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Scientists achieve major breakthrough in preserving integrity of sound waves

In a breakthrough for physics and engineering, researchers from the Photonics Initiative at the Advanced Science Research Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (CUNY ASRC) and from Georgia Tech have presented the first demonstration of topological order based on time modulations. This advancement allows the researchers to propagate sound waves along the boundaries of topological metamaterials withou

17min

Where to get reliable COVID-19 data, now that the CDC doesn't have it

Masks are just one tool against the pandemic — another crucial one is data. (Macau Photo Agency/Unsplash/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . Under the guise of streamlining data, the Trump administration has moved previously available COVID data on hospi

2h

Nyt studie: Avancerede briller lader farveblinde se farver – også uden brillerne på

Farveblinde testpersoner i et mindre forsøg fik forbedret deres evne til at skelne mellem røde eller grønne nuancer ved hjælp af nogle særlige briller – også efter de stoppede med at bruge brillerne.

7h

LATEST

Coordination helps avoid continental COVID-19 resurgence, European modeling study shows

Coordinated lockdown strategies among countries is key to preventing resurgent COVID-19 outbreaks in continental Europe, a new modeling study shows.

3min

Close-up of SARS-CoV-2 protein shows how it interferes with host anti-viral immunity

A detailed study of a SARS-Cov-2 protein, Nsp1, with a central role in weakening the host anti-viral immune response shows that it effectively shuts down production ofproteins in the host.

3min

Perspective: T cell responses to COVID-19 are a crucial target for research

While early research on the adaptive immune response to COVID-19 primarily looked at antibodies, more information is now emerging on how T cells react to the SARS-CoV-2 virus – addressing a crucial knowledge gap, say Daniel Altmann and Rosemary Boyton in a new Perspective.

3min

COVID-19: Viral shutdown of protein synthesis

Researchers from Munich and Ulm have determined how the pandemic coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 inhibits the synthesis of proteins in infected cells and shown that it effectively disarms the body's innate immune system

3min

Coordinated exit strategies crucial to avoid virus second-wave in Europe

Research by the University of Southampton shows European countries need to work together when lifting lockdown measures, to prevent COVID-19 cases rising again on the continent.

3min

Enhanced water repellent surfaces discovered in nature

Through the investigation of insect surfaces, Penn State researchers have detailed a previously unidentified nanostructure that can be used to engineer stronger, more resilient water repellent coatings.

3min

Scientists achieve major breakthrough in preserving integrity of sound waves

In a breakthrough experiment, physicist and engineers at the CUNY ASRC have shown that it is possible to limit the movement of sound to a single direction without interruption even when there are deformations along the pathway. The findings pave the way for technologies with more robust sound wave integrity and advances in ultrasound imaging, sonar, and electronic systems that use surface acoustic

3min

Study identifies missing piece needed for lower-cost, high-quality MRI

Researchers identify the missing piece needed to generate high-quality imaging using low-cost MRI scanners.

3min

Bubonic Plague Cases Are No Cause for Panic

Reports of the infection–including one death this month–recently shook up social media. But, unlike COVID-19, plague is a disease that countries have more or less got under control.

11min

The Guardian view on the government's coronavirus gamble: winter will come | Editorial

Boris Johnson suggested that England could see something like normality by Christmas. Don't count on it Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage In Aesop's fable, the ant uses summer to prepare for the bleak months to come, while the grasshopper idles its time away, only to regret it as temperatures plummet. England must hope Boris Johnson remembers the tale, since as of Wedn

11min

Why Prairie Dogs Are Ecological Heroes

Although many people view prairie dogs as pests, ecologists absolutely dig them

16min

Looking to Reduce Inflammation? This Specially-Designed CBD Could Be The Answer.

For centuries, doctors and scientists viewed inflammation as a necessary and unavoidable systemic response to illness or injury. However, over the last few decades, we have seen a major shift in thinking on the subject. Today we understand that inflammation is as much a cause of major medical issues as it is a symptom. In fact, a lot of doctors now argue that being able to control and reduce infl

16min

Enhanced water repellent surfaces discovered in nature

Through the investigation of insect surfaces, Penn State researchers have detailed a previously unidentified nanostructure that can be used to engineer stronger, more resilient water repellent coatings.

17min

Book Excerpt from COVID-19

In Chapter 8, author Debora MacKenzie recounts an unfortunate history of baselessly blaming disease outbreaks on groups perceived as outsiders.

18min

Ticks that cause red meat allergies are spreading, and invasive fire ants may be our best hope

The lone star tick, common in the southeastern areas of the country, is a frequent carrier of the alpha-gal molecule. It can cause a meat allergy in humans. (NIAID /) If you've ever woken up at midnight with itchy hives, swelling, stomach pain, or trouble breathing with no idea about the cause, there's a chance last night's steak could be the culprit. Allergies to meat are rare, but one way they

18min

Preserved visual memory and relational cognition performance in monkeys with selective hippocampal lesions

The theory that the hippocampus is critical for visual memory and relational cognition has been challenged by discovery of more spared hippocampal tissue than previously reported in H.M., previously unreported extra-hippocampal damage in developmental amnesiacs, and findings that the hippocampus is unnecessary for object-in-context memory in monkeys. These challenges highlight the need for causal

18min

{beta}-Catenin safeguards the ground state of mousepluripotency by strengthening the robustness of the transcriptional apparatus

Mouse embryonic stem cells cultured with MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) and GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3) inhibitors (2i) more closely resemble the inner cell mass of preimplantation blastocysts than those cultured with SL [serum/leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)]. The transcriptional mechanisms governing this pluripotent ground state are unresolved. Release of promoter-proximal

18min

RACK7 recognizes H3.3G34R mutation to suppress expression of MHC class II complex components and their delivery pathway in pediatric glioblastoma

Histone H3 point mutations have been identified in incurable pediatric brain cancers, but the mechanisms through which these mutations drive tumorigenesis are incompletely understood. Here, we provide evidence that RACK7 (ZMYND8) recognizes the histone H3.3 patient mutation (H3.3G34R) in vitro and in vivo. We show that RACK7 binding to H3.3G34R suppresses transcription of CIITA , which is the mas

18min

Evaluating the impact of long-term exposure to fine particulate matter on mortality among the elderly

Many studies link long-term fine particle (PM 2.5 ) exposure to mortality, even at levels below current U.S. air quality standards (12 micrograms per cubic meter). These findings have been disputed with claims that the use of traditional statistical approaches does not guarantee causality. Leveraging 16 years of data—68.5 million Medicare enrollees—we provide strong evidence of the causal link be

18min

The evolution of infant mortality inequality in the United States, 1960-2016

What is the relationship between infant mortality and poverty in the United States and how has it changed over time? We address this question by analyzing county-level data between 1960 and 2016. Our estimates suggest that level differences in mortality rates between the poorest and least poor counties decreased meaningfully between 1960 and 2000. Nearly three-quarters of the decrease occurred be

18min

Probing quantum walks through coherent control of high-dimensionally entangled photons

Control over the duration of a quantum walk is critical to unlocking its full potential for quantum search and the simulation of many-body physics. Here we report quantum walks of biphoton frequency combs where the duration of the walk, or circuit depth, is tunable over a continuous range without any change to the physical footprint of the system—a feature absent from previous photonic implementa

18min

Cryo-EM structures of calcium homeostasis modulator channels in diverse oligomeric assemblies

Calcium homeostasis modulator (CALHM) family proteins are Ca 2+ -regulated adenosine triphosphate (ATP)–release channels involved in neural functions including neurotransmission in gustation. Here, we present the cryo–electron microscopy (EM) structures of killifish CALHM1, human CALHM2, and Caenorhabditis elegans CLHM-1 at resolutions of 2.66, 3.4, and 3.6 Å, respectively. The CALHM1 octamer str

18min

Cryo-EM structure of the calcium homeostasis modulator 1 channel

Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1) is a voltage-gated ATP release channel that plays an important role in neural gustatory signaling and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we present a cryo–electron microscopy structure of full-length Ca 2+ -free CALHM1 from Danio rerio at an overall resolution of 3.1 Å. Our structure reveals an octameric architecture with a wide pore diameter o

18min

Reconfigurable Floquet elastodynamic topological insulator based on synthetic angular momentum bias

Originating with the discovery of the quantum Hall effect (QHE) in condensed matter physics, topological order has been receiving increased attention also for classical wave phenomena. Topological protection enables efficient and robust signal transport; mechanical topological insulators (TIs), in particular, are easy to fabricate and exhibit interfacial wave transport with minimal dissipation, e

18min

Active microrheology of a bulk metallic glass

The glass transition remains unclarified in condensed matter physics. Investigating the mechanical properties of glass is challenging because any global deformation that might result in shear rejuvenation would require a prohibitively long relaxation time. Moreover, glass is well known to be heterogeneous, and a global perturbation would prevent exploration of local mechanical/transport propertie

18min

Aerosol-forced multidecadal variations across all ocean basins in models and observations since 1920

Earth's climate fluctuates considerably on decadal-multidecadal time scales, often causing large damages to our society and environment. These fluctuations usually result from internal dynamics, and many studies have linked them to internal climate modes in the North Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Here, we show that variations in volcanic and anthropogenic aerosols have caused in-phase, multidecada

18min

High-sensitivity in vivo contrast for ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners operating at ultra-low magnetic fields (ULF;

18min

Compact nanoscale textures reduce contact time of bouncing droplets

Many natural surfaces are capable of rapidly shedding water droplets—a phenomenon that has been attributed to the presence of low solid fraction textures ( s ~ 0.01). However, recent observations revealed the presence of unusually high solid fraction nanoscale textures ( s ~ 0.25 to 0.64) on water-repellent insect surfaces, which cannot be explained by existing wetting theories. Here, we show tha

18min

Integrated cascade nanozyme catalyzes in vivo ROS scavenging for anti-inflammatory therapy

Here, an integrated cascade nanozyme with a formulation of Pt@PCN222-Mn is developed to eliminate excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS). This nanozyme mimics superoxide dismutase by incorporation of a Mn–[5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrinato]–based metal-organic framework compound capable of transforming oxygen radicals to hydrogen peroxide. The second mimicked functionality is that

18min

GADL1 is a multifunctional decarboxylase with tissue-specific roles in {beta}-alanine and carnosine production

Carnosine and related β-alanine–containing peptides are believed to be important antioxidants, pH buffers, and neuromodulators. However, their biosynthetic routes and therapeutic potential are still being debated. This study describes the first animal model lacking the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase–like 1 (GADL1). We show that Gadl1 –/– mice are deficient in β-alanine, carnosine, and anserin

18min

Molding free-space light with guided wave-driven metasurfaces

Metasurfaces with unparalleled controllability of light have shown great potential to revolutionize conventional optics. However, they mainly require external light excitation, which makes it difficult to fully integrate them on-chip. On the other hand, integrated photonics enables packing optical components densely on a chip, but it has limited free-space light controllability. Here, by dressing

18min

Dynamic allosteric communication pathway directing differential activation of the glucocorticoid receptor

Allosteric communication within proteins is a hallmark of biochemical signaling, but the dynamic transmission pathways remain poorly characterized. We combined NMR spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance to reveal these pathways and quantify their energetics in the glucocorticoid receptor, a transcriptional regulator controlling development, metabolism, and immune response. Our results delinea

18min

High-frequency hearing in a hummingbird

Some hummingbirds produce unique high-frequency vocalizations. It remains unknown whether these hummingbirds can hear these sounds, which are produced at frequencies beyond the range at which most birds can hear. Here, we show behavioral and neural evidence of high-frequency hearing in a hummingbird, the Ecuadorian Hillstar ( Oreotrochilus chimborazo ). In the field, hummingbirds responded to pla

18min

Human endogenous retroviral protein triggers deficit in glutamate synapse maturation and behaviors associated with psychosis

Mobile genetic elements, such as human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), produce proteins that regulate brain cell functions and synaptic transmission and have been implicated in the etiology of neurological and neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders. However, the mechanisms by which these proteins of retroviral origin alter brain cell communication remain poorly understood. Here, we combined si

18min

De novo rational design of a freestanding, supercharged polypeptide, proton-conducting membrane

Proton translocation enables important processes in nature and man-made technologies. However, controlling proton conduction and fabrication of devices exploiting biomaterials remains a challenge. Even more difficult is the design of protein-based bulk materials without any functional starting scaffold for further optimization. Here, we show the rational design of proton-conducting, protein mater

18min

The Anatomy of a Cisco Counterfeit Shows Its Dangerous Potential

By tearing down bootleg network switches, researchers found ample opportunity for malice—but no signs of a backdoor this time.

20min

Google to fund 100,000 online certificate scholarships

America is facing a "middle-skills gap" thanks to the rapid digitalization of work. Google announces new online certificate courses and 100,000 need-based scholarships to train people for in-demand skills. The need for middle-skills will grow as the COVID-19 pandemic hastens technological adoption. American has a "middle skills" gap. Good jobs requiring a high school diploma have contracted since

24min

Insects Showcase Unexpected Ways to Make Water-Repellent Surfaces

The intersection between water, air, and insects' intricately decorated surfaces turn out to be the key to explain why droplets bounce so quickly off of them.

25min

Inside Johnson & Johnson's Nonstop Hunt for a Coronavirus Vaccine

In Boston and in the Netherlands, scientists are racing to build a vaccine against the virus strangling the world.

26min

US universities are right to fight injustice

Nature, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02143-5 When the Trump administration threatened to deport international students taking only-online courses, there was only one response. No.

28min

US government rescinds antagonistic international-student visa policy

Nature, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02160-4 Plan to force students to take in-person classes or face deportation is dropped during a federal hearing.

28min

Government Leak: Cops Terrified Masks Will Block Facial Recognition

Foiled Again! It turns out that the masks that keep us safe from COVID-19 are a real pain for the police. Leaked documents reveal that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has been particularly concerned about how masks block the facial recognition used to surveil Americans, The Intercept reports . Apparently, federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies have been circulating these conc

31min

Mixed messages hamper pandemic response

US and UK may be suffering impact of unclear policies

32min

NASA Just Picked a Date for SpaceX to Bring Back Its Astronauts

It's a Date On May 30, SpaceX made history by launching the first astronauts to the International Space Station from U.S. ground since the retirement of NASA's Space Shuttle program in 2011. NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley may have piloted the the futuristic Crew Dragon space capsule with ease — but the mission, dubbed Demo-2, is far from over. Both astronauts will still have to make

38min

State-Backed Russian Hackers Are Targeting Coronavirus Vaccine Research

The UK National Cyber Security Centre, (NCSC) in conjunction with their US and Canadian intelligence counterparts, warned on Thursday that Russian hackers with ties to the Kremlin have been targeting coronavirus vaccine development since the early days of the pandemic. The warnings were accompanied by a detailed 16-page document , outlining how Russian hackers might be attempting to steal informa

38min

Cannabis shows potential for mitigating sickle cell disease pain

Cannabis appears to be a safe and potentially effective treatment for the chronic pain that afflicts people with sickle cell disease, according to a new clinical trial co-led by University of California, Irvine researcher Kalpna Gupta and Dr. Donald Abrams of UC San Francisco. The findings appear in JAMA Network Open.

39min

The explosion of new coronavirus tests that could help to end the pandemic

Nature, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02140-8 Researchers are scrambling to find other ways to diagnose the coronavirus and churn out millions of tests a week — a key step in returning to normality.

42min

Author Correction: The Apostasia genome and the evolution of orchids

Nature, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2524-1

49min

Oil and Gas Companies Announce a New CO2 Emissions Target

The aim is to reduce the carbon intensity of operations, but critics say the plan does not go far enough — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

54min

US coronavirus surge: 'It's a failure of national leadership'

Sunbelt states suffer a big rise in cases and deaths amid the growing politicisation of issues such as wearing masks

56min

Groundbreaking new research suggests removing drug-associated memories could prevent relapse

Once the mice in the study had become dependent on the morphine, "switching off" (or silencing) that PVT pathway completely abolished their preference for the morphine. Stanford associate professor Xiaoke Chen's team was able to precisely control the activity of various pathways at different points of the animals' drug-use experience. Extinction training attempts to reduce the strength of those c

57min

Atomtronic device could probe boundary between quantum, everyday worlds

A new device that relies on flowing clouds of ultracold atoms promises potential tests of the intersection between the weirdness of the quantum world and the familiarity of the macroscopic world we experience every day.

1h

Coronavirus Vaccine Data Are Targets for Foreign Hackers

Intelligence officials from the US, UK, and Canada point the finger at Cozy Bear, a group with links to the Russian government.

1h

How does our brain's activity shape behavior?

Suppose you have a ritual of eating cereal every morning for breakfast. Normally, you walk into the kitchen and perform a sequence of fine motor commands, like shaking out the proper amount of cereal, grabbing a single spoon from the drawer, pouring in milk, and carefully raising the spoon to your mouth, being mindful not to spill. But on this morning, you find no cereal in the usual spot in the

1h

Chest x-rays show more severe COVID-19 in non-white patients

Racial/ethnic minority patients admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 infection are more likely to have more severe disease on chest X-rays than white/non-Hispanic patients, increasing the likelihood of adverse outcomes, such as intubation or death, according to a new study.

1h

Dangerous blood clots form in leg arteries of COVID-19 patients

COVID-19 is associated with life-threatening blood clots in the arteries of the legs, according to a new study. Researchers said COVID-19 patients with symptoms of inadequate blood supply to the lower extremities tend to have larger clots and a significantly higher rate of amputation and death than uninfected people with the same condition.

1h

The Scientist Announces Streamlined Facebook Pages For Improved User Experience

In a continued effort to bring the readers of The Scientist the most engaging social media experience, we have examined our full lineup of Facebook niche pages and found that we could streamline some of our channels to provide clearer and more succinct coverage.

1h

Daily briefing: How to take the figures in your paper to the next level

Nature, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02163-1 Journal editors share what makes a great figure. Plus, hackers have been targeting COVID-19 vaccine researchers and how Plan S will open the door to any journal.

1h

1h

Scientists count all the tiny snails in the Arctic

Shell-bearing microgastropods are snails whose size is less than five millimeters. They represent one of the least studied groups of metazoan living organisms in the oceans. Ivan Nekhaev is a senior research associate at the Department of Applied Ecology at St Petersburg University, and Ekaterina Krol is a doctoral student. They have summarized and analyzed the currently known information on the s

1h

Released Siamese crocodile found nesting in the wild

A Siamese crocodile that was released into the wild in 2018 has been recorded nesting in Cambodia's Cardamom Mountains. The female crocodile was identified by her tail scute markings as one that had previously been cared for at Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center and this finding provides evidence that released Siamese crocodiles are not only surviving in the wild, but are also able to nest.

1h

How well do you know your bumblebees?

A citizen science collaboration, of which the University of Aberdeen is part of, launched a new tool this week to help members of the public learn more about bumblebees.

1h

Scientists count all the tiny snails in the Arctic

Shell-bearing microgastropods are snails whose size is less than five millimeters. They represent one of the least studied groups of metazoan living organisms in the oceans. Ivan Nekhaev is a senior research associate at the Department of Applied Ecology at St Petersburg University, and Ekaterina Krol is a doctoral student. They have summarized and analyzed the currently known information on the s

1h

Image: Hubble spies sparkling galaxy

As beautiful as the surrounding space may be, the sparkling galaxy in the foreground of this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope undeniably steals the show.

1h

Released Siamese crocodile found nesting in the wild

A Siamese crocodile that was released into the wild in 2018 has been recorded nesting in Cambodia's Cardamom Mountains. The female crocodile was identified by her tail scute markings as one that had previously been cared for at Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center and this finding provides evidence that released Siamese crocodiles are not only surviving in the wild, but are also able to nest.

1h

Where is water distributed during a drought?

In low precipitation periods, where and how is the limited available water distributed, and what possibilities are there for improving retention in the soil and the landscape? Dörthe Tetzlaff and her team from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have discovered that vegetation has a major influence on this. The researchers are investigating the storage, distribut

1h

How well do you know your bumblebees?

A citizen science collaboration, of which the University of Aberdeen is part of, launched a new tool this week to help members of the public learn more about bumblebees.

1h

New explosive materials to bring nontoxic ammunition

Every time a gun fires, lead leaches into the air. A scientific advancement could provide a comparable replacement for lead-based explosive materials found in ammunition, protecting soldiers and the environment from potential toxic effects.

1h

Separating gamma-ray bursts

By applying a machine-learning algorithm, scientists at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have developed a method to classify all gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), rapid highly energetic explosions in distant galaxies, without needing to find an afterglow—by which GRBs are presently categorized. This breakthrough, initiated by first-year B.Sc. students, may prove key in finally discoverin

1h

The Anthropocene signature on Mount Elbrus, Caucasus

Researchers of the Institute of Polar Sciences of the Italian National Research Council and of the Ca' Foscari University of Venice analyzed fragrances deriving from personal care products and consumer goods in an ice core from Mt. Elbrus, Caucasus. The concentration profile of such fragrances from the 1930s to 2005 follows the trend of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that originate from c

1h

Stabilisation of charge density wave phase by interfacial interactions

NUS researchers have demonstrated that the charge density wave (CDW) phase in H-phase tantalum disulfide (TaS2) bilayers can be stabilized at room temperature by interfacial interactions with a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate.

1h

Researchers develop new materials for energy and sensing

A team of researchers from MIT and Northwestern University has demonstrated the ability to fine-tune the electronic properties of hybrid perovskite materials, which have drawn enormous interest as potential next-generation optoelectronic materials for devices such as solar cells and light sources.

1h

Baleen whales have changed their distribution in the Western North Atlantic

Researchers have been using passive acoustic recordings of whale calls to track their movements. They have found that four of the six baleen whale species found in the western North Atlantic Ocean—humpback, sei, fin and blue whales—have changed their distribution patterns in the past decade. The recordings were made over 10 years by devices moored to the seafloor at nearly 300 locations from the C

1h

Do Air Filters in HVAC Systems Offer Protection Against Coronavirus Indoors? It Depends

There are air filters that can catch particles laden with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. But whether or not the filtration happens depends on other factors.

1h

Pesticides speed the spread of deadly waterborne pathogens

Widespread use of pesticides can speed the transmission of the debilitating disease schistosomiasis, while also upsetting the ecological balances in aquatic environments that prevent infections, finds a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. The infection, which can trigger lifelong liver and kidney damage, affects hundreds of millions of people every year and is s

1h

Study reveals intricate details about Huntington's disease protein

The research focuses on axonal transport — the way in which vital materials travel along pathways called axons inside nerve cells, or neurons. Scientists found that HTT sometimes journeys along these roadways in cellular vehicles (called vesicles) that also carry freight including a protein called Rab4. The research also identified other materials that may be present in these shipments.

1h

Uplifting of Columbia River basalts opens window on how region was sculpted

Information drawn from analyses of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of materials from exposed Columbia River basalts has provided insights about how magma from volcanic eruptions millions of years ago shaped the region and why those eruptions did not trigger a global extinction event.

1h

Synapse-saving proteins discovered, opening possibilities in Alzheimer's, schizophrenia

Loss of synapses is a contributing factor to Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Researchers from the Long School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio discovered a class of proteins that inhibit synapse elimination, opening possibilities for novel therapies for the two diseases.

1h

Baleen whales have changed their distribution in the Western North Atlantic

Researchers have been using passive acoustic recordings of whale calls to track their movements. They have found that four of the six baleen whale species found in the western North Atlantic Ocean—humpback, sei, fin and blue whales—have changed their distribution patterns in the past decade. The recordings were made over 10 years by devices moored to the seafloor at nearly 300 locations from the C

1h

Research underscores importance of global surveillance of plant pathogens

First spotted in the United States in 2014, bacterial leaf streak of corn is an emerging disease of corn that has now spread to ten states, including the top three corn-producing states of Illinois, Iowa, and Nebraska.

1h

Research underscores importance of global surveillance of plant pathogens

First spotted in the United States in 2014, bacterial leaf streak of corn is an emerging disease of corn that has now spread to ten states, including the top three corn-producing states of Illinois, Iowa, and Nebraska.

1h

Will telehealth services become the norm following COVID-19 pandemic?

Experts address whether the routine use of telehealth for patients with cancer could have long-lasting and unforeseen effects on the provision and quality of care.

1h

Expert: Confederate monument facts defang 'heritage' claims

As Confederate monuments and memorials come down across the United States, it's important to think historically not only about the past but also about our own time and what future generations might say about us, historian James T. Campbell argues. With people across the United States confronting the nation's legacy of slavery and systemic racism , monuments and memorials honoring the Confederacy

1h

Jamaal Bowman Is Ready to Join the Squad

Eliot Engel first won his seat in Congress in 1988, in a primary that helped end the old corrupt Bronx machine. Today, according to the official call by the Associated Press, he lost his June primary to newcomer Jamaal Bowman, in a race that became a national symbol of the rise of a new wave of progressives. A lot is happening in Engel and Bowman's sliver of the Bronx and Westchester—and a lot is

1h

Cave's Clues Show It's More Than Just Oldest Outhouse in the Americas

Preserved dung in Oregon's Paisley Caves is helping to fill in some mysteries about some of the earliest people on our continent.

2h

Opioid deaths surge as pandemic spreads across U.S.

Drug overdose deaths hit a record high in 2019, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The pandemic seems to be worsening the opioid crisis, possibly due to users' reluctance to visit hospitals, mental health problems, and disruptions to drug supply. Still, it's too early to know exactly how the pandemic is transforming drug use in the U.S. Opioid deaths in

2h

K-State study first to show SARS-CoV-2 is not transmitted by mosquitoes

A new study by Kansas State University researchers is the first to confirm that SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, cannot be transmitted to people by mosquitoes.

2h

Researchers create a roadmap to better multivalent batteries

Lithium-ion batteries power everything from mobile phones to laptop computers and electric vehicles, but demand is growing for less expensive and more readily available alternatives. The top candidates all hold promise, but researchers report that steep challenges remain.

2h

Come to Grips with Photoshop, Lightroom, and More in this 20-Course Bundle

Photo editing is as old as photography itself. In fact, you have an example in your wallet. The portrait of Lincoln on the $5 bill is a fake : Lincoln's head was taken from an original photo and placed on top of the body of the far less famous John C. Calhoun in an engraving. And, as social media and photo editing software have democratized the art of photography, knowing what to edit and why has

2h

Reduction in commercial flights due to COVID-19 leading to less accurate weather forecasts

Weather forecasts have become less accurate during the COVID-19 pandemic due to the reduction in commercial flights, according to new research. A new study finds the world lost 50 to 75 percent of its aircraft weather observations between March and May of this year, when many flights were grounded due to the pandemic.

2h

Type 1 interferon deficiency: Biomarker of patients at risk of severe COVID-19

Which patients are more likely to develop a severe form of COVID-19? In a new study, researchers describe a unique and unexpected immunological phenotype in severe and critical patients.

2h

A concept in psychology is helping AI to better navigate our world

The concept: When we look at a chair, regardless of its shape and color, we know that we can sit on it. When a fish is in water, regardless of its location, it knows that it can swim. This is known as the theory of affordance, a term coined by psychologist James J. Gibson. It states that when intelligent beings look at the world they perceive not simply objects and their relationships but also th

2h

Covid-19 data is a public good. The US government must start treating it like one.

Earlier this week as a pandemic raged across the United States, residents were cut off from the only publicly available source of aggregated data on the nation's intensive care and hospital bed capacity. When the Trump administration stripped the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of control over coronavirus data , it also took that information away from the public. I run a nonparti

2h

Seven tips for better gaming with Google Stadia

Bonus tip: It's probably not the controller's fault. Learn to accept responsibility for your own actions. Too real? That's OK, you'll feel better after you yell at the screen. (Cristiano Pinto/Unsplash/) A new kind of gaming experience is emerging, one where games stream directly to any device you like, Netflix-style. When the cloud does all the heavy lifting, you can play on your phone just as e

2h

Congressional Democrats Demand White House Restore Hospital Data Collection to CDC

Senate and House Democrats have issued letters calling for the Trump Administration to undo a controversial move reshuffling vital Covid-19 data collection (Image credit: J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

2h

Radiology practices struggle to survive amid COVID-19

Private radiology practices have been especially hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, and the steps they take to mitigate the impact of the pandemic on their practice will shape the future of radiology, according to a special report from the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) COVID-19 Task Force.

2h

Study shows how traumatic experiences can leave their mark on a person's eyes

New research by Welsh academics shows that a patient's pupils can reveal if they have suffered a traumatic experience in the past. The study examined how an individual's eyes responded when shown threatening images.

2h

Where Does 'Castlevania' Go From Here?

The Netflix animated series has been pretty solid for three seasons now. But does it have anything left to say?

2h

How Trump Closed Down the Schools

Few things have captured Donald Trump's fickle attention for long during the pandemic, but for the past 10 days, the president has been highly focused on one issue. He has insisted on the need for America's schools to reopen in August with students in classrooms five days a week, hoping that this might revive the economy, and with it his reelection chances in November. It ought to be an easy sell

2h

Vaccine research shouldn't be secret | Letter

Martin Clavane on what reports about Russian hacking reveal about how the world responds to threats such as Covid-19 Reports about Russian hacking into Covid-19 research are very revealing ( Russian state-sponsored hackers target Covid-19 vaccine researchers , 16 July). They raise fundamental questions about how the world should collectively respond to such existential threats to humankind. Why i

2h

Scientists Discover "Vantablack" Deep-Sea Creatures

A team of marine biologists have discovered 16 new species of terrifying deep-sea fish that reflect almost no light at all, Wired reports — much like the ultra-black material Vantablack . Marine biologist Karen Osborn was astonished when she attempted to take pictures of a fangtooth, a terrifying fanged monster of the deep sea, for cataloguing reasons. The fish appeared to absorb almost all of th

2h

Remove memories to treat addiction?

Researchers have interrupted a neural pathway responsible for opiate-associated memories in mice. Their success in preventing relapse in rodents may one day translate to an enduring treatment of opioid addiction in people. Research surrounding addiction often assumes reward is the primary motivation for drug use and relapse. But while chasing a "high" can prompt drug use, it's often the acute sym

2h

Research underscores importance of global surveillance of plant pathogens

First spotted in the United States in 2014, bacterial leaf streak of corn is an emerging disease of corn that has now spread to ten states, including the top three corn-producing states of Illinois, Iowa, and Nebraska.

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Paper: Mundane behavioral decisions, actions can be 'misremembered' as done

Mundane behaviors such as taking a daily medication can eventually create false memories of completing the task, said Dolores Albarracin, a professor of psychology and marketing at Illinois and the director of the Social Action Lab.

2h

Lifetime discrimination and greater risk of high blood pressure in African Americans

Experiences of discrimination over a lifetime is associated with high blood pressure in African American adults, according to findings published this month in the journal Hypertension from researchers at the Urban Health Collaborative at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health.

2h

Baleen whales have changed their distribution in the Western North Atlantic

Researchers using passive acoustic recordings of whale calls to track their movements have found that four of the six baleen whale species found in the western North Atlantic Ocean — humpback, sei, fin and blue whales — have changed their distribution patterns in the past decade. The recordings were made over 10 years by devices moored to the seafloor at nearly 300 locations from the Caribbean S

2h

St Petersburg University scientists count all the tiny snails in the Arctic

St Petersburg University Scientists have summarised all the known information about Arctic snails that have dimensions less than five millimetres. The information gathered will help to learn more about marine ecosystem pollution and climate change.

2h

Separating gamma-ray bursts: Students make critical breakthrough

By applying a machine-learning algorithm, scientists at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have developed a method to classify all gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), rapid highly energetic explosions in distant galaxies, without needing to find an afterglow – by which GRBs are presently categorized. This breakthrough, initiated by first-year B.Sc. students, may prove key in finally discover

2h

Improved waste separation using super-stable magnetic fluid

Magnetically separating waste particles makes it possible to reclaim a variety of raw materials from waste. Using a magnetic fluid, a waste flow can be separated into multiple segments in a single step. Researchers from Utrecht and Nijmegen have now succeeded in creating a magnetic fluid that remains stable in extremely strong magnetic fields, which makes it possible to separate materials with a h

2h

Social workers identify dire needs as schools prepare to resume classes

As school districts nationwide grapple with how and when to safely reopen in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, a survey of 1,275 social workers across the United States shows the immensity of the challenge ahead.

2h

Research explores motivations and barriers for learners of te reo Māori

Dr. Te Huia, with Māori language researchers Dr. Mauren Muller and Tai Ahu, conducted interviews with 57 Māori language speakers and learners across 12 regions nationally, as well as conducting an indepth survey during the national kapa haka festival Te Matatini, held in Wellington in February 2019, with the support of the 'Te Mitatini' reo Māori campaign.

2h

Computational Lego Designer Outperforms Professional Model-Makers

Designing models with Lego Technic parts is much harder than with traditional Lego bricks. Now a computational designer can do the hard work for you.

2h

Education reform study suggests more charter regulations harm minority educators

Do education regulations sometimes harm those they were intended to help? A recent study by University of Arkansas Education Reform professor Robert Maranto and former doctoral student Ian Kingsbury, now at Johns Hopkins University, says yes.

2h

Honeybees reveal environmental pollution in their surroundings

Honeybee colonies are bioindicators of environmental contamination in the area, since they get coated in everything that there is in the environment, including pollutants, and they end up taking it all back to their bee hives.

2h

Breakthrough blood test detects positive COVID-19 result in 20 minutes

Researchers report a new method that detects positive COVID-19 cases using blood samples in about 20 minutes, and identifies whether someone has contracted the virus.

3h

Kidney transplant, the cost of accounting for patients' preferences

Taking into account patients' preferences can help speed up the organ allocation process and improve the life quality of the recipients, as shown by a joint study conducted by Ca' Foscari University and the University of Padua

3h

New technology promises to revolutionize nanomedicine

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their colleagues from Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry and Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences have developed a breakthrough technology to resolve a key problem that has prevented the introduction of novel drugs into clinical practice for decades. The new solution prolongs

3h

Female surgeon scientists claim more than their share of research grants

While their ranks in academic surgery may be not be robust, women surgeons are holding their own when it comes to surgical research, securing a greater percentage of NIH grants than their numbers suggest.

3h

Neural vulnerability in Huntington's disease tied to release of mitochondrial RNA

A uniquely comprehensive survey of gene expression by cell type in humans and mice revealed several deficits affecting the most vulnerable neurons in Huntigton's disease.

3h

Geologists Say a New Ocean Is Opening up in Africa

Breaking Up In somewhere between five and ten million years, the tectonic plates that form Africa are likely to rip apart so much that it'll eventually split the continent in two. Within Ethiopia's Afar region, the Arabian, Nubian, and Somali tectonic plates are slowly pulling away from each other, NBC News reports , gradually creating a vast rift — slowly forming a new ocean. "We can see that oc

3h

Climate-friendly cooling could cut years of greenhouse gas emissions and save US$ trillions: UN

Coordinated international action on energy-efficient, climate-friendly cooling could avoid as much as 460 billion tons of greenhouse gas emissions—roughly equal to eight years of global emissions at 2018 levels—over the next four decades, according to the Cooling Emissions and Policy Synthesis Report from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the International Energy Agency (IEA).

3h

Fast and flexible computation of optical diffraction

Diffraction is a classic optical phenomenon accounting for light propagation. The efficient calculation of diffraction is of significant value towards the real-time prediction of light fields. The diffraction of electromagnetic (EM) waves can be cataloged into scalar diffraction and vector diffraction according to the validation of different approximation conditions. Although mathematical expressi

3h

A chemical tailor-made suit for Alzheimer's drugs

With over 1.2 million people affected in Germany alone and over 50 million people worldwide, Alzheimer's disease, also referred to simply as Alzheimer's, is one of the greatest medical and social challenges of our time. Due to pathological changes in the brain, patients become increasingly forgetful and disoriented as the disease progresses. In the worst cases, even close relatives are no longer r

3h

The Books Briefing: What to Read If You're Looking for Something to Read

Editor's note: This week's newsletter spotlights some of our favorite Books Briefing reading lists from the past few months. We'll be back with a fresh newsletter next week. Know other book lovers who might like this guide? Forward them this email. What We're Reading (HERITAGE IMAGES / GETTY) Your socially distanced summer-reading list (May 15, 2020) "Books to bring on an airplane . Books to enjo

3h

New technology speeds up organic data transfer

Researchers are pushing the boundaries of data speed with a brand new type of organic LED.

3h

A chemical tailor-made suit for Alzheimer's drugs

With over 1.2 million people affected in Germany alone and over 50 million people worldwide, Alzheimer's disease, also referred to simply as Alzheimer's, is one of the greatest medical and social challenges of our time. Due to pathological changes in the brain, patients become increasingly forgetful and disoriented as the disease progresses. In the worst cases, even close relatives are no longer r

3h

Solar Orbiter returns first data, snaps closest pictures of the Sun

The first images from ESA/NASA's Solar Orbiter are now available to the public, including the closest pictures ever taken of the Sun.

3h

What Makes Grass-Fed Beef Different, and Are You Buying the Real Thing?

How grass-fed and grain-fed cattle are raised — and the truth behind the meat labeling requirements.

3h

Democrats Eye Trump's Game Plan to Reverse Late Rule Changes

President Trump pioneered the use of an obscure 1996 law to quickly reverse the regulations of his predecessor. Now Democrats hope to take a page from his game plan.

3h

Squeezing curium between diamonds yields a surprise

Scientists can manipulate curium, one of the heaviest known elements, to a greater degree than previously thought. A team of researchers has demonstrated how curium—element 96 in the periodic table and one of the last that's visible to the naked eye—responds to high pressure resulting from squeezing a sample between two diamonds. The team finds that the behavior of curium's outer electrons—which

3h

CVIA has just published a new issue, Volume 4 Issue 4

Beijing, 10 July 2020: the journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published a new issue, Volume 4 Issue 4. This issue brings together important research papers from leading cardiologists in US, China, and Africa, including very important new research on identification of Novel TTN Mutations and discovery of digenic mutation.

3h

Antarctica more widely impacted by humans than previously thought

Using a data set of 2.7 million human activity records, the team showed just how extensive human use of Antarctica has been over the last 200 years

3h

Turmeric could have antiviral properties

Curcumin, a natural compound found in the spice turmeric, could help eliminate certain viruses, research has found. A study published in the Journal of General Virology showed that curcumin can prevent Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) – an alpha-group coronavirus that infects pigs – from infecting cells. At higher doses, the compound was also found to kill virus particles.

3h

Psychology: The most personal device

Everyone who uses a smartphone unavoidably generates masses of digital data that are accessible to others, and these data provide clues to the user's personality. Psychologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich (LMU) are studying how revealing these clues are.

3h

Go try the new iPad and iPhone features before they're officially released

iPadOS 14 is in public beta right now. (Apple/) Until recently, you would have had to pay $100 to join the Apple Developer Program in order to get the new iOS 14 beta. I did it a couple weeks ago and have been trying out some of the new features ever since. Now, however, the public beta has hit the internet, which means anyone with a compatible iPhone can jump into the possibly buggy world of iOS

3h

Love-hate relationship of solvent and water leads to better biomass breakup

Scientists have used neutron scattering and supercomputing to better understand how an organic solvent and water work together to break down plant biomass, creating a pathway to significantly improve the production of renewable biofuels and bioproducts.

3h

White House Shift in Covid-19 Data Collection Spurs Confusion

On Wednesday, U.S. hospitals began sending daily Covid-19 data reports to a new database in Washington — a process that bypasses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and that has prompted backlash from some public health experts, hospital leaders, journalists, and others who work with the data.

3h

Pigs turn to humans as dogs do, unless they have a problem to solve

Researchers of the MTA-ELTE 'Lendület' Neuroethology of Communication Research Group at the Department of Ethology at the Faculty of Science, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest (ELTE) compared human-oriented communicative behaviors of young miniature pigs and dogs kept as companion animals. They found that in a neutral situation pigs turn to humans, initiating interactions as much as dogs do. But

3h

Predicting the biodiversity of rivers

Biodiversity is severely threatened both in Switzerland and worldwide, and numerous organisms are facing massive declines—particularly in freshwater ecosystems. All the species living in rivers—including fish, bacteria and many different aquatic invertebrates, such as mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies—are crucial for the functioning of these ecosystems. But many species are under threat due to

3h

SpaceX Is Launching a Fleet of Pirate-Hunting Satellites

At the end of the year, a fleet of pirate-hunting satellites will take to the sky. A satellite intelligence company called HawkEye 360 says it's booked a ticket on a SpaceX rideshare mission to launch a cluster of three satellites that will sail around the globe, tracking down pirates, poachers, and smugglers. HawkEye, unlike the superhero of the same name , doesn't actually dole out justice. But

3h

Pigs turn to humans as dogs do, unless they have a problem to solve

Researchers of the MTA-ELTE 'Lendület' Neuroethology of Communication Research Group at the Department of Ethology at the Faculty of Science, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest (ELTE) compared human-oriented communicative behaviors of young miniature pigs and dogs kept as companion animals. They found that in a neutral situation pigs turn to humans, initiating interactions as much as dogs do. But

3h

Orderly arranged bead-chain ternary nanocomposites for supercapacitors

In a paper published in Nano, a group of researchers from Jiangsu University of Technology, China have developed novel Cu2O-Mn3O4-NiO ternary nanocomposites by electrostatic spinning technology, which improved the performance of supercapacitor electrode materials.

3h

N-doped carbon encapsulated transition metal catalysts to optimize performance of zinc-air batteries

In a report published in Nano, a team of researchers from Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, China have developed N-doped carbon encapsulated transition metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) and oxygen evolution reactions (OER) to optimize performance of zinc-air batteries.

3h

Predicting the biodiversity of rivers

Biodiversity is severely threatened both in Switzerland and worldwide, and numerous organisms are facing massive declines—particularly in freshwater ecosystems. All the species living in rivers—including fish, bacteria and many different aquatic invertebrates, such as mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies—are crucial for the functioning of these ecosystems. But many species are under threat due to

3h

Invisible Ether Evolved with Time

Originally published in November 1904 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Fed expands US coronavirus lending scheme to non-profits

Main Street programme will include groups such as hospitals and universities

3h

3h

Beetle-mounted camera streams insect adventures

Researchers have developed a tiny lightweight video camera that can be carried by a beetle.

3h

The bilbies 'thriving' after a 100-year absence in New South Wales

The marsupial has bred in the wild in New South Wales for the first time in a century.

3h

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Clear strategies needed to reduce bushmeat hunting

Extensive wildlife trade not only threatens species worldwide but can also lead to the transmission of zoonotic diseases. An international research team led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research shed new light on the motivations why people hunt, trade or consume different species. The research shows that more different

3h

A chemical tailor-made suit for Alzheimer's drugs

Over 50 million people worldwide are affected by Alzheimer's disease and it is one of the greatest medical and social challenges of our time. Due to pathological changes in the brain, patients become increasingly forgetful and disoriented as the disease progresses. Alzheimer's is still considered incurable today. Researchers at the University of Göttingen and the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Ther

3h

New technology speeds up organic data transfer

An international research team, involving Newcastle University experts, developed visible light communication (VLC) setup capable of a data rate of 2.2?Mb/s by employing a new type of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs).

3h

Mysterious mechanism of graphene oxide formation explained

Natural graphite, used as the precursor for graphene oxide production, is a highly ordered crystalline inorganic material, which is believed to be formed by decay of organic matter. It is extremely thermodynamically stable and resistant to be converted to the organic-like metastable graphite oxide

3h

Where is the water during a drought?

In low precipitation periods – where and how is the limited available water distributed and what possibilities are there for improving retention in the soil and the landscape? Doerthe Tetzlaff and her team from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries discovered that vegetation has a major influence on this. Using the example of the drought-sensitive Demnitzer Muehlenfliess

3h

New learning algorithm should significantly expand the possible applications of AI

The e-prop learning method developed at Graz University of Technology forms the basis for drastically more energy-efficient hardware implementations of Artificial Intelligence.

3h

Love-hate relationship of solvent and water leads to better biomass breakup

Scientists have used neutron scattering and supercomputing to better understand how an organic solvent and water work together to break down plant biomass, creating a pathway to significantly improve the production of renewable biofuels and bioproducts.

3h

Researchers gives robots intelligent sensing abilities to carry out complex tasks

The novel system developed by computer scientists and materials engineers combines an artificial brain system with human-like electronic skin, and vision sensors, to make robots smarter.

3h

Resurging virus could throw burgeoning economic recovery off its rails

The nascent economic recovery that had started to sprout across the nation as businesses reopened following COVID-19-mandated closures, has been thrown a major curveball as new cases of the virus have surged. According to an analysis released today by the UC Riverside School of Business Center for Economic Forecasting and Development, jobs, income, public revenue, and other indicators are likely t

3h

Photos may improve understanding of volcanic processes

The shape of volcanoes and their craters provide critical information on their formation and eruptive history. Techniques applied to photographs—photogrammetry—show promise and utility in correlating shape change to volcanic background and eruption activity.

3h

Researchers realize nanoscale electrometry based on magnetic-field-resistant spin sensors

A team led by Prof. Du Jiangfeng, Prof. Shi Fazhan, and Prof. Wang Ya from University of Science and Technology of China, of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, proposed a robust electrometric method utilizing a continuous dynamic decoupling technique, where the continuous driving fields provide a magnetic-field-resistant dressed frame. The study was published in Physical Review Letters on June 19.

3h

Pressure suppresses carrier trapping in 2-D halide perovskite

Two-dimensional (2-D) organic-inorganic halide perovskites are emerging materials for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications due to their unique physical properties and a high degree of tunability. Despite impressive advances, challenges remain, including unsatisfactory performance and a vague understanding of their structure-property relationships. Addressing these challenges requires more

3h

Cool plan: Study says better aircon can slow global warming

Making air conditioners and fridges more energy efficient and using more climate-friendly refrigerants can significantly slow global warming, according to a U.N.-backed report released Friday.

3h

Global warming and pollution have similar impact on coral reef fish

An international collaboration has shown for the first time that human-caused stresses of global warming and pollution affect coral reef fish development and survival via the disruption of an endocrine pathway.

3h

Global warming and pollution have similar impact on coral reef fish

An international collaboration has shown for the first time that human-caused stresses of global warming and pollution affect coral reef fish development and survival via the disruption of an endocrine pathway.

3h

New insight into the origin of water on the earth

Scientists have found the interstellar organic matter could produce an abundant supply of water by heating, suggesting that organic matter could be the source of terrestrial water.

3h

A short segment of a prion protein plays a critical role in its susceptibility to cross-species prion transmission

A short segment of an infectious protein known as a prion protein plays a crucial role in determining how susceptible the protein is to interspecies prion transmission, RIKEN researchers have discovered in a yeast study. This finding has important implications for neurodegenerative diseases in humans.

4h

eDNA technology more effective in monitoring salmon runs

The annual upriver migration of Pacific wild salmon—integral to B.C.'s coastal ecosystem—is an important sustenance source for numerous animal species and a vital economic and cultural lifeline for Indigenous and other communities.

4h

River plants counter both flooding and drought to protect biodiversity

"Water plants are a nuisance in streams, blocking the flow. You should remove them." This notion has for many years determined how streams were managed to prevent flooding during high rainfall events. Research by NIOZ scientist Loreta Cornacchia, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, in cooperation with Utrecht University and British and Belgian partners, shows how vegetatio

4h

Reduction of bushmeat hunting

Extensive wildlife trade not only threatens species worldwide but can also lead to the transmission of zoonotic diseases. It encompasses hundreds of species with significant differences in their conservation status and associated disease risk. However, current strategies to mitigate the wildlife trade often neglect these differences. An international research team led by the Max Planck Institute f

4h

The Pentagon Is Quietly Working on a Military Space Station Outpost

Shooting Star The Department of Defense has quietly awarded a contract for the Sierra Nevada Corporation to turn its Shooting Star cargo spacecraft into a small experimental space station, The Drive reports . The defense contractor has been developing the spacecraft since 2016 as a way to resupply the International Space Station under NASA's Commercial Resupply Services program. The craft is 16 f

4h

Fast and flexible computation of optical diffraction

The efficient calculation of diffraction is of significance for tracing electromagnetic field propagation and predicting the performance of optical systems. Scientists in China present a fast and flexible way to compute scalar and vector diffraction using the Bluestein method. The computation time can be substantially reduced, and the region of interest as well as the sampling numbers can be arbit

4h

Honeybees reveal environmental pollution in their surroundings

The University of Cordoba is collaborating on a new project by the University of Almeria to test APIStrip, a new tool for sampling environmental pollutants by means of bee colonies

4h

Researchers realize nanoscale electrometry based on magnetic-field-resistant spin sensor

USTC researchers proposed a robust electrometric method utilizing continuous dynamic decoupling (CDD) technique, where the continuous driving fields provide a magnetic-field-resistant dressed frame.

4h

Increased psychological well-being after the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic

Expectations for our mental health during and after the corona lockdown were pessimistic, but thus far the situation has not turned out to be quite as bad as feared. Danes, and in particular Danish women, appear to have reacted with reduced psychological well-being as the infection rate and death toll peaked in the beginning of April. But already three weeks later, the general psychological well-b

4h

Climate-friendly Cooling Could Cut Years of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Save US$ Trillions: UN

Energy-efficient cooling with climate-friendly refrigerants could avoid up to 460 billion tonnes of greenhouse gas equivalent being added to the atmosphere through 2060 – roughly equal to eight years of global emissions at 2018 levels.To meet all needs by 2050, cooling appliances worldwide would almost quadruple in number from 3.6 billion now to 14 billion, contributing greatly to higher world tem

4h

New tools to study bioactive lipids

NAEs are bioactive lipid molecules that appear to play roles in energy balance, inflammation, stress responses and addiction. How NAE levels are regulated and their precise contributions to biological processes remain poorly understood.

4h

A short segment of a prion protein plays a critical role in its susceptibility to cross-species prion transmission

A short segment of an infectious protein known as a prion protein plays a crucial role in determining how susceptible the protein is to interspecies prion transmission, RIKEN researchers have discovered in a yeast study. This finding has important implications for neurodegenerative diseases in humans.

4h

App will track harmful dust from bauxite mining in Guinea

In western Guinea, near where the Tinguilinta River meets the Atlantic Ocean, a concrete jetty extends about 275 meters into the river's channel. The jetty is equipped with a conveyor belt system, which facilitates the transport of crushed and dried bauxite—the primary ore used in the production of aluminum—from pier-side stockpiles to docked ships for export. Behind the jetty, gaseous and particu

4h

Climate change could make toxic algal blooms in our oceans more deadly

Late spring and early summer in California bring thousands of marine mammals to the state's beaches, as groups of California sea lions, elephant seals and harbor seals give birth along the shore. Visitors to places such as the Carpinteria Harbor Seal Preserve can observe portly cubs lounging in sand, awaiting the return of their mothers from fishing expeditions in the Pacific Ocean.

4h

Gentrification no longer an inner-city phenomenon in Aussie cities

The innermost suburbs of Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne are not seeing a change in gentrification according to new research from The University of Queensland. Instead, the highest levels of urban renewal are occurring within a band located five to 15 kilometers from the cities' central business districts (CBDs).

4h

The research is clear: White people are not more likely than Black people to be killed by police.

When he was asked this week why Black people are "still dying at the hands of law enforcement" in the U.S., President Donald Trump responded by focusing on white people who had been killed by police.

4h

Skyrmions created in a centrosymmetric material lacking geometrical frustration

A restriction on the kind of materials that can host nanoscale magnetic whirlpools known as skyrmions has been lifted by experimentalists at RIKEN. This will significantly expand the range of the materials skyrmions can be created in, making them even more attractive for use in low-power data-storage devices.

4h

New tools to study bioactive lipids

NAEs are bioactive lipid molecules that appear to play roles in energy balance, inflammation, stress responses and addiction. How NAE levels are regulated and their precise contributions to biological processes remain poorly understood.

4h

New research suggests COVID has drastically reduced most pupils' learning and will exacerbate education inequality

More than one in four primary school pupils and one in six secondary school pupils are spending an hour or less a day home learning during the COVID crisis, a wide-ranging education survey by the University of Sussex has revealed.

4h

eDNA technology more effective in monitoring salmon runs

The annual upriver migration of Pacific wild salmon—integral to B.C.'s coastal ecosystem—is an important sustenance source for numerous animal species and a vital economic and cultural lifeline for Indigenous and other communities.

4h

River plants counter both flooding and drought to protect biodiversity

"Water plants are a nuisance in streams, blocking the flow. You should remove them." This notion has for many years determined how streams were managed to prevent flooding during high rainfall events. Research by NIOZ scientist Loreta Cornacchia, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, in cooperation with Utrecht University and British and Belgian partners, shows how vegetatio

4h

Reduction of bushmeat hunting

Extensive wildlife trade not only threatens species worldwide but can also lead to the transmission of zoonotic diseases. It encompasses hundreds of species with significant differences in their conservation status and associated disease risk. However, current strategies to mitigate the wildlife trade often neglect these differences. An international research team led by the Max Planck Institute f

4h

Video: Solar Orbiter first images revealed

ESA's Solar Orbiter spacecraft has sent back its first images of the sun. At 77 million kilometres from the surface, this is the closest a camera has ever flown to our nearest star. The pictures reveal features on the sun's exterior that have never been seen in detail before.

4h

Plant-watering stakes to keep your greenery healthy while you're away

Help your plants grow even from a distance. (Brina Blum via Unsplash/) How are you supposed to go on vacation when you have a garden or houseplants to support? Watering stakes are your solution. Made from terracotta, plastic, or glass, these devices will slowly water plants over time. They're also great for forgetful gardeners who are afraid of under-watering plants, and for thirstier plants that

4h

Ancient peoples in Patagonia who adapted to changing climate offer insights for today

New research has uncovered how an ancient human population adapted effectively to climate change, offering insights that are useful for the environmental challenges of today. The recent study examines the fishing patterns of prehistoric hunter-gatherers in Patagonia, a region at the southern tip of South America. Archaeologists used fish remains to piece together thousands of years of history in t

4h

These Expertly Designed Sneakers Are Actually Steel Toe Boots In Disguise

When it comes to footwear , there are lots of options that will keep your feet safe. Unfortunately, most of those options are severely lacking in the style department. Of course, style shouldn't be a concern when you're working on a job site where your feet are at risk. But once the workday is done, no one wants to hit the town in a clunky, sweaty pair of steel toe boots. But that's life. You hav

4h

Measuring drug-induced molecular changes within a cell at sub-wavelength scale

Synchrotron InfraRed Nanospectroscopy has been used for the first time to measure biomolecular changes induced by a drug (amiodarone) within human cells (macrophages) and localized at 100 nanometre scale, i.e. two orders of magnitude smaller than the IR wavelength used as probe. This was achieved at the Multimode InfraRed Imaging and Micro Spectroscopy (MIRIAM) beamline (B22) at Diamond Light Sour

4h

Regional inequality is not decreasing in low and middle-income countries

Data from the United Nations has shown that inequality in human development between countries has been decreasing at a global level for years. However, new research shows that major differences between regions of individual countries have continued to exist. Together with colleague Iñaki Permanyer, Professor Jeroen Smits has developed a new tool for making a more accurate analysis of wealth differ

4h

Ancient peoples in Patagonia who adapted to changing climate offer insights for today

New research has uncovered how an ancient human population adapted effectively to climate change, offering insights that are useful for the environmental challenges of today. The recent study examines the fishing patterns of prehistoric hunter-gatherers in Patagonia, a region at the southern tip of South America. Archaeologists used fish remains to piece together thousands of years of history in t

4h

Has the coronavirus proved a crisis too far for Europe's far-right outsiders?

In recent years, far-right political parties in Europe have capitalised on crises to build their support bases. Many have made it to positions of power as a result of these efforts. The financial crisis of 2008, the refugee crisis that began in 2014 and the ongoing debate around climate change have all provided opportunities to harness growing uncertainty and resentment for political purposes.

4h

The secret to renewable solar fuels is an off-and-on again relationship

They say it's better to have had something special and lost it than to have never had it at all. Who would have thought that sentiment holds true for metal oxide catalysts? According to scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and Caltech, copper that was once bound with oxygen is better at converting carbon dioxide into renewable fuels than copper that was never bound to

4h

Space station motors take prosthetic legs to a new level

A new robotic prosthetic leg prototype offers a more natural gait while also being quieter and more energy efficient than other designs, researchers report. The key is the use of new small and powerful motors, originally designed for a robotic arm on the International Space Station. The streamlined design offers a free-swinging knee and regenerative braking, which charges the battery with energy

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The best bookends for every kind of media

Better organization for your reads. (Radu Marcusu via Unsplash/) Many bookworms know their collection isn't complete without a set of bookends to keep things in place. But bookends' utility doesn't end there. They're a necessity for collectors of all kinds—DVDs, albums, CDs, magazines, cookbooks—making them a great purchase for any room. Here are some of our favorites, in a range of styles and we

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World must pick sides in vaccines battle, says Russian wealth fund chief

Kirill Dmitriev says his country will be among those to develop a vaccine soon

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Fowl play? Poultry researcher has two more papers retracted for "grave mistakes"

The journal Poultry Science has retracted two papers for authorship issues. The first author on both articles was Sajid Umar, of the Arid Agriculture University, in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, who now has lost at least four papers for similar reasons. One article, from 2016, was titled "Synergistic effects of thymoquinone and curcumin on immune response and … Continue reading

4h

Method may solve mysteries of ancient human ashes in urns

Researchers have become the first ever to test a tracing method on the cremated remains of a large number of ancient humans. The method makes it possible to glean information from the ashes of thousands of buried urns, information that will reveal a bit about who these prehistoric humans were and where they came from. The tracing method has great potential to fill in large gaps in human history.

4h

Challenging jigsaw puzzles to keep you entertained for hours

You'll be set for days. (Mor THIAM via Unsplash/) Jigsaw puzzles have become increasingly popular as meditative, mindful activities—much like filling in coloring books or baking bread. If your current collection feels too easy, and you're up for a challenge—or if you're looking for a puzzle you can leave out on your coffee table to enjoy over time—look no further than these picks. A vivid teal an

4h

A rare discovery: We found the sugar glider is actually three species, but one is disappearing fast

Most Australians are familiar with the cute, nectar-loving sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps), a marsupial denizen of forests in eastern and northern Australia.

4h

Jan van Deursen's bullying: lab members speak out

"There is a clear difference between being a taskmaster and a bully. There just is. Jan was definitely both." – Robin Ricke, former postdoc in van Deursen's Mayo Clinic lab

4h

How the Brain Builds a Sense of Self From the People Around Us

We are highly sensitive to people around us. As infants, we observe our parents and teachers, and from them we learn how to walk, talk, read—and use smartphones. There seems to be no limit to the complexity of behavior we can acquire from observational learning. But social influence goes deeper than that. We don't just copy the behavior of people around us. We also copy their minds. As we grow ol

4h

A rare discovery: We found the sugar glider is actually three species, but one is disappearing fast

Most Australians are familiar with the cute, nectar-loving sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps), a marsupial denizen of forests in eastern and northern Australia.

4h

What if airplanes could repair their own damage?

Airplanes are behemoths of the sky; a commercial airliner is over 6,000 times as heavy as a large Canadian goose. At 500 mph, however, these behemoths are not impervious to impact, even from the seemingly innocuous goose. Such damage can result in a range of issues, from fluctuations in air pressure and altitude.

4h

Pressure suppresses carrier trapping in 2D halide perovskite

Here, we show a remarkable PL enhancement by 12 folds using pressure to modulate the structure of a recently developed 2D perovskite (HA)2(GA)Pb2I7 (HA = n?hexylammonium, GA = guanidinium). This structure features an extremely large cage previously unattainable, affording us a rare opportunity to understand the structure?property relationship and explore emergent phenomena in halide perovskites.

4h

New insight into the origin of water on the earth

Scientists have found the interstellar organic matter could produce an abundant supply of water by heating, suggesting that organic matter could be the source of terrestrial water.

4h

Type 1 interferon deficiency: Biomarker of patients at risk of severe COVID

Which patients are more likely to develop a severe form of Covid-19? This is a key question that needs to be answered to improve the individual management and prognosis of patients. In a study published in Science on July 13, teams from AP-HP, Inserm, Université of Paris, Institut Pasteur and Institut Imagine describe a unique and unexpected immunological phenotype in severe and critical patients.

4h

River plants counter both flooding and drought to protect biodiversity

'Water plants are a nuisance in streams, blocking the flow. You should remove them'. This notion has for many years determined how streams were managed to prevent flooding during high rainfall events. Research by NIOZ scientist Loreta Cornacchia, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, in cooperation with Utrecht University and British and Belgian partners, shows how vegetatio

4h

Study: Five-year review of all alzheimer's drugs in development shows reason for optimism

Dr. Jeffrey L. Cummings, UNLV research professor and a leading expert on Alzheimer's disease clinical trials, led a five-year review of all Alzheimer's drugs in the development pipeline. Currently, there are 121 unique therapies in 136 clinical trials in the pipeline.The paper, "Alzheimer's disease drug development pipeline: 2020," was published this week in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: Tra

4h

Discovery of new glider species highlights conservation risk

Research by Charles Darwin University has changed what was known about the charismatic nectar-loving sugar glider, finding that they are at more risk than ever, particularly after the recent bushfires devastating south-eastern Australia.

4h

New technique improves strains of bacteria used to develop medications

Publishing their findings in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, scientists from the University of Surrey and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México have developed a new computational technique, ReProMin, to identify processes which express non-essential genes in bacterial cells. Identification of these non-essential genes will allow scientists to remove them, saving energy within the cell. This

4h

Don't abandon plans for high-speed rail in Australia

The Grattan Institute's call to "abandon" plans for any high-speed rail network in Australia fails to look at the wider benefits such a project can bring by way of more productive economies and more sustainable towns and cities.

4h

Australia wants to build a huge concrete runway in Antarctica. Here's why that's a bad idea

Australia wants to build a 2.7-kilometer concrete runway in Antarctica, the world's biggest natural reserve. The plan, if approved, would have the largest footprint of any project in the continent's history.

4h

U.S. coronavirus data will now go straight to the White House. Here's what this means for the world

Led by physicians, scientists and epidemiologists, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is one of the most reliable sources of knowledge during disease outbreaks. But now, with the world in desperate need of authoritative information, one of the foremost agencies for fighting infectious disease has gone conspicuously silent.

4h

Antibacterial activewear? The claim is just as absurd as it sounds

Lorna Jane recently launched an "antiviral" line of its activewear, called "LJ Shield," generating significant backlash from medical professionals.

4h

Online tool shows COVID-19 impact on sales tax

Three Georgia regions experienced double-digit declines in sales tax distributions in the June quarter during the coronavirus pandemic, according to an online interactive data tool created by Georgia State University's Fiscal Research Center (FRC).

4h

Cancer-causing dust released by earthworks

Tiny, needle-like fibers that can become airborne if bedrock is disturbed during earthworks has the potential to cause asbestos-type disease and should be investigated, scientists say.

4h

Almost 6,000 Australian veterans experience homelessness each year

A new study into the prevalence of homelessness in ex-serving men and women calls for urgent policy attention and improved service responses.

4h

Do the TRAPPIST-1 planets have atmospheres?

In February of 2017, the scientific community rejoiced as NASA announced that a nearby star (TRAPPIST-1) had a system of no less than seven rocky planets. Since that time, astronomers have conducted all kinds of follow-up observations and studies in the hopes of learning more about these exoplanets. In particular, they have been attempting to learn if any of the planets located in the stars' habit

4h

Discovery of new glider species highlights conservation risk

Research by Charles Darwin University has changed what was known about the charismatic nectar-loving sugar glider, finding that they are at more risk than ever, particularly after the recent bushfires devastating south-eastern Australia.

4h

Q&A: How COVID-19 is impacting politics in the United States

The COVID-19 pandemic is impacting many aspects of our lives, and politics is no exception, especially in a presidential election year. Most in-person campaigning has stalled. Politicians are judged on their responses to the pandemic. Even mask-wearing has become politicized.

4h

New process turns carbon into cleaner, high-performance diesel biofuel blendstock

A new single-phase catalyst that enables the conversion of renewable and waste carbon into sustainable diesel fuels has been developed through a unique collaboration between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) consortia, Chemical Catalysis for Bioenergy (ChemCatBio) and the Co-Optimization of Fuels & Engines (Co-Optima) initiative.

4h

Low-cost, printable 3-D device designed for analysing chemicals from smartphones

Researchers from the University of Alicante (Spain) and the Universidad Nacional del Sur (Argentina) have designed and validated a low-cost 3-D printed device that, connected to a smartphone, makes it possible to conduct chemical analyses. This technology presents a simple solution for on-site testing, in developing countries or remote locations, without the need to step into the laboratory or acc

4h

New technique improves strains of bacteria used to develop medications

Publishing their findings in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, scientists from the University of Surrey and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México have developed a new computational technique, ReProMin, to identify processes which express non-essential genes in bacterial cells. Identification of these non-essential genes will allow scientists to remove them, saving energy within the cell. This

4h

Study confirms hairpin vortices in supersonic turbulence

The turbulence that occurs in the low-pressure region behind a rocket traveling at supersonic speeds is complex and not well understood. In the first experimental study of its kind, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign helped close the knowledge gap for these flows by proving the existence of hairpin vortices in a supersonic separated flow.

4h

Reduction in commercial flights due to COVID-19 leading to less accurate weather forecasts

Weather forecasts have become less accurate during the COVID-19 pandemic due to the reduction in commercial flights, according to new research. A new study in AGU's journal Geophysical Research Letters finds the world lost 50-75% of its aircraft weather observations between March and May of this year, when many flights were grounded due to the pandemic.

4h

The secret to renewable solar fuels is an off-and-on again relationship

Copper that was once bound with oxygen is better at converting CO2 into renewable fuels than copper that was never bound to oxygen, according to Berkeley Lab and Caltech scientists.

4h

Breakthrough blood test detects positive COVID-19 result in 20 minutes

World-first research by Monash University in Australia has been able to detect positive COVID-19 cases using blood samples in about 20 minutes, and identify whether someone has contracted the virus.

4h

New evidence for a dynamic metallocofactor during nitrogen gas reduction

A key mystery about the gas comprising most of our atmosphere is closer to being solved following a discovery by University of California, Irvine biologists. Their findings are the first step in understanding the biological mechanism for breaking down nitrogen gas. Besides yielding groundbreaking knowledge, the information holds promise for developing environmentally friendly and cheaper ways to m

4h

Atomtronic device could probe boundary between quantum, everyday worlds

A new device that relies on flowing clouds of ultracold atoms promises potential tests of the intersection between the weirdness of the quantum world and the familiarity of the macroscopic world we experience every day. The atomtronic Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is also potentially useful for ultrasensitive rotation measurements and as a component in quantum computers.

4h

Daydreaming at work can be an asset or a flaw

Daydreaming carries significant creative benefits, especially for those who identify with their profession and care about their work, research finds. Daydreaming can be both a liability and a significant asset, depending upon certain attributes of the wanderer, however. It can impair performance if not driven by professional challenges. "Daydreaming can have significant upsides for one's tendency

4h

Cognitive ability tied to better social distancing

A new study finds that people with lower working memory capacity were less likely to practice social distancing. The study also found working memory was related to how fairly a subject behaved in an ultimatum game. The findings help explain why some people don't social distance and offer new ways to encourage proper distancing. Social distancing is difficult. Few people would contest that fact. D

4h

Coronavirus is messing with the weather forecast too

Weather forecasts have become less accurate during the COVID-19 pandemic due to the reduction in commercial flights, according to new research.

4h

N-doped carbon encapsulated transition metal catalysts to optimize performance of zinc-air batteries

In a report published in NANO, a team of researchers from Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, China have developed N-doped carbon encapsulated transition metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) and oxygen evolution reactions (OER) to optimize performance of zinc-air batteries.

5h

Orderly arranged bead-chain ternary nanocomposites for supercapacitors

In a paper published in NANO, a group of researchers from Jiangsu University of Technology, China have developed novel Cu 2 O-Mn 3 O 4 -NiO ternary nanocomposites by electrostatic spinning technology, which improved the performance of supercapacitors electrode materials.

5h

5h

Extreme Arctic waves set to hit new heights

Nature, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02104-y Waves crashing into Arctic coastlines could grow by as much as three metres if global warming continues unabated.

5h

Can Comic-Con Work From Home?

The annual confab is going online this year—and there's a chance it will never recover.

5h

TED's Idea Worth Spreading: Stay Home

Plus: Early accounts from Vancouver, the endless surprises of tech journalism, and a new low for the White House.

5h

Probing the properties of a 2-D fermi gas

When a new physical system is created or uncovered, researchers generally study it in depth to unveil its distinctive properties and characteristics. For example, they might try to determine how the system reacts when it is disturbed, and in what ways this disturbance typically propagates through it.

5h

How to Boost Your Immunity

Some simple, practical steps can raise your resistance to viruses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Even videos of police killings can be traumatic

A majority of college students of color show symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder after watching social media videos of police killing unarmed Black men, research finds. Seeing such killings shared on social media contributes to anxiety and fear of future police encounters, researchers say. The study in the Journal of Black Studies surveyed 134 college students in the United States, between

5h

Methane emissions hit record-breaking levels

Global emissions of methane have reached the highest levels on record, research shows. Growth of emissions from coal mining, oil and natural gas production, cattle and sheep ranching, and landfills are primarily driving the increases. Between 2000 and 2017, levels of the potent greenhouse gas barreled up toward pathways that climate models suggest will lead to 3-4 degrees Celsius of warming befor

5h

Solar Orbiter Gets Closest-Ever Look at the Sun

NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) got together earlier this year to launch the aptly named Solar Orbiter spacecraft. The mission recently took up its position near the sun, and the agencies have released the first wave of images from this enviable vantage point. Naturally, the pictures are stunning and unprecedented, but they also show some scientifically relevant "campfires" dotting the s

6h

Review ordered into how Covid-19 deaths are calculated in England

Scientists warn Public Health England data include fatalities of anyone who has tested positive

6h

The Coming Population Bust

I often discuss the fact that the world's population is set to approach 10 billion people by 2060 or so. Right now we are approaching 8 billion. This is a potentially serious issue, mainly for food security. We are already using most of the arable land on the planet, and will need to produce more food on the same, or hopefully less, land if we are to sustain these populations without devastating

6h

Dogs may use Earth's magnetic field to take shortcuts

GPS-equipped hunting dogs take a curious north-south jog, which seems to help them get their bearings

6h

A former Navy disaster specialist wages war against COVID-19 on U.S.-Mexico border

Dennis Amundson invites Science into the intensive care unit he commands to see how his crew battles the new coronavirus

6h

Remember TV on the Internet Before Netflix? Neither Do We

This week, Recode's Peter Kafka joins us to talk about Netflix's dominance over the entertainment industry and how the streaming landscape continues to change.

6h

These ultra-black fish camouflage with the darkness of the deep sea

Idiacanthus antrostomus The ultra-black Pacific black dragon ( Idiacanthus antrostomus ), the second-blackest fish studied by the research team. (Karen Osborn, Smithsonian/) When we think of deep ocean creatures adapting to the dark, bioluminescent jellyfish or the glowy lures of an anglerfish come to mind. But other deep sea animals have adapted in the other direction, evolving skin that acts al

6h

Using neural-network soundscapes to protect natural environments

A team of researchers from Imperial College London, the University of Sydney and Cornel University has found that it is possible to create a soundscape from noises in the natural environment using machine-learning algorithms. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes how such soundscapes can be used by land managers to protect natural environm

6h

Using neural-network soundscapes to protect natural environments

A team of researchers from Imperial College London, the University of Sydney and Cornel University has found that it is possible to create a soundscape from noises in the natural environment using machine-learning algorithms. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes how such soundscapes can be used by land managers to protect natural environm

6h

Sperm discovery reveals clue to genetic 'immortality'

New insights into an elusive process that protects developing sperm cells from damage in growing embryos, sheds light on how genetic information passes down, uninterrupted, through generations.

6h

Sperm discovery reveals clue to genetic 'immortality'

New insights into an elusive process that protects developing sperm cells from damage in growing embryos, sheds light on how genetic information passes down, uninterrupted, through generations.

6h

Air dispersion models for odor assessment

Unpleasant odors are, well, unpleasant. Sometimes, we have to endure the stench but legislation is beginning to recognize that people have a right to not be exposed when they are avoidable. This might apply in the context of the environment local to an industrial plant, water and sewage treatment works, refuse sites and other areas, including the workplace, shopping centers, and places of entertai

6h

NASA announces new James Webb Space Telescope target launch date

NASA now is targeting Oct. 31, 2021, for the launch of the agency's James Webb Space Telescope from French Guiana, due to impacts from the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, as well as technical challenges.

6h

Runaway star might explain black hole's disappearing act

At the center of a far-off galaxy, a black hole is slowly consuming a disk of gas that swirls around it like water circling a drain. As a steady trickle of gas is pulled into the gaping maw, ultrahot particles gather close to the black hole, above and below the disk, generating a brilliant X-ray glow that can be seen 300 million light-years away on Earth. These collections of ultrahot gas, called

6h

Researchers propose novel high-performance dual-ion batteries with 3-D porous structure

Dual-ion batteries (DIBs) consisting of a graphite anode and cathode have attracted increasing attention due to their advantages of environmental friendliness, excellent cyclic stability and good safety.

6h

Coronavirus symptoms fall into six different groupings, study finds

Findings could give medics advance warning for hospital care and respiratory support Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Symptoms of Covid-19 appear to fall into six different groupings, researchers have revealed in work they say could help to predict whether a patient will end up needing a ventilator or other breathing support. The team say the findings could give healt

6h

We Need More Black Physicians

COVID-19 is threatening an already scarce but essential health care resource — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Scientists uncover first atomic structure of Epstein-Bar virus nucleocapsid

A team of Chinese scientists, led by Prof. Yu Xuekui from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and Prof. Zeng Musheng from Sun Yat-sen University, reported the first complete atomic model of Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) nucleocapsid. This study was published online in Cell Research.

6h

No One Has to Get Their Period Anymore

At the posthumous retrial of Joan of Arc in 1455, two decades after she was burned at the stake as a witch and a heretic, she was declared an innocent martyr. During the trial, a personal valet offered evidence of Joan of Arc's piety and purity during her 19 years on Earth: "She never suffered from the secret illness of women." As far as the people closest to her knew, he claimed, she never got h

6h

The State Where Protests Have Already Forced Major Police Reform

I n Loveland, Colorado —the nation's self-proclaimed " Sweetheart City ," about an hour's drive north of Denver—a young police officer paused earlier this month as he was arresting a pregnant woman who had outstanding warrants. Should he handcuff her, the officer asked his supervisors, or, under a new Colorado policing law, would that now be considered excessive force? To officers like Rob Pride,

6h

Scientists uncover first atomic structure of Epstein-Bar virus nucleocapsid

A team of Chinese scientists, led by Prof. Yu Xuekui from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and Prof. Zeng Musheng from Sun Yat-sen University, reported the first complete atomic model of Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) nucleocapsid. This study was published online in Cell Research.

7h

Chemical thermometers take temperature to the nanometric scale

The miniaturization of electronic components coupled with their increasing integration density has considerably expanded heat flows, which can lead to overheating. But measuring these nanometric events is difficult because conventional solutions such as infrared thermography do not work below the scale of a micrometer.

7h

Farvel Boeing 747: British Airways sender »dronningen af himlen« på pension

Nedgangen i flyrejser i kølvandet på COVID-19-pandemien, får nu British Airways til at pensionere hele sin Boeing 747-flåde tre år før tid.

7h

Replacing lithium with sodium in batteries

An international team of scientists from NUST MISIS, Russian Academy of Science and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf has found that instead of lithium (Li), sodium (Na) "stacked" in a special way can be used for battery production. Sodium batteries would be significantly cheaper and equivalently or even more capacious than existing lithium batteries. The results of the study are published

7h

This Algorithm Doesn't Replace Doctors—It Makes Them Better

An artificial intelligence system has outperformed physicians when detecting skin lesions. The results are changing how one school trains dermatologists.

7h

Russia's Latest Hacking Target: Covid-19 Vaccine Projects

Officials in the three countries believe a state-linked group is trying to steal intellectual property and information about potential vaccine candidates.

7h

Colleges Prepare to Test Thousands of Students for Covid-19

As campuses reopen, the logistics of preventing an outbreak are posing thorny questions: Who to test? How often? And will students buy in?

7h

The US Is Paying Way Too Much for Remdesivir

The inflated price of the anti-Covid drug may not bother hospitals, insurance companies, or even patients. But it's still not justified.

7h

When power is toxic: Dominance reduces influence in groups

Being the strongest, biggest and most aggressive individual in a group might make you dominant, but it doesn't mean you make all the decisions.

7h

When power is toxic: Dominance reduces influence in groups

Being the strongest, biggest and most aggressive individual in a group might make you dominant, but it doesn't mean you make all the decisions.

7h

Laser-Textured Metal Surfaces Kill Bacteria Faster

Zapping copper with lasers enhances its antimicrobial properties — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Boris Johnson encourages cautious return to work in offices

UK prime minister says people can return to work at 'discretion' of their employers

7h

Laser-Textured Metal Surfaces Kill Bacteria Faster

Zapping copper with lasers enhances its antimicrobial properties — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Children's sleep severely affected by impact of coronavirus, say experts

Warning as anxiety and lack of routine lead to rise in inquiries at clinics Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The coronavirus crisis is having a significant impact on children's sleep, with anxiety and lack of routine causing serious disruption, experts and charities have warned. The Millpond sleep clinic, in London, says there has been a 30% rise in sleep inquiries fr

7h

Boris Johnson unveils plan to return England 'to normality' by Christmas

PM sets out workplace guidelines and gives local authorities powers to close premises and cancel events Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson has unveiled his plan for a "more significant return to normality" by Christmas, as he revealed steps to encourage people back to work in England and sweeping measures that will allow ministers to issue stay-at-home ord

7h

Predictive policing algorithms are racist. They need to be dismantled.

Yeshimabeit Milner was in high school the first time she saw kids she knew getting handcuffed and stuffed into police cars. It was February 29, 2008, and the principal of a nearby school in Miami, with a majority Haitian and African-American population, had put one of his students in a chokehold. The next day several dozen kids staged a peaceful demonstration. It didn't go well. That night, Miami

7h

Dutch army equipped with vibrating belts for hands-free navigation

Haptic navigation, which uses vibrations to guide the wearer, could be used by people with visual impairments, but the first product to hit the market has been sold to the Royal Netherlands Army

7h

Coronavirus Live Updates: Officials Sound Alarm After U.S. Daily Record of 75,600 New Cases

The number of deaths in the country is increasing, and more than half the states have enacted mask orders. Brazil surpasses 2 million total cases, and India has hit a million.

7h

A million mink culled in Netherlands and Spain as coronavirus causes havoc for fur farmers

Agriculture minister says origins of outbreak unclear after seven farm workers – and 87% of the mink – test positive Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Spain has ordered the culling of nearly 100,000 mink on a farm and an estimated one million mink have already been culled on Dutch fur farms, as coronavirus wreaks havoc in the European fur farming industry. Joaquin Olon

8h

Trump's Fix for Restaurants Is Out of Touch With the Crisis

Economic policy ideas embraced by a president typically grow out of an interagency process that includes White House economic advisers and Cabinet secretaries, or committee hearings on the Hill. But one Donald Trump idea apparently came from a celebrity chef whose signature restaurant has a prix fixe menu starting at $158 a person (not including wine, of course). Trump has mentioned at least 10 t

8h

Global rapport: Markant forskel i tandsundhed og behov for forebyggelse

Forebyggende tandpleje og sundhedsfremmende arbejde afhænger af hvorhenne i verden man er. Ny forskning…

8h

Painfully awkward: Duplicate anesthesiology study retracted

A study that compared drugs used to reverse the effects of relaxants for surgery has been retracted because the majority of the results were already published. The study, "Comparison of sugammadex and pyridostigmine bromide for reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade in short-term pediatric surgery," appeared in the journal Medicine in February 2020. The work found … Continue reading

8h

The Song of the Summer Is in Chaos

What does summer sound like this year? I can only speak for myself, and the answer is that summer sounds like a cartoon character singing over a scratched reggaeton CD. " Mequetrefe ," by the Venezuelan experimental musician Arca, has lately been my default get-moving song, though the places I have to get moving to are mostly the couch and the grocery store. The song is a mess of glitchy noise, w

8h

The Deck Is Not Rigged: Poker and the Limits of AI

Creating an algorithm to win at poker isn't just fun and games — the same code could be applied to military, business, government, and cybersecurity to aid in strategic decision making. But despite tremendous gains in the algorithmic assault on chance, computers haven't yet cracked the code of human nature.

8h

UK '95% sure' Russian hackers tried to steal coronavirus vaccine research

Minister says Britain and allies confident Russian intelligence was behind cyber-attacks Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK security minister James Brokenshire has said Britain is "more than 95%" sure that Russian state-sponsored hackers targeted UK, US and Canadian organisations involved in developing a coronavirus vaccine. Brokenshire said the National Cyber Se

8h

An FGF15/19-TFEB regulatory loop controls hepatic cholesterol and bile acid homeostasis

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17363-6 TFEB is a transcriptional regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, activated upon starvation or lysosomal stress. Here the authors report that TFEB regulates hepatic bile acid synthesis downstream of FGF19 signaling.

9h

AXL confers cell migration and invasion by hijacking a PEAK1-regulated focal adhesion protein network

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17415-x AXL receptor tyrosine kinase has a role in metastasis but the mechanism is unclear. In this study, the authors show that AXL activation can control focal adhesion dynamics via PEAK1 and that AXL-mediated PEAK1 phosphorylation is required for metastasis of triple negative breast cancer cells in vivo.

9h

A solution to the learning dilemma for recurrent networks of spiking neurons

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17236-y Bellec et al. present a mathematically founded approximation for gradient descent training of recurrent neural networks without backwards propagation in time. This enables biologically plausible training of spike-based neural network models with working memory and supports on-chip training of neuromorphic hardwa

9h

Shaping caustics into propagation-invariant light

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17439-3 Propagation-invariant beams have been up to now only available in a few realizations or for specific applications. Here, the authors demonstrate two methods for generating propagation-invariant beams with fully customizable intensity profiles in a comprehensive way inspired by geometrical optics.

9h

Anthropogenic stressors impact fish sensory development and survival via thyroid disruption

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17450-8 Anthropogenic stressors affect many aspects of marine organismal health. Here, the authors expose surgeonfish to temperature and pesticide stressors and show that the stressors, separately and in combination, have adverse effects on thyroid signaling, which disrupts several sensory systems and important predatio

9h

Cross-species oncogenic signatures of breast cancer in canine mammary tumors

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17458-0 Comparison of spontaneous canine cancers and human cancers may illuminate future therapeutic avenues. Here, genomic analyses of these tumors highlights a convergence on PI3K-Akt oncogenic pathways.

9h

Calcium isotopic ecology of Turkana Basin hominins

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17427-7 Non-traditional stable isotopes, such as of calcium, have potential to expand our understanding of ancient diets. Here, Martin et al. use stable calcium isotopes recovered from fossil tooth enamel to compare the dietary ecology of hominins and other primates in the Turkana Basin 2-4 million years ago.

9h

Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17354-7 Spin-polarized current manipulation of magnetic skyrmions is energy consuming. Here, the authors achieve an electric-field manipulation of individual skyrmions in a nanostructured ferromagnetic/ferroelectrical heterostructure at room temperature via an inverse magneto-mechanical effect.

9h

Predicting the biodiversity of rivers

Biodiversity and thus the state of river ecosystems can now be predicted by combining environmental DNA with hydrological methods, researchers from the University of Zurich and Eawag have found. Using the river Thur as an example, the approach allows areas requiring conservation to be identified in order to initiate protective measures.

9h

Chemical thermometers take temperature to the nanometric scale

Scientists from the Coordination Chemistry Laboratory and Laboratory for Analysis and Architecture of Systems, both of the CNRS, recently developed molecular films that can measure the operating temperature of electronic components on a nanometric scale. These patented temperature-sensitive molecules have the distinctive quality of being extremely stable, even after millions of uses. They were pre

9h

Pigs turn to humans as dogs do, unless they have a problem to solve

Researchers compared human-oriented communicative behaviours of young miniature pigs and dogs kept as companion animals. They found that in a neutral situation pigs turn to humans, initiating interactions as much as dogs do. But in a problem solving situation the two species behave differently. Natural differences between pigs and dogs prevail despite similar socialization if an exciting challenge

9h

About lipid metabolism in Hermetia illucens (L. 1758): on the origin of fatty acids in prepupae

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68784-8

9h

Classification of α-synuclein-induced changes in the AAV α-synuclein rat model of Parkinson's disease using electrophysiological measurements of visual processing

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68808-3 Classification of α-synuclein-induced changes in the AAV α-synuclein rat model of Parkinson's disease using electrophysiological measurements of visual processing

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Dopamine induces in vitro migration of synovial fibroblast from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68836-z

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Analysis of the "centrosome-ome" identifies MCPH1 deletion as a cause of centrosome amplification in human cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68629-4

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Different precipitation response over land and ocean to orbital and greenhouse gas forcing

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68346-y

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Adaptation of gene loci to heterochromatin in the course of Drosophila evolution is associated with insulator proteins

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68879-2

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Experimental determination and ray-tracing simulation of bending losses in melt-spun polymer optical fibres

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68568-0

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Carbon nanotube porin diffusion in mixed composition supported lipid bilayers

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68059-2

9h

You're a Senior. How Do You Calculate Coronavirus Risk Right Now?

Early in the pandemic, older adults were told to stay at home. With different states reopening or re-closing, weighing the risks is more complicated.

9h

Why schools should teach habits of mind, not "college readiness"

What does it mean to prepare students for college and why is that the goal? Bena Kallick, co-director of the Institute for Habits of Mind and program director for Eduplanet21, argues that a shift has to be made. Schools should instead be helping learners by preparing them for life, not just higher education. Developed by Kallick and Arthur Costa, habits of mind are 16 problem-solving life skills

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Trump Redirects Foreign Aid Agency To Work On Pandemic. Congress Has Questions

President Trump gave a foreign investment agency an unusual task: Give loans to domestic companies to help refill the depleted U.S. medical stockpile. House appropriators want an independent review. (Image credit: Evan Vucci/AP)

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Mundaflæsning kan forbedre lydoplevelsen for høreapparatbrugere

Med store mængder data fra et kamera og kunstig intelligens har forskere taget et skridt på vejen for at gøre livet lettere for mennesker med høreapparat. Samtidig er de kommet et skridt nærmere løsningen på et velkendt problem for høreapparatbrugere.

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Safe Pregnancy As COVID-19 Surges: What's Best For Mom And Baby?

Preliminary evidence suggests the coronavirus can pass through the placenta, and pregnancy slightly raises a woman's risk of a severe case of COVID-19. Medical experts urge calm and common sense. (Image credit: Leo Patrizi/Getty Images)

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Shark pulls 10-year-old from fishing boat in Australia

A shark "grabbed" a 10-year-old boy from a fishing boat off Australia on Friday but swam off after his father jumped in to save him, officials said.

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6.9-magnitude quake hits Papua New Guinea

A powerful 6.9-magnitude earthquake struck eastern Papua New Guinea Friday, rocking residents across the pacific nation, the US Geological Survey reported.

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Shark pulls 10-year-old from fishing boat in Australia

A shark "grabbed" a 10-year-old boy from a fishing boat off Australia on Friday but swam off after his father jumped in to save him, officials said.

9h

UAE Mars mission liftoff on Japan rocket reset for Monday

The liftoff of a United Arab Emirates' Mars orbiter, postponed due to bad weather at the launch site in southern Japan, is now set for Monday.

9h

NASA's Hubble successor delayed again by virus, other issues

The launch of NASA's successor to the Hubble Space Telescope faces seven more months of delay, this time because of the pandemic and technical issues.

9h

What kind of face mask gives the best protection against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

9h

Huge underground lasers measure Earth's spin with extreme precision

Understanding Earth's rotation in space is crucial for GPS navigation and now we have an extremely precise way to measure it with lasers and supermirrors

9h

'Work from home': UK chief scientific adviser warns of coronavirus risks – video

The UK government's chief scientific adviser has said working from home is still the best option where possible to maintain physical distancing, as he acknowledged that the outcome of Britain's response to the Covid-19 outbreak 'has not been good'. Sir Patrick Vallance 's advice during a two-hour appearance before the science and technology select committee contrasts with Boris Johnson's recovery

9h

Israel returns to partial lockdown with immediate weekend shutdown

Government unveils measures after marathon emergency cabinet session as infections rise Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Israel has reimposed some lockdown measures following a vigorous second surge in the number of coronavirus infections, putting in place stringent weekend shutdowns in which shops, hairdressers and attractions will be closed. The government announced

10h

Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a vaccine?

More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…

10h

Megaphages harbor mini-Cas proteins ideal for gene editing

The DNA-cutting proteins central to CRISPR-Cas9 and related gene-editing tools originally came from bacteria, but a newfound variety of Cas proteins apparently evolved in viruses that infect bacteria.

10h

Megaphages harbor mini-Cas proteins ideal for gene editing

The DNA-cutting proteins central to CRISPR-Cas9 and related gene-editing tools originally came from bacteria, but a newfound variety of Cas proteins apparently evolved in viruses that infect bacteria.

10h

How COVID-19 is Impacting the Pharmaceutical Packaging Market

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Elon Musk details Starlink home broadband that you simply plug in

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Pin-prick blood test used to test for radiation exposure in mice

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Blood iron levels could be key to slowing ageing, gene study shows

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Europe's shift to electric cars picks up despite recession

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Solar Orbiter Returns First Data, Snaps Closest Pictures of the Sun

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White Castle to pilot autonomous kitchen assistant

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Så kan chefen minska skuldkänslor när kollegor sägs upp

Många sägs upp i coronatider. De som blir kvar på arbetsplatsen kan drabbas av något som kallas survivor syndrome eller överlevarsyndrom. Det kan leda till att personal blir mindre effektiva och mindre motiverade att arbeta. De känner skuld mot uppsagda kollegor och är själva rädda för att behöva sluta inom en snar framtid.

11h

Pine beetles successful no matter how far they roam—with devastating effects

Whether they travel only a few metres or tens of kilometres to a new host tree, female pine beetles use different strategies to find success—with major negative consequences for pine trees, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.

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Pine beetles successful no matter how far they roam—with devastating effects

Whether they travel only a few metres or tens of kilometres to a new host tree, female pine beetles use different strategies to find success—with major negative consequences for pine trees, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.

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Kæmpe rovfugl flyver i fem timer uden at baske med vingerne

Andeskondoren kan tilbagelægge 170 kilometer udelukkende ved hjælp af luftstrømme.

11h

A Poorly Conceived Study Fails to Prove Ayurveda Works

Quackery is alive, well, and government-supported in India, as demonstrated by a terrible study of Ayurveda.

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UK coronavirus live: Johnson to unveil £3bn plan to get NHS 'battle ready' for winter

News updates: PM set to make announcement in press conference on Friday PM promises extra £3bn for NHS Ministers urged to rescue Covid-hit early years education providers Oxford vaccine team aim to start lab-controlled human trial soon UK government withdraws Randox test kits over safety issues Global coronavirus updates – live 8.25am BST Brokenshire is asked about Patrick Vallance's opposition t

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Comet Neowise's spectacular journey – in pictures

Comet Neowise was discovered on 27 March by Nasa's Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission. Scientists say the comet is about 3 miles across. Its nucleus is covered with sooty material dating back to the origin of our solar system 4.6bn years ago. It is the brightest comet visible from the northern hemisphere in 25 years Continue reading…

12h

The desperate global search for a coronavirus vaccine! | First Dog on the Moon

Even though all the vaccinologists are flat out like a lizard drinking it's going to take some time. Hang in there everyone Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Get all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading…

12h

Don't Miss This Increasingly Rare Chance to See a Comet With The Naked Eye

Neowise is here, and it won't be back for thousands of years.

12h

India Coronavirus Cases Surge Past One Million

Several states and cities have reimposed total and partial lockdowns as the pandemic accelerates. India now ranks third in the world in infections.

13h

Photos of the Week: Noble Deer, Deadman's Reef, Buffalo Float

Phase 3 reopenings in Europe and North America, locust swarms in India, sunset soccer in Indonesia, a seawater pool in France, in-stream dining in Kuala Lumpur, flooding on the Yangtze River, Sammy the Seal in England, Godzilla in Yokosuka, Bastille Day fireworks in Paris, and much more

13h

Key technology for mass-production of lignin-bio-aviation fuels for reducing greenhouse gas

The team, led by Dr. Jeong-Myeong Ha of the Clean Energy Research Center at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST), has developed a technology that can be used to mass-produce aviation-grade fuels from wood wastes. The ability to produce aviation-grade fuel from wood waste is expected to help international aviation companies comply with the new strong emissions regulations, which are

14h

Glaucoma study findings emphasise need for regular eye checks

People with early-stage glaucoma see the contrast of visible objects in a very similar way to people without the condition, a new study has shown.

14h

Global report: US reports daily record of 77,300 new coronavirus cases

Highest one-day total as Democrats urged to skip convention; restrictions reimposed in Mexico, Spain and Israel Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The US has reported a record 77,300 new coronavirus cases in 24 hours, according to the Johns Hopkins University tracker, which relies on official government data. The figure is the highest one-day total for the pandemic so f

14h

Surge in Covid-19 cases leaves US carers hunting for shields again

Failure to address shortages in protective equipment exposes healthcare professionals as infections rise

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Smittestop-app har advaret mindst fire danskere om corona-risiko

Fire personer har henvendt sig til sundhedsmyndighederne, efter at de har modtaget en besked om mulig risiko for coronasmitte via den officelle danske app til smitteopsporing. Det viser, at appen »allerede har haft en effekt«, lyder det fra Sundheds- og Ældreministeriet.

15h

Perks of Being a Trichromat

As a youngster, many excursions with my grandmother would end with her pointing out the breathtaking combination of hues that graces the sky during golden hour. She would be sure to mention the weather predictions that stem from our folklore: Warm mixtures of pink and lavender, she would tell me, means that tomorrow will be […]

15h

Some decontamination processes damage N95 face masks

Certain methods of decontaminating medical face masks for repeated use during the COVID-19 pandemic appear to damage the masks' integrity and protective function, according to new research.

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Vaccine additives can enhance immune flexibility — Implications for flu and SARS-CoV-2

A vaccine additive known as an adjuvant can enhance responses to a vaccine containing the exotic avian flu virus H5N1, so that both rookie and veteran elements of the immune response are strengthened, according to a new study.

15h

Breakthrough in studying ancient DNA from Doggerland that separates the UK from Europe

Scientists have studied sedimentary ancient DNA (sedaDNA) from sediment deposits in the southern North Sea, an area which has not previously been linked to a tsunami that occurred 8150 years ago.

15h

Scientists uncover SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell immunity in recovered COVID-19 and SARS patients

The T cells, along with antibodies, are an integral part of the human immune response against viral infections due to their ability to directly target and kill infected cells. A Singapore study has uncovered the presence of virus-specific T cell immunity in people who recovered from COVID-19 and SARS, as well as some healthy study subjects who had never been infected by either virus.

15h

Social distancing and COVID-19: A law of diminishing returns

New modeling shows how social distancing could have better been implemented. The key? Longer periods of distancing would have helped — but only to a point. More needed to be done.

15h

Can People ID Infectious Disease by Cough and Sneeze Sounds?

Individuals aren't very good at judging whether someone coughing or sneezing has an infectious condition or is simply reacting to something benign.

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Dangerous parasite controls host cell to spread around body

Researchers have discovered new information about how a dangerous parasite takes control of a patient's cells as it spreads throughout their body, an important finding that could help in the development of new drugs to treat this infection.

15h

Megaphages harbor mini-Cas proteins ideal for gene editing

Cas proteins like CRISPR-Cas9 have great potential for gene therapy to treat human disease and for altering crop genes, but the gene-targeting and gene-cutting Cas proteins are often large and hard to ferry into cells with viral vectors such as adenovirus. Scientists have now discovered a hypercompact Cas protein, Cas-phi, that should work better. It is half the size of Cas9 and apparently evolved

15h

Research raises concerns about firearm access for people with dementia

New research looks at how caregivers address the issues of firearm safety when taking care of someone who has Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD) and has access to a gun.

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Widening cancer gene testing is cost effective and could prevent millions of cancer cases

Screening entire populations for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations could prevent millions more breast and ovarian cancer cases across the world compared to current clinical practice, according to an international study led by Queen Mary University of London. The research also shows that it is cost effective in high and upper-middle income countries.

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Analysing waste water may assist census takers

Chemistry and demography are intertwined

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What if the speed of light were that of a cyclist?

A new paper revives a hero from physics's past

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Can People ID Infectious Disease by Cough and Sneeze Sounds?

Individuals aren't very good at judging whether someone coughing or sneezing has an infectious condition or is simply reacting to something benign. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Can People ID Infectious Disease by Cough and Sneeze Sounds?

Individuals aren't very good at judging whether someone coughing or sneezing has an infectious condition or is simply reacting to something benign. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Opinion: At a Crossroads: Reimagining science, engineering, and medicine—and its practitioners [Social Sciences]

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has cast a bright light on the importance of science and evidence (1). Epidemiologists have provided public health advice informed by experience with epidemics and are sharing best practices for halting the spread of the virus. Biomedical scientists are researching how the virus works,…

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Discovery of the world's highest-dwelling mammal [Evolution]

Environmental limits of animal life are invariably revised when the animals themselves are investigated in their natural habitats. Here we report results of a scientific mountaineering expedition to survey the high-altitude rodent fauna of Volcán Llullaillaco in the Puna de Atacama of northern Chile, an effort motivated by video documentation…

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Clusters of bacterial RNA polymerase are biomolecular condensates that assemble through liquid-liquid phase separation [Cell Biology]

Once described as mere "bags of enzymes," bacterial cells are in fact highly organized, with many macromolecules exhibiting nonuniform localization patterns. Yet the physical and biochemical mechanisms that govern this spatial heterogeneity remain largely unknown. Here, we identify liquid–liquid phase separation (LLPS) as a mechanism for organizing clusters of RNA…

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T-box transcription factor 3 governs a transcriptional program for the function of the mouse atrioventricular conduction system [Genetics]

Genome-wide association studies have identified noncoding variants near TBX3 that are associated with PR interval and QRS duration, suggesting that subtle changes in TBX3 expression affect atrioventricular conduction system function. To explore whether and to what extent the atrioventricular conduction system is affected by Tbx3 dose reduction, we first characterized…

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Direct readout of heterochromatic H3K9me3 regulates DNMT1-mediated maintenance DNA methylation [Biochemistry]

In mammals, repressive histone modifications such as trimethylation of histone H3 Lys9 (H3K9me3), frequently coexist with DNA methylation, producing a more stable and silenced chromatin state. However, it remains elusive how these epigenetic modifications crosstalk. Here, through structural and biochemical characterizations, we identified the replication foci targeting sequence (RFTS) domain…

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Site-specific ubiquitination of pathogenic huntingtin attenuates its deleterious effects [Medical Sciences]

Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive incurable neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and neuropsychiatric symptoms. It is caused by expansion of a cytosine–adenine–guanine triplet in the N-terminal domain of exon 1 in the huntingtin (HTT) gene that codes for an expanded polyglutamine stretch in the protein product which becomes aggregation…

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What ATP binding does to the Ca2+ pump and how nonproductive phosphoryl transfer is prevented in the absence of Ca2+ [Biochemistry]

Under physiological conditions, most Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) molecules bind ATP before binding the Ca2+ transported. SERCA has a high affinity for ATP even in the absence of Ca2+, and ATP accelerates Ca2+ binding at pH values lower than 7, where SERCA is in the E2 state with low-affinity Ca2+-binding sites. Here…

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A mechanism-aware and multiomic machine-learning pipeline characterizes yeast cell growth [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Metabolic modeling and machine learning are key components in the emerging next generation of systems and synthetic biology tools, targeting the genotype–phenotype–environment relationship. Rather than being used in isolation, it is becoming clear that their value is maximized when they are combined. However, the potential of integrating these two frameworks…

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Predicting the long-term stability of compact multiplanet systems [Astronomy]

We combine analytical understanding of resonant dynamics in two-planet systems with machine-learning techniques to train a model capable of robustly classifying stability in compact multiplanet systems over long timescales of 109 orbits. Our Stability of Planetary Orbital Configurations Klassifier (SPOCK) predicts stability using physically motivated summary statistics measured in integrations…

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Qualitative crop condition survey reveals spatiotemporal production patterns and allows early yield prediction [Agricultural Sciences]

Large-scale continuous crop monitoring systems (CMS) are key to detect and manage agricultural production anomalies. Current CMS exploit meteorological and crop growth models, and satellite imagery, but have underutilized legacy sources of information such as operational crop expert surveys with long and uninterrupted records. We argue that crop expert assessments,…

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High-throughput discovery of phage receptors using transposon insertion sequencing of bacteria [Microbiology]

As the most abundant microbes on Earth, novel bacteriophages (phages; bacteria-specific viruses) are readily isolated from environmental samples. However, it remains challenging to characterize phage–bacteria interactions, such as the host receptor(s) phages bind to initiate infection. Here, we tested whether transposon insertion sequencing (INSeq) could be used to identify bacterial…

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HEDGES error-correcting code for DNA storage corrects indels and allows sequence constraints [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Synthetic DNA is rapidly emerging as a durable, high-density information storage platform. A major challenge for DNA-based information encoding strategies is the high rate of errors that arise during DNA synthesis and sequencing. Here, we describe the HEDGES (Hash Encoded, Decoded by Greedy Exhaustive Search) error-correcting code that repairs all…

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Behavioral traits that define social dominance are the same that reduce social influence in a consensus task [Ecology]

Dominant individuals are often most influential in their social groups, affecting movement, opinion, and performance across species and contexts. Yet, behavioral traits like aggression, intimidation, and coercion, which are associated with and in many cases define dominance, can be socially aversive. The traits that make dominant individuals influential in one…

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The gain-of-function allele bamAE470K bypasses the essential requirement for BamD in {beta}-barrel outer membrane protein assembly [Microbiology]

The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria confers innate resistance to toxins and antibiotics. Integral β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) function to establish and maintain the selective permeability of the OM. OMPs are assembled into the OM by the β-barrel assembly machine (BAM), which is composed of one OMP—BamA—and four…

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High plant diversity and slow assembly of old-growth grasslands [Ecology]

Earth's ancient grasslands and savannas—hereafter old-growth grasslands—have long been viewed by scientists and environmental policymakers as early successional plant communities of low conservation value. Challenging this view, emerging research suggests that old-growth grasslands support substantial biodiversity and are slow to recover if destroyed by human land uses (e.g., tillage agriculture,.

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Bioinspired conductive cellulose liquid-crystal hydrogels as multifunctional electrical skins [Engineering]

Bionic electronic skin (E-skin) that could convert external physical or mechanical stimuli into output signals has a wide range of applications including wearable devices, artificial prostheses, software robots, etc. Here, we present a chameleon-inspired multifunctional E-skin based on hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), Poly(Acrylamide-co-Acrylic acid) (PACA), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composited li

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3 tester 5G i Roskilde og på Amager: Forventer hurtigere udbredelse end 4G

PLUS. Selvom 3 endnu ikke har meldt ud, hvem de vælger som 5G-leverandør, så tester de allerede nu næste generations mobilnetværk, blandt andet i Roskilde og på Amager. Planen er at åbne de første 5G-netværk i slutningen af 2020 på 700 og 1.800 MHz-frekvensbåndet.

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Scientists shed light on how the blackest fish in the sea 'disappear'

Experts have shed light on the mystery of how the blackest fish in the deep sea are camouflaged.

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The Atlantic Daily: The COVID-Driven Economic Crisis Isn't Over

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . SPENCER PLATT / GETTY This spring, the U.S. effectively paused its economy in order to buy its medical system some time in the fight against the coronavirus. But the country squandered the moment

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A 'journey mindset' can get you through pandemic stress

The "journey mindset" could prove to be a useful tool for coping with stress and tragedy during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new research. Thinking in terms of a journey rather than a destination can help virus survivors and health care providers cope with post-traumatic stress, the researchers say. Such a mindset can also increase the likelihood that people who learn measures for protecti

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Signs of early heart failure revealed in patients with type 2 diabetes

Adults with type 2 diabetes that have no history, signs or symptoms of heart problems have been shown to have severely limited exercise capacity.

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Opium linked with more deaths after bypass surgery

The largest study on opium use and outcomes after bypass surgery has found that – in contrast to widely held beliefs – it is linked with more deaths and heart attacks. The research is published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that in 2015, 17.7 million people used o

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US tallies 70,000 daily Covid-19 cases for first time

Record accompanied by sharp increase in fatalities led by Texas and Florida

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Launch of the James Webb Space Telescope delayed again due to covid-19

The launch of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has been delayed from March 2021 to October 2021, partially due to measures to limit the spread of covid-19

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NASA Delays James Webb Telescope Launch Date, Again

The universe will have to wait a little longer.

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The Lancet Public Health: Speed of testing is most critical factor in the success of contact tracing strategies to slow COVID-19 transmission

Speed of contact tracing strategies is essential to slowing COVID-19 transmission, according to a mathematical modelling study in The Lancet Public Health journal which models the effectiveness of conventional and app-based strategies on community transmission of the virus.

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Oral herpes rates are falling in children

Fewer people are being exposed to herpes simplex type 1 – also known as oral herpes – in their childhood and the prevalence amongst the population in Europe is falling by 1% per year, suggests research published in the journal BMJ Global Health.

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Range of commercial infant foods has grown markedly in past seven years

The range of commercial foods on sale for babies has grown rapidly in recent years but their sugar levels are still too high, suggests research published in Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Author Correction: Adiponectin promotes muscle regeneration through binding to T-cadherin

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66545-1

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Publisher Correction: The Effects of Extreme Weather on Apple Quality

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69048-1

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Scientists find a switch which may make prostate cancer spread

Scientists have found a switch which is associated with prostate cancers spreading or forming metastases (secondary tumours). The researchers caution that this work is still at an early stage, and needs further investigation to see if it applies to all prostate cancers. Up to 15% of patients have high risk prostate cancers, potentially leading to significantly increased mortality over time. The wo

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More porn, worse erectile function

A study has shown that the amount of porn a man watches is linked to worse erectile function. Watching porn is also associated with greater dissatisfaction with "normal" sex, with only 65% of respondents rating sex with a partner to be more stimulating than porn. This work is presented at the EAU virtual Congress.

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Study finds link between too much or too little sleep and increased death rates in patients with or without diabetes

New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) reveals that too much or too little sleep in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is linked to sharply increased death rates, with the effect much larger than that found in the non-diabetic population.

20h

Ready or Not, Inexpensive VR Sex Is Going Mainstream

It has long been claimed that sex is the guiding force behind major technological developments or at least a major catalyst for taking new technologies mainstream. And with innovations such as home video, home computers, and the Internet, there's a case to be made for this argument. Now, if a company called KIIROO has its way, realistic, affordable VR sex will soon catapult virtual reality onto t

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Author Correction: Observation of Bose–Einstein condensates in an Earth-orbiting research lab

Nature, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2517-0

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Publisher Correction: Whole-genome sequencing of a sporadic primary immunodeficiency cohort

Nature, Published online: 17 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2556-6

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Daily briefing: Arctic heat wave is 'unequivocal' evidence of climate change

Nature, Published online: 16 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02150-6 Record-breaking Arctic heat was made 600 times more likely by human-induced climate change. Plus, the closest photo of the Sun ever taken and what it's like to lead the development of a front-running COVID-19 vaccine candidate.

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Hydroxychloroquine Still Doesn't Do Anything, New Data Shows

Two more studies prove that the much-hyped antimalarial doesn't treat Covid-19.

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New study suggests we have 6,200 thoughts every day

The study passes on figuring out what we think, focusing instead on the frequency of thought. Consistent neurological signals identify the transitions between thoughts. fMRI scans tracked participants' thoughts while they watched movies and when they were at rest. A new study from psychologists at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario reports observations of the transition from one thought to a

20h

Johnson suffers 'back to work' blow from chief scientist

Patrick Vallance insists government advice on homeworking should remain in place

20h

Difference between cystatin C- and creatinine-based eGFRs contains clinical information

It is common to see clinic patients whose eGFR by creatinine and cystatin are different by >15 mL/min. Potok et al surmised that these differences, usually overlooked in favor of a combined eGFR, carry important information. The authors examined the intra-individual difference in eGFR by cystatin vs. creatinine (eGFRDiff) and found that eGFRDiff may hold prognostic information as a negative eGFRDi

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Decision support system within the EHR system can increase provider awareness of CKD

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects approximately 37 million U.S. adults and less than 25% are aware of their disease. CKD is readily identified with simple blood and urine tests that are often in a patient's health record yet providers usually do not diagnose the CKD and inform the patient. This study demonstrates that implementation of a decision support system within the electronic health reco

21h

Air pollution from wildfires linked to higher death rates in patients with kidney failure

Exposure to higher amounts of fine particulate air pollution was associated with higher death rates among patients with kidney failure.

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Earlier lockdown restrictions linked to greater reduction in new COVID-19 cases

Physical distancing measures, such as closing schools, workplaces, and public transport, and restricting mass gatherings, are associated with a meaningful reduction in new covid-19 cases, according to a new study.

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Three countries are launching missions to Mars this month

In this illustration, NASA's Mars 2020 rover uses its drill to core a rock sample on Mars. ( NASA/JPL-Caltech/) Over the next month, a flotilla of spacecraft will blast off into space with a one-way ticket to one of the solar system's most mysterious objects: Mars. They are tasked with helping answer a question that has puzzled scientists for decades—is there, or was there ever, life on the red p

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Scientists Discover A New Material For Cleaning Up Oil Spills

Scientists have come up with a novel material for cleaning up oil spills on land. Mats of human hair and dog fur successfully absorb oil from hard surfaces — but not so well from sand.

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Listen: Is It Safe to Fly?

On this episode of the podcast Social Distance , the staff writer James Hamblin and the executive producer Katherine Wells discuss the perils of air travel and the best ways to prepare for it. Listen here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published. What follows is an edited and condensed transcript o

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How to make your Twitter account more secure in an age of hacks

We are aware of a security incident impacting accounts on Twitter. We are investigating and taking steps to fix it. We will update everyone shortly. — Twitter Support (@TwitterSupport) July 15, 2020

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Posture correctors that help you finally stand up straight

Support for your future. (Kelly Sikkema via Unsplash/) Are all those days spent slumped over your computer starting to wear out your back? Posture correctors are a great option for quick relief, gently encouraging proper alignment and reducing pain caused by slouching. They fit seamlessly under clothes and get to work readjusting your back and shoulders while you go about your regular routine. We

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Affordable wireless power banks for quick charging on the go

Qi charging for wireless power ease. (Amazon/) You're a busy person with places to go and people to see. Running out of charge on your phone is the last thing you should have to worry about. Nowadays, a dead phone is not only an inconvenience—it's a sign of unprofessionalism. Missing a call or being slow to respond to an email could cost you, but stress not! That plummeting battery percentage is

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Some decontamination processes damage N95 face masks

Certain methods of decontaminating medical face masks for repeated use during the COVID-19 pandemic appear to damage the masks' integrity and protective function, according to research by a University of Massachusetts Amherst environmental health scientist.

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Pine beetles successful no matter how far they roam — with devastating effects

Whether they travel only a few metres or tens of kilometres to a new host tree, female pine beetles use different strategies to find success–with major negative consequences for pine trees, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.

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When power is toxic: Dominance reduces influence in groups

New study by researchers from the University of Konstanz, the co-located Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior (both in Germany) and the University of Texas at Austin finds that groups led by subordinate males outperform those led by dominant and aggressive males

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Linen sheet sets for an instant bed upgrade

Sleep better. (Cassidy Kelley via Unsplash/) Even with your air-conditioner blasting, your bedroom may not live up to your breeziest expectations. That's where the natural fiber that is linen comes in: derived from a flax plant and delightfully soft, linen sheets can keep you cool and cozy. Linen advocates will tell you the sheets are durable and stand the test of time. They are often more breath

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Top ceiling fans to help you beat the heat

Take one of these fans for a spin. (Helen Shi via Unsplash/) Air conditioners are expensive and evaporative coolers only work in certain environments. If you're looking to cool down a room and add a pleasant breeze, ceiling fans are tried-and-true tools. They help circulate air through the house quietly and efficiently, making summer days and nights that much more comfortable. What's more, ceilin

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Scientist Discover A New Material For Cleaning Up Oil Spills

Scientists have come up with a novel material for cleaning up oil spills on land. Mats of human hair and dog fur successfully absorb oil from hard surfaces — but not so well from sand.

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Study: Dangerous parasite controls host cell to spread around body

Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have discovered new information about how a dangerous parasite takes control of a patient's cells as it spreads throughout their body, an important finding that could help in the development of new drugs to treat this infection.

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Scientists identify new species of sea sponge off the coast of British Columbia, Canada

A UAlberta research team has published a study on the discovery of a new sponge that is abundant in the region, making up nearly 20 per cent of the live sponges in the reefs off the coast of British Columbia. The new species–called Desmacella hyalina — was discovered using an underwater robot that travelled along the ocean floor, surveying reefs and collecting samples.

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Industry-made pits are beneficial for beavers and wolverines, study shows

Beavers and wolverines in Northern Alberta are using industry-created borrow pits as homes and feeding grounds, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists.

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Research helping to improve detection of disease in newborn babies

New research will help health-care practitioners to more accurately diagnose disease and illness in newborn babies from urine samples, according to a study by researchers at the University of Alberta and the Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas.

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Improving lung cancer CT screening performance in real-world settings

An Online First Accepted Manuscript published in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) finds that focusing on lung cancer screening (LCS) subjects less likely to remain in the program — those with negative low-dose CT exams and those who still smoke — can improve that program's cost-effectiveness and maximize its societal benefits. 'Our study demonstrates that a real-world LCS can perfor

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Phantom-limb pain reduced through brain power

Osaka University researchers have used a brain-computer-interface to reduce phantom-limb pain after only three days of training. In a random crossover trial, patients with phantom-limb pain used brain power related to their intact hand to open and close a virtual hand. Reduction in phantom-limb pain after three days of training remained significant five days after training was complete.

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Fifth of Brazilian beef exports to EU linked to illegal deforestation

Around 20 per cent of the beef and soya the Euopean Union imports from Brazil has been linked to illegal deforestation in the Amazon rainforest and Cerrado savanna

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Workout gear for toned abs

Ab-solutely! (Amazon/) Maintaining an at-home workout routine can be tricky, especially in a cramped space with plenty of distractions and a laundry list of to-do items. That's where ab workout gear comes in handy. You'll strengthen and tone your core through efficient, straightforward exercises, without ever having to leave the living room. Whether you're looking for advanced abdominal training

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Why Lo-Fi Music Draws Listeners In

The fuzz and crackle over Lo-Fi music's familiar beats evokes emotions some of us are looking for right now.

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Scientists fear for the world's most endangered sea turtle as the Park Service cuts back

Every summer, thousands of people travel to Padre Island National Seashore at dawn to cheer on sea turtle hatchlings as they are released into the surf.

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Pioneering method reveals dynamic structure in HIV

Viruses are scary. They invade our cells like invisible armies, and each type brings its own strategy of attack. While viruses devastate communities of humans and animals, scientists scramble to fight back. Many utilize electron microscopy, a tool that can "see" what individual molecules in the virus are doing. Yet even the most sophisticated technology requires that the sample be frozen and immob

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Pressure washers to tackle the toughest cleaning jobs

A tough cleaner when you need it. (Amazon/) Pressure washers use high-powered jets of water to blast away dirt and grime, and make quick work of tough cleaning situations like dingy furniture, dirt-caked driveways, and mildewy patios. If your car is a mess, a pressure washer is like having a personal car wash—and it can get into all those crevices for professional-level detailing. A pressure wash

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Chemists develop bioinspired strategy for the controlled synthesis of polyenes

They occur in nature, are reactive and play a role in many biological processes: polyenes. It is no wonder that chemists have for a long time been interested in efficiently constructing these compounds—not least in order to be able to use them for future biomedical applications. However, such designs are currently neither simple nor inexpensive and present organic chemists with major challenges. S

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Scientists fear for the world's most endangered sea turtle as the Park Service cuts back

Every summer, thousands of people travel to Padre Island National Seashore at dawn to cheer on sea turtle hatchlings as they are released into the surf.

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Syncing NASA laser, ESA radar for a new look at sea ice

With a small nudge to a satellite's orbit, scientists will soon have simultaneous laser and radar measurements of ice, providing new insights into Earth's frozen regions. On July 16, the European Space Agency (ESA) begins a series of precise maneuvers that will push the orbit of its radar-carrying CryoSat-2 satellite about half a mile higher—putting it in sync with NASA's laser-carrying Ice, Cloud

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