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Changes in brain cartilage may explain why sleep helps you learn

The morphing structure of the brain's "cartilage cells" may regulate how memories change while you snooze, according to new research in eNeuro.

5h

Russisk trawler giver hovedpine på Færøerne: 23 ud af 30 testede var corona-positive

PLUS. To russere er indlagt. Skibet fisker nu videre nord for øgruppen, som er nærmeste havn. »Vi er meget sårbare,«, siger landslægen, som kun råder over 5-6 intensivpladser.

8h

Lærke vandt OL-medalje som vegetar: 'Jeg kan præstere på top-niveau uden kød'

Selv om du dyrker meget sport, behøver du ikke spise protein fra kød.

1d

LATEST

E.P.A. Inspector General to Investigate Trump's Biggest Climate Rollback

The agency's watchdog office said Monday it would investigate whether the reversal of Obama-era fuel efficiency standards violated government rules.

6min

Author Correction: Nano-scale structure and mechanical properties of ASR products under saturated and dry conditions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69840-z

17min

Publisher Correction: Global analysis of protein degradation in prion infected cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69657-w

17min

17min

Author Correction: The endocast of the Night Parrot (Pezoporus occidentalis) reveals insights into its sensory ecology and the evolution of nocturnality in birds

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70122-x Author Correction: The endocast of the Night Parrot ( Pezoporus occidentalis ) reveals insights into its sensory ecology and the evolution of nocturnality in birds

17min

17min

Author Correction: Prediction of disulfide bond engineering sites using a machine learning method

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69841-y

17min

17min

Author Correction: Highly pathogenic H5N6 avian influenza virus subtype clade 2.3.4.4 indigenous in South Korea

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69651-2

17min

'Fix your bike' vouchers launch, as doctors to prescribe bikes on NHS

The prime minister says GPs in areas with poor health will be encouraged to prescribe cycling.

36min

Pristine environments offer a window to our cloudy past

A new study uses satellite data over the Southern Hemisphere to understand global cloud composition during the industrial revolution. This research tackles one of the largest uncertainties in today's climate models — the long-term effect of tiny atmospheric particles on climate change.

38min

Introducing The Scientist Social Club

Our first event is a book club for Sinclair Lewis's 1925 classic novel Arrowsmith, which we'll discuss with two prominent scholars during a webinar on September 25.

40min

Unprecedented look into 'central engine' powering a solar flare

Researchers have presented a new, detailed look inside the 'central engine' of a large solar flare accompanied by a powerful eruption by the Owens Valley Solar Array. The new findings offer the first measurements characterizing the magnetic fields and particles at the heart of the explosion.

53min

Lithium in drinking water linked with lower suicide rates

Naturally occurring lithium in public drinking water may have an anti-suicidal effect – according to a new study. The study collated research from around the world and found that geographical areas with relatively high levels or concentration of lithium in public drinking water had correspondingly lower suicide rates.

53min

Patterns in sediment linked to rain, uplift and sea level change

In a recent study, researchers show that a natural record – sediments packed together at basin margins – offers scientists a powerful tool for understanding the forces that shaped our planet over millions of years, with implications on present day understanding.

53min

New paper squares economic choice with evolutionary survival

Unlike businesses or governments, organisms can't go into evolutionary debt — there is no borrowing one's way back from extinction. This can lead to seemingly irrational economic choices that suddenly make sense when viewed as a multiplicative, evolutionary process.

53min

Origami metamaterials show reversible auxeticity combined with deformation recoverability

New research expands the understanding of origami structures, opening possibilities for mechanical metamaterials to be used in soft robotics and medical devices.

53min

Stopping listeria reproduction 'in its tracks'

Listeria contaminations can send food processing facilities into full crisis mode with mass product recalls, federal warnings and even hospitalization or death for people who consume the contaminated products. Researchers have discovered a chemical compound that stops listeria reproduction in both light and dark conditions which could lead to bacterial control in food products.

53min

Water molecules are gold for nanocatalysis

Nanocatalysts made of gold nanoparticles dispersed on metal oxides are very promising for the industrial, selective oxidation of compounds, including alcohols, into valuable chemicals. They show high catalytic activity, particularly in aqueous solution. A team of researchers has been able to explain why: Water molecules play an active role in facilitating the oxygen dissociation needed for the oxi

1h

Ultra-low power brain implants find meaningful signal in grey matter noise

By tuning into a subset of brain waves, researchers have dramatically reduced the power requirements of neural interfaces while improving their accuracy — a discovery that could lead to long-lasting brain implants that can both treat neurological diseases and enable mind-controlled prosthetics and machines.

1h

MicroRNA shows promise for hair regrowth

Researchers have identified a microRNA (miRNA) that could promote hair regeneration. This miRNA — miR-218-5p — plays an important role in regulating the pathway involved in follicle regeneration, and could be a candidate for future drug development.

1h

Study identifies top reasons for sewer line failure

Concrete sewer pipes around the world are most likely to fail either because their concrete is not strong enough or because they can't handle the weight of trucks that drive over them, a new study indicates.

1h

Laser inversion enables multi-materials 3D printing

Selective laser sintering is one of the most widely used processes in additive manufacturing, but it is limited to printing with a single material at a time. Robotics engineers have now developed a new approach to overcome this limitation: By inverting the laser so that it points upwards, they've invented a way to enable SLS to use — at the same time — multiple materials.

1h

WHO Calls COVID-19 the "Most Severe" Health Crisis in Its History

According to World Health Organization (WHO) director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the COVID-19 pandemic is "easily the most severe" global health crisis that the organization has ever seen. Ghebreyesus backed his claim by citing citing the sheer scale of both confirmed coronavirus cases and the global death toll, New Scientist reports . To date, there are over 16.2 million confirmed cases

1h

Moderna and Pfizer Begin Late-Stage Coronavirus Vaccine Trials

The studies each aim to enroll 30,000 people and determine whether the vaccines are safe and effective.

1h

Protecting beta cells against stress may guard against type 1 diabetes

Researchers have found an unusual strategy that eventually may help to guard transplanted beta cells or to slow the original onset of type 1 diabetes.

1h

Water molecules are gold for nanocatalysis

Nanocatalysts made of gold nanoparticles dispersed on metal oxides are very promising for the industrial, selective oxidation of compounds, including alcohols, into valuable chemicals. They show high catalytic activity, particularly in aqueous solution. A team of researchers has been able to explain why: Water molecules play an active role in facilitating the oxygen dissociation needed for the oxi

1h

Return of the zombie cicadas: Manipulative qualities of fungal-infected flyers

Cicadas infected with the parasitic fungus Massospora unknowingly engage in trickery with their fellow insects, resulting in effective disease transmission, according to new research. Massospora manipulates male cicadas into flicking their wings like females – a mating invitation – which tempts unsuspecting male cicadas and infects them.

1h

Make your own greenhouse gas logger

Researchers have developed a simple logger for greenhouse gas flows. It is built using inexpensive and easily available parts, and provides data on levels of methane, carbon dioxide, temperature and humidity.

1h

Ultra-low power brain implants find meaningful signal in grey matter noise

By tuning into a subset of brain waves, researchers have dramatically reduced the power requirements of neural interfaces while improving their accuracy — a discovery that could lead to long-lasting brain implants that can both treat neurological diseases and enable mind-controlled prosthetics and machines.

1h

Unparalleled inventory of the human gut ecosystem

Scientists gathered and published over 200,000 genomes from the human gut microbiome. The catalogue reveals that more than 70% of bacterial species in the human gut have never been grown in the lab. This new data resource could be extremely useful to investigate how the bacterial community in the human gut influences human health and disease.

1h

Hedonism leads to happiness

Relaxing on the sofa or savoring a delicious meal: Enjoying short-term pleasurable activities that don't lead to long-term goals contributes at least as much to a happy life as self-control, according to new research. The researchers therefore argue for a greater appreciation of hedonism in psychology.

1h

Population genetic screening shown to efficiently identify increased risk for inherited disease

Researchers suggest that community-based genetic screening has the potential to efficiently identify individuals who may be at increased risk for three common inherited (CDC Tier 1) genetic conditions known to cause several forms of cancer and increased risk for heart disease or stroke.

1h

Study: Mapping crystal shapes could fast-track 2D materials

Materials scientists at Rice University and the University of Pennsylvania are calling for a collective, global effort to fast-track the mass production of 2D materials like graphene and molybdenum disulfide.

1h

Highly invasive lung cancer cells have longer 'fingers'

Tiny finger-like projections called filopodia drive invasive behavior in a rare subset of lung cancer cells. Analysis of molecular features distinguishing leader from follower cells focuses on filopodia and the MYO10 gene.

1h

Study reveals how different mosquitoes respond to light and ti

In a new study, researchers found that night- versus day-biting species of mosquitoes are behaviorally attracted and repelled by different colors of light at different times of day. Mosquitoes are among major disease vectors impacting humans and animals around the world and the findings have important implications for using light to control them.

1h

Link between education, income inequality has existed for a century

Income is inextricably linked to access to education in America and it has been for a century, according to a new study from researchers at Stanford University and Rice University.

1h

Nationwide trends show fewer cancer patients seeking care since start of pandemic

Researchers observe significant decreases nationwide in the number of patients being seen for cancer-related care as the COVID-19 pandemic progressed during the few first months of 2020.

1h

Antibiotics alone successfully treat uncomplicated appendicitis in children

Of 1,068 patients from 10 health centers enrolled in the study, 67.1% of those who elected to initially manage their care through antibiotics alone experienced no harmful side effects and did not later require an appendectomy by their one-year follow-up appointment. Patients in the non-operative group experienced an average of 6.6 disability days, compared to the 10.9 days in the surgery group.

1h

Novel label-free imaging technique brings out the inner light within T cells

A new imaging method uses the natural autofluorescence within cells to assess T cell activity. The technique could help assess T cell involvement in immunotherapies.

1h

Flu, pneumonia vaccinations tied to lower risk of Alzheimer's dementia

Flu (influenza) and pneumonia vaccinations are associated with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to new research.

1h

Novel label-free imaging technique brings out the inner light within T cells

A new imaging method uses the natural autofluorescence within cells to assess T cell activity. The technique could help assess T cell involvement in immunotherapies.

1h

How a Public Health Campaign in the Warsaw Ghetto Stemmed the Spread of Typhus

A new study shows how life-saving efforts by Jewish doctors helped curb an epidemic during World War II

1h

Solar energy converter creates power and heat for cheap

A new hybrid solar energy converter generates electricity and steam with high efficiency and low cost, researchers report. "Thermal energy consumption is a huge piece of the global energy economy—much larger than electricity use. There has been a rising interest in solar combined heat and power systems to deliver both electricity and process heat for zero-net-energy and greenhouse-gas-free develo

1h

Scientists record rapid carbon loss from warming peatlands

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a direct relationship between climate warming and carbon loss in a peatland ecosystem. Their study published in AGU Advances provides a glimpse of potential futures where significant stores of carbon in peat bogs could be released into the atmosphere as greenhouse gases.

1h

Police can surveil protests from participants' pockets and homes

Protesters in Portland now have to contend with local law enforcement and federal officers. Technology may either help or hurt them. (Tito Texidor III/) Anjuli R. K. Shere is a doctoral researcher in Cyber Security at the University of Oxford. Jason Nurse is an assistant professor in Cyber Security at the University of Kent. This story originally featured on The Conversation . US police forces ha

2h

Will a Robot Take Your Job? It's a Matter of Adaptability, Researchers Say

Increasing automation will likely hit people with limited skill sets the hardest. "Robot-proof" jobs will likely require greater education, interpersonal skills and adaptability.

2h

Glacial stream insect may tolerate warmer waters

An endangered aquatic insect that lives in icy streams fed by glaciers might not mind if the water grows warmer due to climate. A new study found that mountain stoneflies can tolerate warmer water temperatures at least temporarily. In fact, they might even be stressed in their current extremely cold environments.

2h

'Inchworm' pattern of Indonesian earthquake rupture powered seismic 'boom'

A sonic boom-like seismic phenomenon of supershear rupture occurred during the 2018 Palu earthquake in Indonesia. Researchers investigated the relationship between this phenomenon and the complex geometry of the Palu-Koro fault. An 'inchworm-like' pattern of repeated rupture deceleration and acceleration along the fault was detected, associated with bends in the fault trace. This slip evolution ma

2h

Study: Big homes have big carbon footprints

A new study on American homes finds that the homes of the wealthy use more energy than those of the poor. The findings also include reviews of energy use that can be used to help reduce the residential carbon footprint. The findings restate the important of a multi-faceted approach to solving climate change. In a press release that surprised absolutely no one, a team of researchers from the Unive

2h

COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

1. Opinion: During the COVID-10 pandemic, the public must be protected from research without consent ; 2. Occupational Health: A Key to the Control of COVID-19 in Correctional Facilities

2h

How airway cells work together in regeneration and aging

Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have identified the process by which stem cells in the airways of the lungs switch between two distinct phases — creating more of themselves and producing mature airway cells — to regenerate lung tissue after an injury.

2h

Randomness theory could hold key to internet security

In a new paper, Cornell Tech researchers identified a problem that holds the key to whether all encryption can be broken — as well as a surprising connection to a mathematical concept that aims to define and measure randomness.

2h

University of Hawaii and iconic watercress farm collaborate on sustainability research

University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers and Sumida Farm farmers published a study this week detailing their collaboration to study the past, present and future of the multigenerational farm which produces 70 percent of Hawai'i's watercress. The study highlights that relationships with the broader community have enhanced Sumida Farm's ability to adapt and innovate their farm practices in respons

2h

A New Molecular Mechanism for Metastasis

Download this research summary to learn about functional proteomic adaptations leading to increased metastasis!

2h

Trapping tiny particles: A versatile tool for nano-manipulation

Researchers have developed a novel device for single nanoparticle trapping, which has potential applications for drug discovery, disease monitoring, biomedical imaging, and more.

2h

Exotic Australian Fruit May Help Save Florida's Citrus Industry

Researchers are working to control citrus greening, a disease that has killed thousands of acres of orange trees. Finger limes produce a peptide that kills the bacterium responsible for the disease. (Image credit: Miguel Canahuati. /Miguel Canahuati. )

2h

Heat smarter, not harder: How microwaves make catalytic reactions more efficient

Scientists demonstrate a synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy-based method by which the local temperatures of metal nanoparticles can be measured under microwaves. This approach provides insight into the role that their temperature has on their catalytic performance and sheds light on how local particle heating using microwaves could become a critical strategy for improving the energy efficiency of cata

2h

Teen museum educators increase engagement, learning, in tween visitors

A new study finds that youth docents have an overall positive effect on visitors' experiences, learning and information retention at informal learning sites — like museums. The positive effects accrued across age groups regardless of museum type, but were most apparent in children ages 9 to 11.

2h

Trapping tiny particles: A versatile tool for nano-manipulation

Researchers have developed a novel device for single nanoparticle trapping, which has potential applications for drug discovery, disease monitoring, biomedical imaging, and more.

2h

12 stunning images from past Mars missions gallery

First signals (Mariner 4, 1966) First signals (Mariner 4, 1966) NASA's 10-part Mariner program (1962-1973) aimed to look at the surfaces Mars, Venus, and Mercury. Mariner 4 became the first successful Mars flyby in 1964. It took 22 photos of the red planet, each of which took 10 hours to relay back to Earth! (NASA/) The first photo from the surface of Mars (Viking 1, 1976) July 20, 1976 marks the

2h

Mars Perseverance rover 'go for launch,' says NASA

NASA on Monday gave its latest Mars rover Perseverance the all clear to launch later this week on a mission to seek out signs of ancient microbial life.

2h

NIST expands database that helps identify unknown compounds in milk

Got milk? Most people have seen the famous ads featuring celebrities that highlight the importance of drinking milk for building strong bones. Research shows that milk has other benefits, especially for babies, such as helping them grow and strengthening their immune systems. But scientists still don't understand exactly how milk does these things.

2h

Safe work protocols can increase the likelihood the business will fail

There are conflicting predictions on the relationship between worker safety and organization survival. New research in the INFORMS journal Management Science finds organizations that provide a safe workplace have a significantly lower chance of survival because it costs to be safe.

2h

2h

Professor Claims China Tried to Hide Early Info on COVID-19

Kwok Yung Yuen, a professor and microbiologist at the University of Hong Kong, told the BBC on a special titled "Panorama: China's Coronavirus Cover-Up" that Chinese officials may have purposefully tried to hide the source of the outbreak of the coronavirus back in early January. "I do suspect that they have been doing some cover-up locally at Wuhan," he said, as quoted by VICE , referring to the

2h

NASA tracks Hanna's soaking path into Mexico

NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared data on Tropical Depression Hanna while imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite was used to create an animation showing its movement from Texas to Mexico. Infrared data can reveal the location of powerful storms that generate heavy rainfall and Hanna drenched Texas upon landfall over the weekend of July 25-26.

2h

Immune response can predict who gets severe COVID-19

The differing immune system responses of patients with COVID-19 can help predict who will experience moderate and severe consequences of disease, according to a new study. The findings may help identify individuals at high risk of severe illness early in their hospitalization and suggest drugs to treat COVID-19. Researchers examined 113 patients admitted to Yale New Haven Hospital, and analyzed t

2h

NASA sees hurricane Douglas brush Hawaii

Imagery from NASA's Terra satellite was used to create an animation showing Douglas' movement past the Hawaiian Islands.

2h

NIST expands database that helps identify unknown compounds in milk

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have recently doubled the size of a reference library that includes examples of a certain type of carbohydrate found in milk from humans and several other animals. The expansion of the library will help scientists identify the unknown compounds in their own milk samples. The researchers published their new findings in Analyti

2h

Yale to lead trial of potential COVID-19 treatment

Yale School of Medicine and the biopharmaceutical firm AI Therapeutics have launched a multi-institutional clinical trial of a drug for treating COVID-19. Known as LAM-002A (apilimod), the drug has a proven safety record. Preliminary research has shown it can block cellular entry and trafficking of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the cause of COVID-19.

2h

3 questions to ask yourself next time you see a graph, chart, or map

Since the days of painting on cave walls, people have been representing information through figures and images. Nowadays, data visualization experts know that presenting information visually helps people better understand complicated data . The problem is that data visualizations can also leave you with the wrong idea – whether the images are sloppily made or intentionally misleading. Take for ex

2h

From rocks to icebergs, the natural world tends to break into cubes

Scientists discover a seemingly universal rule of how stuff falls apart

2h

Photo tweaks could protect your privacy from algorithms

A new technique could protect your privacy online by safeguarding sensitive information in photos uploaded to social media, researchers say. The method guards users' privacy by making subtle changes that are almost imperceptible to humans but render selected features undetectable by algorithms. In one second, the human eye can only scan through a few photographs . Computers, on the other hand, ar

3h

Johnson warns UK business to prepare for second wave

PM says pandemic could worsen again after summer but push continues for people to go back to workplaces

3h

A new way to target cancers using 'synthetic lethality'

Researchers at Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that inhibiting a key enzyme caused human cancer cells associated with two major types of breast and ovarian cancer to die and in mouse studies reduced tumor growth.

3h

Hydrogel mimics human brain with memorizing and forgetting ability

Hokkaido University researchers have found a soft and wet material that can memorize, retrieve, and forget information, much like the human brain. They report their findings in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

3h

Rising temps put desert shrubs in high-efficiency mode

Research from the University of Utah shows that one shrub, the brittlebush, is adapting, and showing a remarkable ability to respond to increased temperature and aridity.

3h

The big gulp: Inside-out protection of parasitic worms against host defenses

A team of developmental biologists at the Morgridge Institute for Research has discovered a means by which schistosomes, parasitic worms that infect more than 200 million people in tropical climates, are able to outfox the host's immune system.

3h

Pristine environments offer a window to our cloudy past

A new study uses satellite data over the Southern Hemisphere to understand global cloud composition during the industrial revolution. This research tackles one of the largest uncertainties in today's climate models — the long-term effect of tiny atmospheric particles on climate change.

3h

Grape pips reveal collapse of ancient economy in the grip of plague and climate change

A team of archaeologists from Bar-Ilan University and the University of Haifa has discovered new and compelling evidence for a significant economic downturn on the fringe of the Byzantine Empire in the aftermath of a major pandemic in the mid-6th century CE. The research reconstructs the rise and fall of commercial viticulture in the middle of Israel's arid Negev desert using evidence about life d

3h

Invisible barriers cut down on cheating

Both see-through and pretend partitions promoted honesty in taking tests, psychology experiments show, suggesting simple environmental cues can nudge children to do the right thing.

3h

Controlling streams of liquid metal at room temperature

Researchers have demonstrated a technique that allows them to produce streams of liquid metal at room temperature. By applying a low voltage to the liquid metal, the researchers were able to tune its surface tension across at least three orders of magnitude.

3h

Artificial Intelligence to identify individual birds of same species

Humans have a hard time identifying individual birds just by looking at the patterns on their plumage. An international study has now shown how computers can learn to differentiate individual birds of a same species.

3h

Despite debate, even the world's oldest trees are not immortal

The oldest trees on Earth have stood for nearly five millennia, and researchers have long wondered to what extent these ancient organisms undergo senescence, physically deteriorating as they age. Plant biologist now argue that although signs of senescence in long-lived trees may be almost imperceptible to people, this does not mean that they're immortal.

3h

Soft robot actuators heal themselves

Repeated activity wears on soft robotic actuators, but these machine's moving parts need to be reliable and easily fixed. Now a team of researchers has a biosynthetic polymer, patterned after squid ring teeth, that is self-healing and biodegradable, creating a material not only good for actuators, but also for hazmat suits and other applications where tiny holes could cause a danger.

3h

Offshore wind power now so cheap it could pay money back to consumers

The latest round of offshore wind farms to be built in the UK could reduce household energy bills by producing electricity very cheaply.

3h

Soft robot actuators heal themselves

Repeated activity wears on soft robotic actuators, but these machine's moving parts need to be reliable and easily fixed. Now a team of researchers has a biosynthetic polymer, patterned after squid ring teeth, that is self-healing and biodegradable, creating a material not only good for actuators, but also for hazmat suits and other applications where tiny holes could cause a danger.

3h

Astronomers solve a longstanding artwork puzzle

The origin of Vermeer's acclaimed landscape has long puzzled historians. The painting is of Vermeer's home town, but no one has known when he painted it. A team of astronomers uncover clues hidden in the artwork that reveal its secrets. Just 35 paintings done by Johannes Vermeer survive. The best-known among these, of course, is his captivating Girl with a Pearl Earring . Part of what makes it so

3h

'Wrap, trap, and zap' kills superbugs in wastewater

A shield of graphene helps particles destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria and free-floating antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants, researchers report. The researchers have worked toward quenching antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" since first finding them in wastewater treatment plants in 2013. Their new work introduces microspheres wrapped in graphene oxide as a potential sol

3h

The big gulp: Inside-out protection of parasitic worms against host defenses

A team of developmental biologists at the Morgridge Institute for Research has discovered a means by which schistosomes, parasitic worms that infect more than 200 million people in tropical climates, are able to outfox the host's immune system.

3h

Rising temps put desert shrubs in high-efficiency mode

Death Valley doesn't seem like the most ideal place to ride out rising temperatures amid a changing climate. But for the desert plants that live there, it's home—and they face the choice to adapt or die.

3h

Controlling streams of liquid metal at room temperature

Researchers from North Carolina State University have demonstrated a technique that allows them to produce streams of liquid metal at room temperature. By applying a low voltage to the liquid metal, the researchers were able to tune its surface tension across at least three orders of magnitude.

3h

Pristine environments offer a window to our cloudy past

A new study uses satellite data over the Southern Hemisphere to understand global cloud composition during the industrial revolution. This research tackles one of the largest uncertainties in today's climate models—the long-term effect of tiny atmospheric particles on climate change.

3h

The big gulp: Inside-out protection of parasitic worms against host defenses

A team of developmental biologists at the Morgridge Institute for Research has discovered a means by which schistosomes, parasitic worms that infect more than 200 million people in tropical climates, are able to outfox the host's immune system.

3h

Seismic waves help scientists 'see' chemical changes beneath a watershed

Chemical reactions deep below ground affect water quality, but methods for "seeing" them are time-consuming, expensive and limited in scope. A Penn State-led research team found that seismic waves can help to identify these reactions under an entire watershed and protect groundwater resources.

3h

Anti-climate action statements get more visibility in news coverage, study finds

When organizations take a stand against actions to combat climate change, they get more news coverage than their pro-climate action peers, according to a new study by a Brown University researcher.

3h

Rising temps put desert shrubs in high-efficiency mode

Death Valley doesn't seem like the most ideal place to ride out rising temperatures amid a changing climate. But for the desert plants that live there, it's home—and they face the choice to adapt or die.

3h

Grape pips reveal collapse of ancient economy in the grip of plague and climate change

A team of archeologists from Bar-Ilan University and the University of Haifa has discovered new and compelling evidence for a significant economic downturn on the fringe of the Byzantine Empire in the aftermath of a major pandemic in the mid-sixth century CE. The research reconstructs the rise and fall of commercial viticulture in the middle of Israel's arid Negev desert using evidence about life

3h

Too Many Black Americans Are Dying from COVID-19

The pandemic exposed a glaring health gap caused by systemic racism. Here's how to narrow it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Flu and Pneumonia Vaccines Linked to Reduced Risk of Alzheimer's

The authors propose that the shots might keep the immune system primed to battle diseases that would otherwise contribute to cognitive decline.

3h

NASA tracks Hanna's soaking path into Mexico

NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared data on Tropical Depression Hanna while imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite was used to create an animation showing its movement from Texas to Mexico. Infrared data can reveal the location of powerful storms that generate heavy rainfall and Hanna drenched Texas upon landfall over the weekend of July 25-26.

3h

NASA sees hurricane Douglas brush Hawaii

Imagery from NASA's Terra satellite was used to create an animation showing Douglas' movement past the Hawaiian Islands.

3h

'Test-and trace' head fears for low-paid with no sick pay

Dido Harding highlights risk of 1.6m in England who may go work even if ill

3h

Watch a beam of light bounce off mirrors in ultra-slow motion

For the first time, researchers have taken a video of a pulse of laser light as it moves in three dimensions, using a camera with a shutter speed of a trillionth of a second. It could potentially be used to see around corners

4h

Drug-induced interstitial lung disease in breast cancer patients

Drug-induced Interstitial Lung Disease in Breast Cancer Patients: A Lesson We Should Learn from Multi-Disciplinary IntegrationAnnouncing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this case report the authors Zijun Zhao, Zhanghai He, Hongyan Huang, Jiewen Chen, Shishi He, Ailifeire Yilihamu and Yan Nie from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China consider drug-induced interstitial

4h

Alternative amplification technique could speed up SARS-CoV-2 testing

An alternative amplification technique to detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA could offer a way to rapidly test large numbers of people for COVID-19, although the technique is not as sensitive as quantitative RT-PCR, the current standard method for COVID-19 testing.

4h

Remote, real-time monitoring of post-operative lung transplant patients significantly decreases hospital stays

Remote, real-time monitoring of post-operative lung transplant patients significantly decreases hospital readmissions and resulted in shorter hospital stays when patients were readmitted

4h

NSAIDs increase cardiovascular, bleeding risk in Korean heart attack patients

Use of NSAIDs to treat first-time heart attack patients significantly increased the risk for cardiovascular and bleeding events post-heart attack in a nationwide Korean study, published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

4h

Living with infection spikes is the new normal

Weeks after European lockdowns started being eased, cases are ticking upwards

4h

Moderna's coronavirus vaccine has started a nationwide, Phase 3 trial

The pharmaceutical company Moderna Therapeutics, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts announced this week that it has started phase three trials of its COVID-19 vaccine candidate. Phase three is the last main phase of testing a vaccine to prove it's safe and effective against the virus. (Pixabay/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including the latest research on mask efficacy , ways

4h

Biggest ever map of the universe reveals 11 billion years of history

A huge survey of the universe has been able to peer back into the deep past, revealing 80 per cent of the universe's 14-billion-year history

4h

Covid-19 news: This is the "most severe" health crisis ever, says WHO

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

4h

NASA's next Mars rover is brawniest and brainiest one yet

With eight successful Mars landings, NASA is upping the ante with its newest rover.

4h

Mars 2020 mission to be guided by USGS astrogeology maps

When NASA's Perseverance rover lands on Mars next year, it will be equipped with some of the most precise maps of Mars ever created, courtesy of the USGS Astrogeology Science Center. Not only are the new maps essential for a safe landing on Mars, but they also serve as the foundation upon which the science activities planned for the Mars mission will be built.

4h

Stopping listeria reproduction 'in its tracks'

Listeria contaminations can send food processing facilities into full crisis mode with mass product recalls, federal warnings and even hospitalization or death for people who consume the contaminated products. Destroying the bacterium and stopping its spread can be challenging because of the formation of biofilms, or communities of resistant bacteria that adhere to drains or other surfaces.

4h

Stopping listeria reproduction 'in its tracks'

Listeria contaminations can send food processing facilities into full crisis mode with mass product recalls, federal warnings and even hospitalization or death for people who consume the contaminated products. Destroying the bacterium and stopping its spread can be challenging because of the formation of biofilms, or communities of resistant bacteria that adhere to drains or other surfaces.

4h

Daily briefing: Earth's atmosphere rings like a bell

Nature, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02237-0 Scientists have confirmed the 200-year-old hypothesis of atmospheric resonance. Plus: exploring the origin of language, and tackling coronavirus in South Africa.

4h

Model links patterns in sediment to rain, uplift and sea level change

Forces that shape the Earth's surface are recorded in a number of natural records, from tree rings to cave formations.

4h

Return of the zombie cicadas: Team unearths manipulative qualities of fungal-infected flyers

Cicadas infected with the parasitic fungus Massospora unknowingly engage in trickery with their fellow insects, resulting in effective disease transmission, according to West Virginia University-led research.

4h

Jobs for the boys: How children give voice to gender stereotyped job roles

Children, and especially boys, show stronger stereotyping about masculine and feminine jobs than previously suspected, an innovative study by the University of Sussex reveals.

4h

Return of the zombie cicadas: Team unearths manipulative qualities of fungal-infected flyers

Cicadas infected with the parasitic fungus Massospora unknowingly engage in trickery with their fellow insects, resulting in effective disease transmission, according to West Virginia University-led research.

4h

Here's Why NASA's Next Rover is Bringing a Mars Rock Back to Mars

Homeward Bound In a matter of days, NASA is set to launch its Perseverance rover to Mars. One curiosity of the mission is that Perseverance will be bringing a rock back to the Red Planet that scientists believe originated on Mars roughly 600,000 to 700,000 years ago, as the BBC reports — for a fascinating scientific reason. Meteorite Madness The rock, first discovered in the deserts of Oman in 19

4h

New paper squares economic choice with evolutionary survival

If given the chance, a Kenyan herder is likely to keep a mix of goats and camels. It seems like an irrational economic choice because goats reproduce faster and thus offer higher near-term herd growth. But by keeping both goats and camels, the herder lowers the variability in growth from year to year. All of this helps increase the odds of household survival, which is essentially a gamble that dep

4h

What do we know about the long-term effects of Covid-19?

There is growing evidence from around the world that some people continue to experience debilitating symptoms of Covid-19 months after contracting the virus. They have been dubbed the 'long-haulers'. Melissa Davey explains what we know about how patients in Australia who were diagnosed in March and April are recovering more than three months later You can read Melissa Davey's article about the St

4h

New paper squares economic choice with evolutionary survival

If given the chance, a Kenyan herder is likely to keep a mix of goats and camels. It seems like an irrational economic choice because goats reproduce faster and thus offer higher near-term herd growth. But by keeping both goats and camels, the herder lowers the variability in growth from year to year. All of this helps increase the odds of household survival, which is essentially a gamble that dep

4h

Researchers identify microRNA that shows promise for hair regrowth

Researchers from North Carolina State University have identified a microRNA (miRNA) that could promote hair regeneration. This miRNA — miR-218-5p — plays an important role in regulating the pathway involved in follicle regeneration, and could be a candidate for future drug development.

4h

Model links patterns in sediment to rain, uplift and sea level change

In a recent study, researchers from The University of Texas at Austin show that a natural record – sediments packed together at basin margins – offers scientists a powerful tool for understanding the forces that shaped our planet over millions of years, with implications on present day understanding.

4h

Study examines stimulant use in context of state medical cannabis laws

Medical and non-medical prescription stimulant use is higher in states without medical cannabis laws (MCLs) than in states with MCLs among heterosexuals and among certain lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) subpopulations. The study led by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers is published in the International Journal of Drug Policy.

4h

Fewer hip fractures may be associated with reductions in smoking, heavy drinking

A new study, which analyzed 40 years of Framingham Heart Study data, found an association between lowered rates of hip fractures and decreases in smoking and heavy drinking. These results indicate that modifiable lifestyle factors, along with treatments, may be beneficial to bone health.

4h

Stopping listeria reproduction 'in its tracks'

Listeria contaminations can send food processing facilities into full crisis mode with mass product recalls, federal warnings and even hospitalization or death for people who consume the contaminated products. UH researchers have discovered a chemical compound that stops listeria reproduction in both light and dark conditions which could lead to bacterial control in food products.

4h

X-rays recount origin of oddball meteorites

X-ray experiments at Berkeley Lab played a key role in resolving the origin of rare, odd meteorites that have puzzled scientists since their discovery a half-century ago. Known as type IIE iron meteorites, they appear to have originated from a parent body that had a composition featuring both fully melted and unmelted parts – other meteorite types display only one composition.

4h

Jobs for the boys: How children give voice to gender stereotyped job roles

Children, and especially boys, show stronger stereotyping about masculine and feminine jobs than previously suspected, an innovative study by the University of Sussex reveals.

4h

Fostering a sustainable use of phosphorus

Phosphorus is critical to food security, ecosystem functioning and human activities. Urbanization and dietary changes, and in particular industrial use of P for chemical fertilizer production, have determined a declining trend especially in the last decades. A study recently published on Nature food realized with the contribution of the CMCC Foundation provides some suggestions on how to address t

4h

Laser inversion enables multi-materials 3D printing

Selective laser sintering is one of the most widely used processes in additive manufacturing, but it is limited to printing with a single material at a time. Columbia engineers have used their expertise in robotics to develop a new approach to overcome this limitation: By inverting the laser so that it points upwards, they've invented a way to enable SLS to use–at the same time–multiple material

4h

Leaving money on the table to stay in the game

Unlike businesses or governments, organisms can't go into evolutionary debt — there is no borrowing one's way back from extinction. This can lead to seemingly irrational economic choices that suddenly make sense when viewed as a multiplicative, evolutionary process.

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Mars 2020 mission to be guided by USGS astrogeology maps

When NASA's Perseverance rover lands on Mars next year, it will be equipped with some of the most precise maps of Mars ever created, courtesy of the USGS Astrogeology Science Center. Not only are the new maps essential for a safe landing on Mars, but they also serve as the foundation upon which the science activities planned for the Mars mission will be built.

4h

Medical journals' commercial publishing contracts may lead to biased articles

Scientists have long been concerned that the common practice of medical journals accepting commercial payments from pharmaceutical companies may lead to pro-industry bias in published articles. According to new research at The University of Texas at Austin, scientists were right to be concerned, but they were focusing on the wrong type of payments.

4h

Top Science Tip Sheet on heart failure, heart muscle cells, heart attack and atrial fibrillation results

Newly discovered pathway may have potential for treating heart failure – New research model helps predict heart muscle cells' impact on heart function after injury – New mass spectrometry approach generates libraries of glycans in human heart tissue – Understanding heart damage after heart attack and treatment may provide clues for prevention – Understanding atrial fibrillation's effects on heart

4h

Weight loss not always best strategy to enhance athletic fitness in young women

In women under 30, thinner and leaner, particularly at the extremes of low body size, does not necessarily equate with better cardiorespiratory fitness.Rather than emphasizing weight loss, better strategies for maximizing athletic performance in young women may include changes in training intensity, training frequency, skill acquisition, competition strategy, sleep and nutrition.

4h

Difference in a single gene may boost stress on heart from e-cigarettes in people of East Asian descent

A genetic difference in one gene common in people of East Asian descent may make them more susceptible to rapid heart rates and chemical toxicity if they use e-cigarettes.Although e-cigarettes may have fewer chemicals than tobacco cigarettes, the chemicals in e-cigarette aerosol may still cause harmful effects, particularly in people who are more susceptible because of their genetics.

4h

Alcohol abuse may raise risk of death in patients with abnormal heart rhythms

Among patients hospitalized with abnormal heart rhythms, those with alcohol abuse were 72% more likely to die before being discharged.Strategies to reduce problematic alcohol use may improve the health of patients with irregular heart rhythms and other heart problems.

4h

Flu vaccine could protect against serious heart and stroke complications

The rate of seasonal flu vaccinations among people over age 50 and nursing home residents is extremely low, and those who do get the flu vaccine can significantly lower their risk of heart attack, TIA (transient ischemic attack), death and cardiac arrest.Flu vaccination in high-risk patients was associated with a 28% reduced risk of heart attack, a 47% reduced risk of TIA and a 73% reduced risk of

4h

Don't Blame Psychologists (Do) for Subliminal Advertising

Originally published in August 1958 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Smallpox is so much older than we thought, Vikings had it

The fatal disease smallpox is older and more widespread than scientists so far have proved, researchers report. Their new study shows that the Vikings also suffered from smallpox. Through the ages, the highly infectious disease smallpox has killed hundreds of millions of people. But it is unclear exactly when the disease emerged. There has been found evidence of smallpox from individuals from the

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The Guardian view on a new normal: holidays abroad, quarantine at home | Editorial

Covid-19 is lingering such that the public believes things are getting better, long after they are going wrong Another day, another sadly predictable U-turn from the government of Boris Johnson. A few weeks ago ministers were encouraging the public to go abroad for their holidays. They did so without a comprehensive airport testing regime for passengers, unlike in many parts of the world. As rest

4h

Scientists Studying Sex Differences in the Brain Fear Their Work Will Be Misrepresented

A team of National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists is walking a delicate line: publishing research about how the human brain differs across sex, while trying to guard against their work being misrepresented by misogynists . Armin Raznahan, chief of developmental neurogenomics at the NIH, published research in the journal PNAS on Monday about how sex chromosomes are tied linked to difference

4h

Vaccine Trials Should Reflect America's Diversity

Racial minorities and those with underlying health conditions may be at a greater risk from coronavirus infection, but have historically been less likely to be included in clinical trials — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Not just light: The sensitivity of photoreceptors to mechanical stimuli is unveiled

Thanks to optical tweezers, a new study reveals unexpected properties of the neurons responsible for the transduction of light signals. The research has been published in PLOS Biology.

5h

Device is like a router for solar homes in blackouts

Researchers have designed a smart technology that can help utility companies better serve communities affected by blackouts. The researchers say their single device works by improving energy delivery between home solar-power systems and the electrical grid. "Our innovation lets solar energy consumers be less dependent on the external power grid. The same technology also allows the utility company

5h

Not just light: The sensitivity of photoreceptors to mechanical stimuli is unveiled

Thanks to optical tweezers, a new study reveals unexpected properties of the neurons responsible for the transduction of light signals. The research has been published in PLOS Biology.

5h

Researchers develop new cytosine base editors with high specificity and precision

Base editors, which enable production of highly efficient targeted point mutations in genomic DNA without causing double-stranded DNA breaks, hold great promise for gene therapy in human disease and trait improvement in crop plants.

5h

Study challenges idea that lower BMI shields smokers from fat-associated health risks

Some smokers might rationalize continuing to smoke because of lower body weight often associated with the habit. However, Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators have determined that even with a lower body mass index (BMI), smokers have a higher risk of depositing fat in and around organs and tissues compared to those who never smoked.

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Work absences in April highest on record, suggesting under-count of COVID cases: New study

In April, more than 2 million jobholders were out sick from work, the highest number since at least 1976, and more than double the rate from mid-April 2019, according to a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. The surge in absences was largest for immigrant workers, whose absence rate rose almost five-fold from 12 months earlier, when their absenteeism rate had been 37% lower than that

5h

MU School of Nursing programs help nursing homes respond to COVID-19

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to put a strain on health care systems, nursing homes have become overburdened with the challenge of keeping both patients and staff safe and healthy. Older residents in long-term care facilities are especially vulnerable to the effects of a respiratory illness like COVID-19, and nursing homes are not appropriately designed nor staffed to handle large numbers

5h

Study identifies top reasons for sewer line failure

Concrete sewer pipes around the world are most likely to fail either because their concrete is not strong enough or because they can't handle the weight of trucks that drive over them, a new study indicates.

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Immune system variation can predict severe COVID-19 outcomes

The differing immune system responses of patients with COVID-19 can help predict who will experience moderate and severe consequences of disease, according to a new study by Yale researchers published July 27 in the journal Nature.

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Same-day IUD placements hard to come by in Ohio, study finds

Though same-day access to IUDs increases the likelihood a woman will get the reproductive health care she wants and decreases the chance she'll become pregnant when she doesn't plan to, most providers in Ohio don't offer the service, a new study has found.

5h

Army project turns to nature for help with self-healing material

An Army-funded project developed a self-healing material patterned after squid ring teeth protein. The biodegradable biosynthetic polymer could be used to repair materials that are under continual repetitive movement such as robotic machines, prosthetic legs, ventilators and personal protective equipment like hazmat suits.

5h

Origami metamaterials show reversible auxeticity combined with deformation recoverability

New research by Northwestern Engineering and Georgia Institute of Technology expands the understanding of origami structures, opening possibilities for mechanical metamaterials to be used in soft robotics and medical devices.

5h

Researchers offer unprecedented look into 'central engine' powering a solar flare

In a study published in Nature Astronomy, an international team of researchers has presented a new, detailed look inside the "central engine" of a large solar flare accompanied by a powerful eruption by the Owens Valley Solar Array — a solar radio telescope facility operated by New Jersey Institute of Technology's Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research. The new findings offer the first measurement

5h

RNA biology provides the key to cell identity and health

Two papers in Genome Research by the FANTOM Consortium have provided new insights into the core regulatory networks governing cell types in different vertebrate species, and the role of RNA as regulators of cell function and identity.

5h

Researchers develop new cytosine base editors with high specificity and precision

Base editors, which enable production of highly efficient targeted point mutations in genomic DNA without causing double-stranded DNA breaks, hold great promise for gene therapy in human disease and trait improvement in crop plants.

5h

Researchers produce low-cost hand sanitizer from waste

A Tel Aviv University breakthrough allows, for the first time, a local production of ethanol—and hand sanitizer—based on plant and paper waste, using a novel lignin (a substance found in plants) degradation process. This revolutionary process could significantly reduce production costs and lead to a decrease in the use of edible plant sources, help protect the environment, and reduce the use of va

5h

Don't Blame Psychologists (Do) for Subliminal Advertising

Originally published in August 1958 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

New depth map of the Arctic Ocean

An international team of researchers has published the most detailed submarine map of the Arctic Ocean. The study, by Miquel Canals, José Luis Casamor and David Amblàs from the Consolidated Research Group on Marine Geosciences of the University of Barcelona, has been published in Scientific Data.

5h

RNA biology provides the key to cell identity and health

Two papers in Genome Research by the FANTOM Consortium have provided new insights into the core regulatory networks governing cell types in different vertebrate species, and the role of RNA as regulators of cell function and identity.

5h

European and American maize: Same same, but different

German researchers decoded the European maize genome. In comparison to North American maize lines, they discovered variations that underlie phenotypic differences and may also contribute to the heterosis effect. A better understanding of the effect could impact breeding for higher yields. For cultivation of maize in areas with low yields and for challenges imposed by the climate change these obser

5h

Search for a Cleaner Jet Fuel Leads to Sewage Plants

Researchers aim to short-circuit the decay process in organic waste to produce a potent, less carbon-intensive fuel — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Researchers offer unprecedented look into 'central engine' powering a solar flare

In a study published in Nature Astronomy, an international team of researchers has presented a new, detailed look inside the "central engine" of a large solar flare accompanied by a powerful eruption first captured on Sept. 10, 2017 by the Owens Valley Solar Array (EOVSA)—a solar radio telescope facility operated by New Jersey Institute of Technology's (NJIT) Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research

5h

RNA biology provides the key to cell identity and health

Two papers in Genome Research by the FANTOM Consortium have provided new insights into the core regulatory networks governing cell types in different vertebrate species, and the role of RNA as regulators of cell function and identity.

5h

European and American maize: Same same, but different

German researchers decoded the European maize genome. In comparison to North American maize lines, they discovered variations that underlie phenotypic differences and may also contribute to the heterosis effect. A better understanding of the effect could impact breeding for higher yields. For cultivation of maize in areas with low yields and for challenges imposed by the climate change these obser

5h

A photonic amorphous topological insulator

The current understanding of topological insulators and their classical wave analogs, such as photonic topological insulators, is mainly based on topological band theory. Contrary to this, Scientists in China and Singapore experimentally showed photonic topological insulators based on glass-like amorphous phases, for which the bandstructure is ill-defined. The persistence of topological protection

5h

Developing a new strategy to selectively deliver therapies to the brain

The Innovation Center of NanoMedicine in Japan announced that a new strategy to specifically target to the brain was discovered in collaboration with the Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The details are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science issued on July 23.

5h

Vacancy dynamics on CO-covered Pt(111) electrodes

Platinum arguably is the most important electrocatalyst material, not only because it is the best single element catalyst in a variety of important electrocatalytic reactions but also due to its relatively high stability. However, in the corrosive environment of real electrocatalysis systems, such as fuel cells, even platinum can structurally degrade. Moreover, the presence of strongly adsorbing s

5h

Lake Titicaca giant frog: Scientists join forces to save species

International scientific institutions are teaming up to save the world's largest aquatic amphibian.

5h

Lithium in drinking water linked with lower suicide rates

Naturally occurring lithium in public drinking water may have an anti-suicidal effect – according to a new study from Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) and the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London.Published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, the study collated research from around the world and found that geographical areas with relatively high lev

5h

Flu vaccine may reduce risk of Alzheimer's disease, new study shows

People who received at least one flu vaccination were 17% less likely to get Alzheimer's disease over the course of a lifetime, according to researchers at UTHealth.

5h

Study seeks to explain decline in hip fracture rates

In a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine today, researchers showed how analysis of data from the multigenerational Framingham Osteoporosis Study may in part explain why the incidence of hip fracture in the US has declined during the last two decades.

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Better measure of 'good cholesterol' can gauge heart attack and stroke risk in some populations

DALLAS – June 22, 2020 – For decades, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol has been dubbed "good cholesterol" because of its role in moving fats and other cholesterol molecules out of artery walls. People with higher HDL cholesterol levels tend to have lower rates of cardiovascular disease, studies have shown.

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Artificial intelligence finds patterns of mutations and survival in tumour images

Scientists have used artificial intelligence to search for patterns of molecular abnormalities in tumour tissue sections across 28 cancer types. They analysed more than 17 000 tumour microscopy images and found that the appearance of tumour cells and tissues offers insights into the underlying genetic causes. The research could help scientists develop diagnostic tools for when molecular tests are

5h

Protecting beta cells against stress may guard against type 1 diabetes

Joslin Diabetes Center researchers have found an unusual strategy that eventually may help to guard transplanted beta cells or to slow the original onset of type 1 diabetes.

5h

Watching a New Island Grow Over Seven Years

The fastest way to make a new island is volcanism. The island of Nishino-shima in Japan has doubled in a little over 7 years, all thanks to lava flows.

5h

Will Craft Brewing Survive?

A few decades ago, "American beer" had the same connotation in the world of brewing as Velveeta-style "American cheese" had for connoisseurs of Stilton or Brie. Mid-20th-century American beer culture was known for its handful of giant breweries, and for the unadventurous, bland lagers they pumped out. In those days, brewers in England or Belgium or Germany would roll their eyes at what Yanks cons

5h

There Is Nothing Conservative About What Trump Is Doing in Portland

Twenty years ago, Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist—not generally thought of as a radical liberal— said : "We can think of no better example of the police power, which the Founders denied the National Government and reposed in the States, than the suppression of violent crime and vindication of its victims." Last week Attorney General William Barr went full interventionist, telling th

5h

Moderna is enrolling 30,000 volunteers for its biggest covid-19 vaccine trial

Biotech company Moderna has been making some pretty promising strides in developing and testing its covid-19 vaccine . The company just announced it was working with the US National Institutes of Health to launch what will be one of the largest covid-19 vaccine trials, a phase 3 study enrolling tens of thousands of American volunteers to assess whether the vaccine could truly protect people from

5h

Waving to the Great Mapmaker in the Sky

All over the world, people are writing messages and symbols on the land that can only be seen from above. These messages are not for God, but for our fellow humans – pilots, balloonists, or an abstract Mapmaker in the Sky. Non-symbolic communication with the heavens can be traced back to a cartographic innovation by Da Vinci. Da Vinci's satellite map In Minnesota, there's a forest shaped like Min

5h

Viral hepatitis: Europe needs to close the testing gap

Approximately four in five people living with hepatitis B and three out of four people with hepatitis C infection across the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA) and the UK have not yet been diagnosed. This is a major obstacle on the way towards the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) for health in 2030 as highlighted by ECDC on occasion of World Hepatitis Day.

5h

What are the properties of the cryptocurrency market?

In terms of its structure and organization, the cryptocurrency market is a rather young and a very specific financial market. Due to its relatively short history, it is difficult to fully analyze the cryptocurrency market (it appeared only in 2009), which makes this task even more attractive for researchers.

5h

Return of the zombie cicadas: WVU team unearths manipulative qualities of fungal-infected flyers

Cicadas infected with the parasitic fungus Massospora unknowingly engage in trickery with their fellow insects, resulting in effective disease transmission, according to West Virginia University-led research. Massospora manipulates male cicadas into flicking their wings like females – a mating invitation – which tempts unsuspecting male cicadas and infects them.

5h

Brain cell types identified that may push males to fight and have sex

Two groups of nerve cells may serve as "on-off switches" for male mating and aggression, suggests a new study in rodents. These neurons appear to send signals between two parts of the brain – the back tip, or posterior, of the amygdala and the hypothalamus – that together regulate emotions including fear, anxiety, and aggression.

5h

How the zebrafish got its stripes

Animal patterns are a source of endless fascination, and now researchers have worked out how zebrafish develop their stripes.

5h

Life in the pits: Scientists identify key enzyme behind body odor

Researchers have discovered a unique "BO enzyme" responsible for armpit odor.

5h

Wealthier men are more likely to develop high blood pressure

Working men with higher incomes are more likely to develop high blood pressure, reports a new study.

5h

Fossil tracks: Wrong number of fingers leads down wrong track

Have you ever wondered why our hands have five fingers while amphibians usually only have four? Until now it was assumed that this was already the case with the early ancestors of today's frogs and salamanders, the Temnospondyli. However, a new find of the crocodile-like Temnospondyl Metoposaurus krasiejowensis (about 225 million years old) in Poland shows five metacarpal bones and thus five finge

6h

Plant-based diets shown to lower blood pressure even with limited meat and dairy

Consuming a plant-based diet can lower blood pressure even if small amounts of meat and dairy are consumed too, according to new research.

6h

Alaska is getting wetter: That's bad news for permafrost and the climate

Alaska is getting wetter. A new study spells out what that means for the permafrost that underlies about 85% of the state, and the consequences for Earth's global climate.

6h

Double surgery improves chances for heart transplant in patients with obesity

Pairing bariatric surgery with LVAD heart surgery may be an effective bridge to heart transplant for obese patients.

6h

Molecular cause underlying rare genetic disorder revealed

Scientists identify how a nonfunctioning CASK gene creates chaos in the brain.

6h

Study shows three medications currently on the market may have unexpected effects

A new study of 1,443 medications found that three prescription drugs currently on the market caused unexpected changes in worms that could point to potential, unrecognized effects in humans. The research was published online on July 23, 2020 in the journal Chemosphere.

6h

Overweight and obesity are associated with a low sperm quality

Researchers from the Rovira i Virgili University in collaboration with researchers from the University of Utah have carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the association between adiposity (normal weight, overweight, obesity, and low weight) and the sperm quality. Overweight and/or obesity were associated with low semen quality parameters and underweight category was likewise

6h

Make your own greenhouse gas logger

Researchers at Linköping University's Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Change, have developed a simple logger for greenhouse gas flows. It is built using inexpensive and easily available parts, and provides data on levels of methane, carbon dioxide, temperature and humidity.

6h

Did you solve it? The pyramid puzzle

The answers to today's geometrical riddles Earlier today I set you the following two puzzles. Here they are again, together with solutions. 1. A 12cm x 12cm square piece of paper is marked as below. Continue reading…

6h

Researchers Identify 21 Existing Drugs That Stop the Coronavirus

According to a new study published in the prestigious journal Nature , an international team of researchers have identified 21 existing drugs that stop the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, from replicating. The new research could have bold implications for future of medical care during the pandemic. The scientists were able to confirm that at certain concentrations, 21 drugs — out o

6h

New approach refines the Hubble's constant and age of universe

Using known distances of 50 galaxies from Earth to refine calculations in Hubble's constant, astronomers estimates the age of the universe at 12.6 billion years.

6h

Lego-inspired bone and soft tissue repair with tiny, 3D-printed bricks

A new, 3D-printed technology that was inspired by Lego block toys is designed to help heal broken bones, and could one day even lead to lab-made organs for human transplant.

6h

Identified a new regulatory mechanism of response to metabolic stress

The Chromatin Biology group, led by Dr. Alex Vaquero has identified a new enzymatic activity in SIRT7, involved in stress response, aging and hematopoiesis, which plays a key role in metabolic stress and aging.

6h

Water molecules are gold for nanocatalysis

Nanocatalysts made of gold nanoparticles dispersed on metal oxides are very promising for the industrial, selective oxidation of compounds, including alcohols, into valuable chemicals. They show high catalytic activity, particularly in aqueous solution. A team of researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum has been able to explain why: Water molecules play an active role in facilitating the oxygen di

6h

SMART finds new and safe method that enhances dengue vaccination — Paving way to wide use

Researchers at SMART have discovered a practical way to induce strong and broad immunity to the dengue virus. Their study proves that providing immunity shots in sequence offers strong and broad immunity against all four serotypes of dengue virus, providing a way to safely use the only licensed dengue vaccine available.

6h

Nine tweaks to supercharge your gaming PC

You think you might need a new PC to boost up your gaming? Try these tips first. (Fredrick Tendong / Unsplash/) When it comes to PC gaming, frame rates and user experience matter—even the best titles will suffer if their beautifully rendered virtual worlds slow to a crawl. But no matter your particular setup on Windows, you'll find numerous tweaks that can ensure a smooth, frustration-free ride,

6h

Rekordår for teknik og naturvidenskab: Markant flere unge søger ind på STEM-uddannelser

2000 flere studerende end sidste år har fået plads på en ingeniøruddannelse eller en naturvidenskabelig studieretning.

6h

We Need Federal Action to Prevent the Next Pandemic

To reduce the likelihood of crises like COVID-19, a comprehensive national approach is essential — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

6h

New depth map of the Arctic Ocean

An international team of researchers has published the most detailed submarine map of the Artic Ocean. The study, which counts on the participation of the experts Miquel Canals, José Luis Casamor and David Amblàs, from the Consolidated Research Group on Marine Geosciences of the University of Barcelona, has been published in Nature's journal Scientific Data.

6h

Not just light: The sensitivity of photoreceptors to mechanical stimuli is unveiled

"We thought we knew almost everything about photoreceptors, but we have proved that is not the case". With these words, Vincent Torre, Professor of neurobiology of SISSA, comments the results of a new study that, thanks to a multidisciplinary approach and to the use of optical tweezers, reveals for the first time the sensitivity of nerve cells present on the retina to mechanical stimuli and opens

6h

Hedonism leads to happiness

Relaxing on the sofa or savoring a delicious meal: Enjoying short-term pleasurable activities that don't lead to long-term goals contributes at least as much to a happy life as self-control, according to new research from the University of Zurich and Radboud University in the Netherlands. The researchers therefore argue for a greater appreciation of hedonism in psychology.

6h

Video camera in a public place knows the density of people or vehicle more accurately

Deep learning applied for image/video processing opened the door for the practical deployment for object detection and identification with acceptable accuracy. Crowd counting is another application of image/video processing. The scientists at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) designed a new DNN with backward connection, which achieved more accurate estimation of the densit

6h

Coronavirus: Second wave hits Asia as global cases continue to soar

Asian countries such as China and Vietnam are seeing a resurgence of the virus as daily global covid-19 cases hit 300,000, with more than half occurring in the Americas

6h

Coronavirus: Pet cat found to have virus in UK

It is thought the animal caught the virus from its owner.

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Clint Smith Joining The Atlantic as a Staff Writer

The Atlantic has hired Clint Smith as a staff writer, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today. Smith, who received his Ph.D. in education from Harvard University this spring, has contributed to The Atlantic over the past several years––in June, he wrote on becoming a parent in the age of Black Lives Matter, and was part of The Atlantic 's KING special issue in 2018. Smith begins as a sta

6h

Trump's national security adviser tests positive for Covid-19

Robert O'Brien becomes highest-ranking White House official to contract the disease

7h

Hawaiian Islands avoid direct hit from Hurricane Douglas

Hawaii avoided a direct hit Monday from Hurricane Douglas and the Category 1 storm was swirling just north of the island chain.

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An Experimental COVID-19 Vaccine Begins its Phase 3 Trial Today

An experimental COVID-19 vaccine developed by Moderna is beginning its final round of testing on Monday. After passing the previous stages that are more focused on safety and identifying side effects , the new clinical trial will measure how effective the vaccine, dubbed mRNA-1273, actually is when it comes to preventing disease, NPR reports . Over the next few months, Moderna will determine whet

7h

The Doctor Behind the Disputed Covid Data

Dr. Sapan Desai, who supplied the data for two prominent and later retracted studies, is said to have a history of cutting corners and misrepresenting information in pursuit of his ambitions.

7h

Unparalleled inventory of the human gut ecosystem

Scientists gathered and published over 200 000 genomes from the human gut microbiome. The catalogue reveals that more than 70% of bacterial species in the human gut have never been grown in the lab. This new data resource could be extremely useful to investigate how the bacterial community in the human gut influences human health and disease.

7h

Which bacteria truly qualify as probiotics?

Today, the word probiotic is used to describe all kinds of 'good' microorganisms in foods and supplements. Already, scientists have come up with a specific definition of probiotics, however, they have agreed that for a bacterial strain or strains to be called a probiotic, it should follow four simple criteria. Correct use of the term probiotic, per these criteria, will give consumers better transp

7h

Artificial Intelligence to identify individual birds of a same species

Humans have a hard time identifying individual birds just by looking at the patterns on their plumage. An international study involving scientists form the CNRS, Université de Montpellier and the University of Porto in Portugal, among others, has shown how computers can learn to differentiate individual birds of a same species. The results are published on 27 July 2020 in Methods in Ecology and Ev

7h

European and American maize: Same same, but different

German researchers decoded the European maize genome. In comparison to North American maize lines, they discovered variations that underlie phenotypic differences and may also contribute to the heterosis effect. A better understanding of the effect could impact breeding for higher yields. For cultivation of maize in areas with low yields and for challenges imposed by the climate change these obser

7h

Recent advances in 2D, 3D and higher-order topological photonics

A research team from South Korea and the USA has provided a comprehensive review covering the recent progress in topological photonics, a recently emerging branch of photonics. This review introduces the basics of topological band theory and various two-dimensional topological phases, followed by three-dimensional topological phases and approaches to achieve them. Recently emerging fields includin

7h

New review on management of osteoporosis in premenopausal women

An IOF and ECTS Working Group have published an updated review of literature published after 2017 on premenopausal osteoporosis. It outlines key information on factors affecting peak bone mass and distinguishing low bone mass from proper osteoporosis with increased fracture risk at a young age, causes of secondary osteoporosis versus idiopathic osteoporosis, as well as pregnancy-and lactation-asso

7h

Researchers develop new cytosine base editors with high specificity and precision

Recently, GAO Caixia's group from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences created two new CBEs based on a truncated human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminase (A3Bctd) and developed a high-throughput assay for assessing sgRNA-independent deamination changes in plant CBEs.

7h

European maize highlights the hidden differences within a species

Maize is one of our major staple foods and is cultivated around the world, showcasing a broad range of genetic adaptations to different environmental conditions. To date, the best understood maize line is the American dent maize line B73. Scientists have now expanded our knowledge of the maize genome through the analysis of four European flint lines. The found genetic differences between the lines

7h

How to stack graphene up to four layers

IBS research team reports a novel method to grow multi-layered, single-crystalline graphene with a selected stacking order in a wafer scale. They obtained four-layered graphene using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) via Cu-Si alloy formation.

7h

Novel label-free imaging technique brings out the inner light within T cells

A new imaging method developed by the Skala lab uses the natural autofluorescence within cells to assess T cell activity. The technique could help assess T cell involvement in immunotherapies.

7h

Antibiotics alone successfully treat uncomplicated appendicitis in children

Of 1,068 patients from 10 health centers enrolled in the study, 67.1% of those who elected to initially manage their care through antibiotics alone experienced no harmful side effects and did not later require an appendectomy by their one-year follow-up appointment. Patients in the non-operative group experienced an average of 6.6 disability days, compared to the 10.9 days in the surgery group.

7h

Population genetic screening shown to efficiently identify increased risk for inherited disease

In a new study published today in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers behind the Healthy Nevada Project® suggest that community-based genetic screening has the potential to efficiently identify individuals who may be at increased risk for three common inherited (CDC Tier 1) genetic conditions known to cause several forms of cancer and increased risk for heart disease or stroke.

7h

Is spanking of children by parents less common?

Changes over 25 years in how common spanking of children was by parents in the United States are examined in this study.

7h

How a pandemic could advance science of early adversity

Recent advancements across disciplines relevant to early child development can be used to understand the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic and to develop and scale empirically supported interventions for adversity-exposed children and families.

7h

Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection among health care workers in Houston

Rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection among asymptomatic health care workers and community residents in Texas are examined in this observational study.

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Estimation of aerosol emissions from simulated individuals with asymptomatic to moderate COVID-19

Viral aerosol emissions from simulated individuals with asymptomatic to moderate COVID-19 are estimated in this mathematical modeling study.

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Epstein-Barr virus rewires host epigenomes to drive stomach cancer

Researchers in Japan and Singapore have discovered a molecular mechanism that explains how Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection alters a host's epigenome to promote tumorigenesis (the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells) in certain types of stomach cancer. The findings suggest that EBV infection plays an important role in the development of EBV-associated stomach cancers, and provide fr

7h

Ultra-low power brain implants find meaningful signal in grey matter noise

By tuning into a subset of brain waves, University of Michigan researchers have dramatically reduced the power requirements of neural interfaces while improving their accuracy–a discovery that could lead to long-lasting brain implants that can both treat neurological diseases and enable mind-controlled prosthetics and machines.

7h

New genome mapper is like "upgrading from dial-up to fibre-optic"

Researchers describe the first technology able to visualize hundreds to potentially thousands of genomes at the same time under the microscope.

7h

Offshore wind power now so cheap it could pay money back to consumers

The latest round of offshore wind farms to be built in the UK could reduce household energy bills by producing electricity very cheaply.

7h

Characteristics, strength of evidence of COVID-19 studies registered on ClinicalTrials.gov

The characteristics and expected strength of evidence of COVID-19 studies registered on ClinicalTrials.gov are evaluated in this observational study.

7h

Association of cardiac infection with SARS-CoV-2 in confirmed COVID-19 autopsy cases

The presence of SARS-CoV-2 in myocardial tissue from autopsy cases is evaluated in this observational study.

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Outcomes of cardiovascular MRI in patients recovered from COVID-19

The presence of myocardial injury in patients recently recovered from COVID-19 are evaluated in this observational study.

7h

Insulin cost-sharing caps may help kids, young adults with type 1 diabetes

Although additional policies are needed to relieve insulin's financial burden, researchers find a national cost-sharing cap helps privately insured children and young adults with type 1 diabetes pay less out-of-pocket.

7h

Brain cell types identified that may push males to fight and have sex

Two groups of nerve cells may serve as "on-off switches" for male mating and aggression, suggests a new study in rodents. These neurons appear to send signals between two parts of the brain – the back tip, or posterior, of the amygdala and the hypothalamus – that together regulate emotions including fear, anxiety, and aggression.

7h

Soft robot actuators heal themselves

Repeated activity wears on soft robotic actuators, but these machine's moving parts need to be reliable and easily fixed. Now a team of researchers has a biosynthetic polymer, patterned after squid ring teeth, that is self-healing and biodegradable, creating a material not only good for actuators, but also for hazmat suits and other applications where tiny holes could cause a danger.

7h

Despite debate, even the world's oldest trees are not immortal

The oldest trees on Earth have stood for nearly five millennia, and researchers have long wondered to what extent these ancient organisms undergo senescence, physically deteriorating as they age. In a review publishing July 27, 2020 in the journal Trends in Plant Science, plant biologist Sergi Munné-Bosch argues that although signs of senescence in long-lived trees may be almost imperceptible to p

7h

Diagnosing single trees from above

Models based on images from unmanned aerial vehicles and satellites can help farmers to monitor the health of individual trees.

7h

Make your own greenhouse gas logger

Researchers at Linköping University's Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Change, have developed a simple logger for greenhouse gas flows. It is built using inexpensive and easily available parts, and provides data on levels of methane, carbon dioxide, temperature and humidity.

7h

Water molecules are gold for nanocatalysis

Nanocatalysts made of gold nanoparticles dispersed on metal oxides are very promising for the industrial, selective oxidation of compounds, including alcohols, into valuable chemicals. They show high catalytic activity, particularly in aqueous solution. A team of researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has been able to explain why: Water molecules play an active role in facilitating the oxy

7h

Cybertruck Metal Can Be Etched, Heated Into a Rainbow

Shop the Look Last week, Tesla announced that the Elon Musk-run electric car company will be opening a US factory in Austin, Texas, to build the long-awaited Cybertruck . Musk isn't losing any time exploring some ways to make it look, well, just a little less like a giant stainless steel box on wheels . In a series of tweet replies, very much in character for the CEO, Musk offered a hint of what

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Can Trees Live Forever? New Kindling for an Immortal Debate

Some trees can live for thousands of years, but we may not be around long enough to really know whether they can die of old age.

7h

S-glutathionylation of human-inducible Hsp70 reveals regulatory mechanism involving C-terminal α-helical lid

Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) proteins are a family of ancient and conserved molecular chaperones. They play an essential role in maintaining protein homeostasis, including facilitating protein folding and degradation, preventing protein aggregation, and participating in the stress response. Disruption of the cellular quality control machinery is associated with aging, cancer and neurodegenerative

7h

Development of a 3-D titanium-based structure to improve bone implants

A research team from the University of Malaga, the Andalusian Centre for Nanomedicine and Biotechnology-BIONAND, the Canary Islands Technological Institute, the company Osteobionix, and the CIBER (Networking Centre for Biomedical Research) has developed a coating for titanium prostheses based on 3-D branching polymers which can incorporate substances that facilitate bonding with the bone. This mec

7h

CTCF orchestrates long-range cohesin-driven V(D)J recombinational scanning

Nature, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2578-0

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Genome-wide detection of tandem DNA repeats that are expanded in autism

Nature, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2579-z

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S-glutathionylation of human-inducible Hsp70 reveals regulatory mechanism involving C-terminal α-helical lid

Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) proteins are a family of ancient and conserved molecular chaperones. They play an essential role in maintaining protein homeostasis, including facilitating protein folding and degradation, preventing protein aggregation, and participating in the stress response. Disruption of the cellular quality control machinery is associated with aging, cancer and neurodegenerative

7h

Trapping tiny particles: A versatile tool for nanomanipulation

At just 1/1000th of a millimeter, nanoparticles are impossible to see with the naked eye. But, despite being small, they're extremely important in many ways. If scientists want to take a close look at DNA, proteins, or viruses, then being able to isolate and monitor nanoparticles is essential.

7h

Launch of the world's first soft X-ray satellite with 'Lobster-Eye' imaging technology

The 'Lobster-Eye X-ray Satellite' was successfully launched on July 25 into orbit from the Taiyuan Launch Center, with the first signal received, riding the Long March 4B lift rocket. The Lobster-Eye X-ray Satellite project is co-led by Nanjing University (NJU), the Laboratory for Space Research (LSR) of The University of Hong Kong (HKU), the 508 Institute of the Fifth Academy of China Aerospace S

7h

Glacial stream insect may tolerate warmer waters

An endangered aquatic insect that lives in icy streams fed by glaciers might not mind if the water grows warmer due to climate change.

7h

New approach refines the Hubble's constant and age of universe

Using known distances of 50 galaxies from Earth to refine calculations in Hubble's constant, a research team led by a University of Oregon astronomer estimates the age of the universe at 12.6 billion years.

7h

New genome mapper is like 'upgrading from dial-up to fibre-optic'

Researchers from Harvard University, the Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG) and the Center for Genomic Regulation (CRG) have described the first technology able to visualize hundreds to potentially thousands of genomes at the same time under the microscope. The tech images genomes more cheaply, more quickly and increases range of visibility compared to currently available methods. The tec

7h

Soft robot actuators heal themselves

Repeated activity wears on soft robotic actuators, but these machine's moving parts need to be reliable and easily fixed. Now a team of researchers has a biosynthetic polymer, patterned after squid ring teeth, that is self-healing and biodegradable, creating a material not only good for actuators, but also for hazmat suits and other applications where tiny holes could cause a danger.

7h

Despite debate, even the world's oldest trees are not immortal

The oldest trees on Earth have stood for nearly five millennia, and researchers have long wondered to what extent these ancient organisms undergo senescence, physically deteriorating as they age. A recent paper studying ginkgoes, one of the world's longest-lived trees, even found that they may be able to "escape senescence at the whole-plant level," raising questions about the apparent lack of agi

7h

Glacial stream insect may tolerate warmer waters

An endangered aquatic insect that lives in icy streams fed by glaciers might not mind if the water grows warmer due to climate change.

7h

New genome mapper is like 'upgrading from dial-up to fibre-optic'

Researchers from Harvard University, the Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG) and the Center for Genomic Regulation (CRG) have described the first technology able to visualize hundreds to potentially thousands of genomes at the same time under the microscope. The tech images genomes more cheaply, more quickly and increases range of visibility compared to currently available methods. The tec

7h

Despite debate, even the world's oldest trees are not immortal

The oldest trees on Earth have stood for nearly five millennia, and researchers have long wondered to what extent these ancient organisms undergo senescence, physically deteriorating as they age. A recent paper studying ginkgoes, one of the world's longest-lived trees, even found that they may be able to "escape senescence at the whole-plant level," raising questions about the apparent lack of agi

7h

TBI damage may come from tiny bubble bursts

Microbubbles measured in microns—millionths of a meter—can form in cerebral spinal fluid inside the skull during traumatic brain injuries, according to new research. The "formation and dramatic collapse" of these microbubbles could be responsible for some of the damage in a brain injury, the researchers report. Bubble damage may sound trivial. But bubble collapse—a process known as cavitation— an

7h

New study provides valuable historical dataset for Yellow River water management

Researchers led by Prof. LIU Yu from the Institute of Earth Environment of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators reconstructed natural runoff history for the middle reach of the YR from 1492 to 2013 CE to assess the effects of human activities.

7h

Our Genes May Explain Severity of COVID-19 and Other Infections

Why was a marathon runner in his 40s stricken with a case of COVID-19 so severe it landed him in the intensive care unit? Why did a healthy 12-year-old boy lose his life to a disease that mostly harms older people? One of the most terrifying aspects of the pandemic is that the severity of the disease seems so cruelly and arbitrarily variable. Although the SARS-CoV-2 virus is most often fatal in p

7h

Polar bears could be extinct by 2100, says heartbreaking new study

A new report on climate change by the University of Toronto is projecting that most of the polar bear population could reach extinction in under 100 years due to starvation. Polar bears are dependent on sea ice for hunting seals, a primary component of their diet. As temperatures rise and sea ice continues to shrink it has become increasingly challenging for the carnivores to hunt for food. The A

7h

Equity: a mathematician shares her solution

Nature, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02205-8 Look beyond gender — if research thrives on collaboration, a book asks, why do we reward individualism?

7h

Moderna begins first late-stage US trial of Covid vaccine

Shares rise after 30,000 participants get their Phase III jabs

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Hundreds petition to retract paper they call "unscholarly, overtly racist" and full of "racially violent narratives"

Hundreds of academics, anti-poverty advocates and others have signed petitions demanding the journal Society retract a new commentary which argues, in essence, that poor Black and Hispanic people in the United States are poor because they haven't figured out how to be more white. One petition, to the editor of the journal, Jonathan Imber, had … Continue reading

7h

Governments could stop future pandemics via conservation

Governments may be able to prevent future pandemics by investing as little as $22 billion a year in programs to curb wildlife trafficking and stem the destruction of tropical forests, a new analysis shows. Compared to the $2.6 trillion already lost to COVID-19, and the more than 600,000 deaths the virus has caused so far, that annual investment represents an exceptional value, the experts argue.

7h

Here's How to Watch NASA Launch a Mars Mission This Week

Going Live NASA is about to embark on its latest Mars mission, sending its Mars 2020 Perseverance rover on its long journey to the Red Planet atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. The launch is slated for Thursday, July 30 at 7:50 am EDT from Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Luckily, the space agency has set up a live stream on its website so you can follo

8h

Photonic amorphous topological insulator

The current understanding of topological insulators and their classical wave analogues, such as photonic topological insulators, is mainly based on topological band theory. Contrarily, Scientists in China and Singapore experimentally showed photonic topological insulators based on glass-like amorphous phases, for which the bandstructure is ill-defined. The persistence of topological protection is

8h

Temporary salt crystals may provide a permanent solution to Alzheimer's

Researchers at Osaka University have demonstrated that precipitation of a salt crystal occurs even at concentrations much lower than its solubility due to local density fluctuation and this repeated precipitation-dissolution of salt crystals significantly accelerates the production of neurotoxic aggregates of amyloid-β peptides. These results help elucidate the protein aggregation mechanism and th

8h

Cycad plants provide an important 'ecosystem service'

A study published in the June 2020 edition of the peer-reviewed journal Horticulturae shows that cycads, which are in decline and among the world's most threatened group of plants, provide an important service to their neighboring organisms. The study, completed by researchers from the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam and the Montgomery Botanical Center in Miami,

8h

Team develops computational method to explore evolution's influence on preterm birth

Human pregnancy can easily be taken for granted as a natural and regularly occurring event, but it is the product of the complex, coordinated function of two bodies, mother and baby, that has evolved side by side with other important human adaptations. For the first time, researchers have established how a complex disorder associated with pregnancy—spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) – has been shape

8h

Heat smarter, not harder: How microwaves make catalytic reactions more efficient

Many reactions that we use to produce chemical compounds in food, medical, and industrial fields would not be feasible without the use of catalysts. A catalyst is a substance that, even in small quantities, accelerates the rate of a chemical reaction and sometimes allows it to occur at milder conditions (lower temperature and pressure). A good catalyst can sometimes multiply the throughput of an i

8h

Cycad plants provide an important 'ecosystem service'

A study published in the June 2020 edition of the peer-reviewed journal Horticulturae shows that cycads, which are in decline and among the world's most threatened group of plants, provide an important service to their neighboring organisms. The study, completed by researchers from the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam and the Montgomery Botanical Center in Miami,

8h

Team develops computational method to explore evolution's influence on preterm birth

Human pregnancy can easily be taken for granted as a natural and regularly occurring event, but it is the product of the complex, coordinated function of two bodies, mother and baby, that has evolved side by side with other important human adaptations. For the first time, researchers have established how a complex disorder associated with pregnancy—spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) – has been shape

8h

2-in-1 immunotherapy may better fight blood cancer

The combination of two immunotherapy strategies is more effective than either alone in treating certain blood cancers like leukemia, a study in human cells and mice shows. Some of the most promising advances in cancer treatment have centered on immunotherapies that rev up a patient's immune system to attack cancer. But immunotherapies don't work in all patients, and researchers have searched for

8h

Video: Single cells have their own defenses against pathogens

In the fight against pathogens, most researchers have focused on the diverse immune system arsenal that protects people against infection. However, the lab of Yale microbiologist Jorge Galan explored an evolutionarily ancient defense system possessed by every individual cell in the body.

8h

Novel cutting mechanism devised for automated, robotic apple-tree pruning system

The first robotic cutting mechanism—or "end-effector"—for a fully automated, computerized pruning system for modern apple orchards has been designed by a Penn State research team, an early step in the creation of a technology aimed at easing challenges facing tree-fruit growers.

8h

Video: Single cells have their own defenses against pathogens

In the fight against pathogens, most researchers have focused on the diverse immune system arsenal that protects people against infection. However, the lab of Yale microbiologist Jorge Galan explored an evolutionarily ancient defense system possessed by every individual cell in the body.

8h

Novel cutting mechanism devised for automated, robotic apple-tree pruning system

The first robotic cutting mechanism—or "end-effector"—for a fully automated, computerized pruning system for modern apple orchards has been designed by a Penn State research team, an early step in the creation of a technology aimed at easing challenges facing tree-fruit growers.

8h

Researchers create 'decoy' coatings that trick infrared cameras

Light can sometimes play tricks on our eyes. If you look at a shiny surface, what you see will largely depend on the surrounding environment and lighting conditions.

8h

Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a vaccine?

More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…

8h

Pathological regression of lymph nodes better predicts esophageal cancer survival

A team of researchers led by Osaka University established a new pathological grading system to evaluate the therapeutic effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) removed in esophageal cancer (EC) surgery, demonstrating that the system predicts recurrence and prognosis in EC patients better than conventional systems. Their findings will enable 'tailor-made' treatment

8h

Heat smarter, not harder — How microwaves make catalytic reactions more efficient

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and International Christian University (ICU) demonstrate a synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy-based method by which the local temperatures of metal nanoparticles can be measured under microwaves. This approach provides insight into the role that their temperature has on their catalytic performance and sheds light on how local particle heating us

8h

A New Brain-Inspired Learning Method for AI Saves Memory and Energy

Despite the frequent analogies, today's AI operates on very different principles to the human brain. Now researchers have proposed a new learning method more closely tied to biology, which they think could help us approach the brain's unrivaled efficiency. Modern deep learning is at the very least biologically-inspired, encoding information in the strength of connections between large networks of

8h

The insides of pro bowling balls will make your head spin

Storm Bowling engineers its balls to hit different expert needs. (Travis Rathbone/) No matter how hard you try to spin the house balls at your local bowling joint, they rarely curve. That's because they are simple spheres built for durability, not fancy moves. But a small handful of companies—among them Storm Bowling —create gear that is surprisingly complex inside. Precisely shaped, meticulously

8h

France to ban heated terraces in cafes and bars

The new ecology minister says outside heating or air conditioning is an "ecological aberration".

8h

Agonizing over school-reopening plans? Think Marie Kondo

Her advice has helped millions declutter their lives. Now organizing expert Marie Kondo's philosophy of letting go of nonessentials can help K-12 educators scrambling to design creative back-to-school plans in the age of COVID-19, Harvard experts say.

8h

Scientists publish seminal study into impact of nanoparticles on living species

An international team of scientists has completed the first ever study into the potential impact of naturally occurring and man-made nanoparticles on the health of all types of the major living species of animals.

8h

New study shows men are more likely than women to endorse COVID-19 conspiracies

A study published earlier this year found that in the United States Republicans were more likely than Democrats to believe coronavirus (COVID-19) related conspiracy theories.

8h

Studying interactions between ground-nesting bees and soils

Many living creatures live in soil. Though their sizes range from microscopic soil microbes to larger animals like gopher turtles, they all call soil their "home." Included in these ground-dwelling species are bees—vital in the pollination cycle of about 90% of plant life.

8h

Evidence rewrites early Indigenous-colonizer encounters

Indigenous people in Oconee Valley—present-day central Georgia—continued to live and actively resist European influence for nearly 150 years after the arrival of Hernando de Soto, evidence suggests. In American history, we learn that the arrival of Spanish explorers led by de Soto in the 1500s was a watershed moment resulting in the collapse of Indigenous tribes and traditions across the southeas

8h

ExoMars finds new gas signatures in the martian atmosphere

ESA's ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has spotted new gas signatures at Mars. These unlock new secrets about the martian atmosphere, and will enable a more accurate determination of whether there is methane, a gas associated with biological or geological activity, at the planet.

8h

Novel gas-capture approach advances nuclear fuel management

Nuclear energy provides about 20 percent of the U.S. electricity supply, and over half of its carbon-free generating capacity.

8h

Studying interactions between ground-nesting bees and soils

Many living creatures live in soil. Though their sizes range from microscopic soil microbes to larger animals like gopher turtles, they all call soil their "home." Included in these ground-dwelling species are bees—vital in the pollination cycle of about 90% of plant life.

8h

For a happy life, don't forget hedonism

Enjoying short-term pleasurable activities that don't lead to long-term goals contributes at least as much to a happy life as self-control, according to new research. Based on their findings, the researchers argue for a greater appreciation of hedonism in psychology. We all set ourselves long-term goals from time to time, whether we want to start getting into shape, eating less sugar, or learning

8h

Video: Slowing deforestation is the key to preventing the next pandemic – but what does that cost?

In a recent journal article, a team of biologists, medical scientists, environmental scientists and conservationists proposed a number of measures to reduce the likelihood of future pandemics, many of which originate with wild animals such as bats. They argue that spending billions of dollars per year—a fraction of the cost of pandemics—on programs that reduce deforestation would curtail wildlife

8h

Testing Chernobyl fungi as a radiation shield for astronauts

A team of researchers from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Stanford University has tested the viability of using a type of fungus found growing in some of the destroyed nuclear reactors at the former Chernobyl nuclear power plant site to shield astronauts from radiation. They have written a paper describing their work and have uploaded it to the bioRxiv preprint site.

8h

"Inchworm" pattern of Indonesian earthquake rupture powered seismic "boom"

A sonic boom-like seismic phenomenon of supershear rupture occurred during the 2018 Palu earthquake in Indonesia. University of Tsukuba researchers investigated the relationship between this phenomenon and the complex geometry of the Palu-Koro fault. An "inchworm-like" pattern of repeated rupture deceleration and acceleration along the fault was detected, associated with bends in the fault trace.

8h

Duke-NUS: Cancer mutations caused by bacterial toxin preventable

Reports show that cancer is the second leading cause of death globally. Scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School have found DNA mutations in some cancers that link them to a bacterial toxin called colibactin. Their findings, published in the journals Gastroenterology and Genome Research, improve understanding of how some cancers develop, and could help in their prevention.

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NTU Singapore researchers speed up gold-standard COVID-19 diagnostic test

NTU Singapore has demonstrated a way to improve upon COVID-19 laboratory tests, yielding results in 36 minutes – ¼ of the time required by existing gold-standard tests. Their new approach, which can be done with portable equipment, could allow for screening and research especially in countries and regions with limited laboratory capabilities. It can also be used to detect other viruses and bacteri

8h

Trapping tiny particles: A versatile tool for nanomanipulation

Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University have developed a novel device for single nanoparticle trapping, which has potential applications for drug discovery, disease monitoring, biomedical imaging, and more.

8h

Cycad plants provide an important 'ecosystem service'

A study published in the June 2020 edition of the peer-reviewed journal Horticulturae shows that cycads, which are in decline and among the world's most threatened group of plants, provide an important service to their neighboring organisms. The study, completed by researchers from the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam and the Montgomery Botanical Center in Miami,

8h

Designer nanozymes for reactive-oxygen species scavenging anti-inflammatory therapy

In a recent report, Yufeng Liu and a team of interdisciplinary researchers in China developed an integrated nanozyme cascade to eliminate excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS; oxygen free radicals). The nanozyme mimicked superoxide dismutase (a group of enzymes) and incorporated a manganese (Mn)-based metal-organic framework (MOF) to transform oxygen radicals to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Using i

9h

Researchers quantify, characterize and identify functions of collagen, its subtypes

Found in cartilage, bones, blood vessels, skin, and other connective tissues, collagens are the most abundant proteins by weight in the human body. In an article published recently in Nature Reviews Materials, UCI biomedical engineering researchers provide an exhaustive description of the superfamily of this biomaterial, which includes 28 subtypes.

9h

How microscopic scallops wander

All microscopic objects, from enzymes to paint particles, are jittering constantly, bombarded by solvent particles: this is called Brownian motion. How does this motion change when the object is flexible instead of rigid? Ruben Verweij, Pepijn Moerman, and colleagues published the first measurements in Physical Review Research.

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Researchers quantify, characterize and identify functions of collagen, its subtypes

Found in cartilage, bones, blood vessels, skin, and other connective tissues, collagens are the most abundant proteins by weight in the human body. In an article published recently in Nature Reviews Materials, UCI biomedical engineering researchers provide an exhaustive description of the superfamily of this biomaterial, which includes 28 subtypes.

9h

Glacial stream insect may tolerate warmer waters

An endangered aquatic insect that lives in icy streams fed by glaciers might not mind if the water grows warmer due to climate change.A study published in Global Change Biology on July 22 found that mountain stoneflies can tolerate warmer water temperatures at least temporarily. In fact, they might even be stressed in their current extremely cold environments.

9h

Flu, pneumonia vaccinations tied to lower risk of Alzheimer's dementia

Flu (influenza) and pneumonia vaccinations are associated with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to new research reported at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference® (AAIC®) 2020.

9h

New approach refines the Hubble's constant and age of universe

Using known distances of 50 galaxies from Earth to refine calculations in Hubble's constant, a research team led by a University of Oregon astronomer estimates the age of the universe at 12.6 billion years.

9h

Link confirmed between a healthy diet and prostate cancer prevention

Using data from a study conducted in Montreal between 2005 and 2012, a research team led by Professor Marie-Élise Parent of Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has shown a link between diet and prostate cancer in the article "Dietary Patterns Are Associated with Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Population-Based Case-Control Study in Montreal, Canada", published in Nutrients in June.

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Potential therapeutic effects of dipyridamole in the severely ill patients with COVID-19

Effective antivirals with safe clinical profile are urgently needed to improve the overall COVID-19 prognosis. In an analysis of a randomly collected cohort of 124 patients with COVID-19, the authors found that hypercoagulability as indicated by elevated concentrations of D-dimers was associated with disease severity. By virtual screening of a U.S. FDA approved drug library, the authors identified

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Low plasma 25(OH) vitamin D level associated with increased risk of COVID-19 infection

An Israeli population-based study by a group of scientists from the Leumit Health Services and the Azrieli Faculty of Medicine of Bar-Ilan University discovered significant association of low plasma vitamin D level with the likelihood of COVID-19 infection among patients who were tested for COVID-19, even after adjustment for age, gender, socio-economic status and chronic, mental and physical diso

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Vacancy dynamics on CO-covered Pt(111) electrodes

USTC reported in situ video-STM observations of additional point defects in the presence of this dynamic CO adlayer. The STM observations presented in this work provide direct insights into their dynamic behavior and formation mechanisms.

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Blueprint may power up KSA's wind energy future

High-resolution analysis of wind speed across Saudi Arabia can help fast track the expansion of the Kingdom's emerging world-class wind energy industry.

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In Social Insects, Researchers Find Clues for Battling Pandemics

Studying the ability of some ants, termites, bees and wasps to contain pathogens may help human societies control diseases of their own

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'Inchworm' pattern of Indonesian earthquake rupture powered seismic boom

Earthquakes are often imagined as originating from a single point where the seismic waves are strongest, the hypocenter underground or the epicenter at the Earth's surface, with seismic energy radiating outward in a circular pattern. But this simplified model fails to account for the complex geometry of the actual fault systems where earthquakes occur. The real situation may be much more complex—a

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How a scientific spat over how to name species turned into a big plus for nature

Taxonomy, or the naming of species, is the foundation of modern biology. It might sound like a fairly straightforward exercise, but in fact it's complicated and often controversial.

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We know by Year 11 what mark students will get in Year 12: A stressful exam might no longer be needed

By the end of Year 11 we know almost exactly how well New South Wales students will perform on the state's senior school exams. We used predictive analytics to reliably predict a student's HSC (Higher School Certificate) results in a study of more than 10,000 students.

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It really is different for young people: It's harder to climb the jobs ladder

Our memories of the job market prior to COVID have become rosier: the last decade was a period of fairly low unemployment, even if wage growth was less than stellar.

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How a scientific spat over how to name species turned into a big plus for nature

Taxonomy, or the naming of species, is the foundation of modern biology. It might sound like a fairly straightforward exercise, but in fact it's complicated and often controversial.

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The End of Open-Plan Everything

Last fall, True Manufacturing completed a project long in the making. The company, which specializes in commercial refrigeration systems, had decided to abandon the neutral cubicles that had encased customer-service workers at its Missouri headquarters, opting instead for a redesign that featured the clustered, partitionless seating now ubiquitous in modern offices. A few months later, as the cor

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The Pandemic Is Putting Marriage Even Further Out of Reach

It seems insensitive to admit it, but this pandemic hasn't been too hard on my family. My husband and I already worked from home with our toddler, and our income, such as it is (we are writers), has not yet shrunk. Our legume-heavy diet was apocalypse-proof, and our budget had already made restaurants the stuff of memory. Sure, our view of the future is obscured by a haze of anxiety and dread, bu

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A KGB Man to the End

Illustration by Celina Pereira; BStU; Ulrich Hässler / Ullstein Bild / Getty I t was December 1989 , the Berlin Wall had fallen, and in Dresden, crowds were gathering outside the headquarters of the Stasi, the East German secret police, shouting insults and demanding access. Nearby, frantic KGB officers—the Soviet advisers whom the Stasi had long referred to as "the friends"—were barricaded insid

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I Went to Disney World

Earlier this month, Walt Disney World began reopening, following almost four months of closure due to the pandemic. I flew to Orlando to experience the magic. The week I arrived, Florida had registered the highest single-day case count of any state thus far. In Orlando's airport, I felt a vague sense that Floridians considered such statistics a source of secret pride, as if they had set a record

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Redefining life expectancy and maximum lifespan for wildlife management

A new study has developed a method to determine the life expectancy and maximum lifespan of wild animal populations.

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Two new high-redshift red quasars discovered

Using the Subaru Telescope, astronomers have identified two new dust-reddened (red) quasars at high redshifts. The finding, detailed in a paper published July 16 on the arXiv pre-print server, could improve the understanding of these rare but interesting objects.

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This Is the Best Sweatband I've Ever Worn (2020)

WIRED tested. After decades of running with water running down my face, the Treadbands workout headband let me see clearly.

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A Study Finds Sex Differences in the Brain. Does It Matter?

The NIH research connecting anatomy and sex chromosomes could shed light on mental disorders. But the topic is sensitive, and such findings are easy to misuse.

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This tiny camera can show the world from a bug's point of view

Steerable arm helps save energy while capturing panoramic views

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COVID-19 increased anxiety, depression for already stressed college students

College students were more anxious, depressed and sedentary during the initial outbreak of COVID-19 than they were during similar academic terms in other years, according to a multiyear study using mobile sensing.

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Men are more likely than women to endorse COVID-19 conspiracy theories

A new study found men are more likely than women to endorse conspiracy theories connected to COVID-19. The study included a national survey that showed belief in these theories had more to do with gender than political affiliation. The research will help debunk potentially dangerous falsehoods regarding the pandemic and enhance public health practices.

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USTC made breakthrough in the Sb2(S,Se)3 solar cell efficiency

USTC developed a hydrothermal deposition method for the synthesis of antimony selenosulfide for solar cell applications. With this absorber material, the solar cell break the 10% benchmark efficiency barrier. This result has been published in Nature Energy entitled "Hydrothermal deposition of antimony selenosulfide thin films enables solar cells with 10% efficiency".

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Redefining life expectancy and maximum lifespan for wildlife management

A new study has developed a method to determine the life expectancy and maximum lifespan of wild animal populations.

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Starlink Satellites Ruin NEOWISE Comet Photo

Earlier this year, NASA discovered a new comet with its Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) space telescope. The object, casually known as NEOWISE, has been closer to Earth this month than at any point in the last 6,000 years. Astronomers and photographers have been looking skyward to observe the comet, but one astrophotographer got a nasty surprise when Starlink satellites photobombed an

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The moons of Uranus are fascinating enough on their own that we should send a flagship mission out there

What's the most interesting fact you know about Uranus? The fact that its rotational axis is completely out of line with every other planet in the solar system? Or that Uranus' magnetosphere is asymmetrical, notably tilted relative to its rotational axis, and significantly offset from the center of the planet? Or that its moons are all named after characters from Shakespeare or Alexander Pope?

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Taking the guesswork out of twistronics

The twist has been taking the field of condensed matter physics by storm. No, not the 1960s dance craze made famous by Chubby Checker— the stunning discovery that two sheets of graphene, a flat honeycomb-shaped lattice of carbon, could be stacked and twisted at so-called magic angles to exhibit vastly different properties, including superconducting behavior.

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Mapping the Oaxaca earthquake from space

On the morning of 23 June 2020, a strong earthquake struck the southern state of Oaxaca, Mexico. The 7.4-magnitude earthquake prompted evacuations in the region, triggered a tsunami warning and damaged thousands of houses. Satellite radar data, from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission, are being used to analyze the effects of the earthquake on land.

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Butterflies wing their way into the garden with the proper room and board

Fragile, beautiful, and fascinating, butterflies flutter their way into our gardens and seem to just as quickly wing their way out.

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A deep dive into shallow quakes

New research from the Australian National University (ANU) has shown that Australia is prone to shallow and potentially destructive earthquakes.

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Coronavirus and its impact on carbon emissions

The emergence of a novel coronavirus towards the end of 2019 that has led to the major ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has already taken its toll on people's lives, healthcare systems, and the commercial world.

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New technique sheds light on the mysteries of complex chemical reaction networks

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and their colleagues have discovered a way to untangle the mysteries of complex reaction networks by employing a measurement tool in a unique way.

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Scientists develop novel transparent broadband electromagnetic interference shielding materials

The Flexible Optoelectronic Material Group led by Prof. Song Weijie at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has proposed and successfully fabricated visibly transparent electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials with high EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) and visible transmittance. The study was published in ACS Ap

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New study provides valuable historical dataset for Yellow River water management

The Yellow River (YR) is the fifth-longest and the most sediment-laden river in the world. Although the YR accounts for only 3% of China's water resources, it irrigates 13% of its cropland.

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High-capacity oil-adsorbing mats could be deployed in oil spill emergencies to limit ecological damage

An intrinsically porous polymer with a very high internal surface area could be an ideal material for soaking up spilled oil. Researchers from KAUST have identified a polymer that can be formed into robust, reusable mats to rapidly adsorb spilled oil, fuel, or organic solvents from the surface of fresh or salt water.

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Ocean features and changes in the past are explored to anticipate future climate

The climate represents the set of atmospheric conditions that characterize a region. Yet these conditions are the result of global interaction between dry land, vegetation, ice, atmosphere, and ocean. "Bearing in mind that the oceans cover 75% of the Earth's surface, the influence they exert on the climate is very strong, and conversely, the oceans are strongly influenced by climate changes. In ou

9h

Butterflies wing their way into the garden with the proper room and board

Fragile, beautiful, and fascinating, butterflies flutter their way into our gardens and seem to just as quickly wing their way out.

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Solving the jigsaw puzzle of regional carbon budgets

Accurate regional carbon budgets are critical for informing land-based mitigation policy and tracking mitigation progress. For nine regions covering the globe, inventory estimates of carbon stock changes were collected and complemented by satellite estimates of biomass changes where inventory data are missing. The net land-atmospheric carbon exchange was then calculated by taking the sum of the ca

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COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Heads To Widespread Testing In U.S.

A COVID-19 vaccine candidate developed by the U.S. company Moderna and the National Institutes of Health starts its final phase of testing. It's one of a handful of candidates to reach this stage. (Image credit: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

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Carbon dioxide threatens life in the Gulf of Mexico

Rising levels of carbon dioxide in the Gulf of Mexico are becoming harmful to marine life and the commercial fishing industry, researchers warn. The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has increased 40% since the Industrial Revolution (1760 to 1840) because of human activities—and the ocean, including the Gulf of Mexico , has absorbed at least 25% of it. That's a trend that will almost cer

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NASA's Ingenuity–the First Ever Off-World Helicopter–Is Set for a 'Wright Brothers Moment' on Mars

Launching with the Perseverance rover, this technology demonstration could lead to revolutionary new capabilities in interplanetary exploration — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NASA's Ingenuity–the First Ever Off-World Helicopter–Is Set for a 'Wright Brothers Moment' on Mars

Launching with the Perseverance rover, this technology demonstration could lead to revolutionary new capabilities in interplanetary exploration — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Kabelspiral, elektrisk bruser og tvivlsomme stilladser: Læserne fotograferer spøjs teknik

Ingeniørens fotokonkurrence efterlyser billeder af klamp, fejl og spøjse tekniske løsninger fra sommerferien.

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Prayer Is Not Medicine

The Alaska Supreme Court just reaffirmed a very important legal and ethical principle – declaring that prayer is not a replacement for medicine. While this may seem obvious to many, this is a critical legal decision. It will probably not have the downstream effect that it should, but it does highlight a vital reality. The case involves Rachel "O", who has been taking care of her mother, Tiffany "

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Reef sharks around the world are in trouble

Marine biologists have long known that in the open seas, decades of overfishing have devastated shark populations in many regions. Shark populations in coastal areas are less well understood, however. (Global FinPrint/) A massive survey of hundreds of coral reefs along the coasts of nearly 60 nations found that overfishing has significantly diminished the numbers of sharks that live within these

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A Helicopter Ride Over Mars? NASA's About to Give It a Shot

"I see it as kind of a Wright brothers moment on another planet," says the project's chief engineer at JPL.

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In vivo imaging of the human cornea at high speed and high resolution

If the eyes are the mirror of the soul, then thanks to the translucent corneas, we can look deep into that soul. And thanks to the work of scientists from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences, we can look into the depths of the cornea itself. And that without touching it. All thanks to the introduction of an innovative method of holographic optical tomography.

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Photochromic bismuth complexes show great promise for optical memory elements

Russian chemists have obtained a new photochromic complex composed of of bismuth (III) and viologen cations and used the new compound to create optical memory elements which were shown to be highly efficient and stable. The outcomes of the study may serve to expand the range of microelectronics components in the future. The research was published in the journal Chemical Communications.

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Wetter than wet: Global warming means more rain for Asian monsoon regions

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University studied how the weather will change with global warming in Asian monsoon regions using a high-resolution climate simulation. The region is home to a large population, and the monsoons are a major driver of global water cycles. They explicitly simulated cloud formation and dissipation, and found significantly increased precipitation over the monsoon "t

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Wrong number of fingers leads down wrong track

Have you ever wondered why human hands have five fingers? And what about amphibians? They usually only have four. Until now, researchers assumed that this was the case with the early ancestors of today's frogs and salamanders, the Temnospondyli. However, a new find of the crocodile-like Temnospondyl Metoposaurus krasiejowensis from the late Triassic (about 225 million years old) in Poland shows fi

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Discovery of disordered nanolayers in intermetallic alloys

Intermetallic alloys potentially have high strength in a high-temperature environment. But they generally suffer poor ductility at ambient and low temperatures, hence limiting their applications in aerospace and other engineering fields. Yet, a research team led by scientists of City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has recently discovered the disordered nanoscale layers at grain boundaries in the

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High and dry: developed Cambodian wetlands raise flood risk

More than a million Cambodians are at risk from increased flooding and worsening food security, NGOs warned Monday, due to the destruction and gradual filling-in of Phnom Penh's wetlands by politically connected developers.

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Hurricane Douglas gains strength; skirts the state of Hawaii

Hurricane Douglas gained some strength and began to spin away from many of the Hawaiian Islands as it skirted the state late Sunday.

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Measuring ripples in the curvature of space-time

Nature, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02212-9 Experimental physicist Sheila Rowan works with laser beams and suspended mirrors to sharpen detection of collapsing stars and other celestial events.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor lægger man fibernet, når der snart kommer 5G?

En læser undrer sig over, at TDC lægger fibernet i hans område, når 5G er lige på trapperne. Det svarer TDC på.

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Coronavirus: How bad will winter really be?

Could we be heading for a double whammy of flu and coronavirus?

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Experimental optimal verification of entangled states using local measurements

Quantum information is a field where the information is encoded into quantum states. Taking advantage of the "quantumness" of these states, scientists can perform more efficient computations and more secure cryptography compared to their classical counterparts.

11h

Perpetual Fertility: How an Obscure Sea Creature Makes Endless Eggs and Sperm

Understanding hydractinia's rare ability could provide insights into human reproductive disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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I Can't Keep Doing This. Please Open the Schools.

Updated at 12:17 p.m. ET on July 27, 2020. "I can't keep doing this." I hear that over and over from my friends with kids. Holding a job, parenting, and teaching all at once during the pandemic is a juggling act that no one was prepared to undertake, and it has brought working parents to the breaking point. Many of us are now riddled with anxiety over whether we'll send our kids back to school, e

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Dear Therapist: My Husband Doesn't Want Another Kid, so I'm Considering Divorce

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My husband and I have been together for nearly four years and are struggling to decide whether to have another baby. When we met, he had a 3-year-old son, and after a messy custody battle, he got primary custo

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Americans Are Determined to Believe in Black Progress

Part 1 Part 2 (2016) by Lorna Simpson (© Lorna Simpson. Courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth; photograph by James Wang.) F or two days in early June, as America was erupting in sustained protests over the killing of a Black man, George Floyd, by police in Minneapolis, the most watched movie on Netflix was The Help . The 2011 film—which depicts Black servants working in affluent white househo

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Research is our best weapon in the fight against covid-19 and obesity

The obesity and covid-19 pandemics have been shown to be interlinked, and both urgently require more research to provide clear evidence on how best to beat them

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Some Countries Reopened Schools. What Did They Learn About Kids and Covid?

Studies from around the world suggest that success depends on class size, distancing, the age of the students, and how prevalent the virus is locally.

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The Centuries-Long History of Racism in Surveillance Tech

This week's Get WIRED podcast traces how innovators' biases helped design slave ships, the panopticon, and facial recognition.

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Facebook's 'Red Team' Hacks Its Own AI Programs

Attackers increasingly try to confuse and bypass machine-learning systems. So the companies that deploy them are getting creative.

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Researchers develop an optical fiber made of gel derived from marine algae

An optical fiber made of agar has been produced at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP) in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. This device is edible, biocompatible and biodegradable. It can be used in vivo for body structure imaging, localized light delivery in phototherapy or optogenetics (e.g., stimulating neurons with light to study neural circuits in a living brain), and localized drug delivery.

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Why Young Americans Are Lonely

And what we can do about it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why Young Americans Are Lonely

And what we can do about it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Unidentified Aerial Phenomena,' Better Known as UFOs, Deserve Scientific Investigation

UAP are a scientifically interesting problem. Interdisciplinary teams of scientists should study them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Longitudinal analyses reveal immunological misfiring in severe COVID-19

Nature, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2588-y

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How the zebrafish got its stripes

Animal patterns—the stripes, spots and rosettes seen in the wild—are a source of endless fascination, and now researchers at the University Bath have developed a robust mathematical model to explain how one important species, the zebrafish, develops its stripes.

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How the zebrafish got its stripes

Animal patterns—the stripes, spots and rosettes seen in the wild—are a source of endless fascination, and now researchers at the University Bath have developed a robust mathematical model to explain how one important species, the zebrafish, develops its stripes.

11h

Perpetual Fertility: How an Obscure Sea Creature Makes Endless Eggs and Sperm

Understanding hydractinia's rare ability could provide insights into human reproductive disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Blaming "overflow of manuscripts" and "obviously biased" reviewers, journal will retract homeopathy-COVID-19 paper

A public health journal will be retracting a paper that argued for the adoption of homeopathy in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic, according to the editor in chief. We reported on Saturday that the Journal of Public Health: From Theory to Practice, a Springer Nature title also known by its German name, Zeitschrift für Gesundheitswissenschaften, had … Continue reading

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Moderna and N.I.H. Begin Vaccine Trial

President Trump urges more governors to reopen. Two M.L.B. games were postponed after members of the Miami Marlins tested positive.

12h

How the zebrafish got its stripes

Animal patterns are a source of endless fascination, and now researchers at the University Bath have worked out how zebrafish develop their stripes.

12h

Why Congress should look at Twitter and Facebook

Twitter recently announced it would take action against accounts posting information related to the QAnon conspiracy theory, whose adherents follow the "breadcrumbs" left by a mysterious figure known as Q in cryptic messages posted about the Trump administration on anonymous online message boards. In response to their spread of misinformation and harassment, more than 7,000 accounts will be perma

12h

You Can Stop Scrubbing Your Mail Now

A s a COVID-19 summer surge sweeps the country, deep cleans are all the rage. National restaurants such as Applebee's are deputizing sanitation czars to oversee the constant scrubbing of window ledges, menus, and high chairs. The gym chain Planet Fitness is boasting in ads that "there's no surface we won't sanitize, no machine we won't scrub." New York City is shutting down its subway system ever

12h

"[A] painful step": Authors retract paper on fatal poultry virus

The authors of a 2019 paper on a lethal type of poultry virus in Asia have retracted the article because of problems with the data collection. But the researchers stand by their findings, which, they say, suggest the pathogen could be harmful to humans. The paper, titled "Novel orthobunyavirus causing severe kidney disease in broiler … Continue reading

12h

A plague on all your houses? Pandemic politics in Latin America

Voters may not distinguish between populist virus-deniers and science-led technocrats

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Neuroplastic effects of end-effector robotic gait training for hemiparetic stroke: a randomised controlled trial

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69367-3

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Undersized stent graft for treatment of cephalic arch stenosis in arteriovenous hemodialysis access

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69402-3

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One-step fabrication of carbonaceous adsorbent from corncob for enhancing adsorption capability of methylene blue removal

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68591-1

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What kind of face mask best protects against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

12h

Ny rover klar til storslået Mars-mission: Derfor sker det nu

Den nye rover 'Perseverance' har også dansk teknologi med ombord.

12h

Coronavirus doctor's diary: Will vaccine sceptics make trials a headache?

The NHS soon needs to start flu vaccinations and Covid vaccine trials – but anti-vax attitudes seem to be spreading.

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Prior vaccination with rVSV-ZEBOV does not interfere with but improves efficacy of postexposure antibody treatment

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17446-4 During an ongoing Ebola virus outbreak, infection before onset of protective immunity from vaccination is a possible scenario. Here the authors show in non-human primates that vaccination shortly before treatment with a monoclonal antibody does not negatively affect effectiveness of the antibody therapy.

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Knockout of reactive astrocyte activating factors slows disease progression in an ALS mouse model

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17514-9 Astrocyte activation may contribute to neurodegenerative disease. Here the authors show that the combined knockout of three factors known to promote astrogliosis, IL-1α, TNFα and C1qa, leads to improved survival in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS.

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The architecture and stabilisation of flagellotropic tailed bacteriophages

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17505-w Flagellotropic phages spin down flagella to reach the bacterial surface and must withstand remarkable drag forces. Here authors show how two nested sets of chainmail stabilise the viral head and a beta-hairpin regulates the formation of the robust yet pliable tail, characteristic of siphoviruses.

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Tracing animal genomic evolution with the chromosomal-level assembly of the freshwater sponge Ephydatia muelleri

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17397-w Reconstructing the early molecular evolution of animals requires genomic resources for non-bilaterian animals. Here, the authors present the chromosome-level genome of a freshwater sponge together with analyses of its genome architecture, methylation, developmental gene expression, and microbiome.

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VoPo leverages cellular heterogeneity for predictive modeling of single-cell data

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17569-8 Single-cell technologies are increasingly prominent in clinical applications, but predictive modelling with such data in large cohorts has remained computationally challenging. We developed a new algorithm, 'VoPo', for predictive modelling and visualization of single cell data for translational applications.

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Mechanisms of activation and desensitization of full-length glycine receptor in lipid nanodiscs

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17364-5 Glycinergic synapses play a central role in motor control and pain processing in the central nervous system. Here, authors present cryo-EM structures of the full-length glycine receptors (GlyRs) reconstituted into lipid nanodiscs in the unliganded, glycine-bound and allosteric modulator-bound conformations and r

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Directional translocation resistance of Zika xrRNA

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17508-7 Zika xrRNAs survive in host cells because they can be unwound and copied by replicases, but resist degradation by exonucleases. Here authors use atomistic models and simulations and uncover that pulling into a pore the xrRNA $${3}^{\prime}$$ 3 ′ end, as done by replicases, causes progressive unfolding; pulling t

12h

Life in the pits: Scientists identify the key enzyme behind BO

Researchers at the University of York have discovered a unique "BO enzyme" responsible for armpit odour.

13h

Carbon border taxes are unjust

The European Union's economic recovery plan is notable for its focus on climate action, sustainable investments, and a just transition fund. As part of this deal, the EU is also proposing a carbon border adjustment , also known as a carbon border tax, on imports by 2023. In the simplest terms, a carbon border adjustment is a tax on imported goods such as steel or cement, where the amount of tax d

13h

Artificial Intelligence, Health Disparities, and Covid-19

Artificial intelligence has transformed health care, using large datasets to improve diagnostics and treatment. But some AI-powered medical tools replicate racial bias — raising questions about whether these new technologies contributed to Covid-19's disproportionate toll on Black Americans.

13h

Know sweat: scientists solve mystery behind body odour

University of York researchers trace the source of underarm aromas to a particular enzyme Scientists have unravelled the mysterious mechanism behind the armpit's ability to produce the pungent smell of body odour. Researchers at the University of York traced the source of underarm odour to a particular enzyme in a certain microbe that lives in the human armpit. Continue reading…

13h

On the Lookout for Moose on Michigan's Isle Royale

The remote Isle Royale, tucked away in the northern reaches of Lake Superior, is one of America's least visited national parks.

13h

Coming of Age on Mars

In a new book, planetary scientist Sarah Stewart Johnson recalls how the Red Planet drew her to become a scientist.

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A Possible Weapon Against the Pandemic: Printing Human Tissue

Bioprinting could be used for testing potential treatments for Covid-19, cancer and other diseases.

13h

Don't Count Trump Out

Let's stipulate right away that President Donald Trump is losing this race. Set aside the particulars—how suburban voters are migrating toward Joe Biden, and how seniors are rethinking their support too. Consider the basics. Presidents are supposed to keep Americans employed. The jobless rate now stands at 11 percent—more than 3 points higher than when Jimmy Carter lost reelection in 1980 and whe

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Life in the pits: Scientists identify the key enzyme behind body odor

Scientists have discovered a unique enzyme responsible for the pungent characteristic smell we call body odor or BO.

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A Boy With Muscular Dystrophy Was Headed For A Wheelchair. Then Gene Therapy Arrived

Gene therapy has helped a 9-year-old boy regain enough muscle strength to run. If successful in others, the treatment could change the lives of thousands of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. (Image credit: Kholood Eid for NPR)

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'A world with no ice': Confronting the horrors of climate change

Climate change is often framed as a debate that has split society down the middle and that requires more evidence before we can act. In reality, 97 percent of scientists agree that it is real and only 3 percent are skeptical. A sticking point for some is the estimated timeline, but as Columbia University professor Philip Kitcher points out, a 4-5 Celsius temperature increase that makes the planet

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Hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19: Evidence can't seem to kill it

Despite the accumulating negative evidence showing that hydroxychloroquine doesn't work against COVID-19, activists continue to promote it as a way out of the pandemic. This week, the AAPS and a Yale epidemiologist joined the fray with embarrassingly bad arguments.

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Africa needs more help with its pandemic response

Hunger and disease are threatening small and fragile states

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Life in the pits: Scientists identify the key enzyme behind body odor

Scientists have discovered a unique enzyme responsible for the pungent characteristic smell we call body odor or BO.

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AstraZeneca agrees to pay up to £4.7bn for cancer drug

UK-based company hopes deal with Daiichi Sankyo will lead to new breast and lung cancer treatment AstraZeneca has agreed a deal worth as much as £4.7bn with a Japanese drug company to develop and market a potential new cancer treatment. The British–Swedish pharmaceutical company said it would pay $1bn (£800m) upfront to its partner, Daiichi Sankyo, in what is the latest of a series of bets by the

13h

Hvis bierne svigter: Dronebåret sæbeboblekanon skal bestøve blomsterne

Er der pollenkorn i vandet, kan sæbebobler fungere som bestøvere, når de brister på blomsternes støvfang, viser ny forskning.

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OnePlus Nord Review: An Affordable Phone with 6 Good Cameras

OnePlus' new phone, the Nord, isn't available in the US at the moment, but its value is hard to beat. You get a 90-Hz screen, a big battery, great performance, and 5G for 399 euros.

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International team of scientists to preserve Lake Titicaca giant frog

An international team of scientific institutions will join forces to preserve the future of the Lake Titicaca giant frog, an endangered species, Bolivia's natural history museum said.

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International team of scientists to preserve Lake Titicaca giant frog

An international team of scientific institutions will join forces to preserve the future of the Lake Titicaca giant frog, an endangered species, Bolivia's natural history museum said.

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Hurricane Douglas within 'razor thin' distance of Hawaii

Hurricane Douglas came within "razor thin" distance of the Hawaiian Islands but spared the state the worst of the strong winds, storm surge and flooding officials had warned about.

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The US withdrawal from the Paris climate accord will hurt people of color most | Adrienne Hollis

The Paris agreement threw a lifeline to millions of people of color facing a premature death. Trump is tearing that away It's official – in 100 days the United States will formally withdraw from the Paris climate agreement. The impact of Donald Trump's decision, taken three years ago, is already being felt by environmental justice communities. Racism is the driving force behind why certain people

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'Selfish and loveless' society in Uganda really is not

A mountain people in Uganda—branded as selfish and loveless by an anthropologist half a century ago—really is not, according to a study led by a Baylor University anthropologist.

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'Selfish and loveless' society in Uganda really is not

A mountain people in Uganda—branded as selfish and loveless by an anthropologist half a century ago—really is not, according to a study led by a Baylor University anthropologist.

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Lead white pigments on Andean drinking vessels provide new historical context

Researchers studying lead white pigments on Andean ceremonial drinking vessels known as qeros have found new similarities among these artifacts that could help museums, conservators, historians and scholars better understand the timeline and production of these culturally significant items during the colonial period (1532-1821). In a study published in the journal Heritage Science, researchers use

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Researchers build first AI tool capable of identifying individual birds

New research demonstrates for the first time that artificial intelligence (AI) can be used to train computers to recognize individual birds, a task humans are unable to do. The research is published in the British Ecological Society journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution.

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Musblod ger ledtråd till hur motion förbättrar minnet

I studien från universitetet i Kalifornien visade forskarna först att gamla möss som fick motionera i sex veckor presterade bättre på minnestester och hade mer av flera olika proteiner i blodet än en grupp med jämnåriga, stillasittande kompisar. Forskarna valde att fokusera på ett av proteinerna kallat Gpld1. De provade att ge en grupp inaktiva möss injektioner som designats för att på genetisk ni

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Researchers build first AI tool capable of identifying individual birds

New research demonstrates for the first time that artificial intelligence (AI) can be used to train computers to recognize individual birds, a task humans are unable to do. The research is published in the British Ecological Society journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution.

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Can you solve it? The pyramid puzzle

Two geometrical riddles UPDATE: Read the solutions here It is a truism to say that once you know the answer to a puzzle it becomes trivially easy. Yet this statement is especially true when it comes to geometrical problems, which are often solved with a single insight that, once you know it, seems so forehead-slappingly obvious. Both of today's two puzzles are unravelled with a joyous 'aha'. I ho

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China is rewriting the facts about coronavirus to suit its own narrative | Carrie Gracie

Our Panorama programme shows how Xi Jinping's government has tried to hide the truth about the spread of coronavirus China has been here before. During the Sars crisis in 2002 and 2003 it hid cases, censored doctors and withheld information from the world for four months. Nearly 800 people died. Related: EU says China behind 'huge wave' of Covid-19 disinformation Continue reading…

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SPIL Kan du gennemføre Mars-missionen og finde tegn på liv?

Bliver du rumturist eller space commander?

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Stanfordexperimentet

Ett psykologiskt experiment Det så kallade "" genomfördes i augusti 1971 av den amerikanska psykologen Philip Zimbardo vid Stanfords universitet i Kalifornien. Experimentet delade upp ett antal studenter i två grupper och gjorde en grupp till vakter och de andra till fångar. Experimentet avbröts tidigt efter att flera "fångar" vägrade att delta längre. De första […] The post Stanfordexperimentet

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Birdwatching AI can recognise individual birds from behind

Artificial intelligence that can recognise individual birds is being developed for biologists studying wild animals, but could also be adapted so that people can identify individual birds in their surroundings

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Studying COVID-19's envelope protein

A likeness between genes of the SARS and COVID-19 viruses could inform research into potential treatments.

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Face-mask wearers do not stop washing their hands, study suggests

Scientists say people unlikely to reduce one Covid-19 measure when adopting another Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Wearing face coverings does not appear to lead people to abandon hand hygiene, researchers say, suggesting people may not trade off the benefits of one public health measure against another. Face coverings are now mandatory in many parts of the world, a

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Flu Shot And Pneumonia Vaccine Might Reduce Alzheimer's Risk, Research Shows

Two new human studies back earlier hints that vaccines designed to prevent respiratory infections might also provide some protection against Alzheimer's disease. (Image credit: Themba Hadebe/AP)

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Nu skal vi finde liv: Stor Mars-mission har kurs mod historiebøgerne

Prøver fra Mars skal undersøges de næste 100 år, siger ekspert.

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US stimulus, virus curbs European travel, Brexit talks

Republicans are set to unveil their proposals for a fresh round of US stimulus today

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Lead white pigments on Andean drinking vessels provide new historical context

Researchers studying lead white pigments on Andean ceremonial drinking vessels known as qeros have found new similarities among these artifacts that could help museums, conservators, historians and scholars better understand the timeline and production of these culturally significant items during the colonial period (1532-1821).

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'Selfish and loveless' society in Uganda really is not

A mountain people in Uganda — branded as selfish and loveless by an renowned anthropologist half a century ago — really is not, according to a study led by a Baylor University anthropologist.

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Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients Have Low Risk of Stroke

A new paper from Penn Medicine shows a low risk of stroke in patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Notably, the majority of afflicted patients had existing risk factors, such as high blood pressure and diabetes. These findings provide more clarity about the role COVID-19 plays in causing stroke in a diverse population of the United States.

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Study finds increase in number, severity of suicide-related calls to US Poison Control

Researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed the 549,807 calls made to Poison Control Centers (PCCs) in the U.S. for suicide-related cases involving OTC analgesics from 2000 through 2018 and found that both the overall number and rate of these cases increased significantly by 57% and 34%, respectively, during

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Researchers build first AI tool capable of identifying individual birds

New research demonstrates for the first time that artificial intelligence (AI) can be used to train computers to recognise individual birds, a task humans are unable to do. The research is published in the British Ecological Society journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution.

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Modi stumbles: India's deepening coronavirus crisis

The prime minister warned the virus could derail decades of progress. But new infections are now at record levels

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Kan blive blandt de første i verden: Droner skal flyve i aktivt luftrum over Danmark

I dag må droner kun flyve uden for synsvidde, når der ikke er fly i nærheden. Men til efteråret starter de første eksperimenter med såkaldt U-space over Odense Lufthavn.

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More realistic computer graphics

New software techniques make lighting in computer-generated images look more realistic for use in video games, extended reality, and scientific visualization tools.

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Neurons are genetically programmed to have long lives

Most neurons are created during embryonic development and have no "backup" after birth. Researchers have generally believed that their survival is determined nearly extrinsically, or by outside forces, such as the tissues and cells that neurons supply with nerve cells. Scientists have challenged this notion and reports the continuous survival of neurons is also intrinsically programmed during de

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Proposed framework for integrating chatbots into health care

While chatbots are becoming more widespread in health care, it's important to implement them thoughtfully and constantly evaluate them in a variety of ways, authors argue.

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Project creates more powerful, versatile ultrafast laser pulse

Researchers describe a new device, the "stretched-pulse soliton Kerr resonator," that creates an ultrafast laser pulse that is freed from the physical limits endemic to sources of laser light and the limits of the sources' wavelengths. Applications include spectroscopy, frequency synthesis, distance ranging, and pulse generation.

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Researchers use cell imaging and mathematical modeling to understand cancer progression

Using a combination of experiments and mathematical modeling, a team of researchers from the Virginia Tech Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Science and the Fralin Life Sciences Institute are beginning to unravel the mechanisms that lie behind tetraploidy – a chromosomal abnormality that is often found in malignant tumors.

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High levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria found on equipment in communal gyms

Scientists have found that 43% of Staphylococcus bacteria found on exercise equipment in university gyms were ampicillin-resistant, with 73% of those isolates being resistant to multiple additional drugs.

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Different from a computer: Why the brain never processes the same input in the same way

The brain never processes the same information in the same way. Scientists have found out why this is the case and how it works. A decisive role plays a critical state of the neuronal networks.

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