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Chemists develop bioinspired strategy for the controlled synthesis of polyenes

They occur in nature, are reactive and play a role in many biological processes: polyenes. It is no wonder that chemists have for a long time been interested in efficiently constructing these compounds—not least in order to be able to use them for future biomedical applications. However, such designs are currently neither simple nor inexpensive and present organic chemists with major challenges. S

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Pioneering method reveals dynamic structure in HIV

Viruses are scary. They invade our cells like invisible armies, and each type brings its own strategy of attack. While viruses devastate communities of humans and animals, scientists scramble to fight back. Many utilize electron microscopy, a tool that can "see" what individual molecules in the virus are doing. Yet even the most sophisticated technology requires that the sample be frozen and immob

22h

How to use love to repair social inequality | Chloé Valdary

What does Kendrick Lamar have in common with Disney's "Moana"? They recognize our common humanity and show us how to love ourselves and one another, says writer and educator Chloé Valdary. She shares how she uses pop culture to help people develop resilience and advance social change — and explains why cultivating love is the key to connection, healing and moving forward together. (This virtual c

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Pioneering method reveals dynamic structure in HIV

The method reveals that the lattice, which forms the major structural component of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is dynamic. The discovery of a diffusing lattice made from Gag and GagPol proteins, long considered to be completely static, opens up potential new therapies. Apart from viruses, the method can be applied to study any biomedical structure by tracking molecules moving around in

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Researchers solve a long-standing problem in organic chemistry

Chemists have for a long time been interested in efficiently constructing polyenes – not least in order to be able to use them for future biomedical applications. However, such designs are currently neither simple nor inexpensive. Scientists at Münster University have now found a bio-inspired solution to the problem. The study has been published in 'Science'.

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ESA/NASA's solar orbiter returns first data, snaps closest pictures of the sun

The first images from ESA/NASA's Solar Orbiter are now available to the public, including the closest pictures ever taken of the Sun.

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Gel that breaks down, puts itself back together could improve delivery of oral drugs

An emerging hydrogel material with the capacity to degrade and spontaneously reform in the gastrointestinal tract could help researchers develop more effective methods for oral drug delivery. In research published in Soft Matter, Lehigh University rheologists mimic pH environment of GI tract to shed light on pharmaceutical potential of covalent adaptable hydrogels (CAHs).

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How NBA is using technology to help with health and safety protocols inside Orlando bubble

Once the alarm goes off and they remove the crud from their eyes, most people here will instinctively grab their phone.

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Space station power upgrades nearly finished after spacewalk

Spacewalking astronauts completed their part of a three-year power upgrade to the International Space Station on Thursday, replacing six more outdated batteries with powerful new ones.

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Gel that breaks down, puts itself back together could improve delivery of oral drugs

An emerging hydrogel material with the capacity to degrade and spontaneously reform in the gastrointestinal tract could help researchers develop more effective methods for oral drug delivery.

22h

Evidence for decades-old theory to explain the odd behaviors of water

A new study provides strong evidence for a controversial theory that at very cold temperatures water can exist in two distinct liquid forms, one being less dense and more structured than the other. Researchers conducted computer simulations of water molecules to discover the critical point at the transition between the two forms.

22h

Gel that breaks down, puts itself back together could improve delivery of oral drugs

An emerging hydrogel material with the capacity to degrade and spontaneously reform in the gastrointestinal tract could help researchers develop more effective methods for oral drug delivery. In research published in Soft Matter, Lehigh University rheologists mimic pH environment of GI tract to shed light on pharmaceutical potential of covalent adaptable hydrogels (CAHs).

22h

Heat stress: The climate is putting European forests under sustained pressure

No year since weather records began was as hot and dry as 2018. A first comprehensive analysis of the consequences of this drought and heat event shows that central European forests sustained long-term damage. Even tree species considered drought-resistant, such as beech, pine and silver fir, suffered.

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Principles to enhance research integrity and avoid 'publish or perish' in academia

Amid growing criticism of the traditional "publish or perish" system for rewarding academic research, an international team has developed five principles that institutions can follow to measure and reward research integrity. Publishing on July 16, 2020 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, the team believes that applying these principles in academic hiring and promotion will enhance scientific

23h

New study provides evidence for decades-old theory to explain the odd behaviors of water

Water, so ordinary and so essential to life, acts in ways that are quite puzzling to scientists. For example, why is ice less dense than water, floating rather than sinking the way other liquids do when they freeze?

23h

Researchers discover 2 paths of aging and new insights on promoting healthspan

Molecular biologists and bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have unraveled key mechanisms behind the mysteries of aging. They isolated two distinct paths that cells travel during aging and engineered a new way to genetically program these processes to extend lifespan.

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'Proofreading' proteins stop and reel in DNA to correct replication errors

On the DNA assembly line, two proofreading proteins work together as an emergency stop button to prevent replication errors. New research from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows how these proteins—MutL and MutS—prevent DNA replication errors by creating an immobile structure that calls more proteins to the site to repair the error. This struct

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New study sheds light on how nutrient-starved cells recycle internal components

The idea of the cell as a city is a common introduction to biology, conjuring depictions of the cell's organelles as power plants, factories, roads, libraries, warehouses and more. Like a city, these structures require a great deal of resources to build and operate, and when resources are scarce, internal components must be recycled to provide essential building blocks, particularly amino acids, t

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Membrane technology could cut emissions and energy use in oil refining

New membrane technology developed by a team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Imperial College London, and ExxonMobil could help reduce carbon emissions and energy intensity associated with refining crude oil. Laboratory testing suggests that this polymer membrane technology could replace some conventional heat-based distillation processes in the future.

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Huge virus's mini-enzymes boost CRISPR's powers

Nature, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02135-5 The viruses called Biggiephages harbour compact enzymes that can target a broad range of DNA sequences.

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Membrane technology could cut emissions and energy use in oil refining

New membrane technology developed by a team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Imperial College London, and ExxonMobil could help reduce carbon emissions and energy intensity associated with refining crude oil. Laboratory testing suggests that this polymer membrane technology could replace some conventional heat-based distillation processes in the future.

23h

Researchers discover 2 paths of aging and new insights on promoting healthspan

Molecular biologists and bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have unraveled key mechanisms behind the mysteries of aging. They isolated two distinct paths that cells travel during aging and engineered a new way to genetically program these processes to extend lifespan.

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Genetics could help protect coral reefs from global warming

Coral reefs are dying at an alarming rate as water temperatures rise worldwide as a result of global warming, pollution and human activities. In the last three decades, half of Australia's Great Barrier Reef has lost its coral cover.

23h

'Proofreading' proteins stop and reel in DNA to correct replication errors

On the DNA assembly line, two proofreading proteins work together as an emergency stop button to prevent replication errors. New research from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows how these proteins—MutL and MutS—prevent DNA replication errors by creating an immobile structure that calls more proteins to the site to repair the error. This struct

23h

New study sheds light on how nutrient-starved cells recycle internal components

The idea of the cell as a city is a common introduction to biology, conjuring depictions of the cell's organelles as power plants, factories, roads, libraries, warehouses and more. Like a city, these structures require a great deal of resources to build and operate, and when resources are scarce, internal components must be recycled to provide essential building blocks, particularly amino acids, t

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A population of asteroids of interstellar origin inhabits the Solar System

A study conducted by scientists at São Paulo State University's Institute of Geosciences and Exact Sciences (IGCE-UNESP) in Rio Claro, Brazil, has identified 19 asteroids of interstellar origin classified as Centaurs, outer Solar System objects that revolve around the Sun in the region between the orbits of Jupiter and Neptune.

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Strategies for recycling of solar panels

Researchers have conducted the first global assessment into the most promising approaches to end-of-life management for solar photovoltaic (PV) modules.

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Two paths of aging: New insights on promoting healthspan

Scientists have unraveled key mechanisms behind the mysteries of aging. They isolated two distinct paths that cells travel during aging and engineered a new way to genetically program these processes to extend lifespan. Cells embark upon either a nucleolar or mitochondrial path early in life, and follow this "aging route" throughout their entire lifespan through decline and death. At the heart o

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It's A Good Time To Head To Mars

NASA is sending a six-wheeled rover to Mars to look for signs of microbial life stored in the rocks at Jezero crater. The rover is also the first step in bringing samples of Martian rock to Earth. (Image credit: Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre)

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25 gange kraftigere end CO2: Vi udleder mere og mere metan

Den kraftige drivhusgas kommer især fra landbrug og gasindustri.

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The Influenza Masks of 1918

As people worldwide adapt to living with the threat of COVID-19, and especially as the rate of new cases continues to grow in the United States, the wearing of face masks remains widely recommended, and in many places, mandatory. A century ago, an outbreak of influenza spread rapidly across the world, killing more than 50 million—and possibly as many as 100 million—people within 15 months. The sc

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Scientists: Blood Iron Levels Strongly Correlated With Long Lifespan

Iron Man Scientists may have just uncovered a new secret to extending the human lifespan : making sure there's the right amount of iron in our blood. University of Edinburgh scientists looked at data about 1.75 million people's lifespans, including 60,000 who lived to reach an unusually old age, and found a clear link between blood iron levels and a longer life, according to research published Th

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A GoPro for beetles: Researchers create a robotic camera backpack for insects

Researchers have developed a tiny camera that can ride aboard an insect or an insect-sized robot.

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David Kaiser, Rockefeller Heir Who Fought Exxon Mobil, Dies at 50

A great-great grandson of John D. Rockefeller, he steered one of his family's philanthropies to a feisty stance on the oil giant's role in climate change.

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Hyksos, 15th Dynasty rulers of Ancient Egypt, were an internal takeover

The Hyksos, who ruled during the 15th Dynasty of ancient Egypt, were not foreign invaders, but a group who rose to power from within, according to a new study.

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A GoPro for beetles: Researchers create a robotic camera backpack for insects

Researchers have developed a tiny camera that can ride aboard an insect or an insect-sized robot.

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Meditation linked to lower cardiovascular risk

Meditation was linked to lower cardiovascular risk in a large database study. The team looked at data on more than 61,000 survey participants.

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How long should you fast for weight loss?

Two daily fasting diets, also known as time-restricted feeding diets, are effective for weight loss, according to a new study. The study reported results from a clinical trial that compared a 4-hour time-restricted feeding diet and a 6-hour time-restricted feeding diet to a control group.

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Aging-associated inflammation may worsen COVID-19 outcomes in older individuals

The increased severity and mortality of SARS-CoV-2 infections in older individuals may be related to inflammageing — an age-associated phenomenon of increased general inflammation.

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New test offers clarity for couples struggling to conceive

A male fertility test based on Cornell research could help predict which men might need treatment and which couples might have success with different forms of assisted reproduction.

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Lenovo Smart Clock Deal: $30 Off Our Fave Nightstand Display

It can do everything any other Google Assistant display can do—on a smaller scale.

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Mental health toll of the coronavirus pandemic is now becoming clear

People are struggling with uncertainty, isolation, fear and concerns about money or education – leading to elevated levels of anxiety and depression during the pandemic

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"Consistently unsurprised": Nigerian vaccine study with no Nigerian authors retracted

Last month, PLOS ONE published a paper reporting on a trial to improve the uptake of the measles vaccine in Nigeria. The researchers were affiliated with IDinsight, a San Francisco-based "global advisory, data analytics, and research organization that helps development leaders maximize their social impact." San Francisco is about 7,800 miles from Lagos, and the … Continue reading

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Motorcycle makers have put a lot of work into killing bad vibrations

Yamaha's TD1-B was heavy. Kevin Cameron surmises this is due to its engine vibration—thicker materials resist cracking. (Jay McNally/Cycle World Archives/) This story was originally featured on Cycle World . As I've been assembling my 1965 Yamaha TD1-B I've been impressed again and again by how heavy its parts are. My conclusion is that this weight was dictated by its engine vibration. Control wh

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The Twitter Hack Could Have Been Much Worse—and Maybe Was

The meltdown appears to be part of a bitcoin scam and not something more nefarious, but security experts are troubled that it happened at all.

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Data secrecy is crippling attempts to slow COVID-19's spread in U.S., epidemiologists warn

California scientists have been denied access to detailed data on the pandemic by state and local officials

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Closest view of sun from space shows 'campfires' on surface

Images released by European Space Agency were taken 77m km away from Earth

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Recently discovered CRISPR enzyme from huge bacteriophages expands genome editing toolbox

A recently discovered hypercompact CRISPR enzyme found only in huge bacteriophages, and known as CRISPR-CasΦ, is functional, a new study by Patrick Pausch, Jennifer Doudna and colleagues reports, and it provides a powerful new tool in the CRISPR genome editing toolbox, including because it can target a wider range of genetic sequences compared to Cas9 and Cas12.

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Cancer cells in inhospitable brain fluids hijack iron to survive

In order to survive within the remote and harsh anatomical microenvironments of the central nervous system, the disseminated cancer cells that cause rare yet deadly leptomeningeal metastases (LM) hijack crucial iron micronutrients from native macrophages, researchers report.

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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

In a randomized trial, hydroxychloroquine did not substantially reduce symptom severity in outpatients with early, mild COVID-19. These findings may not inform whether an effect would be observed in populations at higher risk for severe COVID-19. Results from a randomized clinical trial are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Can high-quality coral genomes be used to predict bleaching events?

In a new approach to conservation genetics, researchers used a high-quality genome of the coral Acropora millepora, along with environmental data, to study this coral's variable responses to climate change, a trait of key conservation importance.

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Dangerous blood clots form in leg arteries of COVID-19 patients

COVID-19 is associated with life-threatening blood clots in the arteries of the legs, according to a new study. Researchers said COVID-19 patients with symptoms of inadequate blood supply to the lower extremities tend to have larger clots and a significantly higher rate of amputation and death than uninfected people with the same condition.

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A population of asteroids of interstellar origin inhabits the Solar System

Discovery by Brazilian researcher reported in Royal Astronomical Society's Monthly Notices provides clues for understanding the star nursery from which the Sun emerged.

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New study provides evidence for decades-old theory to explain the odd behaviors of water

A new study provides strong evidence for a controversial theory that at very cold temperatures water can exist in two distinct liquid forms, one being less dense and more structured than the other. Researchers at Princeton University and Sapienza University in Rome conducted computer simulations of water molecules to discover the critical point at the transition between the two forms.

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Revealing Brazil's rotten agribusinesses

Groundbreaking study first to identify Brazil's 'bad apple' beef and soy producers, illegally chopping down forests to feed Europe's appetite; Researchers show that transparent data and science-based monitoring are the most potent weapons against illicit forest loss

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Megaphages harbor mini-Cas proteins ideal for gene editing

Cas proteins like CRISPR-Cas9 have great potential for gene therapy to treat human disease and for altering crop genes, but the gene-targeting and gene-cutting Cas proteins are often large and hard to ferry into cells with viral vectors such as adenovirus. UC Berkeley scientists have now discovered a hypercompact Cas protein, CasΦ, that should work better. It is half the size of Cas9 and apparentl

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Genetics could help protect coral reefs from global warming

The research provides more evidence that genetic-sequencing can reveal evolutionary differences in reef-building corals that one day could help scientists identify which strains could adapt to warmer seas.

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Researchers discover 2 paths of aging and new insights on promoting healthspan

Scientists have unraveled key mechanisms behind the mysteries of aging. They isolated two distinct paths that cells travel during aging and engineered a new way to genetically program these processes to extend lifespan. Cells embark upon either a nucleolar or mitochondrial path early in life, and follow this "aging route" throughout their entire lifespan through decline and death. At the heart of

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Membrane technology could cut emissions and energy use in oil refining

New membrane technology developed by a team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Imperial College London, and ExxonMobil could help reduce carbon emissions and energy intensity associated with refining crude oil. Laboratory testing suggests that this polymer membrane technology could replace some conventional heat-based distillation processes in the future.

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Mouse model of contained tuberculosis infection could lead to a more effective vaccine

A novel mouse model of the protective effects of contained tuberculous infection could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine, according to a study published July 16 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Alan Diercks of Seattle Children's Research Institute, and colleagues.

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Principles to enhance research integrity and avoid 'publish or perish' in academia

Amid growing criticism of the traditional "publish or perish" system for rewarding academic research, an international team has developed five principles that institutions can follow to measure and reward research integrity. Publishing on July 16, 2020 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, the team believes that applying these principles in academic hiring and promotion will enhance scientific

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Subsidies Mean This Electric Car Is Literally Free in Germany

Subsidy Party In an effort to pick up plummeted demand for cars back from the ground, European governments are pumping money back into the industry through subsidies. In fact, Bloomberg reports , Germany is currently subsidizing the vehicles so aggressively that leasing the best-selling five-door Renault Zoe EV is now essentially free. Electric Demand As a result of the financial incentives, pros

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We All Want More Sleep. But What Our Bodies Really Need Is Better Sleep.

The importance of high-quality sleep to your mental and physical well-being cannot be overstated. Poor sleep is scientifically proven to diminish critical thinking, judgment, and problem-solving skills. It is scientifically proven to contribute to weaker immune function, weight gain, high blood pressure, and accelerated aging. It is scientifically proven to make us more irritable, reduce our abil

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Covid-19 threatens the fight against global poverty

Productivity gap between rich and poor countries will probably widen

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Beetlecam

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Aging immunity

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Blighted Gotham

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A brainwide atlas of synapses across the mouse life span

Synapses connect neurons together to form the circuits of the brain, and their molecular composition controls innate and learned behavior. We analyzed the molecular and morphological diversity of 5 billion excitatory synapses at single-synapse resolution across the mouse brain from birth to old age. A continuum of changes alters synapse composition in all brain regions across the life span. Expan

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Cancer cells deploy lipocalin-2 to collect limiting iron in leptomeningeal metastasis

The tumor microenvironment plays a critical regulatory role in cancer progression, especially in central nervous system metastases. Cancer cells within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)–filled leptomeninges face substantial microenvironmental challenges, including inflammation and sparse micronutrients. To investigate the mechanism by which cancer cells in these leptomeningeal metastases (LM) overcom

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Ancient DNA indicates human population shifts and admixture in northern and southern China

Human genetic history in East Asia is poorly understood. To clarify population relationships, we obtained genome-wide data from 26 ancient individuals from northern and southern East Asia spanning 9500 to 300 years ago. Genetic differentiation in this region was higher in the past than the present, which reflects a major episode of admixture involving northern East Asian ancestry spreading across

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Second critical point in two realistic models of water

The hypothesis that water has a second critical point at deeply supercooled conditions was formulated to provide a thermodynamically consistent interpretation of numerous experimental observations. A large body of work has been devoted to verifying or falsifying this hypothesis, but no unambiguous experimental proof has yet been found. Here, we use histogram reweighting and large-system scatterin

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Giant piezoelectricity in oxide thin films with nanopillar structure

High-performance piezoelectric materials are critical components for electromechanical sensors and actuators. For more than 60 years, the main strategy for obtaining large piezoelectric response has been to construct multiphase boundaries, where nanoscale domains with local structural and polar heterogeneity are formed, by tuning complex chemical compositions. We used a different strategy to emul

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Introductions and early spread of SARS-CoV-2 in the New York City area

New York City (NYC) has emerged as one of the epicenters of the current severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. To identify the early transmission events underlying the rapid spread of the virus in the NYC metropolitan area, we sequenced the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in patients seeking care at the Mount Sinai Health System. Phylogenetic

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Boron-enabled geometric isomerization of alkenes via selective energy-transfer catalysis

Isomerization-based strategies to enable the stereodivergent construction of complex polyenes from geometrically defined alkene linchpins remain conspicuously underdeveloped. Mitigating the thermodynamic constraints inherent to isomerization is further frustrated by the considerations of atom efficiency in idealized low–molecular weight precursors. In this work, we report a general ambiphilic C 3

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Molecular square dancing in CO-CO collisions

Knowledge of rotational energy transfer (RET) involving carbon monoxide (CO) molecules is crucial for the interpretation of astrophysical data. As of now, our nearly perfect understanding of atom-molecule scattering shows that RET usually occurs by only a simple "bump" between partners. To advance molecular dynamics to the next step in complexity, we studied molecule-molecule scattering in great

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N-Aryl-linked spirocyclic polymers for membrane separations of complex hydrocarbon mixtures

The fractionation of crude-oil mixtures through distillation is a large-scale, energy-intensive process. Membrane materials can avoid phase changes in such mixtures and thereby reduce the energy intensity of these thermal separations. With this application in mind, we created spirocyclic polymers with N -aryl bonds that demonstrated noninterconnected microporosity in the absence of ladder linkage

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Susceptible supply limits the role of climate in the early SARS-CoV-2 pandemic

Preliminary evidence suggests that climate may modulate the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Yet it remains unclear whether seasonal and geographic variations in climate can substantially alter the pandemic trajectory, given that high susceptibility is a core driver. Here, we use a climate-dependent epidemic model to simulate the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic by

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Autoreactivity in naïve human fetal B cells is associated with commensal bacteria recognition

Restricted V(D)J recombination during fetal development was postulated to limit antibody repertoire breadth and prevent autoimmunity. However, newborn serum contains abundant autoantibodies, suggesting that B cell tolerance during gestation is not yet fully established. To investigate this apparent paradox, we evaluated the reactivities of more than 450 antibodies cloned from single B cells from

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A programmable fate decision landscape underlies single-cell aging in yeast

Chromatin instability and mitochondrial decline are conserved processes that contribute to cellular aging. Although both processes have been explored individually in the context of their distinct signaling pathways, the mechanism that determines which process dominates during aging of individual cells is unknown. We show that interactions between the chromatin silencing and mitochondrial pathways

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Site-specific glycan analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 spike

The emergence of the betacoronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), represents a considerable threat to global human health. Vaccine development is focused on the principal target of the humoral immune response, the spike (S) glycoprotein, which mediates cell entry and membrane fusion. The SARS-CoV-2 S gen

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CRISPR-Cas{Phi} from huge phages is a hypercompact genome editor

CRISPR-Cas systems are found widely in prokaryotes, where they provide adaptive immunity against virus infection and plasmid transformation. We describe a minimal functional CRISPR-Cas system, comprising a single ~70-kilodalton protein, Cas, and a CRISPR array, encoded exclusively in the genomes of huge bacteriophages. Cas uses a single active site for both CRISPR RNA (crRNA) processing and crRNA

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Tumor-initiating cells establish an IL-33-TGF-{beta} niche signaling loop to promote cancer progression

Targeting the cross-talk between tumor-initiating cells (TICs) and the niche microenvironment is an attractive avenue for cancer therapy. We show here, using a mouse model of squamous cell carcinoma, that TICs play a crucial role in creating a niche microenvironment that is required for tumor progression and drug resistance. Antioxidant activity in TICs, mediated by the transcription factor NRF2,

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Optical frequency combs: Coherently uniting the electromagnetic spectrum

Optical frequency combs were introduced around 20 years ago as a laser technology that could synthesize and count the ultrafast rate of the oscillating cycles of light. Functioning in a manner analogous to a clockwork of gears, the frequency comb phase-coherently upconverts a radio frequency signal by a factor of to provide a vast array of evenly spaced optical frequencies, which is the comb for

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Population genetics of the coral Acropora millepora: Toward genomic prediction of bleaching

Although reef-building corals are declining worldwide, responses to bleaching vary within and across species and are partly heritable. Toward predicting bleaching response from genomic data, we generated a chromosome-scale genome assembly for the coral Acropora millepora . We obtained whole-genome sequences for 237 phenotyped samples collected at 12 reefs along the Great Barrier Reef, among which

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Revealing Brazil's rotten agribusinesses

Following reports that Brazil's current deforestation rate—1 million hectares—is the highest in a decade, a peer-reviewed study published in Science today finds that 18-22%, and possibly more, of Brazil's annual exports to the European Union are potentially contaminated with illegal deforestation, while identifying for the first time the specific producers of soy in Brazil responsible for "poisoni

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Chest x-rays show more severe COVID-19 in non-white patients

Racial/ethnic minority patients admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 infection are more likely to have more severe disease on chest X-rays than white/non-Hispanic patients, increasing the likelihood of adverse outcomes, such as intubation or death, according to a new study.

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Get a bug's eye view from a tiny 'beetle backpack' camera

A tiny, wireless, steerable camera that can also ride aboard an insect gives everyone a chance to see a bug's view of the world. The camera, which streams video to a smartphone at 1 to 5 frames per second, sits on a mechanical arm that can pivot 60 degrees. This allows a viewer to capture a high-resolution, panoramic shot or track a moving object while expending a minimal amount of energy. "…prio

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Working Scientist podcast: How to craft and communicate a simple science story

Nature, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02117-7 Ditch jargon, keep sentences short, stay topical. Pakinam Amer shares the secrets of good science writing for books and magazines.

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New genes control plant height, could lead to flood-proof crops

Rice variety that can outgrow rising water yielded discovery of new genes

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Un-natural mRNAs modified with sulfur atoms boost efficient protein synthesis

A group of scientists has succeeded in the development of modified messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that contain sulfur atoms in the place of oxygen atoms of phosphate moieties of natural mRNAs. They discovered that modified mRNAs accelerated the initiation step of the translation reactions and improved efficiency of protein synthesis by at least 20 times compared with that using natural-form mRNAs.

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Reprogramming of immune cells enhances effects of radiotherapy in preclinical models of brain cancer

A new study has dissected how radiotherapy alters the behavior of immune cells known as macrophages found in glioblastoma (GBM) tumors and shown how these cells might be reprogrammed with an existing drug to suppress the invariable recurrence of the aggressive brain cancer.

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New antiplatelet drug shows promise for treating heart attack

Researchers have developed a new drug that prevents blood clots without causing an increased risk of bleeding, a common side effect of all antiplatelet medications currently available. A new study describes the drug and its delivery mechanisms and shows that the drug is also an effective treatment for heart attack in animal models.

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For the First Time, Scientists Grow Human Sperm Stem Cells in Lab

For the first time, scientists have been able to grow spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are the cells that eventually develop into fully-fledged sperm, in a laboratory environment . It's too soon for the cells to be used in any sort of clinical setting, but this research lays the groundwork for game-changing developments for fertility medicine . Doctors have long sought after a way to jumps

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The online battle for the mental health of service workers

Morgan Eckroth became famous on TikTok as morgandrinkscoffee . A 21-year-old barista and social-media manager for Tried & True Coffee in Corvallis, Oregon, she shares latte art, dramatic reenactments of customer interactions, and drink tutorials with her 4 million followers. Before the pandemic her content was pretty wholesome—she likes her job! But then in May, someone who was angry about the sh

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Covid-19 news: Scientists suggest young volunteers could test vaccines

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

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Most Covid-19 patients admitted to a Sydney hospital in March still have symptoms

Exclusive: more than three months after being discharged from St Vincent's hospital, some 80% continue to experience symptoms, doctors say Coronavirus Australia: Victoria reports 317 new Covid-19 cases and two deaths as NSW records 10 cases Covid-19 cases will need to keep rising in NSW before restrictions are tightened, experts say Melbourne coronavirus map: where Covid-19 cases are rising or fa

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Liquid-repelling substance works on all surfaces

Acting like an invisible force field, a new liquid coating may provide an extra layer of protection for front-line workers. Researchers have developed a coating that repels nearly all substances off a surface. And that new coating will make cleaning personal protective equipment a little bit easier for front-line health care workers.

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In a first, astronomers watch a black hole's corona disappear, then reappear

It seems the universe has an odd sense of humor. While a crown-encrusted virus has run roughshod over the world, another entirely different corona about 100 million light years from Earth has mysteriously disappeared. For the first time, astronomers have watched as a supermassive black hole's own corona, the ultrabright, billion-degree ring of high-energy particles that encircles a black hole's ev

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Greater flood risks in coastal region of China

New research has revealed that the observed average moving speed (or translation speed) of tropical cyclones making landfall over the coast of China dropped by 11% between 1961 and 2017. These slow-moving tropical cyclones brought about 20% more local total rainfall on average when compared with fast-moving ones, resulting in greater flood risks in the region.

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When many act as one, data-driven models can reveal key behaviors

Researchers have shown that data science approaches can reveal subtle clues about the origins of such collective behaviors as aggregation of bacteria.

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Fish reef domes a boon for environment, recreational fishing

Humanmade reefs can be used in conjunction with the restoration or protection of natural habitat to increase fish abundance in estuaries, researchers have found.

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Tuning frontal polymerization for diverse material properties

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have improved the technique of frontal polymerization, where a small amount of heat triggers a moving reaction wave that produces a polymeric material. The new method enables a wider range of materials with better control over their thermal and mechanical properties.

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Chicago Learned Climate Lessons from Its Deadly 1995 Heat Wave

The city was initially slow to change after the disaster killed 739 people, but is now a model for heat preparedness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sea turtles' impressive navigation feats rely on surprisingly crude 'map'

Since the time of Charles Darwin, scientists have marveled at sea turtles' impressive ability to make their way—often over thousands of kilometers—through the open ocean and back to the very places where they themselves hatched years before. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on July 16 have evidence that the turtles pull off these impressive feats of navigation with only a

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Timing key in understanding plant microbiomes

Oregon State University researchers have made a key advance in understanding how timing impacts the way microorganisms colonize plants, a step that could provide farmers an important tool to boost agricultural production.

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Does "naming and shaming" of colleges with large tuition increases make a difference?

Since 2011 the U.S. Department of Education has published two annual lists of higher education institutions with the highest percentage changes in tuition and fees and average net price. A study published today found that inclusion in either of these College Affordability and Transparency Center (CATC) lists does not affect institutional pricing policies or students' enrollment decisions. The find

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Sea turtles' impressive navigation feats rely on surprisingly crude 'map'

Since the time of Charles Darwin, scientists have marveled at sea turtles' impressive ability to make their way—often over thousands of kilometers—through the open ocean and back to the very places where they themselves hatched years before. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on July 16 have evidence that the turtles pull off these impressive feats of navigation with only a

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Timing key in understanding plant microbiomes

Oregon State University researchers have made a key advance in understanding how timing impacts the way microorganisms colonize plants, a step that could provide farmers an important tool to boost agricultural production.

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Biodiversity and the use of nativist language | Letter

Davina Cooper questions the need to use xenophobic terms to describe species The widely used language of alien and invasive species threatening native ones ( Increase in invasive species poses dramatic threat to biodiversity – report , 15 July) is disturbing, even when it's about plants. There is a long-running debate in biology about the nativist and xenophobic resonances, and racist and antisem

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How nutrient-starved cells recycle internal components

Researchers systematically surveyed the entire protein landscape of normal and nutrient-deprived cells to identify which proteins and organelles are degraded by autophagy.

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Genome guardians stop and reel in DNA to correct replication errors

New research shows how proofreading proteins prevent DNA replication errors by creating an immobile structure that calls more proteins to the site to repair the error. This structure could also prevent the mismatched region from being "packed" back into the cell during division.

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Finding hints at novel target for Ewing sarcoma therapy

A genetic code-reading machine that is overactive in the pediatric cancer Ewing sarcoma causes cell structures called nucleoli to break up, researchers found. A team will study how to take advantage of this finding therapeutically.

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Avoiding food contamination with a durable coating for hard surfaces

A new study by engineers and food scientists demonstrates that a durable coating, made from titanium dioxide, is capable of eliminating foodborne germs, such as salmonella and E. coli, and provides a preventative layer of protection against future cross-contamination on stainless steel food-contact surfaces.

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Estimating the maximum number of hot dogs that can possibly be eaten in 10 minutes

James Smoliga, a physical therapist at High Point University, has developed a computer model that not only shows the rate of improvement in hot dog eating contestants, but provides a number for the limit on the number of hot dogs a person could possibly eat. In his paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Smoliga describes the factors that went into building his model and other possible use

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National abortion study finds out-of-touch labels, knowledge gaps, appetite for moral discussion

To read American polling statistics and social media rhetoric on abortion is to witness a nation evenly, loudly and politically divided, but new research from the University of Notre Dame finds that ordinary Americans do not actually talk much about abortion, do not fit within binary position labels, have significant knowledge gaps on the topic and—across the board—do not regard abortion in itself

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Finding 1154 holes in the ground… and a riddle

You can say all kinds of things about cooking pits, but sensational they're not. They're more what experts in the field might call an everyday archaeological discovery, if such a thing exists.

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Water expert discusses slowdown in federal regulation of drinking water

It didn't grab headlines, but the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) decision last month to back away from regulating a rocket fuel ingredient in drinking water points to a dramatic shift in federal oversight. The decision was followed by a proposal to slow the process for reviewing chemicals under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and delayed action on hazardous perfluorochemicals

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How energy-intensive economies can survive and thrive as the globe ramps up climate action

Today, Russia's economy depends heavily upon its abundant fossil fuel resources. Russia is one of the world's largest exporters of fossil fuels, and a number of its key exporting industries—including metals, chemicals, and fertilizers—draw on fossil resources. The nation also consumes fossil fuels at a relatively high rate; it's the world's fourth-largest emitter of carbon dioxide. As the world sh

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Estimating the maximum number of hot dogs that can possibly be eaten in 10 minutes

James Smoliga, a physical therapist at High Point University, has developed a computer model that not only shows the rate of improvement in hot dog eating contestants, but provides a number for the limit on the number of hot dogs a person could possibly eat. In his paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Smoliga describes the factors that went into building his model and other possible use

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Weaving Indigenous knowledge with scientific research: A balanced approach

Indigenous knowledge, including oral histories, mythologies, place names and classification schemes, can span many generations, preserving information that has helped native communities adapt to natural hazards as well as gradually changing conditions. Although Western scientists have historically deemed such information unreliable, during the past decade there has been increasing recognition of t

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New map for radioactive soil contamination in Western Europe

An international consortium of scientists has refined the map of cesium and plutonium radionuclide concentrations in soils in Switzerland and several neighboring countries. Using an archive of European soil samples, the team led by Katrin Meusburger from the University of Basel, now at the WSL research institute, was able to trace the sources of radioactive fallout between 1960 and 2009. This stud

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Blue light assists a night hunt for bugs

A blue flashlight that makes corals shine in the sea can help spot insects in nighttime forests, according to a recent Texas A&M AgriLife study. The peer-reviewed study suggests that blue light could help with pest control, natural history research and night insect collecting.

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Blue light assists a night hunt for bugs

A blue flashlight that makes corals shine in the sea can help spot insects in nighttime forests, according to a recent Texas A&M AgriLife study. The peer-reviewed study suggests that blue light could help with pest control, natural history research and night insect collecting.

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Avoiding food contamination with a durable coating for hard surfaces

A new study by engineers and food scientists demonstrates that a durable coating, made from titanium dioxide, is capable of eliminating foodborne germs, such as salmonella and E. coli, and provides a preventative layer of protection against future cross-contamination on stainless steel food-contact surfaces.

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Combating drug resistance in age-related macular degeneration

An international team of researchers led by Baylor College of Medicine and Houston Methodist has discovered a strategy that can potentially address a major challenge to the current treatment for age-related macular degeneration,

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Physicists celebrate Japan collider record

University of Cincinnati physicists celebrated a new world record as part of a research team working on a Japanese particle collider.

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Publicizing police killings of unarmed Black people causes emotional trauma

A majority of college students of color show symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder after watching social media videos of unarmed Black men being killed by police, a Rutgers study finds.

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In a first, astronomers watch a black hole's corona disappear, then reappear

It seems the universe has an odd sense of humor. While a crown-encrusted virus has run roughshod over the world, another entirely different corona about 100 million light years from Earth has mysteriously disappeared.

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Dehydration increases amphibian vulnerability to climate change

Amphibians have few options to avoid the under-appreciated one-two punch of climate change, according to a new study from Simon Fraser University researchers and others.

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Scientists discover how deep-sea, ultra-black fish disappear

Deep in the ocean, where sunlight barely reaches, Smithsonian scientists and a team of collaborators have discovered one of the blackest materials known: the skin of certain fish. These ultra-black fish absorb light so efficiently that even in bright light they appear to be silhouettes with no discernible features. In the darkness of the ocean, even surrounded by bioluminescent light, they literal

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New insights into the origins of our universe

New data released today by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) in Chile indicate our universe is around 13.8 billion years old, matching the measurements made by the Planck satellite in 2015, and calling into question the 2019 findings of another research group that determined the age of the universe to be much younger than what the Planck satellite had predicted. That study had measured the mov

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New study reveals a graphene sheet behaves 'like a mirror' for water molecules

A recently published study led by Virginia Commonwealth University researchers sheds new light on how water interacts with the nanomaterial graphene, a single, thin layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal honeycomb lattice.

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Regular arrays of silicon nanoparticles key to improving light emissions in nanophotonic devices

Nanophotonics considers how light and matter at the nanoscale interact with each other, with findings in the field being important for nanofabrication techniques and in future photonic devices. Until recently, metallic nanoparticles have been predominantly used in nanophotonic devices. Nowadays though, semiconductor materials such as silicon are being considered for the nanoparticles.

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Dehydration increases amphibian vulnerability to climate change

Amphibians have few options to avoid the under-appreciated one-two punch of climate change, according to a new study from Simon Fraser University researchers and others.

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Scientists discover how deep-sea, ultra-black fish disappear

Deep in the ocean, where sunlight barely reaches, Smithsonian scientists and a team of collaborators have discovered one of the blackest materials known: the skin of certain fish. These ultra-black fish absorb light so efficiently that even in bright light they appear to be silhouettes with no discernible features. In the darkness of the ocean, even surrounded by bioluminescent light, they literal

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How galaxies die: New insights into the quenching of star formation

Astronomers studying galaxy evolution have long struggled to understand what causes star formation to shut down in massive galaxies. Although many theories have been proposed to explain this process, known as "quenching," there is still no consensus on a satisfactory model.

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Divining monsoon rainfall months in advance with satellites and simulations

Researchers affiliated with The University of Texas at Austin have developed a strategy that more accurately predicts seasonal rainfall over the Asian monsoon region and could provide tangible improvements to water resource management on the Indian subcontinent, impacting more than one fifth of the world's population.

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Scientists predict dramatic increase in flooding, drought in California

California may see a 54 percent increase in rainfall variability by the end of this century, according to new research from the lab of Assistant Professor Da Yang, a 2019 Packard Fellow and atmospheric scientist with the University of California, Davis.

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Solar Orbiter's first images reveal 'campfires' on the Sun

The first images from Solar Orbiter, a new Sun-observing mission by ESA and NASA, have revealed omnipresent miniature solar flares, dubbed 'campfires', near the surface of our closest star.

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'Blinking' crystals may convert CO2 into fuels

Imagine tiny crystals that "blink" like fireflies and can convert carbon dioxide, a key cause of climate change, into fuels. A team has created ultra-small titanium dioxide crystals that exhibit unusual "blinking" behavior and may help to produce methane and other fuels, according to a new study. The crystals, also known as nanoparticles, stay charged for a long time and could benefit efforts

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Botany: Slow growth the key to long term cold sensing

Researchers show that slow growth is used as a signal to sense long-term changes in temperature.

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'Blinking' crystals may convert CO2 into fuels

Imagine tiny crystals that "blink" like fireflies and can convert carbon dioxide, a key cause of climate change, into fuels. A team has created ultra-small titanium dioxide crystals that exhibit unusual "blinking" behavior and may help to produce methane and other fuels, according to a new study. The crystals, also known as nanoparticles, stay charged for a long time and could benefit efforts

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Researchers create liquid-repelling substance that works on all surfaces

Acting like an invisible force field, a new liquid coating being developed by UBC Okanagan researchers may provide an extra layer of protection for front-line workers.

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Patients with substance use disorder discriminated against by post-acute care facilities

A new study shows that 29 percent of private post-acute care facilities in Massachusetts explicitly discriminated against hospitalized individuals with opioid use disorder, rejecting their referral for admission. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center's (BMC's) Grayken Center for Addiction, the study showed that 15 percent of the rejections among patients with substance use disorders were den

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Self-eating decisions

Harvard Medical School researchers systematically surveyed the entire protein landscape of normal and nutrient-deprived cells to identify which proteins and organelles are degraded by autophagy.

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Tuning frontal polymerization for diverse material properties

Researchers from the Beckman Institute have further expanded the technique of frontal polymerization in order to synthesize materials with a wide range of properties. The strategy gives greater versatility to the thermal and mechanical properties of the resulting polymers.

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This Black Hole Just Glitched

Blink Out A distant supermassive black hole seems to have restarted itself, in a cosmic glitch so striking it would leave the architects of The Matrix puzzled. Astronomers observing the black hole watched as its corona, the incredibly bright ring of particles that circles its event horizon, vanished over the course of a year. Then, even more confusingly, it reappeared, as though the entire black

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Sea turtles sometimes get really lost in the ocean on the way home

Sea turtles' ability to navigate across open oceans is legendary, but GPS tracking shows they can miss their targets, sometimes swimming far further than needed

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Scientists Found Something Surprising in Closest-Ever Photos of the Sun

NASA just released the closest pictures ever taken of the Sun — not to be confused with the highest resolution ones — courtesy of the Solar Orbiter, a collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). The close-ups are breathtaking to look at, and also reveal something entirely unexpected as well: small flares they're calling "campfires," all over the star's surface. "The campfires

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Invasive hedgehogs and ferrets habituate to and categorize smells

A new study examines how invasive mammalian predators both habituate to and generalize avian prey cues.

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Giving robots human-like perception of their physical environments

New model helps robots understand their environment as humans do.

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Space station motors make a robotic prosthetic leg more comfortable, extend battery life

A new robotic prosthetic leg prototype offers a more natural gait while also being quieter and more energy efficient than other designs.

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Streamlining quantum information transmission

The quantum realm holds the key to the next revolution in communication technology as we know it. With the promise of unprecedented performance and impenetrable security, quantum technology is taking its first steps towards the ultimate goal of applications such as highly encrypted yet nearly fast-as-light financial transactions. However, the ability for quantum computers to communicate with one a

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Graphene-adsorbate van der Waals bonding memory inspires 'smart' graphene sensors

Monolayer graphene, an atomic-layer thick sheet of carbon, has found immense applications in diverse fields including chemical sensors and detecting single molecule adsorption events electronically. Therefore, monitoring physisorbed molecule induced changes of the electrical response of graphene has become ubiquitous in graphene based sensors. Electric field tuning of the physisorbed molecule-grap

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Finding hints at novel target for Ewing sarcoma therapy

A genetic code-reading machine that is overactive in the pediatric cancer Ewing sarcoma causes cell structures called nucleoli to break up, researchers found. A team at UT Health San Antonio's Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute will study how to take advantage of this finding therapeutically.

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Heat stress: The climate is putting European forests under sustained pressure

No year since weather records began was as hot and dry as 2018. A first comprehensive analysis of the consequences of this drought and heat event shows that central European forests sustained long-term damage. Even tree species considered drought-resistant, such as beech, pine and silver fir, suffered. The international study was directed by the University of Basel, which is conducting a forest ex

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Genome guardians stop and reel in DNA to correct replication errors

New research shows how proofreading proteins prevent DNA replication errors by creating an immobile structure that calls more proteins to the site to repair the error. This structure could also prevent the mismatched region from being "packed" back into the cell during division.

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Vaccine additives can enhance immune flexibility — Implications for flu and SARS-CoV-2

A vaccine additive known as an adjuvant can enhance responses to a vaccine containing the exotic avian flu virus H5N1, so that both rookie and veteran elements of the immune response are strengthened, according to results from an Emory Vaccine Center study.

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Immediate dialysis no better than wait-until-necessary approach, researchers find

In the largest international study of its kind, researchers at the University of Alberta and Toronto's St. Michael's Hospital found that an accelerated renal-replacement therapy strategy did not reduce mortality after three months, compared to a standard strategy for critically ill patients with acute kidney injury.

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Gel that breaks down, puts itself back together could improve delivery of oral drugs

An emerging hydrogel material with the capacity to degrade and spontaneously reform in the gastrointestinal tract could help researchers develop more effective methods for oral drug delivery. In research published in Soft Matter, Lehigh University rheologists mimic pH environment of GI tract to shed light on pharmaceutical potential of covalent adaptable hydrogels (CAHs).

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Coronavirus vaccine: Oxford team aim to start lab-controlled human trial soon

Jenner Institute at Oxford looks to recruit healthy volunteers for controversial 'challenge trial' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The team behind the Oxford Covid-19 vaccine hope to begin tests on volunteers who will be intentionally exposed to the virus in a "challenge trial", a move seen as controversial since there is no proven cure for the illness. Although chal

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Spike Structure Gives Insight into SARS-CoV-2 Evolution

Researchers demonstrate that the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein is more stable and binds the human ACE2 receptor with much higher affinity than the spike protein of its closest known relative, bat coronavirus RaTG13.

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Ultra-black skin allows some fish to lurk unseen

Scientists report that at least 16 species of deep-sea fish have evolved ultra-black skin that absorbs more than 99.5% of the light that hits them, making them nearly impossible to pick out from the shadows. These fish owe their disappearing act to tiny packets of pigment within their skin cells called melanosomes. The melanosomes of ultra-black fish are differently shaped and arranged on a micros

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Sea turtles' impressive navigation feats rely on surprisingly crude 'map'

Since the time of Charles Darwin, scientists have marvelled at sea turtles' impressive ability to make their way — often over thousands of kilometers — through the open ocean and back to the very places where they themselves hatched years before. Now, researchers have evidence that the turtles pull off these impressive feats of navigation with only a crude map to guide them on their way.

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A 'feeling' for dementia? New findings on subjectively perceived memory problems

A research team concludes that personal perception can be an important indicator for the early detection of Alzheimer's disease. Scientists report that individuals with subjectively felt memory problems also exhibited on average measurable cognitive deficits that were associated with abnormalities in the spinal fluid. Early diagnosis and therapy development could benefit from these findings.

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New cobalt-free lithium-ion battery reduces costs without sacrificing performance

Researchers say they've cracked the code to a cobalt-free high-energy lithium-ion battery, eliminating the cobalt and opening the door to reducing the costs of producing batteries while boosting performance in some ways.

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Dehydration increases amphibian vulnerability to climate change

Amphibians have few options to avoid the underappreciated one-two punch of climate change, according to a new study. Rising summer temperatures are also resulting in higher rates of dehydration among wet-skinned amphibians as they attempt to keep themselves cool.

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How galaxies die: New insights into the quenching of star formation

Astronomers studying galaxy evolution have long struggled to understand what causes star formation to shut down in massive galaxies. Although many theories have been proposed to explain this process, known as "quenching," there is still no consensus on a satisfactory model. Now, an international team of scientists has proposed a new model that successfully explains a wide range of observations a

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Climate change: Summers could become 'too hot for humans'

Rising global temperatures could see summers that are too hot to work in.

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Lie on your front: the small things in Covid-19 survival

Doctors in sunbelt states share lessons learnt from New York in hope of limiting deaths

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The DNA of the Viper Reveals an Ancient Map of South America

Although vipers are famous for their venomous bites, it turns out these snakes have another story to tell

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Why no one knows if you can catch COVID-19 twice

There have been a handful of cases in the past couple months, described by physicians, where people have fully recovered from COVID-19 only to feel ill and then test positive again for the novel coronavirus. (Unsplash/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask .

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Beautyberry leaf extract restores drug's power to fight 'superbug'

Laboratory experiments showed that the plant compound works in combination with oxacillin to knock down the resistance to the drug of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA.

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What Is an Individual? Biology Seeks Clues in Information Theory.

More than half a billion years ago, during the Ediacaran Period, a surreal world of life overran the ocean floor. Its bizarre, soft-bodied animals had physical forms that defy the imagination: quilted blobs and ribbed discs, segmented tubes and upturned bells, tapered spindles and slender cones. They were perhaps the planet's first large multicellular organisms — but they soon went extinct withou

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When you're 84…What should life look like as we age?

What will your life look like when you're 84? When a health system leader put that question to Lewis A. Lipsitz, MD, Dr. Lipsitz published an essay in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society that outlined his thoughts. What follows is a summary of his essay, titled "When I'm 84: What Should Life Look Like in Old Age."

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Yale researchers discover potential treatment for rare degenerative disease

Yale pharmacology professor Barbara Ehrlich and her team have uncovered a mechanism driving a rare, lethal disease called Wolfram Syndrome and also a potential treatment. Their findings appear in the July 6 edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

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Skoltech scientists use ML to optimize hydraulic fracturing design for oil wells

Skoltech researchers and their industry colleagues have created a data-driven model that can forecast the production from an oil well stimulated by multistage fracturing technology. This model has high commercialization potential, and its use can boost oil production via optimized fracturing design.

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Trumpism Is the New McCarthyism

When some presidents leave office, politicians and political thinkers jockey to be their intellectual heirs. Even Ronald Reagan, a Republican, claimed the legacy of John F. Kennedy. Even Barack Obama, a Democrat, claimed the legacy of Reagan. If Donald Trump loses this fall, few will be in a hurry to claim his legacy. Commentators on the left and in the center—and even some on the right—will comp

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A Mission to the Sun Left Just in Time

Solar Orbiter / EUI Team (ESA & NASA) / CSL / IAS / MPS / PMOD / WRC / ROB / UCL / MSSL For Daniel Müller, a solar physicist at the European Space Agency, there are two suns. There's the one that hangs in the sky and warms his skin as he walks along the coastline near his home in the Netherlands. And there's the one that exists indoors, on his computer screen, which he can stare at for hours, stu

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Five Scientific Achievements That Happened During Coronavirus Lockdown

Quarantine did not stop these innovators from discovering new species, creating the elusive fifth state of matter remotely, and more

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This Photo of the Sun Is the Closest Ever Taken

Close-up reveals a surface dancing with 'campfires' — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Divining monsoon rainfall months in advance with satellites and simulations

Researchers affiliated with The University of Texas at Austin have developed a strategy that more accurately predicts seasonal rainfall over the Asian monsoon region and could provide tangible improvements to water resource management on the Indian subcontinent, impacting more than one fifth of the world's population.

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Does "naming and shaming" of colleges with large tuition increases make a difference?

A study published in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis today found that the U.S. Department of Education's "naming and shaming" of colleges with large tuition increases does not affect institutional pricing policies or students' enrollment decisions.

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Will telehealth services become the norm following COVID-19 pandemic?

In JAMA Oncology, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center's Trevor Royce, MD, MS, MPH, and his coauthors address whether the routine use of telehealth for patients with cancer could have long-lasting and unforeseen effects on the provision and quality of care.

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Ultra-black skin allows some fish to lurk unseen

Scientists report that at least 16 species of deep-sea fish have evolved ultra-black skin that absorbs more than 99.5% of the light that hits them, making them nearly impossible to pick out from the shadows. These fish owe their disappearing act to tiny packets of pigment within their skin cells called melanosomes. The melanosomes of ultra-black fish are differently shaped and arranged on a micros

1d

Timing key in understanding plant microbiomes

Oregon State University researchers have made a key advance in understanding how timing impacts the way microorganisms colonize plants, a step that could provide farmers an important tool to boost agricultural production.

1d

Sea turtles' impressive navigation feats rely on surprisingly crude 'map'

Since the time of Charles Darwin, scientists have marvelled at sea turtles' impressive ability to make their way–often over thousands of kilometers–through the open ocean and back to the very places where they themselves hatched years before. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on July 16, 2020 have evidence that the turtles pull off these impressive feats of navigation wit

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Scientists discover how deep-sea, ultra-black fish disappear

In the July 16 issue of the journal Current Biology, a team of scientists led by Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History research zoologist Karen Osborn and Duke University biologist Sönke Johnsen report on how a unique arrangement of pigment-packed granules enables some fish to absorb nearly all of the light that hits their skin, so that as little as 0.05% of that light is reflected back

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Explore the Complexity of theNervous System

Download this eBook to learn how single cell techniques unlock the secrets of the CNS in health and disease!

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We each have 6,200 thoughts every day, says a new study

A study passes on figuring what we think, focusing instead on when we think something new. Consistent neurological signals identify the transitions between thoughts. Scans track participants' thoughts while watching movies and when at rest. A new study from psychologists at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario Canada reports observations of the transition from one thought to another in fMRI br

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Heat stress in gestating dairy cows impairs performance of future generations

It is estimated that in the United States, environmental heat stress in cows costs the dairy industry more than $1.5 billion annually due to decreased milk production, impaired reproductive performance, increased rates of illness, and shortened lifespans. But what effects do heat stress in pregnant cows have on the productivity and health of their female offspring in the future, and how much might

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Opinion: Coronavirus Pandemic Highlights Dangers of Health Disparities

The coronavirus pandemic is exposing the underlying biological dangers of being a minority in the US.

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DIY: How Would COVID-19 Travel In Your Home or Office?

By now we hopefully all know that it is better to be outside than inside when it comes not catching the COVID-19 from other people. You've probably also read stories like the famous (infamous) one about how certain patrons in the path of the air conditioner at a restaurant in China got sick, while ones at the other tables didn't. Incidents like that one have resulted in pretty much shutting down

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How Ultra-Black Fish Disappear in the Deepest Seas

Researchers have found fish that absorb more than 99.9 percent of the light that hits their skin.

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Avoiding food contamination with a durable coating for hard surfaces

In the future, a durable coating could help keep food-contact surfaces clean in the food processing industry, including in meat processing plants. A new study from a team of University of Missouri engineers and food scientists demonstrates that the coating—made from titanium dioxide—is capable of eliminating foodborne germs, such as salmonella and E. coli, and provides a preventative layer of prot

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Heat stress in gestating dairy cows impairs performance of future generations

It is estimated that in the United States, environmental heat stress in cows costs the dairy industry more than $1.5 billion annually due to decreased milk production, impaired reproductive performance, increased rates of illness, and shortened lifespans. But what effects do heat stress in pregnant cows have on the productivity and health of their female offspring in the future, and how much might

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SPOCD1 is an essential executor of piRNA-directed de novo DNA methylation

Nature, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2557-5

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How an unlikely call from a university official rescued my academic career

Nature, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02141-7 International student Solmaz Mohadjer had run out of money and time, but then her folder of rejection letters reached the right person.

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Talks on Stonehenge road tunnel delayed by neolithic find

Grant Shapps extends decision deadline after archaeologists discover prehistoric pits at world heritage site in Wiltshire A decision on whether construction of a road tunnel near Stonehenge, in Wiltshire, can go ahead has been further delayed by the transport secretary, Grant Shapps. The deadline for the verdict has been extended by four months to late autumn to allow further consultation followi

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Closest ever images of sun reveal it is covered in miniature flares

Solar Orbiter images shot from between Venus and Mercury orbits show 'campfires' in corona The closest ever images of the sun reveal its surface is speckled with "campfires", miniature versions of the dramatic solar flares visible from Earth. The observations, beamed back from the Solar Orbiter spacecraft, which is a joint Nasa and European Space Agency (ESA) mission, could help resolve why the s

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Vantablack? Meh. Meet the Ultra-Black Vantafish

Scientists have found that some fishes absorb up to 99.956 percent of the light that hits them. The weird deep-sea menagerie just got a whole lot weirder.

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What Are mRNA Vaccines, and Could They Work Against COVID-19?

A technique never before used in humans may be the fastest way to a vaccine against the novel coronavirus

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Avoiding food contamination with a durable coating for hard surfaces

A new study from a team of University of Missouri engineers and food scientists demonstrates that a durable coating, made from titanium dioxide, is capable of eliminating foodborne germs, such as salmonella and E. coli, and provides a preventative layer of protection against future cross-contamination on stainless steel food-contact surfaces.

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Heat stress in gestating dairy cows impairs performance of future generations

In a recent article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from the University of Florida and the University of California, Davis investigated the performance and profitability of two future generations of cows born to mothers exposed to heat stress during pregnancy.

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What if you could help decide how the government spends public funds? | Shari Davis

What if you could help decide how the government spends public funds in your community? That's the idea behind participatory budgeting, a process that brings local residents and governments together to develop concrete solutions to real problems close to home. In this inspiring call to action, community leader Shari Davis shows how participatory budgeting can strengthen democracy, transform neighb

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Five Nonprofits Honored for Renewing Their Communities From the Ground Up

A global pandemic. Racial injustice. Extreme political polarization. In an incredibly challenged moment for the country, extraordinary people in communities across America are working tirelessly to light the way forward. Community-based organizations have become essential lifelines, which is why five nonprofits that represent the brightest lights were chosen as recipients of this year's Renewal A

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How Novavax Won $1.6 Billion to Make a Coronavirus Vaccine

Novavax just received the Trump administration's largest vaccine contract. In the Maryland company's 33-year history, it has never brought a vaccine to market.

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3 highlights from Penn Jillette's Big Think interview on 2020, cancel culture, and friendship

Penn Jillette is an American magician best known for his work as part of the magic duo Penn and Teller. Jillette has also written eight books, co-hosted the Showtime show "Bullshit," and produced the film "Tim's Vermeer." In the interview, Jillette talks about how libertarianism has been distorted in the U.S., and why the democratization of media hasn't produced a utopia. Over the past half-centu

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Accelerated drying increases potential wildfire ignitions statewide in Texas

Significant wildfire activity has increased statewide, and accelerated drying has elevated the potential for new wildfire ignitions. New wildfires will become increasingly difficult to extinguish if current temperatures and drying conditions persist into August as forecasted, according to Texas A&M Forest Service experts.

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Women may not be counted accurately during Census, professor says

It's no secret the COVID-19 pandemic forced businesses and schools to close and people to shelter in place, forcing millions to file for unemployment and delivering a huge blow to the U.S. economy.

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Uncovering crime patterns using location data

When and where does crime arise in cities? To answer this question, criminologists have previously relied on rather static models. Crime has been linked, for example, to the structure of the resident population or to the use of land in a neighborhood. The influence that mobility has on the incidence of crime was previously an unknown quantity.

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Q&A: Airborne water leak detection using an innovative 'triangle method'

This year is on course to be one of the hottest since measurements began and Europe saw its joint second warmest June on record. While the global soaring temperature is heavily impacting water resources, it is crucial to address the leakages in pipes and transmission mains. In some European countries almost half of the channeled water is lost before it reaches the tap.

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Pine trees have an ecological memory

Climate change is leading to drier conditions in Valais. For around two decades now, many Scots pines in the canton have been dying, in some cases over large areas. The Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) is conducting an irrigation experiment to investigate the growth of Scots pines in the Pfyn Forest. Since 2003, it has been irrigating a number of plots within t

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ENSO influences trans-Pacific ozone transport from vegetation fires in Southeast Asia

Long-range transboundary transport of air pollutants (e.g. ozone) is one of the important environmental concerns globally. Previous studies on trans-Pacific transport of air pollutants have been mainly focused on the influence of anthropogenic fossil fuel combustion sources in Asia, especially from China. This study reveals that the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-modulated vegetation fires in

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Wonders of animal migration: How sea turtles find small, isolated islands

One of Charles Darwin's long-standing questions on how turtles find their way to islands has been answered thanks to a pioneering study by scientists.

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Exotic neutrinos will be difficult to ferret out

An international team tracking 'new physics' neutrinos has checked the data of all the relevant experiments associated with neutrino detections against Standard Model extensions proposed by theorists. The latest analysis, the first with such comprehensive coverage, shows the scale of challenges facing right-handed neutrino seekers, but also brings a spark of hope.

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How to teach gold to tell left from right

Nanometer-sized gold particles consisting of only a few atoms can be used as catalysts for important chemical reactions. Noelia Barrabés from the Institute of Materials Chemistry at TU Wien has been researching new methods of adapting and precisely controlling such tiny gold clusters for years. Now she has been awarded an Elise-Richter scholarship.

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Scientists Build Tiny Camera For Beetles to Carry Around

Beetlecam To get a first-hand look at the daily life of insects, scientists built a tiny camera they can mount on a beetle using a lilliputian backpack. The Beetlecam (our name, not theirs) comes from the computer science department of the University of Washington, who were tasked with designing a camera light enough to not interrupt a bug's daily routine but powerful enough to stream live footag

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Pine trees have an ecological memory

Climate change is leading to drier conditions in Valais. For around two decades now, many Scots pines in the canton have been dying, in some cases over large areas. The Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) is conducting an irrigation experiment to investigate the growth of Scots pines in the Pfyn Forest. Since 2003, it has been irrigating a number of plots within t

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Wonders of animal migration: How sea turtles find small, isolated islands

One of Charles Darwin's long-standing questions on how turtles find their way to islands has been answered thanks to a pioneering study by scientists.

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Russian hackers have been accused of targeting covid-19 vaccine researchers

The news: Russian hackers targeted UK, US, and Canadian researchers developing coronavirus vaccines, according to a report from the United Kingdom, American, and Canadian intelligence services. The hackers : The Russian intelligence hacking group known as Cozy Bear or APT29 has been blamed. You might know Cozy from its many previous high-profile cyber-espionage ventures, most notably hacking the

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The ecological footprint of European colonization at the doorway to the Americas

Historical figures such as Columbus have returned to the centre of public debate. Much remains to be discovered about his legacy and current impact on our society. A new study shows the ecological footprint that the arrival of Europeans left in the Caribbean islands.

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Open-access Plan S to allow publishing in any journal

Nature, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02134-6 Funders will override policies of subscription journals that don't let scientists share accepted manuscripts under open licence.

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Widely used blood test could advance heart failure treatment

Researchers at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM) and FuWai Heart Hospital (Beijing, China) have developed a new use for a common blood test, which could provide a potentially life-saving treatment for heart failure.

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CBD may help avert lung destruction in COVID-19

Cannabidiol, or CBD, may help reduce the cytokine storm and excessive lung inflammation that is killing many patients with COVID-19, researchers say.

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This $25,000 Gadget Can Steal Almost Any Car That Starts With a Fob

Game Boy Car It's stylized like a Nintendo Game Boy, but you won't be able to play "Super Mario Land" on it. Instead, the $25,000 device is designed to emulate the signal from a whole host of car makers' key fobs. In other words, The Drive reports , it's a skeleton car key — a devious gadget that lets you steal almost any modern car. The SOS Key Tool is being sold by SOS Autokeys, a Bulgarian com

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COVID-19 lockdown reduced dangerous air pollutants in five Indian cities by up to 54 percent

The COVID-19 crisis and subsequent lockdown measures have led to a dramatic reduction of harmful air pollutants across major cities in India, finds a new study from the University of Surrey.

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Scientists see COVID-19 as historic moment for UK's environmental future

A leading group of University of Manchester academics are imploring policy makers to use the UK's post-pandemic recovery as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to lead a positive green revolution.

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Are Clogged Blood Vessels the Key to Treating Alzheimer's Disease?

A new machine learning contest could help Alzheimer's researchers investigate "stalls," which reduce blood flow in the brain.

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Twitter Is at Its Best When Verified Accounts Can't Tweet

On Wednesday, a hack involving high-profile Twitter accounts led the service to suspend the activity of verified users. It was great.

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Close-ups of the sun

Only a few months after its launch, ESA's Solar Orbiter has captured images of the sun from a previously unattainable distance. Among other things, these images reveal structures in the sun's atmosphere that could possibly be interpreted as so-called nanoflares, very small bursts of radiation. The images from the six remote sensing instruments published today were taken in the days before and afte

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Light and nanoparticles against cancer

Leiden Ph.D. student Xuequan Zhou has designed a new promising molecule that efficiently kills cancer cells, but does not harm healthy tissue. The trick: the drug is only active when irradiated with light. Zhou's new compound does this extra efficiently by cleverly self-organising into nanoparticles. The research made it to the front cover of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

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Nye billeder af solen går tættere på end nogensinde før

Solar Orbiter har taget de tætteste og skarpeste billeder af solen nogensinde. Se en række af dem her.

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Elements from the universe's earliest stars gave birth to our sun

It is easy to regard the sun as humdrum, yet it contains elements blasted from the universe's first stars as they died and is halfway through its 9-billion-year lifespan

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Wonders of animal migration: How sea turtles find small, isolated islands

One of Charles Darwin's long-standing questions on how turtles find their way to islands has been answered thanks to a pioneering study by scientists.

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Why governments have the right to require masks in public

Requirements for consumers to wear masks at public places like retail stores and restaurants are very similar to smoking bans, according to three university experts.In a paper published today (July 16, 2020) in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, the professors say mask requirements to stop the spread of COVID-19 should be considered "fundamental occupational health protections" for worke

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A simple laboratory test can aid in early recognition of COVID-19 in patients

A rapid laboratory test, the eosinophil count, readily obtained from a routine complete blood cell count (CBC) can aid in the early recognition of COVID-19 in patients, as well as provide prognostic information, according to new research in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

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COVID-19 lockdown reduced dangerous air pollutants in five Indian cities by up to 54 percent

The COVID-19 crisis and subsequent lockdown measures have led to a dramatic reduction of harmful air pollutants across major cities in India, finds a new study from the University of Surrey.

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Rare mutation of TP53 gene leaves people at higher risk for multiple cancers

Researchers detail the potential implications of a specific TP53 mutation, including an association with a specific type of Li-Fraumeni syndrome, an inherited predisposition to a wide range of cancers.

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Video: Closer than ever: Solar Orbiter's first views of the sun

The first images from ESA's Solar Orbiter are already exceeding expectations and revealing interesting new phenomena on the sun.

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Some COVID-19 News

As the pandemic goes into its 5th month in the US it's important that we do not suffer from pandemic fatigue. As I wrote previously , this is a marathon, not a sprint. In the US all indications are that we are failing, miserably. As of right now the world has suffered 13.7 million cases of COVID-19 and 587,000 deaths. The US has had almost 3.5 million of those cases, and 137,000 deaths. These num

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Synthetic mRNAs modified with sulfur atoms boost efficient protein synthesis

Since mRNAs play a key role in protein synthesis in vivo, the use of mRNAs as medicines and for in vitro protein synthesis has been desired. In particular, mRNA therapeutics hold the potential for application to vaccine therapy against coronaviruses and are being developed. However, the efficiency of protein production with mRNAs in the natural form is not sufficient enough for certain purposes, i

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Nobel Prize Winner Questions Peacock's Feathers

Originally published in November 1954 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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OpenAI's fiction-spewing AI is learning to generate images

In February of last year, the San Francisco–based research lab OpenAI announced that its AI system could now write convincing passages of English. Feed the beginning of a sentence or paragraph into GPT-2, as it was called, and it could continue the thought for as long as an essay with almost human-like coherence. Now, the lab is exploring what would happen if the same algorithm were instead fed p

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Synthetic mRNAs modified with sulfur atoms boost efficient protein synthesis

Since mRNAs play a key role in protein synthesis in vivo, the use of mRNAs as medicines and for in vitro protein synthesis has been desired. In particular, mRNA therapeutics hold the potential for application to vaccine therapy against coronaviruses and are being developed. However, the efficiency of protein production with mRNAs in the natural form is not sufficient enough for certain purposes, i

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When is the healthiest time to neuter your dog?

Vulnerability to health issues related to neutering varies greatly depending on the dog breed, according to a 10-year study of 35 breeds. Some dog breeds have higher risk of developing certain cancers and joint disorders if neutered or spayed within their first year of life. Until now, studies had only assessed that risk in a few breeds . "We think it's the decision of the pet owner, in consultat

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Nobel Prize Winner Questions Peacock's Feathers

Originally published in November 1954 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A New Gadget Stops Voice Assistants From Snooping on You

Meet LeakyPick, the low-cost audio spy detector for your Amazon Alexa, Google Home, and other network-connected devices.

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Ancient DNA from Doggerland separates the U.K. from Europe

Thousands of years ago the UK was physically joined to the rest of Europe through an area known as Doggerland. However, a marine inundation took place during the mid-holocene, separating the British landmass from the rest of Europe, which is now covered by the North Sea.

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Breakthrough in studying ancient DNA from Doggerland that separates the UK from Europe

Scientists from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick have studied sedimentary ancient DNA (sedaDNA) from sediment deposits in the southern North Sea, an area which has not previously been linked to a tsunami that occurred 8150 years ago.

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A "feeling" for dementia?

A research team led by the DZNE concludes that personal perception can be an important indicator for the early detection of Alzheimer's disease. In a study published in Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, the scientists report that individuals with subjectively felt memory problems also exhibited on average measurable cognitive deficits that were associated with a

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ENSO influences trans-Pacific ozone transport from vegetation fires in Southeast Asia

Ding and colleagues revealed that the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-modulated vegetation fires in Southeast Asia, rather than fossil fuel plumes from China, dominate the springtime trans-Pacific transport of ozone across the entire North Pacific Ocean. The study expanded the understanding of the roles of variability in emissions and meteorology on tropospheric ozone. It proves once more how

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Polymers self-assembling like links of a chain for innovative materials

Nature just published the research on unprecedented "Self-assembled poly-catenanes", which involved PoliTo's Professor Giovanni M. Pavan

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Solid-state intramolecular motions in continuous fibers for fluorescent humidity sensor

One striking feature of molecular rotors is their ability to change conformation with detectable optical signals through molecular motion when stimulated. However, due to the strong intermolecular interactions, synthetic molecular rotors have often relied on fluid environments. Scientists at Donghua University and HKUST take advantage of the solid-state intramolecular motion of aggregation-induced

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Blood vessels communicate with sensory neurons to decide their fate

The researchers, using real-time videos, have discovered that both the neurons and the cells of blood vessels emit dynamic protrusions to be able to 'talk' to each other.

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Composing creativity: Children benefit from new painting materials

New research out of the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) utilizes digital image analysis technology to shed light on some of the challenges children face when representing their imaginations through the medium of paint. The research also offers concrete insight into the development of children's psyches, and importantly, offers suggestions for educators to improve childre

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Closest images ever taken of the sun show 'campfires' near its surface

The European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter spacecraft has captured the closest ever images of the sun, revealing miniature solar flares on its surface dubbed "campfires"

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This Century Will See Massive Shifts in the Global Population, Economy, and Power Structure

A lot of the predictions we hear about the future involve a hot, crowded planet, one where we need some serious science to figure out how to feed everyone and control rising global temperatures. The UN's population forecast of almost 10 billion people by 2050 is widely quoted, and with it has come much conjecture about what such a world will look like. Where will all those people live? What kind

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Review of microfinance studies finds many flaws, no conclusions

What do we know about microfinance—often touted as the solution for the economic woes of developing countries? Practically nothing, say researchers from UConn's Department of Agricultural and Resources and Economics.

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250,000 tonnes of shipping CO2 emissions saved thanks to machine learning insight

Maritime engineers have trained an energy shipping app to save over a quarter of a million tonnes of CO2 emissions by applying machine learning to its predictive system.

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New dinosaur discovery in Switzerland fills a gap in evolutionary history of sauropods

Dinosaurs were the dominant group of animals on Earth for over 150 million years. Long-necked, plant-eating sauropods such as Brontosaurus, Diplodocus and Brachiosaurus are probably among the most famous dinosaurs, in part thanks to their huge size and strange body shape (consisting of a long neck, long tail, round body and columnar limbs). Some of the largest sauropods measured up to 37 metres lo

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Remote jury trials during COVID-19: what one project found about fairness and technology

On March 23 2020, jury trials in England and Wales were suspended in response to COVID-19. This was done to protect public safety as social distancing measures were difficult to implement in courtrooms. Since then, several proposals, such as remote trials, have been put forward to address how jury trials might continue, and how to tackle the backlog of crown court cases which currently stands at o

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Coronavirus: how lockdown exposed food insecurity in a small Bangladeshi city

The COVID-19 pandemic has emerged as far more than a health crisis for the world's poor and marginalised, exposing faultlines in food systems around the world. The UN's World Food Programme warned in early July that 270 million people will face food insecurity before the end of 2020.

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In Coronavirus Vaccine Race, China Strays From the Official Paths

Beijing is offering several vaccine candidates to employees of state-owned companies and the armed forces, while also conducting clinical trials in other countries.

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Predicting X-ray absorption spectra from graphs

X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a popular characterization technique for probing the local atomic structure and electronic properties of materials and molecules. Because atoms of each element absorb X-rays at characteristic energies, XAS is well suited for mapping out the spatial distribution of elements in a sample. Typically, scientists perform XAS experiments at synchrotron light sources

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An effective climate change solution may lie in rocks beneath our feet

Why has Earth's climate remained so stable over geological time? The answer just might rock you.

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Your pension has a huge role to play in combating climate change – here's how to make it sustainable

The onus to live sustainably has never been greater. It drives everyday actions from making sure we recycle our rubbish to carrying reusable cups and bottles with us wherever we go. But there's an enormous part of many people's lives that they probably don't pay much attention to and that's where their pension money is invested.

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Forskere og nobelprisvindere opfordrer: Inficér testpersoner med covid-19

Over 100 forskere opfordrer i et åbent brev til, at man begynder at inficere testpersoner med covid-19 for at fremskynde en vaccine – de har allerede fundet over 2000 frivillige. Det er dog ikke uden risiko mener institutleder, men en enkelt dansker har meldt sig alligevel.

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Crabs are chomping salt marshes down to Florida

Climate change has enabled the voracious Sesarma crab to dramatically alter salt marsh ecosystems across the southeastern US, research finds. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , shows that soils beneath salt marshes from South Carolina to Florida have been softened by higher sea levels and increased tidal inundation. That softening has allowed the burrowing c

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Scientists identify new species of sea sponge off coast of British Columbia

A University of Alberta research team discovered a new sea sponge off the coast of British Columbia that could play a major role in the overall health of delicate reef ecosystems in the area.

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Recognising fake images using frequency analysis

They look deceptively real, but they are made by computers: so-called deep-fake images are generated by machine learning algorithms, and humans are pretty much unable to distinguish them from real photos. Researchers have developed a new method for efficiently identifying deep-fake images. To this end, they analyse the objects in the frequency domain, an established signal processing technique.

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Streamlining quantum information transmission

The Internet has deeply changed our ways of living but at the same time introduced serious security and privacy issues. The quantum internet promises to fundamentally solve these issues. Currently however, the major obstacles towards its development are the scarcity of quantum resources. Researchers in Japan have taken a major step forward by significantly reducing the number of resources required

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Graphene-Adsorbate van der Waals bonding memory inspires 'smart' graphene sensors

Electric field modulation of the graphene-adsorbate interaction induces unique van der Waals (vdW) bonding which were previously assumed to be randomized by thermal energy after the electric field is turned off. We show that the vdW bonding lasts for hours after turning-off the electric field, exhibiting a charge-transfer and carrier scattering memory useful for 'beyond sensing' applications in mo

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Ethical recommendations for triage of COVID-19 patients

An international expert group led by Mathias Wirth, Professor of Systematic Theology and Ethics at the University of Bern, has developed recommendations for avoiding triage of COVID-19 patients in extreme situations. The recommendations should support medical personnel in difficult decisions during a second wave of the infection and ensure better patient care.

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Quantum simulation: Particle behavior near the event horizon of block hole

Scientists from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Nanjing University propose and demonstrate a quantum evolution of fermions near an artificial black hole on a photonic chip. The acceleration, quantum creation and evolution of a fermion pair near the event horizon are observed: a single-photon wave packet with positive energy escapes from black hole while negative energy is captured. The extensibl

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Scientists uncover SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell immunity in recovered COVID-19 and SARS patients

The T cells, along with antibodies, are an integral part of the human immune response against viral infections due to their ability to directly target and kill infected cells. A Singapore study has uncovered the presence of virus-specific T cell immunity in people who recovered from COVID-19 and SARS, as well as some healthy study subjects who had never been infected by either virus.

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Un-natural mRNAs modified with sulfur atoms boost efficient protein synthesis

A group of Japanese scientists has succeeded in the development of modified messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that contain sulfur atoms in the place of oxygen atoms of phosphate moieties of natural mRNAs. They discovered that modified mRNAs accelerated the initiation step of the translation reactions and improved efficiency of protein synthesis by at least 20 times compared with that using natural-form mRNAs

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New very short-lived isotope 222Np is observed

In a recent study, researchers at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators reported the first discovery of 222 Np, a new very short-lived Np isotope, and validated the N = 126 shell effect in Np isotopes. The experiment, led by Prof. GAN Zaiguo of IMP, was carried out at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou.

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Exotic neutrinos will be difficult to ferret out

An international team tracking the 'new physics' neutrinos has checked the data of all the relevant experiments associated with neutrino detections against Standard Model extensions proposed by theorists. The latest analysis, the first with such comprehensive coverage, shows the scale of challenges facing right-handed neutrino seekers, but also brings a spark of hope.

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An ISGlobal team develops an approach to facilitate the diagnosis of tuberculosis as cause of death

The approach, which combines a simple-to-use molecular test with the minimally invasive autopsy, could be a valuable tool in regions with high burden of the disease

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In a first, astronomers watch a black hole's corona disappear, then reappear

For the first time, astronomers have watched a black hole's corona disappear, then reappear.

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HKBU research reveals greater flood risks in the coastal region of China

A research led by the Department of Geography at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) has revealed that the observed average moving speed (or translation speed) of tropical cyclones making landfall over the coast of China dropped by 11% between 1961 and 2017. These slow-moving tropical cyclones brought about 20% more local total rainfall on average when compared with fast-moving ones, resulting in

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Black Lives Matter, LGBTQ rights, Trump: The risks and rewards of corporate activism

Companies and CEOs are increasingly wading into political issues. My latest research suggests that such corporate activism can come with high costs if it doesn't align with the political values of a company's customers, employees and local lawmakers—or big gains when it does.

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Hurricane Maria's impact on Puerto Rico's population will last for decades, study shows

Life for the people of Puerto Rico hasn't been the same since Hurricane Maria devastated the island in September 2017.

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How Rwanda extracts methane from Lake Kivu for electricity

Lake Kivu lies on the border between the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Rwanda. It's almost the size of Mauritius and has a maximum depth of 480 meters. Lake Kivu also stores huge amounts of methane gas which Rwanda is extracting to produce electricity. Natacha Tofield Pasche explains how this process works.

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How we learned more about dangerous pollutants in Lagos lagoon

Lagos lagoon is the largest of four lagoon systems off the Gulf of Guinea. Several rivers and waterways empty into it, and it plays an important role in the West African coastal ecosystem as well as the Nigerian economy.

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Scientists identify new species of sea sponge off coast of British Columbia

A University of Alberta research team discovered a new sea sponge off the coast of British Columbia that could play a major role in the overall health of delicate reef ecosystems in the area.

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Most dietary guidelines are not compatible with global health and environmental targets

A team of researchers, including the University of Adelaide, has found most dietary recommendations provided by national governments are incompatible with global health and environmental targets such as the Paris Climate Agreement, and are in need of reform.

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Fish reef domes a boon for environment, recreational fishing

In a boost for both recreational fishing and the environment, new UNSW research shows that artificial reefs can increase fish abundance in estuaries with little natural reef.

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Poor work-life balance may be damaging your health

Working adults across Europe with poor work-life balance are more likely to report poor general health, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health.

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E-waste-eating protein creates rare earth elements

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers, in collaboration with Pennsylvania State University (PSU) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL), have designed a new process, based on a naturally occurring protein, that could extract and purify rare earth elements (REE) from low-grade sources. It could offer a new avenue toward a more diversified and sustainable REE sector for the United S

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New hope for rare breeds as a healthy filly foal is born from sexed semen

It's the first time in the world that this technique has been used to support the survival of rare breeds.

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Fish reef domes a boon for environment, recreational fishing

In a boost for both recreational fishing and the environment, new UNSW research shows that artificial reefs can increase fish abundance in estuaries with little natural reef.

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New hope for rare breeds as a healthy filly foal is born from sexed semen

It's the first time in the world that this technique has been used to support the survival of rare breeds.

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Eight ways to repel insects without bug spray

Neither bugs nor the chemical smell of commercial repellent are invited to this relaxing evening by the water. (Julie Rotter/Unsplash/) This story was originally featured on Outdoor Life . Unless you're an entomologist (and on the clock), you probably hate being surrounded by bugs, especially if they bite. While these creatures play important roles in the environment, they can be a real nuisance

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Image: Comet NEOWISE seen in an aurora-filled sky

Comet NEOWISE is visible in an aurora-filled sky in this photo by Aurorasaurus Ambassador Donna Lach. The photo was taken early on July 14, 2020, in western Manitoba, Canada. The purple ribbon-like structure to the left is STEVE, an aurora-related phenomenon discovered with the help of citizen scientists working with the Aurorasaurus project. The bright streak near the top of the image is a meteor

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New research of oldest light confirms age of the universe

Just how old is the universe? Astrophysicists have been debating this question for decades. In recent years, new scientific measurements have suggested the universe may be hundreds of millions of years younger than its previously estimated age of approximately 13.8 billions of years. Now new research published in a series of papers by an international team of astrophysicists, including Neelima Seh

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AI upscales Apollo lunar footage to 60 FPS

As exciting and thrilling as it is to watch all the historic footage from the Apollo moon landings, you have to admit, the quality is sometimes not all that great. Even though NASA has worked on restoring and enhancing some of the most popular Apollo footage, some of it is still grainy or blurry.

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Archaeologists date earliest known occupation of North America

A team led by Newcastle University, UK, used analysis of ancient coprolites—fossilized excrement—to identify that samples from one of the most famous "pre-Clovis" sites at Paisley Caves, in Oregon, north America, contained human fecal biomarkers.

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Undescribed mexicanolide-type limonoids are isolated from twigs and leaves of Cipadessa baccifera

Cipadessa baccifera is a bushy shrub with pinnate leaves mainly distributed in tropical Asia. It has been traditionally used as folk medicine by Dai people in Xishuangbanna, southwest China for treatment of various diseases such as dysentery, malaria, pruritus (itchy skin), rheum, rheumatism, and burns and scalds.

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How proteins regulate the outer envelope of bacterial cells

Like all cells, bacteria have a membrane that shields them from the outside like a skin. This barrier is not static, but has to allow transport of substances in and out and be flexible so that the bacterial cells can grow. In order to implement these properties, different types of proteins are active in cells, including the so-called flotillins. These proteins are present in cells from bacteria to

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Antarctica more widely impacted by climate change than previously thought

Antarctica is considered one of the Earth's largest, most pristine remaining wildernesses. Yet since its formal discovery 200 years ago, the continent has seen accelerating human activity. Reporting in the journal Nature, a research team including Tilburg University show where human activities have been conducted and uncover two main concerns: wilderness in Antarctica is decreasing due to an incre

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Silane regulates thermal conductivity of composites on molecular level

A research team from the Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science has conducted a study on thermal conductivity of composites. They found that thermal conductivity (TC) of Poly(vinyl alcohol)/boron nitride composite film could be regulated on the molecular level by covalent coupling.

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Nanocomposites with rich oxygen vacancies promote sensitive electroanalysis of Hg(II)

Recently, Yang Meng and his colleagues from the Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science reported a sensitive electrochemical sensing performance of Ru-loaded single-crystalline (100) CeO2 nanocomposites toward heavy metal ions (e.g., Hg(II)).

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Novel partial isovalent anion substitution induction strategy to design infrared nonlinear optical materials

Infrared nonlinear optical (IR–NLO) materials are crucial for a broad range of applications, such as signal communication, microscopy and data processing. Yet, the challenge is how to obtain a strictly structural non-centrosymmetric (NCS) compound, which is the primary requirement for the IR–NLO materials.

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Undescribed mexicanolide-type limonoids are isolated from twigs and leaves of Cipadessa baccifera

Cipadessa baccifera is a bushy shrub with pinnate leaves mainly distributed in tropical Asia. It has been traditionally used as folk medicine by Dai people in Xishuangbanna, southwest China for treatment of various diseases such as dysentery, malaria, pruritus (itchy skin), rheum, rheumatism, and burns and scalds.

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How proteins regulate the outer envelope of bacterial cells

Like all cells, bacteria have a membrane that shields them from the outside like a skin. This barrier is not static, but has to allow transport of substances in and out and be flexible so that the bacterial cells can grow. In order to implement these properties, different types of proteins are active in cells, including the so-called flotillins. These proteins are present in cells from bacteria to

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Revealing the global environmental impacts of healthcare

An Australian-led, multiregional study has found that the healthcare sector causes up to 5 percent of total global environmental damage, placing it alongside other major global contributors to climate change.

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Antarctica more widely impacted by climate change than previously thought

Antarctica is considered one of the Earth's largest, most pristine remaining wildernesses. Yet since its formal discovery 200 years ago, the continent has seen accelerating human activity. Reporting in the journal Nature, a research team including Tilburg University show where human activities have been conducted and uncover two main concerns: wilderness in Antarctica is decreasing due to an incre

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Researchers find technique for 3-D printing on nanoscale that can correct mistakes

University of Dayton physics and electro-optics researchers Md Shah Alam, Qiwen Zhan and Chenglong Zhao have created a less expensive 3-D printing method on a nanoscale, or a thousand times smaller than a human hair, that can manufacture nanostructures and erase mistakes. Top nanotechnology journal Nano Letters published their findings.

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Researchers observe new, very short-lived neptunium isotope

In a recent study, researchers at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators reported the first discovery of 222Np, a new very short-lived neptunium (Np) isotope, and validated the N = 126 shell effect in Np isotopes.

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Physicists engineer an optical mirror made of only a few hundred atoms

Physicists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ) have engineered the lightest optical mirror imaginable. The novel metamaterial is made of a single structured layer that consists only of a few hundred identical atoms. The atoms are arranged in the two dimensional array of an optical lattice formed by interfering laser beams. The research results are the first experimental observation

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Obesity and metabolic syndrome are risk factors for severe influenza, COVID-19

Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of severe disease from viral infection, according to a new review.

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Study identifies patient- and hospital-level risk factors for death in critically ill COVID-19 patients

Researchers studied over 2,000 critically ill adults with COVID-19, and found that 35 percent of patients died in the 28 days after ICU admission. They also found that treatment and outcomes varied greatly between hospitals.

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Researchers identify genetic factors that may influence COVID-19 susceptibility

A new study has identified genetic factors that may influence susceptibility to COVID-19. The findings could guide personalized treatment for COVID-19.

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Mapping the solar system: from the moon to Bennu

As NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft prepares to briefly touch down and collect a sample from the asteroid Bennu in October, the mission's science team, led by the University of Arizona, has worked meticulously to create the highest resolution global map of any planetary body, including Earth. The endeavor is the latest in the university's long history of celestial imaging and mapping—one that began wi

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Marisa Silver on the Tangled Nature of Memory

Editor's Note: Read Marisa Silver's new short story, "The Memory Wing." " The Memory Wing " is a new story by Marisa Silver. To mark the story's publication in The Atlantic , Silver and Thomas Gebremedhin, a senior editor at the magazine, discussed the story over email. Their conversation has been lightly edited for clarity. Thomas Gebremedhin: Your story " The Memory Wing " concerns a woman name

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Machining the heart: New predictor for helping to beat chronic heart failure

Researchers from Kanazawa University have used machine learning to predict which classes of chronic heart failure patients are most likely to experience heart failure death, and which are most likely to develop an arrhythmic death or sudden cardiac death. If confirmed in a larger study, these results will help doctors extend the life of patients worldwide.

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Fish reef domes a boon for environment, recreational fishing

Manmade reefs can be used in conjunction with the restoration or protection of natural habitat to increase fish abundance in estuaries, UNSW researchers have found.

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Healthy offspring from testicular tissue plantation in mice: Retinoic acid key

Germ cell depletion in recipient testis has adverse effects on spermatogenesis in orthotopically transplanted testis pieces via retinoic acid insufficiency. Repetitive RA administration significantly improved donor spermatogenesis to produce healthy offspring.

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Pre-brain surgery test protects language in some tumors

A preoperative procedure might enable surgeons to protect the language centers during brain tumor removal without needing to keep patients awake during surgery.

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Antarctica more widely impacted than previously thought

Researchers at Australia's Monash University, using a data set of 2.7 million human activity records, have shown just how extensive human use of Antarctica has been over the last 200 years.

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Scientists predict dramatic increase in flooding, drought in California

California may see a 54 percent increase in rainfall variability by the end of this century, according to research from a UC Davis atmospheric scientist.

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Elderly Alzheimer's patients are more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection

It is the first study to highlight the vulnerability of Alzheimer's patients to the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and is expected to be applied to infection diagnosis and prevention

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UBCO researchers create liquid-repelling substance that works on all surfaces

Acting like an invisible force field, a new liquid coating being developed by UBC Okanagan researchers may provide an extra layer of protection for front-line workers. Researchers at the Okanagan Polymer Engineering Research and Applications (OPERA) Lab have developed a coating that repels nearly all substances off a surface. And that new coating will make cleaning personal protective equipment a

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Using the past to predict the future: The case of Typhoon Hagibis

The past is often the window to our future, especially when it comes to natural disasters. Using data from the 2018 floods that struck southwestern Japan to calibrate a machine learning model, researchers from the International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS) at Tohoku University and the Japan-Peru Center for Earthquake Engineering Research and Disaster Mitigation (CISMID, in Spani

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HIV alone not a risk factor for cavities in children

Recent studies indicate HIV infection heightens the risk of dental cavities – but a Rutgers researcher has found evidence that the risk of cavities comes not from HIV itself but from a weakened immune system, which could be caused by other diseases.

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The US is headed for climate disaster – but Joe Biden's green plan might just work | Art Cullen

Biden's $2tn green agriculture plan is ambitious but realistic. That's important, because everything is riding on it The world's food supply is imperiled by a climate crisis already upon us, and Joe Biden this week put forward an agenda to address it that's as bold as you could hope from a man who actually intends to get elected. Related: Biden unveils $700bn 'buy American' proposal to revive US

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New research of oldest light confirms age of the universe

New research suggest the universe is about 13.8 billion years old, according to researchers using observations from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) in Chile.

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A Partial Supernova Flung This White Dwarf Across the Milky Way

Image credit: Sephirohq (CC BY SA 3.0) Supernovas, by their nature, often don't leave a lot of star behind for astronomers to later peruse. Many of these titanic explosions result in the formation of a black hole or a neutron star. For many years, scientists believed that the majority of supernovas resulted in one of three outcomes: black hole, neutron star, or nothing left at all. Now we've foun

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A new material helps transistors become vanishingly small

And more transistors mean more computing power

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Stopping pollution with pine needles

A pair of problems may be made to cancel each other out

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Comet NEOWISE lights up northern skies

It was discovered by a satellite that monitors threats to Earth

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Magnetometers based on diamonds will make navigation easier

Unlike GPS, they cannot be jammed by enemy action

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Andrew Yang Wants You to Get Paid for Your Data. It Doesn't Add Up

He says social media companies should pay you for the data you produce. But loopholes abound, it's too expensive, and other plans like it have failed.

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Publicizing police killings of unarmed black people causes emotional trauma, says Rutgers study

Rutgers study finds majority of college students of color show symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder after watching social media videos of unarmed Black men being killed by police

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When many act as one, data-driven models can reveal key behaviors

Researchers from Rice University and the University of Georgia have shown that data science approaches can reveal subtle clues about the origins of such collective behaviors as aggregation of bacteria.

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New cobalt-free lithium-ion battery reduces costs without sacrificing performance

Researchers from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin say they've cracked the code to a cobalt-free high-energy lithium-ion battery, eliminating the cobalt and opening the door to reducing the costs of producing batteries while boosting performance in some ways.

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Dehydration increases amphibian vulnerability to climate change

Amphibians have few options to avoid the underappreciated one-two punch of climate change, according to a new study from Simon Fraser University researchers and others. Rising summer temperatures are also resulting in higher rates of dehydration among wet-skinned amphibians as they attempt to keep themselves cool.

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How galaxies die: New insights into the quenching of star formation

Astronomers studying galaxy evolution have long struggled to understand what causes star formation to shut down in massive galaxies. Although many theories have been proposed to explain this process, known as "quenching," there is still no consensus on a satisfactory model. Now, an international team of scientists has proposed a new model that successfully explains a wide range of observations abo

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COVID-19 'price gouging' could be prevented

Excessive pricing or 'price gouging' of essential hygiene and medical products during the current global pandemic could be prevented, claims a new paper from the University of Portsmouth.

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Health care has a huge environmental footprint, which then harms health. This is a matter of ethics

The health impacts of environmental change are now squarely on the radar. Australia's recent intense wildfires is one glaring example. Spillover of the virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic from animals to humans is another.

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An Introduction to Cell-Free Protein Expression

Simplify protein production with the myTXTL cell-free expression system

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Cape Canaveral Prepares for First Polar Launches in 60 Years

Florida will soon reopen to launches for pole-orbiting spacecraft — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rapid and Sensitive Detection of SARS-CoV-2

Download this case study to learn about how a new capture panel rapidly detects SARS-CoV-2 and surveys the full-length viral genome for new mutations

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Cool crops with synthetic clouds? It could backfire

Geoengineering, or spraying sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere to combat global warming, would only temporarily and partially benefit apple production in northern India, research finds. But abruptly ending geoengineering might lead to total crop failure faster than if geoengineering didn't take place, according to the study in the journal Climatic Change . "This study reminds us that there is no

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Ending 'streaming' is only the first step to dismantling systemic racism in Ontario schools

Last week, the Ontario government announced its plan to end streaming in Grade 9, something Education Minister Stephen Lecce acknowledged is a "racist, discriminatory" practice.

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These are the closest images of the sun ever taken

It's been a banner year for solar observations so far. The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope in Hawaii presented some of the best images ever taken of the sun , showing us a caramel-like surface where individual cells of plasma ooze up and down hypnotically. Not to be outdone, the ESA-led Solar Orbiter mission has just released its own first images of the sun. Though perhaps not as surprising as D

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Catalyst could help turn seawater into fuel for Navy ships

A "potassium-promoted" catalyst brings the Navy's quest to power its ships by converting seawater into fuel closer to reality, researchers report. They've demonstrated that a potassium-promoted molybdenum carbide catalyst efficiently and reliably converts carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, a critical step in turning seawater into fuel. "This is the first demonstration that this type of molybdenum

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Humans are encroaching on Antarctica's last wild places, threatening its fragile biodiversity

Since Western explorers discovered Antarctica 200 years ago, human activity has been increasing. Now, more than 30 countries operate scientific stations in Antarctica, more than 50,000 tourists visit each year, and new infrastructure continues to be developed to meet this rising demand.

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This photo of the Sun is the closest ever taken

Nature, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02136-4 Close-up reveals a surface dancing with 'campfires'.

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Solar Orbiter gives scientists unprecedented look at Sun

Scientists said Thursday they had obtained the closest ever images taken of the Sun as part of a pan-European mission to study solar winds and flares that could have far-reaching impacts back on Earth.

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Greater flood risks in the coastal region of China due to slower tropical cyclone movement

A study led by the Department of Geography at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) has revealed that the observed average moving speed (or translation speed) of tropical cyclones making landfall over the coast of China dropped by 11% between 1961 and 2017. These slow-moving tropical cyclones brought about 20% more local total rainfall on average when compared with fast-moving ones, resulting in gre

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ATS publishes new guidance on safely restoring elective pulmonary and sleep services

An American Thoracic Society-led international task force has released a guidance document to help guide clinicians on restoring elective in-person pulmonary and sleep services as COVID-19 incidence decreases in their communities. The new guidance, published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society, is titled "Restoring Pulmonary and Sleep Services as the COVID-19 Pandemic Lessens."

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Russian wildfire smoke choking Siberian cities

Smoke from raging forest fires in Siberia was filling cities Thursday as officials scrambled to prevent the flames from reaching homes.

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Spacewalking astronauts closing in on final battery swaps

A pair of spacewalking astronauts tackled the final set of battery swaps outside the International Space Station on Thursday.

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Closest Pictures Ever Taken of Sun Show Tiny Campfire Flares

Images of the new phenomenon were captured by Solar Orbiter, a joint European-NASA mission to study the sun.

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Solar Orbiter: Closest ever pictures taken of the Sun

The European Solar Orbiter probe captures images just 77 million km from the Sun's surface.

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Study reveals how a dangerous parasite controls its host cell to spread around the body

Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have discovered new information about how a dangerous parasite takes control of a patient's cells as it spreads throughout their body, an important finding that could help in the development of new drugs to treat this infection.

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Study reveals how a dangerous parasite controls its host cell to spread around the body

Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have discovered new information about how a dangerous parasite takes control of a patient's cells as it spreads throughout their body, an important finding that could help in the development of new drugs to treat this infection.

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How Many Aliens Are in the Milky Way? Astronomers Turn to Statistics for Answers

The tenets of Thomas Bayes, an 18th-century statistician and minister, underpin the latest estimates of the prevalence of extraterrestrial life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The 15 Best Mac Apps You Should Download Now (2020): Free and Paid

Apple's macOS is a good desktop operating system, but it's missing some key ingredients. Try these programs to get the most out of your Mac.

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Covid-19 vaccine: what have we learned from Oxford phase one trial?

Experts say signs are promising but there is a long way to go to show vaccine works Tracker: how close are we to a vaccine? See all our coronavirus coverage Phase one human trials of a Covid-19 vaccine being developed by researchers at the University of Oxford suggest it triggers two types of immune response, unnamed sources working on the vaccine told ITV's Robert Peston. Not only does the jab t

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3D printed batteries handle the squeeze

While flexible and stretchable electronics technologies have progressed in leaps and bounds over the past 10 years, batteries to power them have some catching up to do. Researchers in Singapore and China have now demonstrated a "quasi-solid-state" battery—made from materials somewhere between a liquid and a solid—that can be compressed by as much as 60% while maintaining high energy density and go

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How Many Aliens Are in the Milky Way? Astronomers Turn to Statistics for Answers

The tenets of Thomas Bayes, an 18th-century statistician and minister, underpin the latest estimates of the prevalence of extraterrestrial life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Bomb in the Desert

All deserts are not alike. The Sahara's romantic dunes form the great sand sea of desert archetype. The Sonoran is monumental, with its majestic saguaros and towering sandstone buttes. Though both are hot, dry, and unforgiving, these deserts are still compatible with human affairs, among them bearing witness to sublime beauty. But others are alien and unwelcoming. Within the Chihuahuan Desert in

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Overcoming perfectionism during the pandemic

Nature, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02133-7 Desiree Dickerson risked burning out while creating a series of online well-being workshops. During lockdown, she was forced to put her perfectionism in its place.

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Rushing Science in the Face of a Pandemic Is Understandable but Risky

We need to be extremely careful about the inevitable pitfalls — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Unusual nanoparticles could benefit the quest to build a quantum computer

Imagine tiny crystals that "blink" like fireflies and can convert carbon dioxide, a key cause of climate change, into fuels.

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Blood iron levels could be key to slowing ageing, gene study shows

Genes linked to ageing that could help explain why some people age at different rates to others have been identified by scientists.

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How Americans Became Part of the Trump Family

H ere is part of an email alert that The New York Times sent to its readers over the weekend: "Breaking News: President Trump wore a mask publicly for the first time." The announcement would not seem, at first glance, to merit the urgency. Breaking news is typically the stuff of shock, its revelations suggesting a rupture in the assumed order of things—and this was, after all, an update about fac

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Blood iron levels could be key to slowing ageing, gene study shows

Genes linked to ageing that could help explain why some people age at different rates to others have been identified by scientists.

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Weaving Indigenous knowledge with scientific research: a balanced approach

Insights from bicultural research can enhance practical applications from a palaeotsunami database to land-use decisions, according to a new review in Earth Surface Dynamics

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Fik du modermælk som barn? – Det hjælper dit immunsystem og stofskifte, selv som voksen

PLUS. Modermælk spiller en endnu vigtigere rolle for vores sundhed, end hidtil troet, fortæller professor fra DTU, og opdagelsen kan være med til at forbedre fremtidens mælkeerstatning for en sundere tarmflora hos voksne.

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Nuclear Tests Have Changed, but They Never Really Stopped

75 years after the first explosive nuclear tests, now outlawed, sophisticated virtual testing allows American physicists to understand these weapons better than ever.

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Tech Firms Hire 'Red Teams.' Scientists Should, Too

Another botched peer review—this one involving a controversial study of police killings—shows how devil's advocates could improve the scientific process.

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New transient X-ray source detected in the galaxy NGC 4945

Using the Suzaku satellite, Japanese astronomers have detected a transient X-ray source in a nearby galaxy known as NGC 4945. The newly discovered source, designated Suzaku J1305−4930, appears to be a black hole binary. The finding is detailed in a paper published July 8 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

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New technology promises to revolutionize nanomedicine

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their colleagues from Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry and Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences have developed a breakthrough technology to resolve a key problem that has prevented the introduction of novel drugs into clinical practice for decades. The new solution prolongs

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Rare twin red-ruffed lemurs born at Singapore zoo

Twin red-ruffed lemurs have been born at Singapore zoo, officials said Thursday, a rare double delivery that is a boost for the endangered saucer-eyed primates.

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The United Arab Emirates is launching its first mission to Mars

A summer of many Mars missions is about to began as the United Arab Emirates prepares to launch its first Mars mission, the Hope orbiter

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Rare twin red-ruffed lemurs born at Singapore zoo

Twin red-ruffed lemurs have been born at Singapore zoo, officials said Thursday, a rare double delivery that is a boost for the endangered saucer-eyed primates.

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Real Reform Comes From Civic Stamina

The fierce national debate over structural racism in the criminal-justice system and other core American institutions isn't new terrain for Sean Goode, the charismatic executive director of Choose 180, an organization that works with at-risk young people in Seattle. Nor is it a novel subject for Naomi Parker at More Than Words in Boston; Audrey Henson at College to Congress in Washington, D.C.; S

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Second Coronavirus Strain May Be More Infectious–but Some Scientists Are Skeptical

Researchers question whether a mutated viral strain that infected more cells in a lab dish is necessarily more transmissible among humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Second Coronavirus Strain May Be More Infectious–but Some Scientists Are Skeptical

Researchers question whether a mutated viral strain that infected more cells in a lab dish is necessarily more transmissible among humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New research shows climate was the key factor impacting the movement of the first farmers across Europe

The research, a collaboration between the University of Roehampton, the University of Cambridge and several other institutions, combined archeological data with palaeoclimatic reconstructions to show for the first time that climate dramatically impacted the migration of people across Europe, causing a dramatic slowdown between 6,100 BCE and 4,500 BCE.

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Giant Hawaii telescope builders say no construction in 2020

Scientists planning to build one of the world's largest telescopes on a Hawaii mountain said Wednesday construction won't begin until at least next year.

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Siberia heat 'almost impossible' without climate change

A heatwave in Siberia that saw temperature records tumble as the region sweltered in 38-degree Celsius highs was "almost impossible" without the influence of manmade climate change, leading scientists said.

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On Antarctica, humanity's small footprint has big impact

Humanity's accelerating impact on the vast wilderness of Antarctica extends well beyond scientific stations and eco-tourism along its fringes, both in scope and intensity, scientists warned Wednesday.

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Russia launches probe into 'orange' Urals streams

Russian prosecutors on Wednesday said they were conducting an inspection of a facility supposed to treat acid runoff from an abandoned Urals mine after photographs emerged of streams running orange.

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'Blinking" crystals may convert CO2 into fuels

Imagine tiny crystals that "blink" like fireflies and can convert carbon dioxide, a key cause of climate change, into fuels. A Rutgers-led team has created ultra-small titanium dioxide crystals that exhibit unusual "blinking" behavior and may help to produce methane and other fuels, according to a study in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The crystals, also known as nanoparticles, stay charged for a

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Laura Ingraham's Descent Into Despair

"I t was cocktail hour on the opening day of the new, Republican-dominated Congress, and the long, chandelier-lighted parlor of David Brock's town house in Georgetown was filling up with exuberant young conservatives fresh from events on the Hill." That was the opening sentence, in 1995, of a New York Times Magazine cover story called "The Counter Counterculture." The author was the late James At

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Love Is Medicine for Fear

" How to Build a Life " is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. We are living in a time of fear. The coronavirus pandemic has threatened our lives, health, and economy in ways most Americans have never experienced. We have no idea what the future will bring. According to the American Psychological Association's annual "Stress in America" survey, the per

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The Unexpected Outcomes of the Manhattan Project

The Manhattan Project resulted in reactions both new and unforeseen. unexpected_infograph_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator with Manhattan Project Emblem ( Public Domain ) Culture Wednesday, July 15, 2020 – 08:00 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — The Manhattan Project was one of the largest and most ambitious scientific ventures of all time, and

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The Fear of Setting the Planet on Fire with a Nuclear Weapon

The idea of a nuclear bomb accidentally setting the entire planet on fire was once a fear shared by many. Nuclear weapon test Bravo on Bikini Atoll 1954 Public Domain.jpg Nuclear weapon test Castle Bravo on March 1, 1954. Image credits: US Department of Energy Rights information: Public Domain Physics Wednesday, July 15, 2020 – 07:45 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — In "Inside the Thir

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When Physics Faced the Darkest Part of Reality

The potentially world-destroying power of the atomic bomb moved many scientists to engage more directly with the public, an effort that continues to this day. topNteaser_TrinityGroundZero.jpg Scientists and military personnel at ground zero of the Trinity test, the first explosion of a nuclear device. Image credits: United States Army Signal Corps via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: Public

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How Culture Wrestled with the Atomic Age

Movies, music and even candy wrappers helped people process what it meant to put the powers of gods in human hands. Atomic-Images.jpg Image credits: GetHiroshima.com via Flickr Rights information: CC BY-NC 2.0 Culture Wednesday, July 15, 2020 – 08:00 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — The previously inconceivable destructive power of nuclear weapons influenced the military, relationships b

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Touring The Trinity Test Site

A glimpse into the history of the start of the atomic age. Touring The Trinity Test Site Video of Touring The Trinity Test Site Physics Wednesday, July 15, 2020 – 07:45 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer It was here in the middle of the desert, in what is now the U.S. Army White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico — that the world's first atomic bomb was tested and exploded on July 16,1945. Now,

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Pandemic shows climate has never been treated as crisis, say scientists

Letter also signed by Greta Thunberg urges EU leaders to act immediately on global heating Greta Thunberg and some of the world's leading climate scientists have written to EU leaders demanding they act immediately to avoid the worst impacts of the unfolding climate and ecological emergency. The letter , which is being sent before a European council meeting starting on Friday, says the Covid-19 p

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A mystery: How did this team plagiarize an unpublished paper?

A study on a wireless communication algorithm was retracted for being an exact duplicate of a paper submitted to a separate journal last year — but the authors were different and it's unclear how they got hold of it. The retracted study, "Energy-aware resource management for uplink non-orthogonal multiple access: Multi-agent deep reinforcement learning" was … Continue reading

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Why does space look so dark?

Stars twinkle up above, but space itself is as dark as can be. (ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Bellini et al./) We know you are bored at home right now—we are too. Here are some puzzles and brainteasers to challenge your family and friends with, either in person or over video chat. If you look up on a clear night, you'll likely see a few bright celestial objects—and a lot of dark space between them. But i

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Iranian Spies Accidentally Leaked Videos of Themselves Hacking

IBM's X-Force security team obtained five hours of APT35 hacking operations, showing exactly how the group steals data from email accounts—and who it's targeting.

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Announcing the Get WIRED Podcast

Hear the trailer for our new weekly show, which goes deep into the weirdest and most compelling stories in tech and science.

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Live Coronavirus News Updates

Two-thirds of global cases have come from the U.S., Brazil, South Africa and India. The National Security Agency said a hacking group associated with Russian intelligence was targeting health care organizations to gain intelligence about vaccines.

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Reconstruction of the full transmission dynamics of COVID-19 in Wuhan

Nature, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2554-8

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Vagus nerve stimulation boosts the drive to work for rewards

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17344-9 The vagus nerve transmits signals between the gut and the brain thereby tuning motivated behavior to physiological needs. Here, the authors show that acute non-invasive stimulation of the vagus nerve via the ear enhances the invigoration of effort for rewards.

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Distributed and retinotopically asymmetric processing of coherent motion in mouse visual cortex

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17283-5 Processing of coherent motion has been extensively studied in the primate visual system, but has not been well characterized in mice. Here, the authors use widefield calcium imaging to reveal that coherent motion responses are organized anisotropically both across and within visual areas in mice.

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Femtosecond exciton dynamics in WSe2 optical waveguides

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17335-w The authors use time-resolved scanning near-field optical microscopy to probe the ultrafast excitonic processes and their impact on waveguide operation in transition metal dichalcogenide crystals. They observe significant modulation of the complex index by monitoring waveguide modes on the fs time scale, and ide

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Multi-layered proteomic analyses decode compositional and functional effects of cancer mutations on kinase complexes

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17387-y Diseases can be associated with various mutations of the same gene, but the molecular consequences of specific mutations remain incompletely understood. Here, the authors present an integrated proteomic workflow to determine the molecular response of cells to different cancer-associated mutations of the kinase D

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Using operando techniques to understand and design high performance and stable alkaline membrane fuel cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17370-7 Modern alkaline membrane fuel cells have generally shown very poor operational stability. Here, the authors combine operando neutron imaging and X-ray computed tomography to understand the root cause for this and then design new electrodes to enable high performance and operational stability.

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Machine learning of serum metabolic patterns encodes early-stage lung adenocarcinoma

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17347-6 Early diagnosis significantly improves the probability of successful cancer therapy. Here, the authors develop a technique to analyse serum metabolites and define a biomarker panel for early-stage lung adenocarcinoma diagnosis.

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Unexpected complexity of everyday manual behaviors

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17404-0 How does the brain control the complex movements of hands? Here, by tracking human hand kinematics and applying multidimensional reduction techniques, the authors provide evidence that grasping involves a complex control system that regulates even the most subtle aspects of hand movement.

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Multivariate genomic scan implicates novel loci and haem metabolism in human ageing

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17312-3 Ageing phenotypes are of great interest but are difficult to study genetically, partly due to the sample sizes required. Here, the authors present a multivariate framework to combine GWAS summary statistics and increase statistical power, identifying additional loci enriched for aging.

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Caribbean cyclone activity: an annually-resolved Common Era record

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68633-8

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Identification of spin effects in the anomalous Righi–Leduc effect in ferromagnetic metals

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68669-w

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Nucleosome binding by the pioneer transcription factor OCT4

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68850-1

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A novel three-dimensional magnetic particle imaging system based on the frequency mixing for the point-of-care diagnostics

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68864-9

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Experimental demonstration of broadband solar absorption beyond the lambertian limit in certain thin silicon photonic crystals

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68704-w

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Structure and dynamics of the Pacific North Equatorial Subsurface Current

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68605-y

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Lesion of doom — how a parasitic bacterium induces blood vessel formation to cause lesions

A research team from Fujita Health University, Japan, has found that bacteria of the genus Bartonella release a protein–which they have named BafA–that stimulates the production of new blood vessels that support bacterial lesions. This discovery may help scientists develop new methods for diagnosing and treating these infections.

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Blood iron levels could be key to slowing ageing, gene study shows

Genes linked to ageing that could help explain why some people age at different rates to others have been identified by scientists.

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New map for radioactive soil contamination in Western Europe

An international consortium of scientists has refined the map of caesium and plutonium radionuclide concentrations in soils in Switzerland and several neighbouring countries. Using an archive of European soil samples, the team led by Katrin Meusburger from the University of Basel, now at the WSL research institute, was able to trace the sources of radioactive fallout between 1960 and 2009. This st

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Significant drop in stroke recurrence found among Mexican Americans

The rate of recurrent strokes significantly declined among Mexican Americans in a long-term study.The ethnic differences in stroke recurrence that was present early in the study (2000) was gone by 2013.

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Analysis finds multiple social disadvantages magnify stroke risk

Living with multiple social disadvantages, including low education, low annual household income, social isolation, living in a neighborhood with high poverty or with poor public health infrastructure, lack of health insurance or being Black, collectively increases the risk of stroke.Younger individuals with multiple social disadvantages, such as Black women living in impoverished neighborhoods in

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At Last, the Medical Profession Is Speaking Out for Black Lives

It's discouraging that it took so long for leading medical institutions to speak out against racism and police brutality. But now that they have, their statements should be accompanied with concrete, evidence-based commitments to address racism in the medical field — from the classroom to the the clinic.

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Rätt säsong för färd till Mars

Tre farkoster ska skjutas iväg mot Mars sommaren 2020. Ett av uppdragen är att leta efter tecken på liv. Världens första utomjordiska helikopter finns också med. Men Europas Mars-bil blir kvar på jorden.

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G20 carbon 'food-print' highest in meat-loving nations: report

If everyone alive ate steaks and dairy the way Brazilians and Americans do, we would need an extra five planets to feed the world, according to the first report to compare the carbon emissions from food consumption in G20 nations, released Thursday.

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Devices can reduce fibers produced in laundry cycle by up to 80%

Using fiber-catching devices as part of the laundry process can dramatically reduce the amount of microscopic particles potentially entering the marine environment, according to new research.

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A New Album Turns The Sound Of Endangered Birds Into Electronic Music

Ten artists from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean recorded tracks using birdsong from their country, with all profits of the vinyl and digital release going to bird conservation projects. (Image credit: Courtesy of the artist)

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Udvidelse af britiske veje giver ekstra 20 millioner ton CO2 – også selvom elbilerne kommer

Regeringen i Storbritannien har afsat omkring 222 milliarder kroner til vejprojekter i de kommende fem år, men det vil føre til massive CO2-udledninger, også selvom samfundet skifter mange gamle diesel- og benzinbiler ud med elbiler.

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Never mind the bull or the fish … meet the serpent-bearer

There's a new star sign in the skies – and the rest of the zodiac will need to shunt along to accommodate it Name: Ophiuchus. Age: Eternal. Continue reading…

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Udenrigsministeriet har forbudt alle ansatte mod at hente regeringens corona-app

Da den danske smitteopsporings-app blev lanceret, påpegede sundhedsminister Magnus Heunicke (S), at den var sikker at bruge. Alligevel har ansatte i Udenrigsministeriet fået forbud mod at downloade appen.

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Booming blooms: how algae are turning the alps pink – podcast

They are usually associated with toxic, murky lakes. But algae blooms are increasingly turning up in icy regions too. Hannah Devlin speaks to Prof Marian Yallop about the recent appearance of pink snow in the Italian alps, and what the growing numbers of algal blooms could mean for melting glaciers and ice sheets Continue reading…

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Booming blooms: how algae are turning the alps pink

They are usually associated with toxic, murky lakes. But algae blooms are increasingly turning up in icy regions too. Hannah Devlin speaks to Prof Marian Yallop about the recent appearance of pink snow in the Italian alps, and what the growing numbers of algal blooms could mean for melting glaciers and ice sheets. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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Overvågning af fiskere sikrer torsk fra at ryge overbord

Overvågning af fiskere, har generelt flere fordele end ulemper, lyder konklusionen i et stort internationalt…

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Ny film: Proxima – En astronaut-mors kvaler

PLUS. Anmeldelse: En fransk astronaut bliver udtaget til et år på rumstationen og må efterlade sin otteårige datter på Jorden imens. Proxima er filmen om de modstridende moderfølelser og karrieredrømme.

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Coronavirus UK: 649,000 people lose their jobs during lockdown – live updates

News updates: Unemployment grew by 74,000 in June Train passengers to be tempted back with 'safe travel' campaign NHS boss who blamed outbreak on staff pictured without mask Children in Scotland need post-Covid-19 mental health care Global coronavirus updates – live 8.22am BST Continued lockdown in Leicester is no longer justified, the city's mayor has said as the government prepares to decide wh

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Mr ACE2 Josef Penninger, Greatest Scientist of Our Time

As a young Wunderkind, Josef Penninger discovered the ACE2 receptor. Now he invented the cure for the coronavirus which will work in his hands where Big Pharma failed. He was never found guilty of research misconduct and never retracted a paper. Dr Penninger is a Genius making a COVID-19 vaccine.

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When should you neuter your dog to avoid health risks?

Some dog breeds have higher risk of developing certain cancers and joint disorders if neutered or spayed within their first year of life. Until now, studies had only assessed that risk in a few breeds. A new, 10-year study by researchers at the University of California, Davis, examined 35 dog breeds and found vulnerability from neutering varies greatly depending on the breed. The study was publish

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When should you neuter your dog to avoid health risks?

Some dog breeds have higher risk of developing certain cancers and joint disorders if neutered or spayed within their first year of life. Until now, studies had only assessed that risk in a few breeds. A new, 10-year study by researchers at the University of California, Davis, examined 35 dog breeds and found vulnerability from neutering varies greatly depending on the breed. The study was publish

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Breeding new rice varieties will help farmers in Asia

After interviewing smallholder farmers throughout South and Southeast Asia, one of the top needs they mentioned is development of shorter duration rice varieties with only 100 days from sowing to harvest. Some farmers want to have more time to prepare for the next season crop, whereas other farmers are concerned about irrigation water running out during the dry season. Another benefit in countries

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Mixed progress highlights support gaps for pupils with English as additional language

Newly-arrived pupils who speak English as an additional language (EAL) often make 'mixed' linguistic and academic progress during their first years in British schools, which need a proper framework to give them sustained support, a study suggests.

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Breeding new rice varieties will help farmers in Asia

After interviewing smallholder farmers throughout South and Southeast Asia, one of the top needs they mentioned is development of shorter duration rice varieties with only 100 days from sowing to harvest. Some farmers want to have more time to prepare for the next season crop, whereas other farmers are concerned about irrigation water running out during the dry season. Another benefit in countries

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NASA finds limited water vapor as depression 06E becomes a trough

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean, it gathered water vapor data on Tropical Depression 06E that showed it had opened up into a trough. A trough is an elongated area of low pressure.

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Obama og Musk er blandt ofrene i kæmpe Twitter-hack

Flere hundrede kendte personer og virksomheder er blevet hacket af svindlere, der forsøgte at snyde sig til bitcoins.

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Expert review warns against compounded bioidentical hormone therapies

A National Academies report finds widely-marketed compounded hormone replacement therapies lack evidence of safety and effectiveness, and recommends restriction of their use.

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Breeding new rice varieties will help farmers in Asia

New research shows enormous potential for developing improved short-duration rice varieties.

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Scientists raise questions over lasting immunity from Covid-19 vaccine

Study shows recovered patients' antibodies declined within months of infection

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How Your Heart Influences What You Perceive and Fear – Facts So Romantic

Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine 's A bstractions blog. The heartbeat and other bodily processes play a surprising role in shaping perception and cognition. ManuMata / Shutterstock We consider the brain the very center of who we are and what we do: ruler of our senses, master of our movements; generator of thought, keeper of memory. But the brain is also rooted in a body, and the co

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Chinese GDP grows 3.2% in second quarter

Recovery from coronavirus boosted by industrial production but mainland stocks fall almost 5%

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'Bystander' Cs meet their match in gene-editing technique

Biomolecular engineers have developed new tools to increase the accuracy of CRISPR single-base editing to treat genetic diseases.

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Credit-card sized tool provides new insights into how cancer cells invade host tissues

Researchers have developed a credit-card sized tool for growing cancer cells outside the human body, which they believe will enhance their understanding of breast cancer metastasis. The device reproduces various environments within the human body where breast cancer cells live. Studying the cells as they go through the process of invasion and metastasis could point the way toward new biomarkers an

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Ballade om sikkerhedshuller i danske robotter: Fik kun 20 dage til at rette fejl

Danske MiR, der producerer mobile robotter til industrien, har lukket fem sårbarheder efter en spansk sikkerhedsvirksomhed med speciale i industrirobotter har henvendt sig. Den spanske virksomhed møder dog kritik for at hastværk og dårlig kommunikation.

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Does eating fish protect our brains from air pollution?

Older women who eat more than one to two servings a week of baked or broiled fish or shellfish may consume enough omega-3 fatty acids to counteract the effects of air pollution on the brain, according to a new study.

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Single drop of blood could help rapidly detect radiation sickness

A new proof-of-concept study reports evidence that a new testing method has the potential to rapidly identify radiation sickness based on biomarkers measured through a single drop of blood. Scientists say the test could help save lives through early and real-time identification of the condition to enable timely clinical interventions.

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'Bystander' Cs meet their match in gene-editing technique

Biomolecular engineers have developed new tools to increase the accuracy of CRISPR single-base editing to treat genetic diseases.

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Credit-card sized tool provides new insights into how cancer cells invade host tissues

Researchers have developed a credit-card sized tool for growing cancer cells outside the human body, which they believe will enhance their understanding of breast cancer metastasis. The device reproduces various environments within the human body where breast cancer cells live. Studying the cells as they go through the process of invasion and metastasis could point the way toward new biomarkers an

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Only a third of pediatricians fully follow guidelines on peanut allergy prevention

While 93 percent of U.S. pediatricians surveyed were aware of the national guidelines on peanut allergy prevention in infants, only 30 percent were fully implementing the recommended practices and 64 percent reported partial implementation, according to the study.

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Bacteria with a metal diet discovered in dirty glassware

Newfound bacteria that oxidize manganese help explain the geochemistry of groundwater.

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Study of natural gas flaring finds high risks to babies

Researchers have found that exposure to flaring — the burning off of excess natural gas — at oil and gas production sites is associated with 50% higher odds of preterm birth, compared with no exposure.

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Early life stress is associated with youth-onset depression for some types of stress but not others

Examining the association between eight different types of early life stress (ELS) and youth-onset depression, a study reports that individuals exposed to ELS were more likely to develop a major depressive disorder (MDD) in childhood or adolescence than individuals who had not been exposed to ELS.

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Researchers 3D print a working heart pump with real human cells

In a groundbreaking new study, researchers have 3D printed a functioning centimeter-scale human heart pump in the lab. The discovery could have major implications for studying heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States killing more than 600,000 people a year.

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New promising treatment uses smart nanoparticles to target lung cancer

A new and promising approach for treatment of lung cancer has been developed. The treatment combines a novel surgical approach with smart nanoparticles to specifically target lung tumors.

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Researchers 3D print a working heart pump with real human cells

In a groundbreaking new study, researchers have 3D printed a functioning centimeter-scale human heart pump in the lab. The discovery could have major implications for studying heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States killing more than 600,000 people a year.

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Novel biomarker technology for cancer diagnostics

A new way of identifying cancer biomarkers has been developed. The new technology allows very sensitive, quick and cost-effective identification of cancer biomarkers.

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New promising treatment uses smart nanoparticles to target lung cancer

A new and promising approach for treatment of lung cancer has been developed. The treatment combines a novel surgical approach with smart nanoparticles to specifically target lung tumors.

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Flavored cigarette ban significantly reduced youth smoking, new study finds

Researchers analyzed National Survey on Drug Use and Health data to test the effect of the 2009 U.S. flavored cigarette ban. The study found the ban reduced underage smoking by 43% and smoking among young adults by 27%. Researchers call for more comprehensive bans of flavored tobacco products to reduce youth use of these dangerous products.

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UK electrical waste mountain growing

Households and businesses in the UK are producing 1.45 million tonnes of electrical waste a year.

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The Atlantic Daily: Coronavirus Deaths Are Rising Right on Cue

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . SHUTTERSTOCK; PAUL SPELLA / THE ATLANTIC 1. There is no mystery in the number of Americans dying of COVID-19 . This summer surge in deaths was entirely predictable by looking honestly at the case

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"Forced empathy" is a powerful negotiation tool. Here's how to do it.

Former FBI negotiator Chris Voss explains how forced empathy is a powerful negotiating tactic. The key is starting a sentence with "What" or "How," causing the other person to look at the situation through your eyes. What appears to signal weakness is turned into a strength when using this tactic. How am I supposed to do that? There's a lot wrapped up in that seemingly simple question. First off,

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White dwarfs hold key to life in the universe, suggests study

White dwarf stars create carbon atoms in the Milky Way galaxy, shows new study. Carbon is an essential component of life. White dwarfs make carbon in their hot insides before the stars die. New analysis adds another wrinkle to the notion that we are all made of stars. Researchers found that white dwarfs , remains of stars, are a key source of carbon , an element essential to life. 90 percent of a

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Listen: Our Deadliest Pandemic Mistake

More than 40 percent of all coronavirus deaths in America have been linked to nursing homes. How did it happen, and how bad could it get? Staff writer Olga Khazan joins James Hamblin and Katherine Wells on Social Distance to explain. Listen here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published. What follow

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Is School Safe? Will Districts Test For COVID-19? Answering Back-To-School Questions

NPR science and education reporters answer questions submitted by listeners about the coming school year. (Image credit: Miguel Pereira/Getty Images)

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Coronavirus live news: Fauci says US must 'stop nonsense'; South Africa cases top 300,000

Dr Fauci predicts US will meet end-of-year vaccine target ; Bolsonaro tests positive again ; Canada approaches zero daily deaths . Follow the latest updates South Africa cases pass 300,000 Fauci stands ground as Trump works to undermine him Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a vaccine? See all our coronavirus coverage 1.53am BST Almost a third of companies plan to make job cuts in t

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A Second Coronavirus Death Surge Is Coming

Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . There is no mystery in the number of Americans dying from COVID-19. Despite political leaders trivializing the pandemic, deaths are rising again: The seven-day average for deaths per day has now jumped by more than 200 since July 6, according to data compiled by the COVID T

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Trump and Biden Square Off Over Environment

Over two days, President Trump and Joseph R. Biden Jr. laid out wildly divergent views on environmental regulations and climate change, helping to define the stakes of the presidential race.

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5 tips for coping with COVID-19 stat overload

Experts have a few important tips to help you handle the flood of COVID-19 statistics. We're confronted around the clock with troubling data as reporters, public health experts, and elected officials seek to understand and describe the path and impact of COVID-19. Rates of infection, hospital admission, and death are just a few key indicators. "…we need statistics—good statistics—to talk sensibly

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People literally don't see things the same way

Our ability to pinpoint the exact location and size of things varies from one person to the next, and even within our own individual field of vision, according to a new study. "We assume our perception is a perfect reflection of the physical world around us, but this study shows that each of us has a unique visual fingerprint," says study lead author Zixuan Wang, a doctoral student in psychology

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High-fat diet and antibiotics may raise pre-IBD risk

Combining a Western-style high-fat diet with antibiotic use significantly increases the risk of developing pre-inflammatory bowel disease, according to new research. The study in Cell Host and Microbe suggests that this combination shuts down the energy factories (mitochondria) in cells of the colon lining, leading to gut inflammation. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects approximately 11% of p

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Expand school digital literacy lessons to cover health technologies used by young people

Young people need more support to navigate the growing number of digital technologies which track and manage their health, say researchers.

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Siberian heatwave was 'impossible' without human-made climate change

The record-breaking heatwave that baked Siberia recently was made at least 600 times more likely by climate change, meaning it probably wouldn't have occurred otherwise

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Author Correction: Finite-key analysis for twin-field quantum key distribution with composable security

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69089-6

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Author Correction: Hyaluronan abrogates imatinib-induced senescence in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69087-8

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Author Correction: Design and Computational Modeling of Fabric Soft Pneumatic Actuators for Wearable Assistive Devices

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69094-9

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Author Correction: Graphene Plasmonic Fractal Metamaterials for Broadband Photodetectors

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69045-4

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Author Correction: Parkinson's disease and bacteriophages as its overlooked contributors

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69086-9

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Governments' dietary guidelines are harming the planet, study finds

Across the world, failure of official advice to provide sustainable, healthy diets is shocking, say scientists Official dietary advice across the world is harming both the environment and people's health, according to scientists who have carried out the most comprehensive assessment of national dietary guidelines to date. Food is responsible for a quarter of the emissions driving the climate cris

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Twitter blocked tweets from verified accounts after a massive security breach

What do Joe Biden, Barack Obama, Elon Musk, and Bill Gates have in common? Dozens of high-profile verified Twitter accounts were hacked on Wednesday, seemingly to push a cryptocurrency scam that may have netted upwards of $100,000 in a matter of minutes. These kinds of scams are old hat on Twitter, but never have so many prominent accounts been taken over at once. To stem the tide, Twitter appear

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A Twitter Hacking Spree Hits Elon Musk, Obama, Apple, and More

An unprecedented "security incident" has rocked Twitter—and scammers are making off with huge amounts of bitcoin.

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Study suggests overall COVID-19 intensive care mortality has fallen by a third since the start of the pandemic

A systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies from three continents published in the journal Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that overall mortality of COVID-19 patients in intensive care units (ICUs) has fallen from almost 60% at the end of March to 42% at the end of May — a relative decrease of almost one third.

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Remembering Grant Imahara

Dear Grant, thanks for the wild ride. Love, The MythBusters Family. From: Discovery

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Good News: This Comet Won't Cause A Mass Extinction In 2020. Also, It's Really Pretty

The celestial visitor should be visible just after sunset for anyone who wants to see it. Bring along the binoculars for an even better view. (Image credit: Owen Humphreys /PA Images via Getty Images)

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The Greatest Journey of All Time – Issue 87: Risk

In the summer of 1977, on a field trip in northern Patagonia, the American archaeologist Tom Dillehay made a stunning discovery. Digging by a creek in a nondescript scrubland called Monte Verde, in southern Chile, he came upon the remains of an ancient camp. A full excavation uncovered the trace wooden foundations of no fewer than 12 huts, plus one larger structure designed for tool manufacture a

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Mars Is a Second-Rate Backup Plan – Issue 87: Risk

These days, when I've listened in on strangers' conversations—all properly socially distanced and discretely of course—I've heard several fatigued souls talk about how they'd like to get off this planet, or wish the timeline would correct itself. It's easy to sympathize, we're living in a world that feels like it has considerably more risk and dysfunction than it did a mere 12 months ago. Of cour

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Horror Fans Have More Fun During a Pandemic – Issue 87: Risk

People running through the streets in terror, stores being looted for supplies, and, of course, people eating other people. In World War Z , the film adaptation of Max Brooks' successful zombie apocalyptic horror novel, things start off calm but quickly escalate to all-out mayhem. The zombies in World War Z are fast, almost superhuman in their athleticism. The speed of the zombies and the quickne

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How eviction is feeding—and being fed by—the pandemic

More than half of the state-level eviction moratoriums put in place in response to current pandemic have lifted, and the federal moratorium will lift later this month. (Unsplash/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic

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Someone Apparently Just Hacked Elon Musk, Joe Biden, Jeff Bezos and Kanye West

God Mode Someone appears to have hacked the Twitter accounts of Elon Musk, Joe Biden, Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, Barack Obama, Kanye West and a dazzling array of other celebrities, business magnates, politicians and other public figures. They even somehow accessed the account of Apple, which has never tweeted before. The accounts are all posting similar messages, which promise that if you send bitco

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Blake Simmons (JBIE, LBNL) 2: Conversion of Biomass into Aviation Biofuels

https://www.ibiology.org/bioengineering/biofuels-optimization Biofuels have the potential to provide a sustainable and renewable way to power our transportation systems. Learn how researchers are working to design biofuel production pathways to be both efficient and affordable at global scales. Biofuels have been around for decades, but interest in them has grown considerably in recent years due

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Blake Simmons (JBIE, LBNL) 1: Driving the Future: Biofuels

https://www.ibiology.org/bioengineering/biofuels-optimization Biofuels have the potential to provide a sustainable and renewable way to power our transportation systems. Learn how researchers are working to design biofuel production pathways to be both efficient and affordable at global scales. Biofuels have been around for decades, but interest in them has grown considerably in recent years due

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Trump weakens environmental law to speed up infrastructure projects

The president hails the changes as "historic", but critics say they are designed to avoid scrutiny.

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Fauci Describes White House Behavior as "Bizarre"

Rather than concerning itself with coronavirus cases surging in the country, the White House seems determined to undermine and discredit top US infectious diseases expert Anthony Fauci — a decision that has mystified the immunologist, according to an interview today with the Atlantic . Fauci's remarks follow a confusing week of attacks from the Trump administration. In a Fox News interview with S

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Siberia's heatwave would not have happened without climate change

Few extreme weather events can be wholly pinned on greenhouse-gas emissions. This one can

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Designing DNA from scratch: Engineering the functions of micrometer-sized DNA droplets

Scientists have constructed "DNA droplets" comprising designed DNA nanostructures. The droplets exhibit dynamic functions such as fusion, fission, Janus-shape formation, and protein capture. Their technique is expected to be applicable to a wide variety of biomaterials, opening doors to many promising applications in materials design, drug delivery, and even artificial cell-like molecular system

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When should you neuter your dog to avoid health risks?

A new, 10-year study by researchers at the University of California, Davis, examined 35 dog breeds and found vulnerability from neutering, and the age at which they are neutered, varies greatly depending on the breed.

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Designing DNA from scratch: Engineering the functions of micrometer-sized DNA droplets

Scientists have constructed "DNA droplets" comprising designed DNA nanostructures. The droplets exhibit dynamic functions such as fusion, fission, Janus-shape formation, and protein capture. Their technique is expected to be applicable to a wide variety of biomaterials, opening doors to many promising applications in materials design, drug delivery, and even artificial cell-like molecular system

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That Siberian Heat Wave? Yes, Climate Change Was a Big Factor

An analysis of recent record temperatures found that climate change made this year's long hot spell 600 times more likely.

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Climate change made Siberian heatwave 600 times more likely – study

Human fingerprint on record temperatures 'has rarely, if ever, been clearer', says report The record-breaking heatwave in the Siberian Arctic was made at least 600 times more likely by human-caused climate change, according to a study . Between January and June, temperatures in the far north of Russia were more than 5C above average , causing permafrost to melt, buildings to collapse, and sparkin

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Climate change: Siberian heatwave 'clear evidence' of warming

The heatwave would have been almost impossible without human-caused climate change, a study says.

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Identified: Molecular Predictors of Rheumatoid Arthritis Relapse

The presence of a particular set of RNAs in the blood forewarns of an onset of severe symptoms and points to the cells involved.

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Scientists build high-performing hybrid solar energy converter

Scientists have developed a hybrid solar energy converter that generates electricity and steam with high efficiency and low cost.

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This Star Appears to Have Survived a Supernova

A white dwarf star was sent hurtling through the Milky Way at more than half a million miles per hour after experiencing a "partial supernova." White dwarves are extremely dense, Earth-sized cores that are left over after a star has depleted all its fuel and shed its outer layers. Astronomers believe the white dwarf in question, dubbed SDSS J1240+6710, was once part of a binary star system, the B

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High-fat diet with antibiotic use linked to gut inflammation

Researchers have found that combining a Western-style high-fat diet with antibiotic use significantly increases the risk of developing pre- inflammatory bowel disease. This combination shuts down the mitochondria in cells of the colon lining, leading to gut inflammation. Mesalazine can help restart the mitochondria and treat pre-IBD condition.

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Molecular 'tails' are secret ingredient for gene activation in humans, yeast, and other organisms

Researchers have discovered how diverse forms of life are able to use the same cellular machinery for DNA transcription.

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Researchers find three distinct immune responses for sicker COVID-19 patients

Researchers have discovered three distinct immune responses to the SARS-CoV2 infection that could help predict the trajectory of disease in severe COVID-19 patients and may ultimately inform how to best treat them. A second study uncovered new details about the innate, or initial, response to SARS-CoV2.

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New antiplatelet drug shows promise for treating heart attack

Researchers have developed a new drug that prevents blood clots without causing an increased risk of bleeding, a common side effect of all antiplatelet medications currently available. A new study describes the drug and its delivery mechanisms and shows that the drug is also an effective treatment for heart attack in animal models.

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NASA finds limited water vapor as depression 06E becomes a trough

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean, it gathered water vapor data on Tropical Depression 06E that showed it had opened up into a trough. A trough is an elongated area of low pressure.

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Reprogramming of immune cells enhances effects of radiotherapy in preclinical models of brain cancer

A Ludwig Cancer Research study has dissected how radiotherapy alters the behavior of immune cells known as macrophages found in glioblastoma (GBM) tumors and shown how these cells might be reprogrammed with an existing drug to suppress the invariable recurrence of the aggressive brain cancer

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Want a more just world? Be an unlikely ally | Nita Mosby Tyler

A more equal world starts with you. Citing a formative moment from her own life, equity advocate Nita Mosby Tyler highlights why showing up and fighting for others who face injustices beyond your own lived experience leads to a fairer, more just future for all.

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Twisting magnetic fields for extreme plasma compression

A new spin on the magnetic compression of plasmas could improve materials science, nuclear fusion research, X-ray generation and laboratory astrophysics.

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