in the world's most widely grown crop.
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Policy options for resilience-enhancing farm demographics
European agriculture as well as the wider economy face substantial demographic changes in the upcoming decades. The baby boomer generation will retire within the next 10 to 15 years and the cohorts of the young generations, which will enter the labor market in the next decades, are much smaller in size. Accordingly, the farming sector will have to compete with other sectors and urban areas, which
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How can education researchers support education and public health and institutions during COVID-19?
As education researchers' ongoing work is interrupted by school closures, what can they do to support education and public health institutions dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic? An article published today in Educational Researcher aims to answer that question, providing recommendations based on conversations with public health officials, state and local policymakers, educational leaders, director
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Unraveling the mystery of wheat herbicide tolerance
Genetically speaking, the loaf of bread you stress-baked during the COVID-19 shutdown is more complex than you think. Wheat's 16 billion genes, organized in not one but three semi-independent genomes, can overlap or substitute for one another, making things extremely tricky for geneticists trying to enhance desirable traits in the world's most widely grown crop.
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Lead fallout from Notre Dame fire was likely overlooked
On April 15, 2019, the world watched helplessly as black and yellow smoke billowed from the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris. The fire started just below the cathedral's roof and spire, which were covered in 460 tons of lead—a neurotoxic metal, dangerous especially to children, and the source of the yellow smoke that rose from the fire for hours. The cathedral is being restored, but questions have re
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A new telescope to study solar flares
The cold, dark chaos of space is filled with mystery.
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Liquid water is more than just hydrogen-oxygen molecules
Skoltech scientists in collaboration with researchers from the University of Stuttgart showed that the concentration of short-lived ions (H3O+ and OH-) in pure liquid water is much higher than that assumed to evaluate the pH, hence significantly changing our understanding of the dynamical structure of water.
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More than half of US students experience summer learning losses five years in a row
Following U.S. students across five summers between grades 1 and 6, a little more than half (52 percent) experienced learning losses in all five summers, according to a large national study published today. Students in this group lost an average of 39 percent of their total school year gains during each summer. The study appeared in American Educational Research Journal, a peer-reviewed publicatio
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NASA sees storms wrapping around Tropical Cyclone Cristina
The analysis of Tropical Cyclone Cristina's cloud top temperatures revealed some bands of thunderstorms were developing and wrapping around the center of the storm's circulation.
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Climate change: Heavy rain after drought may cause fish kills
Fish kills are a recurring phenomenon in lakes suffering from oxygen depletion. Often the kills are triggered by factors like an algae bloom, but now a new study reports on a new, climate-related cause of fish kills.
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Daytime aardvark sightings are a sign of troubled times
Aardvarks occur across most of sub-Saharan Africa, but very few people have seen one, because they are solitary, mostly active at night, and live in burrows. They use their spade-like claws to build these burrows and to dig up ants and termites on which they feed. However, seeing aardvarks feeding in the day is becoming more common in the drier parts of southern Africa. While catching sight of an
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Discovery makes microscopic imaging possible in dark conditions
Researchers have discovered a new way to more accurately analyze microscopic samples by essentially making them 'glow in the dark', through the use of chemically luminescent molecules. Current methods of microscopic imaging rely on fluorescence, which means a light needs to be shining on the sample while it is being analyzed. While this method is effective, it also has some drawbacks.
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Daytime aardvark sightings are a sign of troubled times
Aardvarks occur across most of sub-Saharan Africa, but very few people have seen one, because they are solitary, mostly active at night, and live in burrows. They use their spade-like claws to build these burrows and to dig up ants and termites on which they feed. However, seeing aardvarks feeding in the day is becoming more common in the drier parts of southern Africa. While catching sight of an
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What animal do you see in this image of a nebula?
What do you see in the Carina Nebula? (NASA/) We know you are bored at home right now—we are too. Here are some puzzles and brainteasers to challenge your family and friends with, either in person or over video chat. This image of the Carina nebula shows only dust, ionized gases, and stars. But there's a chance a dog on its hind legs looks back at you. Neuroscientists dubbed such recognition "par
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Fabulous, fun coloring books for kids
Encourage creativity and the arts. ( Aaron Burden via Unsplash/) In this device-dependent world of ours, sometimes kids need breaks from screens to take pen—or rather crayon and marker—to paper. Not only does coloring help children develop cognitively and psychologically, it also fosters self-expression and creativity. And, well, it's just plain fun. Here are the most educational, fanciful, and k
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Understanding the optimal process for fabricating coupled nanocrystal solids
Better understanding the science that underpins well-known techniques for developing quantum dots—tiny semiconducting nanocrystals—can help reduce the guesswork of current practices as material scientists use them to make better solar panels and digital displays.
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New method solves old mystery: Hafnium isotopes clinch origin of high-quality Roman glass
Glass is an immensely interesting archaeological material: While its fragility and beauty is fascinating in itself, geochemical studies of invisible tracers can reveal more than what meets the eye. In a new international collaboration study from the Danish National Research Foundation's Centre for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet), the Aarhus Geochemistry and Isotope Research Platform (AGiR) at Aa
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Our itch to share helps spread COVID-19 misinformation
A study co-authored by MIT scholars contains bad news and good news about Covid-19 misinformation — and a new insight that may help reduce the problem.
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Is COVID-19 widening the gender gap in academic medicine?
A new study finds that fewer women were first authors on COVID-19-related research papers published in the first half of this year. The findings suggest a worsening gender gap in academic medicine as women are already underrepresented among authors of medical research.
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No NELL2, no sperm motility; novel protein is essential for male fertility
An international team of researchers has identified a chain of events that matures the sperm and triggers their motility. The findings have implications for diagnostic and therapeutic research in male infertility and male contraceptive development.
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Older, critically ill patients with COVID-19 may have increased risk of bradycardia with lopinavir and ritonavir
The combined use of antiretroviral medications lopinavir and ritonavir, previously used to treat SARS-Cov-1 and MERS-Cov patients, appeared to cause bradycardia in 22% of elderly, critically ill COVID-19 patients, in a small study in France.Bradycardia was resolved in all patients after discontinuation or dose reduction of both medications.
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Argonne soil carbon research reduces uncertainty in predicting climate change impacts
DOE and USDA researchers use new global models to study how environmental controllers affect soil organic carbon, changes in which can alter atmospheric carbon concentrations and affect climate. Predictions could benefit industry mitigation plans.
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University of Guam: Two climate patterns predict coral bleaching months earlier
A new study by the Marine Laboratory at the University of Guam may help researchers predict coral bleaching months earlier than current tools, and, for the first time, may help predict invasion events of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish. The study was published on May 8 in Scientific Reports, a peer-reviewed journal published by Nature Research.
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Trump Is Successfully Running Out the Clock
Fifty-five days ago, President Donald Trump was supposed to file his annual personal financial disclosures, which give a broad snapshot of his money situation. The White House gave its employees 45 extra days to file the report, citing the coronavirus pandemic , making the new deadline June 29. That was 10 days ago, and Trump still hasn't released the disclosures. The White House told The New Yor
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Sodium found to regulate the biological clock of mice
A new study shows that increases in the concentrations of blood sodium can have an influence on the biological clock of mice, opening new research avenues for potentially treating the negative effects associated with long distance travel or shift work.
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15-foot-long skeleton of extinct dolphin suggests parallel evolution among whales
A report offers a detailed description of the first nearly complete skeleton of an extinct large dolphin, discovered in what is now South Carolina. The 15-foot-long dolphin (Ankylorhiza tiedemani comb. n.) lived during the Oligocene — about 25 million years ago — and was previously known only from a partial rostrum (snout) fossil.
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Discovery makes microscopic imaging possible in dark conditions
Researchers have discovered a new way to more accurately analyze microscopic samples by essentially making them 'glow in the dark', through the use of chemically luminescent molecules. Current methods of microscopic imaging rely on fluorescence, which means a light needs to be shining on the sample while it is being analyzed. While this method is effective, it also has some drawbacks.
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How much does your brain pay attention while you're asleep?
*Tick, tick, tick* I glance over into the dusty corner of the dimly lit room, and to my horror, I see what looks like some sort of explosive device fitted with a clock, inevitably ticking down to my demise. *Tick, tick, tick* I freeze in fear, unsure of how to resolve this situation. The ticking […]
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The many roads to the red planet — a memoir
Nature, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02071-4 As three nations prepare to send spacecraft to Mars, a planetary scientist offers her personal tour of those who led the way. By Alexandra Witze
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Your new lab partner: A mobile robot chemist
Nature, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02030-z This autonomous mobile robot is designed to work alongside humans.
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This material is almost as hard as diamond — but as light as graphite
Nature, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02061-6 A theoretical form of carbon called pentadiamond becomes thicker when stretched.
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Anti-chafing products that could save your skin
Safe from chafe. ( Sharon McCutcheon via Unsplash/) Most of us understand the pain that comes with having thighs that touch, inner arms that rub, and other sensitive areas that need some extra attention when it comes to chafing. It can happen to anyone and everyone due to sweaty skin coming into contact with friction from fabric or other body parts; no one is safe from the chafe. Nothing can ruin
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What to Know About the Three Mars Missions Launching in July
Three different countries are about to send landers and orbiters to the Red Planet
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Scientists Still Don't Know Why COVID-19 Hits Men and Women Differently
When the coronavirus pandemic began, doctors quickly realized that the disease seemed to be hitting men harder — and killing them at higher rates — than it did women. But even now, several months later, scientists still aren't sure why that is, Wired reports . Researchers at Harvard's GenderSci Lab are trying to get to the bottom of the complicated question, which was made even more difficult by
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These juicers give you delicious, vitamin-packed drinks at home
For simple lemonades to crazy concoctions. (Boba Jaglicic via Unsplash/) Fresh-squeezed juice is delicious and healthy, and easy to have at home. There are three main types of juicers, each with pros and cons, and the right one for you depends a lot on what sort of juice you want to make, and how much time you want to spend on preparation and clean-up. Masticating juicers use a narrow feed chute
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Microsoft's solution to Zoom fatigue is to trick your brain
There's a certain routine to logging on to the now-ubiquitous videoconference: join a screen of Brady Bunch–like squares, ping-ponging your gaze between speakers but mostly staring self-consciously at your own face. What started as a novelty of working at home is now an exhausting ordeal that can leave us feeling mentally wiped out. Microsoft thinks it's got a solution. On Wednesday it launched "
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Clean energy future 'is vital' – UN chief
The UN Secretary-General tells a meeting that it is "vital" the world moves towards clean energy.
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Elon Musk says full self-driving Tesla tech 'very close'
A future software update could activate full "level-five" autonomy in cars, the Tesla founder says.
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How can education researchers support education and public health and institutions during COVID-19?
As education researchers' ongoing work is interrupted by school closures, what can they do to support education and public health institutions dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic? An article published today in Educational Researcher aims to answer that question, providing recommendations based on conversations with public health officials, state and local policymakers, educational leaders, director
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IU findings set new standard for blood-based biomarkers in prediction of cancer recurrence
Indiana University School of Medicine researchers Milan Radovich, PhD, and Bryan Schneider, MD, have discovered that the presence of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the plasma of women's blood who have undergone chemotherapy prior to surgery for the treatment of stage 1, 2 or 3 triple negative breast cancer are critical indicators for the prediction of disease r
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Hospital improves on-time administration of medication to Parkinson patients
Amsterdam, NL, July 9, 2020 – Timely administration of anti-Parkinson drugs is a significant issue for hospitalized patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) with late or missed doses resulting in longer stays and worse outcomes. As part of a quality improvement project, a multidisciplinary team was able to change the culture at a US hospital by using a series of measures to ensure PD patients receiv
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Why Light Pollution is a Crucial Test of Humanity's Problem-Solving Skills
A new way to think about light pollution in Europe and the U.S. should help policy makers take its measure. But if they can't solve it, what hope for more complex problems like global heating?
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The Tragic Loss of Coronavirus Patients' Final Words
Of all the wrongdoings of this pandemic, the one that haunts me most is how people are left to die alone. Health-care workers have been heroic throughout all this, but they do not replace the loved ones whom the dying need to be with, and speak with, even if only one last time. A hallmark of COVID-19 has been the speed with which some patients have crashed, going from feeling only a little sick t
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Tag en selvlysende svømmetur i Limfjorden: 'Du får en oplevelse for livet'
Morild-alger blomstrer i Limfjorden og gør vandet lysende blåt.
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Is mask-shaming effective?
NYU associate professor Jennifer Jacquet writes that effective shaming can be a powerful tool for social change. Tess Wilkinson-Ryan, law and psychology professor at the University of Penn, believes shame is useless in the case of the pandemic. The politicization of the coronavirus takes our attention away from the failure of the administration. I can expect anywhere between two and five Karen tw
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The darkness at the end of the tunnel
The Cage, as the elevator is called, leaves at exactly 7:30 a.m. Latecomers are out of luck.
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Unraveling the mystery of wheat herbicide tolerance
Genetically speaking, the loaf of bread you stress-baked during the COVID-19 shutdown is more complex than you think. Wheat's 16 billion genes, organized in not one but three semi-independent genomes, can overlap or substitute for one another, making things extremely tricky for geneticists trying to enhance desirable traits in the world's most widely grown crop.
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About half of health care workers positive for COVID-19 by serology have no symptoms
The IVY Research Network has completed initial studies evaluating the epidemiology of COVID-19 in health care workers and patients.
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Study: More than half of US students experience summer learning losses five years in a row
Following U.S. students across five summers between grades 1 and 6, a little more than half (52 percent) experienced learning losses in all five summers, according to a large national study published today. Students in this group lost an average of 39 percent of their total school year gains during each summer.
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Born to be a cannibal: Genes for feeding behavior in mandarin fish identified
Some mandarin fish species (Sinipercidae) are pure fish-eaters, which feed exclusively on living juvenile fish – also of their own species. A research team led by the Chinese Huazhong Agricultural University (HZAU) and the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) has described the genome of four mandarin fish species and thus also identified genes for cannibalistic eating
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Contracting COVID-19, lifestyle and social connections may play a role
A new article published in the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science explores how lifestyle, social, and psychological factors may increase the risk of contracting COVID-19.
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Lead fallout from Notre Dame fire was likely overlooked
A new study, published today in GeoHealth, used soil samples collected from neighborhoods around the cathedral to estimate local amounts of lead fallout from the fire.
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Sensation seekers, risk-takers who experience more bitterness apt to drink IPAs
People who seek novel and powerful sensations and are more prone to taking risks — and who perceive bitter tastes more intensely — are more likely to prefer bitter, pale-ale-style beers and drink them more often, according to Penn State sensory researchers, who conducted a study that involved blind taste tests and personality assessments.
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Flaring, massively
Using Kyoto University's new 3.8M Seimei Telescope, in collaboration with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, astronomers succeeded in detecting 12 stellar flare phenomena on AD Leonis. One of these flares was 20 times larger than those emitted by our own sun, categorizing it a 'superflare'. Subsequent data analysis presents new insight into these explosive phenomena.
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Lung cancer in non-smokers likely to respond differently to treatment
Lung cancer in non-smokers is a biologically distinct disease from that in smokers, according to a new study. Researchers also found that non-smokers have signs of genetic damage from environmental carcinogens and that some cancers look molecularly like more advanced disease – with characteristics that could be targeted with tailored treatments.
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Scientists reveal comprehensive proteomic map of human lung adenocarcinoma
A team of Chinese scientists from Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Center for Protein Sciences (Beijing), National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, and Shanghai Jiao Tong University, recently reported a comprehensive proteomic analysis based on 103 Chinese patients with lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD), a leading cause o
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Comparing stress cardiomyopathy before, during COVID-19 pandemic
Patients with acute coronary syndrome presenting during the COVID-19 pandemic were compared with patients presenting at times prior to the pandemic to investigate the incidence of stress cardiomyopathy during the pandemic in this observational study.
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COVID-19: Impetus for resident education reform?
How COVID-19 surgical precautions taken in medical centers might be reflected in resident education are detailed in this Viewpoint.
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Examining association of major food sources of fructose-containing sugars with metabolic syndrome
This study combined the results of 13 studies with nearly 50,000 participants to look at the association of major food sources of fructose-containing sugars, such as sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup, with the risk of metabolic syndrome.
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Psychological, ocular surface state of ophthalmologists, ophthalmic nurses working with patients with COVID-19
The mental state and ocular surface state of ophthalmologists and ophthalmic nurses during the COVID-19 outbreak in China in Wuhan and Jiangxi are analyzed in this survey study.
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Cleveland clinic researchers find rise in broken heart syndrome during COVID-19 pandemic
CLEVELAND: Cleveland Clinic researchers have found a significant increase in patients experiencing stress cardiomyopathy, also known as broken heart syndrome, during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Major cause of rare genetic mitochondrial disease identified
An international study led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI) has given hope to families of children born with a fatal heart muscle disease caused by faulty cell machinery.
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Engineering: Reducing noise transmitted through an open window
A new device that can reduce the intensity of sound passing through open windows is presented in a proof-of-principle study in Scientific Reports. It fits into a two-panel sliding window and can decrease the perceived loudness of urban transportation noises by up to half (10 decibel reduction).
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Mapping the immune landscape of haematological cancers may help to enhance therapies
Activating the immune system of the body is a promising form of treatment for cancer. Researchers at the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital as well as the University of Eastern Finland mapped out the immune landscape of haematological malignancies in a dataset covering more than 10,000 patients to identify drug targets and patient groups which could potentially benefit from im
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15-foot-long skeleton of extinct dolphin suggests parallel evolution among whales
A report in the journal Current Biology on July 9 offers a detailed description of the first nearly complete skeleton of an extinct large dolphin, discovered in what is now South Carolina. The 15-foot-long dolphin (Ankylorhiza tiedemani comb. n.) lived during the Oligocene–about 25 million years ago–and was previously known only from a partial rostrum (snout) fossil.
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These messages boost preschool learning activities at home
When early childhood education centers communicate well with parents, those parents are more likely to engage in learning activities with their children at home, research finds. COVID-19 has temporarily shuttered many early childhood education centers across the country, shifting full-time childcare and teaching responsibilities largely to parents. As some of those centers look toward reopening,
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Elon Musk's Boring Company Announces Tunnel-Digging Contest
Digging a Hole Elon Musk's tunneling startup, The Boring Company, has decided to host a fun competition, challenging the general public to dig a tunnel faster than a snail — one of the company's own main goals . The objective in the " Not-a-Boring Competition " is to come up with a tunneling solution that can dig a 30-meter (98 foot) tunnel with the equivalent opening of a circle with a .5 meter
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Black homeownership is lowest since 1968; what that means in an election year
As the United States gears up for a general election in one of the most tumultuous years in recent history, a new BYU study by sociology professor Jacob Rugh uncovers troubling new data about factors that could push down voting levels among Black Americans.
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Evolution makes the world less ragged
How does evolution impact ecological patterns? It helps smooth out the rough edges, say researchers. A new review of the history of ecological and evolutionary research establishes a framework to better understand evolution's impact on ecosystem patterns.
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Skull of two million year-old giant dormouse reconstructed
A researcher has digitally pieced together fossilized fragments from five giant dormouse skulls to reconstruct the first known complete skull of the species, which was roughly the size of a cat.
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This Isn't Sustainable for Working Parents
Child care is the immovable object around which so much else in family life orbits, and when the usual child-care options disappear, something else has to give. During the pandemic, with schools and day-care centers closed or operating at reduced capacity, many parents' careers—particularly mothers' careers—are getting deprioritized. When Salpy Kabaklian-Slentz left her job in April because her f
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Number of positive Covid-19 tests remains stable in England
An estimated 14,000 people had infection over past two weeks, according to ONS data Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The number of people testing positive for Covid-19 has remained stable in England over the past two weeks, according to the Office for National Statistics, with an estimated 14,000 people having the infection. Test results from the coronavirus infection
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Noise control: sound wave system cancels out drum of traffic
Windows can stay open say scientists behind speaker array that emits opposing pressure sound waves to counteract din If the hum of passing cars and the clatter of trains drives you to slam windows shut on a hot day, a new noise cancelling system could be music to your ears. Scientists have developed a sound control system that can be fitted on to an open window, allowing a breeze to waft in while
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Image: New European rack delivered to ISS
After a successful launch aboard the Japanese HTV9 cargo vehicle, a new experiment facility was recently installed in the European laboratory Columbus as part of a comprehensive upgrade of Europe's International Space Station module.
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15-foot-long skeleton of extinct dolphin suggests parallel evolution among whales
A report in the journal Current Biology on July 9 offers a detailed description of the first nearly complete skeleton of an extinct large dolphin, discovered in what is now South Carolina. The 15-foot-long dolphin (Ankylorhiza tiedemani comb. n.) lived during the Oligocene—about 25 million years ago—and was previously known only from a partial rostrum (snout) fossil.
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How many house plants do you need to clean the air in a small flat?
There are lots of claims that house plants filter the air, but it turns out you need an awful lot of them to beat just opening the window, finds James Wong
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Scientists Invent Noise-Canceling Windows
Speakers set on bars inside the windows cancel out unwanted noise, using technology similar to that in noise-canceling headphones. noise-canceling-window-top.jpg Woon-Seng Gan with the new noise-canceling window device. Image credits: NTU Singapore Rights information: This image may only be reproduced with this Inside Science article. Technology Thursday, July 9, 2020 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Co
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Liquid water is more than just H2O molecules
Skoltech scientists in collaboration with researchers from the University of Stuttgart showed that the concentration of short-lived ions (H3O+ and OH-) in pure liquid water is much higher than that assumed to evaluate the pH, hence significantly changing our understanding of the dynamical structure of water.
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Looking at linkers helps to join the dots
Understanding the optimal process for fabricating coupled nanocrystal solids could help researchers to improve optoelectronics devices.
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Pasteurizing breast milk inactivates SARS-CoV-2
Pasteurizing breast milk using a common technique inactivates severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) making it safe for use, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). ttps://www.cmaj.ca/content/cmaj/early/2020/07/09/cmaj.201309.full.pdf
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Challenges in evaluating SARS-CoV-2 vaccines
With more than 140 SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in development, the race is on for a successful candidate to help prevent COVID-19. An effective and safe vaccine would be a major advance in the fight against COVID-19. However, there are challenges in evaluating the efficacy of these vaccines during the pandemic, as an analysis article outlines in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
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NASA sees storms wrapping around Tropical Cyclone Cristina
The analysis of Tropical Cyclone Cristina's cloud top temperatures revealed some bands of thunderstorms were developing and wrapping around the center of the storm's circulation.
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Intimate partner violence, history of childhood abuse worsen trauma symptoms for new moms
New experiences of sexual, emotional and physical abuse at the hands of a romantic partner during the early months of parenthood are associated with increasing symptoms of trauma such as anxiety, depression, self-harm and sleep disorders, researchers report. Having experienced abuse in childhood appears to worsen the impact of current abuse on those symptoms.
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Surprisingly many peculiar long introns found in brain genes
In a recent study of genes involved in brain functioning, their previously unknown features have been uncovered by bioinformaticians from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, RAS.
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Distorted passage of time during the COVID-19 lockdown
A survey conducted in the U.K. suggests that social and physical distancing measures put in place during the Covid-19 pandemic significantly impacted people's perception of how quickly time passed compared to their pre-lockdown perceptions. Ruth S. Ogden of Liverpool John Moores University, U.K., presented these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on July 6, 2020.
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Every day you live, you impact the planet | Jane Goodall
Legendary primatologist Jane Goodall says that humanity's survival depends on conservation of the natural world. In conversation with head of TED Chris Anderson, she tells the story of her formative days working with chimpanzees, how she transformed from a revered naturalist into a dedicated activist and how she's empowering communities around the world to save natural habitats.
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Emissions slashed today won't slow warming until mid-century
Mitigation policies remain essential, but governments need to be wary of public perceptions
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Politics this week
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KAL's cartoon
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Business this week
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OPTN-ATG9 interaction accelerates autophagic degradation of ubiquitin-labeled mitochondria
Researchers at TMIMS have revealed that PINK1 (a serine/threonine kinase) and Parkin (a ubiquitin ligating enzyme: E3) work together to ubiquitylate the outer membrane proteins of damaged mitochondria to induce selective autophagy called mitophagy. Dysfunction of this type of mitophagy causes a decrease in mitochondrial quality and an overproduction of ROS, and thus is linked to the development of
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Fine-tuning excited state of Ru(II)-photosensitizers for boosting carbon dioxide conversion
Solar-driven reduction of CO2 into energy-rich fuels, such as CO, HCOOH, and CH3OH, has been conceived as a highly promising approach to solve energy crisis and environmental pollution. Throughout the molecular photocatalytic systems, numerous catalysts, such as complexes of Re, Ru, Fe, Co and Ni, have been developed with detailed study of their catalytic mechanism. In light of their relatively ma
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Multi-university center aims to minimize mine tailings risk
As the global demand for minerals and metals continues to grow, so too does the proliferation of mine tailings—the waste materials left over when mining is complete. Tailings storage facilities, which typically remain long after the life of a mine is over, use dams to contain ground-up rock, sand, silt and water left over from processing valuable minerals such as copper, gold and phosphate. Howeve
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OPTN-ATG9 interaction accelerates autophagic degradation of ubiquitin-labeled mitochondria
Researchers at TMIMS have revealed that PINK1 (a serine/threonine kinase) and Parkin (a ubiquitin ligating enzyme: E3) work together to ubiquitylate the outer membrane proteins of damaged mitochondria to induce selective autophagy called mitophagy. Dysfunction of this type of mitophagy causes a decrease in mitochondrial quality and an overproduction of ROS, and thus is linked to the development of
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Experimental physicists study steel on board the ISS
For many years, the Institute of Experimental Physics at Graz University of Technology and the Styrian industrial company Böhler Edelstahl have been conducting joint research on the surface tension and temperature dependence of different types of steel. "This data is of great importance for both science and industry," explains experimental physicist Gernot Pottlacher. "It demonstrates how the mate
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Simply scrapping the SAT won't make colleges more diverse
When the University of California decided in early 2020 to stop using the ACT and SAT in admissions by 2025, the decision sparked discussions anew about how fair and useful college entrance exams are in the first place.
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"A liberal culture within the police force is something worth fighting for"
The police forces currently find themselves in the focus of public debate. This was triggered partly by the attacks on police officers in Stuttgart by rioting youths. For another part, police violence against blacks in the U.S. has also brought up the issue of racism in police work in Germany. Ralf Poscher, Director at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Crime, Security and Law is investigat
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Probiotics, revisited
New guidelines do not recommend probiotics for most gastrointestinal conditions.
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A view on climate change from the treetops of Western Africa
The tropical forest canopy is one of the Earth's underexplored frontiers. To understand how these unique environments respond to climate change a team from the Ecosystems Lab at the University of Oxford and partner institutes in Ghana gathered evidence from the treetops, finding drier forests are at greater risks.
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Study suggests less costly approach to pandemic economic stimulus
In late March, as the COVID-19 coronavirus began spreading swiftly throughout the United States, Congress passed a $2 trillion economic stimulus measure that included one-time direct payments to taxpayers, relief for small businesses, and expansion of unemployment insurance, among other provisions.
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Doing more with less: Sperm without a fully active tail move faster and more efficiently, new study finds
Sperm cells moving their long tail to swim through the body in search of an egg is a familiar image, but a fully 'powered' tail may not be the key to success, according to a new UK study which could be crucial for improving the outcomes of assisted fertility treatments.
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Shining light into the dark
Curtin University researchers have discovered a new way to more accurately analyse microscopic samples by essentially making them 'glow in the dark', through the use of chemically luminescent molecules. Lead researcher Dr Yan Vogel from the School of Molecular and Life Sciences said current methods of microscopic imaging rely on fluorescence, which means a light needs to be shining on the sample w
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Breast cancer cells can reprogram immune cells to assist in metastasis
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have uncovered a new mechanism by which invasive breast cancer cells evade the immune system to metastasize, or spread, to other areas of the body.
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Evolution makes the world less ragged
How does evolution impact ecological patterns? It helps smooth out the rough edges, says UConn Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Professor Mark Urban. Urban led an international team of researchers through a review of the history of ecological and evolutionary research to establish a framework to better understand evolution's impact on ecosystem patterns. The research is published as a perspective
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Desert island discs: Music listened to in younger years defines us forever, research finds
Researchers at the University of Westminster and City University of London analysing the music record choices of guests on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs programme has found that the music we listen to between the age of 10 and 30 define us for the rest of our lives.
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Sodium found to regulate the biological clock of mice
A new study from McGill University shows that increases in the concentrations of blood sodium can have an influence on the biological clock of mice, opening new research avenues for potentially treating the negative effects associated with long distance travel or shift work.
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Shellenberger's op-ad
Guest commentary by Michael Tobis This is a deep dive into the form and substance of Michael Shellenberger's promotion for his new book "Apocalypse Never". Shorter version? It should be read as a sales pitch to a certain demographic rather than a genuine apology. Michael Shellenberger appears to have a talent for self-promotion. His book, provocatively entitled "Apocalypse Never" appears to be ga
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Doing more with less: Sperm without a fully active tail move faster and more efficiently, new study finds
Sperm cells moving their long tail to swim through the body in search of an egg is a familiar image, but a fully 'powered' tail may not be the key to success, according to a new UK study which could be crucial for improving the outcomes of assisted fertility treatments.
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CERN: The first accelerators are back in action
The CERN Control Centre is back in shift work mode, with walls of screens showing the status of the beams, and coffee flowing freely day and night. On Friday, 3 July, the Long Shutdown 2 accelerator coordination team handed over the key of the PS Booster to the accelerator operators. Linac 4 and the PS Booster thus become the first two accelerators to be recommissioned, 18 months after the start o
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New report calls for ambitious pesticide reduction target
A new report published by The Wildlife Trusts and authored by a University of Sussex Professor sets out examples of how we can halt insect decline, while asking people, in every part of society, to become 'insect champions'.
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Researcher reconstructs skull of two million year-old giant dormouse
A Ph.D. student has produced the first digital reconstruction of the skull of a gigantic dormouse, which roamed the island of Sicily around two million years ago.
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Analysechef fra varmeværkerne: Vi kommer til at bruge naturgas til 2030
PLUS. Regeringen har med deres klimahandlingsplan gjort varmepumper attraktive for varmeværker, men de vil alligevel bruge gaskedler til at klare spidslasten i årene fremover, fortæller analysechef i Dansk Fjernvarme.
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Wearable Air Conditioner Could Stave Off Your Death In This Heat Wave
Personal Cooldown Sony has developed a wearable personal air conditioner that you can stick inside a specially-designed pocket sewn into an accompanying shirt. The device was meant to cool down attendants of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, but the event had to be postponed due to the coronavirus . But summer itself isn't cancelled — with much of North America slammed by a July heat wave — so luckily Son
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New report calls for ambitious pesticide reduction target
A new report published by The Wildlife Trusts and authored by a University of Sussex Professor sets out examples of how we can halt insect decline, while asking people, in every part of society, to become 'insect champions'.
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CERN: physicists report the discovery of unique new particle
The LHCb collaboration at CERN has announced the discovery of a new exotic particle: a so-called "tetraquark". The paper by more than 800 authors is yet to be evaluated by other scientists in a process called "peer review", but has been presented at a seminar. It also meets the usual statistical threshold for claiming the discovery of a new particle.
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Scientists dive deep into hidden world of quantum states
A research team led by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has developed a technique that could lead to new electronic materials that surpass the limitations imposed by Moore's Law, which predicted in 1975 that the number of transistors packed into a tiny silicon-based computer chip would double every two years. Their findings were reported in the journa
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Assessing the impact of human-associated release of nitrogen into the environment
An international team of researchers that includes the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has conducted an impact assessment of the huge amounts of human-associated nitrogen that are released into the environment every year. In their paper published in the journal Nature Food, the group describes attempting to measure the amounts of human-associated nitrogen that is released i
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Birdwatching increased tenfold last lockdown. Don't stop, it's a huge help for bushfire recovery
Many Victorians returning to stage three lockdown will be looking for ways to pass the hours at home. And some will be turning to birdwatching.
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Children's books must be diverse, or kids will grow up believing white is superior
Global support for the Black Lives Matter movement isn't only about standing up against the injustice done to George Floyd, or Indigenous Australians in custody. People are also standing up against the entrenched racism that leads to a careless approach towards the lives of people who aren't white.
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T-ray camera speed boosted a hundred times over
Scientists are a step closer to developing a fast and cost effective camera that utilises terahertz radiation, potentially opening the opportunity for them to be used in non-invasive security and medical screening.
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New analysis finds opportunities for carbon capture, storage
The Great Plains Institute (GPI) and the University of Wyoming's Jeffrey Brown explore the planning of carbon dioxide transportation networks on a regional scale in a new analysis.
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Discovery opens up new path in study of marine evolution and biodiversity
New UCLA research indicates that an evolutionary phenomenon never before observed among marine life could help explain why there is such immense biodiversity in the world's coral reefs and the ocean beyond.
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Image: Proba-V passes the torch
ESA's cubic-metre-sized Proba-V minisatellite has ended its seven-year global mission to monitor the daily growth of all Earth's vegetation, a task being taken up by Copernicus Sentinel-3 instead, seen right.
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Scientists urge caution, further assessment of ecological impacts above deep-sea mining
Interest in deep-sea mining for copper, cobalt, zinc, manganese and other valuable metals has grown substantially in the last decade and mining activities are anticipated to begin soon. A new study, authored by 19 marine scientists from around the world, argues that deep-sea mining poses significant risks, not only to the area immediately surrounding mining operations but also to the water hundred
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Racism in Health Care Isn't Always Obvious
As physicians, we believe that recognizing it begins with understanding our own privilege and biases — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Aliens Could Have 100 Eyes
Originally published in November 1854 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Canon's new 8K-shooting EOS R5 is the most powerful mirrorless camera yet
A new full-frame sensor is related to the one found in the flagship 1D X Mark III DSLR. (Canon/) Canon entered the mirrorless camera game relatively late, especially when it comes to more advanced models meant for professionals or even high-end amateurs. Companies like Fujifilm with its X-series and Sony with its full-frame A-series had years of head-start by the time Canon announced its first fu
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Birdwatching increased tenfold last lockdown. Don't stop, it's a huge help for bushfire recovery
Many Victorians returning to stage three lockdown will be looking for ways to pass the hours at home. And some will be turning to birdwatching.
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Discovery opens up new path in study of marine evolution and biodiversity
New UCLA research indicates that an evolutionary phenomenon never before observed among marine life could help explain why there is such immense biodiversity in the world's coral reefs and the ocean beyond.
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Structural analysis of COVID-19 spike protein provides insight into its evolution
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have characterised the structure of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein as well as its most similar relative in a bat coronavirus. The structures provide clues about how the spike evolved and could help inform vaccine design.
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Lightening data have more use than previously thought
The lightning data can serve as an indicator for hazardous weather phenomena and improve short-term forecasting,
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How vaping companies are use Instagram to market to young people
Using artificial intelligence, researchers analysed hundreds of thousands of posts from a 6-month period last year, and found that a large portion of Instagram posts are promoting controversial flavoured e-liquids to young audiences
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Fishing for a theory of emergent behavior
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba quantified the collective action of small schools of fish using information theory. They found that groups of three act very differently compared with groups of just two. This work may help solve longstanding problems in complexity theory and allow for a clearer model of emergent behavior.
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Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
According to the latest UN report, the number of displaced persons and refugees has surged, again, by several millions. Most of them will not be able to return to their homes in the foreseeable future. Psychologists at Münster University have developed a model of the psychological factors affecting the successful integration of refugees. The model has been published in the journal "Perspectives on
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Researcher reconstructs skull of two million year-old giant dormouse
A researcher has digitally pieced together fossilised fragments from five giant dormouse skulls to reconstruct the first known complete skull of the species, which was roughly the size of a cat.
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Breast cancer cells turn killer immune cells into allies
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that breast cancer cells can alter the function of immune cells known as Natural killer (NK) cells so that instead of killing the cancer cells, they facilitate their spread to other parts of the body. The study, which will be published July 9 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that preventing this reprogramming
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Is stop and search contributing to the spread of COVID-19 in the UK?
As I was finishing my one-hour walk of the day on the afternoon of June 11 2020, two officers from the Merseyside Police Force stopped me near where I live and work in Liverpool. The men, who were in civilian clothing, identified themselves by showing me their IDs and handcuffs.
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How can we stop people wanting to buy illegal wildlife products?
Conservationists have been working for decades to save species such as pangolins and rhinos from illegal hunting and trading. And, with fears that the coronavirus pandemic originated from the wildlife trade, there's never been more pressure to find solutions.
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Calculating the true pressure required to propel penguin feces
A pair of researchers, one with Kochi University, the other Katsurahama Aquarium, both in Japan, has refined the estimate of the amount of pressure required by an Adélie penguin to shoot its feces a necessary distance. Hiroyuki Tajima and Fumiya Fujisawa have written a paper describing their new calculations and what it could mean for zookeepers.
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Capacitance of thin films containing polymerized ionic liquids
Electrode-polymer interfaces can dictate properties of thin films including their capacitance, electric field, and charge transport, but scientists remain to fully comprehend their interfacial dynamics. In a new report on Science Advances, Rajiv Kumar, and a team of interdisciplinary scientists in the U.S. and Poland investigated electrified interfaces of an imidazolium-based polymerized ionic liq
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Our field cameras melted in the bushfires. When we opened them, the results were startling
In late summer, male northern corroboree frogs call for a female mate. It's a good time to survey their numbers: simply call out "Hey, frog!" in a low, deep voice and the males call back.
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Making the case for slingshotting past Venus on the way to Mars
A team of researchers from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, North Carolina State University and NASA, has proposed, via whitepaper, that NASA should direct its Mars-bound spacecraft to fly by Venus first. In their paper, uploaded to the arXiv preprint server, the researchers outline their arguments for an opposition mission, as opposed to a conjunction mission.
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Trump's America Is Slipping Away
Donald Trump is running for the presidency of an America that no longer exists. Trump in recent weeks has repeatedly reprised two of Richard Nixon's most memorable rallying cries, promising to deliver "law and order" for the "silent majority." But in almost every meaningful way, America today is a radically different country than it was when Nixon rode those arguments to win the presidency in 196
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How can we stop people wanting to buy illegal wildlife products?
Conservationists have been working for decades to save species such as pangolins and rhinos from illegal hunting and trading. And, with fears that the coronavirus pandemic originated from the wildlife trade, there's never been more pressure to find solutions.
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Our field cameras melted in the bushfires. When we opened them, the results were startling
In late summer, male northern corroboree frogs call for a female mate. It's a good time to survey their numbers: simply call out "Hey, frog!" in a low, deep voice and the males call back.
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New report aims to prevent incels from turning to violence
Two political science students at the University of Alberta have written a background report to help social workers, psychologists and other practitioners prevent involuntary celibates, or "incels," from turning to violence.
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VERITAS: exploring the deep truths of Venus
Imagine Earth. Now fill the skies with thick, sun-obscuring clouds of sulfuric acid; boil off the oceans by cranking up the temperature to 900 degrees Fahrenheit (nearly 500 degrees Celsius), and boost the air pressure high enough to flatten you like a pancake. What you now have is Venus, a rocky planet similar in size to Earth but different in almost every other way.
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21st century Texas climate will rival 'megadroughts'
The future climate of Texas will feature drier summers and decreasing water supplies for much of the state for the remainder of the 21st century, researchers report. These factors will likely result in the driest conditions the state has endured in the last 1,000 years, according to the new study. The message is clear: Texas is getting hotter and drier, and the time to take action is now. Using t
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Higher fruit, vegetable and whole grain intake linked to lower risk of diabetes
Higher consumption of fruit, vegetables and whole grain foods are associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to two new studies.
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New bird checklists from Coiba National Park, Panama
A trip to Jicarón Island during the Coiba Bioblitz led to a published bird checklist.
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Stanford prof ordered to pay legal fees after dropping $10 million defamation case against another scientist
A Stanford professor who sued a critic and a scientific journal for $10 million — then dropped the suit — has been ordered to pay the defendants' legal fees based on a statute "designed to provide for early dismissal of meritless lawsuits filed against people for the exercise of First Amendment rights." Mark Jacobson, who … Continue reading
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Structural analysis of COVID-19 spike protein provides insight into its evolution
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have characterised the structure of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein as well as its most similar relative in a bat coronavirus. The structures provide clues about how the spike evolved and could help inform vaccine design.
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New ways to keep proteins healthy outside the cell
With increasing age, and especially in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, proteins tend to misfold and aggregate into harmful deposits both inside and outside cells. Secreted proteins play an important role in regulating body functions and fighting infections. Now a collaborative team at the University of Tübingen has discovered mechanisms to stop secreted proteins from forming deposi
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The ups and downs of a mega-lake
Together with an international team, researchers of the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen reconstructed the 20,000-year-old history of the mega-lake Chew Bahir in a remote valley in Southern Ethiopia. Led by Annett Junginger, the scientists were able to show that the lake underwent rapid water level changes in the course of its history, whic
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Living fossils: We mapped a half-billion years of horseshoe crabs to save them from blood harvests
If you ventured to the New York seaside in summer, you might see a large dome-shaped animal with a spiky tail, slowly moving towards the water. These are horseshoe crabs—the animals time forgot.
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If Canada is serious about confronting systemic racism, we must abolish prisons
Global uprisings in response to anti-Black police brutality have prompted demands to defund policing and reinvest in communities. Public health professionals recognize the connections between racism and community well-being. But it is not just policing agencies that have a systemic racism problem, Canadian prisons do too.
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Albert Einstein the mediocre: Why the h-index is a bogus measure of academic impact
Earlier this year, French physician and microbiologist Didier Raoult generated a media uproar over his controversial promotion of hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19. The researcher has long pointed to his growing list of publications and high number of citations as an indication of his contribution to science, all summarized in his "h-index."
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Structural analysis of COVID-19 spike protein provides insight into its evolution
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have characterised the structure of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein as well as its most similar relative in a bat coronavirus. The structures provide clues about how the spike evolved and could help inform vaccine design.
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New ways to keep proteins healthy outside the cell
With increasing age, and especially in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, proteins tend to misfold and aggregate into harmful deposits both inside and outside cells. Secreted proteins play an important role in regulating body functions and fighting infections. Now a collaborative team at the University of Tübingen has discovered mechanisms to stop secreted proteins from forming deposi
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Living fossils: We mapped a half-billion years of horseshoe crabs to save them from blood harvests
If you ventured to the New York seaside in summer, you might see a large dome-shaped animal with a spiky tail, slowly moving towards the water. These are horseshoe crabs—the animals time forgot.
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Fishing for a theory of emergent behavior
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba used advanced metrics from information theory to describe the collective behavior of small schools of ayu fish. They found that the overall dynamics were noticeably different for groups of three or more, compared with smaller groups, even over very short timescales. This work may help shed light on fundamental problems in complexity theory and assist in the
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New research reveals Indigenous public servants' experiences of racism
The Morrison government has just announced a plan to boost the number of Indigenous Australians in the top ranks of the Australian Public Service.
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Languages will change significantly on interstellar flights
It's a captivating idea: build an interstellar ark, fill it with people, flora, and fauna of every kind, and set your course for a distant star. The concept is not only science fiction gold, it's been the subject of many scientific studies and proposals. By building a ship that can accommodate multiple generations of human beings (a generation ship), humans could colonize the known universe.
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Fishing for a theory of emergent behavior
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba used advanced metrics from information theory to describe the collective behavior of small schools of ayu fish. They found that the overall dynamics were noticeably different for groups of three or more, compared with smaller groups, even over very short timescales. This work may help shed light on fundamental problems in complexity theory and assist in the
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Shining light into the dark: New discovery makes microscopic imaging possible in dark conditions
Curtin University researchers have discovered a new way to more accurately analyze microscopic samples by essentially making them glow in the dark through the use of chemically luminescent molecules.
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Shining light into the dark: New discovery makes microscopic imaging possible in dark conditions
Curtin University researchers have discovered a new way to more accurately analyze microscopic samples by essentially making them glow in the dark through the use of chemically luminescent molecules.
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The 3D Printed Homes of the Future Are Giant Eggs on Mars
Last month, a 3D printed house that can float on a pontoon was unveiled in the Czech Republic. Last year, work started on a community of 3D printed houses for low-income families in Mexico. While building homes with 3D printers is becoming more scalable, it's also still a fun way to play around with unique designs and futuristic concepts for our living spaces. It doesn't get much more futuristic
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Fine-tuning excited state of Ru(II)-photosensitizers for boosting CO2-to-CO conversion
How to substantially improve sensitizing ability of photosensitisers (PSs) through balancing its excited state lifetime and redox driving force represents a key role in promoting electron transfer efficiency and further enhancing photoconversion efficiency, however remains a great challenge. In this work, for the first time, researchers report a facile strategy to improve sensitizing ability via f
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A new nanoconjugate blocks acute myeloid leukemia tumor cells without harming healthy ones
The nanoparticle targets only leukemic cells and therefore would reduce the severe adverse effects of current treatments. The receptor for this nanoparticle is expressed in 20 types of cancer and associated with a poor prognosis, so this drug could open a new therapeutic pathway for other tumors.
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OPTN-ATG9 interaction accelerates autophagic degradation of ubiquitin-labeled mitochondria
Damaged mitochondria are selectively eliminated via autophagy (called mitophagy). Parkin and PINK1, proteins mutated in hereditary Parkinson's disease, amplify ubiquitin signals on damaged mitochondria with the subsequent activation of autophagic machinery. Researchers in the Ubiquitin Project of Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (TMIMS) discovered that the critical autophagy adaptor
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UCLA-led team develops ways to keep buildings cool with improved super white paints
A research team led by UCLA materials scientists has demonstrated ways to make super white paint that reflects as much as 98% of incoming heat from the sun. The advance shows practical pathways for designing paints that, if used on rooftops and other parts of a building, could significantly reduce cooling costs, beyond what standard white 'cool-roof' paints can achieve.
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Restructuring of Medicaid reimbursement model reduces imaging, to the benefit of patients
New research reveals a Medicaid payment model in Oregon leads to fewer traditional primary care services for patients, with the decrease focused entirely on imaging.
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The Scientist Leading the World's Aurora Hunters
The shimmering sheets of spectral light we call auroras were once attributed to many preternatural acts or supernatural entities: a glowing bridge that led deceased warriors to their final resting place, or the whipping of the tail of a fire fox as it zipped across the snow. Today, we know that the northern and southern lights are a manifestation of space weather — the complex entanglement, destr
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New clues from fruit flies about the critical role of sex hormones in stem cell control
In one of the first studies addressing the role of sex hormones' impact on stem cells in the gut, scientists outline new insights showing how a steroidal sex hormone, ecdysone, drastically alters the way intestinal stem cells behave, ultimately affecting the overarching structure and function of this critical organ.
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Daytime aardvark sightings are a sign of troubled times
New research reveals what a shift from night-time to daytime activity means for the well-being of aardvarks in a warming and drying world.
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Study: Hospital security guards employ excessive physical violence, require training
Security guards employed at hospitals may be ill-prepared to deal with Code Black situations where patients or visitors appear threatening or violent, says Flinders University Professor of Nursing (Mental Health) Eimear Muir-Cochrane.
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New comet NEOWISE graces the skies
A comet visiting from the most distant parts of our solar system is putting on a spectacular nighttime display. The comet C/2020 F3 NEOWISE made its once-in-a-lifetime close approach to the sun on July 3 and will cross outside the Earth's orbit on its way back to the outer parts of the solar system by mid-August.
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Novel 'dual-resonant method' in 2-D materials can spur advances in the field of photonics
Scientists at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, have developed a new process that provides an ultrafast process of photon generation in two-dimensional materials. This process can potentially fuel the development of advanced optical devices in the field of photonics.
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Scientists look to bird feathers for printing colors
In nature, colors play a vital role in behaviors such as pollination, signaling for mating and defense against predators. Colors are also an important factor in scientific research that can provide the basis for novel printing and anti-counterfeiting applications.
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Almost all lemur species are now endangered
Verreaux's sifaka was once a common lemur species across the south of Madagascar, but is now listed as critically endangered, the last classification before extinction
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Biologists trace plants' steady mitochondrial genomes to a gene found in viruses, bacteria
One could say that mitochondria, the energy-producing organelles inside every human cell, dance to their own beat. After all, they have their own genome—a set of DNA-containing chromosomes—completely separate from the genome of the cell's nucleus.
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Forskere: Stenstøv på verdens marker kan indfange 2 mia. ton CO2
Behandles al landbrugsjord i Kina, Brasilien, USA og Indien med bjergarten basalt, kan der opsuges, hvad der svarer til de samlede udledninger af CO2 årligt fra Japan og Tyskland. Gå i gang, lyder opfordringen fra forskere fra USA, Storbritannien og Belgien.
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Biologists trace plants' steady mitochondrial genomes to a gene found in viruses, bacteria
One could say that mitochondria, the energy-producing organelles inside every human cell, dance to their own beat. After all, they have their own genome—a set of DNA-containing chromosomes—completely separate from the genome of the cell's nucleus.
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New report sheds light on the impact of COVID-19 on gender and sustainability
Professor Sophie Harman from Queen Mary's School of Politics and International Relations was one of the lead authors on a major new report from U.N. Women, the United Nations organization dedicated to gender equality and the empowerment of women.
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Supermassive binary black hole hunter: SKA pulsar timing array
Recently, researchers from the National Astronomical Observatory of the Chinese Academy of Sciences quantified the potential of gravitational wave detection in the era of the Square Kilometer Array (SKA). The study was published in Physical Review D.
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No association found between exposure to mobile devices and brain volume alterations in adolescents
New study of 2,500 Dutch children is the first to explore the relationship between brain volume and different doses of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields
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Parents' smartphone use does not harm parent/child relationships
Contrary to popular views, parental smartphone use is rarely associated with poor parenting, and more often than not, tends to be associated with warm and attached parenting.
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Amygdala changes in male patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder
Researchers in Japan have revealed that DNA methylation occurs in the serotonin transporter gene that regulates neurotransmitter transmission in schizophrenia and bipolar patients. Particularly prominent in males and patients with certain genetic polymorphisms, this methylation is inversely correlated to amygdala volume. This work is expected to lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiolog
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New method solves old mystery: Hafnium isotopes clinch origin of high-quality Roman glass
Archaeological glass contains information about the movement of goods and ancient economies, yet the understanding of critical aspects of the ancient glass industry is fragmentary. Until now, it has been challenging to scientifically determine the origin of the colourless and clear glass, which was particularly favoured by the Romans. The Romans distinguished between two types of clear glass: Alex
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TGen-led study identifies unique cells that may drive lung fibrosis
This is one of the first comprehensive looks at lung cells using a technology called single-cell RNA sequencing. Instead of examining a mash-up of many cells from a tissue sample, single-cell sequencing allowed researchers in this study to closely examine the individual cells that make up the lungs; to identify their function, and ultimately understand the molecular changes that may be driving the
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Care for cats? So did people along the Silk Road more than 1,000 years ago
Common domestic cats, as we know them today, might have accompanied Kazakh pastoralists as pets more than 1,000 years ago. This is indicated by new analyses done on an almost complete cat skeleton found during an excavation along the former Silk Road in southern Kazakhstan. An international research team has reconstructed the cat's life, revealing astonishing insights into the relationship between
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JCB electric digger wins top MacRobert engineering prize
An all-electric construction vehicle from the Staffordshire firm wins this year's MacRobert Award.
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New findings shed light on development of liposome-based inhibitors
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the biggest global public health challenges. However, the pathogenesis of AD is still unclear.
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Novel high-throughput screening method developed for ketones
Ketones are of great importance as building blocks in synthetic organic chemistry and biocatalysis. Most ketones cannot easily be quantitatively assayed due to the lack of visible photometric properties. Effective high-throughput assay (HTA) development is therefore necessary for ketone determination.
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New findings shed light on development of liposome-based inhibitors
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the biggest global public health challenges. However, the pathogenesis of AD is still unclear.
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Novel high-throughput screening method developed for ketones
Ketones are of great importance as building blocks in synthetic organic chemistry and biocatalysis. Most ketones cannot easily be quantitatively assayed due to the lack of visible photometric properties. Effective high-throughput assay (HTA) development is therefore necessary for ketone determination.
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Lightning data more useful than previously thought
Lightning is a spectacular natural phenomenon closely associated with the electrification and discharge of thunderstorms. Different types of thunderstorms correspond to different lightning characteristics and charge structures. But what are the characteristics of lightning in different types of thunderstorms?
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Graphene boosts perovskite single crystal photodetector performance
Due to the wide application of photodetectors in fields including optical communication, environmental monitoring, and image sensing, research for developing highly efficient photodetectors has attracted extensive attention in recent decades. Since 2009, methyl ammonium lead halide (CH3NH3PbX3, X=halogen) perovskites have become a hot topic in material science for light collection in photodetector
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Reclaim Your Online Privacy With This Awesome Deal on an Outstanding VPN
When it comes to protecting your online privacy and security, the first thing you should probably do is subscribe to a VPN . And if you have not done that yet, this is your lucky day. Right now you can get a really great deal on a three-year subscription to CyberGhost VPN , which will give you comprehensive protection and anonymity without throttling connection speeds. Why You Need A VPN Unsplash
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Forskeralliance vil forstå genmekanismer bag de store folkesygdomme
Den internationale alliance af forskere ICDA offentliggør deres anbefalinger til, hvor videnskaben…
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Researchers apply the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory to cosmology
The anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence, also referred to as gauge/gravity duality, hypothesizes the existence of a relationship between two types of physics theories, namely gravity theories in AdS spacetimes and CFTs. Over the past few decades, gauge/gravity duality constructs have been applied in a wide range of scientific research fields. For instance, some researche
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Viral Learning Curve
Drug manufacturers are racing to create a protective measure against coronavirus without destroying the patient's immune system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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COVID-19 Cases Are Rising, So Why Are Deaths Falling?
For the past few weeks, I have been obsessed with a mystery emerging in the national COVID-19 data. Cases have soared to terrifying levels since June. Yesterday, the U.S. had 62,000 confirmed cases, an all-time high—and about five times more than the entire continent of Europe. Several U.S. states, including Arizona and Florida, currently have more confirmed cases per capita than any other countr
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More than half of Africa's primates are now officially endangered
Verreaux's sifaka was once a common lemur species across the south of Madagascar, but is now listed as critically endangered, the last classification before extinction
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Climate change: Heavy rain after drought may cause fish kills
Due to climate changes, many regions are experiencing increasingly warmer and dryer summers, followed by heavy rain. New study shows this is a fatal combination that can cause massive fish kills in lakes within a few hours.
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Daytime aardvark sightings are a sign of troubled times
New research by the team from Wits, with collaborators from the University of Cape Town and University of Pretoria, reveals what a shift from night-time to daytime activity means for the well-being of aardvarks in a warming and drying world.
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Study sheds light on how cancer spreads in blood
A new study sheds light on proteins in particles called extracellular vesicles, which are released by tumor cells into the bloodstream and promote the spread of cancer. The findings suggest how a blood test involving these vesicles might be used to diagnose cancer in the future, avoiding the need for invasive surgical biopsies.
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X-ray scattering shines light on protein folding
KAIST researchers have used an X-ray method to track how proteins fold, which could improve computer simulations of this process, with implications for understanding diseases and improving drug discovery. Their findings were reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) on June 30.
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Scientists urge caution, further assessment of ecological impacts above deep sea mining
A new study, led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers, argues that deep-sea mining poses significant risks, not only to the area immediately surrounding mining operations but also to the water hundreds to thousands of feet above the seafloor, threatening vast midwater ecosystems. Further, the scientists suggest how these risks could be evaluated more comprehensively to enable society and
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New clues from fruit flies about the critical role of sex hormones in stem cell control
In one of the first studies addressing the role of sex hormones' impact on stem cells in the gut, scientists outline new insights showing how a steroidal sex hormone, ecdysone, drastically alters the way intestinal stem cells behave, ultimately affecting the overarching structure and function of this critical organ.
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Northern Right Whales Are on the Brink, and Trump Could Be Their Last Hope
The species was declared critically endangered on Thursday, with fewer than 450 left.
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Opposition to HPV vaccine finds traction on Facebook
Facebook has allowed anti-vaxxers to gain a stronger voice against the HPV vaccine, a new study finds. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that approximately 80 million Americans have an HPV (human papillomavirus) infection, and 14 million new cases occur annually. HPV is associated with genital warts and six types of cancer in men and women, including cervical and throat can
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Police Are Seeking Tesla Owners to Solve an Attempted Murder
Spy Car Police in Sandefjord, Norway, are turning to an unlikely ally while investigating an attempted murder. On Sunday night, someone tried to burn down Mayor Bjørn Ole Geditsch's house. So far, police haven't identified any suspect, but as spotted by Electrek , local news outlet SB.no reports that they're calling on Tesla owners in the areato see if their cars' security cameras caught anything
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DoNotPay Unsubscribes You From Spam—and Tries to Get You Paid
There's finally a way to get off of email lists with your privacy intact.
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Dear Joe Biden: Don't Listen to Silicon Valley
Unlike 20 years ago, today's Silicon Valley culture is elitist and authoritarian. Its leaders are part of the problem, not the solution.
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Novel "dual-resonant method" in 2D materials can spur advances in the field of photonics
Scientists at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, have developed a new process that provides an ultrafast process of photon generation in two-dimensional materials. This process can potentially fuel the development of advanced optical devices in the field of photonics.
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Research shows child abuse and neglect results in increased hospitalizations over time
In a new study published in the leading international journal, Child Abuse and Neglect, University of South Australia researchers have found that by their mid-teens, children who were the subject of child protective services contact, are up to 52 per cent more likely to be hospitalised, for a range of problems, the most frequent being mental illness, toxic effects of drugs and physical injuries.
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Study of supercooled liquids contributes to better understanding of phase change processes
The authors propose a new quantitative approach to better measure the crystal growth rate in supercooled liquids. The approach is based on a unique statistical algorithm used in molecular dynamics simulation.
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Breakthrough with cancer vaccine
Scientists have developed a new cancer vaccine with the potential to activate the body's immune system to fight a range of cancers, including leukaemia, breast cancer, lung cancer and pancreatic cancers.
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Alzheimer-linked protein complex at super resolution
With the advent of super-resolution microscopy, scientists can study close protein associations better than ever before. In the latest edition of eLife, the team of Wim Annaert (VIB-KU Leuven) combines state-of-the-art imaging techniques to investigate the distribution of γ-secretase, a protein complex associated with both Alzheimer's disease and cancer.
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Hidden Neutrino Particles May Be a Link to the Dark Sector
An experiment aims to find a rumored new type of neutrino that could be a portal to the universe's dark matter — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Extinction: One third of all lemurs 'on the brink'
A third of all the lemur species on Earth are "one step from extinction".
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New insights revealed in the evolution of community-level heredity
What would happen if a selection experiment was performed on thousands of communities of microbes based on some community-level function? Researchers from ESPCI Paris-PSL, College de France, and ENS-PSL used a theoretical approach to show that not only is this feasible, but that community-level heredity can arise from the evolution of interactions among microbes. The results have been published in
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The spin state story: Observation of the quantum spin liquid state in novel material
Aside from the deep understanding of the natural world that quantum physics theory offers, scientists worldwide are striving to bring forth a technological revolution by leveraging this newfound knowledge in engineering applications. Spintronics is an emerging field that aims to surpass the limits of traditional electronics by using the spin of electrons, which can be roughly seen as their angular
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Care for cats? So did people along the Silk Road more than 1,000 years ago
Common domestic cats as we know them today might have accompanied Kazakh pastoralists as pets more than 1,000 years ago. This has been indicated by new analyses done on an almost complete cat skeleton found during an excavation along the former Silk Road in southern Kazakhstan. An international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), Korkyt-Ata Kyzylorda State Univers
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Researchers develop high-speed, low-power silicon-germanium chips for cloud computing
Researchers at the Centre de Nanosciences et de Nanotechnologies, in cooperation with CEA LETI and STMicroelectronics, have demonstrated a power-efficient and high-speed silicon-germanium avalanche photo receiver. The device is fully compatible with accessible semiconductor technology and fiber-optic links operated at telecom waveband standard.
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New insights revealed in the evolution of community-level heredity
What would happen if a selection experiment was performed on thousands of communities of microbes based on some community-level function? Researchers from ESPCI Paris-PSL, College de France, and ENS-PSL used a theoretical approach to show that not only is this feasible, but that community-level heredity can arise from the evolution of interactions among microbes. The results have been published in
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The Brain's Filter
If you have not seen this video of students passing basketballs around, watch it now before reading further. The now famous video, from Simons 1999, is a demonstration of inattentional blindness. There is no trick here, just a demonstration of normal brain functioning. When we are focusing our attention on one type of stimuli we can filter out "distracting" stimuli that doesn't fit the parameters
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Covid Kills More Men Than Women. Experts Still Can't Explain Why
A new tracker from Harvard's GenderSci Lab is the first to consolidate sex-separated data from across the US. It may help researchers solve the mystery.
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Alienware M15 R2 Review: A Powerful Gaming Laptop
Packed with powerful hardware, this second-gen gaming laptop runs circles around the competition—for a short while.
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One Standard to (Maybe) Rule Them All: Intel Debuts Thunderbolt 4
In March 2019, Intel Corporation announced that it has contributed the Thunderbolt protocol specification to the USB Promoter Group. The USB Promoter Group also announced the pending release of the USB4 specification, based on the Thunderbolt protocol. The convergence of the underlying Thunderbolt and USB protocols will increase compatibility among USB Type-C connector-based products, simplifying
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How a Saber-Tooth Marsupial Blinded Us With Its Bite
The extinct South American animal made us believe it was as fierce as a saber-tooth cat, but a new study suggests it was a mere scavenger.
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These are the factors that put you at higher risk of dying from covid-19
The news: A study of more than 17 million people in England has confirmed the various factors that are linked with an increase in a person's risk of dying from covid-19: age; being male, Black, or from an ethnic minority background; or having underlying health conditions. It confirms a lot of previous research, but it's by far the largest study yet. It was published in Nature yesterday. The resea
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Comet NEOWISE Could Be Spectacular: Here's How to See It
Already visible to the naked eye, the object may soon brighten to create the greatest celestial light show in decades—or it could simply fade away — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Comet NEOWISE Could Be Spectacular: Here's How to See It
Already visible to the naked eye, the object may soon brighten to create the greatest celestial light show in decades—or it could simply fade away — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bleak financial outlook for PhD students in Australia
Nature, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02069-y Unable to afford medicines, utilities and housing, some students expect to suspend their doctoral programmes or drop out.
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Pharma industry commits $1bn to fight drug-resistant superbugs
Twenty-three companies join forces to launch a fund to develop new antibiotics by 2030
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Using electricity to break down pollutants left over after wastewater treatment
Pesticides, pharmaceutical products, and endocrine disruptors are emerging contaminants often found in treated domestic wastewater, even after secondary treatment. Professor Patrick Drogui of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) and his team have tested the effectiveness of a tertiary treatment process using electricity in partnership with the European Membrane Institute in Mo
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Gorillas in Nigeria: World's rarest great ape pictured with babies
The sighting of young Cross River gorillas in Nigeria eases fears they will soon die out.
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Using electricity to break down pollutants left over after wastewater treatment
Pesticides, pharmaceutical products, and endocrine disruptors are emerging contaminants often found in treated domestic wastewater, even after secondary treatment. Professor Patrick Drogui of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) and his team have tested the effectiveness of a tertiary treatment process using electricity in partnership with the European Membrane Institute in Mo
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Linkin Park T-Shirts Are All the Rage in China
The band hasn't been cool for years. But its Minutes to Midnight logo is everywhere in the most populous country in the world.
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How to Use Slack Without Driving Your Coworkers Crazy
Many of us use it at work, but here are some tips on how to make Slack work for you. (Stop. Hitting. Enter. So. Often.)
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Larry Brilliant on How Well We Are Fighting Covid-19
Three months ago, the epidemiologist weighed in on what we must do to defeat this new threat. We went back to ask: How are we doing, and what comes next?
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Uber Quietly Recruits Allies to Battle Cities Over User Data
Nonprofits and advocacy groups signed on to an organization called Communities Against Rider Surveillance—without knowing that the ride-hail giant was involved.
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A Missed Warning About Silent Coronavirus Infections
Why an early scientific report of symptom-free cases went unheeded.
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The Woman Who Made the Best Action Movie of 2020
Gina Prince-Bythewood has never been afraid of tackling new genres. The writer and director has made three excellent films set in very different spheres: the coming-of-age masterpiece Love & Basketball , the 1960s-set drama The Secret Life of Bees , and the glittery superstar romance Beyond the Lights . But for years she's craved the scope of a blockbuster action film, the type that studios and a
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Galleri: Kina indvier bro med verdens højeste pylon
PLUS. Kinesiske ingeniører har netop indviet en bro med verdens højeste pylon, der skal fremme opførelsen af jernbanestrækninger langs Yangtze-flodens kyst mellem Beijing og Shanghai. Galleriets billeder – bortset fra det første – er fra konstruktionsfasen.
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COVID-19 Is Forcing Us to Rethink Clinical Trials for Cancer Treatments
Participation rates were already low, but the pandemic threatens to drive them even lower — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ships Hit Smaller Sea Animals More Often than Researchers Thought
New research sheds light on the range of creatures killed and injured by collisions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Laser avslöjar hur bra munskydden är
Kring hemsnickrade munskydd och skydd som finns att köpa i vanliga butiker och apotek, är evidensen gles när det gäller i vilken grad de kan minska smittorisk för covid-19. Nu har amerikanska forskare använt laser för att testa hur sådana skydd presterar på en förkyld skyltdocka.
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Method makes plastic transparent and conductive
A method to make plastic conductive and more transparent could improve large touchscreens, LED light panels, and window-mounted infrared solar cells, say researchers. They provide a recipe to help other researchers find the best balance between conductivity and transparency by creating a three-layer anti-reflection surface. The conductive metal layer is sandwiched between two dielectric materials
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We Can't End AIDS Without Fighting Racism
Howard Bagby, PWA, lies in bed at the VA Hospital in New York City, 1987 (Alon Reininger / Contact Press Images) The color of your skin should not determine the quality of your health. But in the United States, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is exacerbated by racism, bias, and discrimination. As America continues its long-overdue reckoning with racism and systemic injustice, we must address the devastatin
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Ships Hit Smaller Sea Animals More Often than Researchers Thought
New research sheds light on the range of creatures killed and injured by collisions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Vässad svensk teknik avslöjar kärnvapen
På fem platser i Sverige installeras ett världsunikt system som förbättrar förmågan att upptäcka kärnvapenprov. Bakom det nya superkänsliga konceptet står forskare vid Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut, FOI. Här berättar Anders Ringbom, forskningschef på FOI, om en viktig del av det svenska arbetet mot kärnvapen.
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Councils need detailed data to contain Covid-19. Why have they been sidelined? | Chris Ham and Kate Ardern
The government's preference for centralisation and the private sector has undermined England's response to the pandemic Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The easing of the national lockdown has shifted the focus from central government to local authorities. Councils across England have made good progress in developing local outbreak plans and building capacity for cont
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Hubble just captured this 'fluffy' galaxy in all its flocculent glory
Situated 67 million light-years away, NGC 2275 has a feathered, fluffy appearance. (ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Lee and the PHANGS-HST Team; Acknowledgment: Judy Schmidt (Geckzilla)/) The Hubble Space Telescope just imaged a galaxy nestled 67 million light-years away in the Cancer constellation—and it's fluffy. Known as NGC 2775, the galaxy has fuzzy arms spiraling out from its center like the limbs of
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Leading anesthesiologist retracts paper after reader "noticed that the statistical approach was sub-optimal"
An anesthesia journal has retracted a 2020 paper by a group from China, Turkey and the United States after a post-publication review discovered issues with the analysis. According to the notice, in the European Journal of Anaesthesiology: Following a statistical review, the Publish Ahead of Print version of the article, 'Acute pain after serratus anterior … Continue reading
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These 8 Basic Steps Will Let Us Reopen Schools
In any other July, millions of American schoolchildren, their families, and their teachers would be eagerly anticipating, or perhaps dreading, the start of a new school year. This year is different. With coronavirus case counts increasing rapidly in many states, it's natural to wonder whether there will be school at all. Education is an essential foundation of society. The disruptions caused by t
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How a History Textbook Would Describe 2020 So Far
History never ends. But history textbooks must. As deadlines for new editions loom, every textbook writer lurches to a sudden stop. The last chapter always ends in uncertainty: unfinished and unresolved. I've experienced this many times myself, as a co-author on several history textbooks . By now it seems clear that we are all living through a major turning point in history, one that will be stud
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W.H.O., in Reversal, Affirms Covid May Be Airborne Indoors: Live Updates
As President Trump seeks further reopenings, the country set its fifth record in nine days. India's caseload is soaring, weeks after lockdowns were lifted.
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Japan's Deadly Combination: Climate Change and an Aging Society
Record-breaking rains this week in the country's southernmost main island, which have killed 62, have shown the vulnerability of people living in nursing homes.
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Who Gets a Vaccine First? U.S. Considers Race in Coronavirus Plans
When a vaccine hits the market, it will be a key tool in putting an end to the pandemic. A federal committee is debating giving early access to groups that face a high risk.
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Covid-19 and Medicine's Misguided Romance With Machines
At the center of the debate over ventilators' effectiveness in treating Covid-19 is an enigmatic syndrome with a controversial past: acute respiratory distress syndrome. Its story serves as a cautionary tale about the dangers of prioritizing technology in settings where one treatment does not fit all.
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Isboringer fra Grønland kobler vulkanudbrud til mystisk periode med ekstrem kulde i det antikke Rom
Kulde, hungersnød og store omvæltninger i Romerriget og Egypten, da Cæsar blev myrdet…
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The spin state story: Observation of the quantum spin liquid state in novel material
The quantum spin liquid (QSL) state is an exotic state of matter where the spin of electrons, which generally exhibits order at low temperatures, remains disordered. Now, scientists from Tokyo University of Science, Japan, have developed a new material where a two-dimensional QSL state can be experimentally observed, advancing our knowledge of spin behavior, and getting us closer to next-generatio
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Temple scientists identify key factor regulating abnormal heart growth
In new work, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University cast fresh light on a key molecular regulator in the heart known as FoxO1. In a paper published online July 9 in the journal Circulation, the Temple scientists are the first to show that FoxO1 attaches to and activates a wide array of genes in heart cells, leading to widespread increases in growth signaling, specifi
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Care for cats? So did people along the Silk Road more than 1,000 years ago
Common domestic cats, as we know them today, might have accompanied Kazakh pastoralists as pets more than 1,000 years ago. This is indicated by new analyses done on an almost complete cat skeleton found during an excavation along the former Silk Road in southern Kazakhstan. An international research team has reconstructed the cat's life, revealing astonishing insights into the relationship between
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TGF-β regulates Sca-1 expression and plasticity of pre-neoplastic mammary epithelial stem cells
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67827-4
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Pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis in AhR deficient hosts is severe and associated with defective Treg and Th22 responses
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68322-6
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Anti-integrin αv therapy improves cardiac fibrosis after myocardial infarction by blunting cardiac PW1+ stromal cells
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68223-8 Anti-integrin α v therapy improves cardiac fibrosis after myocardial infarction by blunting cardiac PW1 + stromal cells
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Cancer risk in road transportation workers: a national representative cohort study with 600,000 person-years of follow-up
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68242-5
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HOPX regulates bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell fate determination via suppression of adipogenic gene pathways
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68261-2
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Sera of elderly obstructive sleep apnea patients alter blood–brain barrier integrity in vitro: a pilot study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68374-8
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dnmt1 function is required to maintain retinal stem cells within the ciliary marginal zone of the zebrafish eye
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68016-z
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EEF1A1 deacetylation enables transcriptional activation of remyelination
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17243-z The molecular mechanisms regulating remyelination are unclear. Here, the authors show that promoting deacetylation of eEF1A1 prevents the translocation of Sox10 outside the nucleus, contributing to maintaining the expression of Sox10 target genes and increasing remyelination efficiency.
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First look by the Yutu-2 rover at the deep subsurface structure at the lunar farside
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17262-w The authors here report results from the ground-penetrating radar onboard the Yutu-2 rover from the Chagn'E 4 mission. The study presents up to 330 m deep subsurface structure of the Von Karman Crater inside the South Pole Aitken Basin.
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Direct and indirect punishment of norm violations in daily life
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17286-2 People regularly punish norm violations using gossip and direct confrontation. Here, the authors show that the use of gossip versus direct confrontation is context sensitive, with confrontation used more when punishers have more to gain, and gossip used more when the costs of retaliation loom large.
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Th1 responses in vivo require cell-specific provision of OX40L dictated by environmental cues
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17293-3 The OX40-OX40L axis is a crucial component of the costimulatory requirement of CD4 T cell responses. Here, the authors show context and cell type specific expression of OX40L for driving Th1 cell generation during acute and chronic models of infection.
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Development of A4 antibody for detection of neuraminidase I223R/H275Y-associated antiviral multidrug-resistant influenza virus
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17246-w Rapid detection of antiviral resistant strains is important for effective clinical treatment. Here the authors develop an antibody which specifically binds to multidrug-resistant influenza virus and demonstrated detection in a number of different systems using the antibody.
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Publisher Correction: Metabolic characteristics of CD8+ T cell subsets in young and aged individuals are not predictive of functionality
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17441-9 Publisher Correction: Metabolic characteristics of CD8 + T cell subsets in young and aged individuals are not predictive of functionality
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A supervised learning framework for chromatin loop detection in genome-wide contact maps
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17239-9 Predicting chromatin loops from genome-wide interaction matrices such as Hi-C data provides insight into gene regulation events. Here, the authors present Peakachu, a Random Forest classification framework that predicts chromatin loops from genome-wide contact maps, and apply it to systematically predict chromat
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INTS10–INTS13–INTS14 form a functional module of Integrator that binds nucleic acids and the cleavage module
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17232-2 The Integrator complex (INT) is responsible for the 3′-end processing of several classes of non-coding RNAs. Here the authors show that the INTS10-INTS13-INTS14 complex forms a distinct submodule of INT and suggest it facilitates RNA substrate targeting.
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France Is Officially Color-Blind. Reality Isn't.
Nearly 20 years ago, one of France's most prestigious schools, Sciences Po, took what was then seen as a bold step: It became the first elite French university to attempt to diversify its student body. The program is small, with only about 1,000 graduates in total since its inception, but has generally been regarded as successful, offering scholarships to many who would not otherwise have had acc
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Ancient mammoth tusk found in Siberia is engraved with fighting camels
A 13,000-year-old mammoth tusk has engravings of camels fighting and being hunted, plus an image of a human with a camel's hump on their body
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Foreign students fear deportation over Trump visa threat
Pakistani student Taimoor Ahmed is one of hundreds of thousands of foreigners enrolled in American universities now fearing for their future after Donald Trump's administration threatened to revoke their visas.
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UN forecasts even warmer temperatures over next 5 years
The annual mean global temperature is likely to be at least one degree Celsius above pre-industrial levels in each of the next five years, the World Meteorological Organization said Thursday.
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Maskinfabrik glemte at få sparring: Svejserobotter var ikke til at styre
PLUS. Opgaven var ved at vokse Engskov Maskinfabrik over hovedet, da man i 2019 indkøbte to svejserobotter, som skulle hjælpe med at optimere produktionen. Der var ingen i huset, der kunne styre dem ordentligt. Et projekt med SMV:Digital-støtte er nu ved at rette op på det, fortæller teknisk chef Alex …
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This Ultra-Advanced Electric Bike Offers the Best of All Worlds
The electric bike is having its moment. Given the economic and environmental benefits compared of ebikes compared to cars and motorcycles, not to mention the benefits of speed and reduced physical labor compared to traditional bicycles, it's not so hard to see why. So if you're thinking of taking the plunge yourself, the FAT20S900-MB 48V folding fat electric bike from Ecotric is one of the best y
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Heavy rain hits scenic central Japan, more damage in south
Flooding and mudslides have stranded hundreds of people in scenic hot springs and hiking areas in central Japan, while rescue workers searched on Thursday for more people missing in the disaster that already has killed nearly 60 people in a southern region.
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Coronavirus: Is India the next global hotspot?
India's confirmed cases are going up rapidly, but it's not all bad news.
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The tech behind Virgin Orbit's mission to space
Marc Cieslak looks at how Virgin Orbit plans to launch its rockets from a plane.
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The human brain: not just large but finely shaped
Large brains have long differentiated humans and primates from other mammals and there is a clear evidence that brain mass increased through time.
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Kontant reaktion på Apples åbning for uafhængige reparationer også i Danmark: »Det er til grin«
Danske elektronikværksteder kan nu få adgang til manualer, reservedele og uddannelse til iPhones, men uden at være autoriseret af Apple. Åbningen er rent PR-spin lyder det fra reparationsorganisationer, der peger på dårlige erfaringer fra USA.
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The human brain: not just large but finely shaped
Large brains have long differentiated humans and primates from other mammals and there is a clear evidence that brain mass increased through time.
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Extreme rainfall events cause top-heavy aquatic food webs
An expansive, multi-site ecology study led by UBC has uncovered new insights into the effects of climate change on the delicate food webs of the neotropics.
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Water-saving alternative forage crops for Texas livestock
In the semi-arid Texas High Plains, growers and producers are concerned about the sustainability of beef and dairy industries, which rely heavily on irrigated corn for feed-grain and silage. A main source of irrigation—the Ogallala Aquifer—is declining rapidly. The aquifer's decline emphasizes the need for producers and growers to find alternative, water-efficient forage crops for sustainable beef
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Almost 2 million acres of Great Britain grassland lost as woodland and urban areas expand
A major loss of grassland and significant increases in urbanisation and woodland in Great Britain since 1990 have been revealed in a new scientific analysis of land cover changes across the country.
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Gall fly outmaneuvers host plant in game of "Spy vs. Spy"
Over time goldenrod plants and the gall flies that feed on them have been one-upping each other in an ongoing competition for survival. Now, a team of researchers has discovered that by detecting the plants' chemical defenses, the insects may have taken the lead.
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Gall fly outmaneuvers host plant in game of "Spy vs. Spy"
Over time goldenrod plants and the gall flies that feed on them have been one-upping each other in an ongoing competition for survival. Now, a team of researchers has discovered that by detecting the plants' chemical defenses, the insects may have taken the lead.
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Coronavirus Victoria: everything we know about Melbourne's Covid-19 clusters
Melbourne is undergoing a suburban testing blitz after Victorian premier Daniel Andrews revealed hotspots in suburbs were largely caused by extended families Follow live updates in Thursday's Australia coronavirus blog What you need to know about Melbourne's stage 3 lockdown What we know about the public housing tower 'hard lockdowns' Full list of Victoria's Covid-19 clusters Australia hotspots m
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Gall fly outmaneuvers host plant in game of "Spy vs. Spy"
Over time goldenrod plants and the gall flies that feed on them have been one-upping each other in an ongoing competition for survival. Now, a team of researchers has discovered that by detecting the plants' chemical defenses, the insects may have taken the lead.
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How to stop your glasses steaming up – and 19 other essential facts about face masks
How often should you wash a cloth mask? And how effective are the disposable ones? The expert guide to choosing, wearing and caring for your face covering The British have been slow to embrace face masks, despite calls from public health experts. Uptake has been just 25% in the UK, compared with 83.4% in Italy and 65.8% in the US. The president of the Royal Society, Venki Ramakrishnan, said this
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Climate change: 'Rising chance' of exceeding 1.5C global target
The chance of breaching one of the Paris accord goals in the next five years has doubled, a study says.
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Black individuals at higher risk for contracting COVID-19, according to new research
Results of an analysis published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society found that Black individuals were twice as likely as White individuals to test positive for COVID-19. The average age of all participants in the study was 46. However, those infected were on average 52 years old, compared to those who tested negative, who were 45 years old on average.
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Chatbots can ease medical providers' burden, offer guidance to those with COVID-19 symptoms
COVID-19 has placed tremendous pressure on health care systems, not only for critical care but also from an anxious public looking for answers. Research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that chatbots — software applications that conduct online chats via text or text-to-speech — working for reputable organizations can ease the burden on medical providers and offer trust
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Using electricity to break down pollutants left over after wastewater treatment
Pesticides, pharmaceutical products, and endocrine disruptors are some of the emerging contaminants often found in treated domestic wastewater, even after secondary treatment. Professor Patrick Drogui of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) and his team have tested the effectiveness of a tertiary treatment process using electricity in partnership with the European Membrane Ins
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Extreme rainfall events cause top-heavy aquatic food webs
In research recently outlined in Nature, scientists across seven different sites throughout Central and South America replicated the extreme rainfall events predicted by climate change science. Using the insect larvae that live in the water trapped by bromeliad plants as a model ecosystem, they found that food webs became top-heavy with predators when there were large day-to-day variations in rain
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Water-saving alternative forage crops for Texas livestock
With increasing drought conditions in the Texas High Plains, researchers test sorghum and pearl millet as alternatives to corn.
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Access to nature requires attention when addressing community health needs
Nature is a tool to address deeply entrenched health disparities; health systems should work to increase nature access, as they have with other social determinants of health.
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How many contactable alien civilisations are out there? – podcast
Could there really be other civilisations out there in the Milky Way? Nicola Davis talks to Prof Chris Conselice, whose recent work revises the decades-old Drake equation to throw new light on the possibility of contactable alien life existing in our galaxy Continue reading…
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How many contactable alien civilisations are out there?
Could there really be other civilisations out there in the Milky Way? Nicola Davis talks to Prof Chris Conselice, whose recent work revises the decades-old Drake equation to throw new light on the possibility of contactable alien life existing in our galaxy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
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New Zealand police to patrol quarantine hotels after breakouts
Move comes after two people absconded from quarantine, including a man later found to have Covid-19 Police officers will patrol New Zealand's quarantine hotels around-the-clock after a number of people – including a man who tested positive for coronavirus – escaped the managed isolation facilities. In two separate incidents in Auckland hotels guests in isolation left their quarantine hotels, with
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These 7 items make working remotely more efficient and effective
Spotify , Twitter , and Square all announced employees will work from home until at least 2021, perhaps indefinitely. The pandemic just accelerated the process: 50% of American employees were expected to work remotely by 2028. Workers are adjusting to their new employment reality on couches and kitchen tables across the nation. While many uncomfortable changes are occurring right now, businesses
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Learn to think like an engineer with the help of these courses
Engineering is the foundation of society, from physical infrastructure to every device in your possession. Electrical engineering is one of the most in-demand occupations in the technological age. The Mathematics for Engineers Prep Bundle teaches you how to think like an engineer. Have you ever felt like you're just not good at math? Many people feel they don't have the intuitive sense needed to
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Experimental drug shows early promise against inherited form of ALS, trial indicates
A clinical trial has found evidence that the experimental drug tofersen lowers levels of a disease-causing protein in people with an inherited form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, caused by mutations in the gene SOD1.
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