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Commentary in Pediatrics: Children don't transmit Covid-19, schools should reopen in fall
Based on one new and three recent studies, the authors of this commentary in Pediatrics conclude that children rarely transmit Covid-19, either among themselves or to adults. Based on the evidence, the authors recommend that schools reopen in the fall, since staying home can adversely affect children's development.
14h
Scientists propose plan to determine if Planet Nine is a primordial black hole
Scientists at Harvard University and the Black Hole Initiative (BHI) have developed a new method to find black holes in the outer solar system, and along with it, determine once-and-for-all the true nature of the hypothesized Planet Nine. The paper, accepted to The Astrophysical Journal Letters, highlights the ability of the future Legacy Survey of Space and Time (LSST) mission to observe accretio
9h
Koster samfundet dyrt: Byggeriet bruger stadig mere tid på arbejde uden værdi
Et team af forskere fra Aarhus Universitet har for første gang nogensinde koblet 40 års produktivitetsdata i byggeriet med det faktisk udførte arbejde. Resultaterne viser, at produktiviteten i byggeriet har været faldende siden 70'erne, blandt andet fordi der bliver brugt mindre og mindre tid på …
18h

LATEST

Denne gang er den god nok: Nu kan du se en komet med det blotte øje
Endelig er vi heldige. Neowise er den tydeligste komet i årevis, siger astrofysikere.
5min
NSF campaign will drill for ice capturing West Antarctica's last collapse
Core from Hercules Dome could contain 150,000-year-old record
6min
Sea surface temperature has a big impact on coral outplant survival
A new study has shown that coral outplant survival is likely to drop below 50% if sea surface temperatures exceed 30.5 degrees Celsius and that survival rates can also be predicted by considering temperature conditions in the year prior to outplanting.
6min
Scientists discover protective Alzheimer's gene and develop rapid drug-testing platform
A gene has been discovered that can naturally suppress the signs of Alzheimer's Disease in human brain cells. The scientists have also developed a new rapid drug-screening system for treatments that could potentially delay or prevent the disease.
6min
Neonatal exposure to antigens of commensal bacteria promotes broader immune repertoire
Researchers have added fresh evidence that early exposure to vaccine-, bacterial- or microbiota-derived antigens has a dramatic effect on the diversity of antibodies an adult mammal will have to fight future infections by pathogens. This antibody diversity is called the clonal repertoire — basically different single cells with distinct antibody potential that can multiply into a large clone of ce
6min
Science education community should withdraw from international tests, experts urge
The science community should withdraw from involvement in international tests such as PISA because they have forced schools to adopt 'narrow' curricula and pedagogies, a study says.
6min
Coronavirus Pandemic Halts Climate Data Collection
The pandemic has hindered climate data collection from ships and buoys in the oceans. The U.N. warns it could negatively affect climate models' accuracy unless scientists find new ways to gather data.
8min
Wedge pillows to help you find your ideal sleeping position
Snuggle up; it's going to be a sleepy ride. (Amazon/) Sleeping soundly each night can be difficult due to factors like stress levels, insomnia, and noise from traffic or neighbors. If you have GERD, sleep apnea, or chronic pain, it can be even more challenging to get your Zs. When you consult with your doctor about your condition and possible home treatments, ask them whether wedge pillows might
17min
Venice test brings up floodgates for first time
The system of 78 mobile barriers has taken years to construct and its design goes back to the 1980s.
17min
NOAA watchdog chides agency for how it handled Hurricane Dorian's 'Sharpiegate'
Forecasters should not have been rebuked for correcting Trump's claim that Alabama lay in hurricane's path, report concludes
20min
Outdoor pizza ovens that will give you the best slices
Enjoy a quality slice outside. (Anastasiia Chepinska via Unsplash/) Sure, you have a grill in your backyard, but why not upgrade your set-up with an outdoor pizza oven? From compact to full-size, these outdoor pizza ovens will get that crust you dream of without leaving the house. Bring on the big boy. (Amazon/) You need an outdoor pizza oven that will stand up to your grill setup. This one is ca
31min
Global COVID-19 registry finds strokes associated with COVID-19 are more severe, have worse outcomes and higher mortality
Patients with COVID-19 who have an acute ischemic stroke (AIS) experience more severe strokes, have worse functional outcomes and are more likely to die of stroke than AIS patients who do not have COVID-19. The wide range of complications associated with COVID-19 likely explain the worse outcomes.
35min
COVID-19 can be transmitted in the womb, reports pediatric infectious disease journal
A baby girl in Texas — born prematurely to a mother with COVID-19 — is the strongest evidence to date that intrauterine (in the womb) transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can occur, according to a new report.
35min
Access to nature requires attention when addressing community health needs
Nature is a tool to address deeply entrenched health disparities; health systems should work to increase nature access, as they have with other social determinants of health.
35min
To close wage gaps, ban asking about salary history?
Banning employers from asking about salary history can help close the wage gap between white employees and those of color and between men and women, research finds. The paper , which is not yet peer-reviewed, looks at the effects of salary history bans in the 14 states that have passed laws prohibiting employers from asking prospective hires about their past pay. Across the United States, men out
35min
More than meets the eye
New findings reframe the traditional view of face blindness as a disorder arising strictly from deficits in visual perception of facial features. Findings suggest prosopagnosia may be a more complex disorder rooted in multiple deficits. Findings can help inform the design of tools to improve face recognition in those with the condition.
38min
Dr. Fauci Says Trump Hasn't Talked to Him in a Month
It has been two months since Dr. Anthony Fauci, the chief infectious disease expert at the White House, has been able to brief President Trump on the coronavirus pandemic. In fact, Fauci says, the two haven't even spoken to each other in a month. Fauci told Financial Times in a dark, revealing interview that he last saw Trump on June 2. Lately, he's had to merely pass messages along to the Presid
49min
Fluorescent peptide nanoparticles, in every color of the rainbow
The discovery of green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is made by a jellyfish, transformed cell biology. It allowed scientists to stitch the GFP sequence to proteins from other organisms to trace their movements and interactions in living cells. Now, researchers have designed peptide nanoparticles that can each glow in a variety of colors, opening the door for many new biomedical applications.
50min
Old X-rays, new vision: A nano-focused X-ray laser
Researchers have focused the beam of an X-ray free-electron laser to 6 nanometers, closer to the diameter of a typical atom than obtained in prior work. In conjunction with the extremely brief pulses and high intensities of the laser, researchers can now study matter at extremely high resolution and unprecedented speed.
50min
Surfers are riding a wave of new technologies to their Olympic debut
Riding waves is physically demanding, and preparing for competition requires intense cross-training that's being bettered by precise motion and muscle tracking. (Jake Marote/Red Bull/) Popular Science 's Play issue is now available to everyone. Read it now, no app or credit card required. One of the best surf spots in the United States to practice aerial tricks is in central Texas, some 200 miles
52min
Coronavirus News Roundup, July 4-July 9
Pandemic highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Astronomers Want to Figure Out What the Hell Planet Nine Is Once and For All
Is there a ninth planet lurking beyond the orbit of Neptune? Astronomers have been observing strange gravitational patterns of a cluster of bodies known as "trans-Neptunian objects," or TNOs, that could be explained by the presence of massive ninth planet in our solar system. The hypothetical planet, dubbed "Planet Nine," would orbit our star at hundreds of times the distance between the Earth an
1h
Amazon Bans Employees From Using TikTok on Their Phones
US lawmakers have repeatedly raised security concerns over the app's Chinese ownership. Are US businesses next?
1h
Single-cell RNA sequencing outlines the immune landscape of severe COVID-19
A new single-cell RNA sequencing analysis of more than 59,000 cells from three different patient cohorts provides a detailed look at patients' immune responses to severe cases of COVID-19.
1h
How Venus flytraps snap
Venus flytraps catch spiders and insects by snapping their trap leaves. This mechanism is activated when unsuspecting prey touch highly sensitive trigger hairs twice within 30 seconds. A study led by researchers at the University of Zurich has now shown that a single slow touch also triggers trap closure – probably to catch slow-moving larvae and snails.
1h
Lockdowns resume as coronavirus surges
Melbourne, Hong Kong and three most populous US states among those hit
1h
ChIA-PIPE: A fully automated pipeline for comprehensive ChIA-PET data analysis and visualization
ChIA-PET (chromatin interaction analysis with paired-end tags) enables genome-wide discovery of chromatin interactions involving specific protein factors, with base pair resolution. Interpretation of ChIA-PET data requires a robust analytic pipeline. Here, we introduce ChIA-PIPE, a fully automated pipeline for ChIA-PET data processing, quality assessment, visualization, and analysis. ChIA-PIPE pe
1h
Attenuation of Dupuytrens fibrosis via targeting of the STAT1 modulated IL-13R{alpha}1 response
Fibrotic disorders represent common complex disease pathologies that are therapeutically challenging. Inflammation is associated with numerous fibrotic pathogeneses; however, its role in the multifaceted mechanisms of fibrosis remains unclear. IL-13 is implicated in aberrant responses involved in fibrotic disease, and we aimed to understand its role in the inflammatory processes of a common fibro
1h
One-dimensional organic artificial multi-synapses enabling electronic textile neural network for wearable neuromorphic applications
One-dimensional (1D) devices are becoming the most desirable format for wearable electronic technology because they can be easily woven into electronic (e-) textile(s) with versatile functional units while maintaining their inherent features under mechanical stress. In this study, we designed 1D fiber-shaped multi-synapses comprising ferroelectric organic transistors fabricated on a 100-μm Ag wir
1h
MRNIP is a replication fork protection factor
The remodeling of stalled replication forks to form four-way DNA junctions is an important component of the replication stress response. Nascent DNA at the regressed arms of these reversed forks is protected by RAD51 and the tumor suppressors BRCA1/2, and when this function is compromised, stalled forks undergo pathological MRE11-dependent degradation, leading to chromosomal instability. However,
1h
Detection of response to tumor microenvironment-targeted cellular immunotherapy using nano-radiomics
Immunotherapies, including cell-based therapies, targeting the tumor microenvironment (TME) result in variable and delayed responses. Thus, it has been difficult to gauge the efficacy of TME-directed therapies early after administration. We investigated a nano-radiomics approach (quantitative analysis of nanoparticle contrast–enhanced three-dimensional images) for detection of tumor response to c
1h
Prolate and oblate chiral liquid crystal spheroids
Liquid crystals are known to exhibit intriguing textures and color patterns, with applications in display and optical technologies. This work focuses on chiral materials and examines the palette of morphologies that arises when microdroplets are deformed into nonspherical shapes in a controllable manner. Specifically, geometrical confinement and mechanical strain are used to manipulate orientatio
1h
Phylogenetic and physiological signals in metazoan fossil biomolecules
Proteins, lipids, and sugars establish animal form and function. However, the preservation of biological signals in fossil organic matter is poorly understood. Here, we used high-resolution in situ Raman microspectroscopy to analyze the molecular compositions of 113 Phanerozoic metazoan fossils and sediments. Proteins, lipids, and sugars converge in composition during fossilization through lipoxi
1h
A basal-bolus insulin regimen integrated microneedle patch for intraday postprandial glucose control
Multiple daily insulin injections have been a common regimen worldwide for the management of diabetes mellitus but involved potential safety and compliance problems. In this context, a single integrated microneedle patch (IMP) with multiple release kinetics is demonstrated to provide better physiologic insulin coverage for postprandial glycemic excursion in a convenient and pain-free manner. The
1h
TIP60 K430 SUMOylation attenuates its interaction with DNA-PKcs in S-phase cells: Facilitating homologous recombination and emerging target for cancer therapy
Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are major repair pathways of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The pathway choice of HR and NHEJ is tightly regulated in cellular response to DNA damage. Here, we demonstrate that the interaction of TIP60 with DNA-PKcs is attenuated specifically in S phase, which facilitates HR pathway activation. SUMO2 modification of TIP60 K430 m
1h
Dynamic 3D meta-holography in visible range with large frame number and high frame rate
The hologram is an ideal method for displaying three-dimensional images visible to the naked eye. Metasurfaces consisting of subwavelength structures show great potential in light field manipulation, which is useful for overcoming the drawbacks of common computer-generated holography. However, there are long-existing challenges to achieving dynamic meta-holography in the visible range, such as lo
1h
A long-lived magma ocean on a young Moon
A giant impact onto Earth led to the formation of the Moon, resulted in a lunar magma ocean (LMO), and initiated the last event of core segregation on Earth. However, the timing and temporal link of these events remain uncertain. Here, we demonstrate that the low thermal conductivity of the lunar crust combined with heat extraction by partial melting of deep cumulates undergoing convection result
1h
Ecosystem stability and Native American oyster harvesting along the Atlantic Coast of the United States
The eastern oyster ( Crassostrea virginica ) is an important proxy for examining historical trajectories of coastal ecosystems. Measurement of ~40,000 oyster shells from archaeological sites along the Atlantic Coast of the United States provides a long-term record of oyster abundance and size. The data demonstrate increases in oyster size across time and a nonrandom pattern in their distributions
1h
Engineering a far-red light-activated split-Cas9 system for remote-controlled genome editing of internal organs and tumors
It is widely understood that CRISPR-Cas9 technology is revolutionary, with well-recognized issues including the potential for off-target edits and the attendant need for spatiotemporal control of editing. Here, we describe a far-red light (FRL)–activated split-Cas9 (FAST) system that can robustly induce gene editing in both mammalian cells and mice. Through light-emitting diode–based FRL illumina
1h
Chirality-induced bacterial rheotaxis in bulk shear flows
Interaction of swimming bacteria with flows controls their ability to explore complex environments, crucial to many societal and environmental challenges and relevant for microfluidic applications such as cell sorting. Combining experimental, numerical, and theoretical analysis, we present a comprehensive study of the transport of motile bacteria in shear flows. Experimentally, we obtain with hig
1h
Structure-based drug designing and immunoinformatics approach for SARS-CoV-2
The prevalence of respiratory illness caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus associated with multiple organ failures is spreading rapidly because of its contagious human-to-human transmission and inadequate globalhealth care systems. Pharmaceutical repurposing, an effective drug development technique using existing drugs, could shorten development time and reduce costs compared to those of de novo
1h
Extensive morphological variability in asexually produced planktic foraminifera
Marine protists are integral to the structure and function of pelagic ecosystems and marine carbon cycling, with rhizarian biomass alone accounting for more than half of all mesozooplankton in the oligotrophic oceans. Yet, understanding how their environment shapes diversity within species and across taxa is limited by a paucity of observations of heritability and life history. Here, we present o
1h
Elusive consensus: Polarization in elite communication on the COVID-19 pandemic
Cues sent by political elites are known to influence public attitudes and behavior. Polarization in elite rhetoric may hinder effective responses to public health crises, when accurate information and rapid behavioral change can save lives. We examine polarization in cues sent to the public by current members of the U.S. House and Senate during the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, measuring polari
1h
Abrupt decline in tropospheric nitrogen dioxide over China after the outbreak of COVID-19
China's policy interventions to reduce the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 have environmental and economic impacts. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide indicates economic activities, as nitrogen dioxide is primarily emitted from fossil fuel consumption. Satellite measurements show a 48% drop in tropospheric nitrogen dioxide vertical column densities from the 20 days averaged before the 2020 Luna
1h
1h
How Venus flytraps snap
Venus flytraps catch spiders and insects by snapping their trap leaves. This mechanism is activated when unsuspecting prey touch highly sensitive trigger hairs twice within 30 seconds. A study led by researchers at the University of Zurich has now shown that a single slow touch also triggers trap closure—probably to catch slow-moving larvae and snails.
1h
Why We Still Don't Know Enough About Covid-19 and Pregnancy
More than six months into the pandemic there's still a lot we don't know about how the coronavirus affects pregnant women and babies.
1h
Lockdowns Spared Millions of Animals From Becoming Roadkill, Researchers Say
The number of wild animals killed by vehicle traffic was down as much as 45 percent in Maine and 21 percent in California, according to a U.C. Davis report.
1h
Palm Springs Is the Comedy of the Summer
Palm Springs is set during a never-ending day. Sorry to give away the big plot point, which comes some 15 minutes into Max Barbakow's wonderful new comedy, but that premise feels pertinent today in a way that it didn't when the movie premiered at Sundance six months ago. The film belongs to the growing canon of time-loop stories, which ensnare their characters in a repeating cycle from which ther
2h
Arctic Ocean changes driven by sub-Arctic seas
New research explores how lower-latitude oceans drive complex changes in the Arctic Ocean, pushing the region into a new reality distinct from the 20th-century norm.
2h
Study pinpoints brain cells that trigger sugar cravings and consumption
New research published in Cell Metabolism has identified for the first time the specific brain cells that control how much sugar you eat and how much you crave sweet tasting food. The study by researchers at the University of Iowa and the University of Copenhagen specifically identifies the brain cells that respond to the hormone FGF21 to regulate sugar intake and sweet taste preference.
2h
Why does laughing feel so stinkin' good?
Let the giggles move through you. (John Devolle/) Popular Science 's Play issue is now available to everyone. Read it now, no app or credit card required. The oldest known joke dates back nearly 4,000 years, and it's a fart gag. The fact that we've been crackin' wise for so long suggests there's something innate about the need to laugh. Heck—chimps, rats, and perhaps even dolphins do it. Neurosci
2h
How Venus flytraps snap
Venus flytraps catch spiders and insects by snapping their trap leaves. This mechanism is activated when unsuspecting prey touch highly sensitive trigger hairs twice within 30 seconds. A study led by researchers at the University of Zurich has now shown that a single slow touch also triggers trap closure—probably to catch slow-moving larvae and snails.
2h
Amazon deforestation increases 25 percent in Brazil
Deforestation of the Brazilian Amazon increased by a record 25 percent year-on-year in the first half of 2020, official data released Friday showed, increasing pressure on President Jair Bolsonaro to abandon his plans to develop the region.
2h
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Elon Musk Teases Major Neuralink Reveal
August 28 Elon Musk has announced that the mysterious computer-brain interface startup Neuralink, which he co-founded, will release an update on its progress on August 28. "If you can't beat 'em, join 'em," Musk wrote , referring to his greater ambitions to make sure humanity can keep up with advanced AI. "Neuralink mission statement." Skull Lasers Context suggests that this could be a major reve
2h
Extraordinary regeneration of neurons in zebrafish
Biologists from the University of Bayreuth have discovered a uniquely rapid form of regeneration in injured neurons and their function in the central nervous system of zebrafish. They studies the Mauthner cells, which are solely responsible for the escape behaviour of the fish, and previously regarded as incapable of regeneration. However, their ability to regenerate crucially depends on the locat
2h
Pandemic inspires framework for enhanced care in nursing homes
As of May 2020, nursing home residents account for a staggering one-third of the more than 80,000 deaths due to COVID-19 in the U.S. This pandemic has resulted in unprecedented threats–like reduced access to resources needed to contain and eliminate the spread of the virus–to achieving and sustaining care quality even in the best nursing homes. Active engagement of nursing home leaders in develo
2h
NASA infrared data shows Cristina strengthening
NASA's Aqua satellite revealed better organization and colder cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Cristina, indications that the storm was strengthening.
2h
Covid-19 news: UK has opted out of EU coronavirus vaccine programme
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
2h
New research shows that laser spectral linewidth is classical-physics phenomenon
New ground-breaking research from the University of Surrey could change the way scientists understand and describe lasers—establishing a new relationship between classical and quantum physics.
2h
Plant chemistry research examines trends in greening
A Montana State University professor's research on plant chemistry in the Northern Great Plains and Northern Rockies has been published in Global Change Biology, a prominent journal that promotes exploration of the connections between biological processes and environmental change.
2h
NASA infrared data shows Cristina strengthening
NASA's Aqua satellite revealed better organization and colder cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Cristina, indications that the storm was strengthening.
2h
Astronomers Discover Deep-Space "Structure," 1.4 Billion Light Years Across
Astronomers have created a 3D map of a cosmic structure so gigantic that it's almost impossible to even comprehend. The "South Pole Wall" is a flabbergasting 1.4 billion light years across and contains hundreds of thousands of galaxies, Live Science reports . That puts it on par with the Sloan Great Wall, the sixth largest cosmic structure ever discovered at 1.38 billion light-years across. "The
2h
NASA tracks tropical storm Fay's development and strongest side
NASA used satellite data to create an animation of Fay's development and progression over the past few days, showing how the storm organized into a tropical storm. Additionally, NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to find the location of the strongest storms in Tropical Storm Fay occurring in the northeastern quadrant of the storm, mostly over the Atlantic Ocean.
2h
Gall fly outmaneuvers host plant in game of 'Spy vs Spy'
Over time goldenrod plants and the gall flies that feed on them have been one-upping each other in an ongoing competition for survival. Now, a team of researchers has discovered that by detecting the plants' chemical defenses, the insects may have taken the lead.
2h
Microscopy technique reveals nanoscale detail of coatings as they dry
Dull. Slow. Unchanging. Like watching paint dry.
2h
'Nanocage' tool untangles (molecular) spaghetti
A team of scientists at the University of Vermont have invented a new tool—they call it a "nanocage"—that can catch and straighten out molecule-sized tangles of polymers.
2h
Experts, advocates publish guidance for research on HIV, co-infections in pregnancy
Changing practices in the HIV/co-infections research community so that women, providers, and policy makers can make evidence-informed decisions around the use of medications during pregnancy is the goal of the new report, Ending the Evidence Gap for Pregnant Women around HIV and Co-infections: A Call to Action, issued today by the Pregnancy and HIV/AIDS: Seeking Equitable Study (PHASES) Working Gr
2h
Gender bias in evaluating surgical residency faculty members may be decreasing
In the male-dominated field of surgery, female faculty of training programs tend to receive lower scores than male faculty on their teaching evaluations, which are important for career advancement, past research has found. A new study suggests progress in this apparent gender bias: Among 21 U.S. general surgery residency programs, female faculty scored slightly better overall than male faculty did
2h
NASA tracks tropical storm fay's development and strongest side
NASA used satellite data to create an animation of Fay's development and progression over the past few days, showing how the storm organized into a tropical storm. Additionally, NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to find the location of the strongest storms in Tropical Storm Fay occurring in the northeastern quadrant of the storm, mostly over the Atlantic Ocean.
2h
COVID-19 can be transmitted in the womb, reports pediatric infectious disease journal
A baby girl in Texas — born prematurely to a mother with COVID-19 — is the strongest evidence to date that intrauterine (in the womb) transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can occur, reports The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, the official journal of The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases. The journal is published in the Lippincott po
2h
Orbital engineering of quantum confinement in high-Al-content AlGaN quantum well
Recently, professor Kang's group focus on the limitation of quantum confine band offset model, the hole states delocalization in high-Al-content AlGaN quantum well are understood in terms of orbital intercoupling. The potential barriers of different orbitals were investigated by first principle simulation, and a new mechanism of quantum confinement was presented. Based on the orbital intercoupling
2h
Daily briefing: Spain begins an epic economics experiment in universal basic income
Nature, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02088-9 Spain launches the largest test yet of no-strings-attached income — but it's not truly universal. Plus: how group testing could transform the hunt for coronavirus cases, and PhD students in Australia face financial meltdown.
2h
Why lopinavir and hydroxychloroquine do not work on COVID-19
Lopinavir is a drug against HIV, hydroxychloroquine is used to treat malaria and rheumatism. Until recently, both drugs were regarded as potential agents in the fight against the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Researchers have now discovered that the concentration of the two drugs in the lungs of Covid-19 patients is not sufficient to fight the virus.
2h
Black individuals at higher risk for contracting COVID-19, according to new research
A new study found that Black individuals were twice as likely as White individuals to test positive for COVID-19. The average age of all participants in the study was 46. However, those infected were on average 52 years old, compared to those who tested negative, who were 45 years old on average.
2h
The Roberts Court Completes Trump's Cover-Up
Seven Supreme Court justices ruled yesterday morning that Donald Trump is not a king. But Trump still got what he wanted. Since Trump announced his candidacy for president in 2015, he has vowed to release his tax returns, and has also refused to release his tax returns. After the 2018 midterms, Democrats in the House sought to subpoena financial institutions for Trump's records, and Manhattan Dis
2h
Black phosphorus-based van der Waals heterostructures for mid-infrared light-emission applications
Optically- and electrically- driven mid-infrared (MIR) light-emitting devices are realized in a simple but novel van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure, constructed from thin-film black phosphorus (BP) and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDC). This work suggests that vdW heterostructure is a promising platform for mid-infrared research and applications.
3h
Optical shaping of polarization anisotropy in a laterally-coupled-quantum-dot dimer
Coupled-quantum-dot (CQD) structures are considered to be an important building block in the development of scalable quantum devices. We found that emission of a laterally-coupled QD structure is strongly polarized along the coupled direction and its polarization anisotropy can be shaped by changing the orientation of the excitation polarization. Surprisingly, both excitons and local biexcitons se
3h
Fast-spreading mutation helps common flu subtype escape immune response
Strains of a common subtype of influenza virus, H3N2, have almost universally acquired a mutation that effectively blocks antibodies from binding to a key viral protein.
3h
The spin state story: Observation of the quantum spin liquid state in novel material
The quantum spin liquid (QSL) state is an exotic state of matter where the spin of electrons, which generally exhibits order at low temperatures, remains disordered. Now, scientists have developed a new material where a two-dimensional QSL state can be experimentally observed, advancing our knowledge of spin behavior, and getting us closer to next-generation "spintronic" devices.
3h
She's an Authority on Earth's Past. Now, Her Focus Is the Planet's Future.
The climate scientist Maureen Raymo is leading the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia. She has big plans for science, and diversity, too.
3h
The spin state story: Observation of the quantum spin liquid state in novel material
The quantum spin liquid (QSL) state is an exotic state of matter where the spin of electrons, which generally exhibits order at low temperatures, remains disordered. Now, scientists have developed a new material where a two-dimensional QSL state can be experimentally observed, advancing our knowledge of spin behavior, and getting us closer to next-generation "spintronic" devices.
3h
The Books Briefing: How to Read a Classic Today
Saturday marks the 60th anniversary of the publication of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird . The novel was widely beloved, in part, for the character of Atticus Finch. As a lawyer defending a falsely accused Black man, Finch fit neatly into the narrative of a white savior enacting racial justice. Lee's second book, Go Set a Watchman , controversially published in 2015 , revealed the depths of F
3h
Invention: "Nanocage" tool untangles (molecular) spaghetti
A team of scientists at the University of Vermont have invented a new tool–they call it a "nanocage"–that can catch and straighten out molecule-sized tangles of polymers –whether made of protein or plastic. This tool–that works a bit like pulling a wad of thread through a needle hole–opens a new way to create custom materials that have never been made before.
3h
Global COVID-19 registry finds strokes associated with COVID-19 are more severe, have worse outcomes and higher mortality
Patients with COVID-19 who have an acute ischemic stroke (AIS) experience more severe strokes, have worse functional outcomes and are more likely to die of stroke than AIS patients who do not have COVID-19. The wide range of complications associated with COVID-19 likely explain the worse outcomes.
3h
New research shows that laser spectral linewidth is classical-physics phenomenon
New ground-breaking research from the University of Surrey could change the way scientists understand and describe lasers – establishing a new relationship between classical and quantum physics.
3h
Scientists call for pandemic investigations to focus on wildlife trade
Nature, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02052-7 The World Health Organization is sending scientists to China this weekend to investigate the origins of the COVID-19 outbreak.
3h
Structural basis for RIFIN-mediated activation of LILRB1 in malaria
Nature, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2530-3
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Cities — try to predict superspreading hotspots for COVID-19
Nature, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02072-3 Tracking how people move around urban areas can pinpoint where disease might transmit fastest and farthest.
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Blood from fit mice bestows brain benefits of exercise
Nature, Published online: 09 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02068-z Workouts rejuvenate the brains of old mice — but so does plasma from well-conditioned rodents.
3h
Changes in the immune system can promote healthy aging
As we age, the immune system gradually becomes impaired. One aspect of this impairment is chronic inflammation in the elderly, which means that the immune system is constantly active and sends out inflammatory substances. Such chronic inflammation is associated with multiple age-related diseases including arthritis and Alzheimer's disease, and impaired immune responses to infection. One of the que
3h
Models that mimic bug brains shed light on smell
Researchers have developed computational models of neural circuits that mimic the sensory act of smelling. They found the models also manifest certain properties analogous to those observed in olfactory sensory processing in insect brains. In order to build a model that mimicked the process of smelling, the researchers first had to mathematically describe the process of sensory detection. Then th
3h
New biomaterial could shield against harmful radiation
Researchers have synthesized a new form of melanin enriched with selenium. Called selenomelanin, this new biomaterial shows extraordinary promise as a shield for human tissue against harmful radiation.
3h
COVID-19 brain study to explore long-term effects of the virus
The new study seeks to track the health of 50,000 people who have tested positive for COVID-19. The study aims to explore whether the disease causes cognitive impairment and other conditions. Recent research suggests that COVID-19 can, directly or indirectly, cause brain dysfunction, strokes, nerve damage and other neurological problems. As the coronavirus pandemic enters its fifth month, many qu
3h
Study shows that aerosol box used to protect healthcare workers during COVID
A new study shows that certain aerosol boxes of a similar type to those that have been manufactured and used in hospitals in the UK and around the world in order to protect healthcare workers from COVID-19 can actually increase exposure to airborne particles that carry the virus, and thus casts doubt on their usefulness.
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A balancing act between immunity and longevity
Changes in the immune system can promote healthy ageing
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Age-related features of facial anatomy for increase safety during plastic surgery
Researchers from the Center for Diagnostics and Telemedicine together with colleagues from Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, University of Munich and Sechenov University used computed tomography to analyze the individual anatomy of the nasolabial triangle. They identified possible options for the distribution of blood vessels on three-dimensional course.
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Fat cell hormone boosts potential of stem cell therapy
Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy has shown promising results in the treatment of conditions ranging from liver cirrhosis to retinal damage, but results can be variable. Using a mouse heart failure model, researchers led by Osaka University found that levels of a fat cell-derived hormone called adiponectin in the host significantly affect the efficacy of MSC therapy. Administration of a drug tha
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Seven mistakes beginner cyclists make, and how to avoid them
Scenic rides are more fun when your bike fits and your skills are sharp. (Pixabay/) For many people, cycling started during childhood with handlebar streamers and training wheels. As we graduate from precariously practicing in parking lots on three-wheelers to roads and trails as adults, the potential for fun—and mistakes—grows. Here are some common mistakes beginners make when getting out into t
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Dusty air ups infant mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa
Analyzing air pollution in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa and millions of birth outcomes shows that small increases in dust lead to large increases in infant mortality, researchers report. The paper in Nature Sustainability reveals how a changing climate might intensify or mitigate the problem. It also points to seemingly exotic solutions to reducing dust pollution that could be more effective and a
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Autopsies Indicate Blood Clots Are Lethal in COVID-19
A pathologist describes his observations from examining the bodies of those who succumbed to the coronavirus.
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Sperm swim up to 70 per cent faster when they have a lazy tail
Some sperm don't use the final few micrometres of their tail to move, but simulations show they may actually swim faster than others that do, which could help pave the way for improved fertility tests
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What It's Like to Work at Studio Ghibli
Steve Alpert worked at the animation house for 15 years, a time he details in his new book Sharing a House with the Never-Ending Man.
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Enormous 'superflare' detected on nearby star
Astronomers succeeded in detecting 12 stellar flare phenomena on AD Leonis. One of these flares was 20 times larger than those emitted by our own sun, categorizing it a 'superflare'. Subsequent data analysis presents new insight into these explosive phenomena.
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Major cause of rare genetic mitochondrial disease identified
An international study has given hope to families of children born with a fatal heart muscle disease caused by faulty cell machinery.
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Born to be a cannibal: Genes for feeding behavior in mandarin fish identified
Some mandarin fish species (Sinipercidae) are pure fish-eaters, which feed exclusively on living juvenile fish – also of their own species. A research team has described the genome of four mandarin fish species and thus also identified genes for cannibalistic eating behavior. Knowledge of the connections between the genome and feeding behavior is of interest for sustainable aquaculture.
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Astronomers Baffled by Mysterious Ring-Shaped Objects in Deep Space
Lord of the Rings Astronomers have found four distant, ring-shaped objects in space they say are unlike anything observed previously. The rings, which Live Science likened to floating islands, have been temporarily named named "odd radio circles," or ORCs, because they look like brightly glowing discs when viewed at radio wavelengths. Scientists can't tell what they are, or even how far away they
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The week in wildlife – in pictures
The pick of the world's best flora and fauna photos, including a ring-tailed lemur and a spiky sea cucumber Continue reading…
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Montana State research on plant chemistry published in Global Change Biology
Jack Brookshire's work examines the climate and ecological causes of increased plant productivity in the Northern Great Plains.
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Microscopy technique reveals nanoscale detail of coatings as they dry
Thin film coatings do more than add color to walls. For example, they can be used as pharmaceutical devices. How these coatings dry can change their properties, which is especially important for films used in drug delivery. Lehigh University engineering researchers studying the in situ drying behavior of thin film coatings are visualizing particle interactions with groundbreaking precision. Their
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Want to feel better? Science says to care for your dog
A study shows that caring for your pets can improve your well-being. The researchers found the act of caring provided more improvements than mere companionship. These results aren't limited to pets. Plenty of studies show caring for others can improve your well-being. Many pet owners will tell you that tending to their pets is a chore, but one that often brings joy. Psychology noticed this a long
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Participants in UK coronavirus study could be monitored for up to 25 years
Experts say programme could follow participants for decades to look at long-term effects Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Participants in a study to understand the long-term and often unexpected effects of Covid-19 could be monitored for up to 25 years, researchers have said. As coronavirus swept the world, reports began to grow of people experiencing long-lasting sym
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Beyond the Milky Way, a Galactic Wall
Astronomers have discovered a vast assemblage of galaxies hidden behind our own, in the "zone of avoidance."
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Basel study: Why lopinavir and hydroxychloroquine do not work on COVID-19
Lopinavir is a drug against HIV, hydroxychloroquine is used to treat malaria and rheumatism. Until recently, both drugs were regarded as potential agents in the fight against the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. A research group from the University of Basel and the University Hospital has now discovered that the concentration of the two drugs in the lungs of Covid-19 patients is not sufficient to fight the
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New biomarker for dementia diagnosis
Medical researchers in the UK and Australia have identified a new marker which could support the search for novel preventative and therapeutic treatments for dementia. In an innovative new study, coordinated by Flinders University and University of Aberdeen, the researchers investigated the role of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a blood marker associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascula
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Sobering reminder about liver disease
Alcohol's popularity and its central place in socialising in Australia obscures the dangers of excessive drinking and possible liver disease, Flinders University experts warn. As Dry July awareness month highlights the various health risks, the Head of Hepatology and Liver Transplantation at Flinders Medical Centre Associate Professor Alan Wigg says alcohol misuse remains a major health challenge
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New study warns of misinformation about opt-out organ donation
A new study has warned of the power of a type of behaviour dubbed the 'lone wolf' effect which could result in people 'opting out' of supporting organ donation.
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Robust high-performance data storage through magnetic anisotropy
A technologically relevant material for HAMR data memories are thin films of iron-platinum nanograins. An international team led by the joint research group of Prof. Dr. Matias Bargheer at HZB and the University of Potsdam has now observed experimentally for the first time how a special spin-lattice interaction in these iron-platinum thin films cancels out the thermal expansion of the crystal latt
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Is gender equality achievable in the Russian family?
Distribution of rights and obligations in the family, opportunities and responsibilities in performing the main family functions is one of the most controversial, but at the same time one of the most important issues in the modern context.Scientists from the Department of General Sociology and Social Work of the Faculty of Social Sciences at Lobachevsky University have been engaged in research on
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Understanding the love-hate relationship of halide perovskites with the sun
Perovskiet solar cells are at the center of much recent solar research. The material is cheap and almost as efficient as silicon. However, perovskite cells have a love-hate-relationship with the sun. The light they need to generate electricity, also impairs the quality of the cells, limiting efficiency and stability over time. Research at the Eindhoven University of Technology and universities in
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Mom and baby share 'good bacteria' through breast milk
A new study by researchers at the University of British Columbia and the University of Manitoba has found that bacteria are shared and possibly transferred from a mother's milk to her infant's gut, and that breastfeeding directly at the breast best supports this process.
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Study finds fatty acid that kills cancer cells
Researchers have demonstrated that a fatty acid called dihomogamma-linolenic acid, or DGLA, can induce ferroptosis, an iron-dependent type of cell death, in an animal model and in human cancer cells. The discovery has many implications, including a step toward a potential treatment for cancer.
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Study: Medicaid expansion meant better health for the most vulnerable low-income adults
The most vulnerable residents of the nation's 10th most populous state say their health improved significantly after they enrolled in Michigan's expanded Medicaid program, a new study finds. Michiganders with extremely low incomes, those with multiple chronic health problems, and those who are Black, got the biggest health boosts year over year among enrollees in the safety-net health coverage pro
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Discovery of a novel drug candidate to develop effective treatments for brain disorders
Researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia discovered a novel chemical compound, which has the potential to became a new drug for the treatment of core symptoms of brain disorders like Down syndrome and autism. Results are obtained in preclinical models where the new compound ameliorated difficulties in cognitive tasks, social interactions and repetitive behaviors. Researchers aim to creat
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Viral dark matter exposed: Metagenome database detects phage-derived antibacterial enzyme
In a pioneer study published in Cell Host & Microbe – Researchers at Osaka City University and The Institute for Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, reported intestinal bacterial and viral metagenome information from the fecal samples of 101 healthy Japanese individuals. This analysis, leveraging host bacteria-phage associations, detected phage-derived antibacterial enzymes that control path
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Worrisome Signs Emerge for 1.5-Degree-C Climate Target
There is a 24 percent chance that global average temperature could surpass that mark in the next five years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Kazakhstan Denies China's Claim of Disease Deadlier Than COVID-19
According to an alarming statement by China's embassy in Kazakhstan this week, a deadly "unknown pneumonia " is spreading in the country of 18 million people — with a mortality rate "much higher than the novel coronavirus." Unsurprisingly, the ominous news quickly spread worldwide . But now Kazakh officials are firing back. A Facebook post by the Kazakhstan Ministry of Health shows a screenshot o
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Giant A-68 iceberg three years on
The colossus iceberg that split from Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf on 12 July 2017 is now in the open waters of the South Atlantic near the South Orkney Islands, about 1,050 km from its birthplace. Having lost two chunks of ice, this record berg is a little less huge than it once was—and now that it is in rougher waters, it may break up further.
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Satellite data show severity of drought summers in 2018 and 2019
The GRACE-FO (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment-Follow-On) satellites launched in May 2018 are able to quantify the water mass deficit in Central Europe. Relative to long-term climate development, the water mass deficits during the two consecutive summer droughts of 2018 and 2019 amounted to 112 Gt in 2018 and even 145 Gt in 2019, according to a research team from the German Research Centre
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Comet streaking past Earth, providing spectacular show
A newly discovered comet is streaking past Earth, providing a stunning nighttime show after buzzing the sun and expanding its tail.
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New research finds gender- and wealth-driven disparities affecting children's school performance in India
Findings from a research conducted by researchers from the University of Birmingham and University of East Anglia find that poorer children continue to experience educational disadvantages compared to children from wealthier households, with girls being more adversely affected than boys.
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Collective behaviour research reveals secrets of successful football teams
Collective behavior researchers have applied a new tool for analyzing the movement of football players that goes beyond looking at individual athletes to capturing how the team operates as a whole. The tool, which comes from statistical physics but has never been used for sports analysis, finds clear differences in collective dynamics between winning and losing teams and can even predict the marke
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These communities are experimenting with greener and fairer ways of living
Frankie lives in a six-bedroom house on the outskirts of Leeds. She is her own landlord, but doesn't own the house. Instead she is part of a co-operative housing group: together, they have been able to buy the house and then rent it at an affordable price back to themselves as tenants.
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Children rarely transmit COVID-19, doctors write in new commentary
A commentary published in the journal Pediatrics concludes that children infrequently transmit COVID-19 to each other or to adults and that many schools, provided they follow appropriate social distancing guidelines and take into account rates of transmission in their community, can and should reopen in the fall.
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Day in, day out: Targeting the daily magnesium 'rhythm' can optimize crop yield
The fundamental process that arguably forms the backbone of life on earth is photosynthesis; every organism is directly or indirectly dependent on this process. On paper, the process is simple: plants (and other organisms that have chloroplasts, the structures where photosynthesis takes place, and give the characteristic green color to leaves) convert solar energy into chemical energy that helps t
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Viral dark matter exposed: Metagenome database detects phage-derived antibacterial enzyme
In a pioneer study published in Cell Host & Microbe, Researchers at Osaka City University and The Institute for Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, reported intestinal bacterial and viral metagenome information from the fecal samples of 101 healthy Japanese individuals. This analysis, leveraging host bacteria-phage associations, detected phage-derived antibacterial enzymes that control patho
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The moon may have stopped the early Earth from being a frozen snowball
Astronomers have long been puzzled by the faint young sun paradox, which says the sun would not have been bright enough in the past to keep Earth warm. Now it seems the moon may have helped
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Day in, day out: Targeting the daily magnesium "rhythm" can optimize crop yield
Many processes of photosynthesis, including the intake of magnesium, follow a pattern of variation over 24 hours. In a new study, scientists from Okayama University, Japan and Fujian A & F University, China, tested the effect of this variation on the efficiency of photosynthesis in rice plants. Their findings suggest potential candidates for modification for increasing the yield of rice crops, the
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Construction: How to turn 36 seconds into USD 5.4 billion
A team of researchers from Aarhus University have, for the first time ever, linked 40 years of productivity data from the construction industry with the actual work done. The results show that productivity in the construction industry has been declining since the 1970s. The results also explain the decline and how to achieve far more efficient construction in North America and Europe. The study ha
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Day in, day out: Targeting the daily magnesium 'rhythm' can optimize crop yield
The fundamental process that arguably forms the backbone of life on earth is photosynthesis; every organism is directly or indirectly dependent on this process. On paper, the process is simple: plants (and other organisms that have chloroplasts, the structures where photosynthesis takes place, and give the characteristic green color to leaves) convert solar energy into chemical energy that helps t
5h
Viral dark matter exposed: Metagenome database detects phage-derived antibacterial enzyme
In a pioneer study published in Cell Host & Microbe, Researchers at Osaka City University and The Institute for Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, reported intestinal bacterial and viral metagenome information from the fecal samples of 101 healthy Japanese individuals. This analysis, leveraging host bacteria-phage associations, detected phage-derived antibacterial enzymes that control patho
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Discovery of a novel drug candidate to develop effective treatments for brain disorders
Researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) have discovered a novel chemical compound that has the potential to become a new drug for the treatment of core symptoms of brain disorders like Down syndrome and autism. These results were obtained in preclinical models where the new compound ameliorated difficulties in cognitive tasks, as well as social interact
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In changing urban neighborhoods, new food offerings can set the table for gentrification
When new residents and businesses move into low-income neighborhoods, they often deny that they are displacing current residents. In a striking exception, a coffee shop in Denver's rapidly changing Five Points area posted a sign in 2017 that read "ink! Coffee. Happily gentrifying the neighborhood since 2014" on one side, and "Nothing says gentrification like being able to order a cortado" on the o
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Millennials drive for 8% fewer trips than older generations
Millennials—typically defined as those born between 1981 and 1996 – have gotten a lot of press, both positive and negative.
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FN-prognose: Den globale gennemsnitstemperatur kan stige med 1,5 grader inden 2025
Parisaftalens mål om at begrænse den globale opvarmning til 2 grader og helst kun 1,5 grader celsius ser ud til at blive svære at nå.
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Discovery of a novel drug candidate to develop effective treatments for brain disorders
Researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) have discovered a novel chemical compound that has the potential to become a new drug for the treatment of core symptoms of brain disorders like Down syndrome and autism. These results were obtained in preclinical models where the new compound ameliorated difficulties in cognitive tasks, as well as social interact
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Sutter Health's Request to Delay $575 Million Settlement Is Denied
The large California hospital system wanted to postpone an agreement reached in a state antitrust case, as coronavirus cases rise.
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How to disrupt philanthropy in response to crisis | Darren Walker
If we want to build back better after the pandemic, we must reconsider philanthropy and create a new kind of capitalism that's rooted in generosity and accountability, says Darren Walker, president of the Ford Foundation. In this vital conversation, Walker calls for citizens and corporations to question the inequality that makes their wealth possible, to think about their own complicity in creatin
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Gilead says remdesivir data show reduced risk of death
Shares boosted as latest limited trial figures indicate significant cut in fatality rates
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WHO Acknowledges Possibility of Airborne Covid-19 Transmission
President Donald J. Trump formally began the process of withdrawing the United States from the World Health Organization on Tuesday — part of a challenging week for the global public health body, during which it also faced criticism from scientists over its statements on the airborne transmission of Covid-19.
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Automatic soap dispensers that are tough on germs and easy on the eyes
Keep them clean. (Matthew Tkocz via Unsplash/) Washing your hands is a must if you want to keep germs and bacteria away. It is recommended you wash up when coughing, blowing your nose, using the restroom, before and after eating, and much more. Elevate your germ-free game by getting yourself an automated soap dispenser, essentially eliminating contact with the bacteria that can live on bars and p
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Researchers solve a 50-year-old enzyme mystery
Advanced herbicides and treatments for infection may result from the unraveling of a 50-year-old mystery by University of Queensland researchers.
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Image: Hubble sees sculpted galaxy
Captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, this image shows NGC 7513, a barred spiral galaxy. Located approximately 60 million light-years away, NGC 7513 lies within the Sculptor constellation in the Southern Hemisphere.
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Researchers solve a 50-year-old enzyme mystery
Advanced herbicides and treatments for infection may result from the unraveling of a 50-year-old mystery by University of Queensland researchers.
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Polarization of bromine molecule in vanadium oxide cluster cavity and new alkane bromination
Alkanes are major constituents of natural gas and oil, consisting of carbon and hydrogen atoms only. The C-H bonds of alkanes are chemically stable with low reactivity. Technologies that enable selective functionalization of alkanes for converting alkanes into useful raw materials for chemical products such as alcohols and bromoalkanes are eagerly sought for development of both basic chemical scie
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Oil spill clean-up gets doggone hairy
Oil spill disasters on land cause long-term damage for communities and the natural environment, polluting soils and sediments and contaminating groundwater.
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Nytt sätt att kartlägga hjärnans olika områden
Forskare vid Karolinska institutet har kartlagt en mushjärna på molekylär nivå. Metoden skulle med fördel även kunna användas för att kartlägga den mänskliga hjärnan, och till exempel identifiera de molekylära förändringar som uppstår i olika hjärnområden vid psykiska och neurologiska sjukdomar, menar forskarna bakom studien. I en ny studie har forskare vid Karolinska Institutet och KTH tagit fra
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A month after Surgisphere paper retraction, Lancet retracts, replaces hydroxychloroquine editorial
In early June, as controversy swirled over a high-profile study of hydroxychloroquine and COVID-19, Christian Funck-Brentano started receiving aggressive emails, texts and tweets. Funck-Brentano, professor of medicine and clinical pharmacology at Sorbonne Université and Pitié-Salpêtrière University Hospital in Paris, and a colleague had published an editorial in The Lancet alongside the study — pu
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Glowing worms provide live-action movies of the body's internal scaffolding
Researchers have made the first time-lapse movies of the sheet-like mesh that surrounds and supports most animal tissues. While the thin layer of extracellular matrix known as the basement membrane plays key roles in development and disease, visualizing it in living organisms has been difficult to do. The team says their work offers a new way to study basement membrane defects underlying aging, an
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The best weed whackers for keeping your garden tidy
Keep your lawn in check. (Shaun Montero via Unsplash/) Lawn mowers are so closely correlated with cutting grass that it's easy to forget about the frequently unsung yet equally important string trimmer. A string trimmer—commonly referred to as the "weed whacker"—is a touch-up tool of sorts that is just as capable at clearing large swaths of overgrowth as it is tackling the most delicate touch-ups
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T-ray camera speed boosted a hundred times over
Scientists are a step closer to developing a fast and cost effective camera that utilises terahertz radiation, potentially opening the opportunity for them to be used in non-invasive security and medical screening.
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An early morning whey protein snack increases morning blood sugar level in healthy people
Consuming protein at night increases blood sugar level in the morning for healthy people, according to new research presented this week at The Physiological Society's virtual early career conference called Future Physiology 2020.
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Collective behavior research reveals secrets of successful football teams
Collective behaviour researchers have applied a new tool for analysing the movement of football players that goes beyond looking at individual athletes to capturing how the team operates as a whole. The tool, which comes from statistical physics but has never been used for sports analysis, finds clear differences in collective dynamics between winning and losing teams and can even predict the mark
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The best paper filters for your coffee machine
Quality filters for your morning brew. (Tyler Nix via Unsplash/) No traditional drip coffee maker is complete without paper filters. They're available in bulk, often at a wide variety of quantities depending on their features and the type of paper they're made from. If you make multiple pots of joe a day, you might want to buy more filters at a time; if you put sustainability at the top of your p
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College student depression is up during the pandemic
The rate of depression among college students has increased since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new survey. The COVID-19 pandemic is putting significant stress on college students, many of whom are worried about increasing financial pressures caused by the pandemic and the lack of easily accessible mental healthcare, the survey also finds. The new Healthy Minds Network survey
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An Uncrowned Tudor Queen, the Science of Skin and Other New Books to Read
These five July releases may have been lost in the news cycle
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SpaceX Is Planning Starship's First Test Flight for Next Week
Static Fire SpaceX is planning the first test flight of its Starship prototype as soon as next week, Teslarati reports — if a Raptor rocket engine test slated for earlier in the week goes according to plan. Workers are currently installing a Raptor engine on the prototype in question, SN5, in preparation for a rehearsal static fire test on Monday. That's according to recent road closure filings a
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Alaskan volcano linked to mysterious period with extreme climate in ancient Rome
The cold, famine and unrest in ancient Rome and Egypt after the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE has long been shrouded in mystery. Now, an international team, including researchers from the University of Copenhagen, has found evidence suggesting that the megaeruption of an Alaskan volcano may be to blame.
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Satellite data show severity of drought summers in 2018 and 2019
Measurements by the GRACE-FO satellite mission show a decline in water storage in Central Europe by up to 94 percent compared with seasonal fluctuations. The changes are so serious that a recovery within one year is not to be expected. The water shortage in the years 2018 and 2019 is thus the largest in the entire GRACE and GRACE-FO measurement campaign of almost 20 years. The results were publish
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Scientists may have found one path to a longer life
Mifepristone appears to extend lifespan in evolutionarily divergent species Drosophila and C. elegans in ways that suggest it may do so in humans, as well.
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Largest study of prostate cancer genomics in Black Americans ids targets for therapies
Black men in the United States are known to suffer disproportionately from prostate cancer, but few studies have investigated whether genetic differences in prostate tumors could have anything to do with these health disparities. Now, in the largest study of its kind to date, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), UC San Francisco (UCSF), and Northwestern University have ide
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A new way to train AI systems could keep them safer from hackers
The context: One of the greatest unsolved flaws of deep learning is its vulnerability to so-called adversarial attacks . When added to the input of an AI system, these perturbations, seemingly random or undetectable to the human eye, can make things go completely awry. Stickers strategically placed on a stop sign, for example, can trick a self-driving car into seeing a speed limit sign for 45 mil
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Searching for the Right Food for Gut Health? This Microbiome Test Has Answers.
Over the last couple of decades, scientific research has shown that the human gut microbiome plays a much larger role in our overall health and wellness than anyone had ever imagined. However, actually putting this research to work for your health is not as simple as health bloggers and food companies would have you believe. One of the things we've learned about the human gut microbiome is that e
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How the Hosts of 'Call Your Girlfriend' Saved Their Friendship
Each installment of The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two friends who are also professional observers of friendship. Ann Friedman and Aminatou Sow have been exploring friendship, among other topics, on their podcast, Call Your Girlfriend , s
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Scientists warn of airborne transmission of COVID-19
On Monday, more than 230 scientists from around the world declared "It's time to address airborne transmission of COVID-19." In a letter signed by Washington University in St. Louis faculty and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases directed toward "Most public health organizations, including the World Health Organization," the scientists urged that public health organizations need
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Drug shows promise for fighting rare ALS
An experimental drug for a rare, inherited form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has shown promise in a phase 1/phase 2 clinical trial, researchers report. The trial indicated that the experimental drug, known as tofersen, shows evidence of safety that warrants further investigation and lowers levels of a disease-causing protein in people with a type of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, caus
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Why We Need Mass Automation to Pandemic-Proof the Supply Chain
The scale of goods moving around the planet at any moment is staggering. Raw materials are dug up in one country, spun into parts and pieces in another, and assembled into products in a third. Crossing oceans and continents, they find their way to a local store or direct to your door. Magically, a roll of toilet paper, power tool, or tube of toothpaste is there just when you need it. Even more st
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UQ researchers solve a 50-year-old enzyme mystery
Advanced herbicides and treatments for infection may result from the unravelling of a 50-year-old mystery by University of Queensland researchers.
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Oil spill clean- up gets doggone hairy
A study investigating sustainable-origin sorbent materials to clean up oil spill disasters has made a surprising discovery. Dog fur is particularly good at cleaning up crude oil from different types of land surfaces and, together with human hair recycled from salons, can be used as an effective and sustainable way to mop dangerous environmental contaminants.
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One Millionth Patent Awarded without Ceremony
Originally published in August 1911 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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DTU-professor: Sundhedsstyrelsens corona-anbefalinger overser luftbåren smitte
Sundhedsmyndighedernes anbefalinger er ikke nok til at sikre sig mod at blive smittet med Covid-19, fortæller professor Arsen Krikor Melikov fra DTU, fordi der er risiko for at virussen er luftbåren. Han anbefaler større afstand mellem mennesker og bedre ventilationssystemer.
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Deadly DRM: Right to Repair a Life-or-Death Problem During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Up until now, so-called 'right to repair' legislation was a topic that touched on important questions, like whether or not farmers could repair their own tractors, or if end-users were allowed to repair their own electronics goods, but wasn't viewed as a literal life-or-death issue. Now, however, the question of whether or not people and companies are allowed to fix hardware they've purchased has
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Polarization of Br2 molecule in vanadium oxide cluster cavity and new alkane bromination
A hemispherical vanadium oxide cluster has a cavity that can accommodate a bromine molecule. It was found that a bromine molecule trapped in the cavity was polarized and that an alkane molecule like pentane, butane and propane could be brominated with the bromine molecule in the cavity with a selectivity differing from ordinary bromination. The present findings are expected to be useful for polari
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New estimates highlight global economic and environmental impacts of COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an estimated global consumption loss of $3.8 trillion, as well as significant job and income loss. However, these socioeconomic effects are accompanied by notable estimated reductions in air pollution. Manfred Lenzen of the University of Sydney, Australia, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on July 9, 2020.
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Revealing winners & losers in projected future climates
New research reveals how winners & losers from climate change can be identified based on their ability to adapt to rising future temperatures.In the first study of its kind published in PNAS, Flinders University evolutionary biologists have shown that resilience or vulnerability to future climates is influenced by the thermal conditions of the climatic regions where species evolved.
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Breaking down ocean polystyrene—pollution on a global scale
A walk along the beach is a favourite way to connect with nature and, ideally, offers the opportunity to escape the flotsam and jetsam of everyday life. Unfortunately, most of us lucky enough to have access to the coast are conscious of the remains of that everyday life being dragged ashore with each tide, and one particular kind often stands out: the white snow of broken-up polystyrene.
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Like humans, beluga whales form social networks beyond family ties
A groundbreaking study using molecular genetic techniques and field studies brings together decades of research into the complex relationships among beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) that spans 10 locations across the Arctic from Alaska to Canada and Russia to Norway. The behavior of these highly gregarious whales, which include sophisticated vocal repertoires, suggest that this marine mammal
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Like humans, beluga whales form social networks beyond family ties
A groundbreaking study using molecular genetic techniques and field studies brings together decades of research into the complex relationships among beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) that spans 10 locations across the Arctic from Alaska to Canada and Russia to Norway. The behavior of these highly gregarious whales, which include sophisticated vocal repertoires, suggest that this marine mammal
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Success begets success in crowdfunding—but so does falling just short, study shows
Entrepreneurs looking to raise money on crowdfunding sites are better off following in the footsteps of ideas that fell just short of their fundraising goals than coming in behind projects that enjoyed modest success, according to a University of Alberta study that proposes the role of the entrepreneur might be to grow the pie for all and not just grab their piece.
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Liquid metal synthesis for better piezoelectrics: Atomically-thin tin-monosulfide
An RMIT-UNSW collaboration has applied liquid-metal synthesis to piezoelectrics, advancing future flexible, wearable electronics, and biosensors drawing their power from the body's movements.
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Best evidence yet for existence of anyons
A small team of researchers at Purdue University has found the strongest evidence yet of the existence of abelian anyons. They have written a paper describing experiments they conducted designed to reveal the existence of the quasiparticles and have uploaded it to the arXiv preprint server while they await peer review.
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Mars Had Landslide-Powered Tsunamis That Put Earth's Mega-Waves to Shame
A huge mass of material fell down a mountain and into the Red Planet's ancient ocean.
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Digitala klick ska riva språkbarriärer inom mödrahälsovården
Kommunikationsproblemen i mödrahälsovården blev extra synlig 2015, i samband med flyktingvågen. Nu ska språkstödet Sadima hjälpa gravida kvinnor med begränsade kunskaper i svenska att ta till sig information från barnmorskan, till exempel vid akuta besök då tolk saknas. Det digitala språkstödet Sadima ska underlätta kommunikationen mellan barnmorskor och kvinnor med begränsade kunskaper i svenska
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Otago researchers find link between rape and breathing problems
Rape and sexual trauma may have long-lasting consequences for physical health as well as mental health, University of Otago researchers have found.
6h
Study finds less impact from wildfire smoke on climate
New research revealed that tiny, sunlight-absorbing particles in wildfire smoke may have less impact on climate than widely hypothesized because reactions as the plume mixes with clean air reduce its absorbing power and climate-warming effect.
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Reducing the operating temperature of ceramic fuel cells with a high proton conductivity electrolyte
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has developed a way to reduce the operating temperature of ceramic fuel cells by using a high proton conductivity electrolyte. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their electrolyte and how well it worked when tested in a hydrogen fuel cell. Meng Ni and Zongping Shao, with Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ
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Around the world, critical gaps in protections against workplace discrimination
As throngs of people around the world stand in solidarity with American protesters calling for an end to racial injustice, a sweeping study of 193 countries by the UCLA WORLD Policy Analysis Center reveals critical gaps in legal protections against discrimination on the job.
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Make America Sick Again
The graph, by itself, tells much of the story. We are still in the first wave of COVID-19, but the US is seeing a second hump to that wave. We are having the highest number of new cases right now, five months into this pandemic. A few months ago we hoped that by July we would start to see the tail end of this first wave, while we anxiously await a possible second wave in the fall, but instead we
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Masks help prevent the spread of the coronavirus—here's a breakdown of how effective they are
Wearing a mask is one of the most important things you can do right now (Julian Wan/Unsplash/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . Over the past several months, the idea of wearing a face covering has been hotly debated. In the beginning of the pandemic,
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Social distancing is more likely if you have money
A survey finds that liquid assets increased the likelihood that a person in the United States could practice social distancing. "Social distancing is a privilege that comes with resources and wealth, but wealth is not distributed equally in America," says Michal Grinstein-Weiss , professor and director of the Social Policy Institute (SPI) at Washington University in St. Louis. "Wealth gives indiv
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Cause of oversized placentas in cloning found after two decades
One reason a technique for cloning animals often results in oversized placentas, and hence failed births, has been uncovered in mice by an all-RIKEN team. This finding will help improve the success rate of the cloning method and could also shed light on fertility treatments for people.
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Cause of oversized placentas in cloning found after two decades
One reason a technique for cloning animals often results in oversized placentas, and hence failed births, has been uncovered in mice by an all-RIKEN team. This finding will help improve the success rate of the cloning method and could also shed light on fertility treatments for people.
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Microsoft Halts a Global Fraud Campaign That Targeted CEOs
A sophisticated scheme was designed to trick businesses in more than 60 countries into wiring large sums of money to attackers.
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Where Are the Adults in the Clubhouse?
Plus: A tough review of IBM's PCjr, fresh questions on Covid-19, and government help for the self-sufficient.
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By 2025, carbon dioxide levels in Earth's atmosphere will be higher than at any time in the last 3.3 million years
By 2025, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels will very likely be higher than they were during the warmest period of the last 3.3 million years, according to new research by a team from the University of Southampton published today in Nature Scientific Reports.
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Meet baker's yeast, the budding, single-celled fungus that fluffs your bread
They live in bread dough. They die in your oven.
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Research on seawater surface tension becomes international guideline
The property of water that enables a bug to skim the surface of a pond or keeps a carefully placed paperclip floating on the top of a cup of water is known as surface tension. Understanding the surface tension of water is important in a wide range of applications including heat transfer, desalination, and oceanography. Although much is known about the surface tension of fresh water, very little ha
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Meet baker's yeast, the budding, single-celled fungus that fluffs your bread
They live in bread dough. They die in your oven.
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To engineers' surprise, radiation can slow corrosion of some materials
Radiation nearly always degrades the materials exposed to it, hastening their deterioration and requiring replacement of key components in high-radiation environments such as nuclear reactors. But for certain alloys that could be used in fission or fusion reactors, the opposite turns out to be true: Researchers at MIT and in California have now found that instead of hastening the material's degrad
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Nervositet kan förväxlas med lögn
Det har forskats om lögnens psykologi under 40 år. En slutsats är att det är svårt att avgöra om en person ljuger eller talar sanning. Många, däribland en del poliser, tror att de kan avslöja lögnare genom kroppsspråket. Men forskningen visar på motsatsen – det finns inte några säkra ledtrådar i kroppsspråket. Ett bättre sätt är att lyssna på vad personen säger. Genom att ställa frågor strategiskt
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Sol och vind kan lagras i saltvattensbatteri
När el från väderberoende kraftkällor ökar, ökar även vårt behov av att kunna lagra el. Lagringen kan vara långvarig, exempelvis i batterier, eller mycket kortvarig, exempelvis i ett svänghjul för att överbrygga byten mellan två olika kraftförsörjningar.
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Varför så snurrigt om månen?
Månens bana kring jorden har en omloppstid på cirka 27 dagar och 8 timmar. Eftersom jorden och månen tillsammans samtidigt rör sig kring solen tar det lite längre än en omloppstid för månen att återkomma till en viss fas gentemot solen, till exempel från en fullmåne till nästa. Denna så kallade synodiska period är i genomsnitt runt 29 dagar och 13 timmar.
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Hur påverkar it-prylarna klimatet?
Informations- och kommunikationsteknik påverkar mycket riktigt klimatet. Tillsammans med digitala medier och underhållning står den för omkring 2,6 procent av global klimatpåverkan. Samtidigt ger tekniken också positiva effekter som minskar klimatpåverkan i andra sektorer, som att underlätta energieffektivisering och automatisering.
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Smart populärvetenskap entusiasmerar
När Mensa (en organisation som i Sverige samlar personer som fått ett resultat motsvarande de övre två procenten av befolkningen när det gäller IQ) firade 50-årsjubileum, beklagade Lancelot Ware, en av föreningens grundare, att "så många medlemmar ägnade så mycket tid åt att lösa gåtor". När före detta Mensa-medlemmen, Maria Gunther, som till vardags arbetar som Dagens Nyheters vetenskapsredaktör,
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Vad händer när det värsta inträffar?
Cyberkrig, artutrotning eller varför inte en pandemi. Den frågan ställs i P3 Dystopia – en podd i gränslandet mellan vetenskap och filosofi, om katastrofer som hotar mänskligheten och vår planet.
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Ge dig tid att verkligen titta
Jag är mycket förtjust i idén om medborgarforskning. Att ta hjälp av oss invånare för att studera världen, det berikar ju inte bara forskningen, utan också oss själva. Glädjande nog verkar det bli vanligare. Från och med mitten av juni kan både Umeå- och Uppsalabor vara med och spana efter fladdermöss. Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU, lånar ut detektorer och med hjälp av mobilen kan man sedan r
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Laser avgör om avokadon är mogen
Forskare vid brittiska Cranfield university har utvecklat en metod för att testa om en avokado är mogen – utan att förstöra frukten. Metoden använder en laser i kombination med en liten vibrationspuls för att mäta egenfrekvensen, som kan översättas till mognadsgrad. Enligt forskarna kan tekniken användas industriellt och minska spillet med 10 procent. Källa: Biosystems Engineering
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Gentester ställer stora frågor om vilka vi är
Länge var datorer en angelägenhet för ingenjörer på universitet och stora företag. Sedan blev de tillgängliga för vanligt folk – och förändrade världen. En liknande utveckling pågår när det gäller teknik för att avläsa arvsmassa. Hittills har omkring 30 miljoner människor runt om i världen köpt ett kommersiellt dna-test, främst för att komma vidare i sin släktforskning eller för att få kunskap om
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Gudar och människokroppar i konsten
Mary Beard är professor i antikens historia i Cambridge. Hon är också en kändis inom forskarvärlden efter att ha medverkat i många tv-produktioner. Denna bok är baserad på de avsnitt hon gjorde för BBC-serien Civilisations (som visats på Kunskapskanalen i Sverige).
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The WHO often has been under fire, but no nation has ever moved to sever ties with it
In the midst of a surge of new cases of COVID-19, the United States this week gave formal notice of its intention to withdraw from the World Health Organization. The move, to take effect next year, will at once deprive the WHO of one of its major sources of funding and marginalize the United States within the field of global health.
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Scientists discover extraordinary regeneration of neurons
Biologists from the University of Bayreuth have discovered a uniquely rapid form of regeneration in injured neurons and their function in the central nervous system of zebrafish. They studies the Mauthner cells, which are solely responsible for the escape behavior of the fish, and previously regarded as incapable of regeneration. However, their ability to regenerate crucially depends on the locati
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Scientists discover extraordinary regeneration of neurons
Biologists from the University of Bayreuth have discovered a uniquely rapid form of regeneration in injured neurons and their function in the central nervous system of zebrafish. They studies the Mauthner cells, which are solely responsible for the escape behavior of the fish, and previously regarded as incapable of regeneration. However, their ability to regenerate crucially depends on the locati
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Rock-breathing bacteria are electron spin doctors, study shows
Electrons spin. It's a fundamental part of their existence. Some spin "up" while others spin "down." Scientists have known this for about a century, thanks to quantum physics.
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Study finds less impact from wildfire smoke on climate
New research revealed that tiny, sunlight-absorbing particles in wildfire smoke may have less impact on climate than widely hypothesized because reactions as the plume mixes with clean air reduce its absorbing power and climate-warming effect. In a unique megafire study, a Los Alamos National Laboratory-led research team studied the properties of smoke from Arizona's massive Woodbury Fire last sum
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To bring back endangered fish, this First Nation is claiming environmental management authority
Over 20 years ago, the Bella Coola River—located in southern British Columbia and central to the traditional territory of the Nuxalk Nation—saw its last healthy run of eulachon before populations dramatically crashed in 1999. A sovereign Indigenous or First Nation within what is known as Canada, Nuxalk people have maintained a strong relationship with the eulachon since time immemorial. Known as s
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Long-term survey reveals Chinese government satisfaction
Understanding what Chinese citizens think about their own government has proven elusive to scholars, policymakers, and businesspeople alike outside of the country. Opinion polling in China is heavily scrutinized by the government, with foreign polling firms prohibited from directly conducting surveys.
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To bring back endangered fish, this First Nation is claiming environmental management authority
Over 20 years ago, the Bella Coola River—located in southern British Columbia and central to the traditional territory of the Nuxalk Nation—saw its last healthy run of eulachon before populations dramatically crashed in 1999. A sovereign Indigenous or First Nation within what is known as Canada, Nuxalk people have maintained a strong relationship with the eulachon since time immemorial. Known as s
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Rock-breathing bacteria are electron spin doctors, study shows
Electrons spin. It's a fundamental part of their existence. Some spin "up" while others spin "down." Scientists have known this for about a century, thanks to quantum physics.
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Smaller farm fields can reduce biodiversity loss and increase wild plants, birds, beetles, and bats
Around the world, biodiversity is dropping precipitously. In North America, about three billion birds have been lost over recent decades and amphibian populations are declining at a rate of about four percent per year. Globally, insects are vanishing at a rate of about nine percent per decade.
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Pauses in the busy lives of migrant Indian women can make a big difference
Women manage many overlapping responsibilities in both public and private spheres. Their busy routines leave them with just a little time to take a break or a pause in their activity. These pauses are a time for self or for activities other than home, work or care-giving responsibilities.
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Smaller farm fields can reduce biodiversity loss and increase wild plants, birds, beetles, and bats
Around the world, biodiversity is dropping precipitously. In North America, about three billion birds have been lost over recent decades and amphibian populations are declining at a rate of about four percent per year. Globally, insects are vanishing at a rate of about nine percent per decade.
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Stronger environmental regulation makes economic winners
Donald Trump has ordered US federal agencies to bypass environmental protection laws and fast-track pipeline, highway and other infrastructure projects. Signing the executive order last month, the US president declared regulatory delays would hinder "our economic recovery from the national emergency."
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New research reveals surprising differences between salmon species
It is well known that salmon provides a range of valuable nutrients, including omega-3 fatty acids and protein. But it can be confusing for consumers to know which species offers the highest level of nutrition when they are faced with several different types of salmon at the grocery store.
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New research reveals surprising differences between salmon species
It is well known that salmon provides a range of valuable nutrients, including omega-3 fatty acids and protein. But it can be confusing for consumers to know which species offers the highest level of nutrition when they are faced with several different types of salmon at the grocery store.
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Defending Black Lives Means Banning Facial Recognition
What's happening in Detroit should be a wakeup call for the nation. We can't stop police violence without ending police surveillance.
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Covid-19 Immunity May Rely on a Microscopic Helper: T Cells
Researchers have been looking beyond antibodies to understand how immunity to the new virus might work—and how to design a vaccine.
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The Ways We're Fighting Back Against Doomscrolling
This week, Angela Watercutter joins us to talk about why it's hard to unglue your eyes from bad news on social media. Plus, we share our tips for putting down the phone.
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Smooth Handfish Extinction Marks a Sad Milestone
For the first time the IUCN Red List has officially declared a marine fish alive in modern times to be extinct — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Kyld elektronik skapar bättre kvantdatorer
Från att kvantdatorer tidigare mest har varit en fråga för fysiker är det nu dags för ingenjörer och forskare i elektronik att sätta tänderna i de tekniska utmaningarna. Det handlar om att få bättre koll på kvantdatorns allra minsta enheter, de så kallade kvantbitarna, enligt forskare vid Lunds universitet. Ett nytt EU-projekt med drygt 45 miljoner i potten, har som mål att lösa upp en flaskhals
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Pandemic speeds largest test yet of universal basic income
Nature, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01993-3 Economists welcome the chance to see whether giving people cash to spend however they choose improves livelihoods.
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The mathematical strategy that could transform coronavirus testing
Nature, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02053-6 Four charts show how pooling samples from many people can save time or resources.
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Våra tänders historia börjar med de bepansrade fiskarna
Våra tänders historia börjar vid en tid då bepansrade fiskar började fånga levande byten i stället för att filtrera plankton eller svälja bottenslam. Den börjar med de allra första käkförsedda ryggradsdjuren som levde för mer än 400 miljoner år sedan, konstaterar en forskargrupp vars arbete letts från Uppsala universitet. Vi, och alla de andra sextiotusen arterna av nulevande käkförsedda ryggrads
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Americans Need to Know the Hard Truth About Union Monuments in the West
Three weeks ago, a sculpture of a Union soldier who had fought in the Civil War stood on a pedestal before the state Capitol building in Denver, gazing out toward the Rocky Mountains. Across the street, Christopher "Kit" Carson—a frontiersman and scout—kept his balance on a rearing horse, the centerpiece of a fountain dedicated to Colorado's pioneers. Four hundred miles to the south, another Cars
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Norsk studie: Der går 30 år, inden vi ser effekten af en klimaindsats
Der kan gå flere årtier, inden reduktioner i udledningen af drivhusgasser kan måles på jordens temperatur, og det kan komplicere processen med at nå i mål med Parisaftalen, siger norsk forsker bag nyt studie.
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The Triumphant, Complicated Return of 'Hamilton'
The musical, which debuted on Broadway in 2015, is now on Disney+. And it's ready to be reexamined in new ways by an even bigger audience.
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How a 'Heat Dome' Forms—and Why This One Is So Perilous
A massive, intense heat wave is settling over the continental US. The ravages of the Covid pandemic are going to make it all the more deadly.
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13 YouTube Channels We Geek Out Over in Quarantine
From flying a plane to restoring art, YouTubers can truly teach you anything. Here are the best shows that have sparked our curiosity during quarantine.
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Meet the Secret Algorithm That's Keeping Students Out of College
The International Baccalaureate program canceled its high-stakes exam because of Covid-19. The formula it used to "predict" scores puzzles students and teachers.
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Counterfactual Experiments Are Crucial but Easy to Misunderstand
With COVID-19, as with climate, we need to explore a variety of possible futures in order to set policy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Americans Increase LSD Use–and a Bleak Outlook for the World May Be to Blame
Millennials and older adults lead the surge while Gen Z stays on the sidelines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Detection of electrical signaling between tomato plants raises interesting questions
The soil beneath our feet is alive with electrical signals being sent from one plant to another, according to research in which a University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) distinguished professor emeritus in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering participated.
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Q&A: A magnificent new sponge from the deep gets a name
On July 25, 2017, while exploring a seamount during the 2017 Laulima O Ka Moana: Exploring Deep Monument Waters Around Johnston Atoll expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, a team of deep-ocean explorers came upon an extraordinary seascape. Dr. Chris Mah of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) dubbed the scene the "Forest of the Weird" due to the diversity of prominent spon
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The next trend in food: Edible insects?
You might not have known, but a lot of people think you should be eating insects. Their arguments are legion: Edible bugs are better for the environment and can help slow climate change, they can alleviate malnutrition and ease food insecurity. Also, they're delicious.
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NASA's Perseverance rover attached to Atlas V rocket
NASA's Perseverance Mars rover has been attached to the top of the rocket that will send it toward the Red Planet this summer. Encased in the nose cone that will protect it during launch, the rover and the rest of the Mars 2020 spacecraft—the aeroshell, cruise stage, and descent stage—were affixed to a United Launch Alliance Atlas V booster on Tuesday, July 7, at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station i
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The Questionable Ethics of Medical Grade Nonsense: Chinese Herbal Medicine and Kawasaki Disease
A toddler in China with Kawasaki disease was treated with herbs and potions rather than science, and is extremely lucky to have survived without serious complications.
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Detection of electrical signaling between tomato plants raises interesting questions
The soil beneath our feet is alive with electrical signals being sent from one plant to another, according to research in which a University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) distinguished professor emeritus in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering participated.
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Q&A: A magnificent new sponge from the deep gets a name
On July 25, 2017, while exploring a seamount during the 2017 Laulima O Ka Moana: Exploring Deep Monument Waters Around Johnston Atoll expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, a team of deep-ocean explorers came upon an extraordinary seascape. Dr. Chris Mah of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) dubbed the scene the "Forest of the Weird" due to the diversity of prominent spon
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The next trend in food: Edible insects?
You might not have known, but a lot of people think you should be eating insects. Their arguments are legion: Edible bugs are better for the environment and can help slow climate change, they can alleviate malnutrition and ease food insecurity. Also, they're delicious.
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Magnetic memory states go exponential
In a new study, a group of researchers led by Prof. Lior Klein, from the physics department and the Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials at Bar-Ilan University, has shown that relatively simple structures can support an exponential number of magnetic states—much greater than previously thought. They have additionally demonstrated switching between the states by generating spin curren
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The Pandemic Proved That Cash Payments Work
Like millions of other workers, Bridgit Fatora was facing a financial abyss. Before the pandemic hit, she was a freelance photographer and part-time nanny in Seattle. The coronavirus made both of her jobs untenable. Her photography bookings disappeared when Washington State banned mass gatherings, and the couple who employed her to watch their kid laid her off, too. Normally, she made $375 a week
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Nasa Mars rover Perseverance is attached to rocket
The US space agency's next rover is placed atop of the rocket that will send it to the Red Planet.
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Americans Increase LSD Use–and a Bleak Outlook for the World May Be to Blame
Millennials and older adults lead the surge while Gen Z stays on the sidelines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Americans Increase LSD Use–and a Bleak Outlook for the World May Be to Blame
Millennials and older adults lead the surge while Gen Z stays on the sidelines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Jan Bjaalie presents EBRAINS at FENS 2020
Learn more about EBRAINS: ebrains.eu From: HumanBrainProject
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Alien civilisations could move their star to avoid a cosmic disaster
A researcher has come up with an idea for a huge machine that advanced civilisations could use to move their star system around the galaxy – and we might be able to spot one in action
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Vigilance Had a Three-Month Shelf Life
On March 1, California seemed destined to be pummeled by the coronavirus. America's most populous state has large, crowded cities and a diverse population, and travel between it and Asia and Europe is prodigious. Seattle, another West Coast hub, had just become the first U.S. city to be hit by the virus, and a cruise ship crawling with COVID-19 was about to enter San Francisco Bay. Three months l
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Coronavirus Live Updates: U.S. Nears 60,000 New Daily Cases
The country recorded its sixth single-day record in 10 days with almost 60,000 cases on Thursday. In South Africa, virus rules are forcing some to choose between breaking tradition and breaking the law.
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Hong Kong shuts schools as new coronavirus cases hit city
Outbreak tests Asian financial hub's strong record on controlling disease
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Brand researchers have a second study retracted due to data "anomalies"
Three researchers who study consumers' relationships with brands have lost their second paper, this one a study which sought to explain why some people buy things to relieve inner conflicts, because of "data and analysis anomalies." The study, "Identity Threats, Compensatory Consumption, and Working Memory Capacity: How Feeling Threatened Leads to Heightened Evaluations of Identity-Relevant … Cont
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The Cost of the Evangelical Betrayal
The closest thing social conservatives and evangelical supporters of President Donald Trump had to a conversation stopper, when pressed about their support for a president who is so manifestly corrupt, cruel, mendacious, and psychologically unwell, was a simple phrase: "But Gorsuch." Those two words were shorthand for their belief that their reverential devotion to Trump would result in great adv
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Farmers' climate change conundrum: Low yields or revenue instability
Climate change will leave some farmers with a difficult conundrum, according to a new study by researchers from Cornell University and Washington State University: Either risk more revenue volatility, or live with a more predictable decrease in crop yields.
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Meet Phrynopus remotum—the world's newest frog to get a name
The eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in central Perú are among the most remote places in the world.
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Meet Phrynopus remotum—the world's newest frog to get a name
The eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in central Perú are among the most remote places in the world.
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Book Review: Voices From a Slow-Moving Nuclear Calamity
In "The Hanford Plaintiffs," Trisha T. Pritikin gives voice to the civilians who were caught in the path of fallout from the notorious Hanford nuclear plant in Washington state over several decades — providing a definitive history of the legal battle between the federal government and the "downwinders."
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Is deep learning stagnant?
The deep learning boom began in 2012 and GAN appeared in 2014. Has deep learning been stagnant since then? submitted by /u/AGI_Civilization [link] [comments]
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Tyson Chicken Turns to Robot Butchers to Tackle the Industry's Worker Shortage
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Two Australian Cities Go 100% Renewable
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Boom Supersonic jet readies for rollout
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Scenarios for Global Aquaculture and Its Role in Human Nutrition
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Tyson Turns to Robot Butchers, Spurred by Coronavirus Outbreaks
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Economists Warn That a Hotter World Will Be Poorer and More Unequal
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I've Seen a Future Without Cars, and It's Amazing
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The 3D Printed Homes of the Future Are Giant Eggs on Mars
submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]
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Breakthrough with cancer vaccine
submitted by /u/Sorin61 [link] [comments]
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Sanders-Biden climate task force calls for carbon-free power by 2035
submitted by /u/ChargersPalkia [link] [comments]
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Deep learning enables early detection and classification of live bacteria using holography
Waterborne diseases affect more than 2 billion people worldwide, causing substantial economic burden. For example, the treatment of waterborne diseases costs more than $2 billion annually in the United States alone, with 90 million cases recorded per year. Among waterborne pathogen-related problems, one of the most common public health concerns is the presence of total coliform bacteria and Escher
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Structural basis of seamless excision and specific targeting by piggyBac transposase
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17128-1 PiggyBac is a transposon used in genome engineering that does not leave excision footprints. Here the authors determine the structures of two complexes in which the piggyBac transposase is bound to DNA representing different steps of the transposition reaction, providing a basis for how the transposition reactio
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Structure of the DOCK2−ELMO1 complex provides insights into regulation of the auto-inhibited state
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17271-9 DOCK2 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates RHO GTPases and interacts with ELMO1, which stimulates its GEF activity. Here, the authors provide mechanistic insights into how ELMO1 regulates DOCK2 activity by determining the structure of the DOCK2–ELMO1 binary complex representing the closed
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A cytoskeleton regulator AVIL drives tumorigenesis in glioblastoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17279-1 Genes that modulate the cytoskeleton have been associated with increased cell proliferation and migration. Here, the authors show that AVIL, an actin regulatory protein, is overexpressed in glioblastomas and mediates oncogenic effects through regulation of FOXM1 stability and LIN28B expression.
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Synucleinopathy alters nanoscale organization and diffusion in the brain extracellular space through hyaluronan remodeling
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17328-9 The nanoscale organisation of the brain extracellular space can be studied in vivo. Here, the authors investigate how it changes in response to α-synuclein pathology, and identify interactions between microglia and the extracellular matrix.
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Large-scale mass wasting in the western Indian Ocean constrains onset of East African rifting
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17267-5 The authors describe a huge submarine landslide deposit offshore Tanzania and highlight that large and potentially tsunamigenic landslide events are associated with plateau uplift and continental rifting in East Africa.
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A family of lead clusters with precious metal cores
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17187-4 Many Zintl ions with a single endohedrally encapsulated transition metal ion are known, but relatively few where clusters of two or more metals are present. Here, the authors report the synthesis and characterization of two clusters, [Au8Pb33]6− and [Au12Pb44]12−, which contain Au8 and Au12 cores surrounded by P
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Spatial defects nanoengineering for bipolar conductivity in MoS2
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17241-1 Bipolar conductivity is fundamental for electronic devices based on two-dimensional semiconductors. Here, the authors report on-demand p- and n-doping of monolayer MoS2 via defects engineering using thermochemical scanning probe lithography, and achieve a p-n junction with rectification ratio over 104.
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Mechano-modulatory synthetic niches for liver organoid derivation
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17161-0 3D liver organoids hold great promise for regenerative medicine but the use of ill-defined matrices limits their potential. Here, the authors generate human and mouse liver organoids using a chemically defined matrix, and reveal a link between matrix stiffness and organoid growth that does not require acto-myosi
10h
Liquid metal synthesis for better piezoelectrics: Atomically-thin tin-monosulfide
An RMIT-UNSW collaboration applies liquid-metal synthesis to piezoelectrics, advancing future flexible, wearable electronics, and biosensors drawing their power from the body's movements.Piezoelectric materials such as atomically-thin tin-monosulfide (SnS) convert mechanical forces or movement into electrical energy. Along with their inherent flexibility, this makes them candidates for flexible na
10h
Farmers' climate change conundrum: Low yields or revenue instability
Climate change will leave some farmers with a difficult conundrum, according to a new study by researchers from Cornell University and Washington State University: Either risk more revenue volatility, or live with a more predictable decrease in crop yields.
10h
What Happens When You're Disabled but Nobody Can Tell
The author and clinical psychologist Andrew Solomon examines the disabilities that ramps and reserved parking spots don't address.
10h
Overexpressed coiled-coil domain containing protein 8 (CCDC8) mediates newly synthesized HIV-1 Gag lysosomal degradation
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68341-3
10h
Enhancing particle bunch-length measurements based on Radio Frequency Deflector by the use of focusing elements
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67997-1
10h
Quantum double-double-slit experiment with momentum entangled photons
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68181-1
10h
Expression profile of microRNAs in the testes of patients with Klinefelter syndrome
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68294-7
10h
Increased large-scale inter-network connectivity in relation to impulsivity in Parkinson's disease
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68266-x
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Multi-scale habitat modelling and predicting change in the distribution of tiger and leopard using random forest algorithm
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68167-z
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8 million people, 14 alerts: why some covid-19 apps are staying silent
When France launched its app for digital contact tracing, it looked like a possible breakthrough for the virus-ravaged country. After going live in June, StopCovid was downloaded by 2 million people in a short time, and digital affairs minister Cédric O said that "from the first downloads, the app helps avoid contamination, illness, and so deaths." But officials soon had to walk their enthusiasm
10h
Why do people believe in conspiracy theories?
From secret societies to faked moon landings, one thing that humanity seems to have an endless supply of is conspiracy theories. In this compilation, physicist Michio Kaku, science communicator Bill Nye, psychologist Sarah Rose Cavanagh, skeptic Michael Shermer, and actor and playwright John Cameron Mitchell consider the nature of truth and why some groups believe the things they do. "I think the
10h
Fødevarestyrelsen: 'Bambus'-kopper med uønsket kemi er ulovlige
PLUS. Kopper, tallerkener og anden service af bambusplast er teknisk set ulovlige, men Fødevarestyrelsen fjerner dem ikke fra markedet og afventer »en fælles tilgang til produkterne på EU-plan«. Forbrugerrådet Tænk mener, at EU bør rykke hurtigt.
11h
European bison to be introduced into Kent woodland
The European mammals will restore a rich habitat for local wildlife, conservationists say.
11h
A High Tech Vitamix Blender Is the Modern Upgrade Your Kitchen Needs
There are basically two kinds of blenders that occupy a typical kitchen. One is the "special occasion" blender, which actually isn't very special at all – a cheap one-speed wonder that you use to make margaritas twice a year. Then there's the real connoisseur's blender, which never gets hidden away in the pantry. You use it pretty much every single day, so a blender like that is a real investment
11h
Colombia lost forest area the size of Sao Paulo in 2019: report
Colombia lost 159,000 hectares of forest—an area the size of Brazilian megacity Sao Paulo—to deforestation in 2019, according to an official report presented on Thursday.
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A trio of Mars missions in the starting blocks
"We have lift-off, we have lift-off!"
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Study reveals scale of habitat loss for endangered birds
A new study warns that the last remaining habitat for several endangered bird species in Europe could reduce by up to 50 per cent in the next century as farmers convert land to more profitable crops and meet increased demand for products such as olive oil and wine.
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Study reveals scale of habitat loss for endangered birds
A new study warns that the last remaining habitat for several endangered bird species in Europe could reduce by up to 50 per cent in the next century as farmers convert land to more profitable crops and meet increased demand for products such as olive oil and wine.
11h
What kind of face mask gives the best protection against Covid-19?
Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply
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Så funkar algblomning
Algblomning kallas det när mikroalger – encelliga vattenlevande organismer med fotosyntes – förökat sig så mycket att det märks tydligt och eventuellt ställer till problem. Trots ordet har algblomning alltså inget med blommor att göra.
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Eyes on the stars: UAE's Mars probe a first for the Arab world
The oil-rich United Arab Emirates has built a nuclear power programme and sent a man to space, and now plans to join another elite club by sending a probe to Mars.
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Næsten alle lemurer er truet af udryddelse
Af de 107 lemur-arter, der findes i dag, er 103 truet af udryddelse. 33 af dem er akut truet, siger forskere.
14h
Photos of the Week: Chicken Offering, Virginia Creeper, Comet Neowise
Ominous statues in Thailand, protests in Serbia and Greece, solar boats in the Netherlands, a crane collapse in London, Formula One racing in Austria, the empty streets of Pamplona, a zoo reopening in Ecuador, a nuclear-power plant in France, a wildfire in California, and much more
15h
Socio-economic, environmental impacts of COVID-19 quantified
How is COVID-19 impacting people and the planet and what are the implications for a post-pandemic world? A new study quantifies the socio-economic losses and environmental gains.
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Polynesians and Native South Americans Made 12th-Century Contact
Scientists have found snippets of Native South American DNA in the genomes of present-day Polynesians, and they trace the contact to the year 1150. Christopher Intagliata reports.
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Treasury yields hit two-month lows in jittery week
Disconnect emerges between bond and equity markets
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Polynesians and Native South Americans Made 12th-Century Contact
Scientists have found snippets of Native South American DNA in the genomes of present-day Polynesians, and they trace the contact to the year 1150. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Study identifies unique cells that may drive lung fibrosis
This is one of the first comprehensive looks at lung cells using a technology called single-cell RNA sequencing. Instead of examining a mash-up of many cells from a tissue sample, single-cell sequencing allowed researchers in this study to closely examine the individual cells that make up the lungs; to identify their function, and ultimately understand the molecular changes that may be driving the
17h
Critical early step of the visual process uncovered
The key components of electrical connections between light receptors in the eye and the impact of these connections on the early steps of visual signal processing have been identified for the first time, according to new research.
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Salmonella biofilm protein causes autoimmune responses — Possible link with Alzheimer's
Scientists have demonstrated that a Salmonella biofilm protein can cause autoimmune responses and arthritis in animals.
18h
Community initiative increases teenage use of effective contraception
Study finds that teenagers utilize Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC) at a rate five times higher than the United States as a whole.
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Mixed-flow design for microfluidic printing of two-component polymer semiconductor systems [Chemistry]
The rational creation of two-component conjugated polymer systems with high levels of phase purity in each component is challenging but crucial for realizing printed soft-matter electronics. Here, we report a mixed-flow microfluidic printing (MFMP) approach for two-component π-polymer systems that significantly elevates phase purity in bulk-heterojunction solar cells and thin-film…
18h
Niche expansion for phototrophic sulfur bacteria at the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic transition [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Fossilized carotenoid hydrocarbons provide a window into the physiology and biochemistry of ancient microbial phototrophic communities for which only a sparse and incomplete fossil record exists. However, accurate interpretation of carotenoid-derived biomarkers requires detailed knowledge of the carotenoid inventories of contemporary phototrophs and their physiologies. Here we report two distinct.
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Adaptation of plasticity to projected maximum temperatures and across climatically defined bioregions [Evolution]
Resilience to environmental stressors due to climate warming is influenced by local adaptations, including plastic responses. The recent literature has focused on genomic signatures of climatic adaptation, but little is known about how plastic capacity may be influenced by biogeographic and evolutionary processes. We investigate phenotypic plasticity as a target…
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Prototypical pacemaker neurons interact with the resident microbiota [Developmental Biology]
Pacemaker neurons exert control over neuronal circuit function by their intrinsic ability to generate rhythmic bursts of action potential. Recent work has identified rhythmic gut contractions in human, mice, and hydra to be dependent on both neurons and the resident microbiota. However, little is known about the evolutionary origin of…
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Isoform-specific regulation of HCN4 channels by a family of endoplasmic reticulum proteins [Physiology]
Ion channels in excitable cells function in macromolecular complexes in which auxiliary proteins modulate the biophysical properties of the pore-forming subunits. Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-sensitive HCN4 channels are critical determinants of membrane excitability in cells throughout the body, including thalamocortical neurons and cardiac pacemaker cells. We previously showed t
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Identification of the initial nucleocapsid recognition element in the HIV-1 RNA packaging signal [Biochemistry]
Selective packaging of the HIV-1 genome during virus assembly is mediated by interactions between the dimeric 5ʹ-leader of the unspliced viral RNA and the nucleocapsid (NC) domains of a small number of assembling viral Gag polyproteins. Here, we show that the dimeric 5′-leader contains more than two dozen NC binding…
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BCG vaccine protection from severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) [Applied Biological Sciences]
A series of epidemiological explorations has suggested a negative association between national bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccination policy and the prevalence and mortality of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, these comparisons are difficult to validate due to broad differences between countries such as socioeconomic status, demographic structure, rural vs. urban settings,…
18h
Mechanistic determinants of effector-independent motor memory encoding [Neuroscience]
Coordinated, purposeful movements learned with one effector generalize to another effector, a finding that has important implications for tool use, sports, performing arts, and rehabilitation. This occurs because the motor memory acquired through learning comprises representations that are effector-independent. Despite knowing this for decades, the neural mechanisms and substrates that…
18h
European bison to be introduced in the UK for first time outside zoos
In early 2022, four European bison are to be released in a controlled area of a nature reserve outside Canterbury – a move conservationists hope will regenerate ecosystems
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The Atlantic Daily: Trump Wins Himself Some Time
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / GETTY Donald Trump, the man, lost at the Supreme Court today. But Donald Trump, the candidate, can claim victory. As part of the fallout from the new rulings, "the president
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Mexico City buried its river and lakes to prevent disease. But then COVID-19 happened.
Certain winds and weather can turn Mexico City into a dust bowl, making it hard for residents to breathe. (Mario Aranda/Pixabay/) Elena Delavega is an associate professor of Social Work at the University of Memphis. This story originally featured on The Conversation . Mexico City is a dust bowl, a polluted megalopolis where breathing is hard and newly washed clothes hung out to dry turn stiff by
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Lower fertility may follow C-section for first baby
Those who deliver their first child by cesarean section are less likely to conceive a second child than those who deliver vaginally, despite being just as likely to plan a subsequent pregnancy, researchers report. The researchers followed more than 2,000 women for three years after they delivered their first child. Although previous studies showed that women who delivered by cesarean section (C-s
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Coronavirus live news: Bolivia president tests positive amid record rise in South Africa cases
Covid-19 outbreak accelerates across Africa; Venezuelan Socialist Party boss also tests positive; Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro 'in good health'. Follow the latest updates: South Africa warns of coronavirus 'storm' as outbreak accelerates across continent Bolivia's president and Venezuela's Socialist party leader test positive for Covid-19 WHO says coronavirus pandemic still accelerating Tru
20h
Does the COVID crisis cap 25 years of government blunders?
A quarter-century pattern of failure by the federal government in efforts to respond to national crises tells the story of how we've arrived at this moment in American history, argues Paul C. Light. "Our federal government suffers from pervasive complacency." A longtime student of the US federal bureaucracy, Light , a professor of public service at New York University's Wagner School, has been bu
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England's future water supplies at 'serious risk'
MPs warn some regions will run out of water within the next 20 years unless "urgent action" is taken.
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Climate change: Road plans will scupper CO2 targets, report says
The majority of emissions cuts from electric cars will be wiped out by new road-building.
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COVID-19 can have long-term effects on lungs, heart
For some individuals with COVID-19, recovering from the acute phase of the infection is only the beginning, John Swartzberg warns. Worrying reports now indicate that the coronarvirus may be capable of inflicting long-lasting damage to the lungs, heart, and nervous system, and researchers are closely watching to see if the kidneys, liver, and gastrointestinal tract may be susceptible to persistent
20h
New study supports remdesivir as COVID-19 treatment
A new study found that remdesivir potently inhibited SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes COVID-19, in human lung cell cultures and that it improved lung function in mice infected with the virus.
20h
Women who deliver by C-section are less likely to conceive subsequent children
Women who deliver their first child by cesarean section (C-section) are less likely to conceive a second child than those who deliver vaginally, despite being just as likely to plan a subsequent pregnancy, according to researchers. The team followed more than 2,000 women for three years after they delivered their first child.
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About half of health care workers positive for COVID-19 by serology have no symptoms, study finds
A new study suggests that front-line health care workers are at high risk for COVID-19 and that many health care workers with the virus may not have typical symptoms of a respiratory infection.
20h
No association found between exposure to mobile devices and brain volume alterations in adolescents
A new study of 2,500 Dutch children is the first to explore the relationship between brain volume and different doses of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields.
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Study sheds light on bushfires' microclimate impact
A study examining the urban microclimatic impact of the 2019-20 Australian bushfires has uncovered how they affect local meteorological and air quality.
20h
Sea surface temperature has a big impact on coral outplant survival
Global average sea surface temperatures have risen at unprecedented rates for the past three decades, with far-reaching consequences for coral reefs. Today, the majority of coral reefs are surviving at their upper thermal limit and an increase in just one degree Celsius lasting longer than a few weeks can lead to coral bleaching and death. With projections of ocean warming expected to continue to
20h
A complex gene program initiates brain changes in response to cocaine
Researchers used single-nucleus RNA sequencing to compare transcriptional responses to acute cocaine in 16 unique cell populations from the brain nucleus accumbens. The atlas is part of a major study that used multiple cutting-edge technologies to describe a dopamine-induced gene expression signature that regulates the brain's response to cocaine. The study shows neurobiological processes that con
21h
CT of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) versus CT of influenza virus pneumonia
A new article investigating the differences in CT findings between coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia and influenza virus pneumonia found that most lesions from COVID-19 were located in the peripheral zone and close to the pleura, whereas influenza virus was more prone to show mucoid impaction and pleural effusion. The more important role of CT during the present pandemic is in finding lesio
21h
Biologists trace plants' steady mitochondrial genomes to a gene found in viruses, bacteria
Biologists have traced the stability of plant mitochondrial genomes to a particular gene – MSH1 – that plants have but animals don't. Their experiments could lend insight into why animal mitochondrial genomes tend to mutate.
21h
No association found between exposure to mobile devices and brain volume alterations in adolescents
A new study of 2,500 Dutch children is the first to explore the relationship between brain volume and different doses of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields.
21h
Aquaculture's role in nutrition in the COVID-19 era
A new paper examines the economics of an aquaculture industry of the future that is simultaneously environmentally sustainable and nutritious for the nearly 1 billion people worldwide who depend on it.
21h
Study: More than half of US students experience summer learning losses five years in a row
Following U.S. students across five summers between grades 1 and 6, a little more than half (52 percent) experienced learning losses in all five summers, according to a large national study. Students in this group lost an average of 39 percent of their total school year gains during each summer.
21h
Older, critically ill patients with COVID-19 may have increased risk of bradycardia with lopinavir and ritonavir
The combined use of antiretroviral medications lopinavir and ritonavir, previously used to treat SARS-Cov-1 and MERS-Cov patients, appeared to cause bradycardia in 22% of elderly, critically ill COVID-19 patients, in a small study in France. Bradycardia was resolved in all patients after discontinuation or dose reduction of both medications.
21h
Ways to keep buildings cool with improved super white paints
Materials scientists have demonstrated ways to make super white paint that reflects as much as 98% of incoming heat from the sun. The advance shows practical pathways for designing paints that, if used on rooftops and other parts of a building, could significantly reduce cooling costs, beyond what standard white 'cool-roof' paints can achieve.
21h
Author Correction: Modulation of the Neuregulin 1/ErbB system after skeletal muscle denervation and reinnervation
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68521-1
21h
Author Correction: DRP-1-mediated apoptosis induces muscle degeneration in dystrophin mutants
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68522-0
21h
Using electricity to break down pollutants left over after wastewater treatment
Pesticides, pharmaceutical products, and endocrine disruptors are some of the emerging contaminants often found in treated domestic wastewater, even after secondary treatment. Researchers have now tested the effectiveness of a tertiary treatment process using electricity.
21h
New evidence of long-term volcanic, seismic risks in northern Europe
An ancient European volcanic region may pose both a greater long-term volcanic risk and seismic risk to northwestern Europe than scientists had realized, geophysicists report. The densely populated area is centered in the Eifel region of Germany, and covers parts of Belgium, the Netherlands, France and Luxembourg.
21h
Ways to keep buildings cool with improved super white paints
Materials scientists have demonstrated ways to make super white paint that reflects as much as 98% of incoming heat from the sun. The advance shows practical pathways for designing paints that, if used on rooftops and other parts of a building, could significantly reduce cooling costs, beyond what standard white 'cool-roof' paints can achieve.
21h
Scientists trace the origin of our teeth from the most primitive jawed fish
Scientists have digitally 'dissected', for the first time, the most primitive jawed fish fossils with teeth found near Prague more than 100 years ago. The results show that their teeth have surprisingly modern features.
21h
A 'regime shift' is happening in the Arctic Ocean
Scientists find the growth of phytoplankton in the Arctic Ocean has increased 57 percent over just two decades, enhancing its ability to soak up carbon dioxide. While once linked to melting sea ice, the increase is now propelled by rising concentrations of tiny algae.
21h
Brain benefits of exercise can be gained with a single protein
A little-studied liver protein may be responsible for the well-known benefits of exercise on the aging brain, according to a new study in mice. The findings could lead to new therapies to confer the neuroprotective effects of physical activity on people who are unable to exercise due to physical limitations.
21h
WHO: Airborne Transmission Plays Limited Role In Coronavirus Spread
After 239 scientists raised concerns about transmission by aerosolized particles, the World Health Organization has issued a brief on the topic — and called for more research. (Image credit: NIAID)
21h
No NELL2, no sperm motility; novel protein is essential for male fertility
An international team of researchers has identified a chain of events that matures the sperm and triggers their motility. The findings have implications for diagnostic and therapeutic research in male infertility and male contraceptive development.
21h
A new look at deep-sea microbes
Microbes found deeper in the ocean are believed to have slow population turnover rates and low amounts of available energy. But a new examination of microbial communities found deeper in seafloor sediments and around hydrocarbon seepage sites has found they have more energy available and a higher population turnover. The deeper sediments in the seepages are most likely heavily impacted by the mate
21h
Using electricity to break down pollutants left over after wastewater treatment
Pesticides, pharmaceutical products, and endocrine disruptors are some of the emerging contaminants often found in treated domestic wastewater, even after secondary treatment. Researchers have now tested the effectiveness of a tertiary treatment process using electricity.
21h
Therapy delivered electronically more effective than face to face
In this evidence review, researchers identified 17 randomized control trials comparing therapist-supported cognitive behavioural therapy delivered electronically to face to face cognitive behavioural therapy. The studies were conducted between 2003 and 2018 in the United States, Australia, Netherlands, Switzerland, Sweden and the United Kingdom
21h
Spider silk made by photosynthetic bacteria
A research team in Japan reported that they succeeded in producing the spider silk — ultra-lightweight, though, biodegradable and biocompatible material — using photosynthetic bacteria. This study will open a new era in which bio-factories stably output the bulk of spider silk.
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