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2h

Nasa Mars rover: Meteorite to head home to Red Planet

The Perseverance robot will take Martian rock with it when it launches from Earth on Thursday.

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Do bicycles slow down cars on low speed, low traffic roads? Latest research says 'no'

New research demonstrates that bicycles do not significantly reduce passenger car travel speeds on low speed, low volume urban roads without bicycle lanes. The research shows that differences in vehicle speeds with and without cyclists were generally on the order of 1 mph or less – negligible from a practical perspective.

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LATEST

Dual role discovered for molecule involved in autoimmune eye disease

The inflammatory molecule interleukin-17A (IL-17A) triggers immune cells that in turn reduce IL-17A's pro-inflammatory activity, according to a new study.

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Research breakthrough in fight against chytrid fungus

For frogs dying of the invasive chytridiomycosis disease, the leading cause of amphibian deaths worldwide, the genes responsible for protecting them may actually be leading to their demise, according to a new study.

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Seeing the light: Researchers combine technologies for better light control

A new technology that can allow for better light control without requiring large, difficult-to-integrate materials and structures has been developed. The new photonic integrated chip could allow for many advances in the optical field and industry, ranging from improvements in virtual-reality glasses to optical remote sensing, according to the researchers.

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Study finds global trends in women's breast cancer show cause for concern

Breast cancer rates among women globally are on the rise, but new research is uncovering trends related to age and where you live that could help target prevention measures to improve the situation.

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Correct dosage of methane-inhibiting additive in dairy cow feed shown in study

The optimum amount of a methane-inhibiting supplement in dairy cattle feed has been determined by an international team of researchers, indicating that widespread use of the compound could be an affordable climate change-battling strategy, if farmers embrace it.

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Trends in consolidation of US agriculture with 35 years of data

Researchers presentsa detailed history of the consolidation of agriculture in the US based on 35 years of data, with implications for all sectors of agriculture moving forward. Data show a steady shift to fewer and larger farming operations across crops, dairy, and livestock.

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Seeing the light: Researchers combine technologies for better light control

A new technology that can allow for better light control without requiring large, difficult-to-integrate materials and structures has been developed. The new photonic integrated chip could allow for many advances in the optical field and industry, ranging from improvements in virtual-reality glasses to optical remote sensing, according to the researchers.

1h

African vulture poisoning has global disease and biodiversity implications

Researchers have produced recommendations for vulture poisoning control in Southern Africa. Vultures act as nature's most critical scavengers, working as ecosystem garbage disposals and disinfectors to maintain animal, environmental, and human health. Findings highlight the issue from a conservation and criminology perspective, recommending a more coordinated and holistic approach to regulation, e

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New cell profiling method could speed TB drug discovery

A new cell profiling technology combines high throughput imaging and machine learning to provide a rapid, cost-effective way to determine how specific compounds act to destroy the bacterium that causes tuberculosis. It could speed discovery of anti-TB drugs and be applied to other pathogens.

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Two immunotherapies merged into single, more effective treatment

Researchers have combined two immunotherapy strategies into a single therapy and found, in studies in human cells and in mice, that the two together are more effective than either alone in treating certain blood cancers, such as leukemia.

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Gene in fat plays key role in insulin resistance

Deleting a key gene in mice in just their fat made tissues throughout these animals insulin resistant, in addition to other effects, a new study shows. The findings could shed light on Type 2 diabetes and other insulin resistance disorders, which remain poorly understood despite decades of study.

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Battling harmful algae blooms

In two recent studies, marine biologists looked at why one species of algae has some strains that can cause fish kills and others that are non-toxic, while examining an algicidal bacterium found in Delaware's Inland Bays that could provide an environmentally-friendly approach to combating algae blooms.

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AI feat helps machines learn at speed of light without supervision

Researchers at George Washington University discover how to supercharge AI machine learning. Their method uses photons instead of electricity. The approach allows artificial intelligence to learn independently, without needing as much power. A breakthrough in artificial intelligence promises to take machine learning to the next level. Researchers figured out how to use light rather than electrici

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Cells react differently to genomic imprinting

We inherit half of our genes from each parent. For their function of most genes, it doesn't matter which parent a gene comes from. But this is not true for all genes: about 150 genes are subject to "genomic imprinting". They are active either only if inherited from the mother, or only father. Most "imprinted" genes are important for our development. New research shows that brain cells react di

5h

Rosalind Franklin: Beyond the Double Helix

Franklin, who was born 100 years ago, played a key role in the discovery of the structure of DNA. But her full story is much richer. topNteaser_RosalindFranklin.jpg Cropped image of Rosalind Franklin with microscope in 1955. Image credits: MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology/ Wikimedia Rights information: CC BY-SA 4.0 Culture Saturday, July 25, 2020 – 14:30 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Scien

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Researchers capture cell-level details of curved cornea

Researchers have, for the first time, acquired optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the curved layers of a person's cornea with cell-level detail and a large viewing area. The new OCT instrument enables improved monitoring of eye diseases as well as general health conditions such as diabetes, which alter the density of nerves in the cornea.

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Researchers capture cell-level details of curved cornea

Researchers have, for the first time, acquired optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the curved layers of a person's cornea with cell-level detail and a large viewing area. The new OCT instrument enables improved monitoring of eye diseases as well as general health conditions such as diabetes, which alter the density of nerves in the cornea.

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If You're Thirsty, You're Already Dehydrated. But This Rapid Hydration Mix Can Help.

Water is a little bit like sleep and love in the sense that almost nobody is getting as much as they need. One recent study showed that as much as 80 percent of the population reported not getting enough water every day, which doesn't even count those of us who unknowingly aren't hydrating enough. Basically, almost everyone should take steps to improve their daily hydration. And thanks to Hydrant

6h

UK tells people returning from Spain to isolate for two weeks

Move comes as country struggles with new wave of coronavirus infections

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Steven Sloman – Collective Knowledge and Overcoming Ignorance

submitted by /u/rp_tiago [link] [comments]

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my brain(long post)

submitted by /u/blueskull1234 [link] [comments]

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The Data Science Portal

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Intending to Do a Daily Task Can Create False Memories of Completion

submitted by /u/HeinieKaboobler [link] [comments]

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Kontroversiel teori: Sådan fik du din store hjerne

Vores forfædre fik kalorier nok til at udvikle en stor hjerne, da de begyndte at spise marv fra ådsler.

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Best airtight plastic storage containers

Everything in its right—and airtight—space. (Annie Spratt via Unsplash/) It can be a hassle trying to fit store bought grains into your pantry—they come in a variety of containers that require a Tetris-like finesse to fit together—and most of the packaging isn't resealable. Buying airtight plastic containers is an easy and attractive solution for fresh, easy to access grains. The best ones are st

9h

Pompeo's Surreal Speech on China

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo gave one of the most surreal speeches of the Donald Trump presidency at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda, California, on Thursday. In his speech, titled " Communist China and the Free World's Future ," he declared the failure of 50 years of engagement with China and called for free societies to stand up to Beijing. I am sympathetic to

9h

Cooking eased my exile and became my homage to the lives of immigrants

Preparing food helped me reconcile my old and new world. Now my restaurant produces a beautiful mongrel cuisine 'Now you better behave and don't cry!" was the warning from my mother, shot with a stern look to show she was deadly serious. We disembarked from the aircraft at Heathrow. It was a dark and dank day. Cold rain spat at us as we walked across the tarmac into the immigration hall. In the t

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Paper urging use of homeopathy for COVID-19 appears in peer-reviewed public health journal

A peer-reviewed journal has published a paper that urges the adoption of homeopathy in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. The Journal of Public Health: From Theory to Practice — published by Springer Nature and also known by its German name, Zeitschrift für Gesundheitswissenschaften — published "Homeopathy combat against coronavirus disease (Covid-19)" on June 5. … Continue reading

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The UK's app failure sums up our fatally flawed coronavirus response | John Naughton

Thanks to dithering and ineptitude, we may never have contact tracing on our smartphones Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage I've just been looking at the coronavirus death toll in various countries as tallied on the Johns Hopkins University Covid-19 tracker . At the time I checked, the UK had 45,407 deaths, Poland had 1,642, Ireland had 1,753, and Greece had – wait for

11h

When Deafness Is Not Considered a Deficit

In the Peruvian Amazon, the Maijuna peoples created their own sign language — which hints at the importance of community in the evolution of language.

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Weekend reads: Image duplication software debuts; papers that plagiarize Wikipedia; 'Time to Get Serious About Research Fraud'

Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: A review of a French hydroxychloroquine study that found it … Continue reading

12h

AI Helped Uncover Chinese Boats Hiding in North Korean Waters

A combination of technologies helped scientists discover a potentially illegal fishing operation involving more than 900 vessels.

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This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through July 25)

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE OpenAI's New Language Generator GPT-3 Is Shockingly Good—and Completely Mindless Will Douglas Heaven | MIT Technology Review "'Playing with GPT-3 feels like seeing the future,' Arram Sabeti, a San Francisco–based developer and artist, tweeted last week. That pretty much sums up the response on social media in the last few days to OpenAI's latest language-generating AI." RO

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Journal to retract paper that spawned #medbikini

The Journal of Vascular Surgery says it will retract a paper about surgeons' social media posts that said health care professionals who posted pictures of themselves in bikinis were engaging in "potentially unprofessional" behavior — and led to a firestorm on Twitter yesterday. As Medscape reported yesterday before the retraction: Medical professionals are tweeting pictures … Continue reading

13h

Russia Tested a Space Weapon Last Week

Twitter hack details, a botnet vigilante, and more of the week's top security news.

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Bikepacking Gear Guide: Tent, Clothing, Frame Packs, Food, Water

Here's what to consider (and what to buy) before safely heading out on a multi-day cycling trip into the hinterlands.

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Live Coronavirus Updates: World News

Friday was the fourth day running that the United States reported over 1,100 deaths. Pirate attacks are among the crime patterns shifting in the pandemic. New research sheds light on male vulnerability to severe Covid-19.

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Your Used Mask Needs to Make It to the Trash Can

They're on beaches, in parking lots and on sidewalks. You probably won't catch the coronavirus from a discarded mask, but the litter poses a risk to the environment.

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Joining Pro-Business Groups Can Make Tech Firms Seem to Be Antiscience

Some trade organizations have distorted the facts on climate change and other issues to keep members' profits high — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to Back Up Your Digital Life: Time Macine, Backblaze, iDrive, Duplicati, and more.

Backups are boring, but they'll save your digital bacon. Here's how to make sure your data lives on even when your PC doesn't.

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In India, Modern Construction Threatens Prehistoric Sites

The plots of land are key to the story of early human migration. But they're rapidly disappearing as infrastructure and agriculture encroach.

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This Deceptively Simple Device Will Help You to Stop Snoring Once and for All

Growing up, we're taught that snoring is funny. It's something lovable oafs do on TV shows or something you tease your dad about when he falls asleep watching football. However, in reality, snoring is no laughing matter. If left untreated, snoring can lead to major health problems. According to the National Sleep Foundation, roughly 90 million Americans suffer from snoring on a regular basis. If

14h

Rosalind Franklin centenary: 'She would have been totally amazed'

The sister of Rosalind Franklin says she would be surprised to be a "feminist icon" 100 years on.

15h

The Hobbies and Products Getting Us Through Quarantine

Here's what WIRED staff has fallen for thanks to all of the extra time on our hands.

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How to Lose a Swing State

Donald Trump needs Arizona on his side in November. Losing the state and its 11 Electoral College votes would, at the very least, mean a drastically narrower path back to the White House. Keeping Arizona red shouldn't be a challenge; the state has long been a Republican stronghold. But Arizona is changing rapidly, and right now, the forecast for the GOP looks grim: In 2018, Kyrsten Sinema became

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15 Best Tech Deals This Weekend: Games, Amazon Devices, and More

Smarten up your home and upgrade your audio with these discounts.

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Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a vaccine?

More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…

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The Florida Democrat Who's Been Warning About a Pandemic for Decades

Donna Shalala has a new dog named Fauci. He's a rescue dog, maybe part Yorkie, she figures. The name seemed right: He was found running into an Italian restaurant in Miami, where she lives, so the animal-shelter staff suggested that she give him an Italian name. And like everyone else, she's been thinking a lot about Anthony Fauci for the past few months. Shalala, a first-term congresswoman repre

16h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvilken af mine to forskellige kontaktlinser skal jeg bruge til at læse med?

En læser vil gerne købe kontaktlinser i hver sin styrke til hvert sit øje. Men hvilket øje giver det bedst mening at give læsetjansen? Det svarer lektor i optometri på.

16h

How beards put a brave face on threatened masculinity

In the West, for many centuries, shaving has identified a good man properly oriented to a higher order, whether divine or political. Defying this regulation meant being ostracised. But on occasion, a general reorganisation of masculine norms has interrupted the shaving-respectability regime. Alexander the Great established shaving as the ideal in Greco-Roman civilisation when he imitated classica

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Gravide Emilie vil gerne være vegetar, men spiser kød: 'Barnets sundhed kommer først'

Sundhedsstyrelsen anbefaler ikke, at små børn lever vegansk, men vegetarisk kost er helt fint.

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Why Everyone's Talking the 'Green Banana' Off Florida's Coast

Scientists will soon embark on a mission to one of the deepest "blue holes" in the ocean's floor.

17h

Why the 'Super Weird' Moons of Mars Fascinate Scientists

What's the big deal about little Phobos and tinier Deimos?

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This is now the world's greatest threat – and it's not coronavirus

A detailed analysis of environmental research has revealed the greatest threat to the world: affluence. Affluence is the biggest threat to our world, according to a new scientific report. True sustainability will only be achieved through drastic lifestyle changes, it argues. The World Economic Forum has called for a great reset of capitalism in the wake of the pandemic. That's one of the main con

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Now you can join an ongoing NBA game like it's a video conference

No fans? Not on FOX Sports. Thousands of virtual fans will attend FOX's MLB games this Saturday. pic.twitter.com/z9oQU0rYuC — FOX Sports (@FOXSports) July 23, 2020

17h

A change to the zodiac? This should never have been written into the stars

There has been a lot of talk about the Ophiuchus constellation joining the zodiac, but I won't be changing my Cancerian ways I am zodiac person. I have five books on the zodiac (and am open to many more). When I meet someone, before they have even opened their mouth I'll be trying to figure out what their star sign is. I'm not so into this stuff that I'll dislike or avoid certain signs, but sayin

19h

Ground system for NASA's Roman Space Telescope completes major review

When it launches in the mid-2020s, NASA's Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will create enormous panoramic pictures of space in unprecedented detail. The mission's wide field of view will enable scientists to conduct sweeping cosmic surveys, yielding a wealth of new information about the universe.

20h

Cykeln gjorde människan rörlig

"I Paris har velocipeden blifvit fullkomligt naturaliserad och har der blivit ett så nyttigt kommunikationsmedel, att man undrar öfver, huru verlden kunde existera den förutan." Ny illustrerad tidning, 1869

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'A meteor will go by, and everyone gasps': meet the world's most dedicated stargazers

Every year, amateur telescope makers gather under starry skies in the US and South Africa – to trade tips and tales from across the universe You have to be rigorous. You need perseverance. You must be meticulously clean. But even if you possess all these skills, none of them matters if you are in a hurry. Because there is one thing enthusiasts make clear from the start: building a telescope from

20h

Coronavirus: Public Health England calls for action on obesity in Covid-19 fight

New evidence links obesity to increased risks of coronavirus-related hospitalisation, intensive care and death Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The case for action on obesity has "never been stronger", according to Public Health England , who today publish a review of evidence which shows that being overweight remains one of the biggest risk factors in the battle agai

21h

Wetter than wet: Global warming means more rain for Asian monsoon regions

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University studied how the weather will change with global warming in Asian monsoon regions using a high-resolution climate simulation. The region is home to a large population, and the monsoons are a major driver of global water cycles. They explicitly simulated cloud formation and dissipation, and found significantly increased precipitation over the monsoon 't

22h

Klimatförändringarna får träden att "vandra" upp i fjällen

Våra svenska träd innehåller en unik nyckel till klimathistorien, och de har börjat förflytta sig uppåt. Spela videon för att höra forskaren Björn Gunnarson berätta om klimatförändringarnas effekter på träden i de jämtländska fjällen.

22h

GPT-3 on the Future of Humanity and the Seven Steps of Human Evolution

The following if a brief conversation with an artificial intelligence (some are hesitant calling it even that). The length of the original conversation was over twice as long. I have redacted the beginning because it was mostly used to prime GPT-3 away from the construct of the game we were playing and get it focused on an open discussion regarding AI and the future. Given that, you should meet t

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Estudios del futuro: teorí­as y metodologías | OpenMind

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Robot usage is soaring during pandemic

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U.S. hatches plan to build a quantum Internet that might be unhackable

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Porsche successfully tests 3D-printed pistons for 911 GT2 RS

submitted by /u/Danny-California- [link] [comments]

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What is the future relationship between automation and employment? Which career paths are currently considered "safe" or at high risk of automation?

If you could explain advances in the tech and how this directly pertains to employment that would helpful. Ie, what is the reason that some areas continue to be hit harder than others? submitted by /u/kingo15 [link] [comments]

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The covid-19 pandemic is forcing a rethink in macroeconomics

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In the Future, Solar and Wind Will Be Everywhere You Look

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Why does genetics/CRISPR not get nearly as much attention as A.I. / machine learning?

The potential implications of genetically engineered human beings , along with the fact that our society will almost certainly readily accept them makes me look at genetics as the dark horse of science.. not under a microscope like A.I. but just as (if not more) important. submitted by /u/Zzoz44 [link] [comments]

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DOD on 'Aggressive' Track With Hypersonic Weapons Development

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KFC will test 3D printed lab-grown chicken nuggets this fall

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RTP4 inhibits IFN-I response and enhances experimental cerebral malaria and neuropathology [Microbiology]

Infection by malaria parasites triggers dynamic immune responses leading to diverse symptoms and pathologies; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these reactions are largely unknown. We performed Trans-species Expression Quantitative Trait Locus analysis to identify a large number of host genes that respond to malaria parasite infections. Here we functionally…

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Induced proximity of a TIR signaling domain on a plant-mammalian NLR chimera activates defense in plants [Plant Biology]

Plant and animal intracellular nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors detect pathogen-derived molecules and activate defense. Plant NLRs can be divided into several classes based upon their N-terminal signaling domains, including TIR (Toll-like, Interleukin-1 receptor, Resistance protein)- and CC (coiled-coil)-NLRs. Upon ligand detection, mammalian NAIP and NLRC4 NLRs oligo

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Atomic-scale observations of electrical and mechanical manipulation of topological polar flux closure [Applied Physical Sciences]

The ability to controllably manipulate complex topological polar configurations such as polar flux-closures via external stimuli may allow the construction of new electromechanical and nanoelectronic devices. Here, using atomically resolved in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy, we find that the polar flux-closures in PbTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattice films are mobile and can…

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Temporal changes guided by mesenchymal stem cells on a 3D microgel platform enhance angiogenesis in vivo at a low-cell dose [Engineering]

Therapeutic factors secreted by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promote angiogenesis in vivo. However, delivery of MSCs in the absence of a cytoprotective environment offers limited efficacy due to low cell retention, poor graft survival, and the nonmaintenance of a physiologically relevant dose of growth factors at the injury site. The…

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Absence of cGAS-mediated type I IFN responses in HIV-1-infected T cells [Microbiology]

The DNA sensor cGAS catalyzes the production of the cyclic dinucleotide cGAMP, resulting in type I interferon responses. We addressed the functionality of cGAS-mediated DNA sensing in human and murine T cells. Activated primary CD4+ T cells expressed cGAS and responded to plasmid DNA by upregulation of ISGs and release…

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Seasonal climate change and marmot demography [Commentaries]

Seasons strongly influence the life cycles of many species on Earth, and it is therefore not surprising that some of the best evidence we have of the ecological response to recent climate change comes from studies of phenology, the timing of seasonal events (1). We know, however, less about the…

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A hierarchical Bayesian mixture model for inferring the expression state of genes in transcriptomes [Evolution]

Transcriptomes are key to understanding the relationship between genotype and phenotype. The ability to infer the expression state (active or inactive) of genes in the transcriptome offers unique benefits for addressing this issue. For example, qualitative changes in gene expression may underly the origin of novel phenotypes, and expression states…

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Thinner biological tissues induce leaflet flutter in aortic heart valve replacements [Engineering]

Valvular heart disease has recently become an increasing public health concern due to the high prevalence of valve degeneration in aging populations. For patients with severely impacted aortic valves that require replacement, catheter-based bioprosthetic valve deployment offers a minimally invasive treatment option that eliminates many of the risks associated with…

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Coral reefs show resilience to rising temperatures

Rising ocean temperatures have devastated coral reefs all over the world, but a recent study has found that reefs in the Eastern Tropical Pacific region may prove to be an exception.

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Wide awake: Light pollution keeps magpies and pigeons tossing and turning

Researchers find light comparable in intensity to street lighting can disrupt the length, structure and intensity of sleep in magpies and pigeons.

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Gene-controlling mechanisms play key role in cancer progression

Researchers have analyzed how epigenomic modifications change as tumors evolve. In a study of mouse lung tumors, the researchers identified 11 chromatin states, or epigenomic states, that cancer cells can pass through as they become more aggressive.

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Mercury remains a persistent poison in Connecticut's Still River

Researchers are beginning to unravel how century-old mercury pollution impacts local food web.

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Immune system — Knocked off balance

Instead of protecting us, the immune system can sometimes go awry, as in the case of autoimmune diseases and allergies. A team has now dissected how mast cells regulate their calcium levels to keep the immune response under control.

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Electrons obey social distancing in 'strange' metals

A study has used state-of-the-art computational tools to model the chaotic behavior of Planckian, or "strange," metals. This behavior has long intrigued physicists, but they have not been able to simulate it down to the lowest possible temperature until now.

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Electrons obey social distancing in 'strange' metals

A study has used state-of-the-art computational tools to model the chaotic behavior of Planckian, or "strange," metals. This behavior has long intrigued physicists, but they have not been able to simulate it down to the lowest possible temperature until now.

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Researchers simulate, assess damage to brain cells caused by bubbles during head trauma

Researchers are using their expertise with the manufacture of microstructures to study how the collapse of microbubbles within the skull can damage brain cells.

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How a few negative online reviews early on can hurt a restaurant

Just a few negative online restaurant reviews can determine early on how many reviews a restaurant receives long-term, a new study has found. The study also found that a neighborhood's median household income affected whether restaurants were rated at all.

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Mammal cells could struggle to fight space germs

The immune systems of mammals – including humans – might struggle to detect and respond to germs from other planets, new research suggests.

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Software of autonomous driving systems

Researchers have been developing software systems of autonomous driving systems. They have now developed a method for generating safety-critical simulation scenarios and an adaptive control procedure for compensating for internal errors.

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Software of autonomous driving systems

Researchers have been developing software systems of autonomous driving systems. They have now developed a method for generating safety-critical simulation scenarios and an adaptive control procedure for compensating for internal errors.

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Food supplements may improve brain health among young children in low income countries

Giving nutritional supplements to young children in low income countries for around 6 months could improve their brain (cognitive) health, finds a new trial.

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Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, linked to lower risk of death

Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, are associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, finds an analysis of the latest evidence.

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Sweet coolers a gateway to increased alcohol consumption

Sweetened alcoholic beverages can promote harmful alcohol consumption among teens, new University of Guelph research finds.

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Coronavirus live news: Close watch on Victoria, Australia, and record infections globally

WHO reports 284,196 new cases; France discourages travel to Catalonia region; South Africa shuts schools for a month 'Wicked enemy': how Australia's success unravelled US cases pass 4m cases, states dial back reopening Trump cancels Republican convention events in Florida 1.48am BST Reuters reports the US recorded over 1,000 deaths from Covid-19 for the fourth day in a row, for the first time sin

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US coronavirus deaths surpass 1,000 for fourth day in a row

Friday's fatality count caps grim week in which Donald Trump conceded seriousness of outbreak

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Plant-based diets shown to lower blood pressure even with limited meat and dairy

Consuming a plant-based diet can lower blood pressure even if small amounts of meat and dairy are consumed too, according to new research from the University of Warwick.

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Mexican cave contains signs of human visitors from 30,000 years ago

Scientists have found ancient tools as well as plant and animal remains in a high-altitude cave. The site is dated to 30,000 years ago, pushing back estimates of the first humans to arrive in the Americas by 15,000 years. There is no sign these mysterious people remain in the modern gene pool. The stunning discoveries recently made in northern Mexico's Chiquihuite Cave raise more questions than t

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The Gravity Cooling Blanket Is the Perfect Weighted Blanket for Summer

Modern life is a nerve-wracking, enervating experience, with new sources of anxiety being introduced on a daily basis. And social distancing and a deadly pandemic haven't exactly helped matters. So if you feel your mental and emotional composure is fraying and your sleep is suffering as a result, a weighted blanket like those offered by Gravity Blankets may be good for what ails you. And if you'r

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Wrong number of fingers leads down wrong track

Have you ever wondered why our hands have five fingers while amphibians usually only have four? Until now it was assumed that this was already the case with the early ancestors of today's frogs and salamanders, the Temnospondyli. However, a new find of the crocodile-like Temnospondyl Metoposaurus krasiejowensis (about 225 million years old) in Poland shows five metacarpal bones and thus five finge

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Bruce Blair, Crusader for Nuclear Arms Control, Dies at 72

A former Minuteman launch officer, he sounded alarms about how easy it is to start a nuclear attack, and about the lack of safeguards.

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Like it or not, you can't ignore how people look or sound

New research from Ohio State claims we cannot separate how someone looks and sounds. Volunteers were asked to look at photos and listen to audio, and were told to ignore their face or voice. "They were unable to entirely eliminate the irrelevant information," said associate professor Kathryn Campbell-Kibler. Postmates is a way of life in Los Angeles. So when a young Black driver recently crossed

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Sputum testing provides higher rate of COVID-19 detection

In a meta-analysis, researchers found that sputum was more accurate than nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal swabs. The study also shows early testing increased rates of COVID-19 diagnosis.

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Heart transplants declined sharply during pandemic

Heart transplants, donor hearts, and transplant waitlists all fell sharply at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, researchers have found.

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Ancient microbial arms race sharpened our immune system—but also left us vulnerable

Study traces genetic responses to pathogens back more than 600,000 years to the ancestor of Neanderthals and humans

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The Search for Immune Responses that Stop COVID-19

Scientists are examining the role of T cells, which are likely crucial for long-term protection against SARS-CoV-2.

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US and Russia to hold talks on regulating militarisation of space

US claims Russia tested satellite-launched weapon this month Negotiators to meet in Vienna on Monday US and Russian officials will meet in Vienna on Monday to discuss whether and how to regulate the militarisation of space, in the wake of an alleged Russian satellite-launched missile test . The two governments agreed to hold a "space security exchange" in January, but the meeting was put off as a

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Getting under the skin of psoriasis

Psoriasis afflicts millions of people worldwide, but treatments are limited to small molecules like steroids, which can cause skin thinning and lose their effectiveness over time. Medical researchers have circumvented those problems by using a topical ionic liquid to effectively deliver an RNA-based therapy directly into the skin of mice with psoriasis, which reduced multiple psoriasis-related gen

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The Computational Limits of Deep Learning Are Closer Than You Think

Deep learning eats so much power that even small advances will be unfeasible give the massive environmental damage they will wreak, say computer scientists.

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Scientists Are Researching Ways To Transfuse Antibodies In Coronavirus Treatment

Scientists are trying to determine whether blood serum taken from recovered COVID-19 patients could help prevent the disease in others.

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Well-preserved mammoth skeleton found in Siberian lake

Russian scientists are working to retrieve the well-preserved skeleton of a woolly mammoth, which has some ligaments still attached to it, from a lake in northern Siberia.

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Mitigation of greenhouse gases in dairy cattle through genetic selection

Researchers propose mitigating methane production by dairy cattle through breeding. Scientists are targeting reduction of enteric methane in the breeding objectives for dairy cattle to select for animals that use feed more efficiently and thus produce less methane. Because livestock farming contributes 13 percent of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, selective breeding can reduce those emissio

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The longest species of snakes that slither the planet

This story originally featured on Field & Stream . Pretty much all of the really impressive "biggest snakes in the world"—the 50-footers and up—live online or in Hollywood. (Many of the latter starred in the 1982 Arnold Schwarzenegger breakthrough hit Conan the Barbarian and are retired now.) But even in the real world, a handful of snake species can grow to immense proportions. The longest of th

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NASA animation tracks Tropical Storm Hanna's progression

NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible imagery as Tropical Storm Hanna formed in the Gulf of Mexico and continued to organize. A new animation from NASA shows how Hanna developed and intensified as it heads toward landfall in Texas this weekend.

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Manipulating non-magnetic atoms in a chromium halide enables tuning of magnetic properties

The magnetic properties of a chromium halide can be tuned by manipulating the non-magnetic atoms in the material, a team, led by Boston College researchers, reports in the most recent edition of Science Advances.

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'Trump owes us an apology.' Chinese scientist at the center of COVID-19 origin theories speaks out

Wuhan bat virologist Shi Zhengli denies responsibility for the pandemic and calls for more international collaboration

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Quantum loop: US unveils blueprint for 'virtually unhackable' internet

US officials and scientists have begun laying the groundwork for a more secure "virtually unhackable" internet based on quantum computing technology.

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Virus, hurricane season delay removal of wrecked cargo ship

Efforts to cut apart and remove a capsized cargo ship off the Georgia coast are being delayed for more than two months because of hurricane season and challenges posed by the coronavirus, project leaders said Friday.

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Study: Black entrepreneurship in the United States

A steady stream of media reports detailing the deaths of unarmed Black Americans at the hands of police. False 911 calls aimed at bringing harm to African Americans engaged in innocuous, everyday activities. Street protests calling for an end to discrimination and police brutality.

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World War II's Warsaw Ghetto Holds Lifesaving Lessons for COVID-19

An outbreak of typhus in the densely packed walled enclosure was countered by adopting all-too-familiar public health measures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Machine learning reveals recipe for building artificial proteins

Proteins are essential to the life of cells, carrying out complex tasks and catalyzing chemical reactions. Scientists and engineers have long sought to harness this power by designing artificial proteins that can perform new tasks, like treat disease, capture carbon, or harvest energy, but many of the processes designed to create such proteins are slow and complex, with a high failure rate.

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Old Art Offers Agriculture Info

Art museums are filled with centuries-old paintings with details of plants that today give us clues about evolution and breeding practices.

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NASA animation tracks Tropical Storm Hanna's progression

NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible imagery as Tropical Storm Hanna formed in the Gulf of Mexico and continued to organize. A new animation from NASA shows how Hanna developed and intensified as it heads toward landfall in Texas this weekend.

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Manipulating non-magnetic atoms in a chromium halide enables tuning of magnetic properties

The magnetic properties of a chromium halide can be tuned by manipulating the non-magnetic atoms in the material, a team, led by Boston College researchers, reports in the most recent edition of ScienceAdvances. The method is based on a mechanism known as an indirect exchange interaction.

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NASA's tracking Hawaii-bound Major Hurricane Douglas

Hurricane Douglas is a major hurricane tracking through the Central Pacific Ocean on a forecast track to Hawaii. NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to identify strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures and found them surrounding the eyewall of the powerful hurricane. In addition, images from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite were used to generate an animated track of Douglas' moveme

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'Our epidemic could exceed a million cases' — South Africa's top coronavirus adviser

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02216-5 Salim Abdool Karim says the country must rediscover its community spirit to deal with a coming surge in infections.

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Portland State University releases nationwide guidance on bike share equity programs

Last year, Portland State University's Transportation Research and Education Center (TREC) released a 130 page evaluation comparing equity-oriented programs from over 70 U.S. bike share systems across the U.S. Bike share being a relative newcomer to the transportation system, the research team was not surprised to find that approaches to equity programs ranged widely. In the latest installment, fu

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Machine learning reveals recipe for building artificial proteins

Proteins are essential to the life of cells, carrying out complex tasks and catalyzing chemical reactions. Scientists and engineers have long sought to harness this power by designing artificial proteins that can perform new tasks, like treat disease, capture carbon, or harvest energy, but many of the processes designed to create such proteins are slow and complex, with a high failure rate.

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World War II's Warsaw Ghetto Holds Lifesaving Lessons for COVID-19

An outbreak of typhus in the densely packed walled enclosure was countered by adopting all-too-familiar public health measures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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