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12h

Nothing Can Justify the Attack on Portland

The Trump administration has faced outrage since reports first surfaced of federal agents in unmarked vehicles picking up and detaining protesters in Portland, Oregon. Rather than backing down, though, President Trump appears to have decided to go all in: In a July 20 interview, he threatened to send "more federal law enforcement" to New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Detroit, Baltimore, and Oaklan

47min

Indeklima-mareridt i nyt trafiktårn: Ansatte gemmer sig under tæpper og pavillon

De ansatte i S-togs-kontrolcenteret må gemme sig under tæpper og en pavillon på grund af træk, kulde og nedfalden puds. Årsagen skal findes i mobile køleanlæg og et læk køleloft.

9h

LATEST

Women's burden increases in COVID-19 era

The triple burden endured by women — in productive, reproductive and community roles — has been exposed and intensified due to COVID-19-enforced lockdown and quarantine restrictions.

now

Topological photonics in fractal lattices

Photonic topological insulators are currently a subject of great interest because of the features: insulating bulk and topological edge states. Now, scientists from Technion in Israel found theoretically that photonic topological insulators can exist in fractal lattices, comprising only edges – with no bulk at all. Their results offer a realizable experimental platform to study topological fractal

now

Recycling Japanese liquor leftovers as animal feed produces happier pigs and tastier pork

Tastier pork comes from pigs that eat the barley left over after making the Japanese liquor shochu. A team of professional brewers and academic farmers state that nutrients in the leftover fermented barley may reduce the animals' stress, resulting in better tasting sirloin and fillets. Feeding distillation leftovers to farm animals can improve the animals' quality of life, lower farmers' and brewe

now

World's smallest imaging device has heart disease in focus

A team of researchers led by the University of Adelaide and University of Stuttgart has used 3D micro-printing to develop the world's smallest, flexible scope for looking inside blood vessels.

now

Researchers identify subject-specific component to perceptual learning ability

Ph.D. candidate YANG Jia and her colleagues, under the guidance of Prof. HUANG Changbing from the Institute of Psychology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and LU Zhonglin from New York University (NYU) and NYU Shanghai recently collected and analyzed data from a large sample of subjects in seven visual, auditory and working memory training tasks.

now

Synthetic dimensions enable a new way to construct higher-order topological insulators

Higher-order topological insulators (HOTIs) are a new phase of matter predicted in 2017, involving complicated high-dimensional structures which show signature physical effects called "corner modes." Now, scientists have proposed a recipe to construct such HOTIs and observe corner modes for photons in simpler, lower-dimensional structures by harnessing an emerging concept called "synthetic dimensi

now

Scientists observe learning processes online in the brain

Stimulating the fingertip rhythmically for a sustained period of time, markedly improves touch sensitivity of this finger. A research team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum analysed the impact of this process in the brain. Using EEG, the scientists recorded neuronal activity of brain areas associated with tactile processing. They were able to observe changes in activity over time – possibly illustratin

now

Researchers boost koala spotting system

QUT researchers have published an improved and innovative method for estimating the number of koalas in an area detected by using drones and an artificial intelligent algorithm as they continue the quest of identifying surviving koala populations in bushfire areas.

now

Through the nanoscale looking glass — determining boson peak frequency in ultra-thin alumina

'Mysterious' vibrational properties of nanoscale glasses studied by subjecting novel (and slightly explosive) particles of aluminium wrapped in a thin alumina skin to neutron spectroscopy measurement at ANSTO. Experimental/theory collaboration shows lattice vibrations in ultra-thin alumina glass result in a characteristic peak in the density of states at 2.5 meV. The boson peak frequency measured

now

What Is the Pandemic Doing to Work Friendships?

When offices in the U.S. started shutting down to slow the spread of COVID-19, the telework timelines were optimistically brief. But as companies have extended deadlines and shifted to long-term remote work, employees across many different industries are accepting that the pre-pandemic workplace may be a thing of the past. In the Before Times, many found respite during long workdays in the compan

2min

Catch Up On Your Reading With 88% Off The 12min Micro Book Library

Research into reading habits finds that as we get older and rack up more responsibilities, we have read fewer books. That doesn't mean we're reading less; according to one analysis , the average American employee spends 28% of their time reading their email. And when we do read books, it can often go out of our conscious minds quickly, leaving us to um and ah our way through work conversations. T

3min

Women, college graduates, Democrats more likely to self-isolate to reduce coronavirus risks

Women, older Americans, Democrats and people with more education are more likely to try to isolate themselves from contact with other people to reduce COVID-19 transmission risks, according to a new Tufts University national survey.

7min

The immune system facilitates alcohol addiction

The activation of the immune system could eventually perpetuate some of the deleterious effects of alcohol, like addiction. It is the conclusion of a research carried out by an international team led by Dr. Santiago Canals, from the Institute of Neurosciences in Alicante (Spain), a joint center of the Spanish National Research Council and the University Miguel Hernández in Elche, and Dr. Wolfgang

14min

New detection method turns silicon cameras into mid-infrared detectors

Although mid-infrared (MIR) imaging produces images with chemically selective information, the practical implementation of the technique is hampered by the low pixel count and noise performance of current MIR cameras. Scientists at the University of California, Irvine, have overcome this problem through the process of non-degenerate two-photon absorption (NTA) on a Si-chip. This detection strategy

14min

Temporal aiming with temporal metamaterials

Achieving a controllable manipulation of electromagnetic waves is important in many applications. Towards this goal, scientists from the UK and USA have proposed a new way to control the direction of wave-propagation in real time using temporal metamaterials having temporal permittivities that are rapidly changed in time from isotropic to anisotropic values. This new technique, which the authors n

14min

Eating habits of baby predator starfish revealed

The varied diet of juvenile crown-of-thorns starfish complicates scientists' ability to age them. This makes plans for the management of this invasive species more difficult, as outbreaks of adults on the reef are unpredictable.

14min

New research reveals how hurricane Lane brought fire and rain to Hawaiian islands

A recently published study, led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers, details the compounding hazards — fire and rain — produced by Hurricane Lane in August 2018.

14min

Li-ions transport across electrolytes and SEI like beads passing through a Galton Board

Covalent organic framework (COF) film coating on a commercial polypropylene separator is applied as an ion redistributor to eliminate Li dendrites, leading to a high Li-ion transference number of 0.77±0.01. The transport of Li-ions across the COF film can be considered to be analogous to beads passing through a Galton Board.

14min

This App Claims It Can Hear COVID-19 in Your Voice

As some companies re-open their offices or plants, some workers may find themselves asked to partake in a strange new morning ritual: Answer a few questions about their health, take their temperature, and say "ahhh" into their phone. After a few seconds, an app called Sonde One will make a snap decision. If their temperature is too high or they sound sick, it will tell them to stay home with a wa

17min

Black men face high discrimination and depression, even as their education and incomes rise

Are you a highly educated and relatively wealthy Black man in the U.S.? Studies that we have done and also those by others show that you are at increased risk of discrimination and depression. Our research on the intersection of race and gender in the U.S. shows that while education and income reduce the risk of discrimination and depression for whites and Black women, this is not so for Black men

19min

As schools plan to reopen, pediatricians offer guidelines

As we continue into unchartered waters during the coronavirus pandemic, reopening schools safely requires careful planning. Many schools are overcrowded and understaffed, which makes implementing measures such as distancing and cleaning difficult. The American Academy of Pediatrics has outlined some guidelines for states and school districts to consider when planning a safe environment for student

19min

Zoologists call for beach closures to reduce impact on wildlife

University of Otago zoologists are calling for seasonal beach closures to be considered at sites where increasing numbers of visitors are likely to have detrimental impacts on wildlife.

19min

Access to dental care depends on where you live

More high-income countries offer dental care to children and adults to prevent dental and oral diseases, research finds. In comparison, prevention is poor in low-income countries. And the global state of health suffers as a result. Healthy teeth and mouth are linked to a person's state of health in general. At the same time, diseases in the oral cavity and general chronic diseases share risk fact

20min

Zoologists call for beach closures to reduce impact on wildlife

University of Otago zoologists are calling for seasonal beach closures to be considered at sites where increasing numbers of visitors are likely to have detrimental impacts on wildlife.

22min

How to build your own bow and arrows when you're lost in the wild

Strong, flexible wood makes for the best bow. (Tim MacWelch/) This story was originally featured on Outdoor Life . The bow and arrow have been utilized by hunters and warriors for thousands of years. A simple-yet-elegant weapon, it's provided meat and aided in defending civilizations for centuries. Today, bows have gone high-tech, like compounds, crossbows, and carbon-fiber arrow shafts affixed t

23min

Why some species thrive after catastrophe – rules for making the most of an apocalypse

Sixty-six million years ago, an asteroid struck the Earth. The world was plunged into darkness, killing the dinosaurs and over 90% of all species alive. Today, every living thing descends from the handful of surviving species. But not all survivors thrived.

25min

New study takes closer look at how environment affects daily life of brown-throated three-toed sloth

Scientists studying brown-throated three-toed sloths, where predators are extinct and food is more accessible, have found that the animals adapt to have a primarily diurnal, or daytime, schedule.

25min

Researchers develop gene regulation strategies for plants

A team of scientists from the Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology (IBMCP), a mixed center of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV), has developed two strategies based on trans-acting small interfering RNAs (syn-tasiRNAs) to modulate the level of silencing induced by a plant's genes.

25min

Researchers study protein biosynthesis in bacteria

Researchers of the University of Bayreuth and the Columbia University in New York reported groundbreaking findings on protein biosynthesis in bacteria in the journal iScience. The small protein NusG links the two large molecular machines that work together during gene expression, which is the production of bacterial proteins based on genetic information: RNA polymerase and the ribosome. The molecu

25min

Getting animals drunk is an economical way to reduce their stress, improve meat quality

Tastier pork comes from pigs that eat the barley left over after making the Japanese liquor shochu. A team of professional brewers and academic farmers state that nutrients in the leftover fermented barley may reduce the animals' stress, resulting in better tasting sirloin and filets.

25min

Q&A: Covid widening achievement gaps in classrooms

Among the many problems and inequities laid bare by the COVID-19 pandemic are disparities in the U.S. educational system. While the abrupt shift to digital learning has been challenging for many kids, students of color and low-income students have fared worse than the general student population.

25min

Miami chemists' breakthrough technique enables design at the interface of chemistry and biology

A technique developed by Miami University associate professors of chemistry and biochemistry Dominik Konkolewicz and Rick Page may help enable more rapid and efficient development of new materials for use in pharmaceuticals, biofuels, and other applications.

25min

Researchers boost koala spotting system

QUT researchers have published an improved and innovative method for estimating the number of koalas in an area detected by using drones and an artificial intelligent algorithm as they continue the quest of identifying surviving koala populations in bushfire areas.

25min

New model proposed to reduce carbon footprint

Prior to the global pandemic, climate researchers identified an uncomfortable truth: the very meetings and events meant to support the fight against climate change were themselves causing vast greenhouse gas emissions through international air travel.

25min

The App of the Summer Is Just a Random-Number Generator

It took me a week to find a plastic water bottle full of what could only be pee. That was after the abandoned house taped off with gas leak warnings, but before I spun around on an unfamiliar block deep in Brooklyn to see three dalmatians wiggling toward me. When I saw the bottle lying in the middle of the sidewalk, it felt like a rite of passage. This is my summer activity: walking around, or "r

25min

Why some species thrive after catastrophe – rules for making the most of an apocalypse

Sixty-six million years ago, an asteroid struck the Earth. The world was plunged into darkness, killing the dinosaurs and over 90% of all species alive. Today, every living thing descends from the handful of surviving species. But not all survivors thrived.

28min

New study takes closer look at how environment affects daily life of brown-throated three-toed sloth

Scientists studying brown-throated three-toed sloths, where predators are extinct and food is more accessible, have found that the animals adapt to have a primarily diurnal, or daytime, schedule.

28min

Researchers develop gene regulation strategies for plants

A team of scientists from the Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology (IBMCP), a mixed center of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV), has developed two strategies based on trans-acting small interfering RNAs (syn-tasiRNAs) to modulate the level of silencing induced by a plant's genes.

28min

Researchers study protein biosynthesis in bacteria

Researchers of the University of Bayreuth and the Columbia University in New York reported groundbreaking findings on protein biosynthesis in bacteria in the journal iScience. The small protein NusG links the two large molecular machines that work together during gene expression, which is the production of bacterial proteins based on genetic information: RNA polymerase and the ribosome. The molecu

28min

Getting animals drunk is an economical way to reduce their stress, improve meat quality

Tastier pork comes from pigs that eat the barley left over after making the Japanese liquor shochu. A team of professional brewers and academic farmers state that nutrients in the leftover fermented barley may reduce the animals' stress, resulting in better tasting sirloin and filets.

28min

Researchers boost koala spotting system

QUT researchers have published an improved and innovative method for estimating the number of koalas in an area detected by using drones and an artificial intelligent algorithm as they continue the quest of identifying surviving koala populations in bushfire areas.

30min

And the Winner of the First-ever Nobel Prize Is…

Originally published in February 1900 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

32min

Miami chemists' breakthrough technique enables design at the interface of chemistry and biology

A technique developed by Miami University associate professors of chemistry and biochemistry Dominik Konkolewicz and Rick Page may help enable more rapid and efficient development of new materials for use in pharmaceuticals, biofuels, and other applications.

33min

The best time to argue about what a replication means? Before you do it

Nature, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02142-6 To avoid stalemates and provide lessons, replicators and original researchers must reach agreement on a study design and set out expectations ahead of time.

34min

Cinnamon may improve blood sugar control in people with prediabetes

Cinnamon improves blood sugar control in people with prediabetes and could slow the progression to type 2 diabetes, according to a new study published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

37min

Children with type 1 diabetes may have a less desirable gut bacteria composition

Children with type 1 diabetes have a less desirable gut microbiome composition which may play a role in the development of the disease, according to new research published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

37min

High school athletes require longer recovery following concussions

High school athletes sustaining a concussion require careful attention when determining return-to-sport (RTS) readiness. The purpose of this study was to determine epidemiological and RTS data of a large cohort of high school athletes who sustained one or more concussions.

37min

Best surround-sound systems for your home entertainment center

Get immersive sound. (Amazon/) Yes, an immense screen goes a long way toward creating a great home-theater experience, but if you want the full immersion you're going to need a quality surround-sound system that delivers the highs and lows, explosions and whispers at the right level, in the right space relative to your prone ear drums. When choosing the right surround-sound system for your home,

39min

Store and transfer images and video quickly with these SD cards

You can never take enough photos. (Markus Winkler via Unsplash/) When you're first starting out in the world of photography and videography you may not be paying much attention to the tiny memory card that stores your data. But that will change quickly. You'll get the wake-up call after a day of shooting with the family only to find your memory card has failed. Or even worse, perhaps you'll take

39min

'Lost' world's rediscovery is step toward finding habitable planets

The rediscovery of a lost planet could pave the way for the detection of a world within the habitable "Goldilocks zone" in a distant solar system.

39min

The best touchscreen laptops for efficient, portable work

Another way to work. (Sigmund via Unsplash/) Touch screen laptops do all the work of regular laptops—with an efficient twist. These thin, lightweight computers allow you to interact with all your apps through a simple tap of the screen. They're as user-friendly as your smartphone and you'll enjoy bonus features, like digital pens and adaptable structures, that easily convert from tablet to laptop

46min

Three Guides to the Next America

This note is to kick off a resumed set of chronicles in the "Our Towns" series, after a time away for a long Atlantic project on the origins of this era's public-health and economic disaster. The results of that project are here: "Three Weeks That Changed Everything ." If you're wondering, the three weeks I have in mind are from January 1, 2020—when first mentions of an outbreak of a new "pneumon

49min

Contact Tracing, a Key Way to Slow COVID-19, Is Badly Underused by the U.S.

Despite tracing's success in other countries, the U.S. government has failed to adequately fund or apply the tool — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

51min

4 USB Audio Interfaces for Your Home Studio, Reviewed (2020)

These PC accessories allow you to plug microphones and instruments into your computer. They're the nerve center of any studio—from your bedroom to Abbey Road.

54min

Corona forsinker sydhavnsmetro i tre måneder: Koster op til 50 mio. kr om måneden

Metroselskabet har måttet betale udenlandske medarbejderes 14-dages karantæne og stoppe en af de to tunnelboremaskiner i en længere periode.

54min

Team creates vesicles without any lipids

Scientists have created hollow, spherical sacks called vesicles by using protein and RNA. These bubble-like entities—which form spontaneously when specific protein and RNA molecules mix in an aqueous buffer solution—hold potential as biological storage compartments. They could serve as an alternative to traditional vesicles that are made from water-insoluble organic compounds called lipids, resea

57min

Astronauts squeeze in last spacewalk before SpaceX departure

Astronauts squeezed in one last spacewalk Tuesday before turning their attention to the all-important end to SpaceX's first crew flight.

57min

Contact Tracing, a Key Way to Slow COVID-19, Is Badly Underused by the U.S.

Despite tracing's success in other countries, the U.S. government has failed to adequately fund or apply the tool — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Accurate Weather Forecasts 28 Days Out

Meteorologists are using supercomputers and the latest data about climate phenomena to predict temperature and precipitation four weeks in the future — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Women's burden increases in COVID-19 era

The triple burden endured by women in productive, reproductive, and community roles has been exposed and intensified due to COVID-19-enforced lockdown and quarantine restrictions. Rsearchers conducted interviews with women from Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Vietnam, and Australia that highlight intersections between COVID-19 and gendered burdens, particularly in frontline work, unpaid care work and communi

1h

The post-COVID workplace: Expert weighs in on whether employees will be safe

After nearly four months of a coronavirus-compelled shutdown, many workers across the U.S. are being asked to return to offices and shop floors. The kind of workplace they'll be returning to, however, is not so clear. After all, COVID-19 cases are active and even on the upswing in areas across the country, and, with much still unknown about how the virus spreads and behaves, many wonder whether th

1h

Researchers find colder temperatures barely slow down striking rattlers.

In nature, how quickly a creature moves can mean the difference between life and death. Venomous rattlesnakes defend themselves by uncoiling and striking out when faced with predators or prey.

1h

Genome sequencing reveals potential endangered mechanisms of alpine herb in China

Kingdonia uniflora Balf. f. and W.W. Sm. (Circaeasteraceae, Ranunculales), an alpine herb, has a very narrow distribution in the world and is listed as an endangered species in China. The habitat of it represents an ecological environment of primeval forest with few disturbances.

1h

Florida algal blooms produce multiple toxins detrimental to human health

In 2018, cyanobacteria from nutrient-rich waters in Lake Okeechobee were released down the Caloosahatchee river at the same time that red tides were gathering along the western coast of Florida, potentially exposing coastal residents to a mixture of toxins. In 2018, releases of cyanobacterial-laden freshwater from Lake Okeechobee transported a large bloom of Microcystis cyanobacteria down the Calo

1h

Coronavirus binding and core helix fusion simulated on supercomputer

Like the mythical Jacob's Ladder that reaches for the heavens, the coronavirus carries its own far-reaching molecular ladder-like apparatus. The coronavirus essentially builds a ladder to its host cell by piecing together and extending three sections in the core of the spike proteins adorning its surface.

1h

Chinese phase 2 trial finds COVID-19 vaccine is safe and induces an immune response

A phase 2 randomized controlled trial of a recombinant adenovirus type-5-vectored COVID-19 vaccine (Ad5-vectored COVID-19 vaccine) was conducted in China in April 2020 and involved more than 500 people. The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the immune response and safety of the vaccine, and to determine the most suitable dose for a phase 3 trial. Phase 3 trials are needed to confirm w

1h

Geophysics: A first for a unique instrument

Geophysicists have measured Earth's spin and axis orientation with a novel ring laser, and provided the most precise determination of these parameters yet achieved by a ground-based instrument without the need for stellar range finding.

1h

UK's vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 is safe and induces an immune reaction, according to preliminary results

A phase 1/2 trial involving 1,077 healthy adults found that the vaccine induced strong antibody and T cell immune responses up to day 56 of the ongoing trial. These responses may be even greater after a second dose, according to a sub-group study of 10 participants. Compared to the control group (given a meningitis vaccine), the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine caused minor side effects more frequently, but som

1h

Benefits of routine childhood vaccines far outweigh risks of additional COVID-19 transmission in Africa, study suggests

Continuing routine immunizations during the pandemic could save around 702,000 child lives from vaccine-preventable diseases, far exceeding the potential risks of COVID-19 transmission to older family members from visiting clinics, according to experts.

1h

Researchers find colder temperatures barely slow down striking rattlers.

In nature, how quickly a creature moves can mean the difference between life and death. Venomous rattlesnakes defend themselves by uncoiling and striking out when faced with predators or prey.

1h

Genome sequencing reveals potential endangered mechanisms of alpine herb in China

Kingdonia uniflora Balf. f. and W.W. Sm. (Circaeasteraceae, Ranunculales), an alpine herb, has a very narrow distribution in the world and is listed as an endangered species in China. The habitat of it represents an ecological environment of primeval forest with few disturbances.

1h

Florida algal blooms produce multiple toxins detrimental to human health

In 2018, cyanobacteria from nutrient-rich waters in Lake Okeechobee were released down the Caloosahatchee river at the same time that red tides were gathering along the western coast of Florida, potentially exposing coastal residents to a mixture of toxins. In 2018, releases of cyanobacterial-laden freshwater from Lake Okeechobee transported a large bloom of Microcystis cyanobacteria down the Calo

1h

Coronavirus binding and core helix fusion simulated on supercomputer

Like the mythical Jacob's Ladder that reaches for the heavens, the coronavirus carries its own far-reaching molecular ladder-like apparatus. The coronavirus essentially builds a ladder to its host cell by piecing together and extending three sections in the core of the spike proteins adorning its surface.

1h

Researchers accidentally breed sturddlefish

A team of researchers working at Hungary's National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Research Institute for Fisheries and Aquaculture, has accidentally bred a new kind of fish—dubbed the sturddlefish by some observers, it is a cross between an American Paddlefish and a Russian Sturgeon. In their paper published in the journal Genes, the group describes accidentally breeding the fish an

1h

What's the Long-Term Fate of the Xbox One?

Last week, Microsoft canceled the Xbox One X and the Xbox One S Digital Edition. It also declared its intent to keep the Xbox One S in-market as a low-end, entry-level product for the next generation of hardware. It's an interesting decision and it could potentially signal a shift in how Microsoft approaches console generations. Historically, we've seen a specific pattern play out during console

1h

Researchers accidentally breed sturddlefish

A team of researchers working at Hungary's National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Research Institute for Fisheries and Aquaculture, has accidentally bred a new kind of fish—dubbed the sturddlefish by some observers, it is a cross between an American Paddlefish and a Russian Sturgeon. In their paper published in the journal Genes, the group describes accidentally breeding the fish an

1h

Biobläck printar celler i 3D

Ett vävnadsliknande material kan skrivas ut i 3D-skrivare med hjälp av ett nyframtaget biobläck. Det är forskare vid Linköpings universitet som utvecklat en metod och ett material där cellerna överlever och trivs. Bioprinting är en ny och spännande teknik för att tillverka vävnadslika tredimensionella strukturer av celler. – Ett svårt problem är att utveckla de så kallade biobläcken, material som

1h

Making comprehensive water resources modeling more accessible

The growing global population and continued economic development will likely cause a significant increase in water demand, especially in developing regions. At the same time, climate change is already having global, regional, and local impacts on water availability. A huge challenge that will require strategies and policies informed by science will be ensuring that the changing supply can meet the

1h

New study shows advantages of ellipsys system in creating reliable dialysis access

A new study shows significant benefits of the Ellipsys® Vascular Access System in easily and safely creating durable vascular access for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who require hemodialysis.

1h

Front-line physicians stressed and anxious at work and home

Amid the COVID-19 chaos in many hospitals, emergency medicine physicians in seven cities around the country experienced rising levels of anxiety and emotional exhaustion, regardless of the intensity of the local surge, according to a new analysis led by UC San Francisco.

1h

1h

A new directed evolution technique to unlock the potential of xeno-nucleic acids

As well as being required for some of the core techniques of molecular biology, reverse transcriptase (RT) enzymes have played a key role in synthetic genetics by enabling synthesis, replication, and evolution of xeno-nucleic acids (XNAs). However, for most XNA chemistries, no RT enzymes are available or existing enzymes have low activity. Philipp Holliger's group, in the LMB's PNAC Division, have

1h

SCOTUS Doesn't Trust Congress—And That's a Problem for American Government

The Constitution makes Congress the first branch among equals. But the past decade has witnessed a dangerous trend: a Supreme Court that expresses deep suspicion of Congress's competence and motives. This distrust should be worrying for anyone who cares about the most democratic branch's ability to serve as a check on presidential power and confront an ever-growing list of policy challenges. Let'

1h

Apple's 2030 carbon-neutral pledge covers itself and suppliers

The "zero climate impact" promise covers both its own operations and those of its suppliers.

1h

A new directed evolution technique to unlock the potential of xeno-nucleic acids

As well as being required for some of the core techniques of molecular biology, reverse transcriptase (RT) enzymes have played a key role in synthetic genetics by enabling synthesis, replication, and evolution of xeno-nucleic acids (XNAs). However, for most XNA chemistries, no RT enzymes are available or existing enzymes have low activity. Philipp Holliger's group, in the LMB's PNAC Division, have

1h

Import af soja og palmeolie sender syv mio. ton CO2 mod himlen hvert år

Dansk landbrug udleder årligt 12 mio. ton CO2, men hvis man medregner importen af soja og palmeolie skal der lægges yderligere syv mio. ton til det tal.

1h

Pioneering duplication detector trawls thousands of coronavirus preprints

Nature, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02161-3 Automated software flags instances of image reuse — but many were false alarms.

1h

It's Time to Defund Social Media

The algorithmically-warped information crisis can't be fixed with half-measures.

1h

Apple Sets Climate Goals for 2030, Joining Amazon and Microsoft

If anything, these new initiatives show that earlier efforts just weren't enough.

1h

How NASA Built a Self-Driving Car for Its Next Mars Mission

It's hard enough to get an autonomous vehicle to work on Earth. It's even harder on another planet.

1h

Active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display on human skin

The development of electronic applications can take on many new forms to include foldable and wearable displays to monitor human health and act as medical robots. Such devices rely on organic-light emitting diodes (OLEDs) for optimization. However, it is still challenging to develop semiconducting materials with high mechanical flexibility due to their restricted use in conventional electronic for

1h

Bushfires could mean rise in threatened native species

The damage caused by the catastrophic 2019-2020 Australian bushfires could lead to a dramatic jump in the number of native species at risk, according to new research.

1h

Stove, dome, and umbrella effects of atmospheric aerosol in planetary boundary layer

Atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL), also called the atmospheric boundary layer, is the region of the lower troposphere where Earth's surface strongly influences temperature, moisture and wind through the turbulent transfer of air mass. PBL controls the dispersion of air pollutants and is closely related with human life.

1h

Unparalleled inventory of the human gut ecosystem

An international team of scientists has collated all known bacterial genomes from the human gut microbiome into a single large database, allowing researchers to explore the links between bacterial genes and proteins, and their effects on human health.

1h

Gamma-ray telescopes measure diameters of distant stars

By reviving a technique capable of combining specialized gamma-ray telescopes to one giant virtual instrument, scientists have measured the diameters of individual stars hundreds of light-years away. The team used the four VERITAS telescopes (Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) in the US as one combined instrument to determine the size of Beta Canis Majoris—a blue giant star l

1h

Bushfires could mean rise in threatened native species

The damage caused by the catastrophic 2019-2020 Australian bushfires could lead to a dramatic jump in the number of native species at risk, according to new research.

2h

Unparalleled inventory of the human gut ecosystem

An international team of scientists has collated all known bacterial genomes from the human gut microbiome into a single large database, allowing researchers to explore the links between bacterial genes and proteins, and their effects on human health.

2h

The Psychological Toll of Rude E-mails

Research reveals the subtle ways that impolite electronic communication at work brings you down — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

The Psychological Toll of Rude E-mails

Research reveals the subtle ways that impolite electronic communication at work brings you down — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

More flowers and pollinator diversity could help protect bees from parasites

Having more flowers and maintaining diverse bee communities could help reduce the spread of bee parasites, according to a new study.

2h

More flowers and pollinator diversity could help protect bees from parasites

Having more flowers and maintaining diverse bee communities could help reduce the spread of bee parasites, according to a new study.

2h

Yes, women outnumber men at university. But they still earn less after they leave

In his best-selling book, The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference, Canadian journalist Malcolm Gladwell describes a tipping point as "that magic moment when an idea, trend, or social behaviour crosses a threshold, tips, and spreads like wildfire".

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COVID-19 is a disaster for mothers' employment. And no, working from home is not the solution

When COVID-19 hit, some commentators hailed it as an opportunity to revolutionise gender roles in heterosexual couples.

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Tiktok dømt for ulovlig indsamling af børnedata i Sydkorea

Tiktok er blevet idømt en bøde for at indsamle data og opbevaret den i flere forskellige cloud-tjenester. Herunder data fra børn under 14, hvor Tiktok skulle have bedt værge om tilladelse.

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Kampen for et klimaneutralt EU i 2050 får en historisk penge-indsprøjtning

Hele 1.680 mia. kr af en såkaldt genopretningsfond bliver øremærket grøn omstilling. Og for første gang bliver EU-budgettet knyttet til klimamål og Paris-aftalen.

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Climate Change Poses 'Systemic Threat' to the Economy, Big Investors Warn

Financial regulators should act to avoid economic disaster, according to a letter from pension funds and other investors representing almost $1 trillion in assets.

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Hawaii's Invasive Predator Catastrophe

Feral cats, feral pigs and black rats are putting many species on the fast track toward extinction. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mount Sinai researcher identifies single gene biomarker to differentiate between atopic dermatitis

Mount Sinai researchers have pinpointed a single gene biomarker, nitride oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) that can distinguish atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis with 100 percent accuracy using adhesive tape strips, a non-invasive alternative to skin biopsy. The research will be published online today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Black Children Are More Likely to Die After Surgery Than White Peers, Study Shows

A large study, published in the journal Pediatrics, suggests that disparities exist in surgery outcomes, even among healthy children.

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Nature's Noisiest Liars Carry Secrets in Their Calls

Many mammals that have loud calls to deceive other animals seem to have a particular learning style in common.

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Fraud, bias, negligence and hype in the lab — a rogues' gallery

Nature, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02147-1 Was there ever a golden age of unsullied science, as a book implies?

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The False Promise of Anti-racism Books

In today's cultural moment—during which hundreds of mainstream institutions in the U.S. are acknowledging systemic racism—books and other content about race and discrimination have surged in popularity. These texts, such as How to Be an Antiracist , by Ibram X. Kendi; So You Want to Talk About Race , by Ijeoma Oluo; and Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? , by Beverly Da

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Genes May Influence COVID-19 Risk, New Studies Hint

DNA changes tied to immune reactions, a viral doorway and blood type could affect disease severity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Genes May Influence COVID-19 Risk, New Studies Hint

DNA changes tied to immune reactions, a viral doorway and blood type could affect disease severity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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To Navigate Risk In a Pandemic, You Need a Color-Coded Chart

Is going to the dentist more dangerous than grocery shopping? Public health groups want to help us weigh everyday risks with to easy-to-read guides.

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A Summer Without Blockbusters

This year, there are no great movies uniting film fanatics. Maybe that's not such a bad thing.

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Covid Is Pushing Some Mass Transit Systems to the Brink

Riders are skittish. Cleaning costs are soaring. Some, like the Bay Area's Caltrain system, face an existential crisis.

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America Gets an Interior Ministry

For decades, conservative activists and leaders have warned that "jackbooted thugs" from the federal government were going to come to take away Americans' civil rights with no due process and no recourse. Now they're here—but they're deployed by a staunchly right-wing president with strong conservative support. In Portland, Oregon, federal agents in military fatigues have for several days been pa

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Colleges Are Getting Ready to Blame Their Students

"Do you really want to be the reason that Tulane and New Orleans have to shut down again?" That was the question that Erica Woodley, the dean of students at Tulane University, posed in a July 7 email scolding students for their "disrespectful, selfish and dangerous" partying during the Fourth of July weekend. "This type of behavior is indefensible and truly shameful," she admonished. Woodley went

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Genes May Influence COVID-19 Risk, New Studies Hint

DNA changes tied to immune reactions, a viral doorway and blood type could affect disease severity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hundreds of candidate galaxies identified in the protocluster D1UD01

Astronomers have conducted a detailed multiwavelength study of a distant protocluster of galaxies known as D1UD01. As a result, over 350 candidate galaxies have been detected in this protocluster. The research is detailed in a paper published July 14 on the arXiv pre-print server.

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'They Got Her This Time, Son'

This article is a collaboration between The Atlantic and The Marshall Project . O n September 12, 2018 , the five adult children of Debbie Liles waited in the prosecutor's office in Jacksonville, Florida, to meet the man who one year earlier had bludgeoned their mother to death with a golf club. Michelle, 38, had brought what she called her "madwoman" binder of colorfully highlighted police repor

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Coronavirus vaccines get a biotech boost

Nature, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02154-2 Advances in technology are accelerating the search for drugs to arm the immune system against SARS-CoV-2.

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Daily briefing: Huge drop in premature births during lockdown

Nature, Published online: 20 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02176-w From Ireland to Australia, some hospitals are reporting drops of up to 90% in the rate of extremely premature births. Plus: launch success for the United Arab Emirates Mars mission and an explosion of new coronavirus-testing methods.

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The universe may be full of enormous clusters of tiny black holes

If tiny black holes born at the beginning of the universe survived to the present day, they could have formed enormous clusters that might help explain dark matter

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"[H]ow gullible reviewers and editors…can be": An excerpt from Science Fictions

We're pleased to present an excerpt from Stuart Ritchie's new book, Science Fictions: How Fraud, Bias, Negligence, and Hype Undermine the Search for Truth. One of the best-known, and most absurd, scientific fraud cases of the twentieth century also concerned transplants – in this case, skin grafts. While working at the prestigious Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute … Continue reading

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What to know about 'Bunny Ebola,' the rabbit virus sweeping the Southwest US

An outbreak last year of rabbit hemorrhagic disease in northwestern Washington state had devastating impacts on both feral and pet rabbits. Now animal health officials are tracking its spread and trying to protect their most endangered rabbits from a disease that is very contagious and has a high mortality rate. (Pexels/) A deadly virus is spreading with alarming speed among wild and domestic rab

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The Coronavirus Exposed the West's Weakest Link

A Bergamo cemetery worker in April (Alex Majoli / Magnum) In Europe, Italy was hit hardest by the pandemic because it was hit first. Hospitals filled up with patients; one local newspaper was so overwhelmed with obituaries that it published only thumbnail-size ones . The entire country was subject to draconian restrictions, the strictest in the West. Still, Italy rallied: Infections are now under

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Coronavirus Live Updates: E.U. Agrees to $857 Billion Stimulus Deal

The landmark deal would issue grants to hard-hit members of the bloc. A temporary hospital in New York City that cost $52 million treated only 79 virus patients.

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New Emails Show How Energy Industry Moved Fast to Undo Curbs

The messages, made public in a lawsuit, suggest the E.P.A. rescinded a requirement on methane at the behest of an executive just weeks after President Trump took office.

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SiNx/(Al,Ga)N interface barrier in N-polar III-nitride transistor structures studied by modulation spectroscopy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68963-7 SiN x /(Al,Ga)N interface barrier in N-polar III-nitride transistor structures studied by modulation spectroscopy

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Author Correction: Comprehensive genomic analysis of a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pantoea agglomerans strain P5

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69169-7

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Impact of solid surface hydrophobicity and micrococcal nuclease production on Staphylococcus aureus Newman biofilms

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69084-x

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The emergence and adaptive use of prestige in an online social learning task

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68982-4

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Selective protection of human cardiomyocytes from anthracycline cardiotoxicity by small molecule inhibitors of MAP4K4

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68907-1

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Topological and system-level protein interaction network (PIN) analyses to deduce molecular mechanism of curcumin

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69011-0

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Nyt forskningsprojekt vil lade den intelligente by drive af solceller

Batterier og smart city-udstyr følges ofte ad, for de mange små enheder, der kan gøre byen 'intelligent', kræver strøm. Men det er ikke smart, mener folkene bag et nyt forskningsprojekt.

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Curious About Contract Tracing? Here's How it Really Works.

Contact tracing is the public health practice of informing people when they've been exposed to a contagious disease. Part shoe-leather detective work, part social work, it's an age-old infection control strategy. Misinformation on how it works has been spreading — here's what happens according to the experts.

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Gate-tunable spin-galvanic effect in graphene-topological insulator van der Waals heterostructures at room temperature

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17481-1 The spin-galvanic effect allows for the conversion of non-equilibrium spin density into a charge current. Here, by combining graphene in a van de Waals heterostructure with a topological insulator, the authors demonstrate a large, gate-tunable spin-galvanic effect.

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Author Correction: High permeability sub-nanometre sieve composite MoS2 membranes

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17422-y Author Correction: High permeability sub-nanometre sieve composite MoS 2 membranes

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ATP-powered molecular recognition to engineer transient multivalency and self-sorting 4D hierarchical systems

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17479-9 There is interest in creating life-like behaviours in synthetic multicomponent systems. Here, the authors report on a modular DNA toolbox able to create transient, dynamic structures using ATP-driven molecular recognition in which multiple systems can run in parallel and across hierarchies.

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Orexin signaling modulates synchronized excitation in the sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus to stabilize REM sleep

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17401-3 Orexin signaling is provided by diffusely distributed fibers and involved in different brain circuits that orchestrate sleep and wakefulness states. Here, the authors show that a proportion of orexin neurons project to the sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus and exhibit rapid eye movement (REM) sleep-related actio

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TRIB3-EGFR interaction promotes lung cancer progression and defines a therapeutic target

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17385-0 Depletion of tribbles pseudokinase 3 (TRIB3) is known to suppress the expression of several tumor-promoting factors, including EGFR. Here, the authors show that TRIB3 interacts with EGFR and regulates its stability and activity, and perturbing EGFR-TRIB3 interaction attenuates NSCLC progression by accelerating E

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Mitochondrial respiration controls neoangiogenesis during wound healing and tumour growth

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17472-2 During angiogenesis the vasculature switches from a quiescent to a proliferative state. Here the authors show that mitochondrial respiration in endothelial cells controls angiogenesis during development, tumour growth and tissue repair.

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Collective near-field coupling and nonlocal phenomena in infrared-phononic metasurfaces for nano-light canalization

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17425-9 Phenomena such as polariton canalization and hyperlensing can be found at the transition from hyperbolic to elliptical dispersion. Here, the authors investigate this transition using hyperspectral infrared nanoimaging of polaritons in a grating of hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons.

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South-to-North Water Diversion stabilizing Beijing's groundwater levels

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17428-6 The authors here address water sustainability in the greater area of Beijing, China. Specifically, the positive effects towards Beijing groundwater levels via water diversion from the Yangtze River to the North are shown.

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Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a vaccine?

More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…

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What kind of face mask gives the best protection against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

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China Uses W.H.O. Inquiry to Tout Coronavirus Response

The global health agency sent two experts to China, but it is unclear how much access they are getting. They must first complete a two-week quarantine.

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Greta Thunberg to donate one-million-euro humanitarian prize

Campaigner Greta Thunberg says she will donate the money to projects that tackle the climate crisis.

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Popular seafood species in sharp decline around the world

The first-ever global study of long-term trends in the population biomass of exploited marine fish and invertebrates for all coastal areas on the planet.

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Coronavirus: Did 'herd immunity' change the course of the outbreak?

What drove the government's thinking in the crucial stages of the coronavirus outbreak?

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Before a vaccine, we'll need treatments. Is interferon beta-1a a game changer? | Charlotte Summers

It's too early to say if the promising therapy can deliver. But it's a vindication of the UK's brilliant clinical trial infrastructure C harlotte Summers is a lecturer in intensive care medicine at the University of Cambridge Coronavirus – latest updates According to the current UK government data, there have been nearly 300,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19, and more than 45,000 people have died .

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Red Sea corals' heat tolerance offers hope for climate crisis

Reefs from Gulf of Aqaba in the Red Sea survived rise of seven degrees, say marine scientists The scientists cranked the heat above the lethal threshold, and waited for the corals to die. "We were heating the water one degree above the summer maximum temperature," says Anders Meibom, a researcher with the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Lausanne. "On the Great Barrier Reef, after

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Tarmfloran ger ledtrådar för diabetesbehandling

Den individuella mixen av mikroorganismer i tarmen ger viktiga ledtrådar för att förutse eventuell framtida diabetes typ 2, samt förebygga och behandla. Det slås fast i en befolkningsstudie som leds från Göteborgs universitet. En persons tarmmikrobiota, det vill säga mag– tarmkanalens bakterieflora, kan bidra till diabetes typ 2. Det har konstaterats i tidigare forskning, ledd av Fredrik Bäckhed,

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Is the rebound in America's economy already over?

A rise in coronavirus cases in the most populous US states is halting consumer and business activity

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South Korea's first military satellite launched

South Korea's first-ever military communications satellite has been successfully launched by private operator SpaceX, Seoul said Tuesday, as it looks to build up its defence capabilities.

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Michelle Mitchell: 'Cuts to UK cancer research could have a huge impact on patients'

Lifesaving new treatments are at risk due to Covid-19 income slump – unless the government steps in, warns the CRUK chief executive The great British tradition of donning trainers to run for charity has been one of the many casualties of the pandemic, with calamitous consequences for the voluntary sector. At Cancer Research UK (CRUK), which funds 50% of all publicly funded cancer research , the c

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An open-source data platform for researchers studying archaea

Bioinformatics and big data analyses can reap great rewards for biologists, but it takes a lot of work to generate the datasets necessary to begin. At the same time, researchers around the globe churn out datasets that could be useful to others but are not always widely shared.

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An open-source data platform for researchers studying archaea

Bioinformatics and big data analyses can reap great rewards for biologists, but it takes a lot of work to generate the datasets necessary to begin. At the same time, researchers around the globe churn out datasets that could be useful to others but are not always widely shared.

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TENS for Pain Relief: Does It Work?

TENS units are used to relieve pain and for other indications. The evidence is not impressive.

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Label-free imaging helps predict reproductive outcomes

Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and the Department of Animal Sciences have collaborated to develop a new technique that can be used to determine the fertility of sperm samples. They hope to further develop the technique for assisted reproductive technology in humans.

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Restoration of the critically endangered seabird

The global population of the critically endangered Chinese crested tern has more than doubled thanks to a historic, decade-long collaboration among Oregon State University researchers and scientists and conservationists in China, Taiwan and Japan.

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Label-free imaging helps predict reproductive outcomes

Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and the Department of Animal Sciences have collaborated to develop a new technique that can be used to determine the fertility of sperm samples. They hope to further develop the technique for assisted reproductive technology in humans.

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Restoration of the critically endangered seabird

The global population of the critically endangered Chinese crested tern has more than doubled thanks to a historic, decade-long collaboration among Oregon State University researchers and scientists and conservationists in China, Taiwan and Japan.

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Better wastewater treatment? It's a wrap

A shield of graphene helps particles destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria and free-floating antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants.

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Better wastewater treatment? It's a wrap

A shield of graphene helps particles destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria and free-floating antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants.

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Socio-economic status predicts UK boys' development of essential thinking skills

A comparison of children in Hong Kong, mainland China and the UK has found that British boys' development of key thinking skills, known as 'executive functions', is unusually reliant on their socio-economic status.

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If it's big enough and leafy enough the birds will come

A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology highlights specific features of urban green spaces that support the greatest diversity of bird species. The findings were published today in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning.

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If it's big enough and leafy enough the birds will come

A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology highlights specific features of urban green spaces that support the greatest diversity of bird species. The findings were published today in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning.

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Racial discrimination may adversely impact cognition in African Americans

Experiences of racism are associated with lower subjective cognitive function (SCF) among African-American women.

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Everything you ever wanted to know about leech sex but were afraid to ask

Today, we pull the veil back on the secret sex lives of leeches and how researchers at McMaster University and Fisheries and Oceans Canada are using that information to learn about endocrine disrupting chemicals. Leeches, who gained worldwide popularity when making their film debut in the blockbuster "Stand by Me" in 1986, have actually been around much, much longer. They are found on every contin

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Everything you ever wanted to know about leech sex but were afraid to ask

Today, we pull the veil back on the secret sex lives of leeches and how researchers at McMaster University and Fisheries and Oceans Canada are using that information to learn about endocrine disrupting chemicals. Leeches, who gained worldwide popularity when making their film debut in the blockbuster "Stand by Me" in 1986, have actually been around much, much longer. They are found on every contin

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Making comprehensive water resources modeling more accessible

A new large-scale, open source hydrological and water resources model developed at IIASA will support and enable different stakeholder groups and scientific communities to engage with a hydrological model and support their investigations.

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The New Jersey Shooting Suspect Left a Pro-Trump Paper Trail

Roy Den Hollander, the self-described "anti-feminist" attorney who authorities say is the chief suspect in the shootings of the son and the husband of a federal judge in New Jersey, attacked that judge by name in misogynistic, racist writings he wrote over a period of years and posted in bulk on the Internet Archive. Den Hollander, who describes himself as a Trump volunteer in his writings, calle

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Global report: Trump says masks 'patriotic' as EU leaders agree to deal

US president to restart daily briefings; Melbourne records 374 cases; WHO warns South Africa's crisis could be precursor for more outbreaks in Africa Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Donald Trump has announced his daily US coronavirus briefings will resume and that wearing face masks were "patriotic" as European leaders agreed a huge coronavirus rescue plan and Austra

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Everything you ever wanted to know about leech sex but were afraid to ask

New research, published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, sheds light on the effects the synthetic estrogens commonly found in birth control pills have on leeches.

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Spinal stimulators repurposed to restore touch in lost limb

Devices commonly implanted for chronic pain could expand patient access to prosthetic arms that "feel."

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OSU researchers part of international effort to save critically endangered seabird

The global population of the critically endangered Chinese crested tern has more than doubled thanks to a historic, decade-long collaboration among Oregon State University researchers and scientists and conservationists in China, Taiwan and Japan.

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Racial discrimination may adversely impact cognition in African Americans

Experiences of racism are associated with lower subjective cognitive function (SCF) among African-American women.

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Covid-19: what can sewage tell us? – podcast

It may be a respiratory virus, but studies have repeatedly found traces of Covid-19 in the faeces of infected patients. Using this to their advantage, scientists are sampling untreated sewage from wastewater plants in an effort to track the virus. Hannah Devlin speaks to Andrew Singer about how what we flush down the toilet can help detect emerging outbreaks – days before patients begin presentin

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Covid-19: what can sewage tell us?

It may be a respiratory virus, but studies have repeatedly found traces of Covid-19 in the faeces of infected patients. Using this to their advantage, scientists are sampling untreated sewage from wastewater plants in an effort to track the virus. Hannah Devlin speaks to Andrew Singer about how what we flush down the toilet can help detect emerging outbreaks – days before patients begin presenting

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US lab giant warns of new Covid-19 testing crunch in autumn

Quest Diagnostics executive says 'no way' capacity will expand enough to cope with flu season

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The worst of Covid-19 may still be to come

Its effects are rippling out in circles like a stone thrown into a pond. But they can be stopped

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German stocks shed 2020 loss as recovery pact sparks European rally

Investors buy riskier eurozone government debt after EU leaders agreed on €750bn package

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Coronavirus: Housing upgrades urged to create thousands of jobs

Fitting thousands of homes with new energy technology could create 50,000 jobs, housing bodies say.

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A mechanical way to stimulate neurons

Magnetic nanodiscs can be activated by an external magnetic field, providing a research tool for studying neural responses.

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A mechanical way to stimulate neurons

Magnetic nanodiscs can be activated by an external magnetic field, providing a research tool for studying neural responses.

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This Promising New COVID-19 Treatment Could Reduce Patient Deaths

Preliminary results suggest a "breakthrough".

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OpenAI's latest AI text generator GPT-3 amazes early adopters

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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An Interview With NVIDIA: "Make All Cars Autonomous"

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Team Designs Inhibitors To Target Key Enzymes in Alzheimer's

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Most polar bears to disappear by 2100, study predicts

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Oxford coronavirus vaccine triggers immune response

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Solar Panels to be cheaper and more efficient ?

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New nano drug candidate kills aggressive breast cancer cells

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Unpopular opinion we should tax sugar to help stop obesity

Fast food at this point is predatory and praying on people's addiction did you know in the USA 42% of people were obese from 2017-2018 I'm getting this from the cdc I'd like to remind people that's just obese people not chubby people..at this point it's a crisis shouldn't we do something about it? submitted by /u/DARKSOULS103 [link] [comments]

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Oxford Covid Vaccine Among Those Developers Say Have Promising Initial Results

Early trials showed a good immune response in vaccinated subjects, but one researcher sounded a note of caution: "There is still a long way to go."

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Three Coronavirus Vaccine Developers Report Promising Initial Results

Early trials showed a good immune response in vaccinated subjects, but one researcher sounded a note of caution: "There is still a long way to go."

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Researchers identify possible drug target for prostate cancer

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that the protein BRD4 could be an important new target to prevent castration-resistant prostate cancer metastases.

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River Thames 'severely polluted with plastic'

The Thames has some of the highest recorded levels of microplastics in the world, a study says.

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The Atlantic Daily: The Pandemic Is Changing Where We Live

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . CELINA PEREIRA "For the most part, the pandemic has restricted motion in America," my colleague Joe Pinsker pointed out earlier this month . "But one exception has been a large-scale nationwide r

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Physicists take stop-action images of light-driven molecular reaction

Physicists have taken extremely fast snapshots of light-induced molecular ring-opening reactions — similar to those that help a human body produce vitamin D from sunlight.

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COVID-19 vaccine is showing promise in phase 1 trial

An investigational vaccine designed to protect against COVID-19 produced both binding and neutralizing antibodies in healthy adult volunteers, according to interim results of an ongoing phase 1 trial. Researchers designed the experimental vaccine, mRNA-1273, to induce neutralizing antibodies directed at a portion of the coronavirus "spike" protein, which the virus uses to bind to and enter human

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Likely active volcanoes found on Venus, defying theory of dormant planet

Researchers identify 37 ring-like structures known as coronae that are believed to be living volcanoes Scientists have identified 37 volcanic structures on Venus that appear to have been recently active – and probably still are today – painting the picture of a geologically dynamic planet and not a dormant world as long thought. The research focused on ring-like structures called coronae, caused

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European sea bass absorb virtually no microplastic in their muscle tissue

Researchers gave young European see bass feed laced with microplastic for months, but found virtually no microplastic particles in the fish fillets.

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Photos may improve understanding of volcanic processes

The shape of volcanoes and their craters provide critical information on their formation and eruptive history. Techniques applied to photographs — photogrammetry — show promise and utility in correlating shape change to volcanic background and eruption activity.

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MRI scans of the brains of 130 mammals, including humans, indicate equal connectivity

Researchers conducted a first-of-its-kind study designed to investigate brain connectivity in 130 mammalian species. The intriguing results, contradicting widespread conjectures, revealed that brain connectivity levels are equal in all mammals, including humans.

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These cells spike before rheumatoid arthritis flare-ups

Newly discovered cells in the bloodstream dramatically increase in the bloodstream in the week before flare-ups of rheumatoid arthritis, report researchers. They may one day offer a way to predict the oncoming pain and discomfort associated with rheumatoid arthritis flare-ups and perhaps even prevent them from happening, researchers say. For people with rheumatoid arthritis, life is a little like

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Socio-economic status predicts UK boys' development of essential thinking skills

A comparison of children in Hong Kong, mainland China and the UK has found that British boys' development of key thinking skills, known as 'executive functions', is unusually reliant on their socio-economic status.

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UK households experience biggest income shock since 1970s

Resolution Foundation finds average income dropped 4.5% in less than 3 months

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Best monitors for a second screen in your home office

So you can see more. (Saied Hosni via Unsplash/) The idea is simple: extend your desktop across another screen. And yet, many working professionals are still craning over a laptop screen with seemingly a million tabs open, wondering if they'll ever catch a break. A second screen doesn't need to be equipped with all the most innovative tech features, but it should have a decent enough display and

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Gum disease may raise risk of some cancers

People who have periodontal (gum) disease may have a higher risk of developing some forms of cancer, suggests a letter published in the journal Gut detailing a prospective study.

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Biggest risk factors identified to try and prevent Alzheimer's disease

There are at least 10 risk factors that appear to have a significant impact on a person's likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease that could be targeted with preventative steps, suggests research published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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The career cost of COVID-19 to female researchers, and how science should respond

Nature, Published online: 20 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02183-x Some funders and journals are trying to support female researchers and others whose publications and positions are at risk.

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Writing the perfect recommendation letter

Nature, Published online: 20 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02186-8 Crafting a useful letter takes time and effort, particularly with the many demands on an academic's time.

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Black Children Are More Likely to Die After Surgery Than White Peers, Study Shows

A large study, published in the journal Pediatrics, suggests that disparities exist in surgery outcomes, even among healthy children.

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DSLR cameras for your next photography adventure

Capture shots to relive the best moments. (Jamie Street via Unsplash/) Whether you're an amateur photographer or a pro in the field, DSLRs are the perfect choice for crisp, high-quality shots. These flexible, efficient cameras can shoot vibrant photos, no matter the lighting, and allow for interchangeable lenses so you can adapt on the go. You can also take advantage of a long-lasting battery lif

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Publisher Correction: Chemical gradients in human enamel crystallites

Nature, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2544-x

15h

Publisher Correction: A weak topological insulator state in quasi-one-dimensional bismuth iodide

Nature, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2392-8 Publisher Correction: A weak topological insulator state in quasi-one-dimensional bismuth iodide

15h

Two COVID-19 Clinical Trials Seek to Enroll Pregnant Women

Upon seeing pregnant women sick with COVID-19 at a University of Pennsylvania hospital, researchers there wrote trial protocols for blood transfusions to treat the disease that include expecting mothers.

15h

New model connects respiratory droplet physics with spread of Covid-19

Respiratory droplets from a cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot, dry ones, according to a study on droplet physics.

16h

Earthquakes can cause serious psychological aftershocks

A 7.1 magnitude earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand, in 2011 injured thousands of people. But many more likely experienced anxiety and depression after the disaster. (Nigel Spiers/Deposit Photos/) In October of 2019, three strong earthquakes hit the Philippine municipality of Tulunan, Cotabato. With multiple active fault lines snaking around the southern island, residents three hours away in

16h

Keep Your Passwords Safe and Handy With 50% Off a Year of Dashlane

Protecting your password has never been more important . 2019 alone underlined that with a disastrous breach of Marriott's system that revealed the information of 383 million guests . And it has just gotten worse from there, and for a few reasons. First, bad passwords are epidemic. So epidemic, in fact, that Microsoft keeps a rolling blacklist of bad passwords that you can't use on any Microsoft

16h

A 440-mile-long "Megaflash" Enters the Record Books as the Longest Lightning Bolt Ever Observed

New technology enables scientists to document megaflashes spawned by monster storms.

16h

Media tip sheet: Going high-tech in ecology

These presentations feature ecological research that harnesses high-tech advances in new and exciting ways. All will be presented at the Ecological Society of America's upcoming virtual annual meeting, August 3-6, 2020.

16h

Label-free imaging helps predict reproductive outcomes

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have used a combination of label-free imaging and artificial intelligence to determine the potential fertility of sperm samples in cattle. The technique may help improve assisted reproductive technology in humans.

16h

'Ethically troubling.' University reopening plans put professors, students on edge

As the pandemic surges in the United States, academics worry about safety

16h

What silicone wristbands say about chemical exposure in Uruguayan children

Researchers used silicone wristbands to examine the extent of chemical exposure among a small group of children in Montevideo, Uruguay. The 6- to 8-year-olds wore the bands for seven days. After analyzing the wristbands, researchers found an average of 13 pollutants in each one collected. Some of the wristbands showed exposure to DDT, a harmful pesticide that has been banned for use in many countr

16h

Specialized cellular compartments discovered in bacteria

Researchers have discovered bacterial organelles involved in gene expression, suggesting that bacteria may not be as simple as once thought. This finding could offer new targets for the development of new antibiotics.

16h

New research reveals antifungal symbiotic peptide in legume

Scientists have identified a sub class of peptides in the nodules of the legume, Medicago truncatula that proved effective in inhibiting growth of the fungus causing gray mold.

16h

Controversial 'human challenge' trials for COVID-19 vaccines gain support

Volunteers line up, and labs set to work on viral strains for controlled infections

16h

Quantum exciton found in magnetic van der Waals material NiPS3

Things can always be done faster, but can anything beat light? Computing with light instead of electricity is seen as a breakthrough to boost the computer speeds. Transistors, the building blocks of data circuits, require to switch electrical signals into light in order to transmit the information via a fiber-optic cable. Optical computing could potentially save the time and energy used to be spen

16h

How smart, ultrathin nanosheets go fishing for proteins

An interdisciplinary team has developed a kind of bait with which to fish protein complexes out of mixtures.

16h

Which way to the fridge? Common sense helps robots navigate

A robot travelling from point A to point B is more efficient if it understands that point A is the living room couch and point B is a refrigerator. That's the common sense idea behind a 'semantic' navigation system.

16h

Insight into toddlers' awareness of their own uncertainty

Toddlers may not be able to describe their feelings of uncertainty, but a new study from the Center for Mind and Brain at UC Davis provides evidence that toddlers may experience and deal with uncertainty in decision making in the same way as older children and adults.

17h

3D hand-sensing wristband signals future of wearable tech

In a potential breakthrough in wearable sensing technology, researchers from Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin, Madison, have designed a wrist-mounted device that continuously tracks the entire human hand in 3D.

17h

New diagnostic test for heart failure patients could also help COVID-19 patients

A new blood test that reliably predicts outcomes for heart failure patients could lead to new diagnostics and treatments for COVID-19 patients as well, according to new research.

17h

New ways to understand life in a pandemic | Aaron Maniam

Poet and policymaker Aaron Maniam describes how the language we use to explain COVID-19 shapes the way we think about it — whether it's as a "war," a "journey" or, as he suggests, an "ecology." He encourages us to explore a range of imaginative, interlocking metaphors to gain a deeper understanding of the pandemic — and shows how this can help us to envision a better, more inclusive future. (Thi

17h

Florida harmful algal blooms produce multiple toxins detrimental to human health

In 2018, cyanobacteria from nutrient-rich waters in Lake Okeechobee were released down the Caloosahatchee river at the same time red tides were gathering along the Florida west coast, potentially exposing coastal residents to a mixture of toxins.

17h

New model connects respiratory droplet physics with spread of Covid-19

Respiratory droplets from a cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot, dry ones, according to a study on droplet physics by an international team of engineers. The researchers incorporated this understanding of the impact of environmental factors on droplet spread into a mathematical model that can be used to predict the early spread of respiratory viruses

17h

Genes, cardiovascular health each factor into dementia risk

Genes and cardiovascular health both contribute to the risk of dementia, a new study shows. Encouragingly, researchers from UT Health San Antonio point out that even if a person is at higher risk genetically of developing dementia, he or she can still lower the risk by pursuing optimum cardiovascular health.

17h

COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

Data from Iran shows a nearly 25 percent 30-day cumulative mortality rate for hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

17h

The carbon footprint of household energy use in the United States [Sustainability Science]

Residential energy use accounts for roughly 20% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the United States. Using data on 93 million individual households, we estimate these GHGs across the contiguous United States and clarify the respective influence of climate, affluence, energy infrastructure, urban form, and building attributes (age, housing type,…

17h

Link-usage asymmetry and collective patterns emerging from rich-club organization of complex networks [Physics]

In models of excitable dynamics on graphs, excitations can travel in both directions of an undirected link. However, as a striking interplay of dynamics and network topology, excitations often establish a directional preference. Some of these cases of "link-usage asymmetry" are local in nature and can be mechanistically understood, for…

17h

Automated detection of archaeological mounds using machine-learning classification of multisensor and multitemporal satellite data [Anthropology]

This paper presents an innovative multisensor, multitemporal machine-learning approach using remote sensing big data for the detection of archaeological mounds in Cholistan (Pakistan). The Cholistan Desert presents one of the largest concentrations of Indus Civilization sites (from ca. 3300 to 1500 BC). Cholistan has figured prominently in theories about changes…

17h

Redistribution of metabolic resources through astrocyte networks mitigates neurodegenerative stress [Neuroscience]

In the central nervous system, glycogen-derived bioenergetic resources in astrocytes help promote tissue survival in response to focal neuronal stress. However, our understanding of the extent to which these resources are mobilized and utilized during neurodegeneration, especially in nearby regions that are not actively degenerating, remains incomplete. Here we modeled…

17h

Subdomain cryo-EM structure of nodaviral replication protein A crown complex provides mechanistic insights into RNA genome replication [Microbiology]

For positive-strand RNA [(+)RNA] viruses, the major target for antiviral therapies is genomic RNA replication, which occurs at poorly understood membrane-bound viral RNA replication complexes. Recent cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) of nodavirus RNA replication complexes revealed that the viral double-stranded RNA replication template is coiled inside a 30- to 90-nm invagination…

17h

Relating size and functionality in human social networks through complexity [Applied Mathematics]

Extensive empirical evidence suggests that there is a maximal number of people with whom an individual can maintain stable social relationships (the Dunbar number). We argue that this arises as a consequence of a natural phase transition in the dynamic self-organization among N individuals within a social system. We present…

17h

Honey bee colony aggression and indirect genetic effects [Commentaries]

Social interaction is like a dance between two or more individuals who communicate with each other by sending and receiving information. Social cues are multisensory, involving combinations of visual, olfactory, auditory, and tactile information. One individual transmits information through its behavior and the other interprets it, providing a behavioral response…

17h

Cats as predators and early domesticates in ancient human landscapes [Commentaries]

Cats have had diverse relationships with humans, ranging from rodent control, to household pets, to cultural icons. The presence of rodents in grain stores in Neolithic farming settlements is widely thought to have led to the domestication of cats (1–3). Felid bones are rare in archaeological sites, however, and processes…

17h

Specific thylakoid protein phosphorylations are prerequisites for overwintering of Norway spruce (Picea abies) photosynthesis [Plant Biology]

Coping of evergreen conifers in boreal forests with freezing temperatures on bright winter days puts the photosynthetic machinery in great risk of oxidative damage. To survive harsh winter conditions, conifers have evolved a unique but poorly characterized photoprotection mechanism, a sustained form of nonphotochemical quenching (sustained NPQ). Here we focused…

17h

Fc-mediated effector function contributes to the in vivo antiviral effect of an HIV neutralizing antibody [Microbiology]

Treatment of HIV infection with either antiretroviral (ARV) therapy or neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NAbs) leads to a reduction in HIV plasma virus. Both ARVs and NAbs prevent new rounds of viral infection, but NAbs may have the additional capacity to accelerate the loss of virus-infected cells through Fc gamma receptor…

17h

Last step in the path of LDL cholesterol from lysosome to plasma membrane to ER is governed by phosphatidylserine [Cell Biology]

Animal cells acquire cholesterol from receptor-mediated uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which releases cholesterol in lysosomes. The cholesterol moves to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where it inhibits production of LDL receptors, completing a feedback loop. Here we performed a CRISPR-Cas9 screen in human SV589 cells for genes required for LDL-derived…

17h

Phosphoprotein-based biomarkers as predictors for cancer therapy [Applied Biological Sciences]

Disparities in cancer patient responses have prompted widespread searches to identify differences in sensitive vs. nonsensitive populations and form the basis of personalized medicine. This customized approach is dependent upon the development of pathway-specific therapeutics in conjunction with biomarkers that predict patient responses. Here, we show that Cdk5 drives growth…

17h

Recent anthropogenic curtailing of Yellow River runoff and sediment load is unprecedented over the past 500 y [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The Yellow River (YR) is the fifth-longest and the most sediment-laden river in the world. Frequent historical YR flooding events, however, have resulted in tremendous loss of life and property, whereas in recent decades YR runoff and sediment load have fallen sharply. To put these recent changes in a longer-term…

17h

Soft transition between subcritical and supercritical currents through intermittent cascading interfacial instabilities [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Long-running gravity currents are flows that are submerged beneath a deep layer of quiescent fluid and they travel over long distances along inclined or horizontal surfaces. They are driven by the density difference between the current and the clear ambient fluid above. In this work we present results on highly…

17h

TNNT2 mutations in the tropomyosin binding region of TNT1 disrupt its role in contractile inhibition and stimulate cardiac dysfunction [Physiology]

Muscle contraction is regulated by the movement of end-to-end-linked troponin−tropomyosin complexes over the thin filament surface, which uncovers or blocks myosin binding sites along F-actin. The N-terminal half of troponin T (TnT), TNT1, independently promotes tropomyosin-based, steric inhibition of acto-myosin associations, in vitro. Recent structural models additionally suggest TNT1 may…

17h

Human cytomegalovirus protein pUL36: A dual cell death pathway inhibitor [Microbiology]

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important human pathogen and a paradigm of intrinsic, innate, and adaptive viral immune evasion. Here, we employed multiplexed tandem mass tag-based proteomics to characterize host proteins targeted for degradation late during HCMV infection. This approach revealed that mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL), a key…

17h

Co-option of the lineage-specific LAVA retrotransposon in the gibbon genome [Evolution]

Co-option of transposable elements (TEs) to become part of existing or new enhancers is an important mechanism for evolution of gene regulation. However, contributions of lineage-specific TE insertions to recent regulatory adaptations remain poorly understood. Gibbons present a suitable model to study these contributions as they have evolved a lineage-specific…

17h

Light modulates the gravitropic responses through organ-specific PIFs and HY5 regulation of LAZY4 expression in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

Light and gravity are two key environmental factors that control plant growth and architecture. However, the molecular basis of the coordination of light and gravity signaling in plants remains obscure. Here, we report that two classes of transcription factors, PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORS (PIFs) and ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5), can directly bind…

17h

Molecular basis of Coxsackievirus A10 entry using the two-in-one attachment and uncoating receptor KRM1 [Microbiology]

KREMEN1 (KRM1) has been identified as a functional receptor for Coxsackievirus A10 (CV-A10), a causative agent of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD), which poses a great threat to infants globally. However, the underlying mechanisms for the viral entry process are not well understood. Here we determined the atomic structures of different forms…

17h

Cleavage-furrow formation without F-actin in Chlamydomonas [Cell Biology]

It is widely believed that cleavage-furrow formation during cytokinesis is driven by the contraction of a ring containing F-actin and type-II myosin. However, even in cells that have such rings, they are not always essential for furrow formation. Moreover, many taxonomically diverse eukaryotic cells divide by furrowing but have no…

17h

Vps13 is required for the packaging of the ER into autophagosomes during ER-phagy [Cell Biology]

Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) macroautophagy (hereafter called ER-phagy) uses autophagy receptors to selectively degrade ER domains in response to starvation or the accumulation of aggregation-prone proteins. Autophagy receptors package the ER into autophagosomes by binding to the ubiquitin-like yeast protein Atg8 (LC3 in mammals), which is needed for autophagosome formation. In…

17h

An influenza A hemagglutinin small-molecule fusion inhibitor identified by a new high-throughput fluorescence polarization screen [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Influenza hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein is the primary surface antigen targeted by the host immune response and a focus for development of novel vaccines, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs), and therapeutics. HA enables viral entry into host cells via receptor binding and membrane fusion and is a validated target for drug discovery….

17h

Correction for Richaud et al., Vertical transmission in Caenorhabditis nematodes of RNA molecules encoding a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase [Corrections]

GENETICS Correction for "Vertical transmission in Caenorhabditis nematodes of RNA molecules encoding a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase," by Aurélien Richaud, Lise Frézal, Stephen Tahan, Hongbing Jiang, Joshua A. Blatter, Guoyan Zhao, Taniya Kaur, David Wang, and Marie-Anne Félix, which was first published November 18, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1903903116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci….

17h

Nanoparticles presenting clusters of CD4 expose a universal vulnerability of HIV-1 by mimicking target cells [Microbiology]

CD4-based decoy approaches against HIV-1 are attractive options for long-term viral control, but initial designs, including soluble CD4 (sCD4) and CD4-Ig, were ineffective. To evaluate a therapeutic that more accurately mimics HIV-1 target cells compared with monomeric sCD4 and dimeric CD4-Ig, we generated virus-like nanoparticles that present clusters of membrane-associated…

17h

Shifts in timing and duration of breeding for 73 boreal bird species over four decades [Ecology]

Breeding timed to match optimal resource abundance is vital for the successful reproduction of species, and breeding is therefore sensitive to environmental cues. As the timing of breeding shifts with a changing climate, this may not only affect the onset of breeding but also its termination, and thus the length…

17h

High-pressure elastic properties of dolomite melt supporting carbonate-induced melting in deep upper mantle [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Deeply subducted carbonates likely cause low-degree melting of the upper mantle and thus play an important role in the deep carbon cycle. However, direct seismic detection of carbonate-induced partial melts in the Earth's interior is hindered by our poor knowledge on the elastic properties of carbonate melts. Here we report…

17h

Genome-wide role of Rad26 in promoting transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair in yeast chromatin [Genetics]

Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) is an important DNA repair mechanism that removes RNA polymerase (RNAP)-stalling DNA damage from the transcribed strand (TS) of active genes. TC-NER deficiency in humans is associated with the severe neurological disorder Cockayne syndrome. Initiation of TC-NER is mediated by specific factors such as the…

17h

Elevated paleomagnetic dispersion at Saint Helena suggests long-lived anomalous behavior in the South Atlantic [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Earth's magnetic field is presently characterized by a large and growing anomaly in the South Atlantic Ocean. The question of whether this region of Earth's surface is preferentially subject to enhanced geomagnetic variability on geological timescales has major implications for core dynamics, core−mantle interaction, and the possibility of an imminent…

17h

Crop rotation mitigates impacts of corn rootworm resistance to transgenic Bt corn [Agricultural Sciences]

Transgenic crops that produce insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) can suppress pests and reduce insecticide sprays, but their efficacy is reduced when pests evolve resistance. Although farmers plant refuges of non-Bt host plants to delay pest resistance, this tactic has not been sufficient against the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica…

17h

Microbial exposure drives polyclonal expansion of innate {gamma}{delta} T cells immediately after birth [Immunology and Inflammation]

Starting at birth, the immune system of newborns and children encounters and is influenced by environmental challenges. It is still not completely understood how γδ T cells emerge and adapt during early life. Studying the composition of T cell receptors (TCRs) using next-generation sequencing (NGS) in neonates, infants, and children…

17h

QnAs with Hashim Al-Hashimi [QnAs]

Proteins and nucleic acids can undergo a variety of motions inside cells, ranging from vibrations of individual atoms to rearrangements of large molecular domains. In some cases, these motions are integral to the molecule's function, yet difficult to measure and track experimentally. Hashim Al-Hashimi, a biophysical chemist at Duke University,…

17h

Inefficient V(D)J recombination underlies monogenic T cell receptor {beta} expression [Immunology and Inflammation]

The assembly of T cell receptor (TCR) and immunoglobulin (Ig) genes by V(D)J recombination generates the antigen receptor (AgR) diversity that is vital for adaptive immunity. At most AgR loci, V(D)J recombination is regulated so that only one allele assembles a functional gene, ensuring that nearly every T and B…

17h

Identification of GLUT12/SLC2A12 as a urate transporter that regulates the blood urate level in hyperuricemia model mice [Physiology]

Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed some genetic loci associated with serum uric acid levels and susceptibility to gout/hyperuricemia which contain potential candidates of physiologically important urate transporters. One of these novel loci is located upstream of SGK1 and SLC2A12, suggesting that variations in these genes increase the risks of…

17h

Tonoplast-localized Ca2+ pumps regulate Ca2+ signals during pattern-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology]

One of the major events of early plant immune responses is a rapid influx of Ca2+ into the cytosol following pathogen recognition. Indeed, changes in cytosolic Ca2+ are recognized as ubiquitous elements of cellular signaling networks and are thought to encode stimulus-specific information in their duration, amplitude, and frequency. Despite…

17h

Correction for Wu et al., Large enhancement of thermoelectric performance in MoS2/h-BN heterostructure due to vacancy-induced band hybridization [Corrections]

APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Large enhancement of thermoelectric performance in MoS2/h-BN heterostructure due to vacancy-induced band hybridization," by Jing Wu, Yanpeng Liu, Yi Liu, Yongqing Cai, Yunshan Zhao, Hong Kuan Ng, Kenji Watanabe, Takashi Taniguchi, Gang Zhang, Cheng-Wei Qiu, Dongzhi Chi, A. H. Castro Neto, John T. L. Thong,…

17h

Yin Yang 1 is a potent activator of human T lymphotropic virus type 1 LTR-driven gene expression via RNA binding [Microbiology]

Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is a DNA-binding transcription factor that either activates or represses gene expression. YY1 has previously been implicated in the transcriptional silencing of many retroviruses by binding to DNA sequences in the U3 region of the viral long terminal repeat (LTR). We here show that YY1 overexpression…

17h

Elevated dust depositions in West Asia linked to ocean-atmosphere shifts during North Atlantic cold events [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Rapid North Atlantic cooling events during the last deglaciation caused atmospheric reorganizations on global and regional scales. Their impact on Asian climate has been investigated for monsoonal domains, but remains largely unknown in westerly wind-dominated semiarid regions. Here we generate a dust record from southeastern Iran spanning the period 19…

17h

Metformin inhibits RAN translation through PKR pathway and mitigates disease in C9orf72 ALS/FTD mice [Genetics]

Repeat associated non-AUG (RAN) translation is found in a growing number of microsatellite expansion diseases, but the mechanisms remain unclear. We show that RAN translation is highly regulated by the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). In cells, structured CAG, CCUG, CAGG, and G4C2 expansion RNAs activate PKR, which leads to…

17h

Calcium-triggered fusion of lipid membranes is enabled by amphiphilic nanoparticles [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Lipid membrane fusion is an essential process for a number of critical biological functions. The overall process is thermodynamically favorable but faces multiple kinetic barriers along the way. Inspired by nature's engineered proteins such as SNAP receptor [soluble N-ethylmale-imide-sensitive factor-attachment protein receptor (SNARE)] complexes or viral fusogenic proteins that actively…

17h

Intact proviral DNA assay analysis of large cohorts of people with HIV provides a benchmark for the frequency and composition of persistent proviral DNA [Microbiology]

A scalable approach for quantifying intact HIV-1 proviruses is critical for basic research and clinical trials directed at HIV-1 cure. The intact proviral DNA assay (IPDA) is a novel approach to characterizing the HIV-1 reservoir, focusing on the genetic integrity of individual proviruses independent of transcriptional status. It uses multiplex…

17h

Correction for Fowler et al., Arrhythmogenic late Ca2+ sparks in failing heart cells and their control by action potential configuration [Corrections]

PHYSIOLOGY Correction for "Arrhythmogenic late Ca2+ sparks in failing heart cells and their control by action potential configuration," by Ewan D. Fowler, Nan Wang, Melanie Hezzell, Guillaume Chanoit, Jules C. Hancox, and Mark B. Cannell, which was first published January 22, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1918649117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 2687–2692)….

17h

Robust evidence for bisexual orientation among men [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

The question whether some men have a bisexual orientation—that is, whether they are substantially sexually aroused and attracted to both sexes—has remained controversial among both scientists and laypersons. Skeptics believe that male sexual orientation can only be homosexual or heterosexual, and that bisexual identification reflects nonsexual concerns, such as a…

17h

Bidirectional titration of yeast gene expression using a pooled CRISPR guide RNA approach [Applied Biological Sciences]

Most classic genetic approaches utilize binary modifications that preclude the identification of key knockdowns for essential genes or other targets that only require moderate modulation. As a complementary approach to these classic genetic methods, we describe a plasmid-based library methodology that affords bidirectional, graded modulation of gene expression enabled by…

17h

Lay theories of peace and their influence on policy preference during violent conflict [Social Sciences]

We often talk about peace as if the concept is self-explanatory. Yet people can have various theories about what peace "is." In this study, we examine the lay theories of peace of citizens embroiled in a prolonged ethnonational conflict. We show that lay theories of peace 1) depend on whether…

17h

Reproductive outcomes predicted by phase imaging with computational specificity of spermatozoon ultrastructure [Engineering]

The ability to evaluate sperm at the microscopic level, at high-throughput, would be useful for assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs), as it can allow specific selection of sperm cells for in vitro fertilization (IVF). The tradeoff between intrinsic imaging and external contrast agents is particularly acute in reproductive medicine. The use…

17h

Integrative structural, functional, and transcriptomic analyses of sex-biased brain organization in humans [Neuroscience]

Humans display reproducible sex differences in cognition and behavior, which may partly reflect intrinsic sex differences in regional brain organization. However, the consistency, causes and consequences of sex differences in the human brain are poorly characterized and hotly debated. In contrast, recent studies in mice—a major model organism for studying…

17h

Correction for Al et al., Heart-brain interactions shape somatosensory perception and evoked potentials [Corrections]

NEUROSCIENCE Correction for "Heart–brain interactions shape somatosensory perception and evoked potentials," by Esra Al, Fivos Iliopoulos, Norman Forschack, Till Nierhaus, Martin Grund, Paweł Motyka, Michael Gaebler, Vadim V. Nikulin, and Arno Villringer, which was first published April 27, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1915629117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 10575–10584). The authors note…

17h

Better wastewater treatment? It's a wrap

A shield of graphene helps particles destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the free-floating genes in wastewater treatment plants.

17h

US geoscience programmes drop controversial admissions test

Nature, Published online: 20 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02181-z A standardized exam is under fire amid claims that it perpetuates bias and exclusion.

17h

Backyard bounce houses that deliver off-the-wall fun

Nonstop fun. (Mi Pham via Unsplash/) They're soft, they're colorful, and kids can literally ricochet off their walls for hours on end; bounce houses are fun and safe ways to blow off steam. These inflatable amusement-park classics are scaled down for backyard use, and they're available in dozens of different themes, from fantasy castles to jungle caves to space stations. Besides having room to ju

17h

Lightweight laptops that aren't a pain to lug around

You'll barely know you have it with you. ( Martin Castro via Unsplash/) Whether you're a student who wants a laptop that can transition from dorm room to classroom without weighing you down or an executive who treats your computer like an extra appendage, walking room-to-room with laptop in one hand, phone in the other, there is an ultra-light laptop that will give you the freedom and power you n

17h

Affordable espresso machines for your morning caffeine boost

For that much-needed morning buzz. (Sahand Hoseini via Unsplash/) You don't need to cut your teeth at a trendy cafe to deliver an impeccable cup of steamy espresso; you can just buy a machine. Whether you're a novice looking to buff up redeye-making skills or confident making a macchiato, most machines will be able to meet you where you are. The best ones, however, are easy to use and clean, powe

17h

COVID-19 replicating RNA vaccine has robust response in nonhuman primates

A replicating RNA vaccine, formulated with a lipid-based nanoparticle emulsion, produces antibodies against the COVID-19 coronavirus in mice and primates with a single immunization. These antibodies potently neutralize the virus in young and old animals. The antibody levels induced are comparable to those in recovered COVID-19 patients. This formulation is shelf-stable, with mass-production and di

17h

Ultracold mystery: Solved

Last December, researchers designed technology that could achieve the lowest temperature chemical reactions and then broke and formed the coldest bonds in the history of molecular coupling. Now, though reactions are considered too fast to measure, they determined the exact lifespan of their intermediate — the space between reactants and products — and solved the mystery of why some ultracold mol

17h

Researchers Hope Experimental Gene Therapy Is An Answer To A Fatal Genetic Disorder

Researchers believe gene therapy is poised to change the lives of thousands with the fatal genetic disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy — thanks to over 40 years of scientist Jude Samulski's work.

17h

U.K. And China Report Preliminary Success Of Experimental Coronavirus Vaccines

Coronavirus vaccine studies in Great Britain and China have both reported encouraging results. These projects are on the vanguard of vaccine development, but now they are awaiting large-scale tests.

17h

COVID-19 replicating RNA vaccine has robust response in nonhuman primates

A replicating RNA vaccine, formulated with a lipid-based nanoparticle emulsion, produces antibodies against the COVID-19 coronavirus in mice and primates with a single immunization. These antibodies potently neutralize the virus in young and old animals. The antibody levels induced are comparable to those in recovered COVID-19 patients. This formulation is shelf-stable, with mass-production and di

17h

Scientists boost stability and efficiency of next-gen solar tech

Researchers have created next-generation solar modules with high efficiency and good stability. Made using a type of material called perovskites, these solar modules can maintain a high performance for over 2000 hours. Their findings have brightened prospects of commercialization.

17h

The hair-raising reason for goosebumps

Researchers have discovered that the cells that cause goosebumps are also important for regulating the stem cells that regenerate hair. In the skin, the muscle that contracts to create goosebumps is necessary to bridge the sympathetic nerve's connection to hair follicle stem cells. The sympathetic nerve reacts to cold by contracting the muscle and causing goosebumps in the short term, and by drivi

17h

Steven Pinker Will Be Just Fine

H undreds of academics in the linguistics community signed an open letter earlier this month attacking Steven Pinker, one of their field's most prominent scholars, for six tweets and a passage from one of his best-selling books. Whatever their intentions, they were never going to succeed in intimidating the famous, tenured Harvard professor. But they did send a message to less powerful scholars t

17h

NASA Experiment: Radishes Could Probably Grow in Lunar Soil

NASA scientist Max Coleman has been trying to figure out if it's possible to grow radishes in lunar soil — in his kitchen. His goal is to figure out whether astronauts could one day grow their own food on the lunar surface — much like Matt Damon's character in Ridley Scott's 2015 film "The Martian." Coleman chose radishes because "they have been used before in space, and they germinate very, very

17h

If it's big enough and leafy enough the birds will come

A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology highlights specific features of urban green spaces that support the greatest diversity of bird species. The findings were published today in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning. The study focuses specifically on parks in New York City. It uses observations submitted to the eBird citizen-science database from 2002 through 2019 to estimate the var

17h

Advancing knowledge on archaea

An open-source data platform for researchers studying archaea is paving the way for new insights and educational opportunities.

17h

Early Oxford-AstraZeneca Coronavirus Vaccine Data 'Encouraging,' Scientists Say

Testing in more than 1,000 people found the vaccine spurred an immune response and had no severe side effects. Larger trials are underway. (Image credit: Paul Ellis/AFP via Getty Images)

18h

Eight summer activity ideas that will boost kids' brains

Creative play can take many forms, even when access to public spaces and friends is restricted. (Gabriela Braga/Unsplash/) Penny Pexman is a professor of psychology at the University of Calgary. Lorraine Reggin is a PhD student in cognitive psychology at the University of Calgary. Sheri Madigan is an associate professor and Canada Research Chair in determinants of child development at the Univers

18h

Mutant zebrafish reveals a turning point in spine's evolution

A chance mutation that led to spinal defects in a zebrafish has opened a little window into our own fishy past. The single-letter mutation showed that both the ancient and modern recipes for spine development are still to be found in the fish genome.

18h

Ultracold mystery: Solved

Last December, researchers designed technology that could achieve the lowest temperature chemical reactions and then broke and formed the coldest bonds in the history of molecular coupling. Now, though reactions are considered too fast to measure, they determined the exact lifespan of their intermediate — the space between reactants and products — and solved the mystery of why some ultracold mol

18h

Pivotal research discovers practices, technologies key to sustainable farming

Argonne researchers quantify how to reduce emissions by farms changing their practices and adopting novel technologies.

18h

NASA analyzes new eastern Pacific Ocean Tropical Depression 7E

The seventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean has formed. NASA's Terra satellite used infrared light to identify the area of strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures in Tropical Depression 7E.

18h

Climate scientists increasingly ignore ecological role of Indigenous peoples

In their zeal to promote the importance of climate change as an ecological driver, climate scientists increasingly are ignoring the profound role that indigenous peoples played in fire and vegetation dynamics, not only in the eastern United States but worldwide, according to a Penn State researcher.

18h

Changes in farming urgent to rescue biodiversity, scientists say

Over 360 scientists from 42 countries—led by the University of Göttingen and Westlake University China—call for transition of food production systems to agroecological principles.

18h

Humans need to do better if we're to avoid ocean system collapse

A new relationship between humanity and the ocean is required to secure the continuity of the diverse life support roles provided by the sea, according to a paper published in Nature Communications on 17 July 2020.

18h

Plato was right. Earth is made, on average, of cubes

The ancient philosopher Plato posited the shapes of the building blocks of the universe. According to him, the earth was formed of cubes. Researchers now find a fundamental truth in that premise. Studying the shapes and fragmentation patterns of a variety of rocks, they found that the average of all their forms is a cube.

18h

​How start-ups raise capital when their bank account is empty

Big Think's CEO and co-founder Victoria Montgomery Brown explores the challenges of being a female entrepreneur in her forthcoming book, Digital Goddess . In one chapter, Brown offers key insights into how to raise capital when you have no money and no MVP. She advises to use every edge at your disposal; perseverance and tenacity are essential. In 2017, 40 percent of entrepreneurs were female, re

18h

Scientists discover volcanoes on Venus are still active

A new study identified 37 recently active volcanic structures on Venus. The study provides some of the best evidence yet that Venus is still a geologically active planet.

18h

Plato was right. Earth is made, on average, of cubes

The ancient philosopher Plato posited the shapes of the building blocks of the universe. According to him, the earth was formed of cubes. Researchers now find a fundamental truth in that premise. Studying the shapes and fragmentation patterns of a variety of rocks, they found that the average of all their forms is a cube.

18h

The Internet of Things Is the Future and This Training Can Help You Master It

The devices that we interact with every single day are getting smarter. Sure, you already know that your current phone is better than your last one. But think of the appliances in your kitchen, your car, your grocery store. Just about every device is getting loaded up with internet connectivity and new features that you wouldn't have dreamed of in years prior. That development is the emergence of

18h

Legal marijuana may be slowing reductions in teen marijuana use, study says

A longitudinal study of more than 230 teens and young adults in Washington state finds that teens may be more likely to use marijuana following legalization – with the proliferation of stores and increasing adult use of the drug — than they otherwise would have been.

18h

Powerful human-like hands create safer human-robotics interactions

A team of engineers designed and developed a novel humanoid hand that may be able to help human-robotic interactions.

18h

Simply the best bread pans

Fresh loaves daily. ( Conor Brown via Unsplash/) Of the many baked goods to make, bread often reigns supreme. It's the baked good you eat every day, plus it makes for a cute gift with minimal decoration. Even if you measure out your flour, baking soda, and other ingredients meticulously—a great bread pan can totally shape your outcome. Whether you're making banana bread or pound cake, here are so

18h

Matt Hancock hails 'promising news' on Oxford University coronavirus vaccine – video

The health secretary, Matt Hancock, has welcomed the 'promising news' on Oxford University's coronavirus vaccine. Researchers working on the experimental vaccine said it was safe and generated a strong immune response in the people who volunteered to help trial it, raising hopes it could contribute to ending the pandemic. 'Very encouraging news. We have already ordered 100m doses of this vaccine,

18h

Cyber expert on 'insider threat' attacks

Dr Duncan Hodges, Senior Lecturer in Cyberspace Operations, Cranfield University, is actively researching insider threats such as the recent Twitter attack. He and researcher Katie Paxton-Fear are presenting this paper Understanding Insider Threat Attacks Using Natural Language Processing, at the HCI International Conference on Thursday 23 July 2020 1400 CEST.

18h

A mechanical way to stimulate neurons

Magnetic nanodiscs can be activated by an external magnetic field, providing a research tool for studying neural responses.

18h

Argonne's pivotal research discovers practices, technologies key to sustainable farming

Scientists study how sustainable farming practices could reduce emissions.

18h

Advanced Cryo-EM reveals viral RNA replication complex structure in stunning detail

For the first time, scientists at the Morgridge Institute for Research have generated near atomic resolution images of a major viral protein complex responsible for replicating the RNA genome of a member of the positive-strand RNA viruses.

18h

Scientists identify a new drug target for dry age-related macular degeneration

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that the blood protein vitronectin is a promising drug target for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision loss in Americans 60 years of age and older. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), also holds implications for Alzheimer's and heart disease,

18h

NIH study shows highly reproducible sex differences in aspects of human brain anatomy

A scientific analysis of more than 2,000 brain scans found evidence for highly reproducible sex differences in the volume of certain regions in the human brain. This pattern of sex-based differences in brain volume corresponds with patterns of sex-chromosome gene expression observed in postmortem samples from the brain's cortex, suggesting that sex chromosomes may play a role in the development or

18h

Homes of wealthy Americans have carbon footprints 25% higher than lower-income residences

The homes of wealthy Americans generate about 25% more greenhouse gases than residences in lower-income neighborhoods, mainly due to their larger size. In the nation's most affluent suburbs, those emissions can be as much as 15 times higher than in nearby lower-income neighborhoods.

18h

Returning to farming's roots in the battle against the 'billion-dollar beetle'

A new study from University of Arizona entomologists reaffirms the importance of crop rotation and diversification in combating the western corn rootworm's resistance to biotech crops.

18h

South Atlantic anomalies existed 8 – 11 million years ago

Research by the University of Liverpool has revealed that strange behaviour of the magnetic field in the South Atlantic region existed as far back as eight to 11 million years ago, suggesting that today's South Atlantic Anomaly is a recurring feature and unlikely to represent an impending reversal of the Earth's magnetic field.

18h

Psycho Raab confused at being the biggest dove in the Commons on China | John Crace

The foreign secretary tried to take a tough line but found it wasn't enough to satisfy any MPs Sometimes you just can't win. Just a week after announcing he was barring Huawei from the UK's 5G network by 2027 – the Chinese had apparently promised they wouldn't do any spying in the next seven years – Dominic Raab was back in the Commons to make yet another ministerial statement. This time to indef

18h

Global warming shrinks bird breeding windows, potentially threatening species

Birds in Finland breed earlier in the year over a shorter period of time

18h

Kids may spread COVID-19 more than previously assumed

It's been six months since the first US case was spotted in Washington. (Image by Myo Min Kyaw from Pixabay /) While some states are seeing declines in COVID-19 cases, the vast majority of the US is still struggling with surges. Several states that previously saw case counts decline are now facing the consequences of hastily reopening businesses and returning to normal. Florida has garnered more

18h

Returning to farming's roots in the battle against the 'billion-dollar beetle'

Nicknamed the "billion-dollar beetle" for its enormous economic costs to growers in the United States each year, the western corn rootworm is one of the most devastating pests farmers face.

18h

Advanced Cryo-EM reveals viral RNA replication complex structure in stunning detail

For the first time, scientists at the Morgridge Institute for Research have generated near atomic resolution images of a major viral protein complex responsible for replicating the RNA genome of a member of the positive-strand RNA viruses, the large class of viruses that includes coronaviruses and many other pathogens.

18h

Homes of wealthy Americans have carbon footprints 25% higher than lower-income residences

The homes of wealthy Americans generate about 25% more greenhouse gases than residences in lower-income neighborhoods, mainly due to their larger size. In the nation's most affluent suburbs, those emissions can be as much as 15 times higher than in nearby lower-income neighborhoods.

18h

Study reveals strange magnetic behaviour 8-11 million years ago

Research by the University of Liverpool has revealed that strange behaviour of the magnetic field in the South Atlantic region existed as far back as eight to 11 million years ago, suggesting that today's South Atlantic Anomaly is a recurring feature and unlikely to represent an impending reversal of the Earth's magnetic field.

18h

Advanced Cryo-EM reveals viral RNA replication complex structure in stunning detail

For the first time, scientists at the Morgridge Institute for Research have generated near atomic resolution images of a major viral protein complex responsible for replicating the RNA genome of a member of the positive-strand RNA viruses, the large class of viruses that includes coronaviruses and many other pathogens.

19h

City of Hope: Mechanism that may lead to metabolic memory/sustained diabetes complications

For people with diabetes, vascular complications like kidney disease and atherosclerosis, which can lead to poor health and even death, are seen at increased rates. In a new Nature Metabolism study, researchers led by City of Hope's Rama Natarajan, Ph.D., the National Business Products Industry Professor in Diabetes Research, identified for the first time an underlying mechanism for metabolic memo

19h

Trump Says He 'Aced' a Cognitive Test. What Does That Really Mean?

Experts say one popular test that the president might have taken is by no means definitive, or even diagnostic.

19h

Cellular signaling cascade balances information transmission against energy consumption, study says

Cellular signal transmission is not only optimized for precision—it also includes a cost cap. The relationship between information and energy, a concept well established in physics and engineering, is likely to fundamentally shape cellular signaling networks. One of the questions addressed by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, headed by biophysicist Victor Sourji

19h

Cellular signaling cascade balances information transmission against energy consumption, study says

Cellular signal transmission is not only optimized for precision—it also includes a cost cap. The relationship between information and energy, a concept well established in physics and engineering, is likely to fundamentally shape cellular signaling networks. One of the questions addressed by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, headed by biophysicist Victor Sourji

19h

Plant roots increase carbon emission from permafrost soils

A key uncertainty in climate projections is the amount of carbon emitted by thawing permafrost in the Arctic. Plant roots in soil stimulate microbial decomposition, a mechanism called the priming effect. An international research team shows that the priming effect alone can cause emission of 40 billion tonnes carbon from permafrost by 2100.

19h

A nanoparticle vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 produces signs of immunity in mice and macaques

A new nanoparticle vaccine for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, has shown hints of protection and immunity in a preclinical study, safely eliciting the production of antibodies and antiviral T cell responses in mice and pigtail macaques.

19h

Mutant zebrafish reveals a turning point in spine's evolution

A chance mutation that led to spinal defects in a zebrafish has opened a little window into our own fishy past. The single-letter mutation showed that both the ancient and modern recipes for spine development are still to be found in the fish genome.

19h

Changes in farming urgent to rescue biodiversity

Humans depend on farming for their survival but this activity takes up more than one-third of the world's landmass and endangers 62% of all threatened species. However, agricultural landscapes can support biodiversity. Over 360 scientists from 42 countries, led by the University of Göttingen and Westlake University, argue that agroecological principles should be integrated in the post-2020 Global

19h

NASA analyzes new eastern Pacific Ocean Tropical Depression 7E

The seventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean has formed. NASA's Terra satellite used infrared light to identify the area of strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures in Tropical Depression 7E.

19h

Human Memory Explorer Gordon Bower Dies

The Stanford University researcher shared valuable insights into memory and learning during his 49-year career.

19h

Could mini-Neptunes be irradiated ocean planets?

Many exoplanets known today are 'super-Earths,' with a radius 1.3 times that of Earth, and 'mini-Neptunes,' with 2.4 Earth radii. Mini-Neptunes, which are less dense, were long thought to be gas planets, made up of hydrogen and helium. Now, scientists at the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université/Cnes) have examined a new possibility, namely that the low density of

19h

Can consumer brands survive boycotting Facebook?

Over 500 companies, well-known consumer brands among them, have announced that they will not advertise on Facebook-owned media properties until the company curbs hate speech on its platform. Facebook is likely to sustain minimal damages at the hands of the #StopHateForProfit movement, because the lion's share of potential participants depend on the platform for business, and it isn't mutual. Even

19h

Climate scientists increasingly ignore ecological role of indigenous peoples

In their zeal to promote the importance of climate change as an ecological driver, climate scientists increasingly are ignoring the profound role that indigenous peoples played in fire and vegetation dynamics, not only in the eastern United States but worldwide, according to a Penn State researcher.

19h

COVID-19 replicating RNA vaccine has robust response in nonhuman primates

A replicating RNA vaccine, formulated with a lipid-based nanoparticle emulsion, produces antibodies against the COVID-19 coronavirus in mice and primates with a single immunization. These antibodies potently neutralize the virus in young and old animals. The antibody levels induced are comparable to those in recovered COVID-19 patients. This formulation is shelf-stable, with mass-production and di

19h

Pacemaker need in Africa outpacing resources

The need for pacemakers in Africa will rise as life expectancy and associated cardiovascular diseases increase; however, the pacing field, including appropriate training, facilities and devices, are not sufficient to meet future need, according to an Africa Heart Rhythm Association (AFHRA) statement published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

19h

Civil War Vaccine May Have Lessons for COVID-19

Vaccination used against smallpox during the Civil War reveals the identity of the distantly related virus used to keep troops disease free.

19h

UK needs a two-stage inquiry into handling of coronavirus

A swift interim review should start now, followed by a fuller accounting

19h

"Mini-Neptune" Exoplanets May Actually Be Covered in Radioactive Oceans

Nuka-Nepta New research suggests that astronomers may have been entirely wrong about a class of exoplanets that they call "mini-Neptunes." These worlds, which were thought to be smaller versions — just 2.4 Earth radii across — of gas giants like Neptune, may actually be rocky exoplanets covered by thick, deeply-irradiated oceans, according to research by scientists at the Laboratoire d'Astrophysi

19h

Expert: Swap some cops for pros who vow 'first, do no harm'

There are immediate, concrete steps governments can take to address enduring problems in law enforcement, says law professor Barry Friedman. In the weeks following the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, protests erupted nationwide with people demanding justice for Floyd and condemning a policing system in which police kill Black people at disproportionately higher

19h

Coronavirus Live News Updates

Teachers unions sue Florida's governor over an order requiring schools to reopen despite surging cases. India recorded at least 40,000 new infections on Monday, its highest single-day total.

19h

Covid-19 news: Oxford vaccine is safe and induces immune response

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

19h

Jupiter Eclipse Proves the Speed of Light

Originally published in January 1848 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Want to Slow Down Time? Use a Really Slow Clock

Minutes and hours? That's old thinking. Artist Scott Thrift wants you to see the bigger picture.

20h

The National Zoo Will Reopen to the Public on July 24

Two bison, an Andean bear and a baby wallaby are among the new animals ready to welcome visitors back

20h

New Data on the CanSino Vaccine

And now we have more data on the CanSino vaccine, another adenovirus vector (but this one using Ad5, a much more common one in the human population). Their initial Phase I data are discussed here. So what else do we know now? Well, that one was open label and non-randomized, whereas this one is fully controlled. It also is much larger, and has a wider range of ages and should be more of a real-wo

20h

Drop in Global Travel May Have Hurt Weather Forecasts

Commercial planes and ships usually gather valuable data to feed into weather models — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

How brothers become strangers, and vice versa

These two maps capture the centrifugal and centripetal forces at work throughout human history. See how the Proto-Indo-European word for 'brother' spreads and changes, in both sound and meaning. And how the Proto-Germanic word for 'stranger' now is a familiar fixture of European toponymy. Name that animal (in Proto-Indo-European) What is the difference between a brother and a stranger? Distance a

20h

Buried GitHub archival storage to last 1,000 years

If civilization ever succumbs to global warming, nuclear annihilation, an unrelenting pandemic or a martian invasion, some future civilization—or alien life form—might well still be able to reconstruct today's computers and compose advanced machine learning algorithms … and perhaps even play a round of Doom while they're at it.

20h

'Pandemic fatigue' marks a mental health crisis

Anxious, depression, or exhausted? You're not alone. A clinical psychologist explains "pandemic fatigue." Some experts warn the next pandemic challenge will be to "flatten the mental health curve." When widespread lockdowns began across the United States in response to COVID-19, many hoped life would get back to normal in a couple of weeks. Now, four months later, there is still no end in sight f

20h

Study uncovers hair cell loss as underlying cause of age-related hearing loss

In a study of human ear tissues, scientists have demonstrated that age-related hearing loss is mainly caused by damage to hair cells. Their research challenges the prevailing view of the last 60 years that age-related hearing loss is mainly driven by damage to the stria vascularis, the cellular "battery" that powers the hair cell's mechanical-to-electrical signal conversion.

20h

Hair cell loss causes age-related hearing loss

Age-related hearing loss has more to do with the death of hair cells than the cellular battery powering them wearing out, according to new research in JNeurosci. That means wearing ear protection may prevent some age-related hearing loss.

20h

New Data on the Oxford/AZ Vaccine

The hype began building late last week around the Oxford vaccine results released today, and I will confess to wondering just what was going on. The British press has a history of going berserk over drug research – I wouldn't care to count how many times Alzheimer's "breakthroughs" have hit the headlines over there, and I figured this might be part of the problem. But now we have the numbers . So

20h

Civil War Vaccine May Have Lessons for COVID-19

Vaccination used against smallpox during the Civil War reveals the identity of the distantly related virus used to keep troops disease free. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Arab World's First Mars Probe Takes to the Skies

Celebration is tinged with relief as $200-million orbiter embarks on 7-month odyssey to the Red Planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Climate change on track to wipe out polar bears by 2100

Climate change is starving polar bears into extinction, according to research published Monday that predicts the apex carnivores could all but disappear within the span of a human lifetime.

20h

Se måne-talen, der aldrig blev holdt: Forskere advarer mod manipulerede videoer

Hvis Apollo 11-missionen var gået galt, havde Richard Nixon holdt denne tale.

20h

Climate change on track to wipe out polar bears by 2100

Climate change is starving polar bears into extinction, according to research published Monday that predicts the apex carnivores could all but disappear within the span of a human lifetime.

20h

Crowds removing sea creatures from San Pedro tide pools put delicate ecosystem at risk

It was against the backdrop of a pounding surf one recent morning that almost 30 people had gathered on the cragged and slippery folds of White Point tidal pools in San Pedro and set to work with gardening spades, buckets and bags.

20h

Mysterious 450-foot 'blue hole' off Florida has researchers looking for signs of life

Tales of the ocean swallowing places are as ancient as the myth of Atlantis, but there is an element of truth in the science, according to a NOAA-backed expedition set for Florida's Gulf Coast.

20h

How governments resist World Heritage 'in Danger' listings

A study published today found national governments repeatedly resisted the placement of 41 UNESCO World Heritage sites—including the Great Barrier Reef—on the World Heritage in Danger list. This resistance is despite the sites being just as threatened, or more threatened, than those already on the in Danger list.

20h

Crowds removing sea creatures from San Pedro tide pools put delicate ecosystem at risk

It was against the backdrop of a pounding surf one recent morning that almost 30 people had gathered on the cragged and slippery folds of White Point tidal pools in San Pedro and set to work with gardening spades, buckets and bags.

20h

Mysterious 450-foot 'blue hole' off Florida has researchers looking for signs of life

Tales of the ocean swallowing places are as ancient as the myth of Atlantis, but there is an element of truth in the science, according to a NOAA-backed expedition set for Florida's Gulf Coast.

20h

Geoscientists provide data suggesting global climate changes increase river erosion

Scientists have long debated the idea that global climate changes have forced river erosion rates to increase over the past five million years. New field data gleaned from a multi-institution, collaborative study of North America's rugged Yukon River basin, near storied Klondike goldfields, reveal profound increases in river erosion during abrupt global intensification of climate fluctuations abou

20h

Civil War Vaccine May Have Lessons for COVID-19

Vaccination used against smallpox during the Civil War reveals the identity of the distantly related virus used to keep troops disease free. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Seeking an Early COVID-19 Drug, Researchers Look to Interferons

These antiviral proteins are produced by the body as a natural defense against viral infections and synthetic interferons might help prevent or treat the beginning stages of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

21h

The Same Company 3D Printing KFC's Meat Nuggets Is Printing Human Tissue in Space As Well

It's been a wild weekend for Russian startup 3D Bioprinting Solutions. First, the company announced a partnership with fast food chain KFC as part of an effort to create the "world's first laboratory-produced chicken nuggets." Now, the same company is ready to announce that it's been hard at work bringing similar tech into orbit as well. In an experiment on board the International Space Station t

21h

A coronavirus vaccine would be a triumph, but the worst human impulses threaten its success | Polly Toynbee

The combination of anti-vaxxers on the march and a government with woeful health messaging could be lethal for Britain Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The world has moved a step closer to ending the Covid-19 horror as researchers from Oxford University, among the 200 global teams working on vaccines, published promising results in The Lancet. The UK has already order

21h

High-performance large area electrode system developed for artificial photosynthesis

A research team, led by Dr. Hyung-Suk Oh and Dr. Woong Hee Lee of the Clean Energy Research Center of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), working in cooperation with the Technische Universität Berlin (TUB), announced that they had developed a nano-sized, coral-shaped silver catalyst electrode and large-area, high-efficiency carbon dioxide conversion system, which can be used to o

21h

The fight for civil rights and freedom | John Lewis and Bryan Stevenson

Civil rights leader and longtime US congressman John Lewis spent his life fighting for freedom and justice for everyone. In this illuminating conversation with lawyer and activist Bryan Stevenson, Lewis discusses the essential importance of voting, shares encouraging words of wisdom for the generation of young people currently organizing in the struggle for racial justice and tells moving stories

21h

Physicists take stop-action images of light-driven molecular reaction

Kansas State University physicists have taken extremely fast snapshots of light-induced molecular ring-opening reactions—similar to those that help a human body produce vitamin D from sunlight. The research is published in Nature Chemistry.

21h

New Treatment for Covid-19 Shows Promise, but Scientists Urge Caution

A small study of an inhaled form of a commonly available drug, interferon beta, suggests it could reduce the odds of patients becoming severely ill.

21h

Uber Drivers Are Suing to Learn How the Company's Algorithm Works

Black Box Uber drivers in the UK are suing the company in a desperate bid to learn more about the ride-hailing app's algorithm, which governs their lives and income. The core argument of the lawsuit, Business Insider reports , is that the company's decision to withhold personal data about drivers prevents them from understanding how the algorithm assigns them jobs and therefore impacts their live

21h

Quantum exciton found in magnetic van der Waals material

Things can always be done faster, but can anything beat light? Computing with light instead of electricity is seen as a breakthrough to boost computer speeds. Transistors, the building blocks of data circuits, are required to switch electrical signals into light in order to transmit the information via a fiber-optic cable. Optical computing could potentially save the time and energy used for such

21h

Exhaled biomarkers can reveal lung disease

Using specialized nanoparticles, MIT engineers have developed a way to monitor pneumonia or other lung diseases by analyzing the breath exhaled by the patient.

21h

Shells and grapefruits inspire first manufactured non-cuttable material

Engineers have taken their inspiration from shells and grapefruits to create what they say is the first manufactured non-cuttable material.

21h

New Treatment for Covid-19 Shows Promise, but Scientists Urge Caution

A small study of an inhaled form of a commonly available drug, interferon beta, suggested it could reduce the odds of patients becoming severely ill.

21h

He Found 'Islands of Fertility' Beneath Antarctica's Ice

When John Priscu was growing up in Las Vegas, his father, a metallurgist in the aerospace industry, encouraged his son to spend time outdoors. The younger Priscu listened: He played soccer at the youth, collegiate and semi-pro levels. He studied the Colorado River while getting a master's degree in biology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, rafting through the Grand Canyon more than a dozen

21h

Neanderthals of the Western Mediterranean did not become extinct because of changes in climate

Homo Neanderthaliensis did not become extinct because of changes in climate. At least, this did not happen to the several Neanderthal groups that lived in the western Mediterranean 42,000 years ago. A research group of the University of Bologna came to this conclusion after a detailed paleoclimatic reconstruction of the last ice age through the analysis of stalagmites sampled from some caves in Ap

21h

Trials of a vaccine and new drug raise hope of beating covid-19

The latest tests with Oxford University's vaccine, and interferon beta, look promising

21h

Quadruple-stranded DNA seen in healthy human cells for the first time

DNA's most famous form is a double helix, but it can exist in other arrangements, and a quadruple-stranded version has been discovered in healthy human cells

21h

Dozens of active volcano sites spotted on Venus for the first time

We know Venus had many active volcanoes in the past, but now researchers have identified 37 sites that could have seen eruptions as a recently as a million years ago

21h

Climate change may kill off nearly all polar bears by 2100

Unchecked climate change will doom all but one of the world's populations of polar bears before the end of the century, as vanishing sea ice increases their annual fasts beyond their limits

21h

Physicians provide first comprehensive review of COVID-19's effects beyond the lungs

In a collaboration among physicians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Columbia University Irving Medical Center, researcher-clinicians have conducted an extensive review of the latest findings on COVID-19's effect on organ systems outside the lungs. Their review, published in Nature Medicine, also summarized proposed mechanisms behind these wide-ranging systemic effects and provided clin

21h

Study helps to settle debate on roles of REM and non-REM sleep in visual learning

A study by a team of Brown University researchers sheds new light on the complementary roles of REM and non-REM sleep in visual perceptual learning.

21h

New diagnostic test for heart failure patients could also help COVID-19 patients

A new blood test that reliably predicts outcomes for heart failure patients could lead to new diagnostics and treatments for COVID-19 patients as well, according to newly published research from cardiologists at the University of Alberta.

21h

How (and when) to put together a social bubble

"It's four of us, but we're all in a monogamous pandemic relationship with each other." (Johanna Dahlberg / Unsplash/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . In theory, it's simple. To combat the weariness and mental health consequences of strict confinement

21h

European sea bass absorb virtually no microplastic in their muscle tissue

In a new laboratory study, experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) investigated how many microplastic particles would be absorbed in the muscle tissue of young European sea bass after being given feed with extremely high microplastic particle content for a period of four months. At least with regard to this particular food fish, their finding

21h

Physicists take stop-action images of light-driven molecular reaction

Kansas State University physicists have taken extremely fast snapshots of light-induced molecular ring-opening reactions — similar to those that help a human body produce vitamin D from sunlight.

22h

Cheese making relies on milk proteins to form structure

Cheese production relies on coagulation of milk proteins into a gel matrix after addition of rennet. Milk that does not coagulate (NC) under optimal conditions affects the manufacturing process, requiring a longer processing time and lowering the cheese yield, which, in turn, has economic impact. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from Lund University studied the p

22h

Cheese making relies on milk proteins to form structure

Cheese production relies on coagulation of milk proteins into a gel matrix after addition of rennet. Milk that does not coagulate (NC) under optimal conditions affects the manufacturing process, requiring a longer processing time and lowering the cheese yield, which, in turn, has economic impact. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from Lund University studied the p

22h

Arizona rock core sheds light on triassic dark ages

A rock core from Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona, has given scientists a powerful new tool to understand how catastrophic events shaped Earth's ecosystems before the rise of the dinosaurs.

22h

Plugging orphaned and abandoned oil and gas wells can create jobs, reduce pollution

New research released by Columbia University's Center on Global Energy Policy and Resources for the Future (RFF) examines the environmental and job creation benefits of plugging orphaned and abandoned oil and gas wells. The report authors estimate that a federal program to plug roughly half a million abandoned and so-called "orphaned" oil and gas wells—those where the owner is unknown or insolvent

22h

Ultracold mystery solved: Researchers crack a molecular disappearing act

In a famous parable, three blind men encounter an elephant for the first time. Each touches a part—the trunk, ear, or side—and concludes the creature is a thick snake, fan, or wall. This elephant, said Kang-Kuen Ni, is like the quantum world. Scientists can only explore a cell of this vast, unknown creature at a time. Now, Ni has revealed a few more to explore.

22h

The Lancet: Chinese phase 2 trial finds vaccine is safe and induces an immune response

Chinese phase 2 trial finds vaccine is safe and induces an immune response.

22h

New nano drug candidate kills aggressive breast cancer cells

Researchers have developed a new drug candidate that kills triple negative breast cancer cells. The discovery will help clinicians target breast cancer cells directly, while avoiding the adverse, toxic side effects of chemotherapy.

22h

Could mini-Neptunes be irradiated ocean planets?

New research suggests that the low density of mini-Neptunes could be explained simply by the presence of a thick layer of water.

22h

'Love hormone' oxytocin could be used to treat cognitive disorders like Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's disease progressively degrades a person's memory and cognitive abilities, often resulting in dementia. Amid efforts to find novel treatments for this disease, a recent breakthrough study shows that oxytocin — the hormone that we commonly know to induce feelings of love and well-being — can also effectively reverse some of the damage caused by amyloid plaques in the learning and memor

22h

Michigan coyotes: What's for dinner depends on what the neighbors are having

Michigan coyotes in most of the Lower Peninsula are the "top dogs" in the local food chain and can dine on a wide variety of small animals, including rabbits and rodents, along with berries and other plant foods, insects, human garbage and even outdoor pet food.

22h

New nano drug candidate kills aggressive breast cancer cells

Researchers have developed a new drug candidate that kills triple negative breast cancer cells. The discovery will help clinicians target breast cancer cells directly, while avoiding the adverse, toxic side effects of chemotherapy.

22h

Archaeologists use tooth enamel protein to show sex of human remains

A new method for estimating the biological sex of human remains based on reading protein sequences rather than DNA has been used to study an archaeological site in Northern California. The protein-based technique gave superior results to DNA analysis in studying 55 sets of human remains between 300 and 2,300 years old.

22h

Music on the brain

A new study looks at differences between the brains of Japanese classical musicians, Western classical musicians and nonmusicians. Researchers investigated specific kinds of neural behavior in participants as they were exposed to unfamiliar rhythms and nonrhythmic patterns. Trained musicians showed greater powers of rhythmic prediction compared to nonmusicians, with more subtle differences between

22h

The Oxford covid-19 vaccine candidate has produced promising early trial results

The news: A covid-19 vaccine candidate being developed by Oxford University and AstraZeneca proved safe and provoked a strong immune response in its first clinical trials. Participants' systems produced both antibodies and T cells, and only relatively mild side effects were observed. The results were described today in a paper in The Lancet . The study: The trial consisted of 1,077 healthy adults

22h

Stop making mass shooters famous | Tom Teves

On July 20, 2012, a mass shooting in a movie theater of Aurora, Colorado left the town, and the nation, reeling. To many — including Tom Teves, who lost his son in the tragedy — the news coverage that followed focused on all the wrong things. Why did the reporting overwhelmingly fixate on the shooter rather than the lives of the victims or the heroic efforts of first responders? With urgency and

22h

Immunotherapy safe for patients with COVID-19, cancer

Initial findings from a new study show that immunotherapy for cancer won't worsen complications for patients with the disease and COVID-19.

22h

Scientists trace and identify origin of smallpox vaccine strains used in Civil War

Scientists and historians have pieced together the genomes of old viruses that were used as vaccination strains during and after the American Civil War ultimately leading to the eradication of smallpox.

22h

Scientists supercharge shellfish to tackle vitamin deficiency in humans

Cambridge scientists have developed a new way to fortify shellfish to tackle human nutrient deficiencies which cause severe health problems across the world. The team is now working with major seafood manufacturers to further test their microencapsulation technology, or "Vitamin Bullets".

22h

Regular exercise helps prevent high blood pressure, even in areas of high air pollution

Regular physical activity is a healthy way to prevent and reduce high blood pressure, even in places where pollution levels are relatively high. Air pollution increases high blood pressure risk, yet it does not outweigh the benefits of physical activity on high blood pressure prevention. Addressing air pollution remains important for high blood pressure prevention.

22h

Nearly 60% of American children lack healthy cardiorespiratory fitness

Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) measurement provides insight into cardiovascular and overall health, including cognitive and academic functions, among children and teens. Healthy CRF is linked to better heart and blood vessel health, academic achievement, mental health and many other positive outcomes in youth. Most pediatric health care offices do not have the facilities to conduct CRF testing ro

22h

Shells and grapefruits inspire first manufactured non-cuttable material

Engineers have taken their inspiration from shells and grapefruits to create what they say is the first manufactured non-cuttable material.

22h

Data assimilation significantly improves forecasts of aerosol and gaseous pollutants across China

Aerosols are important components of the atmosphere and have an adverse impact on atmospheric visibility and human health, which also affect the climate via direct radiative forcing and the interaction with clouds and precipitation. In recent years, regional aerosol pollution incidents have occurred frequently in China, so enhancing early warning capability for air pollution is of great significan

22h

Using techniques from astrophysics, researchers can forecast drought up to ten weeks ahead

Researchers at the University of Sussex have developed a system which can accurately predict a period of drought in East Africa up to ten weeks ahead.

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A first for a unique instrument

Geophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have measured Earth's spin and axis orientation with a novel ring laser, and provided the most precise determination of these parameters yet achieved by a ground-based instrument without the need for stellar range finding.

22h

Geoengineering is just a partial solution to fight climate change

Could we create massive sulfuric acid clouds that limit global warming and help meet the 2015 Paris international climate goals, while reducing unintended impacts?

22h

Så utnyttjar IS coronapandemin

När samhällen helt stänger ned som svar på coronapandemin tillbringar många all sin tid hemma. IS som redan tidigare hade en stark närvaro på nätet drar nytta av detta i sin rekrytering, enligt en kartläggning vid Malmö universitet. – Historiskt vet vi att IS använder tiden i medieskugga till att bygga sig starka under radarn, säger Michael Krona, IS-expert vid Malmö universitet, som kartlagt ter

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Quantum exciton found in magnetic van der Waals material NiPS3

A new type of exciton in magnetic van der Waals material NiPS 3 is intrinsically of many-body origin.This is an actual realization of a genuine quantum state of diverse possible use in f quantum information&computing.

22h

The real reason behind goosebumps

Harvard researchers have discovered that the cells that cause goosebumps are also important for regulating the stem cells that regenerate hair. In the skin, the muscle that contracts to create goosebumps is necessary to bridge the sympathetic nerve's connection to hair follicle stem cells. The sympathetic nerve reacts to cold by contracting the muscle and causing goosebumps in the short term, and

22h

Using a cardiovascular risk screening tool in women during routine gynecology visits

A new study has shown that although 86% of women seen at an outpatient gynecology clinic had a cardiovascular risk factor and 40.1% had at least one cardiovascular symptom, the awareness of cardiovascular risk factors and symptoms was low

22h

Restoring mobility by identifying the neurons that make it possible

Partial mobility can be restored in rodents with impaired spinal cords. Using AI, scientists can now determine the ¬cellular mechanisms responsible — a technique that may be applicable to many biomedical problems.

22h

The Lancet: UK's vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 is safe and induces an immune reaction

UK's vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 is safe and induces an immune reaction, according to preliminary results.

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MRI scans of the brains of 130 mammals, including humans, indicate equal connectivity

Researchers at Tel Aviv University conducted a first-of-its-kind study designed to investigate brain connectivity in 130 mammalian species. The intriguing results, contradicting widespread conjectures, revealed that brain connectivity levels are equal in all mammals, including humans.

22h

Plato was right. Earth is made, on average, of cubes

The ancient philosopher Plato posited the shapes of the building blocks of the universe. According to him, the earth was formed of cubes. In new research, Douglas Jerolmack of the University of Pennsylvania and Gabor Domokos of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics and colleagues find a fundamental truth in that premise. Studying the shapes and fragmentation patterns of a variety of

22h

Photos may improve understanding of volcanic processes

The shape of volcanoes and their craters provide critical information on their formation and eruptive history. Techniques applied to photographs — photogrammetry — show promise and utility in correlating shape change to volcanic background and eruption activity.

22h

Good news: European sea bass absorb virtually no microplastic in their muscle tissue

Laboratory study: AWI researchers gave young European see bass feed laced with microplastic for months, but found virtually no microplastic particles in the fish fillets.

22h

Experimental drug reduces replication of zika and prevents microcephaly in mice

No adverse effects were observed in the mice treated with the AHR inhibitor, but before the treatment is tested in human volunteers the experiment must be replicated in monkeys.

22h

Increased blood sugar levels may decrease benefits of aerobic exercise

Some benefits of aerobic exercise may be dampened by higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, a condition known as hyperglycemia. These diminished gains are seen in mouse models and humans with chronic hyperglycemia that is in the 'prediabetes' range.

22h

Cheese making relies on milk proteins to form structure

Cheese production relies on coagulation of milk proteins into a gel matrix after addition of rennet. Milk that does not coagulate (NC) under optimal conditions affects the manufacturing process, requiring a longer processing time and lowering the cheese yield, which, in turn, has economic impact. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from Lund University studied the p

22h

How immune cells activate the killer mode

Freiburg researchers find missing link in immune response.

22h

Ultracold mystery: Solved

Last December, Harvard researchers designed technology that could achieve the lowest temperature chemical reactions and then broke and formed the coldest bonds in the history of molecular coupling. Now, though reactions are considered too fast to measure, they determined the exact lifespan of their intermediate–the space between reactants and products–and solved the mystery of why some ultracold

22h

Formation of quadruple helix DNA tracked in live human cells for the first time

The formation of four-stranded DNA has been tracked in living human cells, allowing scientists to see how it works, and its possible role in cancer.

22h

How governments resist World Heritage 'in Danger' listings

Some national governments repeatedly resist the placement of 41 UNESCO World Heritage sites on the World Heritage in Danger list. This resistance is despite the sites being just as threatened, or more threatened, than those already on the in Danger list.

22h

How to repair your gut

In a world first, Monash University researchers have identified a key biomolecule that enhances the repair of your gut lining by prompting stem cells to regenerate damaged tissue.

22h

Scientists strengthen quantum building blocks in milestone critical for scale-up

A team led by UNSW scientists have significantly increased the coherence time of a spin-orbit qubit in silicon, allowing them to preserve quantum information for longer. These results open up a new pathway to scale silicon quantum computers.

22h

Exhaled biomarkers can reveal lung disease

Using specialized nanoparticles, MIT engineers have developed a way to diagnose pneumonia or other lung diseases by analyzing the breath exhaled by the patient.

22h

Older adults who can really smell the roses may face lower likelihood of dementia

Seniors who can identify smells like roses, turpentine, paint-thinner and lemons, and have retained their senses of hearing, vision and touch, may have half the risk of developing dementia as their peers with marked sensory decline.

22h

Prostate cancer metastasis linked to revival of dormant molecular program

When prostate cancer progresses to a more-dangerous metastatic state, it does so by resurrecting dormant molecular mechanisms that had guided the fetal development of the prostate gland but had been subsequently switched off, say scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Researchers generated the world's largest epigenomic dataset in prostate biology.

22h

Plant roots increase carbon emission from permafrost soils

A key uncertainty in climate projections is the amount of carbon emitted by thawing permafrost in the Arctic. Plant roots in soil stimulate microbial decomposition, a mechanism called the priming effect. An international research team co-lead by Frida Keuper from INRAE and Umeå University and Birgit Wild from Stockholm University shows that the priming effect alone can cause emission of 40 billion

22h

Geoscientists glean data suggesting global climate changes increase river erosion rates

Using cosmogenic nuclide burial dating methods and optically stimulated luminescence dating, geoscientists establish ages for river deposits from the Yukon River basin that span key time periods of global climate change.

22h

Free trade can prevent hunger caused by climate change

An international team of researchers investigated the effects of trade on hunger in the world as a result of climate change. The conclusion is clear: international trade can compensate for regional food shortages and reduce hunger, particularly when protectionist measures and other barriers to trade are eliminated.

22h

Oxygen breathes new life into solar cell research

Scientists in Australia and the United States have been able to 'upconvert' low energy light into high energy light, which can be captured by solar cells, in a new way, with oxygen the surprise secret ingredient. The results are published in Nature Photonics today.

22h

Scientists boost stability and efficiency of next-gen solar tech

Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have created next-generation solar modules with high efficiency and good stability. Made using a type of material called perovskites, these solar modules can maintain a high performance for over 2000 hours. Their findings, reported 20th July 2020 in leading journal, Nature Energy, have brightened prospects

22h

Immune system adaptations in cavefish may provide autoimmune disease insight

Cavefish may not seem like a big deal. They're small, they live in tucked away places humans rarely go, and they're common enough that you can find them on every continent except Antarctica. But researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research see them as a potential way to understand more about the rise in autoimmune diseases in humans.

22h

Cacti and other iconic desert plants threatened by solar development

With their tough skins, pointy armor and legendary stamina, cacti are made to defend themselves from whatever nature throws at them. But large solar energy facilities are one threat that cacti weren't built to withstand, according to a study by the University of California, Davis. The study chronicles the impacts of ground-mounted solar energy development in the Mojave Desert on native plants and

22h

Scientists discover volcanoes on Venus are still active

A new study identified 37 recently active volcanic structures on Venus. The study provides some of the best evidence yet that Venus is still a geologically active planet. A research paper on the work, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland and the Institute of Geophysics at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, was published in the journal Nature Geoscience.

22h

KFC Is Working on 3D Printed, Lab-Grown Chicken Nuggets

Lab Nuggets American fast food chain KFC wants to craft the "world's first laboratory-produced chicken nuggets," according to a press release — and no, they won't technically be vegetarian, because they'll include actual chicken cells. To create this "meat of the future," the chain is working with Russian startup 3D Bioprinting Solutions to use "chicken cells and plant material" to print nuggets

22h

Whales Get A Break As Pandemic Creates Quieter Oceans

A drop in shipping traffic is reducing underwater noise, so scientists are listening for how whales and other marine life are responding. (Image credit: Christine Gabriele/National Park Service photo taken under National Marine Fisheries Service Scientific Research Permit # 21059)

22h

Coherent many-body exciton in van der Waals antiferromagnet NiPS3

Nature, Published online: 20 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2520-5 A spin–orbit-entangled exciton state in the van der Waals material NiPS3 is observed, and found to arise from many-body states of a Zhang–Rice singlet.

22h

Global Warming Is Driving Polar Bears Toward Extinction, Researchers Say

By century's end, polar bears worldwide could become nearly extinct as a result of shrinking sea ice in the Arctic if climate change continues unabated, scientists said.

22h

There Are Wasps in the Yard. You'd Better Get to Know Them.

They buzz. They hover. Sometimes they sting. But how much do you really know about these insects that can menace our summers?

22h

Most polar bears to disappear by 2100, study predicts

Melting Arctic sea ice could cause starvation and reproductive failure for many as early as 2040, scientists warn Scientists have predicted for the first time when, where and how polar bears are likely to disappear, warning that if greenhouse gas emissions stay on their current trajectory all but a few polar bear populations in the Arctic will probably be gone by 2100. By as early as 2040, it is

22h

Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a vaccine?

More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…

22h

The Terrible Consequences of Australia's Uber-Bushfires

Scientists calculate that the unprecedented wildfires burned 37,500 square miles. For already endangered species, the conflagration may have spelled doom.

22h

Climate change: Polar bears could be lost by 2100

Scientists say we have time to save polar bears if we act now to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

22h

Study shows genetic markers are useful in predicting osteoporotic fracture risk

A new study shows that genetic pre-screening could reduce the number of screening tests needed to identify individuals at risk for osteoporotic fractures.

22h

Geophysics: A first for a unique instrument

Geophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have measured Earth's spin and axis orientation with a novel ring laser, and provided the most precise determination of these parameters yet achieved by a ground-based instrument without the need for stellar range finding.

22h

Study of kelp in New Zealand reveals earthquake history

A team of researchers at the University of Otago in New Zealand has found that studying the genes of kelp growing offshore can reveal some of the earthquake history of a given area. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of kelp samples taken from sites with a history of earthquakes along the New Zealand coast and what they learn

22h

Scientists discover volcanoes on Venus are still active

A new study identified 37 recently active volcanic structures on Venus. The study provides some of the best evidence yet that Venus is still a geologically active planet. A research paper on the work, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland and the Institute of Geophysics at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, was published in the journal Nature Geoscience on July 20, 2020.

22h

A new species of darkling beetle larvae that degrade plastic

An enormous plastic garbage island exists in the North Pacific that is seven times the size of the Korean Peninsula. The island, called the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, is the result of 13 million tons of plastic that flow into the ocean annually from the 20,000 units of plastic consumed per second around the world. Plastic takes decades to hundreds of years to decompose naturally, with plastic ba

22h

Scientists strengthen quantum building blocks in milestone critical for scale-up

A group of international scientists have substantially lengthened the duration of time that a spin-orbit qubit in silicon can retain quantum information for, opening up a new pathway to make silicon quantum computers more scalable and functional.

22h

Cacti and other iconic desert plants threatened by solar development

With their tough skins, pointy armor and legendary stamina, cacti are made to defend themselves from whatever nature throws at them.

22h

Free trade can prevent hunger caused by climate change

Researchers from KU Leuven, the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) and RTI International investigated the effects of trade on global hunger as a result of climate change. The conclusion is clear: International trade can compensate for regional food shortages and reduce hunger, particularly when protectionist measures and other barriers to trade are eliminated.

22h

Plant roots increase carbon emission from permafrost soils

A key uncertainty in climate projections is the amount of carbon emitted by thawing permafrost in the Arctic. Plant roots in soil stimulate microbial decomposition, a mechanism called the priming effect. An international research team co-lead by Frida Keuper from INRAE and Umeå University and Birgit Wild from Stockholm University shows that the priming effect alone can cause emission of 40 billion

22h

Immune system adaptations in cavefish may provide autoimmune disease insight

Cavefish are seemingly insignificant: They are small, they live in tucked away places humans rarely go, and they're quite common, found on every continent except Antarctica. But researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research see them as a potential way to understand more about the rise in autoimmune diseases in humans.

22h

A Mental-Health Crisis Is Burning Across the American West

T here's a fire up north, the woman says, the Kincade Fire. It flickered into existence on the nighttime horizon, a shapeless brightness billowing into the sky. Now the wind's whipping it south toward Santa Rosa. Evacuations are under way, and she worries her home will burn. Allison Chapman listens in silence. She's modeling for a makeup demo when the woman walks into the studio, where Allison st

22h

Study of kelp in New Zealand reveals earthquake history

A team of researchers at the University of Otago in New Zealand has found that studying the genes of kelp growing offshore can reveal some of the earthquake history of a given area. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of kelp samples taken from sites with a history of earthquakes along the New Zealand coast and what they learn

23h

Cacti and other iconic desert plants threatened by solar development

With their tough skins, pointy armor and legendary stamina, cacti are made to defend themselves from whatever nature throws at them.

23h

Immune system adaptations in cavefish may provide autoimmune disease insight

Cavefish are seemingly insignificant: They are small, they live in tucked away places humans rarely go, and they're quite common, found on every continent except Antarctica. But researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research see them as a potential way to understand more about the rise in autoimmune diseases in humans.

23h

Specialized cellular compartments discovered in bacteria

Researchers at McGill University have discovered bacterial organelles involved in gene expression, suggesting that bacteria may not be as simple as once thought. This finding could offer new targets for the development of new antibiotics.

23h

New research reveals antifungal symbiotic peptide in legume

Fungal diseases cause substantial losses of agricultural harvests each year. The fungus Botrytis cinerea causing gray mold disease is a major problem for farmers growing strawberries, grapes, raspberries, tomatoes and lettuce. To mitigate the problem, they often resort to applying chemical fungicides which can lose their effectiveness over time. Danforth Center scientists, Dilip Shah, Ph.D., resea

23h

23h

Battery breakthrough gives boost to electric flight and long-range electric cars

Researchers have developed a new battery material that could enable long-range electric vehicles that can drive for hundreds of miles on a single charge, and electric planes called eVTOLs for fast, environmentally friendly commutes.

23h

Specialized cellular compartments discovered in bacteria

Researchers at McGill University have discovered bacterial organelles involved in gene expression, suggesting that bacteria may not be as simple as once thought. This finding could offer new targets for the development of new antibiotics.

23h

New research reveals antifungal symbiotic peptide in legume

Fungal diseases cause substantial losses of agricultural harvests each year. The fungus Botrytis cinerea causing gray mold disease is a major problem for farmers growing strawberries, grapes, raspberries, tomatoes and lettuce. To mitigate the problem, they often resort to applying chemical fungicides which can lose their effectiveness over time. Danforth Center scientists, Dilip Shah, Ph.D., resea

23h

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