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Dansk svineri af Øresund kommer fra spildevand – ikke landbrug

Udledning af spildevand står for 80-90 procent af det danske bidrag af kvælstof til Øresund. Men glem ikke bidraget fra Østersøen, lyder det fra AU-forskere.

18h

Murine models of IDH-wild-type glioblastoma exhibit spatial segregation of tumor initiation and manifestation during evolution

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17382-3 Recent studies suggest spatial segregation of tumor initiation and manifestation in IDH-WT glioblastomas. Here, the authors use serial MRI/3D-reconstruction, whole-genome sequencing and spectral karyotyping-based single-cell phylogenetic tree building to establish this unique evolutionary mode in a murine model.

11h

Earliest humans stayed at the Americas 'oldest hotel' in Mexican cave

A cave in a remote part of Mexico was visited by humans around 30,000 years ago – 15,000 years earlier than people were previously thought to have reached the Americas. Excavations of Chiquihuite Cave, located in a mountainous area in northern Mexico controlled by drugs cartels, uncovered nearly 2000 stone tools from a small section of the high-altitude cave. Analysis of the sediment in the cave u

6h

LATEST

California passes NY as US state with most Covid-19 cases

Leaders in Ohio, Indiana, Minnesota, as well as Baltimore and Washington, issue wider mask guidelines

now

Health and happiness depend on each other

New research adds to the growing body of evidence that happiness not only feels good, it is good for your physical health, too.

4min

Evidence of 'hormone disruptor' chemical threats grows

A growing number of chemicals in pesticides, flame retardants, and certain plastics have been linked to widespread health problems including infertility, diabetes, and impaired brain development, a set of reviews of hundreds of studies concludes.

4min

Brain network mechanism causing spatial memory impairment revealed

Patients with Alzheimer's disease frequently suffer from spatial memory loss, such as no recognition of where they are, and forgetting where they put their belongings. They often show a wandering symptom, which is also a feature of spatial memory impairment. Until now, the brain network mechanism that causes spatial memory impairment had been unclear.

4min

While birds chirp, plasma shouldn't: New insight could advance fusion energy

Scientists have furthered understanding of a barrier that can prevent doughnut-shaped fusion facilities known as tokamaks from operating at high efficiency by causing vital heat to be lost from them.

4min

New drug discoveries are closely linked to the quality of lab procedures

High-quality lab procedures are even more crucial to identifying effective drugs than previously thought, new research has revealed.

4min

Site-directed mutagenesis in wheat via haploid induction by maize

Site-directed mutagenesis facilitates the experimental validation of gene function and can speed up plant breeding by producing new biodiversity or by reproducing previously known gene variants in other than their original genetic backgrounds. However, its application is challenging in wheat owing to high genomic redundancy and highly genotype-dependent DNA transfer methods.

4min

Skin stem cells shuffle sugars as they age

Researchers have shown by in vitro experimentation that changes of glycans in mouse epidermal stem cells may serve as a biomarker of aging. Further, by overexpression of specific glycogenes in mouse keratinocytes, they replicated the glycome profile of aging cells as well as their decreased proliferation ability. These findings hold promise for stem cell research into skin disorders, specifically

4min

NIH leadership details unprecedented effort to ramp up testing technologies for COVID-19

In a paper in NEJM, scientific leaders from the National Institutes of Health set forth a framework to increase significantly the number, quality and type of daily tests for detecting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and help reduce inequities for underserved populations that have been disproportionally affected by the disease. The authors describe the current testing landscape and expl

6min

AJTMH July updates

Below is an update of COVID-19 articles published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (AJTMH). We've highlighted below those that we think may of interest for your reporting.

6min

New drug discoveries are closely linked to the quality of lab procedures

High-quality lab procedures are even more crucial to identifying effective drugs than previously thought, new research has revealed.

8min

Gut Microbes Might Keep Malnourished Children From Growing

Bacteria in the small intestine may drive inflammation that makes it harder for children to get the calories and nutrients they need.

9min

Can You Become Reinfected With Covid? It's Very Unlikely, Experts Say

Reports of reinfection instead may be cases of drawn-out illness. A decline in antibodies is normal after a few weeks, and people are protected from the coronavirus in other ways.

9min

Twitter Cracks Down on QAnon. Your Move, Facebook

Twitter's new policy won't make the conspiracy group disappear. But experts say it could dramatically reduce its ability to spread.

22min

Princeton scientists discover a topological magnet that exhibits exotic quantum effects

An international team led by researchers at Princeton University has uncovered a new class of magnet that exhibits novel quantum effects that extend to room temperature. Their findings provide insights into a 30-year-old theory of how electrons spontaneously quantize and demonstrate a proof-of-principle method to discover new topological magnets.

27min

Researchers simulate, assess damage to brain cells caused by bubbles during head trauma

Researchers led by Nicole Hashemi, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at Iowa State University, are using their expertise with the manufacture of microstructures to study how the collapse of microbubbles within the skull can damage brain cells. Their research, which is supported by the Office of Naval Research, could lead to the design of better helmets.

27min

Discovery of first active seep in Antarctica provides new understanding of methane cycle

The discovery of the first active methane seep in Antarctica is providing scientists new understanding of the methane cycle and the role methane found in this region may play in warming the planet.

33min

Giant, fruit-gulping pigeon eaten into extinction on Pacific islands

A large fruit-eating bird from Tonga joins the dodo in the lineup of giant island pigeons hunted to extinction.

33min

Recycling Japanese liquor leftovers as animal feed produces happier pigs and tastier pork

Tastier pork comes from pigs that eat the barley left over after making the Japanese liquor shochu. A team of professional brewers and academic farmers state that nutrients in the leftover fermented barley may reduce the animals' stress, resulting in better tasting sirloin and fillets. Feeding distillation leftovers to farm animals can improve the animals' quality of life, lower farmers' and brewe

33min

World's smallest imaging device has heart disease in focus

A team of researchers has used 3D micro-printing to develop the world's smallest, flexible scope for looking inside blood vessels.

33min

Scientists observe learning processes online in the brain

Stimulating the fingertip rhythmically for a sustained period of time, markedly improves touch sensitivity of this finger. A research team analyzed the impact of this process in the brain. Using EEG, the scientists recorded neuronal activity of brain areas associated with tactile processing. They were able to observe changes in activity over time – possibly illustrating a learning process.

33min

Research explores the link between wages, school and cognitive ability in South Africa

Studies through the decades have linked higher wages to education, with the greatest returns in developing countries. However, the correlation between higher wages and education doesn't always account for an individual's innate cognitive abilities, or the mental processes of gathering and processing information to solve problems, adapt to situations and learn from experiences.

37min

What happens in Vegas, may come from the Arctic?

A cave deep in the wilderness of central Nevada is a repository of evidence supporting the urgent need for the Southwestern U.S. to adopt targets aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, a new UNLV study finds.

37min

Invasive lionfish may be a selective predator

Invasive predators have the capacity to dramatically alter marine ecosystems. The lionfish, a voracious predator native to the Indo-Pacific and now established along the southeast coast of the U.S., the Caribbean and parts of the Gulf of Mexico, has become a growing threat to the ecological balance of Atlantic waters. To gather insight regarding its impact on reef communities, scientists at the Sm

37min

Invasive lionfish may be a selective predator

Invasive predators have the capacity to dramatically alter marine ecosystems. The lionfish, a voracious predator native to the Indo-Pacific and now established along the southeast coast of the U.S., the Caribbean and parts of the Gulf of Mexico, has become a growing threat to the ecological balance of Atlantic waters. To gather insight regarding its impact on reef communities, scientists at the Sm

37min

Health and happiness depend on each other, Psychological Science says

New research adds to the growing body of evidence that happiness not only feels good, it is good for your physical health, too.

42min

Lahontan Cutthroat Trout thrive at Paiute's Summit Lake in far northern Nevada

Summit Lake in remote northwest Nevada is home to the only self-sustaining, robust, lake population of Lahontan Cutthroat Trout, North America's largest freshwater native trout species. Research to understand the reasons why this population continues to thrive, where others have not, will be used to protect the fish and its habitat—as well as to apply the knowledge to help restore other Nevada lak

43min

Giant, fruit-gulping pigeon eaten into extinction on Pacific islands

A large fruit-eating bird from Tonga joins the dodo in the lineup of giant island pigeons hunted to extinction.

43min

Lahontan Cutthroat Trout thrive at Paiute's Summit Lake in far northern Nevada

Summit Lake in remote northwest Nevada is home to the only self-sustaining, robust, lake population of Lahontan Cutthroat Trout, North America's largest freshwater native trout species. Research to understand the reasons why this population continues to thrive, where others have not, will be used to protect the fish and its habitat—as well as to apply the knowledge to help restore other Nevada lak

43min

Giant, fruit-gulping pigeon eaten into extinction on Pacific islands

A large fruit-eating bird from Tonga joins the dodo in the lineup of giant island pigeons hunted to extinction.

43min

2,000 years of storms in the Caribbean

The hurricanes in the Caribbean became more frequent and their force varied noticeably around the same time that classical Mayan culture in Central America suffered its final demise: We can gain these and other insights by looking at the climate archive created under the leadership of geoscientists from Goethe University and now presented in an article in Nature journal's Scientific Reports on 16

43min

Splash slashed: Cornell drops swim test amid pandemic

Cornell University will not conduct its 115-year-old swim test this fall due to the pandemic.

43min

Artificial cells produce parts of viruses for safe studies

Scientists searching for better diagnostic tests, drugs or vaccines against a virus must all begin by deciphering the structure of that virus. And when the virus in question is highly pathogenic, investigating, testing or developing these can be quite dangerous.

47min

How Hurricane Lane brought fire and rain to Hawaiian islands

Researchers detail the compounding hazards — fire and rain — produced by Hurricane Lane in August 2018.

47min

Through the nanoscale looking glass — determining boson peak frequency in ultra-thin alumina

There's more to glass than meets the eye. Glasses, which are disordered materials with no long-range chemical order, have some mysterious properties that have remained enigmatic for several decades. Amongst these are the anomalous vibrational states that contribute to the heat capacity at low temperature. Early researchers established that these states obey Bose-Einstein statistics, and the name s

47min

Protein Atg40 folds the endoplasmic reticulum to facilitate its autophagy, study finds

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an important part of eukaryotic cells (the type of cells that make up every living thing other than bacteria or viruses, including humans). They are a mass of tubes connected to the nucleus of the cell; the production of both proteins and lipids occur in the networks of the ER. For this organelle to properly function, cells routinely degrade portions of the ER so

49min

Protein Atg40 folds the endoplasmic reticulum to facilitate its autophagy, study finds

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an important part of eukaryotic cells (the type of cells that make up every living thing other than bacteria or viruses, including humans). They are a mass of tubes connected to the nucleus of the cell; the production of both proteins and lipids occur in the networks of the ER. For this organelle to properly function, cells routinely degrade portions of the ER so

49min

NASA is Asking Students to Come up With a Lunar Dust Buster

NASA is asking university students to come up with a solution to a very real problem: sticky lunar dust that can get pretty much anywhere, meaning it poses a very real threat to anybody planning to spend much time on the surface of the Moon. The goal is a solution that can remove lunar dust or make surfaces impermeable to the stuff. "This competition gives students an unparalleled opportunity as

49min

Artificial cells produce parts of viruses for safe studies

Scientists searching for better diagnostic tests, drugs or vaccines against a virus must all begin by deciphering the structure of that virus. And when the virus in question is highly pathogenic, investigating, testing or developing these can be quite dangerous.

51min

Through the nanoscale looking glass — determining boson peak frequency in ultra-thin alumina

There's more to glass than meets the eye. Glasses, which are disordered materials with no long-range chemical order, have some mysterious properties that have remained enigmatic for several decades. Amongst these are the anomalous vibrational states that contribute to the heat capacity at low temperature. Early researchers established that these states obey Bose-Einstein statistics, and the name s

51min

Researchers boost koala spotting system

Researchers have published an improved and innovative method for estimating the number of koalas in an area detected by using drones and an artificial intelligent algorithm as they continue the quest of identifying surviving koala populations in bushfire areas.

1h

Cinnamon may improve blood sugar control in people with prediabetes

Cinnamon improves blood sugar control in people with prediabetes and could slow the progression to type 2 diabetes, according to a new study.

1h

Eating habits of baby predator starfish revealed

The varied diet of juvenile crown-of-thorns starfish complicates scientists' ability to age them. This makes plans for the management of this invasive species more difficult, as outbreaks of adults on the reef are unpredictable.

1h

High school athletes require longer recovery following concussions

High school athletes sustaining a concussion require careful attention when determining return-to-sport (RTS) readiness. The purpose of this study was to determine epidemiological and RTS data of a large cohort of high school athletes who sustained one or more concussions.

1h

Making comprehensive water resources modeling more accessible

A new large-scale, open source hydrological and water resources model will support and enable different stakeholder groups and scientific communities to engage with a hydrological model and support their investigations.

1h

Popular seafood species in sharp decline around the world

The first-ever global study of long-term trends in the population biomass of exploited marine fish and invertebrates for all coastal areas on the planet.

1h

Loyola researchers identify common characteristics of rare pediatric brain tumors

In a new study, researchers at Loyola University Medical Center and Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine found that pediatric acoustic neuroma patients had similar symptoms to those of adult patients; however, tumor size was typically larger in the pediatric patients at the time of diagnosis, symptoms of mass effect (secondary effects caused by the tumor) were more common, and the

1h

New UBC study reveals older adults coped with pandemic best

Adults aged 60 and up have fared better emotionally compared to younger adults (18-39) and middle-aged adults (40-59) amid the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new UBC research published recently in the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences.

1h

Research explores the link between wages, school and cognitive ability in South Africa

Using data sets that only became available in recent years, researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York analyzed the wage impact of cognitive skills in South Africa.

1h

City of Hope scientists leverage interference between signaling pathways for cancer treatment

In order for cancer to form in the human body, normal cells must acquire multiple mutations before they develop toward the disease. It was previously believed that these mutations acted in concert in the progression of cancer. But a new Nature study led by City of Hope's Markus Müschen, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the Department of Systems Biology and The Norman and Sadie Lee Foundation Professor in Ped

1h

Largest Seroprevalence Study in US Shows Vast COVID-19 Undercount

Actual cases may be as much as six to 24 times higher than reported, but we're still a long way off from herd immunity.

1h

Sacred site reveals how Indigenous people resisted colonial forces for 130 years

Dyar mound discovery leads to questions about other "precontact" sites

1h

Trump moves to limit greenhouse emissions from planes, but critics skeptical

Proposed rule is historic but weak, environmentalists say

1h

Flying over mountains isn't as scary (or hard) as you might think

View this post on Instagram Highlights from the "Lessons From The Mountains" appearing in May 2020 FLYING. #instaaviation #avgeek #avgeeks #explore #aviation #flying #pilots #airplanes #goflying #aviationlovers #flyingmagazine #flyingmag #pilotsofinstagram #mountainflying #backcountry #backcountryflying #idahoflying #flyidaho #kitfox A post shared by Flying Magazine (@flyingmagazine) on May 6, 20

1h

Rejoice, Nerds! Lab-Grown Bacon Is Here

Some Pig Finally, the world of lab-grown meat has given us an artificial form of bacon. Higher Steaks, a U.K.-based alternative meat startup, has managed to create both bacon and pork belly from a mixture of lab-grown cells and miscellaneous plant products, proteins, fats, and starches, TechCrunch reports . While many of the alternative meat startups out there have been trying to crack steak , th

1h

Studies Suggest Immunity To The Coronavirus Is Likely To Be Short Term

Some studies suggest immunity to the coronavirus doesn't last long. That might have implications for the development of vaccines.

1h

Concussions associated with cognitive, behavioral, and emotional consequences for students

Concussions can have a compounding effect on children, leading to long-term cognitive, behavioral, and emotional health consequences, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), who published their findings in the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

1h

Narcissists don't learn from their mistakes because they don't think they make any

When most people find that their actions have resulted in an undesirable outcome, they tend to rethink their decisions and ask, "What should I have done differently to avoid this outcome?" When narcissists face the same situation, however, their refrain is, "No one could have seen this coming!" In refusing to acknowledge that they have made a mistake, narcissists fail to learn from those mistakes,

1h

Saving critically endangered seabird

The global population of the critically endangered Chinese crested tern has more than doubled thanks to a historic, collaborative, decade-long study.

1h

Experimental COVID Vaccines Are Giving People Fevers, Headaches, and More

It's difficult to overstate the urgency of developing a safe, effective vaccine that protects against COVID-19. While some experimental vaccines seem to be doing okay on the "effective" part, Wired reports that pharmaceutical companies may be understating the associated risks and side effects that come with them, which can include aches, serious fevers, and fatigue. A team of scientists from Oxfo

1h

The hunt for the origins of SARS-CoV-2 will look beyond China

The virus may have been born in South-East Asia

1h

Deep learning, neural networks and the future of AI | Yann LeCun

Yann LeCun, the chief AI scientist at Facebook, helped develop the deep learning algorithms that power many artificial intelligence systems today. In conversation with head of TED Chris Anderson, LeCun discusses his current research into self-supervised machine learning, how he's trying to build machines that learn with common sense (like humans) and his hopes for the next conceptual breakthrough

1h

The artist who helped drive The Magic School Bus remembers Joanna Cole

Bruce Degen teamed with Cole on series of science books for children

1h

2,000 years of storms in the Caribbean

The hurricanes in the Caribbean became more frequent and their force varied noticeably around the same time that classical Mayan culture in Central America suffered its final demise: We can gain these and other insights by looking at the climate archive created under the leadership of geoscientists from Goethe University and now presented in an article in "Nature" journal's 'Scientific Reports' on

1h

New study finds access to food stamps reduces visits to the physicians

In a new study, University of Colorado Denver researchers found when people have access to the food stamp program, they are less likely to frequent a physician for medical care. About 44 percent of food stamp recipients in the United States also receive health insurance coverage through the Medicaid program. Since there is a reduction in the need for medical treatment, government health care spend

1h

Giant, fruit-gulping pigeon eaten into extinction on Pacific islands

A large fruit-eating bird from Tonga joins the dodo in the lineup of giant island pigeons hunted to extinction.

1h

Insight into toddlers' awareness of their own uncertainty

Toddlers may not be able to describe their feelings of uncertainty, but a new study provides evidence that toddlers may experience and deal with uncertainty in decision making in the same way as older children and adults.

1h

Biggest risk factors identified to try and prevent Alzheimer's disease

There are at least 10 risk factors that appear to have a significant impact on a person's likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease that could be targeted with preventative steps, suggests new research.

1h

Gum disease may raise risk of some cancers

People who have periodontal (gum) disease may have a higher risk of developing some forms of cancer.

1h

Largest Seroprevalence Study in US Shows Vast COVID-19 Undercount

Actual cases may be as much as six to 24 times higher than reported, but we're still a long way off from herd immunity.

1h

Hearing restored in rats by modifying ear cells to respond to light

Rats could respond to a sound converted into light after their nerve cells were genetically modified. The experiment suggests a similar approach could help restore hearing in people

1h

Flapping drone can fly, dart and hover like a bird

A drone equipped with light, soft wings can mimic the flight of a bird. Its inventors say it is safer than drones with rotor blades and could be used to monitor delicate crops

1h

Hundreds of illegal Chinese fishing vessels spotted near North Korea

Satellite imaging has revealed hundreds of vessels from China fishing off the coast of North Korea, violating UN resolutions prohibiting such activity

1h

Hungry foxes have been raiding our bins for thousands of years

Foxes rooting through our rubbish to scavenge for food isn't just a modern-day phenomenon – analysis of animal bones in Germany shows foxes were eating human leftovers 42,000 years ago

1h

Legal marijuana may be slowing reductions in teen marijuana use

A longitudinal study of more than 230 teens and young adults in Washington state finds that teens may be more likely to use marijuana following legalization – with the proliferation of stores and increasing adult use of the drug — than they otherwise would have been.

2h

Advancing knowledge on archaea

An open-source data platform for researchers studying archaea is paving the way for new insights and educational opportunities.

2h

Better wastewater treatment? It's a wrap

A shield of graphene helps particles destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the free-floating genes in wastewater treatment plants.

2h

Free trade can prevent hunger caused by climate change

Researchers investigated the effects of trade on hunger in the world as a result of climate change. The conclusion is clear: international trade can compensate for regional food shortages and reduce hunger, particularly when protectionist measures and other barriers to trade are eliminated.

2h

Homes of wealthy Americans have carbon footprints 25% higher than lower-income residences

The homes of wealthy Americans generate about 25% more greenhouse gases than residences in lower-income neighborhoods, mainly due to their larger size. In the nation's most affluent suburbs, those emissions can be as much as 15 times higher than in nearby lower-income neighborhoods.

2h

Older adults feel stressed, yet resilient in the time of COVID-19

America's oldest citizens say they've been through worse, but many older adults are feeling the stress of COVID-19 and prolonged social distancing measures, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.

2h

Dogs take shortcuts based on Earth's magnetic fields

As dogs navigate, they appear to be using the Earth's magnetic fields. 170 dogs orient themselves to north and south as they plot shortcuts back to their people. Dogs join the growing number of magnetism-sensitive animals. It's been known for a while that some animals — migratory birds, mole rats, and lobsters among them — use the Earth's magnetic fields to navigate. There's even some evidence su

2h

How Viruses Evolve

Pathogens that switch to a new host species have some adapting to do. How does that affect the course of a pandemic like Covid-19?

2h

New CCC19 data offer insights on COVID treatments for people with cancer

Newly released data on treatment outcomes of people with cancer diagnosed with COVID-19 reveal a racial disparity in access to Remdesivir, an antiviral drug that has been shown to shorten hospital stays, and increased mortality associated with dexamethasone, a steroid that has had the opposite effect in the general patient population.

2h

Discovery of first active seep in Antarctica provides new understanding of methane cycle

The discovery of the first active methane seep in Antarctica is providing scientists new understanding of the methane cycle and the role methane found in this region may play in warming the planet.

2h

Novel 'on-off' switch discovered in plant defenses

To ensure survival, living organisms are equipped with defensive systems that detect threats and respond with effective counter measures.

2h

Launching Hope to Mars

National Air and Space Museum director Ellen Stofan reflects on the significance of the United Arab Emirates upcoming mission to Mars

2h

Returning to farming's roots in the battle against the 'billion-dollar beetle'

Entomologists reaffirm the importance of crop rotation and diversification in combating the western corn rootworm's resistance to biotech crops.

2h

South Atlantic anomalies existed 8 – 11 million years ago

Research has revealed that strange behavior of the magnetic field in the South Atlantic region existed as far back as eight to 11 million years ago, suggesting that today's South Atlantic Anomaly is a recurring feature and unlikely to represent an impending reversal of the Earth's magnetic field.

2h

Novel 'on-off' switch discovered in plant defenses

To ensure survival, living organisms are equipped with defensive systems that detect threats and respond with effective counter measures.

2h

What happens in Vegas, may come from the Arctic?

Ancient climate records from Leviathan Cave, located in the southern Great Basin, show that Nevada was even hotter and drier in the past than it is today, and that one 4,000-year period in particular may represent a true, "worst-case" scenario picture for the Southwest and the Colorado River Basin — and the millions of people who rely on its water supply.

2h

The Guardian view on austerity: A grotesque failure that must not be revived | Editorial

Rishi Sunak is preparing an autumn of spending cuts – an economic folly and a political gamble This is the week that Boris Johnson and Rishi Sunak began softening up doctors, teachers and other public sector workers for a squeeze to their pay and cuts to their departmental budgets. They have done their best to muffle that particular bit of bad news. Instead, aides to the publicity-conscious Mr Su

2h

Paging Dr. Hamblin: Is a Bandanna a Mask?

Editor's Note: Every Wednesday, James Hamblin takes questions from readers about health-related curiosities, concerns, and obsessions. Have one? Email him at paging.dr.hamblin@theatlantic.com . Dr. Hamblin, We have been told that washing our hands with soap and water for 20 seconds kills the virus, and that the virus doesn't stay viable on surfaces for more than a couple of days. So why are we to

2h

Wireless, optical cochlear implant uses LED lights to restore hearing in rodents

Scientists have created an optical cochlear implant based on LED lights that can safely and partially restore the sensation of hearing in deaf rats and gerbils.

3h

Sweet coolers a gateway to increased alcohol consumption

Sweetened alcoholic beverages can promote harmful alcohol consumption among teens, new University of Guelph research finds.

3h

Getting under the skin of psoriasis

Psoriasis afflicts millions of people worldwide, but treatments are limited to small molecules like steroids, which can cause skin thinning and lose their effectiveness over time. A Wyss Institute collaboration has circumvented those problems by using a topical ionic liquid to effectively deliver an RNA-based therapy directly into the skin of mice with psoriasis, which reduced multiple psoriasis-r

3h

New drug targets clots: A potential treatment for heart attack and stroke prevention

Monash researchers have developed a drug that can be potentially given as a preventative against heart attack. The drug — which has been studied in human cells and animal models — literally blocks the minute changes in blood flow that preempts a heart attack and acts on the platelets preventing the platelet-triggered clot before it can kill or cause damage.

3h

Machine learning system can detect foreign social media influence campaigns using content alone

Researchers have developed an automated machine learning system they say can detect social media posts involved in coordinated political influence campaigns — such as Russia's alleged efforts to sway the results of the 2016 elections in the United States — regardless of platform and based only on the content of the posts.

3h

Tracking misinformation campaigns in real-time is possible, study shows

A research team led by Princeton University has developed a technique for tracking online foreign misinformation campaigns in real time, which could help mitigate outside interference in the 2020 American election.

3h

Is it a bird, a plane? Not superman, but a flapping wing drone

A drone prototype that mimics the aerobatic manoeuvres of one of the world's fastest birds, the swift, is being developed by an international team of engineers in the latest example of biologically inspired flight.

3h

Biotelemetry provides unique glimpse into whitespotted eagle rays' behavior

The whitespotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari), found in estuaries and lagoons throughout Florida, is listed as "near threatened" on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's "Red List of Threatened Species." Keeping tabs on this highly mobile species for conservation efforts can be extremely challenging, especially for extended periods of time.

3h

NASA sees record-breaking new Tropical Storm Gonzalo strengthening

The seventh named tropical cyclone of the North Atlantic Ocean has formed, and like some others this season, it has broken a record. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the small record-breaker.

3h

NASA infrared confirms Douglas still a tropical storm

Infrared data from NASA's Terra satellite showed that dry air around Tropical Storm Douglas has been inhibiting it from strengthening into a hurricane.

3h

Foxes have been eating humans' leftovers for 42,000 years

The diets of ancient foxes were influenced by humans, and these small carnivores might be tracers of human activity over time, according to a study published July 22, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Chris Baumann of the University of Tübingen, Germany and colleagues.

3h

Biotelemetry provides unique glimpse into whitespotted eagle rays' behavior

The whitespotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari), found in estuaries and lagoons throughout Florida, is listed as "near threatened" on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's "Red List of Threatened Species." Keeping tabs on this highly mobile species for conservation efforts can be extremely challenging, especially for extended periods of time.

3h

SpaceX to Attempt First Full-Scale Starship Test Flight This Week

First Flight A full-scale SpaceX Starship prototype is about to finally make its first-ever attempt at getting off the ground. When asked on an update on the company's SN5 Starship prototype, the fifth of its kind, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk responded yesterday that it "will attempt to fly later this week." The massive SN5 prototype is expected to "hop" to just 150 meters (492 feet) according to road c

3h

NASA Is Using a Robot to Search for Leaks Outside the Space Station

Automated Spacewalks NASA and Canadian Space Agency (CSA) scientists were just able to automate one of the dangerous jobs on the International Space Station, sending a robot out on spacewalks so humans don't need to put themselves at risk . Dextre, a CSA robot that looks like a multi-armed tower sticking to the side of the space station, recently checked the outside of the ISS for signs of leaks

3h

Foxes have been eating humans' leftovers for 42,000 years

The diets of ancient foxes were influenced by humans, and these small carnivores might be tracers of human activity over time, according to a study published July 22, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Chris Baumann of the University of Tübingen, Germany and colleagues.

3h

Filamentous active matter: Band formation, bending, buckling, and defects

Motor proteins drive persistent motion and self-organization of cytoskeletal filaments. However, state-of-the-art microscopy techniques and continuum modeling approaches focus on large length and time scales. Here, we perform component-based computer simulations of polar filaments and molecular motors linking microscopic interactions and activity to self-organization and dynamics from the filamen

3h

Cell type-differential modulation of prefrontal cortical GABAergic interneurons on low gamma rhythm and social interaction

Prefrontal GABAergic interneurons (INs) are crucial for social behavior by maintaining excitation/inhibition balance. However, the underlying neuronal correlates and network computations are poorly understood. We identified distinct firing patterns of prefrontal parvalbumin (PV) INs and somatostatin (SST) INs upon social interaction. Moreover, social interaction closely correlated with elevated g

3h

Distortion matrix concept for deep optical imaging in scattering media

In optical imaging, light propagation is affected by the inhomogeneities of the medium. Sample-induced aberrations and multiple scattering can strongly degrade the image resolution and contrast. On the basis of a dynamic correction of the incident and/or reflected wavefronts, adaptive optics has been used to compensate for those aberrations. However, it only applies to spatially invariant aberrat

3h

The clonal repopulation of HSPC gene modified with anti-HIV-1 RNAi is not affected by preexisting HIV-1 infection

Despite advances in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) transplant for HIV-1–infected patients, the impact of a preexisting HIV-1 infection on the engraftment and clonal repopulation of HSPCs remains poorly understood. We have developed a long terminal repeat indexing-mediated integration site sequencing (LTRi-Seq) method that provides a multiplexed clonal quantitation of both anti–HIV-1 RN

3h

A new coumarin compound DCH combats methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilm by targeting arginine repressor

Staphylococcus aureus infection is difficult to eradicate because of biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. The increasing prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection necessitates the development of a new agent against bacterial biofilms. We report a new coumarin compound, termed DCH, that effectively combats MRSA in vitro and in vivo and exhibits potent antib

3h

Mapping of host-parasite-microbiome interactions reveals metabolic determinants of tropism and tolerance in Chagas disease

Chagas disease (CD) is a parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa, presenting with cardiomyopathy, megaesophagus, and/or megacolon. To determine the mechanisms of gastrointestinal (GI) CD tissue tropism, we systematically characterized the spatial localization of infection-induced metabolic and microbiome alterations, in a mouse model of CD. Notably, the impact of the transition bet

3h

Deep learning-based cell composition analysis from tissue expression profiles

We present Scaden, a deep neural network for cell deconvolution that uses gene expression information to infer the cellular composition of tissues. Scaden is trained on single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data to engineer discriminative features that confer robustness to bias and noise, making complex data preprocessing and feature selection unnecessary. We demonstrate that Scaden outperforms ex

3h

Chimeric apoptotic bodies functionalized with natural membrane and modular delivery system for inflammation modulation

Engineered extracellular vesicles (EVs) carrying therapeutic molecules are promising candidates for disease therapies. Yet, engineering EVs with optimal functions is a challenge that requires careful selection of functionally specific vesicles and a proper engineering strategy. Here, we constructed chimeric apoptotic bodies (cABs) for on-demand inflammation modulation by combining pure membrane f

3h

Cellular sensing of extracellular purine nucleosides triggers an innate IFN-{beta} response

Mechanisms linking immune sensing of DNA danger signals in the extracellular environment to innate pathways in the cytosol are poorly understood. Here, we identify a previously unidentified immune-metabolic axis by which cells respond to purine nucleosides and trigger a type I interferon-β (IFN-β) response. We find that depletion of ADA2, an ectoenzyme that catabolizes extracellular dAdo to dIno,

3h

Proteasomal degradation of the intrinsically disordered protein tau at single-residue resolution

Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) can be degraded in a ubiquitin-independent process by the 20 S proteasome. Decline in 20 S activity characterizes neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we examine 20 S degradation of IDP tau, a protein that aggregates into insoluble deposits in Alzheimer's disease. We show that cleavage of tau by the 20 S proteasome is most efficient within the aggregation-pro

3h

Realization of an intrinsic ferromagnetic topological state in MnBi8Te13

Novel magnetic topological materials pave the way for studying the interplay between band topology and magnetism. However, an intrinsically ferromagnetic topological material with only topological bands at the charge neutrality energy has so far remained elusive. Using rational design, we synthesized MnBi8Te13, a natural heterostructure with [MnBi 2 Te 4 ] and [Bi 2 Te 3 ] layers. Thermodynamic,

3h

Switching the intracellular pathway and enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of small interfering RNA by auroliposome

Gene silencing using small-interfering RNA (siRNA) is a viable therapeutic approach; however, the lack of effective delivery systems limits its clinical translation. Herein, we doped conventional siRNA-liposomal formulations with gold nanoparticles to create "auroliposomes," which significantly enhanced gene silencing. We targeted MICU1, a novel glycolytic switch in ovarian cancer, and delivered

3h

Increased PIP3 activity blocks nanoparticle mRNA delivery

The biological pathways that affect drug delivery in vivo remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that altering cell metabolism with phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate (PIP3), a bioactive lipid upstream of the metabolic pathway PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)/AKT/ mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) would transiently increase protein translated by nanoparticle-delivered messenger R

3h

Shattering barriers toward clinically meaningful MSC therapies

More than 1050 clinical trials are registered at FDA.gov that explore multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for nearly every clinical application imaginable, including neurodegenerative and cardiac disorders, perianal fistulas, graft-versus-host disease, COVID-19, and cancer. Several companies have or are in the process of commercializing MSC-based therapies. However, most of the clinical-

3h

The elusive cyclotriphosphazene molecule and its Dewar benzene-type valence isomer (P3N3)

Although the chemistry of phosphorus and nitrogen has fascinated chemists for more than 350 years, the Hückel aromatic cyclotriphosphazene (P 3 N 3 , 2 ) molecule—a key molecular building block in phosphorus chemistry—has remained elusive. Here, we report a facile, versatile pathway producing cyclotriphosphazene and its Dewar benzene–type isomer (P 3 N 3 , 5 ) in ammonia-phosphine ices at 5 K ex

3h

Speech perception at birth: The brain encodes fast and slow temporal information

Speech perception is constrained by auditory processing. Although at birth infants have an immature auditory system and limited language experience, they show remarkable speech perception skills. To assess neonates' ability to process the complex acoustic cues of speech, we combined near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to measure brain responses to syllables differin

3h

Architecture of the AP2/clathrin coat on the membranes of clathrin-coated vesicles

Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is crucial for modulating the protein composition of a cell's plasma membrane. Clathrin forms a cage-like, polyhedral outer scaffold around a vesicle, to which cargo-selecting clathrin adaptors are attached. Adaptor protein complex (AP2) is the key adaptor in CME. Crystallography has shown AP2 to adopt a range of conformations. Here, we used cryo–electron micro

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The structures of natively assembled clathrin-coated vesicles

Clathrin-coated vesicles mediate trafficking of proteins and nutrients in the cell and between organelles. Proteins included in the clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) category include clathrin heavy chain (CHC), clathrin light chain (CLC), and a variety of adaptor protein complexes. Much is known about the structures of the individual CCV components, but data are lacking about the structures of the

3h

Turbulence in the Sun is suppressed on large scales and confined to equatorial regions

Convection in the Sun's outer envelope generates turbulence and drives differential rotation, meridional circulation, and the global magnetic cycle. We develop a greater understanding of these processes by contrasting observations with simulations of global convection. These comparisons also enhance our comprehension of the physics of distant Sun-like stars. Here, we infer toroidal flow power as

3h

Illuminating dark fishing fleets in North Korea

Illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing threatens resource sustainability and equity. A major challenge with such activity is that most fishing vessels do not broadcast their positions and are "dark" in public monitoring systems. Combining four satellite technologies, we identify widespread illegal fishing by dark fleets in the waters between the Koreas, Japan, and Russia. We find >900 vesse

3h

Enabling the assessment of trauma-induced hemorrhage via smart wearable systems

As the leading cause of trauma-related mortality, blood loss due to hemorrhage is notoriously difficult to triage and manage. To enable timely and appropriate care for patients with trauma, this work elucidates the externally measurable physiological features of exsanguination, which were used to develop a globalized model for assessing blood volume status (BVS) or the relative severity of blood

3h

Peptidoglycan editing provides immunity to Acinetobacter baumannii during bacterial warfare

Peptidoglycan (PG) is essential in most bacteria. Thus, it is often targeted by various assaults, including interbacterial attacks via the type VI secretion system (T6SS). Here, we report that the Gram-negative bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii strain ATCC 17978 produces, secretes, and incorporates the noncanonical -amino acid -lysine into its PG during stationary phase. We show that PG editing i

3h

3D touchless multiorder reflection structural color sensing display

The development of a lightweight, low-power, user-interactive three-dimensional (3D) touchless display in which a human stimulus can be detected and simultaneously visualized in noncontact mode is of great interest. Here, we present a user-interactive 3D touchless sensing display based on multiorder reflection structural colors (SCs) of a thin, solid-state block copolymer (BCP) photonic crystal (

3h

Content-based features predict social media influence operations

We study how easy it is to distinguish influence operations from organic social media activity by assessing the performance of a platform-agnostic machine learning approach. Our method uses public activity to detect content that is part of coordinated influence operations based on human-interpretable features derived solely from content. We test this method on publicly available Twitter data on C

3h

Treatment of psoriasis with NFKBIZ siRNA using topical ionic liquid formulations

Systemic antibodies targeting tumor necrosis factor–α (TNF-α) and interleukin-17A (IL-17A) are effective in plaque psoriasis. Despite their popularity, safety concerns pose a challenge for systemic biologics. While anti–TNF-α and anti–IL-17A antibodies effectively inhibit respective proteins, we hypothesize that an approach based on local silencing of an upstream target such as NFKBIZ can be adva

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Geometrically reconfigurable 3D mesostructures and electromagnetic devices through a rational bottom-up design strategy

Microelectronic devices with reconfigurable three-dimensional (3D) microarchitecture that can be repetitively switched among different geometrical and/or working states have promising applications in widespread areas. Traditional approaches usually rely on stimulated deformations of active materials under external electric/magnetic fields, which could potentially introduce parasitic side effects

3h

Role of Ca2+ transients at the node of the mouse embryo in breaking of left-right symmetry

Immotile cilia sense extracellular signals such as fluid flow, but whether Ca 2+ plays a role in flow sensing has been unclear. Here, we examined the role of ciliary Ca 2+ in the flow sensing that initiates the breaking of left-right (L-R) symmetry in the mouse embryo. Intraciliary and cytoplasmic Ca 2+ transients were detected in the crown cells at the node. These Ca 2+ transients showed L-R asy

3h

My Glitchy, Glorious Day at a Conference for Virtual Beings

Spectators spent much of the time debating who was real and who was fake.

3h

We already know how to beat COVID in three easy steps

Washing your hands is still an important prevention technique, even while wearing a mask (Christine Sandu/Unsplash/) All you hear about right now is masks, but in all the debate we may have temporarily forgotten about some other important ways of fighting off the coronavirus. New research from scientists in the Netherlands found that combining masks with hand washing and social distancing is cruc

3h

In the EU, space heating accounts for the majority of domestic energy use

For healthy individuals, experiencing a wider range of temperatures than average—which can save on home energy costs— is associated with higher health satisfaction and a lower risk of cardiorespiratory conditions, according to a new study published July 22, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dr. Harry Kennard of University College London, UK, and colleagues. However, for more vulnerable p

3h

Gender differences in prosecution of police assault in Sweden

In Sweden, prosecutors randomly assigned to cases of police assault are sixteen percentage points more likely to investigate rather than dismiss the case if they are female, according to a study published July 22, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kristine Eck from Uppsala Universitet, Sweden and Charles David Crabtree from Dartmouth College, US.

3h

Report exposes rampant illegal fishing in North Korean waters

A new study published today in the journal Science Advances reveals widespread illegal fishing by dark fleets—vessels that do not publicly broadcast their location or appear in public monitoring systems. These fleets are operating in the waters between the Koreas, Japan and Russia, some of the world's most disputed and poorly monitored waters.

3h

The most important task for a PTSD service dog for veterans is disrupting anxiety

Science has shown that service dogs can benefit some veterans with PTSD. But the exact role service dogs play in the day-to-day lives of veterans is less known. A recent study shows what trained tasks service dogs perform the most often and which ones are the most helpful to veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. The study found that the task of disrupting episodes of anxiety ranked among t

3h

Expanded access to treatment in prisons can reduce overdose deaths by 31.6%, study finds

Using a microsimulation model, researchers at Brown predicted the number of opioid-related overdose deaths related to three different treatment options over the course of 8 years.

3h

Novel 'on-off' switch discovered in plant defenses

Researchers investigating the ways that plants protect themselves–from insects to pathogens–have discovered an "on-off" switch that controls plant defensive mechanisms. The switch turns on immune responses minutes after an attack and later sends a deactivation signal to avoid self-inflicted damage. The finding lays the groundwork for improved plant disease resistance and food stability.

3h

What happens in Vegas, may come from the Arctic?

Ancient climate records from Leviathan Cave, located in the southern Great Basin, show that Nevada was even hotter and drier in the past than it is today, and that one 4,000-year period in particular may represent a true, "worst-case" scenario picture for the Southwest and the Colorado River Basin — and the millions of people who rely on its water supply.

3h

Care for veterans with substance use and mental health disorders needs improvement

While the availability of services for veterans has expanded in recent years, many post-9/11 veterans do not receive appropriate care for their co-occurring substance use and mental health problems, according to a new study.

3h

Lahontan Cutthroat Trout thrive at Paiute's Summit Lake in far northern Nevada

Summit Lake in remote northwest Nevada is home to the only self-sustaining, robust, lake population of Lahontan Cutthroat Trout, North America's largest freshwater native trout species. Research to understand the reasons why this population continues to thrive, where others have not, will be used to protect the fish and its habitat – as well as to apply the knowledge to help restore other Nevada l

3h

Triple negative breast cancer meets its match

One member of a larger family of oxygen sensing enzymes could offer a viable target for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), UTSW researchers report in a new study. The findings, published online this week in Cancer Discovery, might offer hope to this subset of patients who have few effective treatment options and often face a poor prognosis.

3h

Visual working memory is hierarchically structured

Researchers from HSE University and the University of California San Diego, Igor Utochkin and Timothy Brady, have found new evidence of hierarchical encoding of images in visual working memory. It turns out that the precision of remembering and recalling individual objects in a group is affected by ensemble representations–the mean and standard deviation of all objects in the group. The study has

3h

Popular hypertension drugs don't increase risk of COVID-19 severity, fatality

A new study in mice found a widely used class of drugs to treat patients with hypertension, cardiovascular disease and diabetic kidney disease – many of whom are elderly — does not increase the risk of developing a severe and potentially fatal COVID-19 infection, as previously feared.

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For-profit long-term care homes have COVID-19 outbreaks with more cases, deaths

For-profit status is associated with the extent of an outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in long-term care (LTC) homes and the number of resident deaths from COVID-19, but not the likelihood of an outbreak, which was related to the infection rate in the surrounding local public health unit and the total number of beds in the home, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical

3h

How Antidepressants Work Is a Mystery Scientists Still Don't Understand

Antidepressants have many unknowns — from why different medications work for different people, why they take so long to work, and why they affect depression symptoms in the first place.

3h

Report exposes rampant illegal fishing in North Korean waters

A new study published today in the journal Science Advances reveals widespread illegal fishing by dark fleets—vessels that do not publicly broadcast their location or appear in public monitoring systems. These fleets are operating in the waters between the Koreas, Japan and Russia, some of the world's most disputed and poorly monitored waters.

3h

In a Fight Over a Colombian Coal Mine, Covid-19 Raises the Stakes

The Indigenous Wayuu people of Colombia have long battled a large open-pit coal mine called Cerrejón, which critics say pollutes the air and depletes and sullies local water sources — charges the mine operators dispute. With Covid-19 now threatening the region, the Wayuu have turned to the U.N. for help.

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Novel PFAS comprise 24% of those measured in blood of Wilmington, North Carolina residents

In a new paper detailing findings from North Carolina State University's GenX Exposure Study, researchers detected novel per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) called 'fluoroethers' in blood from residents of Wilmington, North Carolina. The fluoroethers—Nafion byproduct 2, PFO4DA and PFO5DoA—represented 24% of the total PFAS detected in the blood of Wilmington residents and appear to leave the

3h

Coronavirus Rages on Coasts as Hurricane Fears Rise

Dramatic increases in storm-prone areas will complicate evacuation, sheltering and recovery efforts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Covid-19 news: Care home visits set to be allowed to resume in England

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

3h

Mitigation of greenhouse gases in dairy cattle through genetic selection

Researchers in Spain propose mitigating methane production by dairy cattle through breeding. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists are targeting reduction of enteric methane in the breeding objectives for dairy cattle to select for animals that use feed more efficiently and thus produce less methane. Because livestock farming contributes 13 percent of global greenhous

3h

Mitigation of greenhouse gases in dairy cattle through genetic selection

Researchers in Spain propose mitigating methane production by dairy cattle through breeding. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists are targeting reduction of enteric methane in the breeding objectives for dairy cattle to select for animals that use feed more efficiently and thus produce less methane. Because livestock farming contributes 13 percent of global greenhous

3h

Perceived 'whiteness' of Middle Eastern Americans correlates with discrimination

The perceived 'whiteness' of Americans of Middle Eastern and North African descent is indirectly tied to discrimination against them, and may feed a "negative cycle" in which public awareness of discrimination leads to more discrimination, according to a Rutgers-led study.

3h

Digitizing chemistry with a smart stir bar

Miniaturized computer systems and wireless technology are offering scientists new ways to keep tabs on reactions without the need for larger, cumbersome equipment. In a proof-of-concept study in ACS Sensors, researchers describe an inexpensive new device that functions like a conventional magnetic stir bar, but that can automatically measure and transmit information on a solution's color, viscosit

3h

Climate predictions several years into the future?

Our planet's climate system is complex. Different components, like atmosphere, ocean, sea and land ice influence each other and cause natural climate variations on a range of timescales from months to decades. Particularly for the long timescales, the ocean plays an essential role. In a new study published today, a research team led by GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel investigates t

3h

How to See Comet Neowise Before It's Gone

The comet will make its closest approach to Earth on Thursday before it fades into black. Here's how you can catch a glimpse.

3h

Calcium channel subunits play a major role in autistic disorders

Neurobiologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have found new evidence that specific calcium channel subunits play a crucial role in the development of excitatory and inhibitory synapses.

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Antibiotics disrupt development of the 'social brain' in mice

Antibiotic treatment in early life impedes brain signalling pathways that function in social behaviour and pain regulation in mice, a new study by Dr Katerina Johnson and Dr Philip Burnet has found. It was published today in BMC Neuroscience.

3h

Fine-tuning adoptive cell therapy for advanced cancers

Researchers identified a discordant phenomenon in which a subset of patients displayed profoundly decreased expression of the transgenic TCR over time, despite the transgenic TCR being present at the DNA level.

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Discovery of first active seep in Antarctica provides new understanding of methane cycle

The discovery of the first active methane seep in Antarctica is providing scientists new understanding of the methane cycle and the role methane found in this region may play in warming the planet.

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NASA infrared confirms Douglas still a tropical storm

Infrared data from NASA's Terra satellite showed that dry air around Tropical Storm Douglas has been inhibiting it from strengthening into a hurricane.

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NASA sees record-breaking new Tropical Storm Gonzalo strengthening

The seventh named tropical cyclone of the North Atlantic Ocean has formed, and like some others this season, it has broken a record. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the small record-breaker.

3h

We are mutating SARS-CoV-2, but it is evolving back

Scientists at the Milner Centre for Evolution looked at the evolution of the virus that causes Covid19; their findings could help the design of a new vaccine.

3h

Biotelemetry provides unique glimpse into whitespotted eagle rays' behavior

Researchers are the first to characterize the ecology and fine-scale habitat use of 'near threatened' whitespotted eagle rays in Florida while also identifying areas of potential interactions between this species and multiple environmental threats. Biotelemetry provided unique insights into this species' occupancy, which is not apparent at the landscape-scale. Prolonged observations showed affinit

3h

Stone tools move back the arrival of humans in America thousands of years

Findings of stone tools move back the first immigration of humans to America at least 15,000 years. This is revealed in a new international study from the University of Copenhagen, where researchers have analysed ancient material from a Mexican mountain cave.

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UNH researchers discover new pathways that could help treat RNA viruses

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have identified new pathways in an RNA-based virus where inhibitors, like medical treatments, unbind. The finding could be beneficial in understanding how these inhibitors react and potentially help develop a new generation of drugs to target viruses with high death rates, like HIV-1, Zika, Ebola and SARS-CoV2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

3h

UAlberta researchers make real-time tumor tracking in radiation therapy 5 times faster

A team of University of Alberta researchers has developed a faster way of tracking the movement of tumors in the body during radiation therapy, which could significantly improve outcomes for cancer patients. The team's work builds on the Linac-MR project, a radiation beam (linear accelerator or 'linac') and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hybrid machine developed by researchers at the Cross Cance

3h

Expert: Leaving the WHO could be 'disastrous'

The Trump administration's decision to withdraw from the World Health Organization (WHO) is a "terrible decision," says Davidson Hamer, a global health and infectious disease expert. Earlier this month, the Trump administration sent a letter to the United Nations formally notifying them of the United States' intention to leave the World Health Organization (WHO), after accusing the organization o

3h

Asteroide-regn ramte Jorden for 800 millioner år siden: Ville udrydde os i dag

Jorden blev ramt med mere kraft end den asteroide, der udryddede dinosaurerne.

3h

Coronavirus cutting Australians' lives short by more years than top three causes of death

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report shows Covid-19 not just dangerous for chronically ill and elderly Australians who have died from Covid-19 have lost more years of their expected lifespan, on average, than those dying from the country's three leading causes of death, a new study suggests. The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) report, released on Thursday, makes it

3h

Why the advice on wearing masks has changed

Wearing masks in Melbourne is now mandatory with $200 fines for those not wearing them outside the home. This is a first for Australia, but the enforced wearing of masks has been legislated in numerous countries around the world, particularly in the past few weeks. So why are the rules changing? You can read Graham Readfearn's article on the changing health advice on wearing masks here . Continue

3h

UK medical student creates handbook to show clinical symptoms on darker skin

A medical student in the UK recently created a handbook to help trainee doctors recognize life-threatening conditions on black and brown skin. "Mind the Gap" includes images that display how certain illnesses appear on both darker and lighter skin tones. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated problems with suspected coronavirus patients being asked if they are "pale" or if their lips "turned blue"

4h

How Effective Does a COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine Need to Be to Stop the Pandemic?

A new study has answers. A vaccine that's 70% effective might not be good enough if too few people are willing to be vaccinated.

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Warning: Atmosphere Could Burst into Flames

Originally published in August 1846 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bacteria and Colon Cancer

Let's catch on some non-coronavirus research today with an interesting approach against a very bad disease, metastatic colon cancer. This new paper (from groups at Virginia Tech and Wake Forest) adds to our understanding of something that's been noticed for some time: colon cancer tissue is often infected with Fusobacterium nucleatum . This bacterium (an anaerobic Gram-negative beast) especially

4h

Shrinking (ultra)violet

Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) report the technical details of pioneering research they conducted on the disinfection of drinking water using ultraviolet (UV) light.

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Erectile dysfunction drugs can help cells destroy misfolded proteins

PDE5 inhibitors — which include the erectile dysfunction drugs sildenafil and tadalafil — can activate the cell's protein quality-control systems and improve its ability to dispose of misfolded proteins. Researchers observed lower accumulation of mutant proteins and reduced cell death and anatomical defects in zebrafish models of neurodegeneration after treatment.

4h

Cellular cleanup! Atg40 folds the endoplasmic reticulum to facilitate its autophagy

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Institute of Microbial Chemistry investigated 'ER-phagy,' the degradation mechanism of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an important organelle with multiple biologically necessary functions like the synthesis of proteins and lipids. Degradation is critical for maintaining ER functions. Scientists found that the 'Atg40' protein not only ma

4h

Why Japan is emerging as NASA's most important space partner

The first time the US went to the moon, it put down an estimated $283 billion to do it alone. That's not the case with Artemis, the new NASA program to send humans back. Although it's a US-led initiative, Artemis is meant to be a much more collaborative effort than Apollo. Japan is quickly emerging as one of the most important partners for this program—perhaps the most important. Although NASA ha

4h

Before the Media Treated Him as a Threat, They Treated Him as a Joke

I n March 2011, The Colbert Report aired an installment of "Difference Makers," the segment in which Stephen Colbert, through the character he played on the show, satirized American "heroes" in the guise of celebrating them. Its subject this time was a lawyer who had been making headlines for his efforts to challenge the constitutionality of "ladies' nights" at bars. "The latest giant of civil ri

4h

Check Out This Amazing Design for an Underwater "Space Station"

Fabien Cousteau, the grandson of legendary ocean explorer Jacques Cousteau, wants to build the equivalent of the International Space Station (ISS) — but on the ocean floor deep below the surface, as CNN reports . All images: Courtesy Proteus/Yves Béhar/Fuseproject With the help of industrial designer Yves Béhar, Cosuteau unveiled his bold ambition: a 4,000 square foot lab called Proteus that coul

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New antibody mix could form 'very potent' Covid-19 treatment, say scientists

Researchers say development could lead to a coronavirus treatment that can be mass produced Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Researchers have identified a potent cocktail of antibodies that may help doctors treat Covid-19 infections and protect people at risk from falling ill with the disease. The antibodies were collected from patients hospitalised with severe Covid-

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Almost quarter of Delhi may have had coronavirus, finds study

Random sample of 20,000 residents finds 23.48% have antibodies, equating to more than 6.5m people Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Almost a quarter of Delhi's 28 million residents may have developed coronavirus antibodies, making it one of the worst affected capital cities in the world, according to research. A random sample of 20,000 residents by India's National Cen

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MIT Researchers Prototype Reusable N95 Mask

Six months into the COVID-19 pandemic, the world is still short of N95 respirators (i.e. masks) — a product most people probably knew nothing about before this year. Here in California, we've been using them for wildfire smoke, but typically only for a few days or weeks each year. In normal times they are used and then thrown away. But shortages have required all sorts of innovative ways to allow

4h

When did people arrive in the Americas? New evidence stokes debate

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02200-z New evidence may push back the date on human arrival to the Americas, and an examination of science's flaws.

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Controversial cave discoveries suggest humans reached Americas much earlier than thought

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02190-y Archaeologists say stone artefacts point to occupation more than 30,000 years ago — but not everyone is convinced.

4h

New Blood Test Appears to Detect Cancer Years Before Symptoms

A team of Chinese researchers claim their new blood test can detect cancer in 95 percent of subjects, The Guardian reports — years before they showed any conventional symptoms. As detailed in a paper about the research published in the journal Nature Communications this week, the researchers' test was able to detect traces of five types of cancer "through a DNA methylation-based blood test up to

4h

Robotic hand uses soft touch to grip and grab

A new and powerful robotic hand could create safer human-robot interactions, engineers say. Industrial settings often use robots for tasks that require repetitive grasping and manipulation of objects. The end of a robot that mimics a human hand is called an end effector or gripper. "The novel humanoid hand design is a soft-hard hybrid flexible gripper. It can generate larger grasping force than a

4h

Atomic force microscopy reveals nanoscale dental erosion from beverages

KAIST researchers used atomic force microscopy to quantitatively evaluate how acidic and sugary drinks affect human tooth enamel at the nanoscale level. This novel approach is useful for measuring mechanical and morphological changes that occur over time during enamel erosion induced by beverages.

4h

Immune system treatment to reduce stress prevents cancer metastases

Tel Aviv University researchers have found that the short time period around tumor removal surgery (the weeks before and after surgery) is critical for the prevention of metastases development, which develop when the body is under stress.

4h

Digitizing chemistry with a smart stir bar

Miniaturized computer systems and wireless technology are offering scientists new ways to keep tabs on reactions without the need for larger, cumbersome equipment. In a proof-of-concept study in ACS Sensors , researchers describe an inexpensive new device that functions like a conventional magnetic stir bar, but that can automatically measure and transmit information on a solution's color, viscosi

4h

Mitigation of greenhouse gases in dairy cattle through genetic selection

Researchers in Spain propose mitigating methane production by dairy cattle through breeding. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists are targeting reduction of enteric methane in the breeding objectives for dairy cattle to select for animals that use feed more efficiently and thus produce less methane. Because livestock farming contributes 13 percent of global greenhous

4h

Non-invasive biomarkers to diagnose infant urinary tract obstruction

One in every 500 babies is born with ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO), an obstruction of the ureter that prevents urine from flowing from one or both of the kidneys into the bladder. A group of researchers led by Linda Shapiro and Charan Kumar Devarakonda from UConn's School of Medicine developed an inexpensive, non-invasive panel of five biomarker proteins for the diagnosis and monitorin

4h

Study Links Gas Flares to Preterm Births, With Hispanic Women at High Risk

Expectant mothers who lived near flaring sites had higher odds of giving birth prematurely than those who did not, researchers found. The adverse outcomes fell entirely on Hispanic women.

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Face masks needed for Covid-safe offices | Letter

The longer you spend in an aerosol-rich environment such as a poorly ventilated office with someone who is infected, the greater the risk, say Dr Helen Davison, Dr Finola O'Neill, and Dr Jonathan Fluxman The health secretary is plain wrong when he says face masks do not work in offices because "you're there for a long time" with other people ( Senior doctors warn second coronavirus wave could 'de

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Newly excavated tools suggest humans lived in North America at least 30,000 years ago

Artefacts from central Mexico cave are strong evidence humans lived on continent 15,000 years earlier than previously thought Tools excavated from a cave in central Mexico are strong evidence that humans were living in North America at least 30,000 years ago, some 15,000 years earlier than previously thought, scientists said on Wednesday. The artefacts, including 1,900 stone tools, showed human o

4h

Animals Sense Earthquakes Before They Happen. Can They Help Us Predict Disasters?

There are many documented cases of strange animal behavior before earthquakes. Scientists finally put some farm animals to the test.

4h

UK could eliminate the coronavirus but it might do more harm than good

A group of scientists has said the UK can eliminate coronavirus in the next year, but the strict lockdown it would require may make it unfeasibly hard

4h

Recent decades of European floods are among the worst in 500 years

The years 1990-2016 rank among the worst periods of flooding in Europe in five centuries, according to an assessment of historical letters, annals and legal records

4h

Humans reached the Americas 15,000 years earlier than thought

Almost 2000 stone tools have been found in a Mexican cave and some seem to be 33,000 years old – suggesting people reached America before the peak of the last glacial period

4h

Discovery in Mexican Cave May Drastically Change the Known Timeline of Humans' Arrival to the Americas

In a controversial new study, scientists cite artifacts dating the event to more than 26,000 years ago

5h

Bristol science and arts centre looks into the soul for next show

We The Curious whittles down thousands of questions posed by residents to seven key themes Some of the questions were not unexpected: how does gravity work, do aliens exist, what happens if bees become extinct? But when Bristol's science and culture centre asked citizens young and old what questions they really wanted answered, it was amazed and delighted at the size and breadth of the response.

5h

Bovine TB vaccine trials get go-ahead in England and Wales

Scientific breakthrough could lead to phasing out of badger culling to tackle disease Field trials of a cattle vaccine for bovine tuberculosis have been given the go-ahead as part of moves to phase out badger culling to tackle the disease. The trials are due to get under way in England and Wales to accelerate deployment of a cattle vaccine for TB by 2025, the government announced on Wednesday. Co

5h

Oncotarget: Therapeutic efficacy of liposomal Grb2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (L-Grb2)

The cover for issue 29 of Oncotarget features Figure 5, "In vivo effects of treatment with L-Grb2 in combination with anti-angiogenic therapy in an ovarian tumor model," by Lara, et al. which reported that adaptor proteins such as growth factor receptor-bound protein-2 play important roles in cancer cell signaling. In the present study, the authors examined the biological effects of liposomal anti

5h

UVA pioneers study of genetic diseases with quantum computing

Scientists are harnessing the mind-bending potential of quantum computers to help us understand genetic diseases – even before quantum computers are a thing.

5h

Chocolate is good for the heart

Eating chocolate at least once a week is linked with a reduced risk of heart disease, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 "Our study suggests that chocolate helps keep the heart's blood vessels healthy," said study author Dr. Chayakrit Krittanawong of Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Tex

5h

Scientists Made Wine and Cheese Using an Annoying Weed

Floral Undertones Russian scientists may have found the best possible use for an invasive weed species in the area: using it to make wine and cheese. It turns out that leaf extract from the flower Bidens pilosa , also known as " hairy beggarticks ," is pretty effective at breaking down proteins, according to research published earlier this year in the International Journal of Scientific & Technol

5h

First ever image of a multi-planet system around a sun-like star captured by ESO telescope

The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope has taken the first ever image of a young, Sun-like star accompanied by two giant exoplanets. Images of systems with multiple exoplanets are extremely rare, and — until now — astronomers had never directly observed more than one planet orbiting a star similar to the Sun. The observations can help astronomers understand how planets formed a

5h

Photonic crystal light converter

Spectroscopy is the use of light to analyze physical objects and biological samples. Different kinds of light can provide different kinds of information. Vacuum ultraviolet light is useful as it can aid people in a broad range of research fields, but generation of that light has been difficult and expensive. Researchers created a new device to efficiently generate this special kind of light using

5h

The sun is setting on unsustainable long-haul, short-stay tourism — regional travel bubbles are the future

Unprecedented border closures and the domestic lockdown have paralysed New Zealand's $40.9 billion a year tourism industry. In the process, the vulnerability of the sector to external shocks and the tenuous nature of tourism employment have been exposed. While New Zealand's handling of the pandemic has been hailed as a global masterclass, and the prospect of travel bubbles promoted as a way to re

5h

Photonic crystal light converter

Spectroscopy is the use of light to analyze physical objects and biological samples. Different kinds of light can provide different kinds of information. Vacuum ultraviolet light is useful as it can aid people in a broad range of research fields, but generation of that light has been difficult and expensive. Researchers created a new device to efficiently generate this special kind of light using

5h

Small, game-changing utilities for Windows and macOS

You think you're productive now? You have no idea. ( Windows / Unsplash/) Sometimes the most useful software is not the biggest, feature-packed, expensive one. From tools for customizing desktop layouts to clearing out junk files, you'll find numerous smaller utilities on both Windows and macOS that will sure end up being indispensable to your workflow. These little apps can make you more product

5h

People are using artificial intelligence to help sort out their divorce. Would you?

An online app called Amica is now using artificial intelligence to help separating couples make parenting arrangements and divide their assets.

5h

China's Mars Tianwen-1 Launch Will Answer a 'Heavenly Question'

A goal of the Tianwen-1 launch is to catch up with decades of American success on the red planet, all in one mission.

5h

What My Kids Learned When They Weren't in School

In mid-March, my two middle-school-aged daughters were sent home from school. They didn't know that their school year was essentially at an end, or that they would not see some of their friends for a long time. They didn't know that they wouldn't sit in a classroom for at least six months. They didn't know that their lives would be changed for even longer. Their lessons continued online, but the

5h

Earliest humans stayed at the Americas 'oldest hotel' in Mexican cave

A cave in a remote part of Mexico was visited by humans around 30,000 years ago – 15,000 years earlier than people were previously thought to have reached the Americas. Excavations of Chiquihuite Cave, located in a mountainous area in northern Mexico controlled by drugs cartels, uncovered nearly 2000 stone tools from a small section of the high-altitude cave. Analysis of the sediment in the cave u

5h

Retreat of East Antarctic ice sheet during previous warm periods

Questions about the stability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet are a major source of uncertainty in estimates of how much sea level will rise as the Earth continues to warm. For decades, scientists thought the East Antarctic Ice Sheet had remained stable for millions of years, but recent studies have begun to cast doubt on this idea. Now, researchers report new evidence of substantial ice loss from

5h

Chemists make tough plastics recyclable

Chemists have developed a way to modify thermoset plastics with a chemical linker that makes it much easier to recycle them, but still allows them to retain their mechanical strength.

5h

Test, test, test — but what can America do about the delays?

Patients in the US are waiting more than a week for results, by which time it's probably too late

5h

Study: Novel PFAS comprise 24% of those measured in blood of Wilmington, N.C. residents

Researchers detected novel per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) called "fluoroethers" in blood from residents of Wilmington, North Carolina. The fluoroethers represented 24% of the total PFAS detected in the blood of Wilmington residents and appear to leave the body faster than legacy PFAS.

5h

Malaria drug chloroquine does not inhibit SARS-CoV-2

Study shows that chloroquine does not block SARS-CoV-2 infection of lung cells.

5h

What happens around an Alzheimer plaque?

A research team led by Bart De Strooper and Mark Fiers at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Brain & Disease Research in Leuven, Belgium used pioneering technologies to study in detail what happens in brain cells in the direct vicinity of plaques. Their findings, published in the prestigious journal Cell, show how different cell types in the brain work together to mount a complex response to amyloid pla

5h

Astronomers Release Largest Map of the Universe in History

New Matrix After two decades of work, a giant team of astronomers unveiled their pièce de résistance: the most comprehensive map of the universe ever assembled. The map spans back over 12 billion years into the history of the universe, CNET reports . To build it, astronomers relied on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and analyzed more than 4 million galaxies and quasars. And in doing

5h

What AIDS Taught Us about Dealing with COVID-19

It's foolhardy to assume that only some categories of people are at risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Trump Is Determined to Split the Country in Two

New offensives against major cities from President Donald Trump and GOP governors are pushing at the central geographic fault line between the Republican and Democratic coalitions. On one front, Trump is taking his confrontational approach toward big cities to an ominous new level by deploying federal law-enforcement officials to Portland and potentially other locales over the objection of local

5h

Clever Hackers Are Making ATMs Spit Out All Their Money

Make It Rain A major ATM sales and services company is warning that thieves have found a new way of "jackpotting" ATM machines — causing them to spit out massive wads of cash, Ars Technica reports . Jackpotting involves attaching rogue devices called "black boxes" to open up programming interfaces inside the ATM machine's software and issue commands, forcing it to, proverbially, make it rain . Ac

5h

Chasing bumble bees on a patch of prairie

It's hot and the key to the gate doesn't work, but I can see the deep shade of mature woods and a swath of tall prairie plants just beyond the fence. Heavy clouds hover to the north and east, and a distant rumble warns of potential rain.

5h

Siblings can also differ from one another in bacteria

In human reproduction, the genes of the mother and father are combined and mixed in countless variations. Their offspring can differ significantly from one another. However, bacteria multiply by simple cell division, so that the two daughter cells carry the same genetic material as the mother cell. A research team led by Dr. Simon Heilbronner from the Interfaculty Institute for Microbiology and In

5h

Climate change is impacting the spread of invasive animal species

What factors influence the spread of invasive animal species in our oceans? This question was the focus for a team of experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), Bangor University (Wales, UK), and the University of Greifswald's Zoological Institute and Museum in the context of the DFG-sponsored Research Training Group 2010 RESPONSE (Biological R

5h

Chemists offer a new look at polymers for space industry

Employees of the Department of Physical Chemistry of Kazan Federal University have found that the mechanisms of polymerization of aryl cyanates in the solid state and in the melted state differ in the number of broken multiple bonds of the monomer at the stage that determines the rate of the process.

5h

Climate shift, forest loss and fires: Scientists explain how Amazon forest is trapped in a vicious circle

Amazonia experiences seasonal fires each year. More than 90% of the fires are distributed across the southern boundary of Amazon Basin where the vegetation dominated by savannas are flammable in the dry season. In recent decades, however, more fires have been reported in the Amazon forests. The 2019 Amazon fires surged to a record high.

5h

Science sweetens native honey health claims

Science has validated Indigenous wisdom by identifying a rare, healthy sugar in native stingless bee honey that is not found in any other food.

5h

New 'super light source' should allow fascinating insights into atoms

The 'Gamma Factory initiative'—an international team of scientists—is currently exploring a novel research tool: They propose to develop a source of high-intensity gamma rays using the existing accelerator facilities at CERN. To do this, specialized ion beams will be circulated in the SPS and LHC storage rings, which will then be excited using laser beams so that they emit photons. In the selected

5h

Chasing bumble bees on a patch of prairie

It's hot and the key to the gate doesn't work, but I can see the deep shade of mature woods and a swath of tall prairie plants just beyond the fence. Heavy clouds hover to the north and east, and a distant rumble warns of potential rain.

5h

Siblings can also differ from one another in bacteria

In human reproduction, the genes of the mother and father are combined and mixed in countless variations. Their offspring can differ significantly from one another. However, bacteria multiply by simple cell division, so that the two daughter cells carry the same genetic material as the mother cell. A research team led by Dr. Simon Heilbronner from the Interfaculty Institute for Microbiology and In

5h

Climate change is impacting the spread of invasive animal species

What factors influence the spread of invasive animal species in our oceans? This question was the focus for a team of experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), Bangor University (Wales, UK), and the University of Greifswald's Zoological Institute and Museum in the context of the DFG-sponsored Research Training Group 2010 RESPONSE (Biological R

5h

As Summer Takes Hold, So Do the Jumping Worms

These invasive pests, which ravage the soil and damage plant life, are easiest to spot now, in their adult form. But what to do if you see them?

5h

Science sweetens native honey health claims

Science has validated Indigenous wisdom by identifying a rare, healthy sugar in native stingless bee honey that is not found in any other food.

5h

Dragonfly larvae collected by citizen-scientists as sentinels for mercury bioaccumulation

Various forms of mercury are released naturally by volcanoes and weathering of rocks and soil. Human activities, such as mining or burning fossil fuels, can also release the element into the environment, where aquatic microbes can convert it into the toxic form, methylmercury. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have shown that dragonfly larvae, collected from nat

5h

Climate predictions several years into the future?

In five years, will the winter be mild, and will the following summer be rainy? Unfortunately, reliable answers to such questions are not possible. Nevertheless, there are quantities like the sea surface temperature of the North Atlantic, that are known to promote trends in the weather over Europe. To that, North Atlantic sea surface temperatures are predictable several years into the future – as

5h

Siblings can also differ from one another in bacteria

A research team from the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) is investigating how pathogens influence the immune response of their host with genetic variation. This enables Staphylococcus aureus bacteria to develop antibiotic resistance and improve their chances of survival.

5h

More flowers and pollinator diversity could help protect bees from parasites

Having more flowers and maintaining diverse bee communities could help reduce the spread of bee parasites, according to a new study.

5h

Perceived "whiteness" of Middle Eastern Americans correlates with discrimination

The perceived "whiteness" of Americans of Middle Eastern and North African descent is indirectly tied to discrimination against them, and may feed a "negative cycle" in which public awareness of discrimination leads to more discrimination, according to a Rutgers-led study.

5h

Antioxidant-rich powders from blueberry, persimmon waste could be good for gut microbiota

Feeding the world's growing population in a sustainable way is no easy task. That's why scientists are exploring options for transforming fruit and vegetable byproducts — such as peels or pulp discarded during processing — into nutritious food ingredients and supplements. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have shown that blueberry and persimmon waste c

5h

Research shows ibuprofen does not hinder bone fracture healing in children

Doctors have traditionally avoided prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen to patients with fractures. However, a new study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care shows ibuprofen is an effective medication for fracture pain in children and its use does not affect fracture healing.

5h

New role for white blood cells in the developing brain

. In a seminal study published in Cell, an international team of scientists led by Prof. Adrian Liston (VIB-KU Leuven, Belgium & Babraham Institute, UK) describe a population of specialized brain-resident immune cells discovered in the mouse and human brain, and show that the presence of white blood cells is essential for normal brain development in mice.

5h

America's Inescapable Offices

(Peter Marlow / Magnum) In the face of unprecedented disaster, even elaborate safety measures can seem absurd and insufficient. For instance, to clear radioactive debris from the roof of the molten Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Soviet authorities resorted to using what they called " bio-robots ." About 4,000 human men were handed gas masks, gloves, and lead-lined boots and instructed to fling the ra

5h

E.P.A. Proposes Airplane Emission Standards That Airlines Already Meet

Staving off a lawsuit, the Environmental Protection Agency has proposed new regulations to hold airlines to the carbon dioxide emissions standards they created.

5h

Astronomer claims to have pinpointed date of Vermeer's View of Delft

'Celestial sleuth' says light and shade show when 17th-century cityscape was painted He is known as the "Sphinx of Delft" as so little is known about him. But courtesy of research by Donald Olson, a professor of astronomy from the University of Texas, a little of the mystery surrounding the life and works of the Dutch master Johannes Vermeer may now have been cleared up. Vermeer's View of Delft,

5h

Mexico archaeology: Pre-Hispanic ruins found on mountaintop

Experts think the site, estimated to be 1,500 years old, was dedicated to the god of the underworld.

5h

Camera Deal: DJI's Osmo Action Is $100 Off Right Now

The company's compact action camera is a worthy GoPro competitor, especially at this discounted price.

6h

World population will begin to shrink after 2064

According to new research at the University of Washington, a significant population decline will begin after 2064. The reasons include more access to contraception and better education for girls and women. Many countries will have to grapple with the social and financial consequences of their decline. After two centuries of unprecedented growth, human population will begin to shrink after 2064. T

6h

Reviews sound the alarm on endocrine disruptors

Reviews of hundreds of studies show that a growing number of chemicals—in pesticides, flame retardants, and certain plastics—are linked to widespread health problems, including infertility, diabetes, and impaired brain development. Researchers from the New York University Grossman School of Medicine led a team of environmental health experts in an analysis of research published in the past five y

6h

Kazan University chemists offer a new look at polymers for space industry

Employees of the Department of Physical Chemistry of Kazan Federal University have found out that the mechanisms of polymerization of aryl cyanates in the solid state and in the melt differ in the number of broken multiple bonds of the monomer at the stage that determines the rate of the process.

6h

New 'super light source' should allow fascinating insights into atoms

The 'Gamma Factory initiative' — an international team of scientists — is currently exploring a novel research tool: They propose to develop a source of high-intensity gamma rays using the existing accelerator facilities at CERN. To do this, specialized ion beams will be circulated in the SPS and LHC storage rings, which will then be excited using laser beams so that they emit photons within the

6h

Scientists discover how immune cells mobilize to fight infection

New research from the University of York is an important step forward in understanding how our immune system works and also why it fails.

6h

Climate change is impacting the spread of invasive animal species

What factors influence the spread of invasive animal species in our oceans?

6h

Optimizing neural networks on a brain-inspired computer

Neural networks in both biological settings and artificial intelligence distribute computation across their neurons to solve complex tasks. New research now shows how so-called 'critical states' can be used to optimize artificial neural networks running on brain-inspired neuromorphic hardware. The study was carried out by scientists from Heidelberg University working within the Human Brain Project

6h

Sharks almost gone from many reefs

A massive global study of the world's reefs has found sharks are 'functionally extinct' on nearly one in five of the reefs surveyed.

6h

How neurons reshape inside body fat to boost its calorie-burning capacity

Scientists have found that a hormone tells the brain to dramatically restructure neurons embedded in fat tissue. Their work widens our understanding of how the body regulates its energy consumption, and how obesity might be treated in the future.

6h

Genomic basis of bat superpowers revealed: Like how they survive deadly viruses

The genetic material that codes for bat adaptations and superpowers – such as the ability to fly, to use sound to move effortlessly in complete darkness, to tolerate and survive potentially deadly viruses, and to resist aging and cancer – has been revealed and published in Nature.

6h

Mapping the brain's sensory gatekeeper

Researchers from MIT and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have mapped the thalamic reticular nucleus in unprecedented detail, revealing that the region contains two distinct subnetworks of neurons with different functions. The findings could offer researchers much more specific targets for designing drugs that could alleviate attention deficits, sleep disruption, and sensory hypersensitivity

6h

Flood data from 500 years: Rivers and climate change in Europe

Studying historical documents from 5 centuries, scientists were able to compare flood events from the past with recent flood events in Europe. This combination of historical and hydrological research provides evidence for the strong influence of climate change on rivers and floodings. Floods tend to be larger, the timing has shifted and the relationship between flood occurrence and air temperature

6h

Comparing unsupervised midnasal swabs collected at home with clinician-collected nasopharyngeal swab

Unsupervised home self-collected midnasal swabs are compared with clinician-collected nasopharyngeal swabs for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 in this diagnostic study.

6h

Risk factors associated with mortality among residents with COVID-19 in long-term care facilities

Risk factors associated with COVID-19 death in long-term care facilities in Ontario, Canada, are examined in this observational study.

6h

Brain builds and uses maps of social networks, physical space, in the same way

Even in these social-distanced days, we keep in our heads a map of our relationships with other people: family, friends, coworkers and how they relate to each other. New research from the Center for Mind and Brain at UC Davis shows that we put together this social map in much the same way that we assemble a map of physical places and things.

6h

Association of interleukin 7 immunotherapy with lymphocyte counts among patients with severe COVID-1

This case series examines whether interleukin 7 (IL-7) is associated with restored host protective immunity in patients with severe COVID-19 and immunosuppression.

6h

Changes in US heart transplant waitlist activity, volume during COVID-19 pandemic

National and regional changes in waitlist inactivations and additions, donor recovery and heart transplant volume during the COVID-19 pandemic are described in this observational study.

6h

Fear of COVID-2019: Emerging cardiac risk

Fear of COVID-19 is an issue stopping patients from accessing needed cardiac care and methods to ameliorate negative outcomes.

6h

New role for white blood cells in the developing brain

Whether white blood cells can be found in the brain has been controversial, and their role there a complete mystery. In a study published in Cell, an international team from the Babraham Institute, UK & VIB-KU Leuven, Belgium describe a population of specialised brain-resident immune cells discovered in the mouse and human brain, and show that the presence of white blood cells is essential for nor

6h

Proteins — and labs — coming together to prevent Rett syndrome

Two labs investigated whether the disruption of one protein's condensate-forming ability contributes to Rett syndrome. During these investigations, the researchers also uncovered how cells may use condensates to help organize the active and inactive parts of chromosomes. Their findings, published in the journal Nature on June 22, report on these insights and suggest new paths for developing therap

6h

Chemists make tough plastics recyclable

MIT chemists have developed a way to modify thermoset plastics with a chemical linker that makes it much easier to recycle them, but still allows them to retain their mechanical strength.

6h

Diamonds shine a light on hidden currents in graphene

A new diamond-based quantum sensing technique gives researchers a map of the intricate movement of electricity on a microscopic scale. New results demonstrate the potential of the technique by revealing the fluid-like electrical currents that flow in graphene, a layer of carbon just one atom thick. Graphene has exceptional electrical properties, and the technique could help researchers better unde

6h

New study shows retreat of East Antarctic ice sheet during previous warm periods

Questions about the stability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet are a major source of uncertainty in estimates of how much sea level will rise as the Earth continues to warm. For decades, scientists thought the East Antarctic Ice Sheet had remained stable for millions of years, but recent studies have begun to cast doubt on this idea. Now, researchers report new evidence of substantial ice loss from

6h

Invasive lionfish may be a selective predator

The invasive lionfish has become a growing threat to the ecological balance of Atlantic waters. To gather insight regarding its impact on reef communities, scientists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and collaborating institutions evaluated the predatory behaviors and diet choices of lionfish in a semi-natural environment. Their experiments revealed that most of them actively

6h

Stenredskaber rykker menneskets ankomst til Amerika tusindvis af år

Fund af stenredskaber rykker tidspunktet for den første menneskelige indvandring til Amerika mindst…

6h

Sharks 'functionally extinct' from one in five coral reefs

Global study finds severe declines from overfishing, but also points to conservation successes

6h

Earliest evidence for humans in the Americas

Humans settled in the Americas much earlier than previously thought, according to new finds from Mexico.

6h

Coronavirus: Cracking the secrets of how bats survive viruses

Bats' codes of life contain genetic clues to their "exceptional immunity", which protects them from viruses.

6h

Extreme environmental conditions can lead to a massive global reshuffling of biodiversity

Around 252 million years ago, the world experienced a mass extinction, killing ninety percent of all animal and plant species in the world's oceans. This event, called the Permian-Triassic mass extinction, at the end of the Permian Age had consequences beyond simple loss of species: In the following five million years, the pattern of the global distribution of biodiversity appeared to be very diff

6h

Extreme environmental conditions can lead to a massive global reshuffling of biodiversity

Around 252 million years ago, the world experienced a mass extinction, killing ninety percent of all animal and plant species in the world's oceans. This event, called the Permian-Triassic mass extinction, at the end of the Permian Age had consequences beyond simple loss of species: In the following five million years, the pattern of the global distribution of biodiversity appeared to be very diff

6h

Researchers develop photonic crystal light converter

Spectroscopy is the use of light to analyze physical objects and biological samples. Different kinds of light can provide different kinds of information. Vacuum ultraviolet light is useful as it can aid people in a broad range of research fields, but generation of that light has been difficult and expensive. Researchers created a new device to efficiently generate this special kind of light using

6h

A big Nature study on a tiny dinosaur is being retracted

A paper on a pocket-sized winged "dinosaur" is being retracted after new unpublished findings cast doubt on the authors' characterizations of their discovery. The study, "Hummingbird-sized dinosaur from the Cretaceous period of Myanmar," was published in Nature on March 11, 2020. Many news outlets, including the New York Times, Newsweek and National Geographic, picked up … Continue reading

6h

Artifacts Point to Humans Living in Mexico 33,000 Years Ago

If confirmed, the result means people migrated to North America much earlier than thought, but some experts remain unconvinced.

6h

How bats have outsmarted viruses—including coronaviruses—for 65 million years

Newly sequenced genomes reveal the secrets of their "superstar" immune systems

6h

Were humans living in a Mexican cave during the last ice age?

Startlingly early dates for stone tools could upend ideas about peopling of the Americas

6h

Structure of the human sodium leak channel NALCN

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2570-8

6h

Measurement of the time spent by a tunnelling atom within the barrier region

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2490-7 Using the spin precession of Bose-condensed 87Rb atoms as a clock, direct measurements are made of the time required for Rb atoms to quantum tunnel through a classically impenetrable barrier.

6h

A leptin–BDNF pathway regulating sympathetic innervation of adipose tissue

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2527-y The authors show that leptin signalling regulates the plasticity of sympathetic architecture of adipose tissue via a top-down neural pathway that is crucial for energy homeostasis.

6h

Six reference-quality genomes reveal evolution of bat adaptations

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2486-3 Reference-quality genomes for six bat species shed light on the phylogenetic position of Chiroptera, and provide insight into the genetic underpinnings of the unique adaptations of this clade.

6h

How the flame lily synthesizes a therapeutic natural product

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01675-0 The discovery of the biosynthetic pathway for colchicine, a medicine produced by plants, holds promise for the use of metabolic-engineering approaches in producing reliably high yields of this compound.

6h

Signalling input from divergent pathways subverts B cell transformation

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2513-4 Analysis of B-cell leukaemia samples reveals that oncogenic mutations do not cause malignant transformation unless they converge on the same signalling pathway, and that it may be possible clinically to combine inhibition of the principal oncogenic driver with reactivation of divergent pathways.

6h

Structural basis of GPBAR activation and bile acid recognition

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2569-1

6h

Glypicans shield the Wnt lipid moiety to enable signalling at a distance

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2498-z Genetic studies in Drosophila combined with structural analyses show that glypicans bind palmitoylate moieties in Wnt ligands, and thus shield Wnt ligands from their aqueous environments to enable them to signal to their distant receptors.

6h

Evidence of human occupation in Mexico around the Last Glacial Maximum

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2509-0 Chiquihuite Cave (Zacatecas, Mexico) provides evidence of human presence in the Americas between about 33,000–31,000 and 14,000–12,000 years ago, and expands the cultural variability known from sites of this date.

6h

Ice retreat in Wilkes Basin of East Antarctica during a warm interglacial

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2484-5 Uranium isotopes in subglacial precipitates from the Wilkes Basin of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet reveal ice retreat during a warm Pleistocene interglacial period about 400,000 years ago.

6h

Five centuries of human observation reveal Europe's flood history

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02138-2 Europe's rich heritage of historical documents has been used to reconstruct the flooding history of the continent for the past five centuries. This could help policymakers to develop flood-management strategies for the future.

6h

Distinct subnetworks of the thalamic reticular nucleus

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2504-5 A study integrating single-cell RNA-sequencing and electrophysiology data shows that in mouse, the cellular repertoire of the thalamic reticular nucleus is characterized by a transcriptomic gradient defined at its extremes by mutually exclusive expression of Spp1 and Ecel1, providing insights into the organizational principles

6h

The timing and effect of the earliest human arrivals in North America

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2491-6 A Bayesian age model suggests that human dispersal to the Americas probably began before the Last Glacial Maximum, overlapping with the last dates of appearance for several faunal genera.

6h

Imaging viscous flow of the Dirac fluid in graphene

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2507-2 Viscous Dirac fluid flow in room-temperature graphene is imaged using quantum diamond magnetometry, revealing a parabolic Poiseuille profile for electron flow in a high-mobility graphene channel near the charge-neutrality point.

6h

MeCP2 links heterochromatin condensates and neurodevelopmental disease

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2574-4

6h

Histone H3.3 phosphorylation amplifies stimulation-induced transcription

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2533-0 The histone variant H3.3 is phosphorylated at Ser31 in induced genes, and this selective mark stimulates the histone methyltransferase SETD2 and ejects the ZMYND11 repressor, thus revealing a role for histone phosphorylation in amplifying de novo transcription.

6h

Quantum-limit Chern topological magnetism in TbMn6Sn6

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2482-7 Scanning tunnelling microscopy is used to reveal a new topological kagome magnet with an intrinsic Chern quantum phase, which shows a distinct Landau fan structure with a large Chern gap.

6h

Global status and conservation potential of reef sharks

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2519-y Fishing has had a profound impact on global reef shark populations, and the absence or presence of sharks is strongly correlated with national socio-economic conditions and reef governance.

6h

Current European flood-rich period exceptional compared with past 500 years

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2478-3 Analysis of thousands of historical documents recording floods in Europe shows that flooding characteristics in recent decades are unlike those of previous centuries.

6h

Discovery and engineering of colchicine alkaloid biosynthesis

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2546-8 Discovery of a near-complete colchicine biosynthetic pathway enables the engineered production of the tropolone-containing alkaloid N-formyldemecolcine from amino acid precursors in Nicotiana benthamiana.

6h

Retraction Note: Hummingbird-sized dinosaur from the Cretaceous period of Myanmar

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2553-9

6h

Two dynamically distinct circuits drive inhibition in the sensory thalamus

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2512-5 In the thalamic reticular nucleus there are two neuron types that are segregated into central and edge zones and receive inputs from different thalamocortical nuclei, creating subcircuits with distinct dynamics.

6h

Cleavable comonomers enable degradable, recyclable thermoset plastics

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2495-2 A method of endowing thermoset plastics with a degree of recyclability and reprocessability by incorporating cleavable chemical linkages in the strands of the polymer, rather than in the crosslinks, is presented.

6h

Retraction Note: Exploring the quantum speed limit with computer games

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2515-2

6h

Evidence grows that peopling of the Americas began more than 20,000 years ago

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02137-3 The long-debated timing of the peopling of the Americas comes into focus, thanks to some archaeological findings. What are the implications of a revised timeline for our understanding of these earliest inhabitants?

6h

New Research Suggests Humans Arrived in the Americas Much Earlier Than Thought

Artifacts found in a Mexican cave are about 30,000 years old. Cave-Archaeology.jpg Assistant professor Mikkel Winther Pedersen from the University of Copenhagen sampling the cave sediments for DNA. Image credits: Devlin A. Gandy Culture Wednesday, July 22, 2020 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — The Americas may have been home to humans for more than 12,000 years longer tha

6h

This 1400-horsepower Mustang Mach-E foreshadows Ford's electric car future

All-Electric Mustang Mach-E 1400 Prototype (LARRY CHEN/) Look inside Ford's Mustang Mach-E 1400 demo car and you'll find a total of seven motors. Three sit in the front, while four reside in the back, all of which are connected to a single driveshaft, allowing them to combine for a ridiculous total of 1,400 peak horsepower. The Mach-E 1400 will never go into production, but Ford is using it as a

6h

How Quickly Can Atoms Slip, Ghostlike, Through Barriers?

A new experiment on how rapidly atoms can tunnel through a barricade revives a physics debate about how time passes on the quantum scale.

6h

Buckwheat enhances the production of a protein that supports the longevity

A healthy low-calorie diet that contains plant products can help us improve the level of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein production that is known to increase life expectancy. A team of scientists from Krasnoyarsk conducted an experiment to see how buckwheat affected the health of rats.

6h

Climate shift, forest loss and fires — Scientists explain how Amazon forest is trapped in a vicious circle

A new study, published in Global Change Biology, showed how the fire expansion is attributed to climate regime shift and forest loss.

6h

A new device provides added protection against COVID-19 during endoscopic procedures

The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown up unimaginable challenges for healthcare workers. Even simple outpatient procedures such as endoscopies can expose staff to the risk of infection.However, a team of researchers has developed a simple, disposable, and inexpensive device to provide an additional barrier of protection for healthcare workers performing esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGD).

6h

Mix and match: New 3D cell culture model replicates fibrotic elements of pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is a deadly cancer characterized by prominent fibrosis, which plays a crucial role in disease progression and therapeutic resistance. Despite various efforts, experimental models to date have generally failed to fully recapitulate the extent of fibrosis in human tissue. Now, scientists at Okayama University, Japan, have reported a new method that uses a 3D cell culture technique

6h

Science sweetens native honey health claims

Examination of honey from five different stingless bee species across Neotropical and Indo-Australian regions has enabled for the first time the identification of the unusual disaccharide trehalulose as a major component representing between 13 and 44 g per 100 g of each of these honeys. The previously unrecognised abundance of trehalulose in stingless bee honeys is concrete evidence that supports

6h

New research finds graphene can act as surfactant

New research into graphene flakes has discovered that the material can act as a surfactant, for the first time demonstrating how it can be a versatile 2D stabiliser ideal for many industrial applications from oil extraction to paper processing.

6h

Quantum Tunneling Is Not Instantaneous, Physicists Show

A new experiment tracks the transit time of particles burrowing through barriers, revealing previously unknown details of a deeply counterintuitive phenomenon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Diamonds shine a light on hidden currents in graphene

It sounds like pure sorcery: using diamonds to observe invisible power swirling and flowing through carefully crafted channels. But these diamonds are a reality. JQI Fellow Ronald Walsworth and Quantum Technology Center (QTC) Postdoctoral Associate Mark Ku, along with colleagues from several other institutions, including Professor Amir Yacoby and Postdoctoral Fellow Tony Zhou at Harvard, have deve

6h

Proteins—and labs—coming together to prevent Rett syndrome

New discoveries about the disruption of condensates in the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome provide insights into how cells compartmentalize chromosomes as well as new potential paths for therapies.

6h

New study shows retreat of East Antarctic ice sheet during previous warm periods

Questions about the stability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet are a major source of uncertainty in estimates of how much sea level will rise as the Earth continues to warm. For decades, scientists thought the East Antarctic Ice Sheet had remained stable for millions of years, but recent studies have begun to cast doubt on this idea. Now, researchers at UC Santa Cruz have reported new evidence of s

6h

Genomic basis of bat superpowers revealed: Like how they survive deadly viruses

The genetic material that codes for bat adaptations and superpowers—such as the ability to fly, to use sound to move effortlessly in complete darkness, to tolerate and survive potentially deadly viruses, and to resist aging and cancer—has been revealed and published in Nature. Liliana M. Dávalos, a Stony Brook University evolutionary biologist and co-author, worked as part of the executive committ

6h

Chemists make tough plastics recyclable

Thermosets, which include epoxies, polyurethanes, and rubber used for tires, are found in many products that have to be durable and heat-resistant, such as cars or electrical appliances. One drawback to these materials is that they typically cannot be easily recycled or broken down after use, because the chemical bonds holding them together are stronger than those found in other materials such as

6h

Earliest humans stayed at the Americas 'oldest hotel' in Mexican cave

A cave in a remote part of Mexico was visited by humans around 30,000 years ago—15,000 years earlier than people were previously thought to have reached the Americas.

6h

Sharks almost gone from many reefs

A massive global study of the world's reefs has found sharks are 'functionally extinct' on nearly one in five of the reefs surveyed.

6h

Flood data from 500 years: Rivers and climate change in Europe

Overflowing rivers can cause enormous problems. Worldwide, the annual damage caused by river floods is estimated at over $100 billion—and it continues to rise. To date, it has been unclear whether Europe is currently in a flood-rich period from a long-term perspective.

6h

Proteins—and labs—coming together to prevent Rett syndrome

New discoveries about the disruption of condensates in the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome provide insights into how cells compartmentalize chromosomes as well as new potential paths for therapies.

6h

Genomic basis of bat superpowers revealed: Like how they survive deadly viruses

The genetic material that codes for bat adaptations and superpowers—such as the ability to fly, to use sound to move effortlessly in complete darkness, to tolerate and survive potentially deadly viruses, and to resist aging and cancer—has been revealed and published in Nature. Liliana M. Dávalos, a Stony Brook University evolutionary biologist and co-author, worked as part of the executive committ

6h

China's First Mars Rover Launch Could Make History

If the nation's mission is successful, it will become only the second country to ever deploy a rover on the surface of the Red Planet.

6h

Quantum Tunneling Is Not Instantaneous, Physicists Show

A new experiment tracks the transit time of particles burrowing through barriers, revealing previously unknown details of a deeply counterintuitive phenomenon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

'Seeing' and 'manipulating' functions of living cells

A research group composed of Professor Takayuki Shibata and his colleagues at Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, has given greater functionalities to atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our research team has succeeded in minimally invasive surgery to living cells using photocatalytic oxidation controlled in a nanoscale space and visualizing dynamic information on

6h

Researchers describe unique system for testing how well narrow wavebands of UV light kill germs

While awaiting full access to their labs due to COVID-19 restrictions, scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have taken this rare opportunity to report the technical details of pioneering research they conducted on the disinfection of drinking water using ultraviolet (UV) light.

6h

Jamaica revamps energy policy for green COVID-19 recovery

Jamaica has overhauled its energy policy to create a post-pandemic recovery package anchored in stronger carbon emissions targets for farms and forestry—raising hopes other countries in the region will follow suit.

6h

Cells communicate by doing the 'wave'

Cells work around the clock to deliver, maintain, and control every aspect of life. And just as with humans, communication is a key to their success.

6h

Sharks almost gone from many reefs

A massive global study of the world's reefs has found sharks are 'functionally extinct' on nearly one in five of the reefs surveyed.

6h

Cells communicate by doing the 'wave'

Cells work around the clock to deliver, maintain, and control every aspect of life. And just as with humans, communication is a key to their success.

6h

Elon Musk's New Tunnel Render Makes No Sense

Is Elon Musk taking us for a ride? Early this morning, the Boring Company and Tesla CEO shared a brand new render of his tunnel company's latest project, an underground loop that transports visitors at the Las Vegas Convention Center. Coming soon pic.twitter.com/6nOgLix6b5 — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) July 22, 2020 The Boring Company officially kicked off the project in November, becoming the company'

6h

'Four times more toxic': How wildfire smoke ages over time

Enormous plumes of smoke thrown into the atmosphere by uncontrolled wildfires may be affecting the health of people living hundreds of miles away.

6h

Dragonflies reveal mercury pollution levels across US national parks

A citizen science program that began over a decade ago has confirmed the use of dragonflies to measure mercury pollution, according to a study in Environmental Science & Technology.

6h

Learn How To Draw From Artists Who Have Worked At Marvel And Dreamworks

Art predates the written word and possibly even formal spoken language as one of the first forms of human expression. And as we learn more about art and creation, we've discovered that creating art is therapeutic when undergoing long-term cancer treatment and dealing with mental health concerns . Art is good for you, and it may even be good for your career; a 2017 survey of arts graduates found t

6h

How to connect while apart | Eric Yuan

People everywhere are using Zoom to work, take classes, do yoga — and even get married. The company's CEO and founder Eric Yuan reflects on how they developed the world's most popular video chat software and envisions a digital future that will include things like virtual handshakes and real-time language translations to rival face-to-face gatherings. (This virtual conversation, hosted by TED tec

6h

Primary care physicians during the COVID-19 epidemic

Scientists from the University of Geneva has analysed clinical data from more than 1,500 ambulatory patients tested for COVID-19. Their results point out the great disparity in symptoms between inpatient and outpatient care and the diagnostic difficulties that can result. They highlight the need for greater involvement of primary care physicians in defining and implementing health policies aimed a

6h

'Seeing' and 'manipulating' functions of living cells

Toyohashi University of Technology has given greater functionalities to atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our research team has succeeded in minimally invasive surgery to living cells using photocatalytic oxidation controlled in a nanoscale space and visualizing dynamic information on intracellular biomolecules. This proposed technique for controlling and visualizing the process of cell function expr

6h

Hummingbirds see lots of colors we can't

Hummingbirds can see colors in the ultraviolet range. We cannot. The tiny powerhouse derive hues from four types of photoreceptors, as opposed to our three. Beautiful as the world already is, let's talk about what what hummers see. Do you know what the first three nonspectral colors are? Nope. Neither do we or any other humans. Maybe you should ask a hummingbird. The colors we know are part of th

6h

Image: Letting a satellite breathe

This air intake collector is designed to harvest sufficient air particles as it skims the top of the atmosphere to fuel an "air-breathing" electric thruster. The aim is to help satellites to overcome atmospheric drag to operate on an ongoing basis in orbits from as low as 180 km to a maximum 250 km altitude.

6h

International analysis narrows range of climate's sensitivity to carbon dioxide

The most advanced and comprehensive analysis of climate sensitivity yet undertaken has revealed with more confidence than ever before how sensitive the Earth's climate is to carbon dioxide.

6h

Mathematicians Will Never Stop Proving the Prime Number Theorem

"You don't have to believe in God, but you have to believe in The Book ," the Hungarian mathematician Paul Erdős once said. The Book , which only exists in theory, contains the most elegant proofs of the most important theorems. Erdős' mandate hints at the motives of mathematicians who continue to search for new proofs of already proved theorems. One favorite is the prime number theorem — a state

6h

The CDC is no longer in control of COVID-19 hospitalization data—here's what that means

Under a new federal mandate, the COVID-19 data that U.S. hospitals had been sending directly to the Centers for Disease Control and prevention are now being sent to a different central database, using a system run by a private technology firm.

6h

Active leak of sea-bed methane discovered in Antarctica for first time

A team of researchers with Oregon State University has confirmed the first active leak of sea-bed methane in Antarctica. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their trip to Cinder Cones located at McMurdo Sound situated in the Ross Sea, and why they believe it signals very serious repercussions for global warming.

6h

US wildlife agency rejects protections for rare fish species

U.S. wildlife officials on Wednesday plan to reject special protections for a rare, freshwater fish species that's been at the center of a long-running legal dispute.

6h

Pandemic politics: How divided are we?

Despite the pandemic and upcoming presidential election, the United States may not be as divided as it seems, says political scientist Samara Klar. "…I get to read past the pundits and crazy media reports and find empirical research, which often shows that things are better than they seem." Most in-person campaigning has stalled. Politicians are judged on their responses to the pandemic. Even mas

7h

Weather-based decisions may reduce fungicide sprays on table beets

A plant pathologist at Cornell University, Sarah J. Pethybridge supplies New York vegetable growers with the information they need to control soilborne diseases and adopt effective management strategies. She crafts her research around conversations with table beet growers about productivity issues in the field. These growers continuously expressed frustration with maintaining healthy foliage.

7h

What factors influence the likelihood of fracking-related seismicity in Oklahoma?

The depth of a hydraulic fracturing well in Oklahoma, among other factors, increases the probability that fracking will lead to earthquake activity, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.

7h

US wildlife agency rejects protections for rare fish species

U.S. wildlife officials on Wednesday plan to reject special protections for a rare, freshwater fish species that's been at the center of a long-running legal dispute.

7h

How Much Will the Planet Warm if Carbon Dioxide Levels Double?

New research has sharply narrowed the range of outcomes.

7h

Giant Sunfish larva identified for the first time

Australian and New Zealand scientists have, for the first time, successfully identified the tiny larva of the giant Bump-head Sunfish (Mola alexandrini). Led by sunfish expert, Dr. Marianne Nyegaard from the Auckland War Museum in collaboration with Australian Museum scientists, Kerryn Parkinson and Andrew King, the significant discovery was made using the Australian Museum's (AM) Ichthyology coll

7h

Weather-based decisions may reduce fungicide sprays on table beets

A plant pathologist at Cornell University, Sarah J. Pethybridge supplies New York vegetable growers with the information they need to control soilborne diseases and adopt effective management strategies. She crafts her research around conversations with table beet growers about productivity issues in the field. These growers continuously expressed frustration with maintaining healthy foliage.

7h

Giant Sunfish larva identified for the first time

Australian and New Zealand scientists have, for the first time, successfully identified the tiny larva of the giant Bump-head Sunfish (Mola alexandrini). Led by sunfish expert, Dr. Marianne Nyegaard from the Auckland War Museum in collaboration with Australian Museum scientists, Kerryn Parkinson and Andrew King, the significant discovery was made using the Australian Museum's (AM) Ichthyology coll

7h

Discovery of novel autoantibody that is a major risk factor for recurrent pregnancy loss

A Kobe University led study has revealed for the first time in the world the high frequency of a novel autoantibody in women suffering from recurrent pregnancy loss. It is expected that these results will contribute towards the illumination of the underlying mechanisms behind this disorder, thrombosis, and pregnancy complications such as hypertensive disorders; leading to the development of new tr

7h

International analysis narrows range of climate's sensitivity to CO2

The most advanced and comprehensive analysis of climate sensitivity yet undertaken has revealed with more confidence than ever before how sensitive the Earth's climate is to carbon dioxide. The new research, revealed in a 165 page, peer-reviewed journal article finds that the true climate sensitivity is unlikely to be in the lowest part of the 1.5-4.5°C range.

7h

Improving coastal restoration by temporarily imitating nature

Coastal ecosystems are in rapid decline around the world. Restoring them is very expensive and is often unsuccessful. But an international team of researchers discovered a way of increasing restoration success of salt marshes and seagrass meadows, using biodegradable mats.Their findings will be published in Nature Communications on 22 July.

7h

Sea-level charting satellite passes with flying colours

Like students all over the world currently awaiting exam grades, the Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite has also been put through a series of strenuous tests leaving the eyes of the teams involved in this international mission set firmly on its final results. Happily, Sentinel-6 has passed with flying colours and engineers can now prepare it for shipment to the US for liftoff on a Sp

7h

Next generation of wearable devices will stay charged longer and track movements better

What if your belt did more than hold up your pants? What if it also listened to your FitBit, smart glasses, and smart jewelry to better recognize what activities you were engaged in while using far less power than anything currently on the market?

7h

Lifeguards with drones keep humans and sharks safe

A teenager in New South Wales recently died after a fatal shark bite, adding to four other unprovoked shark-related deaths this year. These tragic events send shockwaves through the community and re-ignite our fear of sharks.

7h

Find out if Residential Solar Power Is Worth It for Your Home With a Free Assessment

For decades people have been dreaming about the day when homes would be powered by solar energy. Now, at long last, these dreams are starting to become a reality. However, going solar is still a very complex process, and it is not necessarily a smart investment for everyone . Luckily, if you're interested in residential solar and you're not sure where to start, companies like Understand Solar are

7h

After 40 years, researchers finally see Earth's climate destiny more clearly

Landmark study narrows bounds for "climate sensitivity," ruling out benign warming

7h

Lifeguards with drones keep humans and sharks safe

A teenager in New South Wales recently died after a fatal shark bite, adding to four other unprovoked shark-related deaths this year. These tragic events send shockwaves through the community and re-ignite our fear of sharks.

7h

Giant whale washes up on Indonesian beach

A giant 23-metre (75-foot) whale briefly washed up near a beach in Indonesia but it was unclear how the enormous marine mammal died, a conservation official said Wednesday.

7h

Computationally classifying fungal lifestyles

As a proof of concept, researchers developed an algorithm that "taught" a computer how to classify 101 representative genomes of Dothideomycetes, the largest class of fungi, by lifestyles. The machine "learned" to identify data generated in part through the 1000 Fungal Genomes Project, including 55 newly-sequenced species.

7h

Eksperter uenige om stigende smittetal: Men forvent ny bølge, når det bliver koldt

De seneste to uger er det stabilt lave covid-19-smittetal begyndt at stige herhjemme. SSI er opmærksom på udviklingen, som er jævnt fordelt, og ikke bunder i større lokale udbrud.

7h

Giant whale washes up on Indonesian beach

A giant 23-metre (75-foot) whale briefly washed up near a beach in Indonesia but it was unclear how the enormous marine mammal died, a conservation official said Wednesday.

7h

Aussie student in landmark climate change lawsuit against government

An Australian student is suing the government for failing to disclose climate change risks to investors in sovereign bonds, in what lawyers believe is the first case of its kind.

7h

Computationally classifying fungal lifestyles

As a proof of concept, researchers developed an algorithm that "taught" a computer how to classify 101 representative genomes of Dothideomycetes, the largest class of fungi, by lifestyles. The machine "learned" to identify data generated in part through the 1000 Fungal Genomes Project, including 55 newly-sequenced species.

7h

Global heating: best and worst case scenarios less likely than thought

Uncertainty over climate outcomes reduced but experts warn urgent reduction in CO2 levels is essential Doomsayers and hopemongers alike may need to revise their climate predictions after a study that almost rules out the most optimistic forecasts for global heating while downplaying the likelihood of worst-case scenarios. The international team of scientists involved in the research say they have

7h

Snowshoe hare carcasses feed more than usual predator suspects, study shows

Snowshoe hare carcasses may provide a vital food source for a wide variety of species in Canada's boreal forest—including lynx, ravens, flying squirrels and even other hares, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists.

7h

New paper examines disproportionate effect of eugenics on North Carolina's black population

A sordid element of North Carolina's history is its eugenics program, which authorized sterilization of many citizens throughout much of the 20th century.

7h

Snowshoe hare carcasses feed more than usual predator suspects, study shows

Snowshoe hare carcasses may provide a vital food source for a wide variety of species in Canada's boreal forest—including lynx, ravens, flying squirrels and even other hares, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists.

7h

Research confirms creativity is key for both arts and science

International expert in creativity and innovation, UniSA's Professor David Cropley, is calling for Australian schools and universities to increase their emphasis on teaching creativity, as new research shows it is a core competency across all disciplines and critical for ensuring future job success.

7h

Study illuminates fates of distant planetary atmospheres

When telescopes became powerful enough to find planets orbiting distant stars, scientists were surprised to see that a lot of them didn't have atmospheres like Earth's. Instead, they appear to have thick blankets of hydrogen.

7h

How to keep supply chains moving during a catastrophe

Researchers in the University at Buffalo School of Management have developed a new framework to make supply chains more resilient during a crisis like COVID-19.

7h

Covid-19 unmasks weaknesses of English public health agency

Matt Hancock ready to reform PHE as criticism of its response to coronavirus crisis mounts

7h

This Startup Is 3D Printing Custom Prosthetics for a Fraction of the Standard Cost

Around 1.9 million people in the US are currently living with limb loss. The trauma of losing a limb is just the beginning of what amputees have to face, with the sky-high cost of prosthetics making their circumstance that much more challenging. Prosthetics can run over $50,000 for a complex limb (like an arm or a leg) and aren't always covered by insurance. As if shelling out that sum one time w

7h

Climate Sensitivity: A new assessment

Not small enough to ignore, nor big enough to despair . There is a new review paper on climate sensitivity published today ( Sherwood et al., 2020 ( preprint ) that is the most thorough and coherent picture of what we can infer about the sensitivity of climate to increasing CO 2 . The paper is exhaustive (and exhausting – coming in at 166 preprint pages!) and concludes that equilibrium climate se

7h

Putting the spring-cam back into stroke patients steps

A research group has developed a new, lightweight and motor-less device that can be easily attached to an ankle support device – otherwise known as an ankle foot orthosis (AFO). The new device will aid stroke patients in their rehabilitation, improving their walking and preventing falls.

7h

Apollo-Soyuz Mission: When the Space Race Ended

The space race formally ended on July 17, 1975, when the U.S. and Soviet Union linked up in orbit and shook hands during the Apollo-Soyuz mission.

7h

Bird brain scientists find link between chicken behavior and epigenetics

"Bird-brain" is a term used to describe someone scatty, indecisive, forgetful. But in an innovative new study published in Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology—Part D: Genomics and Proteomics , researchers found that the behavior of chickens is far from random. In fact, it appears to be strongly linked to non-genetic modifications involving key genes in the chicken brain.

7h

Even if you want to, you can't ignore how people look or sound

Your perceptions of someone you just met are influenced in part by what they look like and how they sound.

7h

New research finds graphene can act as surfactant

New research into graphene flakes has discovered that the material can act as a surfactant, for the first time demonstrating how it can be a versatile 2-D stabiliser ideal for many industrial applications from oil extraction to paper processing.

7h

Bird brain scientists find link between chicken behavior and epigenetics

"Bird-brain" is a term used to describe someone scatty, indecisive, forgetful. But in an innovative new study published in Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology—Part D: Genomics and Proteomics , researchers found that the behavior of chickens is far from random. In fact, it appears to be strongly linked to non-genetic modifications involving key genes in the chicken brain.

7h

Science money slashed in EU's €1.8-trillion budget deal

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02199-3 European Union's flagship research programme allocated €81 billion in latest negotiations — substantially less than earlier proposed.

7h

Telework mostly benefits white, affluent Americans – and offers few climate benefits

Back in in 2018—in the pre-pandemic world—about 5% of the U.S. workforce teleworked from home. That changed dramatically with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic; by May 2020 that number had jumped to about 35%. Tech giants Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon and Twitter announced plans to extend teleworking well into the fall and possibly beyond. It's a sea change that will permanently alter the w

7h

Here's one way to make daily covid-19 testing feasible on a mass scale

It's impossible to contain covid-19 without knowing who's infected: until a safe and effective vaccine is widely available, stopping transmission is the name of the game. While testing capacity has increased , it's nowhere near what's needed to screen patients without symptoms, who account for nearly half of the virus's transmission . Our research points to a compelling opportunity for data scien

7h

No honor among cyber thieves

A backstabbing crime boss and thousands of people looking for free tutorials on hacking and identity theft were two of the more interesting findings of a study examining user activity on two online 'carding forums,' illegal sites that specialize in stolen credit card information.

7h

City of Hope, TGen looking to create personalized roadmaps for treatment of kidney cancer

Experts at City of Hope and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) are using one of the world's most comprehensive genomic analysis tools to map out personalized treatment plans for metastatic kidney cancer patients. "The hope is to one day identify patients who will benefit from immunotherapy and those who will not. Eventually we may be able to distinguish which patient is better su

7h

What factors influence the likelihood of fracking-related seismicity in Oklahoma?

The depth of a hydraulic fracturing well in Oklahoma, among other factors, increases the probability that fracking will lead to earthquake activity, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.

7h

Parents of 1 in 2 unvaccinated US adolescents have no intention to initiate HPV vaccine

Study results documenting parental hesitancy to begin and complete their child's HPV vaccine series were published in The Lancet Public Health by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

7h

O Christmas Tree: DNA shows WA's largest parasitic plant adapts to climate

A closer look at DNA from south-western Australia's native Nuytsia floribunda, known as the WA Christmas Tree, has found that temperature, rather than rainfall, impacts the tree's resilience and reproductive success.

7h

CSU study links physical stress on the job with brain and memory decline in older age

A new study out of Colorado State University has found that physical stress in one's job may be associated with faster brain aging and poorer memory.

7h

Cells communicate by doing the 'wave'

A research team at Kyoto University reports on a novel method of cell communication relying on 'mechano-chemical' signals to control cell movement.

7h

DNA shows southwestern Australia's largest parasitic plant adapts to climate

A closer look at DNA from southwestern Australia's native Nuytsia floribunda, known as the WA Christmas Tree, has found that temperature, rather than rainfall, impacts the tree's resilience and reproductive success.

7h

DNA shows southwestern Australia's largest parasitic plant adapts to climate

A closer look at DNA from southwestern Australia's native Nuytsia floribunda, known as the WA Christmas Tree, has found that temperature, rather than rainfall, impacts the tree's resilience and reproductive success.

7h

NASA's 'robot hotel' gets its occupants

Storage is just as important aboard the International Space Station as it is on Earth. While the space station is about the size of a football field, the living space inside is much smaller than that. Just as you wouldn't store garden tools in a house when you could store them in a shed outside, astronauts now have a "housing unit" in which they can store tools for use on the exterior of the space

7h

Highly efficient method to synthesize ultra-high molecular weight polyisoprene rubber

Branched ultra-high molecular weight polydiene rubbers possess remarkable mechanical properties, such as high tensile strength, high wet-slip resistance, and high damping performance. They are applied in high-performance tires and noise-reducing materials.

7h

Radio relic detected in a merging galaxy cluster

Using the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), an international team of astronomers has detected a radio relic in a merging galaxy cluster known as SPT-CL 2023-5535. The discovery is reported in a research paper published July 16 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

7h

DNA analysis confirms a zooplankton community border along Baja California

Marine ecosystems don't recognize national boundaries—but they do sometimes have invisible borders of their own. Thanks to metabarcoding, a sweeping DNA analysis technique, MBARI researchers explored these watery borderlands along the California-Mexico coastline in closer detail than they ever had before.

7h

Homes of wealthy Americans spew 25% more emissions

The homes of wealthy Americans generate about 25% more greenhouse gases than residences in lower-income neighborhoods, mainly due to their larger size. In the nation's most affluent suburbs, those emissions can be as much as 15 times higher than in nearby lower-income neighborhoods. Those estimates come from a new University of Michigan study of 93 million American homes. It is the most comprehen

7h

DNA analysis confirms a zooplankton community border along Baja California

Marine ecosystems don't recognize national boundaries—but they do sometimes have invisible borders of their own. Thanks to metabarcoding, a sweeping DNA analysis technique, MBARI researchers explored these watery borderlands along the California-Mexico coastline in closer detail than they ever had before.

8h

Researchers diffract a beam of organic molecules

A team of researchers from Austria, Germany, and the U.K. has succeeded in diffracting a beam of organic molecules. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the researchers describe demonstrating Bragg diffraction of the molecules ciprofloxacin and phthalocyanine.

8h

Photonic crystal light converter

Spectroscopy is the use of light to analyze physical objects and biological samples. Different kinds of light can provide different kinds of information. Vacuum ultraviolet light is useful as it can aid people in a broad range of research fields, but generation of that light has been difficult and expensive. Researchers created a new device to efficiently generate this special kind of light using

8h

First ever image of a multi-planet system around a sun-like star captured by ESO telescope

The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT) has taken the first ever image of a young, Sun-like star accompanied by two giant exoplanets. Images of systems with multiple exoplanets are extremely rare, and — until now — astronomers had never directly observed more than one planet orbiting a star similar to the Sun. The observations can help astronomers understand how plan

8h

COVID-19 shutdown led to increased solar power output

As the air cleared after lockdowns, solar installations in Delhi produced 8 percent more power, study shows.

8h

Post-surgical bleeding associated with more deaths when compared to blood clots after surgery

Post-surgical bleeding is associated with more deaths than blood clots from surgery, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in the journal Anesthesia & Analgesia.

8h

When Feeling American Requires Leaving America

Susan Page found home as a 14-year-old on a high-school orchestra trip to Europe. She wasn't drawn to one place in particular. Rather, it was the feeling that, whether it be in London, Paris, or Amsterdam, she was meant to be an outsider. She would return overseas for her senior year of college, studying at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, before traveling to Italy during law school, an

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This is our first direct look at a multiplanet system around a Sun-like star

Image could help astronomers understand how our own solar system formed

8h

The Many Faces of Bad Science

In his new book, psychologist Stuart Ritchie paints a portrait of the modern system of research, and all the ways it gets undermined.

8h

Thieves Are Emptying ATMs Using a New Form of Jackpotting

The new hardware-based attack, which has targeted machines across Europe, can yield a stream of cash for the attacker.

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This is the First Image of a Multi-Planet System Around a Sun-Like Star

An international team of astronomers have taken what they claim is the first-ever image of a multi-planet system around a Sun-like star. While plenty of images exist of a single planet orbiting a star roughly the size of the Sun, this is the first time such a system has been imaged featuring multiple exoplanets. It's an exceedingly rare event. So far only two systems with two or more exoplanets a

8h

First image of a multi-planet system around a sun-like star

The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT) has taken the first ever image of a young, sun-like star accompanied by two giant exoplanets. Images of systems with multiple exoplanets are extremely rare, and—until now—astronomers had never directly observed more than one planet orbiting a star similar to the sun. The observations can help astronomers understand how planets fo

8h

Even if you want to, you can't ignore how people look or sound

Your perceptions of someone you just met are influenced in part by what they look like and how they sound. But can you ignore how someone looks or how they sound if you're told it is not relevant? Probably not, at least in most cases, a new study found.

8h

New cosmic magnetic field structures discovered in galaxy NGC 4217

Spiral galaxies such as our Milky Way can have sprawling magnetic fields. There are various theories about their formation, but so far the process is not well understood. An international research team has now analysed the magnetic field of the Milky Way-like galaxy NGC 4217 in detail on the basis of radio astronomical observations and has discovered as yet unknown magnetic field structures. The d

8h

Weather-based decisions may reduce fungicide sprays on table beets

Use of a weather-based decision support system to schedule fungicides for the control of CLS in table beet reduces unnecessary expense to the grower and unnecessary exposure of a fungal population to single-site modes of action posing a high risk of resistance development. For more information, read 'Optimizing Cercospora Leaf Spot Control in Table Beet Using Action Thresholds and Disease Forecast

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Coronavirus antibodies fall dramatically in first 3 months after mild cases of COVID-19

A study by UCLA researchers shows that in people with mild cases of COVID-19, antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes the disease — drop sharply over the first three months after infection, decreasing by roughly half every 73 days. If sustained at that rate, the antibodies would disappear within about a year.

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A Dolphin Has Been Living Solo in This Irish Harbor for Decades

Named Fungie, the cetacean draws thousands of tourists to Dingle—and may teach us how to protect other solitary-sociable animals in the wild

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Powerful quake jolts Alaska towns, produces small tsunami

A powerful earthquake located off Alaska's southern coast jolted some coastal communities late Tuesday, and some residents briefly scrambled for higher ground over fears of a tsunami.

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Canadian dads are doing more at home than before the coronavirus pandemic

Over the past few months, everyday housework, like cooking and washing dishes, has multiplied and most parents have become responsible for teaching their kids. Given the uneven distribution of these tasks before the pandemic, much of this extra work has fallen squarely on mothers.

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Inside the 'man box': how rigid ideas of 'manning up' harm young men and those around them

Among men in Australia, why do some use violence? Why do other men drink to excess and feel hopeless or suicidal, while many men do not?

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Flourishing mental health delays mortality by five months in 18 year prospective study

We have known for decades that mental health plays an important role in one's quality of life, but a study released this week suggests it is also an important factor in one's quantity of life.

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Scientists identify new methylation site on P53 guided by structure of MLL2 complex

Lysine methylation is one of the most important covalent modifications involved in diverse cellular processes. Methylation of histone H3 Lys4 (H3K4), predominantly associated with actively transcribed genes, is mainly mediated by KMT2-family histone lysine methyltransferases (KMTs). The mammalian KMT2 family contains six members (MLL1–MLL4, SET1A and SET1B), each of which has crucial and non-redun

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Scientists identify new methylation site on P53 guided by structure of MLL2 complex

Lysine methylation is one of the most important covalent modifications involved in diverse cellular processes. Methylation of histone H3 Lys4 (H3K4), predominantly associated with actively transcribed genes, is mainly mediated by KMT2-family histone lysine methyltransferases (KMTs). The mammalian KMT2 family contains six members (MLL1–MLL4, SET1A and SET1B), each of which has crucial and non-redun

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New tropical cyclone outlook model has potential to save lives in the Pacific

People in Fiji, New Zealand, Solomon Islands, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea, Tonga and other island nations in the Southwest Pacific will have months more to prepare for tropical cyclones, thanks to a new outlook model published today in Scientific Reports.

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Scientists make wine and cheese using weeds

Scientists at South Ural State University (SUSU) have discovered that the extract of a common weed plant, Bidens pilosa, is a promising source of enzymes for the food industry. According to the authors, the technique can produce cheaper plant alternatives to expensive enzymes necessary in wine and cheese production. The study is published in the International Journal of Scientific and Technology R

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Site-directed mutagenesis in wheat via haploid induction by maize

A new study recently published in the Plant Biotechnology Journal demonstrates how site-directed mutagenesis can be achieved in virtually any wheat germplasm by intergeneric pollination of wheat with cas9/guide-RNA (gRNA)-transgenic maize.

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Aerosols have an impact on the solar power yield in Europe

High up in the atmosphere, even the smallest particles lead to the formation of clouds. Air flows that carry Sahara dust to Europe also affect our weather. In the PermaStrom research project, a joint research team from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), German Weather Service (DWD), and Meteocontrol, a solar energy service provider, is investigating how to better account for such events in w

8h

Valley Hall nanoscale lasers developed

Topological photonics underpins a promising paradigm for robust light manipulation, as well as smart design of optical devices with improved reliability and advanced functionalities that are governed by the nontrivial band topology. Nanostructures made of high-index dielectric materials with resonant elements and lattice arrangements show special promise for implementation of topological order for

8h

Researchers find how enzyme environment alters the rate and direction of a reaction

As researchers look for ways to develop and improve everyday products ranging from fuel to medicines, enzymes provide nature's example of the control needed to make chemical reactions work in desired ways. But a phenomenon known as catalytic bias continues to stump scientists.

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Thermal manipulation of plasmons in atomically thin films

Surface plasmons in graphene have been widely studied in the past decade due to their very appealing properties, such as the strong tunability of its optical properties through electrical gating and the relatively high plasmon lifetime. However, these exceptional properties are limited to lower frequencies ranging from the mid-infrared (mid-IR) to the terahertz (THz) spectral regions. Additionally

8h

Scientists make wine and cheese using weeds

Scientists at South Ural State University (SUSU) have discovered that the extract of a common weed plant, Bidens pilosa, is a promising source of enzymes for the food industry. According to the authors, the technique can produce cheaper plant alternatives to expensive enzymes necessary in wine and cheese production. The study is published in the International Journal of Scientific and Technology R

8h

Site-directed mutagenesis in wheat via haploid induction by maize

A new study recently published in the Plant Biotechnology Journal demonstrates how site-directed mutagenesis can be achieved in virtually any wheat germplasm by intergeneric pollination of wheat with cas9/guide-RNA (gRNA)-transgenic maize.

8h

Lawn edgers that keep your property from looking like a jungle

For the tidiest of lawns. (Kosuke Noma via Unsplash/) Lawn edgers are a perfect way to give your property a finished and polished look by keeping the grass along walkways, gardens, and driveways neat and trimmed. Generally, there are two types of edgers: Electric and gas-powered. Edgers that run on electricity use batteries or can be plugged into a standard wall outlet, and are ideal for people w

8h

Protein powders to fill out your fitness routine

No need to sacrifice taste. (Indivar Kaushik via Unsplash/) People use protein powder to increase muscle mass—or decrease muscle loss when entering a fat loss phase. When selecting a powder, you'll want it to fit your personal goals and ideally be tasty to consume. Below are some of the most praised powders on the market. Your body will thank you. (Amazon/) This hefty bag of whey protein will las

8h

What you do for a friend

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02156-0 A question of trust.

9h

Laws may slow downward trend in teen pot use

Teens may be more likely to use marijuana following legalization—with the proliferation of stores and increasing adult use of the drug—than they otherwise would have been, research suggests. "When we think about marijuana legalization, a worry is that underage use may go up ," says Jennifer Bailey, the study's lead author and principal investigator with the Social Development Research Group in th

9h

Facebook says it will look for racial bias in its algorithms

The news: Facebook says it is setting up new internal teams to look for racial bias in the algorithms that drive its main social network and Instagram, according to the Wall Street Journal. In particular, the investigations will address the adverse effects of machine learning—which can encode implicit racism in training data—on Black, Hispanic, and other minority groups. Why it matters: In the la

9h

Best facial razors designed for women

Ultimate smoothness. ( Sara Kauten via Unsplash/) For some people, facial razors are a best-kept secret. Once you discover that you don't need to shell out endless money on hair removal at salons, you're unlikely to look back. Using a facial razor at home enables you to slough off dead skin cells and reveal a fresh, glowing layer of skin. At-home dermaplaning advocates will tell you that you'll e

9h

Dragonflies reveal mercury pollution levels across US national parks

Research confirms dragonfly larvae as "biosentinels" to indicate mercury pollution and presents the first-ever survey of mercury pollution in the U.S. National Park System.

9h

Even if you want to, you can't ignore how people look or sound

Your perceptions of someone you just met are influenced in part by what they look like and how they sound. But can you ignore how someone looks or how they sound if you're told it is not relevant? Probably not, at least in most cases, a new study found.

9h

COVID-19 and Excess Deaths

Excess deaths during the pandemic help tell a more complete picture of the impact of COVID-19.

9h

The Black Lives Matter Movement Is Being Written Into the Streetscape

In the weeks following George Floyd's death, activists and city officials have painted dozens of American streets, walls, and public spaces with three words: black lives matter . In June, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio proposed co-naming a prominent street in every borough for the movement. One recent stop: Fifth Avenue, directly in front of Trump Tower. Joining activists and city workers in

9h

Optoma UHD50X Review: Bring the Movie Theater Home

The company's latest consumer projector looks better than ever and even offers a 240-Hz refresh rate for PC gamers.

9h

Everything You Need to Know About the Oxford Covid-19 Vaccine

Early results from the UK team show that its approach is safe and provokes an immune response. But that doesn't mean it works.

9h

Gun culture isn't just one thing in America

A new study documents what the researchers call "gun culture 3.0," a third mentality to accompany recreational use and self-defense. This third mentality is made up of people who view the defense of the Second Amendment as necessary to freedom in the United States. The study, which Boston University School of Public Health researchers led, finds that this "gun culture 3.0" has increased the most

9h

What is the best way to lose weight and keep it off for good?

The UK government wants people to lose weight to reduce their risk of severe covid-19, but despite 40 years of rising obesity, we still don't know the best way to permanently slim down

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Instantaneous color holography system for sensing fluorescence and white light achieved

The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Toin University of Yokohama, and Chiba University have succeeded in developing a color-multiplexed holography system by which 3-D information of objects illuminated by a white-light lamp and self-luminous specimens are recorded as a single multicolor hologram by a specially de

9h

Vampire Bats Self-Isolate, Too

When these mammals are ill, they have fewer interactions with family and friends, a new study suggests. "It's like us," said one researcher.

9h

Publishers: let transgender scholars correct their names

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02145-3 Prohibiting changes to author names on published works can harm vulnerable people.

9h

Daily briefing: Three vaccines show early promise for COVID-19

Nature, Published online: 21 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02194-8 Evidence that three more vaccines are safe and produce an immune response to the new coronavirus. Plus, polar bears at risk of extinction within 80 years and how to write the perfect recommendation letter.

9h

Mobbningen ökar när lärarna överbelastas

Statistiken över antal mobbade i Sverige har länge varit mycket stabil. Trenden bröts nyligen då en SCB-rapport från 2018 visade att i snitt 19 procent av de tillfrågade ungdomarna i 11, 13, och 15-årsåldern hade blivit mobbade någon gång de senaste månaderna. Det är en ökning från 12 procent 2014.

9h

Rapid, deep and precise profiling of the plasma proteome with multi-nanoparticle protein corona

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17033-7 Large-scale, unbiased proteomics studies of biological samples like plasma are constrained by the complexity of the proteome. Herein, the authors develop a highly parallel protein quantitation platform leveraging multi nanoparticle protein coronas for deep proteome sampling and biomarker discovery.

10h

Cosmic Rays and the Handedness of Life

A mystery about why biological molecules come in just one of two possible configurations may have been answered — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Cosmic Rays and the Handedness of Life

A mystery about why biological molecules come in just one of two possible configurations may have been answered — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Rådgivere af hollandsk regering: Drop biomasse til el og varme

Stop brugen af biomasse i energiforsyningen, lyder opfordringen til den hollandske regering fra Social- og Økonomisk Råd. Der er dog uvished om, hvordan man skal erstatte biomassen.

10h

US spends $2bn to secure Covid-19 vaccine

BioNTech and Pfizer announce deal for 100m doses of coronavirus inoculation candidate

10h

The Literature of the Pandemic Is Already Here

A bleak fact of writing is that honing sentences is often far easier than honing the thoughts they convey. A corollary fact is that polished, elegant prose serves as a useful, if not always intentional, hiding place for half-baked ideas. Walter Benjamin wrote that a key element of fascism is the aestheticization of politics—the concealment of bad thinking behind bright optics. Even in fascist-fre

10h

How to Stay Productive When the World Is on Fire

It feels impossible to get anything done right now. Here's how to keep your head above water—without falling into the busy trap.

10h

AI Text Generator GPT-3 Is Learning Our Language—Fitfully

The new program from OpenAI shows how far the field has come—and how far it has to go.

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Spridning av influensavirus vanligt i sjukhusmiljö

Var fjärde inneliggande patient med influensa under en given säsong visade tecken på att ha smittats i vården. Det framgår i en avhandling från Göteborgs universitet om influensaspridning på sjukhus och hur problemen kan åtgärdas. En av studierna i avhandlingen är baserad på journalgenomgång av samtliga vuxna patienter, 435 individer, som vårdades inneliggande på Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset

10h

What a Shift in the U.K.'s Foreign Policy Means for the U.S.

In mid-February, two weeks after Brexit formally began, the world's foreign-policy and national-security establishment gathered in Germany for the Munich Security Conference. Speakers included Emmanuel Macron, Mike Pompeo, Mark Esper, Nancy Pelosi, Mark Zuckerberg, Wang Yi, and Justin Trudeau. The U.K. was largely absent. The chairman of the conference, the veteran German diplomat Wolfgang Ischin

10h

COVID-19 Pandemic Shows Telecommuting Can Help Fight Climate Change

In cities with relatively clean electricity and long car commutes, widespread telework could reduce greenhouse gas emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

COVID-19 Pandemic Shows Telecommuting Can Help Fight Climate Change

In cities with relatively clean electricity and long car commutes, widespread telework could reduce greenhouse gas emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

As Summer Takes Hold, So Do the Jumping Worms

These invasive pests, which ravage the soil and damage plant life, are easiest to spot now, in their adult form. But what to do if you see them?

11h

Coronavirus Live Updates

Republicans are arguing over what to include in the next round of pandemic relief. Harvard said that newly admitted students from abroad cannot come to campus to study this fall.

11h

Retraction of paper on romantic crushes marks second for psychology researcher

A psychology researcher who left her tenure track position at Northwestern University in 2018 amid concerns about the integrity of her data has lost a second paper. Here's the abstract of the 2018 paper, titled "Romantic crushes increase consumers' preferences for strong sensory stimuli:" What influences consumers' preferences for strong versus weak sensory stimuli? In … Continue reading

11h

The November Election Is Going to Be a Mess

American voters face a nightmare in November. The recent stretch of primary elections has raised a slew of red flags of glitches, missteps, incompetence, and worse that could plague the national elections in November. In Wisconsin, the failure of election officials to send out absentee ballots requested by voters and the failure of the United States Postal Service to deliver them in time forced t

11h

Läkemedel mot prostatacancer testas mot covid-19

Ett läkemedel som används vid prostatacancer skulle även kan användas för att behandla patienter med covid-19. Eftersom läkemedlet bland annat påverkar ett enzym som är viktigt vid både prostatacancer och coronainfektion, hoppas forskarna kunna korta sjukdomsförloppet och minska behovet av intensivvård. – Målet är att läkemedlet ska minska mängden coronavirus som kan ta sig in i lungcellerna geno

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Wearing a face mask is patriotic

View this post on Instagram ⚠️ Everyone wants to return to "normal," but some of our favorite activities carry more risk than others. ⚠️ These levels assume participants are social distancing and wearing a mask when possible, so you should! That way we'll all have a better chance of working our way up this list. 📊: @sarachodoshviz A post shared by Popular Science (@popsci) on Jul 17, 2020 at 12:

11h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvad holder sammen på en foton?

En læser undrer sig over, at lyskvanter kommer hele frem til modtageren, mens elektromagnetiske bølger spreder sig. Ingeniørens Jens Ramskov giver en forklaring.

11h

Vaccines stop diseases safely — why all the suspicion?

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02192-w To immunize people against misinformation, public-health researchers must forge authentic relationships that build confidence, urges Heidi Larson. By Joan Donovan

11h

Plastics found in sea-bed sharks

Microplastics have been found in the guts of sharks that live near the seabed off the UK coast. University of Exeter scientists studied four species of demersal (seabed-dwelling) shark.

11h

Plastics found in sea-bed sharks

Microplastics have been found in the guts of sharks that live near the seabed off the UK coast. University of Exeter scientists studied four species of demersal (seabed-dwelling) shark.

11h

Gene biomarker discovery at different stages of Alzheimer using gene co-expression network approach

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69249-8

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Systemic lipid dysregulation is a risk factor for macular neurodegenerative disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69164-y

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Label-free detection of rare circulating tumor cells by image analysis and machine learning

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69056-1

11h

In Social Insects, Researchers Find Hints for Controlling Disease

Over the past three decades, researchers have begun mapping the myriad ways that some insect colonies avoid succumbing to disease. Put together, they form a kind of parallel epidemiology that might provide insights, inspiration, and even validation for human societies battling pathogens of their own.

11h

B cell zone reticular cell microenvironments shape CXCL13 gradient formation

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17135-2 Morphogens such as chemokines form gradients to direct graded responses and modulate cell behaviors. Here the authors show, using imaging and computer simulation, that the chemokine CXCL13 originated from follicular reticular cells in the lymph nodes forms both soluble and immobilized gradients to regulate B cel

12h

Attosecond electronic timing with rising edges of photocurrent pulses

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17460-6 For edge-sensitive timing applications, the edge jitter of electrical pulses is important. Here, the authors report on very low rising edge jitter extracted from an optical frequency comb and explore the best condition for low jitter by minimizing the amplitude-to-timing conversion in photodiodes.

12h

Chelating-agent-assisted control of CsPbBr3 quantum well growth enables stable blue perovskite emitters

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17482-0 Metal halide perovskites have been studied as promising materials for blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) but the stability is still a bottleneck. Here Wang et al. develop a chelating additive strategy to increase efficiency, operational stability and color stability of blue perovskite LEDs.

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Publisher Correction: Long-term culture of human pancreatic slices as a model to study real-time islet regeneration

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17574-x

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Causality matters in medical imaging

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17478-w Scarcity of high-quality annotated data and mismatch between the development dataset and the target environment are two of the main challenges in developing predictive tools from medical imaging. In this Perspective, the authors show how causal reasoning can shed new light on these challenges.

12h

Transmission phase read-out of a large quantum dot in a nanowire interferometer

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17461-5 Measuring the transmission phase of a quantum dot is crucial for the read-out of future topological qubits based on nanowire networks but has not been established yet. Here, the authors demonstrate interferometric read-out of the transmission phase in a nanowire-based architecture.

12h

Neutralizing antibodies isolated from COVID-19 patients may suppress virus

Researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center have isolated antibodies from several COVID-19 patients that, to date, are among the most potent in neutralizing the SARS-CoV-2 virus.These antibodies could be produced in large quantities by pharmaceutical companies to treat patients, especially early in the course of infection, and to prevent infection, particularly in the elderly.

12h

New study: Brain tumors may be seeded from distant site

A mouse model of glioblastoma, an aggressive type of cancer that can occur in the brain, suggests that this recalcitrant cancer originates from a pool of stem cells that can be a significant distance away from the resulting tumors. The findings of a new study, led by Children's National Hospital researchers and published July 22 in the journal Nature Communications, suggest new ways to fight this

12h

Plastics found in sea-bed sharks

Microplastics have been found in the guts of sharks that live near the seabed off the UK coast.

12h

Common blood test identifies benefits and risks of steroid treatment in COVID-19 patients

A new study led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System (www.montefiore.org) confirms the findings of the large scale British trial of steroid use for COVID-19 patients and advances the research by answering several key questions: Which patients are most likely to benefit from steroid therapy? Could some of them be harmed? Can other formulations of steroids substitute f

12h

Potent neutralizing antibodies directed to multiple epitopes on SARS-CoV-2 spike

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2571-7

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What we owe to fire, home working vs the driverless car, and survival of the unfittest: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02148-0 Andrew Robinson reviews five of the week's best science picks.

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Hydroxychloroquine use against SARS-CoV-2 infection in non-human primates

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2558-4

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Chloroquine does not inhibit infection of human lung cells with SARS-CoV-2

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2575-3

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U.S. Disaster Response Scrambles To Protect People From Both Hurricanes And COVID-19

Hotel rooms would be "ideal" for housing an overflow of evacuees from shelters practicing social distancing, but few towns have them lined up in the southeast, where coronavirus infections are raging. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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How Ugly Politicking Ate Election Oversight

This article is a collaboration between The Atlantic and ProPublica . Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET on July 22, 2020. O n March 20, state election administrators got on a conference call with the Election Assistance Commission to plead for help. The EAC is the bipartisan federal agency that was established for the precise purpose of maintaining election integrity through emergencies, and this was, by e

12h

Once Science Fiction, Gene Editing Is Now a Looming Reality

The prospect of erasing some disabilities and perceived deficiencies hovers at the margins of what people consider ethically acceptable.

12h

Rapid, Cheap, Less Accurate Coronavirus Testing Has A Place, Scientists Say

A single test that can give false reassurance sounds bad. But a $10 test for the coronavirus, if repeated daily, would discover real infections, say proponents of such tests as screening tools. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Oväntad koppling mellan genförändringar och läkemedelssvar i hjärntumörer

Cellförändringar i glioblastomceller påverkar effekten av olika läkemedel. Det visar en undersökning av ett stort antal cellprover från patienter med denna hjärncancerform. Kunskapen kan öka precisionen vid behandling av glioblastom. Glioblastom är en allvarlig cancerform i hjärnan med mycket dålig prognos. Det har blivit alltmer känt att glioblastomtumörer innehåller många genetiska förändringar

12h

How learning journals can help students grow

Jiang Xueqin, an educator and researcher at Harvard Graduate School of Education, endorses learning journals as a good method to promote meta-learning for students during the coronavirus pandemic. Learning journals can be kept for any activity and have three components: defining a goal "concretely and precisely," writing down the process, and writing down observations and reflecting on the experi

12h

Is there life on Mars?

A new generation of spacecraft may soon find out

12h

Closest Sun shot, methane rising and a Plan S development

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02146-2 The latest science news, in brief.

12h

Ads for junk food in the UK seem to be concentrated in poorer areas

A map of outdoor billboards in Liverpool developed with the help of AI shows that advertisements for unhealthy food are concentrated in less affluent areas. The same may be true elsewhere in the UK

13h

Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a vaccine?

More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…

13h

While birds chirp, plasma shouldn't: New insight could advance fusion energy

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have furthered understanding of a barrier that can prevent doughnut-shaped fusion facilities known as tokamaks from operating at high efficiency by causing vital heat to be lost from them.

13h

Invention offers new option for monitoring heart health

An invention may turn one of the most widely used materials for biomedical applications into wearable devices to help monitor heart health.

13h

Racial and LGBT bias persists in ridesharing drivers despite mitigation efforts

Despite efforts by ridesharing companies to eliminate or reduce discrimination, research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business finds that racial and LGBT bias persists among drivers.

13h

Life in the shallows becomes a trap for baby sharks

Scientists can now explain how baby reef sharks tolerate living in the sometimes-extreme environments of their nurseries—but, they also say these habitats face an uncertain future which may leave newborn sharks 'trapped'.

14h

Evidence of "hormone disruptor" chemical threats grows

A growing number of chemicals in pesticides, flame retardants, and certain plastics have been linked to widespread health problems including infertility, diabetes, and impaired brain development, a set of reviews of hundreds of studies concludes.

14h

Life in the shallows becomes a trap for baby sharks

Scientists can now explain how baby reef sharks tolerate living in the sometimes-extreme environments of their nurseries—but, they also say these habitats face an uncertain future which may leave newborn sharks 'trapped'.

14h

This Bizarre River of Black Sludge in Arizona Is Totally Real

It looks like a cartoon villain, but it's much more dangerous.

14h

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Mekanisk dovendyr skal overvåge regnskoven

Amerikanske forskere tog ved lære af det totåede dovendyr, da de udviklede en energieffektiv robot, der kan bevæge sig langs udspændte liner.

14h

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Patients who lived longer with cancer at greater risk of severe COVID-19 infection

Cancer patients diagnosed more than 24 months ago are more likely to have a severe COVID-19 infection, research has found. Cancer patients of Asian ethnicity or who were receiving palliative treatment for cancer were also at a higher risk of death from COVID-19.

15h

Shaming people who refuse to wear face masks isn't a good look | Arwa Mahdawi

Yes, they are selfish. Yes, they are putting lives in danger. But do they deserve to be vilified? No Costco Karen; Walmart Karen; Starbucks Karen; Target Karen. Name a US retail establishment and there's probably a viral video of a " Karen " (internet slang for an angry white woman) fuming about face masks in it or getting chased out of the store for refusing to wear one . "Mask meltdown" videos

15h

Early menstruation linked to increased menopause symptoms

Early menstruation increases the likelihood of hot flushes and nights sweats decades later at menopause, according to a University of Queensland study.

16h

Sing into the funnel please: inside the Covid-19 lab hoping to declare singing safe

Britain's 40,000 choirs have all been silenced, brass and woodwind players too. We meet the scientists racing to find out exactly how dangerous blowing instruments and singing are Declan Costello, an ear, nose and throat surgeon with an interest in voice disorders and a side career as a tenor, is looking back on the year. "Six months ago, if you'd said, 'You're not going to be doing any clinical

16h

Speaker System Blocks City Noise

The system works like noise-cancelling headphones but fits over an open window. Christopher Intagliata reports.

17h

Junk DNA might be really, really useful for biocomputing

When you don't understand how things work, it's not unusual to think of them as just plain old junk. So it was with DNA that repeats the same sequences over and over again; how could such junk DNA be useful? Isn't it just garbage that nature didn't bother to take out? In a paper published in Trends in Genetics, Dr. Alan Herbert of InsideOutBio Inc shows that these repeats may be more treasure than

17h

Racial and LGBT bias persists in ridesharing drivers despite mitigation efforts

Despite efforts by ridesharing companies to eliminate or reduce discrimination, research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business finds that racial and LGBT bias persists among drivers.

17h

Invention offers new option for monitoring heart health

A team from Purdue University developed self-powered wearable triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based contact layers for monitoring cardiovascular health. TENGs help conserve mechanical energy and turn it into power.

17h

Study suggests increased risks for COVID-19 patients who smoke, vape

TTUHSC's Luca Cucullo, Ph.D., has for years studied the effects smoking and vaping have on the cerebrovascular and neurological systems. He recently led an effort to review the effect smoking and vaping may have on the cerebrovascular and neurological systems of COVID-19 patients. The study, "Cerebrovascular and Neurological Dysfunction under the Threat of COVID-19: Is There a Comorbid Role for Sm

17h

Solar-driven membrane distillation technology that can double drinking water production

A joint research team from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), led by Dr. Kyung-guen Song from the KIST Water Cycle Research Center and Dr. Won-jun Choi from the KIST Center for Opto-Electronic Materials and Devices, announced that it had used solar heat, a source of renewable energy, to develop a highly efficient membrane distillation technology that can produce drinking water f

17h

Keeping pinto beans away from the dark side

New slow-darkening pinto bean varieties show benefits for farmers and consumers

17h

Instantaneous color holography system for sensing fluorescence and white light

The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Toin University of Yokohama, and Chiba University have succeeded in developing a color-multiplexed holography system by which 3D information of objects illuminated by a white-light lamp and self-luminous specimens are recorded as a single multicolor hologram by a specially des

17h

Coronavirus clusters: why meatworks are at the frontline of Australia's 'second wave'

Three new Covid-19 clusters have emerged in Brooklyn, Tottenham and Colac in Victoria Follow our Australian coronavirus live blog Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus email Around the world, certain environments have repeatedly proved to be hotbeds for Covid-19 infection. Chief among these are aged care homes, cruise ships, prisons and abattoirs. As Victoria enters a "second wave" of Covi

18h

Japan's GoTo domestic tourism push stalls amid fears of Covid-19 'disaster'

Surge in cases forces the government to create an exclusion zone around the capital and pay out for cancellations Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A government-sponsored campaign to revive domestic tourism in Japan has begun in disarray amid fears it could cause a coronavirus "disaster". The " Go To " campaign was supposed to help kick start the world's third-biggest

18h

Speaker System Blocks City Noise

The system works like noise-cancelling headphones but fits over an open window. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Global stocks fall on Trump's new Covid-19 tone and Sino-US tension

European and Asian equities sink as optimism over virus measures wanes

18h

Coronavirus Infections Far Higher Than Confirmed But Most Americans Still Not Exposed

Data from the CDC estimates that roughly 10 times the amount of people have the virus than have been documented. The number is still far below what experts say would be needed for widespread immunity. (Image credit: Frank Franklin II/AP)

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Fire tips: Det kan webudviklere lære fra mobilapps

Webudviklerne kan lære noget af mobiludvikling. Den viden opsamler udvikler TJ VanToll i fire tips: Nem rulning på lister, test på fysiske enheder, brug en smule animation og minimer dine downloads. Og måske har vi brug for et nyt HTML-tag?

20h

The Atlantic Daily: Trump's Show of Force in American Cities

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . RIAN DUNDON / ECONOMIC HARDSHIP REPORTING PROJECT The deployment of federal forces against protesters in Portland, Oregon, is, apparently, only the beginning. At a press conference yesterday, Don

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20h

Hair dye that changes in UV light can reveal your risk of sunburn

Printable stickers that go from purple to light pink throughout the day measure your UV exposure, and the pigment that makes them has also been added to colour-changing hair dye

21h

Quarantine exemptions blamed for surge in Hong Kong cases

Executives among those granted special treatment in bid to maintain economic growth

21h

Coronavirus live news: Trump urges people to wear masks as China vaccine starts final tests

Sinovac vaccine becomes third worldwide to enter Phase 3 clinical trial ; California cases set to overtake New York's ; Mike Pompeo attacks WHO . Follow the latest updates Trump urges Americans to wear masks Trump says pandemic will 'get worse' at first Covid-19 briefing in months US failure to report vital coronavirus data is hobbling response Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a v

22h

Crown-of-thorns enhance their growth by switching diets early

When juvenile crown-of-thorns starfish switch their diets from coralline algae to corals early after settlement, they exhibit enhanced growth rates for longer and will ultimately get much bigger.

22h

Life in the shallows becomes a trap for baby sharks

Baby reef sharks tolerate living in the sometimes-extreme environments of their nurseries — but these habitats face an uncertain future which may leave newborn sharks 'trapped'.

22h

Spider monkey groups as collective computers

New research shows that spider monkeys use collective computation to figure out the best way to find food.

22h

First active leak of sea-bed methane discovered in Antarctica

Researchers say potent climate-heating gas almost certainly escaping into atmosphere The first active leak of methane from the sea floor in Antarctica has been revealed by scientists. The researchers also found microbes that normally consume the potent greenhouse gas before it reaches the atmosphere had only arrived in small numbers after five years, allowing the gas to escape. Continue reading..

22h

Do vegetarians really have better sex than meat-eaters?

A new study explains the differences in libido and sexual satisfaction between vegetarians and meat-eaters, with vegetarians coming out on top. According to this survey, 57 percent of vegetarians claim to have sex 3-4 times per week compared to 49 percent of meat-eaters. Also, 58 percent of vegetarians (compared to 35 percent of meat-eaters) claim to be "givers" rather than "takers" in the bedroo

22h

Crown-of-thorns enhance their growth by switching diets early

Crown-of-thorns starfish are renowned for eating coral and destroying coral reefs—but when juvenile crown-of-thorns first settle in reef environments they start out by eating rock-hard coralline algae. In a new study, Jennifer Wilmes and her colleagues compared the growth between juvenile crown-of-thorns starfish that switch diets early after settlement (within six months) versus those that contin

22h

22h

Crown-of-thorns enhance their growth by switching diets early

Crown-of-thorns starfish are renowned for eating coral and destroying coral reefs—but when juvenile crown-of-thorns first settle in reef environments they start out by eating rock-hard coralline algae. In a new study, Jennifer Wilmes and her colleagues compared the growth between juvenile crown-of-thorns starfish that switch diets early after settlement (within six months) versus those that contin

22h

Trump says coronavirus will 'get worse before it gets better'

President resumes regular briefings with a marked change in tone as cases rise in some states

22h

African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

Journalist Bob Hirshon reports from the Taking Nature Black conference, reporter Shahla Farzan talks about tracking copperhead snakes, and nanoscientist Ondrej Krivanek discusses microscopes with… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

The Lancet Psychiatry: Study estimates impact of COVID-19 pandemic on UK mental health after first month of lockdown

Mental health declined substantially after the first month of COVID-19 lockdown, a survey of UK households published today in The Lancet Psychiatry journal suggests.

22h

Life in the shallows becomes a trap for baby sharks

Baby reef sharks tolerate living in the sometimes-extreme environments of their nurseries — but these habitats face an uncertain future which may leave newborn sharks 'trapped'.

23h

A Bird Named for a Confederate General Sparks Calls for Change

McCown's longspur has launched a renewed reckoning over the troubling histories reflected in taxonomy

23h

Author Correction: Microfluidic Enrichment Barcoding (MEBarcoding): a new method for high throughput plant DNA barcoding

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69598-4

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Author Correction: Interferon-Dependent and Respiratory Virus-Specific Interference in Dual Infections of Airway Epithelia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69600-z

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23h

Author Correction: Unrevealed genetic diversity of GII Norovirus in the swine population of North East Italy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69599-3

23h

Author Correction: Virtual clinical trials identify effective combination therapies in ovarian cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69092-x

23h

Author Correction: Grazing enhances species diversity in grassland communities

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69594-8

23h

23h

A Paleontologist's Guide to Playing with Your Dinosaur-Obsessed Kid

Paleontologists say parents should nurture children's romance with playing with dinosaurs, for "Paleontology is the gateway to science."

23h

Yes, The Bubonic Plague Is Still Around. But There's No Need to Freak Out

Cases of the plague are nothing new — and are unlikely to ever cause a widespread epidemic like the Black Death.

23h

Popular seafood species in sharp decline around the world

Fish market favorites such as orange roughy, common octopus and pink conch are among the species of fish and invertebrates in rapid decline around the world, according to new research.

23h

Popular seafood species in sharp decline around the world

Fish market favorites such as orange roughy, common octopus and pink conch are among the species of fish and invertebrates in rapid decline around the world, according to new research.

1d

While birds chirp, plasma shouldn't: New insight could advance fusion energy

Scientists at PPPL have furthered understanding of a barrier that can prevent doughnut-shaped fusion facilities known as tokamaks from operating at high efficiency by causing vital heat to be lost from them.

1d

81 million Americans lacking space or bathrooms to follow COVID quarantine recommendations

New research shows that 25 million dwellings housing 81 million Americans — more than one in five homes — lack adequate space or plumbing to comply with recommendations that a person exposed to COVID-19 maintain physical separation from household members. The proportion of unsuitable homes is higher among low-income and minority households: 46% of Latinx, 43% of Native Americans, and 32% of Blac

1d

Mike Pompeo attacks WHO in private meeting during UK visit

US secretary of state said the World Health Organization was responsible for Britons who had died from Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The US secretary of state Mike Pompeo launched an extraordinary attack on the World Health Organization during a private meeting in the UK, accusing it of being in the pocket of China and responsible for "dead Britons" who pa

1d

Pharma Execs Say They Plan to Profit on COVID-19 Vaccine

Multiple pharmaceutical companies have taken huge U.S. government grants to develop a vaccine for COVID-19 — but some still plan to sell the vaccines for a profit once they're ready. AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson, and Moderna all took funding from the federal government in hopes of developing a safe and effective vaccine against the coronavirus, The New York Times reports . But Moderna — which r

1d

Humans owe our evolutionary success to friendship

Our ability to show each other compassion could be the quality that has kept humans alive for so long. (Photo by Helena Lopes on Unsplash/) The following is an excerpt adapted from SURVIVAL OF THE FRIENDLIEST: Understanding Our Origins and Rediscovering Our Common Humanity by Brian Hare and Vanessa Woods. Our beliefs about human nature shape almost everything we do as a society. Theories about wh

1d

Lab-made virus mimics COVID-19 virus

Researchers have created a virus in the lab that infects cells and interacts with antibodies just like the COVID-19 virus, but lacks the ability to cause severe disease. This safer virus makes it possible for scientists who do not have access to high-level biosafety facilities to join the effort to find drugs or vaccines for COVID-19.

1d

Engineers Develop Material That Cannot Be Cut

Even the best locks and doors are little more than an inconvenience to a motivated person with the proper tools. However, engineers from Durham University and the Fraunhofer Institute have created the first synthetic material that can block even the most determined intruders. Researchers claim the material, known as Proteus, cannot be cut. In fact, it's so tough it destroys any tool that attempts

1d

Race and ethnicity did not affect outcomes for new moms with COVID-19, finds study

Hispanic mothers had higher rates of COVID-19 than other groups of women, but ethnicity had no effect on outcomes among women with COVID-19 who delivered at two hospitals in northern Manhattan.

1d

COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

More than 1 in 5 U.S. homes lack sufficient space and plumbing facilities to comply with recommendations to limit household spread of COVID-19

1d

Chinese, American scientists leading efforts on COVID-19

Despite the political tensions between the United States and China, scientists in the two countries are working together more than ever to study the COVID-19 virus, a new study suggests.Researchers analyzed the scientific papers that researchers around the world produced on coronaviruses before and after the arrival of COVID-19. They found that the United States and China were world leaders in the

1d

Brain network mechanism causing spatial memory impairment revealed

Patients with Alzheimer's disease frequently suffer from spatial memory loss, such as no recognition of where they are, and forgetting where they put their belongings. They often show a wandering symptom, which is also a feature of spatial memory impairment. Until now, the brain network mechanism that causes spatial memory impairment had been unclear.

1d

Congress Is a Hostile Workplace

You think your job sucks? Imagine going to work every day at an office where about half of your colleagues think you're not just bad at what you do, but that you're trying to destroy the whole enterprise. In fact, they spend much of their time at work denigrating you to other colleagues, tweeting nasty things about you, and trash-talking you to the media. They even publicly try to get you fired.

1d

Magnetic field of a spiral galaxy

A new image from the VLA dramatically reveals the extended magnetic field of a spiral galaxy seen edge-on from Earth.

1d

Climate scientists increasingly ignore ecological role of indigenous peoples

In their zeal to promote the importance of climate change as an ecological driver, climate scientists increasingly are ignoring the profound role that indigenous peoples played in fire and vegetation dynamics, not only in the eastern United States but worldwide, according to researchers.

1d

Changes in farming urgent to rescue biodiversity

Humans depend on farming for their survival but this activity takes up more than one-third of the world's landmass and endangers 62% of all threatened species. However, agricultural landscapes can support biodiversity. Scientists argue that agroecological principles should be integrated in the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework to be decided at the 15th Convention of the Parties (COP15).

1d

Chinese Hackers Charged in Decade-Long Crime and Spying Spree

From defense contractors to videogame companies, the indictment details an astonishing array of victims.

1d

States Must Standardize Coronavirus Data, Former C.D.C. Director Says

Dr. Thomas Frieden proposed uniform reporting guidelines for states. Experts said the C.D.C. should have done it months ago.

1d

Scientists publish findings from 1st statewide COVID-19 random sample study in US

The results of the first statewide random sample study in the United States to measure the spread of COVID-19 indicated a general population prevalence of about 2.8 percent in Indiana.

1d

Leukemia drug shows the potential to treat aggressive pediatric brain câncer

When tested in vitro, arsenic trioxide killed tumor cells and prevented the formation of new colonies. This leukemia drug also boosted the effect of radiation therapy on medulloblastoma, a type of central nervous system tumor most common in children.

1d

Lab-made virus mimics COVID-19 virus

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a virus in the lab that infects cells and interacts with antibodies just like the COVID-19 virus, but lacks the ability to cause severe disease. This safer virus makes it possible for scientists who do not have access to high-level biosafety facilities to join the effort to find drugs or vaccines for COVID-19.

1d

New Hack Makes Phone Chargers Kill Devices Plugged Into Them

BadPower Researchers at a Chinese security lab have found a dangerous security vulnerability that allows them to trick fast chargers for smartphones into doing irreversible damage to anything hooked up to them, Android Central reports . Fast charging is a technology that allows devices such as phones or tablets to be charged at much faster speeds. The actual charger features its own microprocesso

1d

Polio vaccination campaigns restart after modelers warn about risk of 'explosive' outbreaks

Eradication drives were suspended worldwide in March to prevent spread of COVID-19

1d

A developmental clock with a checkpoint function

The group of Helge Grosshans characterized the "C. elegans oscillator", over 3,700 genes that are rhythmically expressed during the larval development of C. elegans. They demonstrated the coupling of the oscillator with molting and got insights into how it is wired. Their findings suggest that the oscillator functions as a developmental clock with a developmental checkpoint function.

1d

A developmental clock with a checkpoint function

The group of Helge Grosshans characterized the "C. elegans oscillator", over 3,700 genes that are rhythmically expressed during the larval development of C. elegans. They demonstrated the coupling of the oscillator with molting and got insights into how it is wired. Their findings suggest that the oscillator functions as a developmental clock with a developmental checkpoint function.

1d

Physicists take stop-action images of light-driven molecular reaction

Physicists have taken extremely fast snapshots of light-induced molecular ring-opening reactions — similar to those that help a human body produce vitamin D from sunlight.

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