Search Posts

Nyheder2020juli24

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS?
Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

Triple negative breast cancer meets its match

One member of a larger family of oxygen sensing enzymes could offer a viable target for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), researchers report in a new study. The findings might offer hope to this subset of patients who have few effective treatment options and often face a poor prognosis.

1d

Lahontan Cutthroat Trout thrive at Paiute's Summit Lake in far northern Nevada

Summit Lake in remote northwest Nevada is home to the only self-sustaining, robust, lake population of Lahontan Cutthroat Trout, North America's largest freshwater native trout species. Research to understand the reasons why this population continues to thrive, where others have not, will be used to protect the fish and its habitat – as well as to apply the knowledge to help restore other Nevada l

1d

Novel 'on-off' switch discovered in plant defenses

Researchers investigating the ways that plants protect themselves — from insects to pathogens — have discovered an "on-off" switch that controls plant defensive mechanisms. The switch turns on immune responses minutes after an attack and later sends a deactivation signal to avoid self-inflicted damage. The finding lays the groundwork for improved plant disease resistance and food stability.

1d

NASA's tracking Hawaii-bound Major Hurricane Douglas

Hurricane Douglas is a major hurricane tracking through the Central Pacific Ocean on a forecast track to Hawaii. NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to identify strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures and found them surrounding the eyewall of the powerful hurricane. In addition, images from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite were used to generate an animated track of Douglas' moveme

1d

Alaska is getting wetter. That's bad news for permafrost and the climate

Alaska is getting wetter. A new study spells out what that means for the permafrost that underlies about 85% of the state, and the consequences for Earth's global climate.

1d

Heavy D Races Todd Leduc in the F100 | Diesel Brothers

Todd LeDuc challenges the Diesel Brothers to a desert race! Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DieselBrosTV https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on I

1d

How a Jewish ghetto beat a typhus epidemic during the second world war

Jews imprisoned in a ghetto during the second world war stamped out a big typhus outbreak using public health measures like those currently being used to fight covid-19

1d

US, UK Accuse Russia of Testing Space-Based Anti-Satellite Weapon

Both the US and the UK claim to have evidence that Russia has tested an anti-satellite weapon on July 15. The weapon test has been classified as "non-destructive," meaning it didn't target any other satellites. That doesn't mean it can't, just that the Russians may have wanted to test their new weapon without tipping their hand on what they had. An extensive report from Time details what we know

1d

The most important task for a PTSD service dog for veterans is disrupting anxiety

Science has shown that service dogs can benefit some veterans with PTSD. But the exact role service dogs play in the day-to-day lives of veterans is less known. A recent study shows what trained tasks service dogs perform the most often and which ones are the most helpful to veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. The study found that the task of disrupting episodes of anxiety ranked among t

1d

Fine-tuning adoptive cell therapy for advanced cancers

Researchers identified a discordant phenomenon in which a subset of patients displayed profoundly decreased expression of the transgenic TCR over time, despite the transgenic TCR being present at the DNA level.

1d

New 'super light source' should allow fascinating insights into atoms

The 'Gamma Factory initiative' — an international team of scientists — is currently exploring a novel research tool: They propose to develop a source of high-intensity gamma rays using the existing accelerator facilities at CERN. To do this, specialized ion beams will be circulated in the SPS and LHC storage rings, which will then be excited using laser beams so that they emit photons within the

1d

How infectious bacteria can produce genetic variants among sibling cells

A research team is investigating how pathogens influence the immune response of their host with genetic variation. This enables Staphylococcus aureus bacteria to develop antibiotic resistance and improve their chances of survival.

1d

Alaska is getting wetter. That's bad news for permafrost and the climate.

Alaska is getting wetter. A new study spells out what that means for the permafrost that underlies about 85% of the state, and the consequences for Earth's global climate.

1d

External hard drive for all your music and movies

All the storage you'll need. (Dylan Gillis via Unsplash/) Thanks to the advent and proliferation of SSD technology, external hard drives are becoming faster, more convenient, and in some cases cheaper. It's easy now to get a whopping 10 TB in a regular hard drive for the price of a 2 TB SSD card. So which hard drive should you turn to when your computer is overflowing with MP3s and WMVs? It depen

1d

25 Underrated Films That Will Save Your Summer

Summer blockbusters have started to look the same in recent years: iterations from the same franchises, with comic-book superheroes leading the pack again and again. But because of the coronavirus pandemic, the 2020 summer-movie season never really began. With Hollywood's biggest films delayed for months, or indefinitely, I've assembled a list of unconventional and underrated movies with a much m

1d

FAA Warns That After Pandemic, Long-Grounded Jets Could Experience Engine Failure

Corrosive Evidence The aviation industry is experiencing a massive drop in demand during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. That means thousands of commercial airliners are being put in storage, patiently waiting to take to the skies again — that is, if we're ever willing to get in a plane again. Having the jets grounded for so long may turn into a significant safety issue in the future, NPR repor

1d

An origin story for a family of oddball meteorites

Most meteorites that have landed on Earth are fragments of planetesimals, the very earliest protoplanetary bodies in the solar system. Scientists have thought that these primordial bodies either completely melted early in their history or remained as piles of unmelted rubble. But a family of meteorites has befuddled researchers since its discovery in the 1960s. The diverse fragments, found all ove

1d

Should We Close Schools? It's Complicated, Says Historian Who Studied H1N1 and the 1918 Flu

We've shut down schools during past pandemics. Does that mean we should for the coronavirus?

1d

Genetic mutations help super bug become highly resistant to antibiotics

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have found that genetic mutations in MRSA allow it to evolve and become more resistant to antibiotics such as penicillin.

1d

Genetic mutations help super bug become highly resistant to antibiotics

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have found that genetic mutations in MRSA allow it to evolve and become more resistant to antibiotics such as penicillin.

1d

Genetic mutations predispose individuals to severe COVID-19

When two pairs of previously healthy young brothers from two families required mechanical ventilation at the intensive care unit in rapid succession, doctors and researchers at Radboud University Medical Center were inclined to consider that genetic factors had a key role in compromising their immune system. Their research identified the gene TLR7 as an essential player in the immune response agai

1d

Photochromic bismuth complexes show great promise for optical memory elements

Russian chemists obtained a new photochromic complex composed of bismuth (III) and viologen cations and used the new compound to create optical memory elements that were shown to be highly efficient and stable. The outcomes of the study may serve to expand the range of microelectronics components in the future.

1d

Coronavirus News Roundup: July 18-July 24

Here are pandemic highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Citizen science at heart of new study showing COVID-19 seismic noise reduction

Research published in the journal Science, using a mix of professional and Raspberry Shake citizen seismic data, finds that lockdown measures to slow the spread of the virus COVID-19 reduced seismic noise by 50% worldwide.

1d

Oh Great: Space Travel Makes Bacteria Even Deadlier

The long-term effects that microgravity — the almost-total weightlessness experienced during near-Earth space travel — have on the human body are still largely unknown. But scientists do have some bad news about what microgravity does to other living things. Ominously, it can make bacteria both more lethal and more resistant to antibiotics, University of Adelaide PhD student Vikrant Minhas wrote

1d

New Research Suggests Humans Arrived in the Americas Much Earlier Than Thought

Artifacts found in a Mexican cave are about 30,000 years old.

1d

Foreign Researchers Accused of Hiding Links to Chinese Military

Four Chinese nationals have been charged with visa fraud after revelations that they sent information on the layout of US labs and research carried out by colleagues back to China.

1d

How COVID-19 causes smell loss

Loss of smell, or anosmia, is one of the earliest and most commonly reported symptoms of COVID-19. A new study identifies the olfactory cell types most vulnerable to infection by the novel coronavirus. Surprisingly, sensory neurons involved in smell are not among the vulnerable cell types.

1d

Novel PFAS comprise 24% of those measured in blood of Wilmington, N.C. residents

Researchers detected novel per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) called "fluoroethers" in blood from residents of Wilmington, North Carolina. The fluoroethers represented 24% of the total PFAS detected in the blood of Wilmington residents and appear to leave the body faster than legacy PFAS.

1d

What happens around an Alzheimer plaque?

A research team used pioneering technologies to study in detail what happens in brain cells in the direct vicinity of plaques. Their findings show how different cell types in the brain work together to mount a complex response to amyloid plaques which is likely protective at first, but later on damaging to the brain.

1d

Elevated levels of a specific protein found to correlate with inflammatory symptom severity in COVID

A new study found raised levels of transforming growth factor beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) in blood sampled from roughly 100 people hospitalized for COVID-19, and further found that elevated levels of

1d

SARS-CoV-2 infection of non-neuronal cells, not neurons, may drive loss of smell in patients with COVID-19

A new study of human olfactory cells has revealed that viral invasion of supportive cells in the nasal cavity might be driving the loss of smell seen in some patients with COVID-19. The findings show that non-

1d

How COVID-19 causes smell loss

Loss of smell, or anosmia, is one of the earliest and most commonly reported symptoms of COVID-19. A new study identifies the olfactory cell types most vulnerable to infection by the novel coronavirus. Surprisingly, sensory neurons involved in smell are not among the vulnerable cell types.

1d

Discovery of a rare human gene mutation that causes MAIT cells to disappear

A collaboration between Monash Health, the Australian Genomics Health Alliance (AGHA) and researchers at the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute has led to the discovery of a rare single gene mutation in a patient that eliminates an immune cell population, namely MAIT cells.

1d

Big brains and dexterous hands

Primates with large brains can master more complex hand movements than those with smaller brains. However, fine motor skills such as using tools can take time to learn, and humans take the longest of all. Large-brained species such as humans and great apes do not actually learn more slowly than other primates but instead start later, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown.

1d

Genetic mutations help MRSA to become highly resistant to antibiotics

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have found that genetic mutations in MRSA allow it to evolve and become more resistant to antibiotics such as penicillin.

1d

An origin story for a family of oddball meteorites

Study suggests a family of rare meteorites likely came from an early planetesimal with a magnetic core.

1d

Novel drug delivery particles use neurotransmitters as a 'passport' into the brain

Drug-carrying lipid nanoparticles were created that incorporate neurotranmitters to help them cross the blood-brain barrier in mice. The innovation could overcome many limitations encountered in delivering drugs into the central nervous system.

1d

New model by CHOP researchers identifies noncoding mutations across five pediatric cancers

Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed a new computational algorithm that has, for the first time, identified a spectrum of mutations in the noncoding portion of the human genome across five major pediatric cancers. The study, which was published today in Science Advances, used the algorithm to analyze more than 500 pediatric cancer patients' mutations and gene ex

1d

New study explains 'miracle' of how the Warsaw Ghetto beat Typhus

Through state-of-the-art mathematical modelling and historical documents, a new study points to community health programs and social distancing practices as the most likely explanations for the epidemic's sudden and mysterious collapse, which was hailed by survivors at the time as a miracle.

1d

Putting patients at the centre of COVID-19 research

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02226-3 Emily Sirotich's involvement in a global alliance gave people with rheumatic diseases a driving seat in shaping research on how COVID-19 is affecting them.

1d

Daily briefing: Quantum tunnelling takes time

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02229-0 The quantum effect that underlies everything from photosynthesis to nuclear fusion is not instantaneous. Plus, a Neanderthal gene linked to increased pain sensitivity and how ancient DNA is rewriting our long history with infectious disease.

1d

Old Art Offers Agriculture Info

Art museums are filled with centuries-old paintings with details of plants that today give us clues about evolution and breeding practices. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

A New Solution to Climate Science's Biggest Mystery

The project began, in one telling, five years ago, in a castle that overlooks the Bavarian Alps, where three dozen of the world's most successful and rivalrous earth scientists came together for a week of cloistered meetings. They gathered, in part, out of embarrassment. For the past four decades, their field—the study of Earth's natural phenomena, including its land, ocean, and climate—had boome

1d

Astronomers Say "Megaripples" Are Moving Across the Surface of Mars

Researchers have found evidence of gigantic waves of sand, often referred to as "megaripples," slowly moving around on the surface of Mars, as Science reports . Megaripples aren't unique to Mars; they can be found in deserts back here on Earth as well. But the Red Planet's colossal sand dunes, believed to have formed hundreds of thousands of years ago, could be a sign that winds on Mars are even

1d

World's Smallest Dinosaur is Probably a Lizard

Paper that reported the animal's discovery was retracted following new evidence from a similar fossil — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Old Art Offers Agriculture Info

Art museums are filled with centuries-old paintings with details of plants that today give us clues about evolution and breeding practices. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Miraklet i ghettoen: Sådan lykkedes det jøder at stoppe epidemi

Under 2. verdenskrig raserede plettyfus den jødiske ghetto i Warszawa.

1d

Discovery of disordered nanolayers in intermetallic alloys

A research team led by scientists of City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has recently discovered the disordered nanoscale layers at grain boundaries in the ordered intermetallic alloys. The nanolayers can not only resolve the irreconcilable conflict between strength and ductility effectively, but also maintain the alloy's strength with an excellent thermal stability at high temperatures. Designin

1d

Structure-specific DNA recombination sites: Design, validation, and machine learning-based refinement

Recombination systems are widely used as bioengineering tools, but their sites have to be highly similar to a consensus sequence or to each other. To develop a recombination system free of these constraints, we turned toward attC sites from the bacterial integron system: single-stranded DNA hairpins specifically recombined by the integrase. Here, we present an algorithm that generates synthetic a

1d

SirT7 auto-ADP-ribosylation regulates glucose starvation response through mH2A1

Sirtuins are key players of metabolic stress response. Originally described as deacetylases, some sirtuins also exhibit poorly understood mono–adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)–ribosyltransferase (mADPRT) activity. We report that the deacetylase SirT7 is a dual sirtuin, as it also features auto-mADPRT activity. SirT7 mADPRT occurs at a previously undefined active site, and its abrogation alters SirT

1d

Epigenetically heterogeneous tumor cells direct collective invasion through filopodia-driven fibronectin micropatterning

Tumor heterogeneity drives disease progression, treatment resistance, and patient relapse, yet remains largely underexplored in invasion and metastasis. Here, we investigated heterogeneity within collective cancer invasion by integrating DNA methylation and gene expression analysis in rare purified lung cancer leader and follower cells. Our results showed global DNA methylation rewiring in leader

1d

Direct observation of anisotropic growth of water films on minerals driven by defects and surface tension

Knowledge of the occurrences of water films on minerals is critical for global biogeochemical and atmospheric processes, including element cycling and ice nucleation. The underlying mechanisms controlling water film growth are, however, misunderstood. Using infrared nanospectroscopy, amplitude-modulated atomic force microscopy, and molecular simulations, we show how water films grow from water va

1d

A potentiometric mechanotransduction mechanism for novel electronic skins

Human skin perceives external mechanical stimuli by sensing the variation in the membrane potential of skin sensory cells. Many scientists have attempted to recreate skin functions and develop electronic skins (e-skins) based on active and passive sensing mechanisms. Inspired by the skin sensory behavior, we investigated materials and electronic devices that allow us to encode mechanical stimuli

1d

Meteorite evidence for partial differentiation and protracted accretion of planetesimals

Modern meteorite classification schemes assume that no single planetary body could be source of both unmelted (chondritic) and melted (achondritic) meteorites. This dichotomy is a natural outcome of formation models assuming that planetesimal accretion occurred nearly instantaneously. However, it has recently been proposed that the accretion of many planetesimals lasted over 1 million years (Ma).

1d

Dermal exosomes containing miR-218-5p promote hair regeneration by regulating {beta}-catenin signaling

The progression in the hair follicle cycle from the telogen to the anagen phase is the key to regulating hair regrowth. Dermal papilla (DP) cells support hair growth and regulate the hair cycle. However, they gradually lose key inductive properties upon culture. DP cells can partially restore their capacity to promote hair regrowth after being subjected to spheroid culture. In this study, results

1d

Diverse noncoding mutations contribute to deregulation of cis-regulatory landscape in pediatric cancers

Interpreting the function of noncoding mutations in cancer genomes remains a major challenge. Here, we developed a computational framework to identify putative causal noncoding mutations of all classes by joint analysis of mutation and gene expression data. We identified thousands of SNVs/small indels and structural variants as putative causal mutations in five major pediatric cancers. We experim

1d

Epitaxial antiperovskite/perovskite heterostructures for materials design

Engineered heterostructures formed by complex oxide materials are a rich source of emergent phenomena and technological applications. In the quest for new functionality, a vastly unexplored avenue is interfacing oxide perovskites with materials having dissimilar crystallochemical properties. Here, we propose a unique class of heterointerfaces based on nitride antiperovskite and oxide perovskite m

1d

Expression of inhibitory receptors by B cells in chronic human infectious diseases restricts responses to membrane-associated antigens

Chronic human infectious diseases, including malaria, are associated with a large expansion of a phenotypically and transcriptionally distinct subpopulation of B cells distinguished by their high expression of a variety of inhibitory receptors including FcRIIB. Because these B cells, termed atypical memory B cells (MBCs), are unable to respond to soluble antigens, it was suggested that they contr

1d

Robust differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into endothelial cells via temporal modulation of ETV2 with modified mRNA

Human induced pluripotent stem cell (h-iPSC)–derived endothelial cells (h-iECs) have become a valuable tool in regenerative medicine. However, current differentiation protocols remain inefficient and lack reliability. Here, we describe a method for rapid, consistent, and highly efficient generation of h-iECs. The protocol entails the delivery of modified mRNA encoding the transcription factor ETV

1d

PET, image-guided HDAC inhibition of pediatric diffuse midline glioma improves survival in murine models

Efforts at altering the dismal prognosis of pediatric midline gliomas focus on direct delivery strategies like convection-enhanced delivery (CED), where a cannula is implanted into tumor. Successful CED treatments require confirmation of tumor coverage, dosimetry, and longitudinal in vivo pharmacokinetic monitoring. These properties would be best determined clinically with image-guided dosimetry

1d

Neurotransmitter-derived lipidoids (NT-lipidoids) for enhanced brain delivery through intravenous injection

Safe and efficient delivery of blood-brain barrier (BBB)–impermeable cargos into the brain through intravenous injection remains a challenge. Here, we developed a previously unknown class of neurotransmitter–derived lipidoids (NT-lipidoids) as simple and effective carriers for enhanced brain delivery of several BBB-impermeable cargos. Doping the NT-lipidoids into BBB-impermeable lipid nanoparticl

1d

When ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny: Fixed neurodevelopmental sequence of manipulative skills among primates

Neural development is highly conserved across distantly related species of different brain sizes. Here, we show that the development of manipulative complexity is equally cumulative across 36 primate species and also that its ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny. Furthermore, larger-brained species reach their adult skill levels later than smaller-brained ones, largely because they start later with t

1d

Epigenetic transcriptional reprogramming by WT1 mediates a repair response during podocyte injury

In the context of human disease, the mechanisms whereby transcription factors reprogram gene expression in reparative responses to injury are not well understood. We have studied the mechanisms of transcriptional reprogramming in disease using murine kidney podocytes as a model for tissue injury. Podocytes are a crucial component of glomeruli, the filtration units of each nephron. Podocyte injury

1d

An alternate conformation of HCV E2 neutralizing face as an additional vaccine target

To achieve global elimination of hepatitis C virus (HCV), an effective cross-genotype vaccine is needed. The HCV envelope glycoprotein E2 is the main target for neutralizing antibodies (nAbs), which aid in HCV clearance and protection. E2 is structurally flexible and functions in engaging host receptors. Many nAbs bind to the "neutralizing face" on E2, including several broadly nAbs encoded by th

1d

Accessing new magnetic regimes by tuning the ligand spin-orbit coupling in van der Waals magnets

Van der Waals (VdW) materials have opened new directions in the study of low dimensional magnetism. A largely unexplored arena is the intrinsic tuning of VdW magnets toward new ground states. Chromium trihalides provided the first such example with a change of interlayer magnetic coupling emerging upon exfoliation. Here, we take a different approach to engineer previously unknown ground states, n

1d

Extraordinary curtailment of massive typhus epidemic in the Warsaw Ghetto

The highly dependent interplay of disease, famine, war, and society is examined based on an extreme period during World War II. Using mathematical modeling, we reassess events during the Holocaust that led to the liquidation of the Warsaw Ghetto (1941–1942), with the eventual goal of deliberately killing ~450,000, mostly Jewish residents, many through widespread starvation and a large-scale typhu

1d

Protecting nature could prevent the next pandemic

Deforestation is both an environmental and a health hazard. (Ales Krivec/Unsplash/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . Our current pandemic likely originated in bats . One of these flying mammals somehow came into close contact with a human, or infected a

1d

An origin story for a family of oddball meteorites

Most meteorites that have landed on Earth are fragments of planetesimals, the very earliest protoplanetary bodies in the solar system. Scientists have thought that these primordial bodies either completely melted early in their history or remained as piles of unmelted rubble.

1d

Covid-19 news: England to offer more flu vaccines to ease NHS burden

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

1d

Study: Mask-Wearing Moms with COVID-19 Can Safely Nurse Babies

None of the breastfed infants in the study tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 within the first two weeks of life.

1d

An AI hiring firm says it can predict job hopping based on your interviews

Since the onset of the pandemic, a growing number of companies have turned to AI to assist with their hiring. The most common systems involve using face-scanning algorithms, games, questions, or other evaluations to help determine which candidates to interview. While activists and scholars warn that these screening tools can perpetuate discrimination, the makers themselves argue that algorithmic

1d

Dartmouth-industry collaborations improve computer graphics

New software techniques make lighting in computer-generated images look more realistic for use in video games, extended reality, and scientific visualization tools.

1d

The Guardian view on singing and Covid-19: science needed for art to survive | Editorial

Facts and data are desperately required so that musicians can get back to entertaining the world While the tentative resumption of the performing arts is officially allowed in England , singing, along with the playing of woodwind and brass instruments, is deemed a special case. Some serious early outbreaks of Covid-19 were associated with choirs and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and

1d

Stone stacking destroys the environment for clicks and likes

In recent years, stone stacks have become a popular pastime on social media and in our national parks. Scientists and conservationists warn that such stacks cause ecological damage and risk the survival of many endemic plant and animal species. The problem is one of scale: The more popular the pastime becomes, the great the damage to our natural parks and reserves. The perfect balance of the stac

1d

'The Rental' Is a Perfect Movie for Sleepy Summer Nights

Dave Franco's directorial debut is a lean thriller about a home share from hell.

1d

Canada Got Better. The United States Got Trump.

I reached the Canadian border on the Fourth of July. Usually, the Thousand Islands crossing station between New York and Ontario is busy on summer weekends. Not this time. Eight of the nine lanes were closed, and only one car waited ahead of me in the single open queue. Despite the light traffic, I waited a while for my inspection—and when it was my turn, the car behind me waited a while too. In

1d

Behind the Byline With Hannah Giorgis

In our series "Behind the Byline," we're chatting with Atlantic staffers to learn more about who they are and how they approach their work. Hannah Giorgis is a staff writer who covers culture. This interview has been lightly edited and condensed. Nesima Aberra: How have you been lately? Hannah Giorgis: Today, I am in better spirits than I have been. I think some of that has been that I feel a lit

1d

Bacteria tied to stunted growth in malnourished children

Malnutrition can lead to stunted growth. A new study of children in Bangladesh implicates 14 types of bacteria in the small intestine. Many children who receive treatment for malnutrition in developing countries never fully recover. They can also experience immune system dysfunction and poor cognitive development that typically cause long-term health issues into adulthood. The bacteria in questio

1d

How I ran a virtual research retreat during a pandemic

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02215-6 Rob Salguero-Gómez shares how he made the most of lockdown by moving a planned laboratory retreat online.

1d

How I navigated a new job during the coronavirus pandemic

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02193-9 Environmental scientist Sally Brown learnt to connect with others through talking rather than e-mailing, and to not fear asking dumb questions.

1d

Meet the Scientist Studying How Cell Phones Change Societies

"Smartphones embody globalization," says the Smithsonian cultural anthropologist Josh Bell

1d

The Coronavirus Uses a "Camouflage" Enzyme to Merc Your Cells

Scientists just found out a crucial part of what makes SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, so infectious: It's capable of sneaking into our cells totally under the radar. It's a devious biological trick. A team of scientists at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio discovered that the coronavirus contains a particular enzyme, nsp16, that it uses to fool our cells in

1d

The Books Briefing: What Is a Political Memoir For?

Memoirs by politicians and their family members are in a strange genre that must balance compelling storytelling with personal aims. Mary Trump's Too Much and Never Enough is better written than most, Megan Garber argues . (Mary has a master's degree in comparative literature.) But the book's resonance is strongest when it sees the president's niece, a clinical psychologist, take on the work of s

1d

Neurons are genetically programmed to have long lives

Most neurons are created during embryonic development and have no "backup" after birth. Researchers have generally believed that their survival is determined nearly extrinsically, or by outside forces, such as the tissues and cells that neurons supply with nerve cells. A research team led by Sika Zheng, a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has challenged this notion a

1d

Machine learning reveals recipe for building artificial proteins

A team lead by Pritzker Molecular Engineering researchers has developed an artificial intelligence-led process that uses big data to design new proteins.

1d

Policy Can Clash with Affordable Housing

Efforts to green buildings and encourage public transit could unintentionally price out low-income residents — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Sputum testing provides higher rate of COVID-19 detection

The team found that sputum testing detected the RNA of the virus that causes COVID-19 at significantly higher rates while oropharyngeal swab testing had lower rates.

1d

Fungus Growing at Chernobyl Could Protect Astronauts From Cosmic Rays

Space Shields One of the biggest challenges facing crewed missions to Mars is figuring out how to protect crewmembers from the onslaught of deadly cosmic rays . Now, scientists at a number of universities say there's growing evidence that an unusual solution could be effective: building shields out of a radiation-absorbing fungus that grows near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. New Scientist re

1d

High-protein distillers dried grains with solubles provide high quality pig nutrition

With more ethanol in production and a greater ability to upcycle co-products into animal feed ingredients, companies are creating custom products and partnering with University of Illinois researchers to test for quality and digestibility.

1d

Coronavirus data failing local authorities, health bosses in England say

One public health director says that even after improvements, 'detective work' is required Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government is still not sharing enough coronavirus data for local authorities to get a full picture of who is being infected, health bosses have said. On Monday, Matt Hancock told parliament he was "putting enhanced levels of data in the hand

1d

1d

Project creates more powerful, versatile ultrafast laser pulse

University of Rochester researchers are setting a new standard when it comes to producing ultrafast laser pulses over a broader range of wavelengths than traditional laser sources.

1d

NASA Water vapor data reveals Tropical Storm Gonzalo's soaking capability

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the North Atlantic Ocean, it gathered water vapor data on Tropical Storm Gonzalo as tropical storm warnings, a tropical storm watch, and hurricane watch were posted.

1d

High-protein distillers dried grains with solubles provide high quality pig nutrition

With more ethanol in production and a greater ability to upcycle co-products into animal feed ingredients, companies are creating custom products and partnering with University of Illinois researchers to test for quality and digestibility.

1d

23andMe Releases Devastating Analysis of Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade

By combining genetic ancestry reports with existing historical documentation, The New York Times reports , 23andMe and a team of historians were able to piece together new discoveries about the transatlantic slave trade. During the trans-Atlantic slave trade, some 12.5 million African people were abducted from their homes and brought to America where they were sold into slavery. According to the

1d

High-protein distillers dried grains with solubles provide high quality pig nutrition

With more ethanol in production and a greater ability to upcycle co-products into animal feed ingredients, companies are creating custom products and partnering with University of Illinois researchers to test for quality and digestibility.

1d

Coronavirus: Vietnam bans wildlife trade over pandemic risk

The ban covers the import of wildlife and wildlife products as well as markets, including online sales.

1d

Capturing rainwater is an easy way to save money and the planet

It might look good, but don't drink water off your roof. It's gross. (Anna King/Unsplash/) When an inch of rain falls, more than 1,000 gallons of water runs off the average American roof. That's enough free H2O to supply the family inside for a few days and maybe knock a few dollars off the monthly utility bill. But beyond saving money, stocking up on stormwater can help prevent environmental pro

1d

Rethinking long-term investment strategies for the new normal

In these topsy turvy times, it can be hard to know how to go about ensuring your long-term financial health. Even before the pandemic, many underestimated their need to be proactive about saving for retirement. It may be tempting to reduce or pause your retirement contributions. Unless absolutely necessary, the best thing to do is ignore the panic and stay the course. No matter where you have bee

1d

Narrow wavebands of UV light kill germs

Scientists report the technical details of pioneering research they conducted on the disinfection of drinking water using ultraviolet (UV) light.

1d

Diamonds shine a light on hidden currents in graphene

A new diamond-based quantum sensing technique gives researchers a map of the intricate movement of electricity on a microscopic scale. New results demonstrate the potential of the technique by revealing the fluid-like electrical currents that flow in graphene, a layer of carbon just one atom thick. Graphene has exceptional electrical properties, and the technique could help researchers better unde

1d

Genetic impact of African slave trade revealed in DNA study

The consequences of rape, maltreatment, disease and racism are revealed by the findings.

1d

High-deductible health plans and major cardiovascular outcomes

New research finds that individuals with cardiovascular disease risk factors who switched to high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) did not experience increased risk of heart attack or stroke.

1d

Climate predictions several years into the future?

In five years, will the winter be mild, and will the following summer be rainy? Unfortunately, reliable answers to such questions are not possible. Nevertheless, there are quantities like the sea surface temperature of the North Atlantic, that are known to promote trends in the weather over Europe. To that, North Atlantic sea surface temperatures are predictable several years into the future – as

1d

Antioxidant-rich powders from blueberry, persimmon waste could be good for gut microbiota

Feeding the world's growing population in a sustainable way is no easy task. That's why scientists are exploring options for transforming fruit and vegetable byproducts — such as peels or pulp discarded during processing — into nutritious food ingredients and supplements. Now, researchers have shown that blueberry and persimmon waste can be made into antioxidant-rich powders that might have bene

1d

Narrow wavebands of UV light kill germs

Scientists report the technical details of pioneering research they conducted on the disinfection of drinking water using ultraviolet (UV) light.

1d

Robot mops are here to keep your house spotless

Extra shine for your floor. (Amazon/) Nothing beats hands-free cleaning—and it truly doesn't get any better than a robot mop. A cousin of the robot vacuum and sister to the robot mop/vacuum hybrid, these powerful machines are dedicated to one thing and one thing only: keeping your floors sparkling clean with advanced mopping features. Robot mops are a great way to sit back and relax while getting

1d

Rethinking long-term investment strategies for the new normal

In these topsy turvy times, it can be hard to know how to go about ensuring your long-term financial health. Even before the pandemic, many underestimated their need to be proactive about saving for retirement. It may be tempting to reduce or pause your retirement contributions. Unless absolutely necessary, the best thing to do is ignore the panic and stay the course. No matter where you have bee

1d

Kanye West og tusindvis af danskere har sygdommen: Men hvad er bipolar lidelse egentlig?

Sygdommen rammer sidst i teenageårene og giver både maniske og depressive perioder.

1d

Health, well-being and food security of families deteriorating under COVID-19 stress

The ongoing disruptive changes from efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19 are having a substantial negative impact on the physical and mental well-being of parents and their children across the United States, according to a new national survey.

1d

Pizza study shows body copes surprisingly well with one-off calorie indulgence

Young men can eat twice as much food as they need to feel 'full', research shows.

1d

Home-made face masks likely need at least two layers to curb COVID-19 spread

Home-made cloth face masks likely need a minimum of two layers, and preferably three, to prevent the dispersal of viral droplets from the nose and mouth that are associated with the spread of COVID-19, a new study indicates.

1d

Lightning strikes more than 100 million times per year in the tropics

Tropical storms often begin with an impressive display of pyrotechnics, but researchers have largely overlooked the role of lightning strikes in tropical ecosystems.

1d

'Dark' Is a Carefully Crafted Time Travel Puzzle

Netflix's German science fiction series stuck the landing in its third and final season.

1d

'Major' breakthrough in Covid-19 drug makes UK professors millionaires

Synairgen's share price rises 540% on morning of news of successful drugs trial Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Three professors at the University of Southampton school of medicine have this week made a "major breakthrough" in the treatment of coronavirus patients and become paper millionaires at the same time. Almost two decades ago professors Ratko Djukanovic, Step

1d

Formulating RNA – And Owning It

Headlines appeared last night about Moderna losing a patent case that affects its coronavirus vaccine work. I know from long experience on this blog that any discussion of patent and IP issues has an effect on my readership traffic numbers that looks like I'm paying folks not to click on my links that day, but I'm going to brave this one. What's going on? For starters, it's worth realizing that t

1d

French science bill promises boost to public R&D

Proposed law would introduce tenure-track positions to make French science more competitive

1d

Fifteen to one: how many applications it can take to land a single academic job offer

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02224-5 Survey finds that standard metrics of success can't completely explain why some candidates get offers and others don't.

1d

Project creates more powerful, versatile ultrafast laser pulse

In Physical Review Letters, University of Rochester researchers describe a new device, the "stretched-pulse soliton Kerr resonator," that creates an ultrafast laser pulse that is freed from the physical limits endemic to sources of laser light and the limits of the sources' wavelengths. "Simply put, this is the shortest pulse ever from a gain-free fiber source," says William Renninger, assistant p

1d

NASA Water vapor data reveals Tropical Storm Gonzalo's soaking capability

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the North Atlantic Ocean, it gathered water vapor data on Tropical Storm Gonzalo as tropical storm warnings, a tropical storm watch, and hurricane watch were posted.

1d

Heart transplants declined sharply during pandemic

Heart transplants, donor hearts, and transplant waitlists all fell sharply at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, Columbia University researchers have found.

1d

Proposed framework for integrating chatbots into health care

While chatbots are becoming more widespread in health care, it's important to implement them thoughtfully and constantly evaluate them in a variety of ways, Penn authors argue.

1d

More than half the restaurants closed due to the pandemic are shut down for good, Yelp says

As states have moved to reopen nonessential businesses in recent months, many restaurants still haven't turned the lights back on, and more than half of them never will.

1d

Concussions associated with cognitive, behavioral, and emotional consequences for students

Concussions can have a compounding effect on children, leading to long-term cognitive, behavioral, and emotional health consequences, according to researchers.

1d

Investors brace for consumer debt defaults if US relief stalls

Delinquencies on car loans, credit cards and student loans have remained low so far

1d

Heat waves, wildfire & permafrost thaw: The North's climate change trifecta

The Arctic Circle became unbelievably hot on June 20. In the Russian community of Verkhoyansk, temperatures topped 38C, marking what may be the highest air temperature ever recorded within the Arctic.

1d

Thanks to COVID, the Earth's Surface Is Shaking 50 Percent Less

The Big Quiet The world has been both literally and figuratively standing still during the ongoing pandemic, scientists say. Lockdowns around the globe have drastically reduced human activity, and as a direct result, the ground is shaking far less — a silver lining for those studying seismic signals. In fact, an international team of researchers have found that seismic vibrations generated by hum

1d

To photograph comet Neowise, it takes patience and placement

The newly discovered comet Neowise is only visible from Earth once every 6,800 years, and photographers who want to document it seek places with high elevation and little smog or light pollution. A place like North Carolina's famed Grandfather Mountain.

1d

High-deductible health plans and major cardiovascular outcomes

In the first study to examine the association between high out-of-pocket costs and adverse cardiovascular events, research led by the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute finds that individuals with cardiovascular disease risk factors who switched to high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) did not experience increased risk of heart attack or stroke. The study, "Association Between Switching to a Hig

1d

COVID-19 medical leave among EMS responders, firefighters in New York

The use of medical leave among emergency medical service responders and firefighters in New York during the COVID-19 pandemic is compared with earlier periods.

1d

Knowledge, concerns, behaviors of individuals during 1st week of COVID-19 pandemic in Italy

This is a survey study that examined the knowledge, concerns and behaviors of people living in different COVID-19 exposure zones during the first week of the pandemic in Italy.

1d

Study identifies 21 existing drugs that could treat COVID-19

A new study has identified 21 existing drugs that stop the replication of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

1d

If relaxed too soon, physical distancing measures might have been all for naught

If physical distancing measures in the United States are relaxed while there is still no COVID-19 vaccine or treatment and while personal protective equipment remains in short supply, the number of resulting infections could be about the same as if distancing had never been implemented to begin with, reports a team of mathematicians and scientists.

1d

Coronavirus makes changes that cause cells not to recognize it

The novel coronavirus changes the appearance of its messenger RNA cap to trick the host cell into not recognizing it is foreign, according to a new study.

1d

Livestock expansion is a factor in global pandemics

A new study looks at the growth of global livestock farming and the threat to biodiversity, and the health risks to both humans and domesticated animals.

1d

Rapid COVID-19 test developed to detect neutralizing antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity

A unique and rapid SARS-CoV-2 surrogate virus neutralisation test (sVNT) may be the much needed boost to current COVID-19 investigations to determine infection rate, herd immunity, predicted humoral protection, and vaccine efficacy during clinical trials.

1d

Coronavirus lockdown reduced seismic activity around the world – new study

Seismic activity doesn't just come from earthquakes, volcanoes and landslides. Everyday human activity also gives rise to vibrations that travel through the ground as seismic waves, something we call "anthropogenic noise".

1d

Phage therapy shows potential for treating prosthetic joint infections

Bacteriophages, or phages, may play a significant role in treating complex bacterial infections in prosthetic joints, according to new Mayo Clinic research. The findings suggest phage therapy could provide a potential treatment for managing such infections, including those involving antibiotic-resistant microbes.

1d

Phage therapy shows potential for treating prosthetic joint infections

Bacteriophages, or phages, may play a significant role in treating complex bacterial infections in prosthetic joints, according to new Mayo Clinic research. The findings suggest phage therapy could provide a potential treatment for managing such infections, including those involving antibiotic-resistant microbes.

1d

Teachers have been let down by a decade of inaction on digital technologie

The coronavirus pandemic has led to significant disruption to school education in England. Teachers have made a concerted effort to use digital technology and remote teaching and learning to lessen the impact of this disruption on their students.

1d

Sci-fi foretold social media, Uber and Augmented Reality, offers insights into the future

Science fiction authors foresaw augmented reality video games, the rise of social media and trends of hyper-consumption, and can help predict future consumer patterns.

1d

In cell studies, seaweed extract outperforms remdesivir in blocking COVID-19 virus

In a test of antiviral effectiveness against the virus that causes COVID-19, an extract from edible seaweeds substantially outperformed remdesivir, the current standard antiviral used to combat the disease.

1d

Researchers use cell imaging and mathematical modeling to understand cancer progression

Cell division is a fundamental process that organisms need to reproduce, grow, and make repairs. But when an error disrupts this complex biological process, cellular abnormalities can lead to diseases, such as cancer, where cells are enabled to grow and divide out of control.

1d

Love avocados? Thank a toxodon

Given avocado's popularity today, it's hard to believe that we came close to not having them in our supermarkets at all.

1d

Scientists create 'non-cuttable' material 85% less dense than steel

The material's strength comes from the unique arrangement of the ceramic spheres and aluminum of which it's composed. This arrangement is found in some biological structures, such as fish scales. Proteus is currently awaiting a patent. How is the Amazonian Arapaimas fish able to block bites from razor-toothed piranha? The fish's scales are extremely tough and flexible, with a hard outer layer, an

1d

Researchers use cell imaging and mathematical modeling to understand cancer progression

Cell division is a fundamental process that organisms need to reproduce, grow, and make repairs. But when an error disrupts this complex biological process, cellular abnormalities can lead to diseases, such as cancer, where cells are enabled to grow and divide out of control.

1d

As if space wasn't dangerous enough, bacteria become more deadly in microgravity

China has launched its Tianwen-1 mission to Mars. A rocket holding an orbiter, lander and rover took flight from the country's Hainan province yesterday, with hopes to deploy the rover on Mars's surface by early next year.

1d

Love avocados? Thank a toxodon

Given avocado's popularity today, it's hard to believe that we came close to not having them in our supermarkets at all.

1d

Will school temperature checks curb the spread of coronavirus?

This week, most students in Melbourne and Mitchell Shire returned to remote learning for term 3.

1d

Another mRNA-based vaccine candidate protects animals against SARS-CoV-2

An experimental messenger RNA (mRNA)-based vaccine against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) elicits protective immune responses in mice and non-human primates, researchers report on July 23rd in the journal Cell. Two injections of the vaccine were sufficient to induce robust immunity, completely preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection in mice.

1d

Can light stop the coronavirus? | David Brenner

Far-UVC light is a type of ultraviolet light that kills microbes and viruses and, crucially, seems to be safe to use around humans. Radiation scientist David Brenner describes how we could use this light to stop the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, in hospitals, nursing homes, trains and other public indoor spaces — paving the way for a potentially game-changing tool in t

1d

Understanding why trees are dying may be key to locking up carbon

Rising tree deaths may be reducing the ability of many forests worldwide to lock up carbon by pulling in greenhouse gases from the air. To properly grasp what this means for carbon budgets, scientists need to solve the puzzle of why trees are dying—and how they respond to change.

1d

Women in STEM are still far short of workplace equity. COVID-19 risks undoing even these modest gains

The events of 2020 are reshaping the way we live, work, teach and learn. And while we have all been affected differently, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on women has been particularly significant.

1d

Why urban density is good for health – even during a pandemic

Disease outbreaks shape our cities. Public health concerns have influenced some of the most iconic developments in urban planning. London's sewage systems were developed in response to cholera outbreaks in the 19th century. In the U.S. at the turn of the 20th century, public parks became a popular (though possibly ineffective) way of offering citizens cleaner air to protect them from diseases such

1d

Personal connections key to strong supply chains

Amid a pandemic when limitations on disinfecting wipes, toilet paper and drugs brought attention—and disruption—to supply chains, new research involving Washington University in St. Louis delivers something of an answer to improving these lines of business:

1d

Global report into plastic threats to the ocean

A world-renowned expert in plastic pollution from the University of Plymouth has contributed to a major new report showing that without immediate and sustained action, the annual flow of plastic into the ocean could nearly triple by 2040.

1d

The Pentagon's UFO Task Force Is Finally Ready to Report Findings

UFO Task Force The Pentagon's Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon (UAP) Task Force, a program dedicated to investigating UFO sightings, is ready to start reporting some of its findings to the public, The New York Times reports . The news comes after the Senate released a committee report last month outlining spending for the unusual task force. Adversarial Interference Determining whether aliens exist

1d

Engineering study examines sunflower stem growth

Examining the structure of a sunflower stem as it matures can help both the plant scientist and biomaterials engineer. That's the premise that Anamika Prasad, an assistant professor in South Dakota State University's Department of Mechanical Engineering, is putting into practice.

1d

Five burning questions about tequila, answered

Tequila inspires strong opinions in people, just like the Beatles, goat cheese, and the 1988 Detroit Pistons. Some can't stand the smell or taste of it; others relish every sip and wait for the "tequila!" feeling to hit . But the fact is, tequila and its smokier sister, mezcal, have never been more popular outside of their Mexican homeland. The spirits rocketed to the top of the US drinking chart

1d

Researchers use cell imaging and mathematical modeling to understand cancer progression

Using a combination of experiments and mathematical modeling, a team of researchers from the Virginia Tech Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Science and the Fralin Life Sciences Institute are beginning to unravel the mechanisms that lie behind tetraploidy – a chromosomal abnormality that is often found in malignant tumors.

1d

Nature study identifies 21 existing drugs that could treat COVID-19

A Nature study authored by a global team of scientists and led by Sumit Chanda, Ph.D., professor at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, has identified 21 existing drugs that stop the replication of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

1d

China 2050: How the US should prepare for an ascendant China — RAND Report

New RAND report says US should prepare for a triumphant or ascending People's Republic of China — scenarios that not only align with current PRC national development trends but also represent the most challenging future scenarios for the US military.

1d

EMA adopts positive opinion on monthly vaginal ring to reduce HIV risk

IPM today welcomed a positive opinion from the EMA on the dapivirine vaginal ring for use by cisgender women ages 18 and older in developing countries to reduce their risk of HIV-1 infection. The monthly ring is the first long-acting HIV prevention product and is designed to help address women's unmet need for new methods given the persistently high rates of HIV they face, especially in sub-Sahara

1d

Engineering study examines sunflower stem growth

Examining the structure of a sunflower stem as it matures can help both the plant scientist and biomaterials engineer. That's the premise that Anamika Prasad, an assistant professor in South Dakota State University's Department of Mechanical Engineering, is putting into practice.

1d

What racial discrimination does to young people's wellbeing

Discrimination against minority groups can be difficult to prove. Perpetrators are typically motivated to deny their prejudices, and are not always aware of their biases.

1d

Annual country index with new food dependency data reflects vulnerability to climate change

The annual update to the University of Notre Dame's Global Adaptation Initiative (ND-GAIN) Country Index shows sources for some vulnerability indicators have changed, including food dependency and urban concentration.

1d

Scientists discover key to restricting antibiotic resistant bacteria

Antibiotic resistance poses a significant threat to human health on a global scale. It has been predicted that resistant infections will cause 10 million deaths per year by 2050. Given that antibiotics are crucial in many areas of medicine, it is important to understand how antibiotic use influences the likelihood that resistance will emerge in response to treatment.

1d

The Funkadelic Album That Predicted the Future

Fifty years: a breath. A snap of the fingers. Or in the case of Funkadelic's Free Your Mind … And Your Ass Will Follow —recorded in one day, with the whole band tripping on LSD—a single ageless lizard-blink of the third eye. Is it possible that this album sounds heavier and crazier today than it did upon its release in July 1970? I think it's very possible. In the general countercultural churn

1d

Scientists discover key to restricting antibiotic resistant bacteria

Antibiotic resistance poses a significant threat to human health on a global scale. It has been predicted that resistant infections will cause 10 million deaths per year by 2050. Given that antibiotics are crucial in many areas of medicine, it is important to understand how antibiotic use influences the likelihood that resistance will emerge in response to treatment.

1d

As Covid-19 Vaccine Race Heats Up, Other Interventions Flounder

On Wednesday, pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and a German partner, BioNTech, announced that they had reached a $1.95 billion deal with the U.S. government for 50 million courses of a Covid-19 vaccine — provided that it works. In the meantime, the U.S. has struggled to implement more low-tech interventions.

1d

Designing a freestanding, supercharged polypeptide proton-conducting membrane

Protons are subatomic particles with a positive electric charge. Proton translocation plays a significant role in natural phenomena and manmade technologies. But it remains challenging to control proton conduction and fabrication in biomaterials and devices. In a new report, Chao Ma and an interdisciplinary team of scientists in China, the Netherlands, and Germany, rationally designed proton-condu

1d

Researchers design a nanotechnology-based system that can transport methane at lower pressure and cost

Researchers from the University of Alicante's Advanced Materials Laboratory have created an optimal, low-cost methane storage system. The team, led by UA Professor of Inorganic Chemistry Joaquín Silvestre, has used an MOF material (highly porous metal-organic framework). In the pores of this material, it is possible to create the conditions required to replicate gas structures under the sea, where

1d

NASA Wants to Watch Newborn Stars From a Ginormous, Stadium-Sized Balloon

NASA is planning to watch newborn stars from high up in the Earth's atmosphere, using a gigantic football stadium-sized balloon. NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab is planning to kick off the mission, called ASTHROS , (Astrophysics Stratospheric Telescope for High Spectral Resolution Observations at Submillimeter-wavelengths) in December 2023. The plan is for a 400-foot wide balloon to float over Antarcti

1d

Sarah Gilbert, the researcher leading the race to a Covid-19 vaccine

The Oxford scientist has devoted her career to combating deadly pathogens with pandemic potential

1d

Artificial intelligence can help predict the bacteria responsible for pneumonia in emergency rooms

A team of researchers showed that artificial intelligence (AI) could help predict the type of bacteria that caused the infection in patients with pneumonia. The research is presented at ASM Microbe Online, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

1d

Experimental optimal verification of entangled states using local measurements

USTC modified the original proposal to be robust to practical imperfections, and experimentally implement a scalable quantum state verification on two-qubit and four-qubit entangled states with nonadaptive local measurements. The research results were published in Physical Review Letters on July 17th.

1d

High levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria found on equipment in communal gyms

Research presented at ASM Microbe Online found that 43% of Staphylococcus bacteria found on exercise equipment in university gyms were ampicillin-resistant, with 73% of those isolates being resistant to multiple additional drugs.

1d

Healthy international travelers not likely to acquire Candida auris

Researchers have shown that there is a low risk for healthy people to acquire Candida auris during travel. The research is presented at ASM Microbe Online, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

1d

Brazilian researchers develop an optical fiber made of gel derived from marine algae

Edible, biocompatible and biodegradable, these fibers have potential for various medical applications. The results are described in the journal Scientific Reports.

1d

In cell studies, seaweed extract outperforms remdesivir in blocking COVID-19 virus

In a test of antiviral effectiveness against the virus that causes COVID-19, an extract from edible seaweeds substantially outperformed remdesivir, the current standard antiviral used to combat the disease.

1d

Why is obesity so common in COVID-19 patients?

A hormone that connects the body's metabolism and immune response system may explain why COVID-19 is so dangerous for people with obesity.

1d

The Declining Power of the American Passport

In late 2012, after a brief trip into Aleppo to cover the Syrian civil war, I walked up to a Turkish border checkpoint. I expected to be waved through to Kilis, a town a short distance away, where I had been staying. Colleagues of mine who had covered the rebels for longer had told me the crossing was a quiet one, and I shouldn't expect any trouble. Before volunteering for the assignment, I had l

1d

A Vaccine Reality Check

Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . N early five months into the pandemic, all hopes of extinguishing COVID-19 are riding on a still-hypothetical vaccine. And so a refrain has caught on: We might have to stay home—until we have a vaccine. Close schools—until we have a vaccine. Wear masks—but only until we hav

1d

Dust seen streaming out of Namibia into the Atlantic Ocean

Landsat 8 is the United States Geological Survey's most recently launched satellite, and it holds the powerful Operational Land Imager (OLI.) The OLI is a powerful multi-spectral imager with a wide dynamic range.

1d

Most productive workforce may require indefinite affirmative action, study shows

Affirmative action policies have been debated for decades and Supreme Court rulings have guided how universities structure their admission policies. It stands to reason that diverse graduating classes will ultimately lead to diverse workplaces, but this is not always the case.

1d

Launch Your IT Career With The Complete 2020 CompTIA Certification Training Bundle

IT remains one of the hottest careers out there. From 2018 to 2028, the IT sector is expected to expand by at least 12% , far faster than almost every other occupational sector. IT has become the backbone of even the most unexpected companies: Dominos, for example, has called itself a "tech company that sells pizza" , as it completely rebuilt its sales system to make it as easy as possible to buy

1d

Do you want it – or do you need it? Here's how you know | Oliver Burkeman

Next time you have the urge to check your phone, or have a second cocktail, remember you might not enjoy it as much as you think As anyone who counts a three-year-old among their acquaintances will know, there's a fiery purity to the will of a small child that's difficult to oppose. Once my son has figured out that there's ice-cream in the freezer, and decided he wants some for dessert, my role i

1d

Image: Hubble snaps ghostly galaxy

A notable feature of most spiral galaxies is the multitude of arching spiral arms that seemingly spin out from the galaxy's center. In this image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the stunning silvery-blue spiral arms of the galaxy NGC 4848 are observed in immense detail. Not only do we see the inner section of the spiral arms containing hundreds of thousands of young, bright, blue

1d

This Russian Firm's Star Designer Is an AI—but No One Knew That for a Year

Imagine discovering a new artist or designer—whether visual art, fashion, music, or even writing —and becoming a big fan of her work. You follow her on social media, eagerly anticipate new releases, and chat about her talent with your friends. It's not long before you want to know more about this creative, inspiring person, so you start doing some research. It's strange, but there doesn't seem to

1d

Sci-fi foretold social media, Uber and Augmented Reality, offers insights into the future

Science fiction authors foresaw augmented reality video games, the rise of social media and trends of hyper-consumption, and can help predict future consumer patterns.

1d

Pandemic to accelerate adoption of electronic patient portal for epilepsy

The COVID-19 pandemic is a catalyst to accelerate the adoption of technology-enabled patient care for epilepsy, according to a new study published in Epilepsia.

1d

Pizza study shows body copes surprisingly well with one-off calorie indulgence

Young men can eat twice as much food as they need to feel 'full', research shows.

1d

Ocean features and changes in the past are explored to anticipate future climate

The Quaternary International journal has published a study by the UPV/EHU's Department of Stratigraphy and Palaeontology describing, in detail, the climate changes taking place in the Bay of Biscay over the last 37,000 years. Specifically, it details these changes mainly through the study of foraminifera and ostracod species predominating in various climatic intervals. This palaeoceanographic stud

1d

AsEH enzyme: A new pharmacological target against Alzheimer's disease

A UB study published in the journal Neurotherapeutics has validated a new pharmacological target for Alzheimer's disease. The results show the inhibition of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) in murine models with the disease reduces the neuroinflammatory process, improving the endogen response of the organism and reducing the neuronal damage and death that cause this type of dementia.

1d

Gold vs. Salmon: An Alaska Mine Project Just Got a Boost

The Trump Administration, rejecting concerns over the risks to Alaska's fishery, cleared the way on Friday for the Pebble Mine.

1d

20 Years of Friendship With the Woman Across the Hall

Each installment of The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two women who have been neighbors in the same New York City apartment building for 20 years. They live alone and have always looked out for each other—but their connection has been extra

1d

Poll: Many teens say active shooter drills are harmful

Active shooter drills in schools have a negative effect on students' emotional health and yield questionable results, according to a national teen poll. About two-thirds of the poll's respondents indicated their school had either active shooter or other types of lockdown drills. The majority mentioned hiding, but only about 7% reported experiencing drills that follow national recommendations of "

1d

Anthropause: Lockdowns sent 'wave' of quiet around the world

The COVID-19 lockdown period results in a 50% reduction in seismic noise around the world. By analyzing months-to-year-long datasets from over 300 seismic stations around the world, the study was able to show seismic noise reduced in many countries and regions, making it possible to visualize the resulting "wave" moving through China, then to Italy, and around the rest of the world. The seismic l

1d

How Dinosaurs Raised Their Young

New research into eggshells and nesting sites help paleontologists unravel the family lives of the Mesozoic

1d

Antiviral method against herpes paves the way for combatting incurable viral infections

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a new method to treat human herpes viruses. The new broad-spectrum method targets physical properties in the genome of the virus rather than viral proteins, which have previously been targeted. The treatment consists of new molecules that penetrate the protein shell of the virus and prevent genes from leaving the virus to infect the cell. It

1d

Rapid COVID-19 test developed to detect neutralising antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity

As the current COVID-19 pandemic continues to adversely impact communities and economies across the world, efficiency in testing for the infection and antibodies is vital. A unique and rapid SARS-CoV-2 surrogate virus neutralisation test (sVNT), developed in Singapore, may be the much needed boost to current COVID-19 investigations to determine infection rate, herd immunity, predicted humoral prot

1d

Solving the jigsaw puzzle of regional carbon budgets

Ciais and colleagues obtained the first bottom-up global land carbon budget from the sum of regional estimates, combining inventories with lateral transfers from the trade of wood and food products and the export of dissolved carbon by rivers to the oceans. Carbon being moved away from ecosystems by lateral fluxes and emitted by fires and as reduced compounds is a large fraction of primary product

1d

Look into the mirror

If the eyes are the mirror of the soul, then thanks to the translucent corneas, we can look deep into that soul. And thanks to the work of scientists from the IPC PAS we can look into the depths of the cornea itself. And that without touching it! All thanks to the introduction of an innovative method of holographic optical tomography.

1d

Livestock expansion is a factor in global pandemics

The growth of global livestock farming is a threat to our biodiversity and also increases the health risks to both humans and domesticated animals. The patterns that link them are at the heart of a study published in Biological Conservation by a scientist from the Institute of Evolution Sciences of Montpellier (ISEM – CNRS/Université de Montpellier/IRD/EPHE) and the French Agricultural Research Ce

1d

Serendipity broadens the scope for making graphite

Curtin University researchers have unexpectedly discovered a new way to make crystalline graphite, an essential material used in the making of lithium ion batteries.

1d

Nobelpris-modtager sabler Lomborgs klimabog ned

Joseph E. Stiglitz, nobelpris-modtager i økonomi, er ikke imponeret over Lomborgs 'False Alarm', der opfordrer til en moderat tilgang til klimaproblematikken, mindre panik og større omtanke for økonomien.

1d

Mouse study shows spinal cord injury causes bone marrow failure syndrome

Research conducted at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine found that spinal cord injuries in mice cause an acquired bone marrow failure syndrome that may contribute to chronic immune dysfunction. "We also found that it's possible to overcome certain aspects of spinal cord injury-induced bone marrow failure. This could have an immediate

1d

Rely on gut feeling? New research identifies how second brain in gut communicates

You're faced with a big decision so your second brain provides what's normally referred to as 'gut instinct', but how did this sensation reach you before it was too late?In a new study in the eNeuro journal, Professor Nick Spencer's laboratory has identified a particular type of neuron in the gut wall that communicates signals to other neurons near the spinal cord and up to the brain.

1d

Phage therapy shows potential for treating prosthetic joint infections

Bacteriophages, or phages, may play a significant role in treating complex bacterial infections in prosthetic joints, according to new Mayo Clinic research. The findings suggest phage therapy could provide a potential treatment for managing such infections, including those involving antibiotic-resistant microbes.

1d

If relaxed too soon, physical distancing measures might have been all for naught

If physical distancing measures in the United States are relaxed while there is still no COVID-19 vaccine or treatment and while personal protective equipment remains in short supply, the number of resulting infections could be about the same as if distancing had never been implemented to begin with, reports a UCLA-led team of mathematicians and scientists.

1d

Lego-inspired bone and soft tissue repair with tiny, 3D-printed bricks

A new, 3D-printed technology that was inspired by Lego block toys is designed to help heal broken bones, and could one day even lead to lab-made organs for human transplant.

1d

Desert mosses use quartz rocks as sun shades

Desert conditions are harsh, and mosses often spend much of the year in a dormant condition, desiccated and brown, until rain comes. UC Berkeley and Cal State-LA researchers discovered two species of moss that found a hiding place under translucent milky quartz where they can stay moist and green and continue to photosynthesize and grow while other mosses on the soil surface go dormant. This is th

1d

Best stainless steel cleaners for restoring your appliances

Make sure all surfaces shine. (Sidekix Media via Unsplash/) Stainless steel appliances are the white sneakers of your kitchen. For a brief moment in time, they look amazing, but the wear and tear of daily use leaves its mark all over them way too quickly and easily. Fortunately, there exists a broad range of products focused exclusively on restoring your metallic workhorses to their original smoo

1d

Marketing professor's research shows stadium naming rights have little risk for sponsors

It's a case where the investment greatly outweighs the risk.

1d

NASA Juno takes first images of jovian moon Ganymede's north pole

On its way inbound for a Dec. 26, 2019, flyby of Jupiter, NASA's Juno spacecraft flew in the proximity of the north pole of the ninth-largest object in the solar system, the moon Ganymede. The infrared imagery collected by the spacecraft's Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) instrument provides the first infrared mapping of the massive moon's northern frontier.

1d

Serendipity broadens the scope for making graphite

Curtin University researchers have unexpectedly discovered a new way to make crystalline graphite, an essential material used in the making of lithium ion batteries.

1d

Who Are You? The Lure and Limitations of Personality Tests

Even if they're not the most scientifically accurate, we're obsessed with learning about ourselves and where we fit in groups.

1d

Stor pop-koncert med lysende håndsprit skal afsløre coronasmitte

I Tyskland slår man nu dørene op til en kæmpe koncert med 4000 gæster for at forstå smittekilder bedre.

1d

Siberian heatwave: Wildfires rage in Arctic, sea ice melts

The U.N. weather agency warned Friday that average temperatures in Siberia were 10 degrees Celsius (18 Fahrenheit) above average last month, a spate of exceptional heat that has fanned devastating fires in the Arctic Circle and contributed to a rapid depletion in ice sea off Russia's Arctic coast.

1d

Big Tech's Antitrust Hearing? They're (Almost) All Guilty

Apple aside, anticompetitive practices by Amazon, Facebook, and Google have corroded democracy and sabotaged the nation's pandemic response.

1d

20 Years Ago, Steve Jobs Built Apple's G4 Cube. It Bombed

Plus: An interview from the archives, the most-read story in WIRED history, and bottled-up screams.

1d

Risk of sepsis greatest for patients with frailty, older age or urinary tract infections

Patients with frailty, older age and urinary tract infections (UTIs) are at greatest risk of developing sepsis following infection consultations in primary care, research has found.

1d

Increasing rates of preventable hospitalizations among adults with dementia

A team of investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has found that in recent years, increasing numbers of these hospitalizations were for conditions for which hospitalization can often be avoided with improvements in outpatient care.

1d

Livestock expansion is a factor in global pandemics

The growth of global livestock farming is a threat to our biodiversity and also increases the health risks to both humans and domesticated animals. The patterns that link them are at the heart of a study published in Biological Conservation by a scientist from the Institute of Evolution Sciences of Montpellier (ISEM—CNRS/Université de Montpellier/IRD/EPHE) and the French Agricultural Research Cent

1d

NASA mission will study the cosmos with a stratospheric balloon

Work has begun on an ambitious new mission that will carry a cutting-edge 8.4-foot (2.5-meter) telescope high into the stratosphere on a balloon. Tentatively planned to launch in December 2023 from Antarctica, ASTHROS (short for Astrophysics Stratospheric Telescope for High Spectral Resolution Observations at Submillimeter-wavelengths) will spend about three weeks drifting on air currents above th

1d

Livestock expansion is a factor in global pandemics

The growth of global livestock farming is a threat to our biodiversity and also increases the health risks to both humans and domesticated animals. The patterns that link them are at the heart of a study published in Biological Conservation by a scientist from the Institute of Evolution Sciences of Montpellier (ISEM—CNRS/Université de Montpellier/IRD/EPHE) and the French Agricultural Research Cent

1d

4-D printed thermite could make welding in space and combat zones easier, safer

A recent mechanical engineering doctoral graduate has created a material for welding in extreme conditions that could minimize equipment needed and operator hazards.

1d

Paper describing hummingbird-sized dinosaur retracted

The journal Nature has issued a retraction for a paper it published March 11th called "Hummingbird-sized dinosaur from the Cretaceous period of Myanmar." The editorial staff was alerted to a possible misclassification of the fossil embedded in amber, and after review, agreed with the assessment and issued the retraction.

1d

Marriage isn't a ticket to happiness

How much do love and marriage play into overall well-being? A new study quantifies the happiness of married, formerly married, and single people at the end of their lives to find out. The study—published in the Journal of Positive Psychology —examines the relationship histories of 7,532 people followed from ages 18 to 60 to determine who reported to be happiest at the end of their lives. "…if the

1d

Climate Sensitivity

There are various (non-mutually exclusive) ways to deny science . You can cherry pick the data and sources you like – there is always someone on the fringe with an opinion counter to the mainstream. You can use the all-purpose method of invoking a grand conspiracy theory. You can replace scientific opinion with pseudoscience. Or, if you have sufficient background scientific knowledge, you can mag

1d

It's time to explain some game theory

It's about way more than just baseball and apple pie. (Photo by Jose Francisco Morales on Unsplash/) Three slices of fresh apple pie sit on the kitchen counter, and you and a trio of buddies are drooling over them. What do you do? Try to grab a piece right away, and you risk a tussle with a pal who makes the same move. Hesitate, and you might get nothing. Maybe it's smarter to reach for the small

1d

Self-assembled nanoporous biomaterials to enhance vitamin intake

The scientific group led by Professor Ivan Stoikov has been engaged in supramolecular chemistry research for more than 20 years and is well-known in the professional community. The main undertaking of the research group is the study of new, biologically significant materials obtained on the basis of macrocyclic compounds.

1d

Desert mosses use quartz rocks as sun shades

Living under a translucent rock can be quite comfortable—if you're a moss in the Mojave Desert.

1d

Map of ammonium's journey 'could prevent infection'

The mechanism of a protein which transports ammonium across cell membranes has been discovered in research led at the University of Strathclyde, which could lay the foundations for preventing infection.

1d

Diving into the structure of molten salts in tight spaces

Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs), a special class of molten salts, promise far greater electrochemical performance compared to conventional aqueous solutions due to a suite of novel and tunable properties. Over the past two decades, ILs have been explored as a means of improving a range of different technologies, from energy storage and conversion to catalysis to electroplating of metals and s

1d

Desert mosses use quartz rocks as sun shades

Living under a translucent rock can be quite comfortable—if you're a moss in the Mojave Desert.

1d

Map of ammonium's journey 'could prevent infection'

The mechanism of a protein which transports ammonium across cell membranes has been discovered in research led at the University of Strathclyde, which could lay the foundations for preventing infection.

1d

Historic carbon dioxide decline could hold clues for future climate

A new study led by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) provides a clearer snapshot of conditions during the last ice age—when global ice sheets were at their peak—and could even lead to better models for future climate projections.

1d

What Would Happen If TikTok Was Banned?

This week, we discuss whether the Chinese-owned app is as much of a security risk as some claim, and where everyone would go if the platform went dark.

1d

Rehab Centers Struggle as Covid-19 Drives Up Costs

Drug and alcohol use has risen, but the pandemic could force some treatment centers out of business.

1d

Mould from Chernobyl nuclear reactor tested as radiation shield on ISS

A radiation-absorbing fungus discovered in Chernobyl blocked harmful cosmic rays on the International Space Station and may help protect future Mars colonies

1d

Reimagining Colleges and Universities to Make Them More Equitable

COVID-19 could amplify the persistent lack of diversity in higher education—but the pandemic also gives us a chance to fix it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Johnson admits UK government's virus response could have been different

Prime minister concedes lessons need to be learned about how early stages of pandemic were handled

1d

Justice Gorsuch's Legal Philosophy Has a Precedent Problem

Justice Neil Gorsuch is a proud textualist. According to this approach, what Congress intended, or expected, when it passed a law doesn't matter. What matters are the words printed on paper. In practice, Justice Gorsuch will strictly follow the text of statutes, no matter what result it yields. Last month, he decided that the 1964 Civil Rights Act has always prohibited LGBTQ discrimination. Every

1d

US accuses Russia of firing anti-satellite weapon in space

The United States accused Russia of test-firing an anti-satellite weapon in space, warning that the threat against Washington's systems was "real, serious and increasing."

1d

Sundt den ene uge, usundt den næste: Derfor gør kød-forskning os sjældent klogere

Forskning i kost er så komplekst, at det er svært at vurdere sundheden af enkelte fødevarer som kød.

1d

How to Outrun a Dinosaur

If, through some scientific malfunction, you found yourself transported 70 million years into the past, you might be safer from certain hungry reptiles than you think.

1d

Russia's GRU Hackers Hit US Government and Energy Targets

A previously unreported Fancy Bear campaign persisted for well over a year—and indicates that the notorious group has broadened its focus.

1d

Is It Too Soon for Covid-19 TV Shows?

This week, the executive producer of Grey's Anatomy revealed that the show would tackle the pandemic "for sure." Are we even ready for that?

1d

A Crispr Cow Is Born. It's Definitely a Boy

UC Davis scientists spent years editing a sex-determining gene into bovine embryos using Crispr. In April, Cosmo arrived—and his DNA reveals how far the field has to go.

1d

Emerging Evidence of Intrauterine SARS-CoV-2 Infections

New evidence supports the potential for intrauterine spread of SARS-CoV-2 to a developing fetus. it's uncommon, but something to take seriously. Also some good news from the AAP regarding the care of babies born to mothers with COVID-19!

1d

Sverige parat med nattog til Europa fra 2022

Om senest to år skal der rulle tog fra perronerne i Malmø og Stockholm mod henholdsvis Bruxelles og Hamborg. Det har den svenske regering endeligt besluttet.

1d

Forskere advarer: 6000 MW vandkraftværk i Afrika er en krudttønde af konflikter

Et ufærdigt vandkraftværk i Etiopien, der skal levere elektricitet til 65 mio. mennesker har udviklet sig til et slagsmål med Sudan og Egypten. Nu advarer forskere efter forliste forhandlinger landene imellem.

1d

Scientists Unveil First Ever Pictures of Multiple Planets around a Sunlike Star

The two giant worlds, each much larger than Jupiter, constitute only the third multiplanet system ever imaged — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Scientists Unveil First Ever Pictures of Multiple Planets around a Sunlike Star

The two giant worlds, each much larger than Jupiter, constitute only the third multiplanet system ever imaged — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

This temple was equipped with accessibility ramps more than 2,000 years ago

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02184-w Features at ancient Greek sanctuary would have aided visitors with impaired mobility.

1d

Discovery of SARS-CoV-2 antiviral drugs through large-scale compound repurposing

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2577-1

1d

Daily briefing: The biotech building a better, faster, stronger coronavirus vaccine

Nature, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02221-8 Advances in technology are accelerating the search for drugs to arm the immune system against SARS-CoV-2. Plus, China's mission to Mars launches successfully and stone tools hint that people arrived much earlier than thought in the Americas.

1d

Ancient African skull sheds light on American crocodile origins

The extinct African crocodile species Crocodylus checchiai may be closely related to American crocodile species alive today, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. The findings suggest that crocodiles may have migrated from Africa to America during the Late Miocene epoch (11-5 million years ago).

1d

Now We'll Know What the Recession Feels Like

This week, Congress will decimate the economy, in an unfortunately literal sense: It will cut unemployment-insurance payments to more than 25 million people, more than one in 10 American adults. When it does, the coronavirus recession, already historic in its severity, will become far, far worse. The CARES Act, the coronavirus-relief legislation, included a huge expansion of the unemployment-insu

1d

Teaching Isn't About Managing Behavior

Editor's Note: In the next five years, most of America's most experienced teachers will retire. The Baby Boomers are leaving behind a nation of more novice educators. In 1988, a teacher most commonly had 15 years of experience. Less than three decades later, that number had fallen to just three years leading a classroom . The Atlantic' s "On Teaching" project is crisscrossing the country to talk

1d

Live Coronavirus News Updates

New C.D.C. guidance for reopening schools takes a political tone. Japanese officials remain narrowly focused on Tokyo's nightlife as the country's outbreak spreads.

1d

A Climate Plan in Texas Focuses on Minorities. Not Everyone Likes It.

For years, money for flood protection in the Houston area went mostly to richer neighborhoods. A new approach prioritizes minority communities, and it's stirring up resentments.

1d

The Doctor From Nazi Germany and the Search for Life on Mars

Astrobiologists have used Mars jars for decades. Many didn't know about the controversial Air Force scientist who started them.

1d

3 Great Mysteries About Life on Mars

How habitable was early Mars? Why did it become less hospitable? And could there be life there now?

1d

Why smokers and vapers – and those around them – may face higher Covid-19 danger

New reports cast doubt on early claims smoking offered protection from disease At the beginning of the pandemic, smokers may have thought they had little to worry about, as there was a sliver of good news for them: a study circulating on social media suggested smoking could be associated with a lower risk of contracting Covid-19. That's not the full story. Related: Biden predicts Trump will try t

1d

Risk för malaria i Sverige?

I Sverige finns ett femtiotal stickmyggarter, varav åtta kan sprida malaria. Det är framför allt två som man anser har varit delaktiga i tidigare spridning av sjukdomen i Sverige, källarfrossmyggan, Anopheles messeae, och stallfrossmyggan, Anopheles atroparvus. Den första gången vi kan läsa om malaria i Sverige är när biskop Israel Erlandsson berättar om hur han gick i skola i Linköping på 1200-ta

1d

Duplex DNA engagement and RPA oppositely regulate the DNA-unwinding rate of CMG helicase

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17443-7 During eukaryotic chromosome replication cells utilize ring-shaped CMG helicase that separates the two strands of the DNA double helix. Here the authors reveal that CMG helicase activity is inhibited by duplex DNA engagement at the fork, which is relieved by binding of RPA to the lagging-strand template.

1d

Mucosal-associated invariant T cells promote inflammation and intestinal dysbiosis leading to metabolic dysfunction during obesity

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17307-0 Inflammation, immune cells and the host microbiota are intimately linked in the pathophysiology of obesity and diabetes. Here the authors show mucosal-associated invariant T cells fuel inflammation in the tissues and serve a function in promoting metabolic breakdown, polarising macrophage populations and inducin

1d

Structural analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 methyltransferase complex involved in RNA cap creation bound to sinefungin

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17495-9 SARS-CoV-2 expresses a 2′-O RNA methyltransferase (MTase) that is involved in the viral RNA cap formation and therefore a target for antiviral therapy. Here the authors provide the structure of nsp10-nsp16 with the panMTase inhibitor sinefungin and report that the development of MTase inhibitor therapies that ta

1d

Quantum walks and Dirac cellular automata on a programmable trapped-ion quantum computer

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17519-4 Implementations of quantum walks on ion trap quantum computers have been so far limited to the analogue simulation approach. Here, the authors implement a quantum-circuit-based discrete quantum walk in one-dimensional position space, realizing a Dirac cellular automaton with tunable mass parameter.

1d

A non-invasive far-red light-induced split-Cre recombinase system for controllable genome engineering in mice

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17530-9 Current light-inducible Cre-loxP systems have minimal capacity for deep tissue penetration. Here, the authors present a far-red light-induced split Cre-loxP system for in vivo genome engineering.

1d

In vivo cell biological screening identifies an endocytic capture mechanism for T-tubule formation

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17486-w It is unclear how the T-tubule structure of skeletal muscle, which regulates coordinated muscle contraction, forms. Here, the authors develop a four-dimensional quantitative model for T-tubule formation in zebrafish, based on live imaging, proposing a dynamic endocytic capture model.

1d

Li2CO3-affiliative mechanism for air-accessible interface engineering of garnet electrolyte via facile liquid metal painting

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17493-x At Li-garnet interface, the poor interfacial wettability due to Li2CO3 passivation causes large resistance and unstable contact. Here the authors propose a Li2CO3-affiliative mechanism for air-accessible interface engineering of garnet electrolyte with superior wettability via facile liquid metal painting.

1d

Genome assembly of wild tea tree DASZ reveals pedigree and selection history of tea varieties

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17498-6 Wild teas are considered as valuable resource for studying domestication and breeding. Here, Zhang et al. report genome of wild tea DASZ and transcriptome of 217 accessions, which clarify pedigree of Chinese tea cultivars and show tea may not have undergone long-term artificial directional selection on flavor-re

1d

Microstructural controls of anticrack nucleation in highly porous brittle solids

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67926-2

1d

Loss of Rsph9 causes neonatal hydrocephalus with abnormal development of motile cilia in mice

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69447-4

1d

Preparation and evaluation of zeolites for ammonium removal from municipal wastewater through ion exchange process

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69348-6

1d

Sierra Nevada sweep: metagenomic measurements of bioaerosols vertically distributed across the troposphere

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69188-4

1d

1d

1d

Evidence of macrophage modulation in the mouse pubic symphysis remodeling during the end of first pregnancy and postpartum

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68676-x

1d

Barrow's Covid-19 spike down to hospital testing regime, analysis suggests

Investigation shows rigorous testing at hospital trust led to rise in cases in 'pariah town' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage During the height of the coronavirus pandemic, Barrow-in-Furness was labelled a "pariah town" when it emerged the Cumbrian local authority had by far the highest number of positive cases per head of population in England. Now, analysis of posit

1d

100.000 personbiler hjælper Cowi med at tage temperaturen på trafikken efter corona

Rådgivere fra Cowi har fået adgang til data fra 100.000 personbiler fra VW-gruppen i Danmark. Data fra bilerne giver blandt andet indblik i, hvordan vejtrafikken har artet sig under nedlukningen af samfundet.

1d

The Chaos in New York Is a Warning

More than a month after New York's June 23 primary elections, state election officials are still counting votes. In some legislative districts, they haven't even started counting absentee votes. In the best-case scenario, election officials hope to declare winners by the first Tuesday in August—six weeks after Election Day. It might take a lot longer than that. Election officials in New York City

1d

T cells can shift from helping to harming in atherosclerosis

At La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) researchers are dedicated to finding a way to stop plaques from forming in the first place. In a new study, LJI scientists show that certain T lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, that start out trying to fight the disease can end up increasing inflammation and making atherosclerosis cases even worse.

1d

Health, well-being and food security of families deteriorating under COVID-19 stress

The ongoing disruptive changes from efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19 are having a substantial negative impact on the physical and mental well-being of parents and their children across the country, according to a new national survey published today in Pediatrics.

1d

Coronavirus makes changes that cause cells not to recognize it

The novel coronavirus changes the appearance of its messenger RNA cap to trick the host cell into not recognizing it is foreign, according to a study reported by researchers from UT Health San Antonio.

1d

Can universal basic income fix a crisis that's already begun?

The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown millions of Americans into unemployment, highlighting the impracticality of living paycheck to paycheck, which a shocking number of Americans must do. Yet pandemic unemployment is just a glimpse of the fallout the US can expect in a future where more and more jobs are automated. Is universal basic income the answer? In this video, a range of experts from economist

1d

Without A Vaccine, Researchers Say, Herd Immunity May Never Be Achieved

A growing number of researchers think until there's an effective vaccine, the coronavirus will simply persist in the population, causing illness indefinitely. Better to squelch the spread instead. (Image credit: Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images)

1d

Book Review: The Pandemic May Be the Least of It

In "The Precipice," Toby Ord sees humanity at a crossroads, and examines the daunting existential risks to our survival, and how we might confront them. Will we address anthropogenic threats head-on? What do we owe to our descendants? Ord is looking to the future of humanity — and how to ensure it arrives.

1d

Coronavirus: Will lockdown easing see more of us using rivers?

There has been a surge in people visiting waterways after the lockdown was eased, outdoor groups say.

1d

Spiderwebs gather DNA that can help us monitor insects in forests

Spiders may build their webs to catch prey, but trials in Slovenian forests show they also grab onto DNA, which can help us monitor biodiversity in a less invasive manner

1d

Spacewatch: Nasa delays James Webb space telescope to October 2021

Delay is result of coronavirus pandemic and technical challenges as troubled project is set to cost £6.8bn Nasa has announced that the often delayed James Webb space telescope (JWST) is to be delayed once more. Instead of a launch on 30 March 2021, the mission has now slipped to 31 October 2021. The seven-month delay is the result of impacts from the coronavirus pandemic, as well as technical cha

1d

Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a vaccine?

More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…

1d

Men 'less supportive' in more egalitarian nations

A new 42-country study has found that the more gender egalitarian the country, the less likely men are to support women's causes.

1d

Five questions about Ethiopia's controversial Nile dam

Ethiopia said this week it had hit its first-year target for filling the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, a concrete colossus 145 metres (475 feet) high that has fuelled tensions with downstream nations for nearly a decade.

1d

Vietnam suspends wildlife trade as pandemic prods action

Vietnam, one of Asia's biggest consumers of wildlife products, has suspended all imports of wild animal species "dead or alive" and vowed to "eliminate" illegal markets across the country.

1d

1d

Fires triple in Brazil's Pantanal wetlands in 2020

The number of forest fires in the Pantanal, the world's largest tropical wetlands, has nearly tripled in 2020 compared to the same period last year, according to satellite data released Thursday.

1d

Vietnam suspends wildlife trade as pandemic prods action

Vietnam, one of Asia's biggest consumers of wildlife products, has suspended all imports of wild animal species "dead or alive" and vowed to "eliminate" illegal markets across the country.

1d

Rare leopard frog found beyond its known range in Southwest

A rare frog has been found beyond its known range in the Southwest.

1d

Hurricane Douglas bears down on Hawaii as pandemic flares

The first hurricane to threaten the United States since the start of the coronavirus pandemic is presenting new challenges to Hawaii officials long accustomed to tropical storms.

1d

US mulls endangered status for Nevada plant in mine fight

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says there's enough scientific evidence that two rare plants in Nevada's desert could go extinct to warrant a year-long review of whether to list them as endangered species, including one at the center of a fight over a proposed lithium mine.

1d

Rare leopard frog found beyond its known range in Southwest

A rare frog has been found beyond its known range in the Southwest.

1d

US mulls endangered status for Nevada plant in mine fight

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says there's enough scientific evidence that two rare plants in Nevada's desert could go extinct to warrant a year-long review of whether to list them as endangered species, including one at the center of a fight over a proposed lithium mine.

1d

Master's degree loan scheme must continue for further inclusivity, vast study finds

The introduction of a master's degree loan scheme in England "substantially" broadened the socioeconomic class of people able to further their higher education.

1d

Tandem catalytic system efficiently converts carbon dioxide to methanol

Converting carbon dioxide to methanol, a potentially renewable alternative fuel, offers an opportunity to simultaneously form an alternative fuel and cut down on carbon dioxide emissions.

1d

1d

"Jeg fik kun én pomfrit": Ny metode vil sikre madstudier mod uærlige svar

Meget forskning i fødevarer beror på deltagernes ærlighed i forhold til, hvad de fortæller,…

1d

1d

Young dolphins pick their friends wisely

Strategic networking is key to career success, and not just for humans. A new study of wild bottlenose dolphins reveals that in early life, dolphins devote more time to building connections that could give them an edge later on.

1d

Young dolphins pick their friends wisely

Strategic networking is key to career success, and not just for humans. A new study of wild bottlenose dolphins reveals that in early life, dolphins devote more time to building connections that could give them an edge later on.

1d

Small-farm tech reduces deforestation, climate change

Small farms in Zambia that use the latest hybrid seed for maize, along with improving health on neutral soils, help reduce deforestation and tackle climate change, Cornell University researchers report this month in Global Environmental Change.

1d

Thomas gjorde stenalderkost populær: Nu opfordrer han ikke længere alle til at spise kød

Engang var der status i at spise meget kød. Sådan er det ikke mere.

1d

'Meet' the now officially extinct smooth handfish | First Dog on the Moon

While it seems a likely culprit Tasmania's infamous curried scallop pie is not to blame for the disappearance of the smooth handfish Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Get all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading…

1d

Household Chemical Effects on Our Health Appear Increasingly Dire, New Evidence Shows

Researchers are working hard to unravel the connection.

1d

Dansk forsøg i gang: Protein fra lamaer skal erstatte zink i smågrise

Konsortium af danske forskere vil erstatte medicinsk zink med protein, som nænsomt jager sygdomsfremkaldende bakterier ud af tarmen på smågrise under afvænning. Landbruget ser stort potentiale.

1d

Photos of the Week: Portland Moms, Beach Astronauts, Fire Whirl

A cheetah at rest in Kenya, flamenco dancing in Spain, tennis at a Berlin airport, a giant spoon on an English trail, a baby hippo in Mexico, an online mud festival in South Korea, the night sky above Syria, wildfires in Greece, concerts in Australia and Germany, a Chinese mission to Mars, and much more

1d

No Longer in Shadows, Pentagon's U.F.O. Unit Will Make Some Findings Public

For over a decade, the program, now tucked inside the Office of Naval Intelligence, has discussed mysterious events in classified briefings.

1d

Tandem catalytic system efficiently converts carbon dioxide to methanol

Boston College chemists have used a tandem catalytic system to efficiently convert carbon dioxide to methanol. By encapsulating multiple catalysts involved in the tandem process in nanoporous materials called metal-organic frameworks, the team reports achieving superior performance by eliminating catalyst incompatibility. The method could be applied to other tandem catalytic processes, allowing mo

1d

Blame game escalates as Catalonia grapples with second wave of virus

Mis-steps and weaknesses exposed as Spanish region endures new round of restrictions

1d

1d

Droppede fax og kuglepen: Corona satte turbo på akut-udvikling i Sundhedsplatformen

Covid-19 fik sat gang i udviklingshastigheden i Region Hovedstaden. Ny løsning betyder mere tid til kritiske intensivpatienter og kan redde menneskeliv, når det gælder.

1d

Researchers discover new pathways that could help treat RNA viruses

Researchers have identified new pathways in an RNA-based virus where inhibitors, like medical treatments, unbind. The finding could be beneficial in understanding how these inhibitors react and potentially help develop a new generation of drugs to target viruses with high death rates, like HIV-1, Zika, Ebola and SARS-CoV2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

2d

Plastic flow into ocean expected to triple by 2040, action could stem tide more than 80%

A new analysis finds that without immediate and sustained action, the annual flow of plastic into the ocean could nearly triple by 2040. The study also identifies solutions that could cut this volume by more than 80% using technologies available today, if key decision-makers make system-wide changes.

2d

Bee disease spreading via flowers

One in 11 flowers carries disease-causing parasites known to contribute to bee declines, according to a new study that identifies how flowers act as hubs for transmitting diseases to bees and other pollinators.

2d

Some 'inert' drug ingredients may be biologically active

Some supposedly inert ingredients in common drugs — such as dyes and preservatives — may potentially be biologically active and could lead to unanticipated side effects, according to a preliminary new study.

2d

Lone Star ticks in Illinois can carry, transmit Heartland virus

Researchers have confirmed that Heartland virus, an emerging pathogen with potentially dire consequences for those infected, is present in Lone Star ticks in two Illinois counties hundreds of miles apart. Lone Star ticks were first detected in Illinois in 1999 but had not been found to be infected with Heartland virus in the state.

2d

Older adults feel stressed, yet resilient in the time of COVID-19

America's oldest citizens say they've been through worse, but many older adults are feeling the stress of COVID-19 and prolonged social distancing measures, according to a new study.

2d

Older adults coped with pandemic best, study reveals

Adults aged 60 and up have fared better emotionally compared to younger adults (18-39) and middle-aged adults (40-59) amid the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new research.

2d

Calcium channel subunits play a major role in autism spectrum disorders

Neurobiologists have found new evidence that specific calcium channel subunits play a crucial role in the development of excitatory and inhibitory synapses.

2d

Researchers discover new pathways that could help treat RNA viruses

Researchers have identified new pathways in an RNA-based virus where inhibitors, like medical treatments, unbind. The finding could be beneficial in understanding how these inhibitors react and potentially help develop a new generation of drugs to target viruses with high death rates, like HIV-1, Zika, Ebola and SARS-CoV2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

2d

Lung ultrasound shows duration, severity of coronavirus disease (COVID-19)

A new study found that lung ultrasound was highly sensitive for detecting abnormalities in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19), with B-lines, a thickened pleural line, and pulmonary consolidation the most commonly observed features. Additionally, the authors found that lung ultrasound features can be used to reflect both the infection duration and disease severity.

2d

Coronavirus antibodies fall dramatically in first 3 months after mild cases of COVID-19

In people with mild cases of COVID-19, antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes the disease — drop sharply over the first three months after infection, decreasing by roughly half every 36 days, a new study finds. If sustained at that rate, the antibodies would disappear within about a year.

2d

2d

Last step in the path of LDL cholesterol from lysosome to plasma membrane to ER is governed by phosphatidylserine [Cell Biology]

Animal cells acquire cholesterol from receptor-mediated uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which releases cholesterol in lysosomes. The cholesterol moves to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where it inhibits production of LDL receptors, completing a feedback loop. Here we performed a CRISPR-Cas9 screen in human SV589 cells for genes required for LDL-derived…

2d

General learning ability in perceptual learning [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Developing expertise in any field usually requires acquisition of a wide range of skills. Most current studies on perceptual learning have focused on a single task and concluded that learning is quite specific to the trained task, and the ubiquitous individual differences reflect random fluctuations across subjects. Whether there exists…

2d

When possible, report a Fisher-exact P value and display its underlying null randomization distribution [Applied Biological Sciences]

In randomized experiments, Fisher-exact P values are available and should be used to help evaluate results rather than the more commonly reported asymptotic P values. One reason is that using the latter can effectively alter the question being addressed by including irrelevant distributional assumptions. The Fisherian statistical framework, proposed in…

2d

Mitochondria-lysosome contacts regulate mitochondrial Ca2+ dynamics via lysosomal TRPML1 [Cell Biology]

Mitochondria and lysosomes are critical for cellular homeostasis, and dysfunction of both organelles has been implicated in numerous diseases. Recently, interorganelle contacts between mitochondria and lysosomes were identified and found to regulate mitochondrial dynamics. However, whether mitochondria–lysosome contacts serve additional functions by facilitating the direct transfer of metabolites

2d

A structural framework for unidirectional transport by a bacterial ABC exporter [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter of mitochondria (Atm1) mediates iron homeostasis in eukaryotes, while the prokaryotic homolog from Novosphingobium aromaticivorans (NaAtm1) can export glutathione derivatives and confer protection against heavy-metal toxicity. To establish the structural framework underlying the NaAtm1 transport mechanism, we determined eight structures by X-ray crystallo

2d

Targeting nanoparticles to the brain by exploiting the blood-brain barrier impermeability to selectively label the brain endothelium [Engineering]

Current strategies to direct therapy-loaded nanoparticles to the brain rely on functionalizing nanoparticles with ligands which bind target proteins associated with the blood–brain barrier (BBB). However, such strategies have significant brain-specificity limitations, as target proteins are not exclusively expressed at the brain microvasculature. Therefore, novel strategies which exploit alternati

2d

Prototypical pacemaker neurons interact with the resident microbiota [Developmental Biology]

Pacemaker neurons exert control over neuronal circuit function by their intrinsic ability to generate rhythmic bursts of action potential. Recent work has identified rhythmic gut contractions in human, mice, and hydra to be dependent on both neurons and the resident microbiota. However, little is known about the evolutionary origin of…

2d

Stochastic bacterial population dynamics restrict the establishment of antibiotic resistance from single cells [Microbiology]

A better understanding of how antibiotic exposure impacts the evolution of resistance in bacterial populations is crucial for designing more sustainable treatment strategies. The conventional approach to this question is to measure the range of concentrations over which resistant strain(s) are selectively favored over a sensitive strain. Here, we instead…

2d

Molecular characterization of a fungal gasdermin-like protein [Genetics]

Programmed cell death (PCD) in filamentous fungi prevents cytoplasmic mixing following fusion between conspecific genetically distinct individuals (allorecognition) and serves as a defense mechanism against mycoparasitism, genome exploitation, and deleterious cytoplasmic elements (i.e., senescence plasmids). Recently, we identified regulator of cell death-1 (rcd-1), a gene controlling PCD in germi

2d

Experimental and theoretical evidence for hydrogen doping in polymer solution-processed indium gallium oxide [Chemistry]

The field-effect electron mobility of aqueous solution-processed indium gallium oxide (IGO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) is significantly enhanced by polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) addition to the precursor solution, a >70-fold increase to 7.9 cm2/Vs. To understand the origin of this remarkable phenomenon, microstructure, electronic structure, and charge transport of IGO:PVA film are…

2d

New CT scan method lowers radiation exposure

A CT scan technique that splits a full X-ray beam into thin beamlets can deliver the same quality of image at a much reduced radiation dose, according to a new study. The technique, demonstrated on a small sample in a micro CT scanner, could potentially be adapted for medical scanners and used to reduce the amount of radiation millions of people are exposed to each year.

2d

New CT scan method lowers radiation exposure

A CT scan technique that splits a full X-ray beam into thin beamlets can deliver the same quality of image at a much reduced radiation dose, according to a new study. The technique, demonstrated on a small sample in a micro CT scanner, could potentially be adapted for medical scanners and used to reduce the amount of radiation millions of people are exposed to each year.

2d

Young dolphins pick their friends wisely

Strategic networking is key to career success, and not just for humans. A study of bottlenose dolphins reveals that in early life, dolphins devote more time to building connections that could give them an edge later on. Analyzing nearly 30 years of records for some 1700 dolphins in Australia, researchers find that dolphins under age 10 seek out peers and activities that could help them forge bonds

2d

Boats and ships leave baby reef fish vulnerable to predators

Scientists say the noise from boats and ships slows down the activity of baby fish on coral reefs, which leaves them more vulnerable to their predators.

2d

Hot or cold, venomous vipers still quick to strike

Most reptiles move slower when temperatures drop, but venomous rattlesnakes appear to be an exception. The cold affects them, but not as much as scientists expected.

2d

Shifts seen in breeding times and duration for 73 boreal bird species over 40 years

Forest ecologist report finding "clear evidence of a contraction of the breeding period" among boreal birds in Finland over a 43-year span for which good quality data were available.

2d

COVID-19 vaccine innovation could dramatically speed up worldwide production

A new modified version of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein has a 10-fold higher expression rate in cell cultures than an earlier version that forms the basis of some candidates currently in clinical trials. Vaccine manufacturers could swap in the new version and produce vaccine doses at much higher rates, researchers say.

2d

How mosquitoes got their taste for human blood and what it means for the future

To predict and help control the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses, it's important to know where and why certain mosquitoes got their taste for biting humans in the first place. Now, researchers have identified two major factors: a dry climate and city life. Based on these findings, they predict that increased urbanization in the coming decades will mean even more human-biting mosquitoes in the fu

2d

Reexamining the history of slavery through 23andMe African ancestry data

Researchers have compiled genetic data from consenting 23andMe research participants to paint a more complete picture of African ancestry in the New World. By linking genetic data with slave trade historical records, the findings reinforce harsh truths about slavery in the Americas and uncover insights into its history, including the methods used to suppress and exploit Africans once they disembar

2d

Unprecedented effort to ramp up testing technologies for COVID-19

In a new paper, experts set forth a framework to increase significantly the number, quality and type of daily tests for detecting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and help reduce inequities for underserved populations that have been disproportionally affected by the disease.

2d

Tracking misinformation campaigns in real-time is possible, study shows

A research team has developed a technique for tracking online foreign misinformation campaigns in real time, which could help mitigate outside interference in the 2020 American election.

2d

2d

Preventing the next pandemic

A new article shows that an annual investment of $30 billion should be enough to offset the costs of preventing another global pandemic such as COVID-19.

2d

Study finds decline in emergent hospitalizations during early phase of COVID-19

Researchers report on the decline of emergent medical, surgical and obstetric hospitalizations at the medical center during the six-week period following the week of the declaration of the COVID-19 public health emergency in Boston in mid-March 2020.

2d

Driving immunometabolism to control lung infection

When drugs to kill microbes are ineffective, host-directed therapy uses the body's own immune system to deal with the infection. This approach is being tested in patients with COVID-19, and now a team of researchers has published a study showing how it might also work in the fight against tuberculosis (TB).

2d

COVID-19 shutdown led to increased solar power output

As the air cleared after lockdowns, solar installations in Delhi produced 8 percent more power, a new study shows.

2d

Common blood test identifies benefits and risks of steroid treatment in COVID-19 patients

A new study confirms the findings of the large scale British trial of steroid use for COVID-19 patients and advances the research by answering several key questions: Which patients are most likely to benefit from steroid therapy? Could some of them be harmed? Can other formulations of steroids substitute for the agent studied in the British trial?

2d

Long-distance learning could help us democratize education

Kids with all different skin colors need to see teachers from underrepresented groups. (August de Richelieu from Pexels/) This story originally featured on Working Mother . "We moved here for the schools." It's a popular refrain of suburban families wealthy enough to afford the high real-estate taxes that go toward funding well-rated public schools but not wealthy enough, or not interested, to se

2d

The Atlantic Daily: The Pandemic Population Lull

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . SHUTTERSTOCK / THE ATLANTIC 1. The pandemic, and its aftereffects, could stifle U.S. population growth. The country's birth rate, for example, will likely decline. "Between births and deaths, we'

2d

Neutralizing antibodies isolated from COVID-19 patients may suppress virus

Researchers have isolated antibodies from several COVID-19 patients that, to date, are among the most potent in neutralizing the SARS-CoV-2 virus. These antibodies could be produced in large quantities by pharmaceutical companies to treat patients, especially early in the course of infection, and to prevent infection, particularly in the elderly.

2d

Patients who lived longer with cancer at greater risk of severe COVID-19 infection

Cancer patients diagnosed more than 24 months ago are more likely to have a severe COVID-19 infection, research has found. Cancer patients of Asian ethnicity or who were receiving palliative treatment for cancer were also at a higher risk of death from COVID-19.

2d

Teen museum guides can improve your visit

Teen museum docents can boost the experiences, learning, and information retention of visitors to informal learning sites. The positive effects hold true across age groups regardless of museum type, but were most apparent in children ages 9 to 11. Informal learning sites—such as museums , zoos, and aquariums —often have programs for teenage docents, or educators that serve as a way for the teens

2d

We are mutating SARS-CoV-2, but it is evolving back

Scientists looked at the evolution of the virus that causes COVID-19. Their findings could help the design of a new vaccine.

2d

Study suggests increased risks for COVID-19 patients who smoke, vape

A new review looks at the effect that smoking and vaping may have on the cerebrovascular and neurological systems of COVID-19 patients.

2d

Scientists publish findings from first statewide COVID-19 random sample study in US

The results of the first statewide random sample study in the United States to measure the spread of COVID-19 indicated a general population prevalence of about 2.8 percent in Indiana.

2d

Why people with Alzheimer's may lose their way

Disruption of normal brain network function in hippocampus cells may explain loss of spatial memory in people with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study. People with Alzheimer's disease frequently suffer from spatial memory loss, such as not recognizing where they are, and forgetting where they put their belongings. They often show a wandering symptom, which is also a feature of spatial m

2d

Coronavirus live news: US cases top 4m as WHO chief chides Pompeo for 'untrue' claims

US Secretary of State's reported comments 'untrue, unacceptable and without foundation' says WHO ; Trump cancels Jacksonville RNC ; Bolsonaro not distancing despite positive test . Follow the latest updates US surpasses 4m Covid-19 cases as states dial back reopening South Africa sees spike in excess deaths suggesting high Covid-19 toll South Korea goes into recession as Australia flags huge defi

2d

Chinese, American scientists leading efforts on COVID-19

Despite the political tensions between the United States and China, scientists in the two countries are working together more than ever to study the COVID-19 virus, a new study suggests.

2d

Nasa Mars rover: How Perseverance will hunt for signs of past life

If there was life on Mars, how will the US space agency's next robot rover recognise it?

2d

Men 'less supportive' in more egalitarian nations

A new 42-country study has found that the more gender egalitarian the country, the less likely men are to support women's causes.

2d

Coronavirus lockdowns reduced human 'rumble'

Ground vibrations produced by human activity took a big dive when Covid restrictions were in force.

2d

UK and US say Russia fired a satellite weapon in space

The UK says the Russian satellite launched "a projectile with the characteristics of a weapon".

2d

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: Mothers unlikely to pass COVID-19 to their newborn babies if precautions are taken, small study suggests

Mothers with COVID-19 infection are unlikely to pass the virus to their newborn babies, if correct hygiene precautions are observed, according to a small observational study published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal.

2d

Simple urine test could significantly improve detection of adrenal cancer

Using a simple urine test alongside routine imaging for patients with adrenal masses could speed up adrenal cancer diagnosis, improving patient's prognosis and reducing the need for invasive diagnostic procedures, a new multi-centre study published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology has found.

2d

Home-made face masks likely need at least 2 layers to curb COVID-19 spread

Home-made cloth face masks likely need a minimum of two layers, and preferably three, to prevent the dispersal of viral droplets from the nose and mouth that are associated with the spread of COVID-19, indicates a video case study published online in the journal Thorax.

2d

Spectacular ultraviolet flash may finally explain how white dwarfs explode

For just the second time ever, astrophysicists have spotted a spectacular flash of ultraviolet (UV) light accompanying a white dwarf explosion. An extremely rare type of supernova, the event is poised to offer insights into several long-standing mysteries, including what causes white dwarfs to explode, how dark energy accelerates the cosmos and how the universe creates heavy metals, such as iron.

2d

When it comes to happiness, what's love got to do with it?

Researchers have conducted one of the first studies of its kind to quantify the happiness of married, formerly married and single people at the end of their lives to find out just how much love and marriage played into overall well-being.

2d

How does cooperation evolve?

In nature, organisms often support each other in order to gain an advantage. However, this kind of cooperation appears to contradict the theory of evolution proposed by Charles Darwin: Why would organisms invest valuable resources to help others? Instead, they should rather use them for themselves, in order to win the evolutionary competition with other species. A new study has now solved this puz

2d

Scientists develop new material for longer-lasting fuel cells

New research suggests that graphene — made in a specific way — could be used to make more durable hydrogen fuel cells for cars.

2d

2,000 years of storms in the Caribbean

The hurricanes in the Caribbean became more frequent and their force varied noticeably around the same time that classical Mayan culture in Central America suffered its final demise: We can gain these and other insights by looking at the climate archive.

2d

Antibiotics disrupt development of the 'social brain' in mice

Antibiotic treatment in early life impedes brain signalling pathways that function in social behavior and pain regulation in mice, a new study has found.

2d

Holograms help physicians during cardiac procedure

A holographic display improves physician accuracy when performing a procedure to treat irregular heartbeat.

2d

How COVID-19 Decreases Weather Forecast Accuracy

Meteorologists take advantage of weather data collected by commercial jetliners at different altitudes and locations. Fewer flights mean less data.

2d

Why Walking Might Be One of the Best Exercises For Health

Science says: Don't worry so much about getting 10,000 steps a day. But you might want to walk faster to reduce disease risk and live longer.

2d

Researchers develop a method for predicting unprecedented events

Researchers combined avalanche physics with ecosystem data to create a computational method for predicting extreme ecological events. The method may also have applications in economics and politics.

2d

Overcoming my writing guilt: writing in lockdown

Nature, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02219-2 How a PhD student found a way to be productive during lockdown after weeks of inactivity.

2d

Author Correction: Sentinel optical and SAR data highlights multi-segment faulting during the 2018 Palu-Sulawesi earthquake (Mw 7.5)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69652-1 Author Correction: Sentinel optical and SAR data highlights multi-segment faulting during the 2018 Palu-Sulawesi earthquake (M w 7.5)

2d

Author Correction: Role of intestinal trefoil factor in protecting intestinal epithelial cells from burn-induced injury

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69648-x

2d

2d

2d

2d

Researchers develop a method for predicting unprecedented events

Researchers combined avalanche physics with ecosystem data to create a computational method for predicting extreme ecological events. The method may also have applications in economics and politics.

2d

Study finds the real reason you get goosebumps

A new study suggests that goosebumps are part of a larger system that not only keeps us warm, but also helps hair to heal. The sympathetic nerve system reacts to cold air with goose skin. If it stays on long enough, it orders new hair growth. The authors note that other, currently unknown, connections between this system and other parts of the body are likely to exist. Everybody gets goosebumps,

2d

Listen: $600 a Week

In a few days, 30 million Americans will lose the $600 boost in unemployment insurance they've depended on every week. What happens next? Annie Lowrey, the Atlantic staff writer and author of Give People Money , joins to explain. Listen here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published. What follows is

2d

How COVID-19 Decreases Weather Forecast Accuracy

Meteorologists take advantage of weather data collected by commercial jetliners at different altitudes and locations. Fewer flights mean less data. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2d

Hubble sees summertime on Saturn

Saturn is truly the lord of the rings in this latest snapshot from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, taken on July 4, 2020, when the opulent giant world was 839 million miles from Earth. A new Saturn image was taken during summer in the planet's northern hemisphere.

2d

COVID-19 lockdown caused 50 percent global reduction in human-linked Earth vibrations

The lack of human activity during lockdown caused human-linked vibrations in the Earth to drop by an average of 50 percent between March and May 2020.

2d

China Successfully Launches Its First Mars Rover to the Red Planet

The U.S. is the only (existing) nation to ever successfully land a mission on Mars. China plans to change that.

2d

China launches unnamed Mars probe – video

China launched an unmanned probe on 23 July to Mars in its first independent mission to visit another planet. China's largest carrier rocket blasted off with the probe at Wenchang Space Launch Centre in the southern island province of Hainan and is expected to reach Mars in February 2021. The Mars-launching season occurs every 26 months when Earth and Mars are at their closest; the Chinese probe

2d

L-type calcium channel blockers may contribute to heart failure, study finds

Researchers found that in rats and human cells in vitro, LCCBs cause changes in blood vessels — known as vascular remodeling — that reduce blood flow and increase pressure. Examining epidemiological data, the team also found that LCCBs are associated with a greater risk for heart failure. The findings suggest that care should be taken when prescribing these drugs to patients, particularly older

2d

Do bicycles slow down cars on low speed, low traffic roads? Latest research says 'no'

The new article Evidence from Urban Roads without Bicycle Lanes on the Impact of Bicycle Traffic on Passenger Car Travel Speeds published in Transportation Research Record, the Journal of the Transportation Research Board, demonstrates that bicycles do not significantly reduce passenger car travel speeds on low speed, low volume urban roads without bicycle lanes. The research shows that difference

2d

Young dolphins pick their friends wisely

Strategic networking is key to career success, and not just for humans. A study of bottlenose dolphins reveals that in early life, dolphins devote more time to building connections that could give them an edge later on. Analyzing nearly 30 years of records for some 1700 dolphins in Australia, researchers find that dolphins under age 10 seek out peers and activities that could help them forge bonds

2d

African American Genomes Yield Insight into Slavery Practices

A massive study finds that regional differences in how slaves were treated throughout the Americas are reflected in the DNA of present-day Americans of African descent.

2d

Scientists: Climate Change Is Going to Suck, But It Won't Be Armageddon

Middle Ground A new study has both good and bad news for the future of the planet. If atmospheric carbon dioxide levels double, things probably won't get as bad as the doomsday, absolute worst-case projections some scientists have made — but, at the same time, we've already screwed the environment up too much for the best-case outcomes, Scientific American reports . The study is "the most importa

2d

Geologists say Venus has enough active volcanoes to form a 'Ring of Fire'

A volcano named Sapas Mons dominates this computer-generated view of the surface of Venus. (NASA/JPL/) In many ways—size, density, chemical make-up—Venus is Earth's fiery twin. Sure, this radiation-bombarded, sulfuric-acid-raining, blistering hellscape of a planet is hardly a haven of habitability like our home. But the longstanding hypothesis that Venus, like the Earth, is a volcanically active

2d

SpaceX's Starlink Satellites Ruined This Photo of the NEOWISE Comet

Over the past year, SpaceX has been launching hundreds of small broadband internet-beaming satellites into low-Earth orbit as part of its Starlink constellation. The tally as of June: 540 . While the promise of reliable and fast satellite internet accessible from pretty much anywhere in the world sounds pretty promising, not everybody is happy. As it turns out, the tiny satellites are way brighte

2d

Former Employee: "Facebook is Hurting People at Scale"

The Departed With the presidential election looming, current and recently-departed Facebook employees are reckoning with the many ways that they say the social media platform is damaging society. Software engineer Max Wang left the company after seven years this month, BuzzFeed News reports. As he departed, he posted a 24-minute video and accompanying note urging his fellow employees to take a cl

2d

Silicon core fishbone waveguide extends frequency comb

It is difficult to make very wide frequency combs from silicon waveguides, but clever waveguide engineering may be about to make that task a bit easier.

2d

Small-farm tech reduces deforestation, climate change

Small farms in Zambia that use the latest hybrid seed for maize, help reduce deforestation and tackle climate change in a new Cornell University study.

2d

Trump cancels Florida convention as US cases top 4m

President reverses course as latest pandemic milestone underlines disease's rapid spread

2d

Different from a computer: Why the brain never processes the same input in the same way

The brain never processes the same information in the same way. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) have found out why this is the case and how it works. A decisive role plays a critical state of the neuronal networks.

2d

NASA examines Tropical Storm Gonzalo's structural changes

Visible and microwave imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite indicated Tropical Storm Gonzalo was slightly less organized than it was on the previous day.

2d

Boats and ships leave baby reef fish vulnerable to predators

Juvenile fishes have one of the highest mortality rates compared to other life stages. Within two days of settling into a reef almost 60 percent are consumed by predators. Our recent study found noisy boats and ships can also affect the prey response of these young fishes.

2d

Boats and ships leave baby reef fish vulnerable to predators

Juvenile fishes have one of the highest mortality rates compared to other life stages. Within two days of settling into a reef almost 60 percent are consumed by predators. Our recent study found noisy boats and ships can also affect the prey response of these young fishes.

2d

Plastic pollution to weigh 1.3 billion tonnes by 2040

An estimated 1.3 billion tonnes of plastic is destined for the environment by 2040 unless global action is taken, scientists say.

2d

NASA finds strength in new Gulf Tropical Depression 8

NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to identify the strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures in Tropical Depression 8, spinning in the Gulf of Mexico.

2d

Biologists shed light on how cells move resources

Florida State University researchers have new insight into the tiny packages that cells use to move molecules, a structure that is key to cellular metabolism, drug delivery and more.

2d

NASA examines Tropical Storm Gonzalo's structural changes

Visible and microwave imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite indicated Tropical Storm Gonzalo was slightly less organized than it was on the previous day.

2d

Study finds decline in certain emergency hospitalizations during early phase of COVID-19

Researchers from BIDMC report on the decline of emergent medical, surgical and obstetric hospitalizations at the medical center during the six-week period following the week of the declaration of the COVID-19 public health emergency in Boston in mid-March 2020. Comparing data from the same period in 2019, the authors found a 35 percent decrease in weekly hospitalizations overall and 45 percent dec

2d

Frequent social media use influences depressive symptoms over time among LGBTQ youth

Frequent social media use can impact depressive symptoms over time for LGBTQ youth, according to research from a Washington State University communication professor. Findings highlight the positive influence of a 'social media break' in a supportive environment on mental health, especially for LGBTQ youth. They also demonstrate the value of face-to-face interactions and how many youth may be unawa

2d

FSU biologists shed light on how cells move resources

Florida State University researchers have new insight into the tiny packages that cells use to move molecules, a structure that is key to cellular metabolism, drug delivery and more.

2d

Preventing the next pandemic

A Policy Forum article published today in Science shows that an annual investment of $30 billion should be enough to offset the costs of preventing another global pandemic such as COVID-19.

2d

Excellent research results for CAR-T Cell therapy against Hodgkin lymphoma

Results from an early-phase clinical trial found CAR-T cell therapy, which attacks cancer cells using a person's reprogrammed immune cells, was highly active in patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma. The treatment led to the complete disappearance of tumor in the majority of patients treated at the highest dose level of therapy with almost all patients having clinical benefit after tr

2d

Biologists shed light on how cells move resources

Florida State University researchers have new insight into the tiny packages that cells use to move molecules, a structure that is key to cellular metabolism, drug delivery and more.

2d

20 Xbox Series X Games Revealed (Trailers): Every Game Shown

The fourth Xbox is coming this year, and these are its first batch of trailers, including new Halo and Fable games.

2d

Who Gets the Covid-19 Vaccine First? Here's One Idea

A weighted lottery gives everyone a chance at a drug or vaccine in short supply. But some have a better shot than others.

2d

Researchers develop a method for predicting unprecedented events

A black swan event is a highly unlikely but massively consequential incident, such as the 2008 global recession and the loss of one-third of the world's saiga antelope in a matter of days in 2015. Challenging the quintessentially unpredictable nature of black swan events, bioengineers at Stanford University are suggesting a method for forecasting these supposedly unforeseeable fluctuations.

2d

Watch a 60-Foot Mecha-Style Robot Take Its First Steps

Headless Horseman Engineers in Japan have been hard at work building a gigantic, 60-foot humanoid robot modeled after those in the "Gundam" sci-fi franchise . And while construction of the robot has slowed due to the coronavirus, it seems like progress is well under way. A recent video shows it taking its first tentative steps, Popular Mechanics reports , despite still missing its head. The foota

2d

Researchers develop a method for predicting unprecedented events

A black swan event is a highly unlikely but massively consequential incident, such as the 2008 global recession and the loss of one-third of the world's saiga antelope in a matter of days in 2015. Challenging the quintessentially unpredictable nature of black swan events, bioengineers at Stanford University are suggesting a method for forecasting these supposedly unforeseeable fluctuations.

2d

Silicon core fishbone waveguide extends frequency comb

Frequency combs are becoming one of the great enabling technologies of the 21st century. High-precision atomic clocks, and high-precision spectroscopy are just two technologies that have benefited from the development of highly precise frequency combs. However, the original frequency comb sources required a room full of equipment. And it turns out that if you suggest that a room full of delicate e

2d

NASA finds strength in new Gulf Tropical Depression 8

NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to identify the strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures in Tropical Depression 8, spinning in the Gulf of Mexico.

2d

A new approach to aiding black male trauma survivors

Many Black men suffer symptoms of traumatic stress in the aftermath of traumatic injury, and they also often carry social concerns, including experiences of discrimination and stigma. Yet despite their significant needs, underserved populations often have limited access to behavioral health care as well as a lack of financial resources to pay for such care. Because of these barriers, many trauma s

2d

Genome-mapping reveals 'supermutation' resulting in cryptic coloration in stick insects

Traits that form an organism's appearance, including color, are determined by many different genes and the creature's environment.

2d

Hubble Space Telescope captures summertime on Saturn

Saturn is truly the lord of the rings in this latest snapshot from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, taken on July 4, 2020, when the opulent giant world was 839 million miles from Earth. This new Saturn image was taken during summer in the planet's northern hemisphere.

2d

Genome-mapping reveals 'supermutation' resulting in cryptic coloration in stick insects

Traits that form an organism's appearance, including color, are determined by many different genes and the creature's environment.

2d

U.S. Congress approves conservation bill

Congress has passed sweeping legislation allocating $900 million a year for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), and an additional $9.5 billion over five years to address an urgent backlog of maintenance projects at the nation's parks and other public lands.

2d

Near-field light research advances particle manipulation, high resolution microscopy, and more

There are many types of light—some visible and some invisible to the human eye. For example, our eyes and brain don't have the tools to process ultraviolet light when it hits our eyes, making it invisible. But there is another type of light that is invisible simply because it never reaches our eyes. When light hits certain surfaces, part of it sticks and remains behind rather than being transmitte

2d

New native Hawaiian land snail species discovered, first in 60 years

Scientists have described a new native Hawaiian land snail species, sounding a rare, hopeful note in a story rife with extinction.

2d

Long-Term Observations on Mars Reveal Shifting Sands

The new findings come after more than 10 years of observation. McLaughlin-Crater-Dunes.jpg McLaughlin Crater Dunes on Mars Image credits: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona Rights information: Public Domain Space Thursday, July 23, 2020 – 16:00 Christian Fogerty, Contributor (Inside Science) — Martian megaripples might sound like they are straight out of science fiction. But they are real and just

2d

New native Hawaiian land snail species discovered, first in 60 years

Scientists have described a new native Hawaiian land snail species, sounding a rare, hopeful note in a story rife with extinction.

2d

New CRISPR DNA base editor expands the landscape of precision genome editing

New genome-editing technologies developed by researchers in J. Keith Joung's laboratory at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have the potential to help understand disease-associated genetic mutations that are based on C-to-G (cytosine to guanine) single base changes. The new base editors are also designed to minimize unintended ("off-target") mutations that could potentially cause undesirab

2d

Highly stable amyloid protein aggregates may help plant seeds last longer

Highly stable polymeric "amyloid" proteins, best known for their role in Alzheimer's disease, have been mostly studied in animals. But a new study on the garden pea publishing July 23, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by Anton Nizhnikov of All-Russia Research Institute for Agricultural Microbiology (ARRIAM) and colleagues, shows that they also occur in plants, and they may be an impor

2d

A catastrophic asteroid shower hit Earth & moon 800 million years ago

A new study examined data on lunar craters to gain a better understanding of ancient impact events on Earth. Although scientists know of some ancient impacts on Earth, weather and erosion makes it hard to study impacts that occurred beyond 600 million years ago. Studying craters on the moon can provide some clues. Since Earth formed 4.5 billion years ago, it's been bombarded by countless asteroid

2d

Neanderthals may have had a lower threshold for pain

Nerve cells have a special ion channel that has a key role in starting the electrical impulse that signals pain and is sent to the brain. New research finds that people who inherited the Neanderthal variant of this ion channel experience more pain.

2d

Meet Cosmo, a bull calf designed to produce more male offspring

Scientists have successfully produced a bull calf, named Cosmo, who was genome-edited as an embryo so that he'll produce more male offspring.

2d

Narcissists don't learn from their mistakes because they don't think they make any

When most people find that their actions have resulted in an undesirable outcome, they tend to rethink their decisions and ask, 'What should I have done differently to avoid this outcome?' When narcissists face the same situation, however, their refrain is, 'No one could have seen this coming!' In refusing to acknowledge that they have made a mistake, narcissists fail to learn from those mistakes,

2d

Is it a bird, a plane? Not superman, but a flapping wing drone

A drone prototype that mimics the aerobatic manoeuvres of one of the world's fastest birds, the swift, is being developed by an international team of engineers in the latest example of biologically inspired flight.

2d

Foxes have been eating humans' leftovers for 42,000 years

The diets of ancient foxes were influenced by humans, and these small carnivores might be tracers of human activity over time.

2d

New CRISPR DNA base editor expands the landscape of precision genome editing

New genome-editing technologies developed by researchers in J. Keith Joung's laboratory at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have the potential to help understand disease-associated genetic mutations that are based on C-to-G (cytosine to guanine) single base changes. The new base editors are also designed to minimize unintended ("off-target") mutations that could potentially cause undesirab

2d

Highly stable amyloid protein aggregates may help plant seeds last longer

Highly stable polymeric "amyloid" proteins, best known for their role in Alzheimer's disease, have been mostly studied in animals. But a new study on the garden pea publishing July 23, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by Anton Nizhnikov of All-Russia Research Institute for Agricultural Microbiology (ARRIAM) and colleagues, shows that they also occur in plants, and they may be an impor

2d

A gene helps women in labour to skip the painkillers

Nature, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02201-y Uncommon genetic variant dampens the response of uterine neurons that sense pain.

2d

Why COVID-19 made weather forecasts less reliable

Nature, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02198-4 The pandemic grounded many commercial flights, starving forecast models of valuable data acquired at high altitudes.

2d

Earth faces plastic pollution disaster unless we take drastic action

Even if we took every feasible action to reduce plastic pollution, we would only cut it by 78 per cent by 2040, a study has found. That doesn't mean we should stop trying

2d

Big drop in Earth's surface vibrations seen during covid-19 lockdowns

Earthquake monitoring stations have detected sharp reductions in Earth's surface vibrations during coronavirus lockdowns due to limits on noisy human activities

2d

DNA from Viking people reveals the unexpected history of smallpox

Smallpox DNA found in the bodies of people who lived in the Viking era show that these viruses were different to the one eliminated in the 20th century – and perhaps much less deadly

2d

Some 'inert' drug ingredients may be biologically active

Some supposedly inert ingredients in common drugs — such as dyes and preservatives — may potentially be biologically active and could lead to unanticipated side effects, according to a preliminary new study by researchers from the UC San Francisco School of Pharmacy and the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR).

2d

Study identifies spread of bee disease via flowers

One in 11 flowers carries disease-causing parasites known to contribute to bee declines, according to a Cornell University study that identifies how flowers act as hubs for transmitting diseases to bees and other pollinators.

2d

Vikings had smallpox and may have helped spread the world's deadliest virus

Scientists have discovered extinct strains of smallpox in the teeth of Viking skeletons — proving for the first time that the killer disease plagued humanity for at least 1400 years.

2d

Elon Musk: If You Don't Think AI Could Outsmart You, You're an Idiot

Big Brain Elon Musk, who long been notorious for warning of the dangers of artificial intelligence, has a message to the doubters among us: They're not as clever as they think. In the past, Musk has gone as far as to say that artificial intelligence is even more dangerous than nuclear war, Business Insider reports . One of his concerns is that AI will replace human workers. But he also frets that

2d

Author retracts Nature commentary over concerns about section's sponsorship

Nature has retracted a recent commentary after the author complained that he had been misled by the relationship of the publication to a financial sponsor and told to avoid critiquing work from the institution. The journal says it is revisiting its "editorial guidelines and processes" in the wake of the case. Kenneth Witwer, an RNA … Continue reading

2d

Getting a grip on near-field light

Harvard researchers have developed a system to mold near-field light — opening the door to unprecedented control over this powerful, largely unexplored type of light.

2d

New technology makes homes more energy independent, helps divert power during blackouts

In a new study, researchers from Texas A&M University and industry have designed a smart technology that can help utility companies better serve communities affected by blackouts. The researchers said their single device works by improving energy delivery between home solar-power systems and the electrical grid.

2d

Online tools can improve autism diagnosis

Online tools and assessments can help speed up diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the first comprehensive survey of research in the field has concluded. The survey showed that using internet-based tools in healthcare – a field known as telehealth – has potential to improve services in autism care, when used alongside existing methods. The results are timely as the Covid-19 pandemic is pr

2d

New approach simultaneously measures EEG and fMRI connectomes

Researchers have developed a new approach to compare changes in neural communication using electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging simultaneously. The approach allows them to assess the association between the two measurements and better understand neural connectivity changes over time.

2d

First Multi-Planet System Around a Sun-Like Star Imaged

This image, captured by the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope, shows the star TYC 8998-760-1 accompanied by two giant exoplanets. This is the first time astronomers have directly observed more than one planet orbiting a star similar to the Sun. The image was captured by blocking the light from the young, Sun-like star (on the top left corner) using a coronagraph, which allows for th

2d

Quickly Sanitize Phones, Keys, Toys, and More With This Portable UV Sterilizer Box

When it comes to preventing the spread of COVID-19 , most of the focus in the media has been on wearing face masks and washing hands. And rightly so. However, with new cases being reported at an alarming rate all across the country, it's also incredibly important to regularly sterilize the things we touch the most, like our cell phones and keys. By doing so, it helps us from inadvertently bringin

2d

Teen museum educators increase engagement, learning, in tween visitors

Do you want to get the most out of a museum and encourage your child's interest in STEM? Try interacting with a teenaged museum docent. Research led by investigators from North Carolina State University and the University of Exeter in the U.K. has found that youth docents have an overall positive effect on visitors' experiences, learning and information retention at informal learning sites. The po

2d

Smallpox and other viruses plagued humans much earlier than suspected

Nature, Published online: 23 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02083-0 Genetic research is rewriting the history of diseases.

2d

2d

PolyA-miner assesses the effect of alternative polyadenylation on gene expression

Researchers with an interest in unraveling gene regulation in human health and disease are expanding their horizons by closely looking at alternative polyadenylation (APA), an under-charted mechanism that regulates gene expression.

2d

Where are arctic mosquitoes most abundant in Greenland and why?

Bzz! It's mosquito season in Greenland. June and July marks the period when Arctic mosquitoes (Aedes nigripes) are in peak abundance, buzzing about the tundra. While Arctic mosquitoes serve as an important food source to other animals, they are notorious for their role as pests to humans and wildlife, including caribou, whose populations can be affected by their attacks. Yet, these mosquitoes spen

2d

PolyA-miner assesses the effect of alternative polyadenylation on gene expression

Researchers with an interest in unraveling gene regulation in human health and disease are expanding their horizons by closely looking at alternative polyadenylation (APA), an under-charted mechanism that regulates gene expression.

2d

Where are arctic mosquitoes most abundant in Greenland and why?

Bzz! It's mosquito season in Greenland. June and July marks the period when Arctic mosquitoes (Aedes nigripes) are in peak abundance, buzzing about the tundra. While Arctic mosquitoes serve as an important food source to other animals, they are notorious for their role as pests to humans and wildlife, including caribou, whose populations can be affected by their attacks. Yet, these mosquitoes spen

2d

Learning how to battle harmful algae blooms

Throughout the world's oceans in global nutrient cycles, food chains, and climate, as well as increasingly in human-made industrial processes, a diverse set of planktonic microbes, such as algae, play an integral role. For nearly all of these planktonic microbes, however, little is known about them genetically beyond a few marker sequences, while their morphology, biological interactions, metaboli

2d

Researchers find evidence of smallpox in the viking age

The fatal disease smallpox is older and more widespread than scientists so far have proved. A new study by an international team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the University of Cambridge shows that the Vikings also suffered from smallpox.

2d

New native Hawaiian land snail species discovered, first in 60 years

Auriculella gagneorum, a small candy-striped snail from Oahu's Waianae Mountains, represents the first new species of a living Hawaiian land snail described in 60 years.

2d

Learning how to battle harmful algae blooms

Throughout the world's oceans in global nutrient cycles, food chains, and climate, as well as increasingly in human-made industrial processes, a diverse set of planktonic microbes, such as algae, play an integral role. For nearly all of these planktonic microbes, however, little is known about them genetically beyond a few marker sequences, while their morphology, biological interactions, metaboli

2d

Understanding the microbial community hiding in our showers

In Benedum Hall at the University of Pittsburgh, nine shower heads in three brand new shower stalls run for eight minutes every day.

2d

Cornell Scientists Say "Strange Metals" Are Similar to Black Holes

Strange Metals For the first time, scientists are saying that so-called " strange metals " could be a bizarre new state of matter. According to new research published Wednesday in the journal PNAS by researchers at the Flatiron Institute and Cornell, there are even odd parallels between strange metals and black holes. Those unexpected similarities, they say, could help them probe previously unexp

2d

Researchers develop a method for predicting unprecedented events

Researchers combined avalanche physics with ecosystem data to create a computational method for predicting extreme ecological events. The method may also have applications in economics and politics.

2d

New CRISPR C-to-G DNA base editor expands the landscape of precision genome editing

The new base editing platform may help researchers understand and correct genetic diseases by selective editing of single DNA 'letters' across nucleobase classes.

2d

Two distinct circuits drive inhibition in the sensory thalamus of the brain

The thalamus is a 'Grand Central Station' for sensory information coming to our brains. Almost every sight, sound, taste and touch travels to our brain's cortex via the thalamus. Researchers now report that the somatosensory part of the thalamic reticular nucleus is divided into two functionally distinct sub-circuits that have their own types of genetically defined neurons that are topographically

2d

Virtual Encounters With Purring Cheetahs and Curious Penguins

Zoos are beginning to open, but digital experiences allow visitors to see ecosystems from a different perspective.

2d

With Covid-19, a Seismic Quiet Like No Other

Coronavirus shutdowns led to "the longest and most coherent global seismic noise reduction in recorded history," scientists report.

2d

Viking Age Smallpox Complicates Story of Viral Evolution

An extinct version of the smallpox virus dating to 1,400 years ago prompts speculation about viruses becoming more lethal over time.

2d

Leagues scramble to replace the roar of the crowd as pro sports return

Fenway without fans cussing in the stands? Get used to it. (Veronica Benavides/Unsplash/) It's going to be a good while before fans can pack the bleachers and seats at sporting events again. But as teams mount their summer comebacks in empty arenas and stadiums, some leagues have found alternative ways to keep viewers from suffering awkward silences during the action. Here's what you can expect t

2d

A time capsule of computer code is buried deep in the Arctic

Buried underground near the Svalbard Global Seed Vault is the Arctic World Archive safeguarding humanity's books, documents, and data. The Archive includes the massive GitHub library of software code behind the world's open-source applications. Information in the vault is stored on special media said to be durable for 1,000 years. For a place that's so cold, Norway's Svalbard archipelago is downr

2d

Forskere finder bevis for kopper i vikingetiden

Den dødelige sygdom kopper er ældre og mere udbredt, end forskningen hidtil har kunnet bevise….

2d

PolyA-miner assesses the effect of alternative polyadenylation on gene expression

Meet PolyA-miner, a new computational tool that enables scientists to evaluate the contribution of alternative polyadenylation to gene regulation in health and disease.

2d

Hubble sees summertime on Saturn

Saturn is truly the lord of the rings in this latest snapshot from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, taken on July 4, 2020, when the opulent giant world was 839 million miles from Earth. This new Saturn image was taken during summer in the planet's northern hemisphere.

2d

Scientists chart SARS-CoV-2 origin and transmission in Brazil, harboring one of fastest growing COVID-19 epidemics in the world

A team of Brazilian and European scientists has determined the transmission rates and out-of-country origins of predominant SARS-CoV-2 strains currently circulating in Brazil, which harbors one of the fastest growing COVID-19 epidemics in the world.

2d

Engineered SARS-CoV-2 protein offers better stability and yields for vaccine researchers

A team of scientists has engineered the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus – a critical component of potential COVID-19 vaccines – to be more environmentally stable and generate larger yields in the lab.

2d

COVID-19 vaccine innovation could dramatically speed up worldwide production

A new modified version of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein has a 10-fold higher expression rate in cell cultures than an earlier version that forms the basis of vaccine candidates currently in clinical trials from Moderna and Novavax. Vaccine manufacturers could swap in the new version and produce vaccine doses at much higher rates. Their findings appear today in Science.

2d

Teen museum educators increase engagement, learning, in tween visitors

A new study finds that youth docents have an overall positive effect on visitors' experiences, learning and information retention at informal learning sites — like museums. The positive effects accrued across age groups regardless of museum type, but were most apparent in children ages 9 to 11.

2d

Boats and ships leave baby reef fish vulnerable to predators

Scientists say the noise from boats and ships slows down the activity of baby fish on coral reefs, which leaves them more vulnerable to their predators.

2d

Plastic flow into ocean expected to triple by 2040, action could stem tide more than 80%

New analysis by The Pew Charitable Trusts and SYSTEMIQ finds that without immediate and sustained action, the annual flow of plastic into the ocean could nearly triple by 2040. The study also identifies solutions that could cut this volume by more than 80% using technologies available today, if key decision-makers make system-wide changes. The findings were released in a report 'Breaking the Plast

2d

'Self-eating' process of stem cells may be the key to new regenerative therapies

The self-eating process in embryonic stem cells known as chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and a related metabolite may serve as promising new therapeutic targets to repair or regenerate damaged cells and organs, Penn Medicine researchers show in a new study published online in Science.

2d

COVID-19 lockdown caused 50% global reduction in human-linked Earth vibrations

The lack of human activity during lockdown caused human-linked vibrations in the Earth to drop by an average of 50% between March and May 2020.

2d

Fertility is likely to decline in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study finds

Fertility is likely to decline in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, a new Bocconi University study finds

2d

New technique to capture carbon dioxide could greatly reduce power plant greenhouse gases

Removing carbon dioxide from power plant emissions is ever more urgent to limit the damage from climate change. UC Berkeley chemists working with ExxonMobil have come up with an efficient and less expensive technique for removing CO2 from natural gas plant emissions. The technique could be tweaked for more polluting plants that use coal. The chemists took a magnesium-based metal-organic framework

2d

Genome-mapping reveals 'supermutation' resulting in cryptic coloration in stick insects

In a paper published July 23, 2020 in 'Science,' a multi-institution team discusses findings from an investigation of genetic mutations in seven species of North American stick insects (Timema) resulting in cryptic coloration.

2d

Vikings had smallpox and may have helped spread the world's deadliest virus

Scientists have discovered extinct strains of smallpox in the teeth of Viking skeletons – proving for the first time that the killer disease plagued humanity for at least 1400 years. Smallpox spread via infectious droplets, killed around a third of sufferers and left another third permanently scarred or blind. Around 300 million people died from it in the 20th century alone before it was officiall

2d

Some "inactive" drug ingredients may not be inert

The inactive ingredients that make up a major component of drug formulations may not be as inactive as previously thought, researchers report.

2d

Ancient viral DNA suggests smallpox widespread in Viking Age Northern Europe

Viral DNA isolated from ancient human remains reveals the presence of smallpox in 7th century northern Europe, increasing the definitive antiquity of the disease in humans by nearly 1,000 years, according to a new study.

2d

Even immediate, significant efforts to reduce plastic pollution could leave Earth with 710 million metric tons by 2040, modeling suggests

Immediate and globally coordinated action to limit plastic consumption and waste could reduce the rate of plastic pollution by nearly 80% over the next two decades, according to a new modeling report.

2d

Seismic background noise drastically reduced due to COVID-19 lockdown measures

Global COVID-19 "lockdown" measures – the quarantines, physical isolation, travel restrictions and widespread closures of services and industry that countries around the world have implemented in 2020 – resulted in a months-long reduction in global seismic noise by up to 50%, representing the longest and most prominent global seismic noise reduction in recorded history.

2d

A world drowning in plastic pollution

Almost one billion tonnes of plastic will be dumped on land and in the oceans over the period from 2016 to 2040 unless the world acts, say a team of 17 global experts who have developed a computer model to track the stocks and flows of plastic around the world.

2d

A new MXene material shows extraordinary electromagnetic interference shielding ability

Researchers from Drexel University and the Korea Institute of Science and Technology have discovered a MXene material that presents exceptional electromagnetic interference shielding abilities.

2d

Tracking antibody profiles for influenza exposures across the lifespan

Immune responses to influenza exposures increase early in life, then decline in middle age, according to a study published July 23 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Bingyi Yang of the University of Florida, Steven Riley of Imperial College London, Derek Cummings of the University of Florida, and colleagues.

2d

Highly stable amyloid protein aggregates may help plant seeds last longer

Highly stable polymeric "amyloid" proteins, best known for their role in Alzheimer's disease, have been mostly studied in animals. But a new study on the garden pea publishing July 23, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by Anton Nizhnikov of All-Russia Research Institute for Agricultural Microbiology (ARRIAM) and colleagues, shows that they also occur in plants, and they may be an impor

2d

Research security bill advances in U.S. Senate despite opposition from research groups

Sweeping measure to combat foreign influence wins unanimous backing of key committee

2d

Lockdown was the longest period of quiet in recorded human history

When lockdown started in March, the world went instantly, strangely silent. City streets emptied. Joggers and families disappeared from parks. Construction projects froze. Stores closed. Now a network of seismic monitoring stations around the world has quantified this unprecedented period of quiet. The resulting research into "seismic silence," published in Science today, has shown just how much

2d

Researchers find earliest confirmed case of smallpox

Variola virus DNA found in bones of people from Denmark to Russia around Viking era The Vikings are known for their intrepid seafaring, fearsome fighting and extensive trading, but it seems it may not only have been goods and weapons they carried on their travels – they could also have carried a deadly disease. Researchers say they have found the world's earliest confirmed case of smallpox, revea

2d

Cost of preventing next pandemic 'equal to just 2% of Covid-19 economic damage'

World must act now to protect wildlife in order to stop future virus crises, say scientists Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The cost of preventing further pandemics over the next decade by protecting wildlife and forests would equate to just 2% of the estimated financial damage caused by Covid-19, according to a new analysis. Two new viruses a year had spilled from t

2d

'Wave of silence' spread around world during coronavirus pandemic

Seismologists said high frequency noise fell as much as 50% as planes were grounded and roads emptied Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage An unprecedented wave of silence spread around the world in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, according to researchers who found that vibrations from human activity slumped under national lockdowns. Records from seismic stations al

2d

NASA's Next Rover Will Bring First-Ever Microphone to Mars

No country has ever successfully sent a microphone to Mars. As a result, we've never heard the eerie sounds of the surface of Red Planet. "Even if only a few minutes of Martian sounds are recorded from this first experiment, the public interest will be high and the opportunity for scientific exploration real," famed astronomer Carl Sagan wrote in a 1996 letter to NASA, as quoted by the Planetary

2d

Russia Just Tested a Military Satellite That Kills Other Satellites

Space War Last week, Russia tested what U.S. military officials believe to be a dangerous new anti-satellite weapon. In short, the Russian satellite Cosmos 2543 demonstrated that it's capable of approaching another satellite in orbit and shooting it down, C4ISRNET reports . And that demo, amidst international talks about demilitarizing space, has the Pentagon concerned . Nesting Dolls The actual

2d

2d

2d

News at a glance

[no content]

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

Aftermath

[no content]

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

Fine-tuning stemness

[no content]

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

Shields up!

[no content]

2d

2d

2d

2d

A cell size sensor

[no content]

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

2d

Lost years

[no content]

2d

2d

2d

Growing in the light

[no content]

2d

2d

2d

2d

Cooperative carbon capture and steam regeneration with tetraamine-appended metal-organic frameworks

Natural gas has become the dominant source of electricity in the United States, and technologies capable of efficiently removing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the flue emissions of natural gas–fired power plants could reduce their carbon intensity. However, given the low partial pressure of CO 2 in the flue stream, separation of CO 2 is particularly challenging. Taking inspiration from the crystal

2d

Chaperone-mediated autophagy regulates the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells

Embryonic stem cells can propagate indefinitely in a pluripotent state, able to differentiate into all types of specialized cells when restored to the embryo. What sustains their pluripotency during propagation remains unclear. Here, we show that core pluripotency factors OCT4 and SOX2 suppress chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), a selective form of autophagy, until the initiation of differentiat

2d

The activities of drug inactive ingredients on biological targets

Excipients, considered "inactive ingredients," are a major component of formulated drugs and play key roles in their pharmacokinetics. Despite their pervasiveness, whether they are active on any targets has not been systematically explored. We computed the likelihood that approved excipients would bind to molecular targets. Testing in vitro revealed 25 excipient activities, ranging from low-nanom

2d

The impact of COVID-19 and strategies for mitigation and suppression in low- and middle-income countries

The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic poses a severe threat to public health worldwide. We combine data on demography, contact patterns, disease severity, and health care capacity and quality to understand its impact and inform strategies for its control. Younger populations in lower-income countries may reduce overall risk, but limited health system capacity coupled with close

2d

Determining plasmonic hot-carrier energy distributions via single-molecule transport measurements

Hot carriers in plasmonic nanostructures, generated via plasmon decay, play key roles in applications such as photocatalysis and in photodetectors that circumvent bandgap limitations. However, direct experimental quantification of steady-state energy distributions of hot carriers in nanostructures has so far been lacking. We present transport measurements from single-molecule junctions, created b

2d

Ultrahigh-strength and ductile superlattice alloys with nanoscale disordered interfaces

Alloys that have high strengths at high temperatures are crucial for a variety of important industries including aerospace. Alloys with ordered superlattice structures are attractive for this purpose but generally suffer from poor ductility and rapid grain coarsening. We discovered that nanoscale disordered interfaces can effectively overcome these problems. Interfacial disordering is driven by m

2d

Structural basis for membrane insertion by the human ER membrane protein complex

A defining step in the biogenesis of a membrane protein is the insertion of its hydrophobic transmembrane helices into the lipid bilayer. The nine-subunit endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein complex (EMC) is a conserved co- and posttranslational insertase at the ER. We determined the structure of the human EMC in a lipid nanodisc to an overall resolution of 3.4 angstroms by cryo–electron

2d

Remote structuring of near-field landscapes

The electromagnetic near field enables subwavelength applications such as near-field microscopy and nanoparticle manipulation. Present methods to structure the near field rely on optical antenna theory, involving nanostructures that locally convert propagating waves into confined near-field patterns. We developed a theory of remote rather than local near-field shaping, based on cascaded mode conv

2d

An evolution-based model for designing chorismate mutase enzymes

The rational design of enzymes is an important goal for both fundamental and practical reasons. Here, we describe a process to learn the constraints for specifying proteins purely from evolutionary sequence data, design and build libraries of synthetic genes, and test them for activity in vivo using a quantitative complementation assay. For chorismate mutase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of a

2d

Anomalous absorption of electromagnetic waves by 2D transition metal carbonitride Ti3CNTx (MXene)

Lightweight, ultrathin, and flexible electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials are needed to protect electronic circuits and portable telecommunication devices and to eliminate cross-talk between devices and device components. Here, we show that a two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbonitride, Ti 3 CNT x MXene, with a moderate electrical conductivity, provides a higher shielding

2d

Itaconate is an effector of a Rab GTPase cell-autonomous host defense pathway against Salmonella

The guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rab32 coordinates a cell-intrinsic host defense mechanism that restricts the replication of intravacuolar pathogens such as Salmonella . Here, we show that this mechanism requires aconitate decarboxylase 1 (IRG1), which synthesizes itaconate, a metabolite with antimicrobial activity. We find that Rab32 interacts with IRG1 on Salmonella infection and facilitat

2d

Genomic insights into the early peopling of the Caribbean

The Caribbean was one of the last regions of the Americas to be settled by humans, but where they came from and how and when they reached the islands remain unclear. We generated genome-wide data for 93 ancient Caribbean islanders dating between 3200 and 400 calibrated years before the present and found evidence of at least three separate dispersals into the region, including two early dispersals

2d

Large-scale mutation in the evolution of a gene complex for cryptic coloration

The types of mutations affecting adaptation in the wild are only beginning to be understood. In particular, whether structural changes shape adaptation by suppressing recombination or by creating new mutations is unresolved. Here, we show that multiple linked but recombining loci underlie cryptic color morphs of Timema chumash stick insects. In a related species, these loci are found in a region

2d

Cell growth dilutes the cell cycle inhibitor Rb to trigger cell division

Cell size is fundamental to cell physiology. For example, cell size determines the spatial scale of organelles and intracellular transport and thereby affects biosynthesis. Although some genes that affect mammalian cell size have been identified, the molecular mechanisms through which cell growth drives cell division have remained elusive. We show that cell growth during the G 1 phase of the cell

2d

New Products

[no content]

2d

Working through grief

[no content]

2d

Simultaneous cross-evaluation of heterogeneous E. coli datasets via mechanistic simulation

The extensive heterogeneity of biological data poses challenges to analysis and interpretation. Construction of a large-scale mechanistic model of Escherichia coli enabled us to integrate and cross-evaluate a massive, heterogeneous dataset based on measurements reported by various groups over decades. We identified inconsistencies with functional consequences across the data, including that the t

2d

2d

Diverse variola virus (smallpox) strains were widespread in northern Europe in the Viking Age

Smallpox, one of the most devastating human diseases, killed between 300 million and 500 million people in the 20th century alone. We recovered viral sequences from 13 northern European individuals, including 11 dated to ~600–1050 CE, overlapping the Viking Age, and reconstructed near-complete variola virus genomes for four of them. The samples predate the earliest confirmed smallpox cases by ~10

2d

Does your blood type influence how susceptible you are to covid-19?

There is some evidence that blood types can influence whether or not someone becomes infected with the coronavirus, as they do with SARS, but it is not yet conclusive

2d

Covid-19 news: Contact tracing failings risk second wave in England

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

2d

The Ethics of Dangerous Code

Who should get to decide which software is safe to share?

2d

During Lockdowns, the Earth (Sort of) Stood Still

Seismometers pick up human activity, like driving. When Covid arrived, scientists watched that global seismic noise plummet by 50 percent.

2d

A Billion More Tons of Plastic Could Blanket Earth by 2040

Even with immediate action, 710 million metric tons of plastic will enter the environment in the next two decades, scientists show. Welcome to Plastic Planet.

2d

Worst- and Best-Case Scenarios for Warming Less Likely, Groundbreaking Study Finds

The research narrows the range for how much Earth's average temperature may rise if CO2 levels are doubled — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2d

How atomic bomb survivors have transformed our understanding of radiation's impacts

Scientists are still studying the health of those who were in Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the bombs fell

2d

Activities Discovered for Some Inactive Drug Ingredients

Screens of hundreds of drug excipients reveal that some can interact with biological targets, contradicting their FDA categorization as inert.

2d

'Self-eating' process of stem cells may be the key to new regenerative therapies

The self-eating process in embryonic stem cells known as chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and a related metabolite may serve as promising new therapeutic targets to repair or regenerate damaged cells and organs, Penn Medicine researchers show in a new study published online in Science.

2d

2d

2d

2d

Shields up!

[no content]

2d

2d

2d