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Scientists discover a topological magnet that exhibits exotic quantum effects

An international team led by researchers at Princeton University has uncovered a new class of magnet that exhibits novel quantum effects that extend to room temperature.

7h

Mammal cells could struggle to fight space germs

The immune systems of mammals—including humans—might struggle to detect and respond to germs from other planets, new research suggests.

7h

Vindenergi i balloner: Ny teknologi til at lagre strøm vil hæve landskabet 15 meter

Det danske firmaet AquaNamic har kurs mod et anlæg til at lagre 230 MWh energi i vandfyldte balloner under jorden. Først skal et nyt mindre anlæg dog testes.

10h

LATEST

Energy majors 'spend 90%' on fossil fuels despite climate pledges

Energy giants Shell and Total continue to invest 90 percent of their capital on planet-warming fossil fuels despite promises to slash their greenhouse gas emissions, according to an industry analysis seen exclusively by AFP.

2min

How AI Will Make Drug Discovery Low-Cost, Ultra-Fast, and Personalized

If you had to guess how long it takes for a drug to go from an idea to your pharmacy, what would you guess? Three years? Five years? How about the cost? $30 million? $100 million? Well, here's the sobering truth: 90 percent of all drug possibilities fail. The few that do succeed take an average of 10 years to reach the market and cost anywhere from $2.5 billion to $12 billion to get there. But wh

4min

CIC nanoGUNE reaches new depths in infrared nanospectroscopy

Researchers from the Nanooptics Group at CIC nanoGUNE (San Sebastian) demonstrate that nanoscale infrared imaging – which is established as a surface-sensitive technique – can be employed for chemical nanoidentification of materials that are located up to 100 nm below the surface.

6min

The best players are passionate about football

Sogndal football/soccer teams from Vestland county in Norway have now been studied by specialists. Football coaches often consider the players with the greatest passion and grit to be the best.

6min

A mouse model was used to determine the personalized treatment for a cancer patient

A team from IDIBELL and ICO, using a mouse orthotopic model, conducted a real-time personalized oncology study to test the best therapeutic option to treat a type of relapse sarcoma.

6min

Humanizing hotel brands during COVID-19 could encourage tourists to return

Hotels should build an emotional attachment with tourists when communicating during crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic if they are to encourage them to return, according to new research.The study finds that crisis communication emphasising shared emotional responses to risks enables tourists to humanise the hotel, which can subsequently create an emotional attachment. This attachment can then in

6min

Novel theory of climate dynamics: Three-pattern decomposition of global atmospheric circulation

Due to the lack of a complete theoretical system for climate prediction, the forecasting of drought and flood in summer of China has always been a major scientific problem for meteorologists. A recent study has made up for this very shortage and has offered new opportunities in improving the prediction accuracy of major climate events in China and even in the world. This work was published in SCIE

6min

The spatial consistency of summer rainfall variability between the Mongolian Plateau and North China

The regional differences and similarities of precipitation variability are hotspots in climate change research. Now a scientific research has revealed the variability in precipitation is consistent between the Mongolian Plateau and Northeast and North China, which was published in the Science China: Earth Sciences.

6min

Meet Cosmo, a bull calf designed to produce 75% male offspring

Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have successfully produced a bull calf, named Cosmo, who was genome-edited as an embryo so that he'll produce more male offspring.

6min

Genomic signature explains FDG-avidity of PSMA-suppressed prostate tumors

Scientists have uncovered the genomic signature to explain why 18F-FDG imaging performs better than PSMA-targeted imaging for prostate cancer patients with low or no expression of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). In a study published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers determined that a neuroendocrine gene signature associates with a distinct differential expression of gl

6min

Patience Is a Dirty Word

(Danny Lyon / Magnum) On August 27, 1963, John Lewis returned to his room at the Hilton on 16th and K Streets in downtown Washington, D.C. Just 23 years old, but already a veteran activist, Lewis was poised to speak at the March on Washington the next day, as the chair of the irrepressible young revolutionaries of the civil-rights movement, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Someone d

6min

Spectacular UV flash may explain how white dwarfs explode

For only the second time ever, astrophysicists have spotted a spectacular flash of ultraviolet (UV) light accompanying a white dwarf explosion.

8min

Just how sensitive is the climate to increased carbon dioxide? Scientists are narrowing in on the answer

At the dawn of the industrial revolution, the Earth's atmosphere contained 278 parts of CO₂ per million. Today, after more than two and a half centuries of fossil fuel use, that figure is around 414 parts per million (ppm). If the build-up of CO₂ continues at current rates, by 2060 it will have passed 560 ppm—more than double the level of pre-industrial times.

8min

Scientists root out wine blight genome sequence

Researchers identify Vitis riparia as phylloxera's original host and say it came to Europe from the US In the mid-19th century almost half of France's vineyards were destroyed in the great French wine blight. The previously unknown phylloxera insect, an almost microscopic aphid-like creature, went on to decimate vines across Europe before spreading to Australia, South Africa and elsewhere. It is

8min

Looking For a New Hobby? Urban Foraging Is Making a Comeback

Your city may hold a buffet of edible vegetation — with wild mushrooms, berries, nuts and more. Here are a few tips to get you started on your hunt for plants you can eat.

8min

Controversial Cave Discoveries Suggest Humans Reached Americas Much Earlier Than Thought

Archeologists say stone artifacts point to occupation more than 30,000 years ago—but not everyone is convinced — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10min

Dark energy: map gives clue about what it is – but deepens dispute about the cosmic expansion rate

Dark energy is one of the greatest mysteries in science today. We know very little about it, other than it is invisible, it fills the whole universe, and it pushes galaxies away from each other. This is making our cosmos expand at an accelerated rate. But what is it? One of the simplest explanations is that it is a "cosmological constant"—a result of the energy of empty space itself—an idea introd

20min

We discovered a new species, but war means it may now remain hidden forever

The world has a new species. My colleagues and I were hugely excited to announce it but, alas, this stingray—a distant cousin of sharks—can't be claimed to be a particularly spectacular or awe-inspiring animal. It's small—about the size of an outstretched hand—and, as far as we know, plain, without distinctive markings. But what's special about this stingray is where it came from, how we came to d

23min

Scientists appeal for public help with climate change technology project

Citizen scientists are being asked to play a role in developing cutting edge imaging technologies that will help us understand the effects of major threats to biodiversity.

23min

We discovered a new species, but war means it may now remain hidden forever

The world has a new species. My colleagues and I were hugely excited to announce it but, alas, this stingray—a distant cousin of sharks—can't be claimed to be a particularly spectacular or awe-inspiring animal. It's small—about the size of an outstretched hand—and, as far as we know, plain, without distinctive markings. But what's special about this stingray is where it came from, how we came to d

26min

Comprehensive study of Latinx U.S. immigration agents shows economic self-interest drives decisions to join ICE

With the goal of addressing why Latinxs elect to work for agencies that have systematically targeted the ethnic communities to which they belong, David Cortez, assistant professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, conducted the largest and most diverse study yet of U.S. immigration agents and his results are now published in Political Research Quarterly. He found that Latinxs—r

26min

Report shows major effects of COVID-19 on Asian American labor force

A UCLA report released today reveals the disparate economic impact the coronavirus pandemic has had on Asian Americans and points to a need to expand financial relief for all workers in order to stave off the worst effects of the crisis and ensure a strong recovery.

26min

Scientists appeal for public help with climate change technology project

Citizen scientists are being asked to play a role in developing cutting edge imaging technologies that will help us understand the effects of major threats to biodiversity.

26min

Mercury remains a persistent poison in Connecticut's Still River

Western Connecticut is known for rolling hills, rich history, and industry, such as hat making. Once called the "Hat City of the World," Danbury thrived. Anyone familiar with Lewis Carroll's Mad Hatter may also be aware of the dangers of hat making, due to the industry's use of the potent toxin mercury. Starting in the late 1700s, Danbury hat factories were a point source of pollution, dumping lar

26min

Scientists use CRISPR technology to insert sex-determining gene

Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have successfully produced a bull calf, named Cosmo, who was genome-edited as an embryo so that he'll produce more male offspring. The research was presented in a poster on July 23 at the American Society of Animal Science meeting.

26min

Video: Matthias Maurer: training for a spacewalk

ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer has been training at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, U.S. In this video, he walks us through training for a spacewalk with NASA colleagues in the 12 m deep Neutral Buoyancy Facility (NBL).

26min

Lightning strikes more than 100 million times per year in the tropics

Tropical storms often begin with an impressive display of pyrotechnics, but researchers have largely overlooked the role of lightning strikes in tropical ecosystems.

27min

Novel technology extends battery life, increases upload speed, and reduces data corruption

Researchers from the University of Southern California have created a memory device with improved material and structure and which promises to increase data upload speed, extend smartphone battery life, and reduce data corruption.

27min

Scientists use CRISPR technology to insert sex-determining gene

Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have successfully produced a bull calf, named Cosmo, who was genome-edited as an embryo so that he'll produce more male offspring. The research was presented in a poster on July 23 at the American Society of Animal Science meeting.

29min

Gorilla Glass Victus Will Be a Lot Harder to Scratch

The new smartphone glass is the first significant improvement in scratch prevention from Corning's team in seven years.

32min

Amud 9 is shown to be a Neandertal woman weighing 60 kg who lived in the Late Pleistocene

Adrián Pablos, a scientist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), led a study published in PaleoAnthropology, the official journal of the PaleoAnthropology Society, looking at the morphology and anatomy of a partial foot recovered over 25 years ago at Amud Cave (Israel), which confirms that the individual Amud 9 was a Neandertal woman from the Late Pleistocene,

32min

How a few negative online reviews early on can hurt a restaurant

Just a few negative online restaurant reviews can determine early on how many reviews a restaurant receives long-term, a new study has found.

32min

Advanced Photon Source upgrade will transform the world of scientific research

From chemistry to materials science to COVID-19 research, the APS is one of the most productive X-ray light sources in the world. An upgrade will make it a global leader among the next generation of light sources, opening new frontiers in science.

32min

Perseverance microphones fulfill long Planetary Society campaign to hear sounds from Mars

If you could stand on the surface of Mars, what would you hear? While eight missions have returned stunning views from the surface of the Red Planet, none have returned any sound.

32min

The Svalbard Vault Now Has One Million Seeds

Backup seeds—held in storage as insurance against climate change—come from nearly every country in the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

44min

x86 Beware: Nvidia May Be Eyeing an ARM Takeover From Soft Bank

SoftBank is reportedly exploring the sale of ARM and Nvidia is one of the companies that might be interested. This is a remarkably interesting idea that could have enormous consequences for the mobile and desktop markets. First, let's talk about the obvious. Once upon a time (by which I mean roughly years ago), there were three companies building x86 chipsets: Nvidia, AMD, and Intel. Nvidia was,

48min

Software of autonomous driving systems

Researchers at TU Graz and AVL focus on software systems of autonomous driving systems. They developed a method for generating safety-critical simulation scenarios and an adaptive control procedure for compensating for internal errors.

49min

Lung ultrasound shows duration, severity of coronavirus disease (COVID-19)

According to an open-access article published in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), lung ultrasound was highly sensitive for detecting abnormalities in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19), with B-lines, a thickened pleural line, and pulmonary consolidation the most commonly observed features. Additionally, the authors of this AJR article found that lung ultrasound features can

49min

New platform enables long-term tracking of stem cell-derived tissues after transplantation

A new platform reported on in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM) will enable long-term tracking of cardiomyocytes produced from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) after implantation into the heart.

49min

Study finds clothing-based racist stereotypes persist against Black men

Hardworking or lazy; trustworthy or dangerous: People often make assumptions about someone's character and personality based solely on how they're dressed. A recent study from Oregon State University finds that while more formal clothing may deflect certain racially biased assumptions, many people still hold negative stereotypes about Black men based on what they're wearing.

49min

Closure of schools during the COVID-19 lockdown could increase inequalities in primary and secondary education

A new study has highlighted the impact that the closure of schools during the COVID-19 lockdown could have to children's education, with those from disadvantaged backgrounds most affected.

50min

America's Cities Are Staggeringly Unequal

The rising tide of economic revival in many of the nation's largest urban centers has definitively not lifted all boats. And that may help explain why so many cities have faced waves of protest this year. In every major American metropolitan area, including many of those that have prospered most since the 2008 financial crash, huge gaps still separate white people and people of color—not only in

51min

These Specialty CBD Shots Provide a Productive Day's Work and a Productive Night's Sleep

It seems like more and more people are discovering the benefits that CBD oil can bring to the human body and mind. If you've been looking for a way to try it for yourself but haven't been able to decide on the right product, these two single-serving CBD shots from B GREAT are a great place to start. The Relax Shot is designed to help you relax in order to get the rest you need, while the Focus sh

54min

Image: Mars rover revival

As Mars exploration prepares for a rebirth, a European rover tunes up its gear for the challenges ahead.

56min

The four best ways to cook a burger

Think you're good at cooking burgers now? You might be even better after you read this. (Zac Cain/Unsplash/) This story was originally featured on Saveur . Whether you've got a single skillet or a fully stocked kitchen—or perhaps you're just itching to light that new grill —there is a burger method that's right for you. Below, we break down the best ways to cook burgers on the stovetop, in a toas

1h

UK spends £100m on new Covid-19 vaccine facility

Centre will open in December 2021 and is part of government's push to boost manufacturing capacity

1h

Top job for PTSD service dogs: Disrupt anxiety

Disrupting episodes of anxiety ranks among the most important tasks a service dog can provide to veterans with PTSD, research finds. Science has shown that service dogs can benefit some veterans with PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). But the exact role they play in the day-to-day lives of veterans—and the helpfulness of the tasks they perform—is less clear. The new study explores what traine

1h

The genome of the phylloxera that devastated European vines in the nineteenth century, deciphered

The genome of the phylloxera, an insect that caused plagues that devastated European vines in the 19th century, has been deciphered by an international team involving researchers Miquel Barberà and David Martínez, from the Institute for Integrative Systems Biology (I2SysBio), center of the University of Valencia, and the CSIC. The study is published in the journal BMC Biology.

1h

The genome of the phylloxera that devastated European vines in the nineteenth century, deciphered

The genome of the phylloxera, an insect that caused plagues that devastated European vines in the 19th century, has been deciphered by an international team involving researchers Miquel Barberà and David Martínez, from the Institute for Integrative Systems Biology (I2SysBio), center of the University of Valencia, and the CSIC. The study is published in the journal BMC Biology.

1h

Ionic spiderwebs that imitate dual functions in real spiderwebs

A team of researchers from Seoul National University and Eumam Middle School has developed a type of ionic spiderweb that is able to imitate dual functions found with real spiderwebs. In their paper published in the journal Science Robotics, the group describes their spiderwebs and possible uses for them.

1h

How to Understand Coronavirus Numbers

There's more to COVID-19 numbers than what you see on TV.

1h

How a few negative online reviews early on can hurt a restaurant

Just a few negative online restaurant reviews can determine early on how many reviews a restaurant receives long-term, a new study has found. The study, published online earlier this month in the journal Papers in Applied Geography, also found that a neighborhood's median household income affected whether restaurants were rated at all.

1h

The Svalbard Vault Now Has One Million Seeds

Backup seeds—held in storage as insurance against climate change—come from nearly every country in the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Co-author of controversial hydroxychloroquine study has 2018 paper corrected for "unintentional mistake"

Didier Raoult, whose claims that hydroxychloroquine can treat COVID-19 have been widely disputed, has had a 2018 paper corrected for what his team says was unintentional duplication of a figure. Here's the correction for "Identification of rickettsial immunoreactive proteins using a proximity ligation assay Western blotting and the traditional immunoproteomic approach," which came four months … Co

1h

Physicists develop technology to transform information from microwaves to optical light

Physicists at the University of Alberta have developed technology that can translate data from microwaves to optical light—an advance that has promising applications in the next generation of super-fast quantum computers and secure fiber-optic telecommunications.

1h

Humans may have reached the Americas 15,000 years earlier than previously thought

Humans may have reached the Americas over 30,000 years ago, new research from international teams of scientists shows—a period 15,000 years earlier than previously thought.

1h

Sharks are disappearing from the world's oceans

Shark populations around the world have seen an alarming and continual drop in the past 70 years, according to a new study. The findings suggest that despite conservation efforts, many species have become threatened and endangered and remain at risk because of overfishing and habitat loss, researchers say. Continued improvements are needed in many parts of the world to slow and reverse declines,

1h

New reintroduction tactics boost eastern quoll survival rate

An experimental research project led by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) has found a new way to boost the survival rates of eastern quolls reintroduced to the Australian Capital Territory.

1h

New reintroduction tactics boost eastern quoll survival rate

An experimental research project led by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) has found a new way to boost the survival rates of eastern quolls reintroduced to the Australian Capital Territory.

1h

Conservation: Reef sharks are in major decline worldwide

The crash in shark numbers, caused largely by over-fishing, could have dire consequences for corals.

1h

Cereal accessories for hard-core breakfasters

Eat your breakfast exactly how you like it. (Freestocks via Unsplash/) Sometimes when you look a little closer at what you thought was a good relationship, you start to see problems that you've ignored so frequently, you've forgotten there might be a solution. Take cereal and milk, for instance. When cow, almond, or oat milk enters the equation, the relationship doesn't feel so light and sweet. W

1h

Herd Immunity and COVID-19

One of the challenges of dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, both on an individual patient level and public health level, is that this is a novel virus. We don't yet have a lot of experience with it or clinical data about how it behaves, what it is capable of doing, and how the immune system deals with it. We are learning fast, but there is still much we don't know, especially, of course, about l

1h

Measuring how long quantum tunneling takes

A team of researchers at the University of Toronto has found a way to measure how long quantum tunneling takes to happen. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes experiments they conducted and the result they found when attempting to measure how long quantum tunneling takes under certain circumstances.

1h

Leica M10-R Digital Rangefinder Review: Dreamy but Decadent

The latest entry in the company's legendary M-series is a luxurious camera for a different world.

2h

Giant waves of sand are moving on Mars

Migrating "megaripples" point to stronger-than-expected winds

2h

2h

Fat-burning neurons in mice grow with leptin

Fat-burning neurons have previously unrecognized powers. If they get the right signal, they have an astonishing capacity to grow, research in mice shows. There's no doubt that you can lose fat by eating less or moving more —yet after decades of research, the biology underlying this equation remains mysterious. What really ignites the breakdown of stored fat molecules are these nerves embedded in

2h

The Beautiful Things inside Your Head: Winners of the 10th Annual Art of Neuroscience Contest

The top works—and our favorites—range from interactive pieces to a pen-and-paper drawing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

The Beautiful Things inside Your Head: Winners of the 10th Annual Art of Neuroscience Contest

The top works—and our favorites—range from interactive pieces to a pen-and-paper drawing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

The Beautiful Things inside Your Head: Winners of the 10th Annual Art of Neuroscience Contest

The top works—and our favorites—range from interactive pieces to a pen-and-paper drawing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Bias in 'the science' on coronavirus? Britain has been here before | Sonia Sodha

Lessons about scientific transparency from the BSE scandal have been forgotten as the government grapples this crisis Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage It became the defining moment of the BSE crisis. In an attempt to persuade the public that it was perfectly safe to eat beef, the then agriculture minister, John Gummer, fed his four-year-old daughter a burger on camera

2h

The Power of Scientific Brainstorming

The process can be inefficient, but it can also get research out of a rut — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Venus May Be Geologically Active After All

Venus is sometimes called Earth's "sister planet," a distinction that came about before we knew how profoundly unpleasant it was. The crushing atmospheric pressure and clouds of acid make it an unappealing vacation spot, but scientists may have made a discovery that makes it just a little more Earth-like. Research from the University of Maryland suggests Venus may be volcanically active like Eart

2h

A giant impact may have caused cracks all over Jupiter's moon Ganymede

New analysis of images of cracks on Ganymede indicate that they cover most of the surface in concentric rings, suggesting a giant impact rocked the moon 4 billion years ago

2h

China's Tianwen-1 mission is on its way to Mars

The news: China's Tianwen-1 mission to Mars successfully lifted off shortly before 1 p.m. local time on Thursday, July 23, Chinese media reported. The mission, which includes a lander, rover, and orbiter, is expected to arrive at the Red Planet in February 2021. China is the first nation to try to transport all three components to Mars at once. If the landing is successful, it will become the sec

2h

Laser techniques and photochemistry find elusive molecular building block

A key molecular building block in phosphorus chemistry has been elusive, until now. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa researchers have discovered a simple and versatile way to identify the Hückel aromatic cyclotriphosphazene molecule along with its isomer (which has the same molecular formula, but differs structurally).

2h

Researchers reveal lineage logics of retinal neurogenesis and reprogramming

In a study published online in the Journal of Cell Biology on July 23, the researchers from Dr. He Jie's Lab at the Institute of Neuroscience, Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences systematically analyzed the lineage progression in the zebrafish retina and provided a proof-of-concept method to get specific neuron types through lineage

2h

Daily briefing: First photo of a Sun-like star with its planets

Nature, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02207-6 See the first direct image of a star like our Sun with multiple planets orbiting it. Plus: the four coronavirus vaccine front-runners, and why the best time to argue about replication is before you do it.

2h

Researchers reveal lineage logics of retinal neurogenesis and reprogramming

In a study published online in the Journal of Cell Biology on July 23, the researchers from Dr. He Jie's Lab at the Institute of Neuroscience, Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences systematically analyzed the lineage progression in the zebrafish retina and provided a proof-of-concept method to get specific neuron types through lineage

2h

China launches its first independent mission to Mars

Unmanned flight is latest marker in ambitious programme to outpace the US in space

2h

Why medicines must be tested in the developing world

For one, it builds expertise. Vietnam's Sars 'dividend' has helped keep its Covid-19 deaths at zero

2h

A Wisconsin City Experiments With a Faster, DIY Covid-19 Test

In a former boxing gym in Racine, firefighters are trying out a spit test that's simpler and cheaper than PCR. Could it change how we screen for the virus?

2h

How Taiwan's Unlikely Digital Minister Hacked the Pandemic

Audrey Tang says tech can build trust, tame misinformation, and strengthen democracy. Her plan might even work in the US.

2h

Neuroscience Could Be the Key to Getting People to Wear Masks

In a study, people responded to messages that resonated with them personally—up to a certain extent. The results could help shape responses to future pandemics.

2h

Spelet om sockret

Blir man sjuk av socker? Sedan 2005 har EU:s livsmedelsmyndighet brottats med frågan. Turerna har varit många och trycket hårt från sockerlobbyn. I år görs ett nytt försök att ta fram en enhetlig rekommendation för socker inom EU.

3h

Stabilization of ferulic acid in topical gel formulation via nanoencapsulation and pH optimization

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68732-6

3h

Using an ontology of the human cardiovascular system to improve the classification of histological images

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69037-4

3h

Sub-half-cycle field transients from shock-wave-assisted soliton self-compression

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67134-y

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Gene expression profiling of glioblastoma cell lines depending on TP53 status after tumor-treating fields (TTFields) treatment

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68473-6

3h

Epigenetic alterations in cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (Por) in sperm of rats exposed to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69204-7 Epigenetic alterations in cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase ( Por ) in sperm of rats exposed to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)

3h

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Phosphate-dependent aggregation of [KL]n peptides affects their membranolytic activity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69162-0 Phosphate-dependent aggregation of [KL] n peptides affects their membranolytic activity

3h

Två exoplaneter fångade på bild

För första gången har astronomer lyckats ta en bild av två planeter runt en avlägsen stjärna.

3h

Coronavirus Live Updates: U.S. Nears 4 Million Cases

The president's proposal had emerged as an obstacle to Senate Republicans' plans for a stimulus package. Alabama, California, Idaho and Texas recorded daily death records.

3h

Welcome to the Great Indoors: Museums Beckon in the Berkshires

At Mass MoCA and the Clark, there are timely new exhibitions, but our critic finds as much relevance in a still life by Manet, or an Ingres drawing.

3h

How long does it take to get to Mars – and why is it so difficult?

Summer 2020 is a popular time for missions to Mars because of the way the planets align – but how long does it take to get there?

3h

Japan Prepares for Hayabusa2's Daring Return to Earth

In December the spacecraft will swing past our planet and drop off samples collected from an ancient asteroid — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Study: Gender inequality increases in media during pandemic

Gender inequalities in newsrooms have increased during the coronavirus pandemic according to a survey published Thursday by the International Federation of Journalists.

3h

There's a dangerous virus brewing in pigs—but there's no need to panic yet

Viruses grow and evolve in many animal hosts, and pigs allow them to become especially dangerous. (Unsplash/) We first learned about COVID-19 when headlines proclaimed that the virus was already spreading like wildfire amongst humans. But what if there was a way to catch these viruses before they become efficiently transmissible between humans? In a study published last month in Proceedings of th

3h

Japan Prepares for Hayabusa2's Daring Return to Earth

In December the spacecraft will swing past our planet and drop off samples collected from an ancient asteroid — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Github gemmer 21 terabyte data i isen på Svalbard

En helt særlig backup findes langt, langt nordpå og dybt, dybt under jorden, hvor Github har valgt at gemme et imponerende stort udsnit af den kode, brugerne har lavet og lagt tilgængeligt for offentligheden.

3h

It's Time to Get Serious About Research Fraud

Only a small fraction of research misconduct ever comes to light. Part of the problem is the ambiguity around how to define research misconduct. Plus, many research institutions, left to police themselves, brush misconduct investigations under the carpet. Fortunately, there's a relatively simple fix.

3h

Abolish the Trump Administration, Not Homeland Security

In the memoir Decision Points , President George W. Bush looked back ruefully on one of his greatest mistakes. No, it wasn't the war in Iraq. It was his failure to invoke the Insurrection Act and send active military troops into New Orleans during the 2005 Hurricane Katrina disaster. In retrospect, the troops were needed. Under the Constitution, which offers a "guarantee to every State in this Un

3h

Why did a journal suddenly retract a 45-year-old paper over lack of informed consent?

A journal has retracted a 45-year-old case study over concerns that the authors had failed to obtain proper informed consent from the family they'd described. The article, "Stickler syndrome report of a second Australian family," appeared in Pediatric Radiology, a Springer Nature title, in 1975. The first author was Kazimierz Kozlowski, a prominent radiologist who … Continue reading

3h

Ni år efter uheld: Nu er kinesiske rover på vej mod Mars

Efter en uheldsramt mission i samarbejde med Rusland har Kina taget sagen i egen hånd. Til februar ankommer landets første rover til Mars.

4h

The world needs a 'people's vaccine' for coronavirus, not a big-pharma monopoly | Helen Clark and Winnie Byanyima

AstraZeneca and others should not own a lucrative patent on a medicine that is needed by poor as well as rich nations • See all our coronavirus coverage • Helen Clark is a former prime minister of New Zealand and Winnie Byanyima is UN undersecretary general To bring an end to the pandemic, the world needs a vaccine. Promising early trial results for the vaccine developed by Oxford University sugg

4h

China launches space rocket in ambitious Mars landing mission

Tianwen-1 mission attempts to put China in 'elite' club of countries conquering red planet China has launched its most ambitious Mars mission yet in a bold attempt to join the US in successfully landing a spacecraft on the red planet. With engines blazing orange, a Long March 5 carrier rocket took off on Thursday at about 12.40 pm local time (0540 BST) from Hainan Island, south of the Chinese mai

4h

Genetic testing for heart diseases may help patients and families identify risks

Some cardiovascular diseases may be inherited, including cardiomyopathies, arrhythmic disorders, aneurysms and certain types of lipid disorders. The implications of genetic testing extend beyond the original patient, and family members at risk of the same cardiovascular condition should also undergo testing. Genetic counseling is essential both before and after genetic testing.

4h

AI-agenter kan lära sig att kommunicera effektivt

Artificiella agenter kan på egen hand kan lära sig att kommunicera på ett artificiellt språk som liknar mänskligt språk. De visar fyra Göteborgsforskare som tagit fram en metod för att studera hur språk utvecklas som ett effektivt verktyg för att beskriva mentala bilder. Artificiella agenter är mjukvarumoduler som är aktiva i en datormiljö. Fyra forskare från Göteborgs universitet och Chalmers jo

4h

Photodegradable branched polyethylenes from carbon monoxide copolymerization under benign conditions

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17542-5 Small amounts of in-chain keto groups render polyethylene (PE) photodegradable, a desirable feature in view of environmental plastics pollution. Here the authors introduce low ketone content by copolymerization in organic solvent or under aqueous conditions at moderate pressures.

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Targeting adhesion to the vascular niche to improve therapy for acute myeloid leukemia

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17594-7 Niche hijack by malignant cells is considered to be a prominent cause of disease relapse. Barbier and colleagues uncover (E)-selectin as a novel mediator of malignant cell survival and regeneration which, upon blockade, has the potential to significantly improve therapeutic outcomes.

4h

Structural mechanism for gating of a eukaryotic mechanosensitive channel of small conductance

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17538-1 Mechanosensitive channels transduce physical force into electrochemical signaling in processes such as hearing, touch, proprioception, osmoregulation, and morphogenesis. Here, authors use cryo-electron microscopy to provide structural insights into the mechanical gating mechanism.

4h

Microbial diversity drives carbon use efficiency in a model soil

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17502-z Microbial carbon use efficiency has an important role in soil C cycling. Here the authors test the interactive effects of temperature and moisture and manipulate microbial community composition in soil microcosms, showing a positive relationship between microbial diversity and CUE that is contingent on abiotic c

4h

Author Correction: Combined ground and aerial measurements resolve vent-specific gas fluxes from a multi-vent volcanic system

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17658-8

4h

An active mechanical Willis meta-layer with asymmetric polarizabilities

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17529-2 Here, the authors experimentally demonstrate abilities of a mechanical Willis meta-layer, in beams and plates, for independently engineering transmission and reflection coefficients of flexural waves in both amplitude and phase and nonreciprocal wave propagation.

4h

Fast growth of large-grain and continuous MoS2 films through a self-capping vapor-liquid-solid method

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17517-6 Here, the authors develop a self-capping vapour-liquid-solid reaction to fabricate large-grain continuous MoS2 films, whereby an intermediate liquid phase-Na2Mo2O7 is formed through a eutectic reaction of MoO3 and NaF, followed by sulphurisation into MoS2.

4h

Astrocytes modulate sensory-evoked neuronal network activity

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17536-3 Astrocytes respond to neurotransmitters with calcium transients stimulating the release of gliotransmitters that regulate synaptic and neuronal functions. Here, the authors show that cortical astrocytes also respond to sensory inputs and regulate sensory-evoked neuronal network activity.

4h

Australian Student Files Climate Change Lawsuit Against Government

A 23-year-old law student filed a class-action suit accusing Australia of failing to disclose financial risks from climate change. Experts say it is the first of its kind.

5h

Moon bears: Korean campaigners call for farm closures

Animal rights campaigners are calling for the closure of hundreds of moon bear farms.

5h

What kind of face mask gives the best protection against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

5h

China's successful launch of Mars mission seals global era in deep-space exploration

Nature, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02187-7 Tianwen-1 is the second of three spacecraft to take off this month for the red planet.

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Kapløb med USA: Kina affyrer Mars-sonde med succes

Det er højsæson for Mars-missioner denne sommer. Seneste forsøg står Kina for.

6h

6h

Study on electroless Cu plating quality of in situ TiCp

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69105-9 Study on electroless Cu plating quality of in situ TiC p

6h

Long-range inputome of cortical neurons containing corticotropin-releasing hormone

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68115-x

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7h

The English (Bulldog) Patient: What A Travesty of Canine Health Teaches us About Cognitive Dissonance

Bulldogs are cute, loveable, and borderline an abuse to breed. Their adorable faces are the result of intense selective pressure that is accompanied by a large number of misery-inducing health conditions for the pet, and cognitive dissonance for the owner.

7h

Black waters: Oil spills pollute northeast Syria creeks

In his village near a northeast Syria oil facility, Abdulkarim Matar said he has watched his horses die because of oil spills that have polluted waterways in the resource-rich region.

7h

China launches Mars probe in space race with US

China launched a rover to Mars on Thursday, a journey coinciding with a similar US mission as the powers take their rivalry into deep space.

7h

New research identifies the rules that termites use to build their nests

The local curvature of a wall has been identified as the simple building 'rule' that termites use to build their complex nests, according to new research conducted by the University of Roehampton.

7h

New research identifies the rules that termites use to build their nests

The local curvature of a wall has been identified as the simple building 'rule' that termites use to build their complex nests, according to new research conducted by the University of Roehampton.

7h

Big wheel ruts, big economic losses

Excessively wet field conditions at harvest throughout the North Central and upper Midwest regions resulted in many fields with deep wheel-traffic compaction as evident by deep ruts from combines and grain wagons. Although this is a common occurrence during years with excessive moisture at harvest, the subsequent economic costs are rarely, if ever, projected for large regions.

7h

Mammal cells could struggle to fight space germs

The immune systems of mammals—including humans—might struggle to detect and respond to germs from other planets, new research suggests.

7h

Study of US mass shootings, firearms homicides suggests two-pronged policy approach

Over the past 30 years, mass shootings have fueled calls for changes in gun ownership and concealed carry legislation, but few studies have evaluated whether permissive gun policies deter mass shootings, and none have determined if their effects are the same on firearms homicides. A new study examined the impact of household gun ownership and concealed carry legislation on annual counts of mass sh

7h

Scientists develop new material for longer-lasting fuel cells

New research suggests that graphene—made in a specific way- could be used to make more durable hydrogen fuel cells for cars.

7h

Donald Trump's assault on the WHO is deeply worrying for global health | Peter Beaumont

A diplomacy shaped around self-serving tittle-tattle now risks lives and undermines America's standing in the world The campaign by the Trump administration against the World Health Organization has often seemed faintly preposterous. Over the months of the coronavirus pandemic its untruths and hyperbole have been dismissed by many as iterations of Trumpspeak , whose main purpose has been to distr

7h

7h

OneWeb: Minister overrode warning about £400m investment

MPs will probe a £400m investment in the satellite firm after a top civil servant warned of financial risk.

8h

Israeli firm says micro-pancreas to 'cure' diabetes ready for UK trials

Exclusive: hopes testing can begin in 2021 on product intended to free people of need for insulin injections An Israeli company claiming to have created a tiny micro-pancreas that can "cure" diabetes for millions of people has said it will submit a request next month for human clinical trials in the UK. Betalin Therapeutics said its "bio-artificial" pancreas aims to free patients of the need for

8h

China's Tianwen-1 Mars rover rockets away from Earth

The six-wheeled robot will arrive in orbit around the Red Planet in February.

8h

Multi-faceted epigenetic dysregulation of gene expression promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17227-z The epigenetic landscape of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) at genome-wide high resolution is incompletely studied. Here, the authors performed an integrated multi-omics analysis of ESCC and non-tumor tissues to define the genome-wide methylome landscape and epigenetic alterations to uncover oncogenic

9h

Mammal cells could struggle to fight space germs

The immune systems of mammals – including humans – might struggle to detect and respond to germs from other planets, new research suggests.

9h

Big wheel ruts, big economic losses

Research suggests the economic loss from wheel-traffic compaction for farmers in North Dakota and Minnesota could exceed 1 billion USD.

9h

Study of US mass shootings, firearms homicides suggests two-pronged policy approach

A new study examined the impact of household gun ownership and concealed carry legislation on annual counts of mass shootings and homicides from firearms in the United States over the last 25 years. The study found that mass shootings occur disproportionately in states with higher levels of gun ownership, while rates of firearms homicides are higher in states with permissive concealed carry polici

9h

IUDs successfully manage menstrual pain in adolescents with disabilities

Adolescents and young women with disabilities can stop periods and get relief from distressing menstrual symptoms with IUDs, in the largest study in this population to date.

9h

When will we have a Covid-19 vaccine? Live Q&A

There has been notable progress on the clinical trial front this week. Our reporters break down what it all means

9h

Roman amphoras discovered in frozen seafood shop in Spain

Shop-owner's son had apparently come across ancient artefacts while out fishing Police conducting a routine inspection of a frozen seafood shop in eastern Spain have netted 13 Roman amphoras and an 18th-century metal anchor, all of which were apparently found by the owner's son on fishing trips and used to decorate the premises. After stopping in at the shop in the coastal town of Santa Pola, in

9h

Are we in the midst of a new space race? – podcast

From Elon Musk's SpaceX, to Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic and Jeff Bezos's Blue Horizon – there is a growing interest in space exploration by some of the world's least publicity-shy billionaires. But does the 2020 launch of the SpaceX Dragon 2 spacecraft really mark the beginning of a new privately financed space race? And what do recent international launches, such as the UAE's Hope probe to

9h

The path from Covid-19 to a new social contract

Pandemic offers world leaders an opportunity to rebuild faith in liberal democracy

10h

Are we in the midst of a new space race?

From Elon Musk's SpaceX, to Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic and Jeff Bezos's Blue Horizon – there is a growing interest in space exploration by some of the world's least publicity-shy billionaires. But does the 2020 launch of the SpaceX Dragon 2 spacecraft really mark the beginning of a new privately financed space race? And what do recent international launches, such as the UAE's Hope probe to

10h

Antibody testing in England slumps as 'game-changer' scheme founders

Questions over immunity and eligibility and lack of clear strategy leave manufacturers in limbo

11h

Forskare: "Sveriges corona-återhämtning måste vara grön"

Den ekonomiska återhämtningen efter covid-19 måste inkludera stora investeringar i hållbar teknik, enligt en ny rapport från svenska forskare. Annars riskerar Sverige att missa klimatmålen för Parisavtalet .

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12h

China's Mars Tianwen-1 Mission Launches on Months-Long Journey

The successful launch of an orbiter, lander and rover was the second trip to Mars of the summer.

12h

New role for white blood cells in the developing brain

Whether white blood cells can be found in the brain has been controversial, and their role there a complete mystery. Scientists describe a population of specialized brain-resident immune cells discovered in the mouse and human brain, and show that the presence of white blood cells is essential for normal brain development in mice.

12h

Brain builds and uses maps of social networks, physical space, in the same way

Even in these social-distanced days, we keep in our heads a map of our relationships with other people: family, friends, coworkers and how they relate to each other. New research shows that we put together this social map in much the same way that we assemble a map of physical places and things.

12h

Flood data from 500 years: Rivers and climate change in Europe

Studying historical documents from 5 centuries, scientists were able to compare flood events from the past with recent flood events in Europe. This combination of historical and hydrological research provides evidence for the strong influence of climate change on rivers and floodings. Floods tend to be larger, the timing has shifted and the relationship between flood occurrence and air temperature

12h

Mapping the brain's sensory gatekeeper

Researchers have mapped the thalamic reticular nucleus in unprecedented detail, revealing that the region contains two distinct subnetworks of neurons with different functions. The findings could offer researchers much more specific targets for designing drugs that could alleviate attention deficits, sleep disruption, and sensory hypersensitivity.

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Linear resistivity and Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) spin liquid behavior in a quantum critical metal with spin-1/2 fermions [Physics]

"Strange metals" with resistivity depending linearly on temperature T down to low T have been a long-standing puzzle in condensed matter physics. Here, we consider a lattice model of itinerant spin-1/2 fermions interacting via onsite Hubbard interaction and random infinite-ranged spin–spin interaction. We show that the quantum critical point associated…

12h

Dynamic CCN3 expression in the murine CNS does not confer essential roles in myelination or remyelination [Neuroscience]

CCN3 is a matricellular protein that promotes oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and myelination in vitro and ex vivo. CCN3 is therefore a candidate of interest in central nervous system (CNS) myelination and remyelination, and we sought to investigate the expression and role of CCN3 during these processes. We found CCN3…

12h

Early IL-1 receptor blockade in severe inflammatory respiratory failure complicating COVID-19 [Immunology and Inflammation]

Around the tenth day after diagnosis, ∼20% of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)−associated pneumonia evolve toward severe oxygen dependence (stage 2b) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (stage 3) associated with systemic inflammation often termed a "cytokine storm." Because interleukin-1 (IL-1) blocks the production of IL-6 and other proinflammatory cytokines,…

12h

No clear association emerges between intergenerational relationships and COVID-19 fatality rates from macro-level analyses [Social Sciences]

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 originated in Wuhan, China at the end of 2019 and rapidly spread in more than 100 countries. Researchers in different fields have been working on finding explanations for the unequal impact of the virus and deaths from the associated coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)…

12h

A connectomics approach to understanding a retinal disease [Neuroscience]

Macular telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel), a late-onset macular degeneration, has been linked to a loss in the retina of Müller glial cells and the amino acid serine, synthesized by the Müller cells. The disease is confined mainly to a central retinal region called the MacTel zone. We have used electron…

12h

Calcium and hydroxyapatite binding site of human vitronectin provides insights to abnormal deposit formation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The human blood protein vitronectin (Vn) is a major component of the abnormal deposits associated with age-related macular degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, and many other age-related disorders. Its accumulation with lipids and hydroxyapatite (HAP) has been demonstrated, but the precise mechanism for deposit formation remains unknown. Using a combination of solution…

12h

News Feature: Finding a vaccine for misinformation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

With deliberate deception a growing threat online, social scientists are devising ways to fight back with "cognitive inoculations" In early March, after a wave of coronavirus cases struck a Muslim congregation in India, the hashtag #CoronaJihad went viral on Indian Twitter, and Islamophobic messages began to surge on social media….

12h

Opinion: It's ethical to test promising coronavirus vaccines against less-promising ones [Social Sciences]

With multiple candidate vaccines against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) entering efficacy testing, researchers and ethicists should come to grips with the distinctive medical ethics questions that could arise. An important one is determining the most ethical way to proceed when comparing a purportedly promising vaccine against a…

12h

Tesla Will Build 'GigaTexas' to Crank Out Cybertrucks

On the heels of another profitable quarter, despite a coronavirus-induced shutdown of its California plant, the electric-auto maker announced its fourth factory.

12h

Genomic basis of bat superpowers revealed: Like how they survive deadly viruses

The genetic material that codes for bat adaptations and superpowers – such as the ability to fly, to use sound to move effortlessly in complete darkness, to tolerate and survive potentially deadly viruses, and to resist aging and cancer – has been revealed and published in Nature.

12h

How neurons reshape inside body fat to boost its calorie-burning capacity

Scientists have found that a hormone tells the brain to dramatically restructure neurons embedded in fat tissue. Their work widens our understanding of how the body regulates its energy consumption, and how obesity might be treated in the future.

12h

International analysis narrows range of climate's sensitivity to CO2

The most advanced and comprehensive analysis of climate sensitivity yet undertaken has revealed with more confidence than ever before how sensitive the Earth's climate is to carbon dioxide. The new research, revealed in a 165 page, peer-reviewed journal article finds that the true climate sensitivity is unlikely to be in the lowest part of the 1.5-4.5°C range.

12h

Sharks almost gone from many reefs

A massive global study of the world's reefs has found sharks are 'functionally extinct' on nearly one in five of the reefs surveyed.

12h

Dragonflies reveal mercury pollution levels across US national parks

Research confirms dragonfly larvae as "biosentinels" to indicate mercury pollution and presents the first-ever survey of mercury pollution in the U.S. National Park System.

12h

C++ er svaret – men hvad var egentligt spørgsmålet?

Bjarne Stroustrup giver et omfattende tilbageblik på sprogets nylige historie og udvikling.

13h

Twitter data reveals global communication network

Twitter mentions show distinct community structure patterns resulting from communication preferences of individuals affected by physical distance between users and commonalities, such as shared language and history. While previous investigations have identified patterns using other data, such as mobile phone usage and Facebook friend connections, research now looks at the collective effect of mess

13h

Smile: Atomic imaging finds root of tooth decay

Researchers combined complementary imaging techniques to explore the atomic structure of human enamel, exposing tiny chemical flaws in the fundamental building blocks of our teeth. The findings could help scientists prevent or possibly reverse tooth decay.

13h

Portable blood ammonia detector

This device offers a significantly faster and easier method for detecting ammonia levels in blood, which can reach dangerous levels in people with certain diseases and genetic conditions.

13h

Cancer metabolic pathway identified as target for therapy

Fighting cancer often means employing a suite of techniques to target the tumor and prevent it from growing and spreading to other parts of the body. It's no small feat — the American Cancer Society predicts roughly 1.8 million new cases of cancer in the country in 2020, underscoring the need to identify additional ways to outsmart the runaway cells.

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Cricket Avoids Being Bat Food By Doing Nothing

The sword-tailed cricket can discern bats's echolocation signals by only responding to calls of a certain volume, at which point it plummets out of their approach.

13h

Do stone tools put humans in America 30K years ago?

New evidence suggests the first humans arrived in America at least 30,000 years ago, about 15,000 earlier than previously thought, say researchers. The scientists conducted DNA analyses of ancient remains from animal and plant material found during the excavations of the Chiquihuite Cave in Northern Mexico. "The article in Nature is a scientific hand grenade," says Eske Willerslev, professor and

13h

The Atlantic Daily: The Limits of Anti-racism Books

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . GETTY / THE ATLANTIC As America continues to reckon with systemic racism, anti-racist reading lists are everywhere. But two of our writers warn against treating even well-intended works as a cure

13h

Republican divisions threaten new stimulus proposal

Party's rank-and-file fears Americans are growing dependent on government assistance

14h

Autopsies of COVID-19 patients reveal surprising effects of heart damage

LSU Health New Orleans pathologists conducted autopsies on 22 patients that died of the novel coronavirus. The team discovered that damage is not typical inflammation of the heart, as is common with myocarditis. These research findings could have implications in treating COVID-19. Science is not an infallible truth waiting to be discovered, but the process of acquiring knowledge through experimen

14h

Markerless motion capture technology could help skeleton athletes' training

Researchers have developed the first non-invasive way of measuring athletes' push start performance.

14h

Ultra-small, parasitic bacteria found in groundwater, moose — and you

Saccharibacteria within a mammalian host are more diverse than ever anticipated, according to recent research. The researchers also discovered that certain members of the bacteria are found in the oral cavity of humans, the guts of other mammals, and in groundwater.

14h

Fasting diet could boost breast cancer therapy

A team of scientists has found that a fasting-mimicking diet combined with hormone therapy has the potential to help treat breast cancer, according to newly published animal studies and small clinical trials in humans.

14h

Coronavirus live news: California sees record daily cases as global infections top 15m

California Covid-19 cases pass New York's after record day ; WHO emergencies chief says vaccinations unlikely before 2021; global cases pass 15m. Follow the latest updates US daily coronavirus deaths surpass 1,000 for first time since June California surpasses New York as state with most coronavirus cases after record day Nearly a quarter of people in Delhi have had coronavirus, study finds See a

14h

Show Me How to Say No to This – Issue 88: Love & Sex

In the 2004 film, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind , a heartbroken man played by Jim Carrey undergoes an experimental treatment to erase memories of his ex-girlfriend, played by Kate Winslet, following their painful breakup. When the film came out, using drugs or other technologies to meddle with memory, especially as a way of healing from a traumatic relationship, was not exactly feasible i

14h

The Brave New World of Chemical Romance – Issue 88: Love & Sex

With Hamilton on my mind, I had a fanciful thought while reading the new book Love Drugs: The Chemical Future of Relationships . The Founding Father, stressed and tired and focused on getting his bill for a national bank through Congress, could have saved himself a lot of grief if, in his moment of weakness with the temptress Maria Reynolds, he'd had an anti-love drug to cool his loins. Instead h

14h

Your Brain in Love – Issue 88: Love & Sex

Helen Fisher first appeared in Nautilus in 2015 with her article, " Casual Sex May Be Improving America's Marriages ." Since then we've interviewed the biological anthropologist a host of times, anxious to hear her insights into the ties that bind and fray. Fisher made her name in popular science in 1992 with her book, Anatomy of Love , tracing the evolution of love from prehistoric to neuroscien

14h

Scientists develop new material for longer-lasting fuel cells

New research suggests that graphene — made in a specific way — could be used to make more durable hydrogen fuel cells for cars

14h

Cricket Avoids Being Bat Food By Doing Nothing

The sword-tailed cricket can discern bats's echolocation signals by only responding to calls of a certain volume, at which point it plummets out of their approach. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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China is sending its first rover to Mars with the Tianwen-1 mission

China is launching its first solo interplanetary mission, called Tianwen-1, to Mars on 23 July. If all goes well, the ambitious mission will arrive in February 2021

14h

Raising legal age for handgun sales to 21 linked to fewer adolescent suicides

Restricting the sale of handguns to those aged 21 or older is associated with a reduction in suicide rates among adolescents in the United States, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

15h

Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, linked to lower risk of death

Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, are associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, finds an analysis of the latest evidence published by The BMJ today.

15h

Covid-19 Patients No Longer Need Tests to End Isolation

Under new guidelines from the C.D.C., recovering coronavirus patients should be free to resume normal activity after 10 days, if they have no fever or other symptoms.

15h

Author Correction: Tropical forest soil carbon stocks do not increase despite 15 years of doubled litter inputs

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69595-7 Author Correction: Tropical forest soil carbon stocks do not increase despite 15 years of doubled litter inputs

15h

Student files climate change lawsuit against Australian government

Katta O'Donnell is accusing Canberra of failing to disclose risks from climate change to its bonds.

15h

Home insulation scheme must guarantee high-quality work, say campaigners

Homeowners using a energy efficiency grant must be protected from bad quality work, campaigners say.

15h

Apple's Hackable iPhones Are Finally Here

Last year, Apple announced a special device just for hackers. The phone—for approved researchers only—will soon go into circulation.

15h

Silver-plated gold nanostars detect early cancer biomarkers

Biomedical engineers have engineered a method for simultaneously detecting the presence of multiple specific microRNAs in RNA extracted from tissue samples without the need for labeling or target amplification. The technique could be used to identify early biomarkers of cancer and other diseases without the need for the elaborate, time-consuming, expensive processes and special laboratory equipmen

15h

This pattern changes as it gets closer to your face

This image is clearly made of squares. Wait! No—pentagons! (PopSci/) We know you are bored at home right now—we are too. Here are some puzzles and brainteasers to challenge your family and friends with, either in person or over video chat. Sometimes the farther away you are from something, the clearer it is. At a distance, you can tell that the pattern in the center of this image differs slightly

16h

Putting the spring-cam back into stroke patients steps

A research group has developed a new, lightweight and motor-less device that can be easily attached to an ankle support device – otherwise known as an ankle foot orthosis (AFO). The new device will aid stroke patients in their rehabilitation, improving their walking and preventing falls.

16h

US military improved mortality since World War II, but there have been alarming exceptions

Although wound survivability has increased over the last 80 years, the U.S. military's medical corps suffered some periods of backsliding during conflicts, recent analysis shows.

16h

Silver-plated gold nanostars detect early cancer biomarkers

Biomedical engineers have engineered a method for simultaneously detecting the presence of multiple specific microRNAs in RNA extracted from tissue samples without the need for labeling or target amplification. The technique could be used to identify early biomarkers of cancer and other diseases without the need for the elaborate, time-consuming, expensive processes and special laboratory equipmen

16h

Can social unrest, riot dynamics be modeled?

Episodes of social unrest rippled throughout Chile in 2019. Researchers specializing in economics, mathematics and physics in Chile and the U.K. banded together to explore the surprising social dynamics people were experiencing. Social media is changing the rules of the game, and previously applied epidemic-like models, on their own, may no longer be enough to explain current rioting dynamics.

16h

Cells communicate by doing the 'wave'

A research team reports on a novel method of cell communication relying on 'mechano-chemical' signals to control cell movement.

16h

Senior official raised concerns with Alok Sharma over £400m satellite deal

OneWeb went bankrupt this year while trying to develop space network to deliver broadband The business secretary, Alok Sharma, overrode the concerns of his senior official when the government took a £400m stake in the failed satellite company OneWeb. The UK is part of a consortium with India's Bharti Global which won a bidding war for the company , which went bankrupt earlier this year while tryi

16h

The best fax machines and gear for securely sending your signature

Send important documents without email. (Adolfo Felix via Unsplash/) If you've ever had to submit official paperwork in a hurry, then you probably know that fax machines are still alive and well in business and government settings today. In most cases, fax remains a widely-accepted way to transmit legally valid copies of documents and contracts between companies and individuals and at places like

16h

Cells communicate by doing the 'wave'

A research team reports on a novel method of cell communication relying on 'mechano-chemical' signals to control cell movement.

16h

Physical stress on the job linked with brain and memory decline in older age

A new study has found that physical stress in one's job may be associated with faster brain aging and poorer memory.

16h

Plastics found in sea-bed sharks

Microplastics have been found in the guts of sharks that live near the seabed off the UK coast.

16h

Early menstruation linked to increased menopause symptoms

Early menstruation increases the likelihood of hot flushes and nights sweats decades later at menopause, according to a new study.

16h

Photon-based processing units enable more complex machine learning

Machine learning performed by neural networks is a popular approach to developing artificial intelligence, as researchers aim to replicate brain functionalities for a variety of applications. A paper proposes a new approach to perform computations required by a neural network, using light instead of electricity. In this approach, a photonic tensor core performs multiplications of matrices in paral

16h

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