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Desert mosses use quartz rocks as sun shades

Desert conditions are harsh, and mosses often spend much of the year in a dormant condition, desiccated and brown, until rain comes. Researchers discovered two species of moss that found a hiding place under translucent milky quartz where they can stay moist and green and continue to photosynthesize and grow while other mosses on the soil surface go dormant. This is the first green plant known to

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Phage therapy shows potential for treating prosthetic joint infections

Bacteriophages, or phages, may play a significant role in treating complex bacterial infections in prosthetic joints, according to new research. The findings suggest phage therapy could provide a potential treatment for managing such infections, including those involving antibiotic-resistant microbes.

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Phage therapy shows potential for treating prosthetic joint infections

Bacteriophages, or phages, may play a significant role in treating complex bacterial infections in prosthetic joints, according to new research. The findings suggest phage therapy could provide a potential treatment for managing such infections, including those involving antibiotic-resistant microbes.

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Efter V2-historier: Energistyrelsen indkalder Teleindustrien til møde om spoofing

Spoofing kan bruges af kriminelle til at svindle folk ved at ringe eller skrive fra et hvilket som helst dansk nummer, men løsningerne lader vente på sig. Energistyrelsen har indtil nu valgt ikke at stille nogle tekniske krav til telebranchen. Teleindustrien har ingen kommentarer.

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Science News Briefs from around the Planet

Here are some brief reports about science and technology from all over, including one about how a lizard population responded to hurricanes by developing larger and stickier toe pads on average.

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Science News Briefs from around the Planet

Here are some brief reports about science and technology from all over, including one about how a lizard population responded to hurricanes by developing larger and stickier toe pads on average. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Coronavirus live news: US sees 5,000 deaths in five days as Dr Birx urges some states to close bars

Birx says federal health experts recommend bar closures in Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, Indiana and Virginia ; Spain's Covid-19 deaths could be 60% higher ; Global deaths near 650,000. Follow the latest updates Pacific Islanders in US hospitalised with Covid-19 at up to 10 times the rate of other groups UK could impose more 'handbrake restrictions' on arrivals beyond Spain US records more than 1,00

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Existing evidence suggests face coverings do not lead to false sense of security

Existing limited evidence suggests that wearing face coverings to protect against COVID-19 does not lead to a false sense of security and is unlikely to increase the risk of infection through wearers foregoing other behaviours such as good hand hygiene, say researchers from the University of Cambridge and King's College London.

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Ease restrictions on medical psychedelics to aid research, experts say

Psilocybin may be safe for treating depression but research is stymied by government controls Potential treatments for severe depression, addiction and other mental health disorders are being held up by excessive restrictions on psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms , scientists and politicians have said. Clinical trials suggest that psilocybin may be a safe and effective medicine

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Wealthier men are more likely to develop high blood pressure

Working men with higher incomes are more likely to develop high blood pressure, reports a study presented at the 84th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society (JCS 2020). "Men with higher incomes need to improve their lifestyles to prevent high blood pressure," said study author Dr. Shingo Yanagiya of the Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.

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Edit gorgeous photos right on your phone

To get that sunset 'Gram-ready, you'll need more than a filter. ( Cyriac Jannel / Unsplash/) Smartphones have a serious advantage over DSLRs and other dedicated cameras —not only can you shoot great photos, but you can edit and share them too. For a lot of people, editing images with their phone just consists of slapping a filter on and posting the pic to social media. And while that was your onl

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States Issue Warnings About Seed Packets From China

Agriculture officials in several states are urging residents not to plant the seeds, which were mailed in pouches featuring Chinese characters.

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Genetic mutations help MRSA to become highly resistant to antibiotics

Scientists have found that genetic mutations in MRSA allow it to evolve and become more resistant to antibiotics such as penicillin.

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Simple urine test could significantly improve detection of adrenal cancer

Using a simple urine test alongside routine imaging for patients with adrenal masses could speed up adrenal cancer diagnosis, improving patient's prognosis and reducing the need for invasive diagnostic procedures, a new multi-center study found.

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Biologists shed light on how cells move resources

Researchers have new insight into the tiny packages that cells use to move molecules, a structure that is key to cellular metabolism, drug delivery and more.

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New CRISPR C-to-G DNA base editor expands the landscape of precision genome editing

The new base editing platform may help researchers understand and correct genetic diseases by selective editing of single DNA 'letters' across nucleobase classes.

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Antiviral method against herpes paves the way for combating incurable viral infections

Researchers have discovered a new method to treat human herpes viruses. The new broad-spectrum method targets physical properties in the genome of the virus rather than viral proteins, which have previously been targeted. The treatment consists of new molecules that penetrate the protein shell of the virus and prevent genes from leaving the virus to infect the cell. It does not lead to resistance

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Big brains and dexterous hands

Primates with large brains can master more complex hand movements than those with smaller brains. However, fine motor skills such as using tools can take time to learn, and humans take the longest of all. Large-brained species such as humans and great apes do not actually learn more slowly than other primates but instead start later, researchers have shown.

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Getting a grip on near-field light

Researchers have developed a system to mold near-field light — opening the door to unprecedented control over this powerful, largely unexplored type of light.

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New CRISPR C-to-G DNA base editor expands the landscape of precision genome editing

The new base editing platform may help researchers understand and correct genetic diseases by selective editing of single DNA 'letters' across nucleobase classes.

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Starwatch: full moon joins Jupiter and Saturn in southern sky

At midnight on 2 August, people around globe will be able to see grouping high in the sky Set a calendar reminder for this coming weekend when an essentially full moon joins Jupiter and Saturn in the southern sky. When full, the moon rises at sunset and spends the entire night in the sky, so the grouping will be visible during all the hours of darkness. The chart shows the view looking due south

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New native Hawaiian land snail species discovered, first in 60 years

Auriculella gagneorum, a small candy-striped snail from Oahu's Waianae Mountains, represents the first new species of a living Hawaiian land snail described in 60 years.

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The Atlantic Daily: What Our Newsroom Is Watching This Summer

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Heading into another socially distant weekend spent largely in front of the television? Consider one of these: Today, writers and editors from around our newsroom share the works that impressed t

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The Unprecedented Bravery of Olivia de Havilland

Olivia de Havilland was the last great living female star of the movies' golden age, in the 1930s and '40s. She died today at 104 at her home in Paris, and her radiant visage and sinuous voice will haunt audiences for at least another century, whether as Errol Flynn's blushing Maid Marian in The Adventures of Robin Hood , or as her old friend Bette Davis's scheming foil in the Grand Guignol of Hu

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New technology makes homes more energy independent, helps divert power during power outages

Researchers have designed a smart technology that can help utility companies better serve communities affected by power outages. The researchers said their single device works by improving energy delivery between home solar-power systems and the electrical grid.

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New approach simultaneously measures EEG and fMRI connectomes

Researchers have developed a new approach to compare changes in neural communication using electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging simultaneously. The approach allows them to assess the association between the two measurements and better understand neural connectivity changes over time.

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New technology makes homes more energy independent, helps divert power during power outages

Researchers have designed a smart technology that can help utility companies better serve communities affected by power outages. The researchers said their single device works by improving energy delivery between home solar-power systems and the electrical grid.

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A new MXene material shows extraordinary electromagnetic interference shielding ability

Researchers have discovered a MXene material that presents exceptional electromagnetic interference shielding abilities.

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Two distinct circuits drive inhibition in the sensory thalamus of the brain

The thalamus is a 'Grand Central Station' for sensory information coming to our brains. Almost every sight, sound, taste and touch travels to our brain's cortex via the thalamus. Researchers now report that the somatosensory part of the thalamic reticular nucleus is divided into two functionally distinct sub-circuits that have their own types of genetically defined neurons that are topographically

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PolyA-miner assesses the effect of alternative polyadenylation on gene expression

Meet PolyA-miner, a new computational tool that enables scientists to evaluate the contribution of alternative polyadenylation to gene regulation in health and disease.

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Highly stable amyloid protein aggregates may help plant seeds last longer

Highly stable polymeric "amyloid" proteins, best known for their role in Alzheimer's disease, have been mostly studied in animals. But a new study on the garden pea shows that they also occur in plants, and they may be an important adaptation for prolonging seed viability.

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Tracking antibody profiles for influenza exposures across the lifespan

Immune responses to influenza exposures increase early in life, then decline in middle age, according to a new study.

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A new MXene material shows extraordinary electromagnetic interference shielding ability

Researchers have discovered a MXene material that presents exceptional electromagnetic interference shielding abilities.

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Best Wi-Fi extenders for your home

Video chat from your backyard. (Chase Chappell via Unsplash/) Do you avoid parts of your apartment because you can't stream Netflix, play your Switch, or even get Chrome to load? Do you have parties, only to find the guests all huddled around your Wi-Fi router so they can post selfies without using their network? Don't worry, you aren't alone, but it's probably time you consider a Wi-Fi range ext

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Highest-ever temperature recorded in Norwegian Arctic archipelago

Norway's Arctic archipelago Svalbard on Saturday recorded its highest-ever temperature, the country's meteorological institute reported.

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Tropical Storm Hanna drenches South Texas amid virus crisis

A day after roaring ashore as a hurricane, Hanna lashed the Texas Gulf Coast on Sunday with high winds and drenching rains that destroyed boats, flooded streets and knocked out power across a region already reeling from a surge in coronavirus cases.

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Passion for purple revives ancient dye in Tunisia

A Tunisian man has pieced together bits of a local secret linked to ancient emperors: how to make a prized purple dye using the guts of a sea snail.

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Colleges plan for virus testing, but strategies vary widely

For students heading to Colby College in Maine this fall, coronavirus testing is expected to be a routine part of campus life. All students will be required to provide a nasal swab every other day for two weeks, and then twice a week after that. All told, the college says it will provide 85,000 tests, nearly as many as the entire state of Maine has since the pandemic started.

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Will we ever find life on Mars?

Planetary scientist Sarah Stewart Johnson describes how the latest mission to Mars builds on centuries of discoveries about the red planet – Earth's nearest neighbour Nasa plans to launch its latest mission to Mars this month, which aims to place the Perseverance rover on the surface of the planet in February 2021. It is the latest attempt to explore a planet that has loomed large in the popular

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Covid-19: trust the public on scientific uncertainty | Letters

Dr Jane Lethbridge of the University of Greenwich, Heather Hancock of the Food Standards Agency and Jim Grozier of University College London on science and coronavirus. Plus Bruce White on Boris Johnson's reference to asymptomatic transmission Sonia Sodha ( Bias in 'the science' on coronavirus? Britain has been here before , 23 Juy) provides a welcome reminder of the BSE crisis and government sci

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Getting to the new normal in a safe manner | Letters

The risk to teachers as they return to school in the autumn concerns Pat Brockbank , while Sue Rogers finds the mask-wearing debate disheartening. Plus Po-yu Sung on why supermarkets should enforce face coverings My daughter teaches in a senior school of about 600 pupils. In less than six weeks' time, all pupils are being forced to return to the classroom, with 30 children to each room. The only

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Genome-mapping reveals 'supermutation' resulting in cryptic coloration in stick insects

Biologists discuss findings from an investigation of genetic mutations in seven species of North American stick insects (Timema) resulting in cryptic coloration.

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DeepMind's Newest AI Programs Itself to Make All the Right Decisions

When Deep Blue defeated world chess champion Garry Kasparov in 1997, it may have seemed artificial intelligence had finally arrived. A computer had just taken down one of the top chess players of all time. But it wasn't to be. Though Deep Blue was meticulously programmed top-to-bottom to play chess, the approach was too labor-intensive, too dependent on clear rules and bounded possibilities to su

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New technique to capture carbon dioxide could greatly reduce power plant greenhouse gases

Removing carbon dioxide from power plant emissions is ever more urgent to limit the damage from climate change. Chemists have come up with an efficient and less expensive technique for removing CO2 from natural gas plant emissions. The technique could be tweaked for more polluting plants that use coal. The chemists took a magnesium-based metal-organic framework and added a tetraamine that catalyze

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South Dakota: Images of the Mount Rushmore State

South Dakota is the fifth-smallest state by population in the U.S., with approximately 885,000 residents living in its 77,000 square miles. From the Black Hills and the Badlands, across the plains to Sioux Falls, h ere are a few glimpses of the landscape of South Dakota and some of the wildlife and people calling it home. This photo story is part of Fifty , a collection of images from each of the

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Infection surges force countries to curb European travel

Restrictions cause dismay in Spain and anger tourism industry

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New technique to capture carbon dioxide could greatly reduce power plant greenhouse gases

Removing carbon dioxide from power plant emissions is ever more urgent to limit the damage from climate change. Chemists have come up with an efficient and less expensive technique for removing CO2 from natural gas plant emissions. The technique could be tweaked for more polluting plants that use coal. The chemists took a magnesium-based metal-organic framework and added a tetraamine that catalyze

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'Self-eating' process of stem cells may be the key to new regenerative therapies

The self-eating process in embryonic stem cells known as chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and a related metabolite may serve as promising new therapeutic targets to repair or regenerate damaged cells and organs, researchers show.

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Why the most successful students have no passion for school

In order to be successful, many people believe, one must be passionate. Passion makes challenges enjoyable. It bestows the stamina necessary to excel. However, there are telling counterexamples where passion doesn't seem to be a necessary ingredient for success. One such case is academic success. You might think that successful students should be passionate about their schooling, and that this pa

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Why the most successful students have no passion for school

In order to be successful, many people believe, one must be passionate. Passion makes challenges enjoyable. It bestows the stamina necessary to excel. However, there are telling counterexamples where passion doesn't seem to be a necessary ingredient for success. One such case is academic success. You might think that successful students should be passionate about their schooling, and that this pa

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The Sly Psychology Behind Magicians' Card Tricks

Is this your card? A recent study found that participants will select the suit or number they were primed to choose.

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This Science-Backed Anti-Aging Research Could Change the Way We Age

Nobody likes getting old . That's why you can walk into any drugstore in the country and find a hundred different "anti-aging" creams, oils, masks, serums, and vitamins. Unfortunately, while many of these products may claim to "reverse the aging process," none of them actually address the underlying cause of aging. If you want to do that, you need products developed by real scientists, not beauty

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A New Theory of Dreaming

Do dreams exist to protect the brain's visual cortex?

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Love avocados? Thank the toxodon

Given avocado's popularity today, it's hard to believe that we came close to not having them in our supermarkets at all. In my new book " Avocado: A Global History ," I explain how the avocado survived a series of ecological and cultural close calls that could have easily relegated them to extinction or niche delicacy. Instead, the avocado persevered, prospered – and became one of the most Instag

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So Much for the Decentralized Internet

Kanye West, Elon Musk, Bill Gates, and Barack Obama were all feeling generous on the evening of July 16, according to their Twitter accounts, which offered to double any payments sent to them in bitcoin. Not really, of course; they'd been hacked. Or, rather, Twitter itself had been hacked, and for apparently stupid reasons: The perpetrators stole and resold Twitter accounts and impersonated high-

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How different wheelchair designs can help Paralympians excel

The Paralympics—so called for the Greek prefix para , meaning "alongside"—give elite disabled athletes the chance to compete at the highest level. Not all contenders in the games, which typically run after the Olympics, use wheelchairs, but those who do showcase some of the most technologically advanced assistive devices in the world. Each sport requires different tweaks to the standard chair; we

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Paper blaming COVID-19 on 5G technology withdrawn

A paper which argued that 5G cellphone technology could lead to infection with the novel coronavirus has been retracted, but not before scientific sleuth Elisabeth Bik wondered whether it was the "worst paper of 2020." The article, "5G Technology and induction of coronavirus in skin cells," came from a group from Italy, the United States … Continue reading

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Live Global Coronavirus News: Antibody Puzzle Complicates Immunity Question

The expiring $600 unemployment payments are a flash point for Washington. Britain orders travelers from Spain into 14 days of isolation, upending vacation plans for thousands.

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Winter's Tale

Reading Maxine Kumin in quarantine solitude, I've found something familiar in the way that little details come alive when larger, flashier things have fallen away. Kumin is known for quiet, observational poems, and "," published in The Atlantic in 2009, is quiet both in style and in subject matter. "Even from my study at the back of the house I can hear an orange drop upstairs," she writes. Her m

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Democrats Are Allowing Trump to Frame the Debate on China

"Have you ever met anyone who's read the party platform? I haven't," the former Republican House Speaker John Boehner said during a 2012 interview about his party's manifesto. Last week, the Democratic National Committee released a draft of its new platform . But in this case, when it comes to China, the document merits a close read. It shows how dramatically President Donald Trump has reframed t

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Interestingly, Toddlers Tend to Deal With Uncertainty The Same Way The Rest of Us Do

Kids are aware of uncertainty earlier than we thought.

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The Best Tarot Card Apps: Learn to Read Tarot at Home

Divination in the digital age has never been easier.

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Looking for Gravitons? Check for the 'Buzz'

The hypothetical particles are a cornerstone of quantum gravity theories, but they're famously hard to observe. Yet maybe they create detectable 'noise.'

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Nightingale investment before pandemic would have made NHS resilient

If the £1.5bn was spent earlier it could have freed the equivalent of 28,000 beds, says think-tank

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Testing drugs for humans on dogs makes no sense

The US has moved in the right direction, away from misleading and wasteful animal trials

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California's Air Pollution Cops Are Eyeing Uber and Lyft

A proposal would require 60 percent of ride-hail miles to be in electric vehicles by 2030. And the companies are on board.

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9 Tips to Keep Your Cloud Storage Safe and Secure

Make sure that your Dropbox, Google Drive, and Microsoft OneDrive data is protected—while still being easy for you to access.

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Coronavirus in Texas: 'You Do the Right Things, and Still You Get It'

A Texas family tried to ward off the virus. But as cases in the state soared and debates about masks and distancing raged, there was only so much they could control.

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The Battle for Local Control Is Now a Matter of Life and Death

T his week, Governor Brian Kemp pleaded with Georgians to cover their faces in public. "Today, I am encouraging all Georgians—from every corner of our great state—to do four things for four weeks to stop the spread of COVID-19," he said. "If Georgians commit to wearing a mask, socially distancing, washing their hands regularly, and following the guidance in our executive order and from public-hea

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Termisk kamera opdager syge patienter: Måler temperatur mellem øjenkrog og næsetip

Overlæge i akutmedicin tror på, at termiske målinger kan være fremtidens redskab til at spotte kritisk syge patienter. To softwarestuderende fra SDU har udviklet en app, som via termiske billeder hurtigt beregner temperaturforskellen mellem næsetip og øjenkrog.

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Your Coronavirus Antibodies Are Disappearing. Should You Care?

Declining antibody levels do not mean less immunity, experts say. Besides, two widely used tests may detect the wrong antibodies.

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Produktnyt: Regnemaskinen 'Brunsviga' regner med fuldkommen pålidelighed

Med ni indstillingstal og 13 facitrubrikker er prisen 190 kroner, og da den er særdeles tidsbesparende navnlig ved multiplikation og division med flercifrede tal, kan det vist nok forventes, at regnemaskinen vil vinde indpas i mange bankforretninger, forsikringsanstalter og observatorier, skrev I…

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What kind of face mask is best against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting or giving someone Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly,

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It's too late to stop QAnon with fact checks and account bans

Twitter is perfect as a megaphone for the far right: its trending topics are easy to game, journalists spend way too much time on the site, and—if you're lucky—the president of the United States might retweet you. QAnon, the continuously evolving pro-Trump conspiracy theory, is good at Twitter in the same way as other successful internet-native ideologies —using the platform to manipulate informa

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Rewilding hitter: Her er fire steder i Danmark, hvor du kan se store, vilde dyr

Du kan blandt andet opleve elge, bisoner og heste, som lever vildt i naturen.

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Pensioner Jan van Deursen and postdoc engage Hoecker Lawyers against me

Jan van Deursen, together with his postdoc Bennett Childs, engaged a notorious German law firm against me. The former Mayo Clinic professor denies accusations of bullying and discrimination and obviously seeks to prevent his lab members from talking to the press. Hoecker Lawyers claim van Deursen resigned as pensioner on 24 July 2020, voluntarily.

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I'm a Covid-19 'long-hauler'. For us, there is no end in sight | Jemma Kennedy

Thousands of people like me are suffering ill health months after contracting the virus. We need more help As a writer, I spend my days trying to craft believable, satisfying narratives. But as a Covid-19 "long-hauler", I have given up trying to find an internal logic to the story of my illness. As we now know, thousands of people are suffering a range of bewildering and debilitating post-Covid s

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Rock from Mars heads home after 600,000 year odyssey across space

Tiny piece of meteorite from London's Natural History Museum will be used by rover exploring red planet A small piece of rock will be hurled into space this week on one of the strangest interplanetary voyages ever attempted. A tiny piece of Martian basalt the size of a 10p coin will be launched on board a US robot probe on Thursday and propelled towards the red planet on a seven-month journey to

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Britain wins rare praise for leading race to test life-saving Covid drugs

UK's high infection rate and centralised NHS have enabled Recovery team to help victims across the world Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage It has been a startling week for those following Britain's response to the pandemic. Roundly derided for the lateness of its lockdown and its bungled testing programmes, the UK was the unexpected recipient of a sudden bout of lavish

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The Observer view on Britain's Covid-19 response

The Recovery drugs trial is a beacon of excellence among the general coronavirus incompetence Being British has been a discomforting experience for the past six months. A nation that had prided itself on the strength and resilience of its healthcare system has been laid low by the Covid-19 pandemic, which has claimed nearly 50,000 lives in the UK. Most other western nations have suffered fewer de

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Seismologists Find the World Quieted Down during Pandemic Lockdowns

COVID-19-related lockdowns dampened human activity around the globe—giving seismologists a rare glimpse of the earth's quietest rumblings. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Britain will respond to space threat from Russia and China – minister

'Provocative test of a weapon-like projectile' from Russian satellite shows peaceful use of space is under threat, says defence secretary Britain will boost its ability to handle threats posed by Russia and China in space as part of a foreign, security and defence policy review, the defence secretary, Ben Wallace, has said. "This week we have been reminded of the threat Russia poses to our nation

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Seismologists Find the World Quieted Down during Pandemic Lockdowns

COVID-19-related lockdowns dampened human activity around the globe—giving seismologists a rare glimpse of Earth's quietest rumblings. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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