Search Posts

Nyheder2020juli28

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS?
Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

NYUAD astrophysicist investigates the possibility of life below the surface of Mars

Although no life has been detected on the Martian surface, a new study from astrophysicist and research scientist at the Center for Space Science at NYU Abu Dhabi, Dimitra Atri finds that conditions below the surface could potentially support it.

7h

Frankrig forbyder varmelamper på barer: Skal hjælpe klimaet

Forbuddet er en del af en større pakke af klimatiltag, der skal reducere Frankrigs CO2-udledning.

10h

Rekordstort optag på Københavns Universitet

7.831 ansøgere fik natten til tirsdag tilbudt en studieplads på en af KU's…

11h

LATEST

What will COVID-19 look like to geologists in the far future?

COVID-19 is a major global shock that has turned our lives upside down, but how does it measure up on the grand billion-year scale of Earth history? The answer puts our human dramas in the largest perspective—and may yet be critical to all our futures.

2min

Preserving coffee and forests in Ethiopia for a sustainable future

The University of Huddersfield is helping rural communities make a sustainable living while preserving the source of the something that keeps the world going on a daily basis—coffee.

5min

Preserving coffee and forests in Ethiopia for a sustainable future

The University of Huddersfield is helping rural communities make a sustainable living while preserving the source of the something that keeps the world going on a daily basis—coffee.

8min

Many students with the potential to excel in STEM fields struggle in school

Students who have the kinds of talent scientists and engineers need to solve problems by visualizing how objects could be rotated, combined or changed in three dimensions often struggle at school. These students, whose strong spatial talents allow them to imagine new technological innovations, generally fare worse than their classmates who excel at English and math. In addition, as we observed in

8min

Five graphs that show how uncertain markets are about the coronavirus recovery

Financial markets can tell us a lot about the economic recovery ahead, based on their direction of travel and how confident investors feel about the future. This is important as we emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic. There is much debate about whether the economic recovery will be a V-shape, indicating a short-lived economic downturn with a quick return to previous levels of output. Or if the recov

8min

Black phosphorus future in 3-D analysis, molecular fingerprinting

Many compact systems using mid-infrared technology continue to face compatibility issues when integrating with conventional electronics. Black phosphorus has garnered attention for overcoming these challenges thanks to a wide variety of uses in photonic circuits.

8min

Probing the properties of magnetic quasi-particles

Researchers have for the first time measured a fundamental property of magnets called magnon polarization—and in the process, are making progress towards building low-energy devices.

8min

Deep sea microbes dormant for 100 million years are hungry and ready to multiply

For decades, scientists have gathered ancient sediment samples from below the seafloor to better understand past climates, plate tectonics and the deep marine ecosystem. In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers reveal that given the right food in the right laboratory conditions, microbes collected from sediment as old as 100 million years can revive and multiply, even after l

8min

Researchers urge the scientific community to #StopPandemicBias

While there is little doubt that COVID-19 will have lasting impacts on health and the economy, a group of researchers is bringing attention to the effects the pandemic could have on the careers of scientific researchers. Carnegie Mellon University and Max Planck Institute physicist Ulrike Endesfelder, University of Stuttgart's Dirk Pflüger and Technische Universität Braunschweig's Timo de Wolff la

8min

Deep sea microbes dormant for 100 million years are hungry and ready to multiply

For decades, scientists have gathered ancient sediment samples from below the seafloor to better understand past climates, plate tectonics and the deep marine ecosystem. In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers reveal that given the right food in the right laboratory conditions, microbes collected from sediment as old as 100 million years can revive and multiply, even after l

11min

Madagascar: New mouse lemur species discovered

Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot. In the last 20 years new lemur species have been discovered while forested habitats have been quickly disappearing. Recent reports by the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) have identified the lemurs as one of the most threatened groups of vertebrates, with 33 of the 107 recognized species being critically endangered.

11min

Identification of new 'oxidative stress sensor' MTK1

In an aging society, various studies are being conducted to explore the relationship between active oxygen and aging-related diseases such as cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases, and metabolic syndrome.

11min

Madagascar: New mouse lemur species discovered

Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot. In the last 20 years new lemur species have been discovered while forested habitats have been quickly disappearing. Recent reports by the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) have identified the lemurs as one of the most threatened groups of vertebrates, with 33 of the 107 recognized species being critically endangered.

14min

Massive seagrass die-off leads to widespread erosion in a California estuary

The large-scale loss of eelgrass in a major California estuary—Morro Bay—may be causing widespread erosion, according to a new study from California Polytechnic State University.

14min

Identification of new 'oxidative stress sensor' MTK1

In an aging society, various studies are being conducted to explore the relationship between active oxygen and aging-related diseases such as cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases, and metabolic syndrome.

14min

Eavesdropping on trout building their nests

Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) stir up the sediment of the river bed when building their spawning pits, thus influencing the composition of the river bed and the transport of sediment. Until now, this process could only be studied visually, irregularly and with great effort in the natural environment of the fish. Now, researchers led by Michael Dietze of the GFZ German Research Centre for G

14min

New scenario for the India-Asia collision dynamics

To elucidate the timing, location and geodynamic models of the India-Asia collision, Yuan and colleagues conducted paleomagnetic and rock magnetic analyses on two key successions that were deposited on the distal northern part of the Indian passive margin (Tethyan Himalaya terrane), where Upper Cretaceous oceanic red beds (CORBs) of the Chuangde Formation are exposed in the Cailangba A and B secti

14min

New affinity purification technique for therapeutic proteins

Professor Kimoon Kim's research group at POSTECH has developed a highly pure and efficient technique for purifying antiviral and anti-cancer protein therapeutics using molecular affinity interaction.

14min

The amazing travels of small RNAs

In most organisms, small bits of RNA play a key role in gene regulation by silencing gene expression. They do this by targeting and docking onto complementary sequences of gene transcripts (also RNA molecules), which stop the cell machinery from using them to make proteins. This mechanism is called RNA interference (RNAi), and it is critically important in biology.

14min

New technique enables mineral ID of precious Antarctic micrometeorites

The composition of Antarctic micrometeorites and other tiny but precious rocks such as those from space missions—is really hard to analyze without some sample loss. But a new technique should make it easier, cheaper and faster to characterize them while preserving more of the sample. The findings were published on the peer reviewed journal Meteoritics & Planetary Science on May 21.

14min

Antibiotics could replace surgery for some kids with appendicitis

For children who have uncomplicated appendicitis, non-surgical treatment can mean they spend less time being sick and don't have to deal with the risks of surgical complications. (Unsplash/) It used to be that appendicitis nearly always meant getting your appendix removed. However, in the last decade, a spate of new research has demonstrated that treating the infected appendix with a course of an

16min

Iowa State University scientists examine reproductive effects of glyphosate in mice

A pair of recently published studies analyzed how ovarian function in mice responded to various levels of exposure to glyphosate, a chemical extensively used to kill weeds. The results showed exposure changed the level of some ovarian proteins but did not impact ovarian steroid production, an indication glyphosate may not adversely affect reproduction.

17min

New affinity purification technique for therapeutic proteins

Professor Kimoon Kim's research group at POSTECH has developed a highly pure and efficient technique for purifying antiviral and anti-cancer protein therapeutics using molecular affinity interaction.

17min

The amazing travels of small RNAs

In most organisms, small bits of RNA play a key role in gene regulation by silencing gene expression. They do this by targeting and docking onto complementary sequences of gene transcripts (also RNA molecules), which stop the cell machinery from using them to make proteins. This mechanism is called RNA interference (RNAi), and it is critically important in biology.

17min

Little Evidence that Mass Transit Poses a Risk of Coronavirus Outbreaks

A major drop in public transit use coincides with concerns about reducing air pollution that can exacerbate lung conditions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22min

Research suggests combating a pandemic is 500 times more expensive than preventing one

BU biologist and peers find investing in wildlife monitoring and deforestation could prevent costly pandemics.

31min

Artificial intelligence could speed up and improve Alzheimer's diagnosis

Research from the University of Sheffield's Neuroscience Institute examines how the routine use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in healthcare could help to relieve the economic impact neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, put on the NHS

31min

Probing the properties of magnetic quasi-particles

Researchers have for the first time measured a fundamental property of magnets called magnon polarisation — and in the process, are making progress towards building low-energy devices.

31min

Therapy helps children with food allergies manage severe anxiety

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has launched the Food Allergy Bravery (FAB) Clinic to help children with a phobia of anaphylaxis. This revolutionary clinic, housed within the Food Allergy Center, is the first in the world to bring together psychologists and food allergy experts to treat food allergic children with severe phobia of anaphylaxis.

31min

Experimental drug for Alzheimer's may help children with autism

An extensive international study led by Tel Aviv University researchers found deposits of the tau protein typically found in Alzheimer's patients in tissues taken from the postmortem brain of a 7-year-old autistic child.

31min

The owner of WeChat thinks deepfakes could actually be good

The news: In a new white paper about its plans for AI, translated by China scholars Jeffrey Ding and Caroline Meinhardt, Tencent, the owner of WeChat and one of China's three largest tech giants, emphasizes that deepfake technology is "not just about 'faking' and 'deceiving,' but a highly creative and groundbreaking technology." It urges regulators to "be prudent" and to avoid clamping down on it

32min

Scientists Start Construction of World's Largest Fusion Reactor

Today, engineers started construction of the world's largest nuclear fusion project in southern France, The Guardian reports , with operations planned to begin in late 2025. The project, called ITER, is an international collaborative effort between 35 countries with enormous ambitions: prove the feasibility of fusion energy with a gigantic magnetic device called a "tokamak," as per the project's

39min

Can the Census Bureau actually meet Trump's demand to count noncitizens?

Experts doubt ability to exclude undocumented residents from tally used to apportion House seats

49min

Aerobic microbial life persists in oxic marine sediment as old as 101.5 million years

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17330-1 The discovery of aerobic microbial communities in nutrient-poor sediments below the seafloor begs the question of the mechanisms for their persistence. Here the authors investigate subseafloor sediment in the South Pacific Gyre abyssal plain, showing that aerobic microbial life can be revived and retain metaboli

50min

'Zero bias' could cost you money for retirement

An odd phenomenon called "zero bias" can shortchange people's retirement funds, research finds. Target Retirement Funds, also known as TRFs, are built based on a goal retirement year, with choices ending in either a zero or a five (such as 2030, 2035, 2040, or 2045). As it turns out, investors are more likely to select funds labeled with years ending in zeros rather than fives. "Targeted funds of

53min

Hollywood Is Finally Admitting That the U.S. Is a Lost Cause

Bryan Anselm / Redux Finally, there's some good news for Hollywood: Yesterday, Warner Bros. announced that Christopher Nolan's highly anticipated action thriller, Tenet , will debut next month following multiple delays. As the pandemic has shut down cinemas across the globe, Tenet has been widely regarded as the film that could revive a depressed theater industry, and now it has its chance. Start

53min

Outdoor School Has Never Sounded Better

This month, Berkeley public schools, like many school districts across the country, announced they will not start the year with full-time, in-person school. Soon after, J Li, a business-innovation strategist who lives in the area, noticed moms in the local Facebook groups turn, like starlings at dusk, to one topic in particular: homeschool pods. Reluctant to face more months supervising Zoom clas

53min

The Pandemic Is Making Monopolies Worse

Tomorrow, the House Antitrust Subcommittee will hear testimony from the CEOs of the Big Four tech firms: Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. Aside from possibly bringing together more wealth than ever before assembled in a congressional hearing, the event marks a triumph for a nascent movement of antitrust scholars who have revived the debate about concentrated economic power in the United State

53min

These Microbes May Have Survived 100 Million Years Beneath the Seafloor

Rescued from their cold, cramped and nutrient-poor homes, the bacteria awoke in the lab and grew.

56min

Researchers urge the scientific community to #StopPandemicBias

While there is little doubt that COVID-19 will have lasting impacts on health and the economy, a group of researchers is bringing attention to the effects the pandemic could have on the careers of scientific researchers. Carnegie Mellon University and Max Planck Institute physicist Ulrike Endesfelder, University of Stuttgart's Dirk Pflüger and Technische Universität Braunschweig's Timo de Wolff la

1h

Eavesdropping on trout building their nests

Steelhead trout stirring up the sediment of the river bed were detected by seismic sensors. Researchers led by Michael Dietze of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam have used geophones to analyze the trout's nest-building process in detail. The study was published in the journal Earth Surface Processes and Landforms.

1h

Deep sea microbes dormant for 100 million years are hungry and ready to multiply

In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers reveal that given the right food in the right laboratory conditions, microbes collected from subseafloor sediment as old as 100 million years can revive and multiply, even after laying dormant since large dinosaurs prowled the planet.

1h

New study finds racial disparities in COVID-19-related deaths exist beyond income differences in 10

New analyses by a team of researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine examine the interplay between race/ethnicity and income on COVID-19 cases and related deaths in 10 major US cities.

1h

Study pinpoints women who benefit less from 3D mammograms

A new comparison of two breast-screening technologies has found that, for most women, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT, also called 3D mammography) is superior to digital mammography for cancer detection and for reducing recall visits due to unclear or false findings. The study's distinction, though, is in identifying women for whom DBT's advantage is less. Previous evidence had suggested that DB

1h

Assessing inequities in COVID-19 deaths by race/ethnicity reported by CDC

Weighted and unweighted population data are compared to assess inequities in COVID-19 deaths by race/ethnicity as reported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in this observational study.

1h

Community-level disparities in COVID-19 infections, deaths in large US metro areas

The association of neighborhood race/ethnicity and poverty with COVID-19 infections and related deaths in urban U.S. counties are examined in this observational study.

1h

Novel diabetes drug candidate shows promising properties in human islets and mouse models

Researchers have discovered a new drug candidate that offers a major advance in the treatment for diabetes. Tested on isolated human and mouse pancreatic islets, mouse and rat cell cultures and animal models of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, the experimental drug significantly improved four detrimental characteristics of diabetes: hyperglycemia; hyperglucagonemia, elevation in the hormone glucag

1h

Black phosphorus future in 3D analysis, molecular fingerprinting

Many compact systems using mid-infrared technology continue to face compatibility issues when integrating with conventional electronics. Black phosphorus has garnered attention for overcoming these challenges thanks to a wide variety of uses in photonic circuits. Research published in Applied Physics Reviews highlights the material's potential for emerging devices ranging from medical imaging to e

1h

Online Science Talks For All Ages, Brought to You by Your Local Library

A new summer series called Summer Reading Meets Citizen Science is designed to keep students and adults engaged with reading and research to prevent "summer slide" learning loss.

1h

Singapore's divisions are deepening

Eased lockdowns for permanent residents mask continued hardship for migrant workers

1h

Scientists pull living microbes from 100 million years beneath the sea

Bacteria 75 meters below the sea floor began to divide after a light snack

1h

Coronavirus vaccine hope rises after a flurry of positive results

There are more than 160 coronavirus vaccines in development, and we don't yet know if any will work, but a string of promising results offers hope for the long run

1h

Mad Scientists Revive 100-Million-Year-Old Microbes

Researchers collected sediment thousands of feet deep, filtered out bacteria, and revived the cells. But fear not—the destruction of humanity by ancient microbes is not nigh.

1h

Everyone in This French Town Just Got a Free Electric Car

You Get A Car! The electric automaker Renault just gave every household in the tiny French town of Appy a free three-year lease for one of its electric cars. Is it a PR stunt? Yes. Could it also do some good along the way? It's possible! Business Insider reports that the company is trying to demonstrate that electric vehicles can be useful to people living in remote or rural areas, rather than ju

1h

The Trump administration must stop sidelining the CDC

Nature, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02231-6 The US government needs to strengthen the agency charged with preventing the spread of disease — not undermine it.

1h

An Alternative to Dark Matter Passes Critical Test

For decades, a band of rebel theorists has waged war with one of cosmology's core concepts — the idea that an invisible, intangible form of matter forms the universe's primary structure. This dark matter, which seems to outweigh the stuff we're made of 5-to-1, accounts for a host of observations: the tight cohesion of galaxies and packs of galaxies, the way light from faraway galaxies will bend o

1h

Iron deficiency during infancy reduces vaccine efficacy

About 40 percent of children around the globe suffer from anaemia because they do not consume enough iron. Now, studies by ETH researchers show that iron deficiency also reduces the protection provided by vaccinations.

1h

Researchers identify evolutionary origins of SARS-CoV-2

By reconstructing the evolutionary history of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, an international research team of Chinese, European and U.S. scientists has discovered that the lineage that gave rise to the virus has been circulating in bats for decades and likely includes other viruses with the ability to infect humans. The findings have implications for the prev

1h

Winning the digital transformation race: three emerging approaches for leading transition

New research from Professor Feng Li, Chair of Information Management at City's Business School has outlined three new approaches that digital innovators can take to reduce the risk of failure and seize competitive advantage in the industry.

1h

Immunoprotein impairs Sars-Cov-2

A protein produced by the human immune system can strongly inhibit corona viruses, including Sars-Cov-2, the pathogen causing Covid-19. An international team from Germany, Switzerland and the USA successfully showed that the LY6E-Protein prevents coronaviruses from causing an infection.

1h

Why Doctors Are Posing in Swimwear on Social Media

A study purporting to uncover "unprofessionalism" spurred a #MedBikini-hashtagged backlash — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

SP Industries Announces Partnership Agreement with Ecodyst to Distribute Single Sample Evaporation Systems

SP Industries (SP) CEO Brian Larkin has announced the signing of a partnership agreement with Ecodyst (NC, USA).

1h

New England Scientific Associates (NESA) partners with Allentown, LLC. for exclusive representation in the New England & upstate New York areas.

NESA, The Baker Company's consultative sales group, is proud to announce our new partnership with Allentown, LLC.

1h

Multiomics investigation revealing the characteristics of HIV-1-infected cells in vivo

A research group at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) using HIV-1-infected cells performed "multiomics" analyses, which are technologies recently developed to comprehensively investigate the features of biological samples.In this study, a hematopoietic stem cell-transplanted humanized mouse model infected with a gene-modified HIV-1 was used to reveal multiple charac

1h

Shrinking dwarves

The biomass of small animals that decompose plants in the soil and thus maintain its fertility is declining both as a result of climate change and over-intensive cultivation. To their surprise, however, scientists from the UFZ have discovered that this effect occurs in two different ways: while the changing climate reduces the body size of the organisms, cultivation reduces their frequency. Even b

1h

Identification of new "oxidative stress sensor" MTK1

A research group at the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo in Japan has uncovered a new mechanism that elicits a cellular response by detecting oxidative stress in the human body. MTK1 SAPKKK functions is identified as a new human oxidative stress sensor that senses excess active oxygen in the body and transmits that information to cells, leading to cell death and inflammatory c

1h

Study: COVID-19 pandemic has negatively influenced subjective well-being

The COVID-19 pandemic has also affected many people's subjective well-being. This is the result of a long-term study involving 979 people from Germany conducted by psychologists from Leipzig University and Saint Louis University. It found that in the early stage of the pandemic average life satisfaction and the experience of positive feelings decreased significantly. The findings have now been pub

1h

Deadly genetic synergy in cancer cells could be exploited for therapy

A Ludwig Cancer Research study has identified a new instance in which the simultaneous mutation of two nonessential genes — neither of which is on its own vital to cell survival — can cause cancer cell death.

1h

The positive case for suppression: A guest post from the editor in chief of Clarivate's Web of Science

This is an invited guest post related to news about two suppression reversals announced today by Clarivate. The research process is rarely straightforward. There are a myriad of ways in which it can go wrong, from the inception of a hypothesis that goes on to be disproved, to failed experiments and rejected manuscripts, hopefully ending … Continue reading The positive case for suppression: A guest

1h

Poor Pluto Is Ten Times Smaller than Thought

Originally published in July 1950 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Experts: Biden's climate plan is 'bold' but lacks some specifics

Joe Biden's $2 trillion plan to tackle climate change and stimulate an economic recovery is "bold, ambitious, and visionary," but lacks specifics on oceans and infrastructure planning, experts argue. The plan Biden, the presumed 2020 Democratic nominee for US president, has proposed would take four years to roll out over his first term in office. It calls for increasing clean energy use in transp

1h

Major indexing service reverses decision to suppress two journals from closely followed metric

Following pushback from members of the taxonomy community, Clarivate Analytics, the company behind the Impact Factor, has reversed its decision to suppress two journals from receiving those scores this year. As we reported in late June, Clarivate suppressed 33 journals from its Journal Citation Reports, which meant denying them an Impact Factor, for high levels … Continue reading

1h

Size matters in air pollution—but it's not enough

Current regulations on air pollution mainly focus on the mass of particles of a particular size range in a sample, and this has been used as a marker for their threat to human health. But these air quality standards do not address the medical implications of the very smallest particles—nor other attributes that may be damaging, such as their chemical makeup.

1h

Scientists: Trained Dogs Can Smell Coronavirus

Researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover, Germany, have found that dogs are able to sniff out the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 with astonishing accuracy. During tests, they found that eight dogs from Germany's military could correctly identify the presence of the coronavirus 94 percent of the time after only being trained a week, as Bloomberg reports . "We think that t

1h

Pfizer and BioNTech Pick a Vaccine Candidate

In a bit of a surprise move, Pfizer and their partner BioNTech announced yesterday that they were moving their BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine candidate forward into Phase II/III trials. The surprise was because all the publications from this effort so far had been on another one of their four candidates, BNT162b1. Fans keeping score at home will know that there were originally four candidates: two with mo

1h

Media coverage fostered support for gun control in wake of mosque shootings, study finds

Media coverage of the March 2019 Christchurch mosque shootings contributed to an increase in public support for gun control, a study by researchers at the University of Otago, Wellington has found.

1h

How will the population accept COVID-19 tracing apps?

Coronavirus tracing applications for the detection of infection chains are currently being developed and made available. Contact-tracing apps are a central component of national strategies for relaxing restrictions. However, for these apps to be successful, they must be widely accepted and used by most of the population. Researchers led by the University of Göttingen investigated how decision-make

1h

Adjusting FRAX estimates to account for site of recent fracture

This important new study by Kanis et al provides probability ratios that can be used to adjust conventional FRAX estimates of fracture probability by accounting for the site of a recent fracture.

1h

New technique enables mineral ID of precious Antarctic micrometeorites

The composition of Antarctic micrometeorites and other tiny but precious rocks such as those from space missions–is really hard to analyze without some sample loss. But a new technique should make it easier, cheaper and faster to characterize them while preserving more of the sample. The findings were published on the peer reviewed journal Meteoritics & Planetary Science on May 21.

1h

New scenario for the India-Asia collision dynamics

The India-Asia collision is an outstanding smoking gun in the study of continental collision dynamics. Yuan and colleagues hypothesize that the Tethyan Himalaya terrane rifted from India after ~75 Ma, generating the North India Sea. They further document a new two-stage continental collision, first at ~61 Ma between the Lhasa and Tethyan Himalaya terranes, subsequently at ~53-48 Ma between the Tet

1h

Ammonia synthesis from selective electroreduction of nitrates over electron-deficient Co

Heterostructured Co/CoO nanosheet arrays with electron-deficient Co were constructed and exhibited excellent performances for nitrate electroreduction to ammonia: Faradaic efficiency (93.8%) and selectivity (91.2%), greatly outperforming Co NSAs.

1h

To end King Coal's reign, must his most loyal subjects get paid?

Governments should be prepared to pay billions of pounds to operators of coal-fired power plants in agreements to shut down their plants early, a new paper published in Nature Climate Change today recommends.

1h

New studies reveal inside of central energy release region in solar eruption

Prof. LIN Jun from the Yunnan Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, collaborating with Prof. CHEN Bin from the New Jersey Institute of Technology, conducted the radio observation of the magnetic field distribution and relativistic electron acceleration characteristics in the current sheet of solar flares.

1h

Poker: The high-stakes way to unlock your potential

Add event to calendar When best-selling author and journalist Maria Konnikova had a streak of bad luck, she set out to write a psychology book about game theory and poker to unpack this question: What can you control in life, and what can't you? She knew precisely zero about poker when she asked Erik Seidel, 8-time World Series of Poker winner and Poker Hall of Fame inductee, to be her mentor, an

1h

GMMIP simulations on global monsoon interannual variability show higher skill than historical simulations

Studies and simulations of global land precipitation and summer hemispheric precipitation have received much scientific and societal attention due to the impacts on economic development. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate and improve the simulation capability of precipitation for models.

2h

Pesticides can protect crops from hydrophobic pollutants

Researchers have revealed that commercial pesticides can be applied to crops in the Cucurbitaceae family to decrease their accumulation of hydrophobic pollutants, thereby improving crop safety. The research group consisted of Fujita Kentaro (1st year Ph.D. student) of Kobe University's Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Academic Researcher Yoshihara Ryouhei (now an assistant professor at Sai

2h

Science publishing has opened up during the coronavirus pandemic. It won't be easy to keep it that way

Scientific publishing is not known for moving rapidly. In normal times, publishing new research can take months, if not years. Researchers prepare a first version of a paper on new findings and submit it to a journal, where it is often rejected, before being resubmitted to another journal, peer-reviewed, revised and, eventually, hopefully published.

2h

GDPR-smæk: Hotelkæde indstilles til millionbøde for ulovlig omgang med kundedata

Datatilsynet politianmelder Arp-Hansen og indstiller virksomheden til en bøde på 1.100.000 kroner for manglende sletning af ca. 500.000 kundeprofiler.

2h

Marie Tharp pioneered mapping the bottom of the ocean – scientists are still learning about Earth's last frontier

Despite all the deep-sea expeditions and samples taken from the seabed over the past 100 years, humans still know very little about the ocean's deepest reaches. And there are good reasons to learn more.

2h

Lasers to destroy bladder stones in animals

Urinary tract stones in cats and dogs can now be 'pulverised' by new laser technology acquired by The University of Queensland's veterinary hospital.

2h

The amazing travels of small RNAs

Biologists have known for some time that RNA interference can silence genes in far-?off cells. They suspected that a messenger substance "transmits" RNA interference. Now, ETH researchers have definitively shown that these messengers in plants are short double-?stranded RNA fragments.

2h

Scientists unlock genetic secrets of wine growers' worst enemy

Following a decade-long effort, scientists have mapped out the genome of an aphid-like pest capable of decimating vineyards. In so doing, they have discovered how it spreads — and potentially how to stop it.

2h

The mystery of the less deadly mosquito nets

Research published in Nature Communications shows that insecticide-treated mosquito nets, the mainstay in the global battle against malaria, are not providing the protection they once did – and scientists say that's a cause for serious concern in tropical and subtropical countries around the globe.

2h

2h

A zap controls liquid metal at room temp

A new technique allows researchers to produce streams of liquid metal at room temperature. By applying a low voltage to the liquid metal, the researchers were able to tune its surface tension across at least three orders of magnitude. "Liquids want to form droplets, because that lowers their surface energy," says Michael Dickey, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at North Caroli

2h

Why Some Male Leaders Won't Follow COVID-19 Safety Protocols

Men often think masks and other precautions make them look like wimps — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Lasers to destroy bladder stones in animals

Urinary tract stones in cats and dogs can now be 'pulverised' by new laser technology acquired by The University of Queensland's veterinary hospital.

2h

Towards 'Eternal Sunshine'? New Links Found Between Memory and Emotion

Nearly a decade ago, I almost drowned. As an amateur scuba diver, I recklessly joined a group of experts for a deep—much deeper than I was qualified for—dive at night. Already exhausted from swimming my gear from shore, within minutes after I descended I lost my light, a flipper, and complete sense of space. I didn't know which way was up. Oxygen ran low. Then very low. Of course, it ended well.

2h

For accurate food studies, ask for pee instead of honesty

Instead of asking participants in food studies what they ate, researchers propose testing their urine. A lot of food research hinges on the honesty of participants about what they've eaten, as well as the accuracy of their memories. It's possible for researchers to end up with false conclusions—for example, about how much junk food our bodies can manage—if participants don't tell the whole truth

2h

Racism, regret and rat hunters: what history tells us about previous pandemics

To cope with COVID-19 pandemic fatigue, some are making sourdough starter from scratch while others binge TV shows from a growing number of streaming services. Dan Wallace found relief by researching the ways in which the United States has been terrorized by bio-organisms since the late 1800s.

2h

Compact nanoscale textures reduce contact time of bouncing droplets

Many natural surfaces can rapidly shed water droplets due to their water-repellent functionality. In 1945, scientists Cassie and Baxter linked the water-repellent function of natural surfaces to their surface textures. The use of low solid fraction textures (denoted Φs) is therefore a key principle to design water-repellent surfaces. In this work, Lin Wang and a team of scientists in materials sci

2h

Supportive communities and progressive politics can reduce suicide risk among LGBTQ girls

Many LGBTQ youth continue to experience stigma and discrimination despite Canada's progress in protecting human rights. New research from UBC's school of nursing shows that supportive communities–and a progressive political climate–can help mitigate the effects of stigma on mental health.

2h

Deep learning algorithm identifies tumor subtypes based on routine histological images

Researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center, working with colleagues in Europe, created a deep learning algorithm that can infer molecular alterations directly from routine histology images across multiple common tumor types. The findings were published in Nature Cancer.

2h

Maternal depression increases odds of depression in offspring, study shows

Depression in mothers during and after pregnancy increased the odds of depression in offspring during adolescence and adulthood by 70%.

2h

UCalgary researchers unlock new insights that could help with vaccine development

Researchers at the University of Calgary have unlocked new insights that may help with vaccine development for infectious diseases such as COVID-19, malaria, and tuberculosis. The findings show that rather than enhancing protection, a highly polarized cell-mediated response that was believed to be protective was, in fact, detrimental. These observations into the regulation of immunity against infe

2h

Tendency to select targeted retirement fund ending in zero may impact wealth

New research shows that selecting a targeted retirement fund that ends in a zero could negatively impact your retirement savings. The study identified a "zero bias" or tendency for individuals to select retirement funds ending in zero, which affects the amount people contribute to retirement savings and leads to an investment portfolio with an incompatible level of risk.

2h

Pesticides can protect crops from hydrophobic pollutants

Researchers have revealed that commercial pesticides can be applied to crops in the Cucurbitaceae family to decrease their accumulation of hydrophobic pollutants, thereby improving crop safety. The team developed two approaches to control the functions of plant proteins related to the transport of hydrophobic pollutants. These findings will lead to these new functions of pesticides being utilized

2h

'SoundWear' a heads-up sound augmentation gadget helps expand children's play experience

KAIST researchers designed a wearable bracelet using sound augmentation to leverage play benefits by employing digital technology. The research team also investigated how sound influences children's play experiences according to their physical, social, and imaginative aspects.

2h

Owe the IRS? No problem, some Americans say

A new study shows the surprising way that many American taxpayers adjust their standard of living when they owe money to the IRS versus when they receive tax refunds.

2h

Pandemic-related stress holds steady, but fears and frustrations rise

While the issue of how to prevent the spread of COVID-19 continues to be highly politicized, a new survey by the American Psychological Association shows a consensus among Republicans and Democrats: A majority of Republicans (65%) and Democrats (88%) report that they find preventive measures like wearing masks and physical distancing are reassuring, and agree that it is stressful to be around othe

2h

Balance between mask exemptions and public health isn't simple

Balancing the safety of the general public while accommodating people with legitimate medical challenges and their need for exemptions from wearing face masks is a "new frontier," argues a physician and health policy expert. Health care clinicians sometimes face a quandary during the COVID-19 pandemic. Some patients request medical exemptions to state and municipal mandates that require masks, ev

2h

White Christian America Needs a Moral Awakening

The Christian denomination in which I grew up was founded on the proposition that slavery could flourish alongside the gospel of Jesus Christ. Its founders believed that this arrangement was not just possible, but divinely mandated. Yet many white Christians, like myself, came of age in churches and communities where we seldom heard anything substantive or serious about the white-supremacist root

2h

Researchers identify evolutionary origins of SARS-CoV-2

By reconstructing the evolutionary history of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, an international research team of Chinese, European, and U.S. scientists has discovered that the lineage that gave rise to the virus has been circulating in bats for decades and likely includes other viruses with the ability to infect humans. The findings, which University of Glasgow

2h

The likely impact of Great American Outdoors Act

After winning final bipartisan approval in Congress last week, a bill that will pump billions of dollars into overdue repairs and maintenance of U.S. national parks is now headed to the president for his signature. It's an unlikely success story: bipartisan support in a polarized legislature for an environmental and conservationist initiative to which the Trump administration has shown itself host

2h

Researchers identify evolutionary origins of SARS-CoV-2

By reconstructing the evolutionary history of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, an international research team of Chinese, European, and U.S. scientists has discovered that the lineage that gave rise to the virus has been circulating in bats for decades and likely includes other viruses with the ability to infect humans. The findings, which University of Glasgow

2h

The likely impact of Great American Outdoors Act

After winning final bipartisan approval in Congress last week, a bill that will pump billions of dollars into overdue repairs and maintenance of U.S. national parks is now headed to the president for his signature. It's an unlikely success story: bipartisan support in a polarized legislature for an environmental and conservationist initiative to which the Trump administration has shown itself host

2h

COVID-19 can affect pets

Social distancing applies to pets as well as humans in households with positive cases of COVID-19. Confirmed cases of pets infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are being reported across the U.S.

2h

COVID-19 can affect pets

Social distancing applies to pets as well as humans in households with positive cases of COVID-19. Confirmed cases of pets infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are being reported across the U.S.

2h

Why hate crime perceptions vary among the general populace

A team of researchers from the University of Groningen and the University of Maryland has looked into the question of why people learning of hate crimes react to them differently. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of four hate crimes and how people who heard of the crimes felt about them.

2h

Racist stereotyping of Asians as good at math masks inequities and harms students

Some people stereotype Asian students as the "model minority" in math achievement: they generalize attributes of a so-called "minority" (racialized) community in a way that just perpetuates racism disguised as a compliment.

2h

The yield potential of wheat grown in controlled-environment vertical farms

A team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions in the U.S. has investigated the yield potential of wheat grown on controlled-environment vertical farms, finding it higher than expected. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes modeling indoor vertical wheat farming and what their models showed.

2h

Telehealth: Doctor Zoom

Payment parity is needed to give providers an incentive to keep offering the service

2h

Scientists describe the most complete fossil from the early stages of owl evolution

Discoveries from the early stages of owl evolution are exceedingly rare. An approximately 60-million-year-old leg bone is the oldest fossil that can be assigned to an owl. "Other owls from this time period are also only known on the basis of individual bones and fragments. Therefore, I was especially pleased when I received a largely complete owl skeleton from the North American Willwood Formation

2h

As a result of climate change, soil animals are getting smaller, numbers falling due to intensive land use

Today, life in the soil must contend with several problems at once. The biomass of small animals that decompose plants in the soil and thus maintain its fertility is declining both as a result of climate change and over-intensive cultivation. To their surprise, however, scientists from the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research

2h

Cloud data a silver lining for climate change predictions

Clouds above the Southern Ocean could hold the key to more accurate global climate change predictions. University of Canterbury (UC) researchers have led a Deep South National Science Challenge project to collect information about cloud formations near Antarctica.

2h

Perseverance Rover Will Take a Tiny Piece of Mars Home to the Red Planet

The Perseverance rover will set the stage by collecting samples from Mars. NASA's Perseverance rover is set to lift off this week to begin its journey toward the red planet. The robot carries a plethora of instruments, a helicopter, and sample containers that might one day conduct pieces of Mars back to Earth. However, Perseverance will also repatriate a tiny fragment of Mars back to its homeworl

2h

As a result of climate change, soil animals are getting smaller, numbers falling due to intensive land use

Today, life in the soil must contend with several problems at once. The biomass of small animals that decompose plants in the soil and thus maintain its fertility is declining both as a result of climate change and over-intensive cultivation. To their surprise, however, scientists from the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research

3h

A practicable and reliable therapeutic strategy to treat SARS-CoV-2 infection

In a new study in Cell Discovery, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University and two other groups from Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Second Hospital of Nanjing present a novel finding that absorbed miRNA MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction (HD) can directly target SARS-CoV-2 genes and inhibit viral replication. Drinking of HD accelerate the negative conversion of COVID-19 patients.

3h

Adult stem cells/glaucoma drug combo promotes diabetic wound healing in mice

A new study released in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine shows promise of a major breakthrough in healing chronic foot ulcers resulting from diabetes.

3h

Massive seagrass die-off leads to widespread erosion in a California estuary

The large-scale loss of eelgrass in a major California estuary — Morro Bay — may be causing widespread erosion. Over the last century, Morro Bay has been building up sediment quickly. After the die-off, however, erosion took place in more than 90% of the places where eelgrass previously grew.

3h

Rethinking women's mental health following partner abuse

When one in six Australian women report experiencing physical and/or sexual violence – and one in four report emotional abuse – by a current or previous cohabiting partner since the age of 15, you know there is a problem.

3h

New affinity purification technique for therapeutic proteins

Professor Kimoon Kim's research group at POSTECH has developed a highly pure and efficient technique for purifying antiviral and anti-cancer protein therapeutics using molecular affinity interaction.

3h

UK businesses borrow £50bn in state-backed coronavirus loans

Treasury figures show continued need for financial support despite lockdown easing

3h

Tendency to select targeted retirement fund ending in zero may impact wealth

New research shows that selecting a targeted retirement fund that ends in a zero could negatively impact your retirement savings.

3h

Eight great sandwiches to make with your wild game and fish

Catch it, cook it, and put it on some bread. (Michael Kilcoyne/Unsplash/) This story was originally featured on Field & Stream . If there is one meal that's more satisfying than a delicious, well-crafted sandwich—it's a delicious, well-crafted sandwich stuffed with the hard-earned meat of wild game or fish that you've brought home from the woods or the water. Over the years, we've published many

3h

Unprecedented 3-D reconstruction of pre-Columbian crania from the Caribbean and South America

Alfonso Benito Calvo, head of the Digital Mapping and 3-D Analysis Laboratory at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) has participated in the 3-D reconstructions of a representative selection of 13 pre-Columbian human crania specifically from Cuba and Peru, which are part of the osteological collection of the The Montané Anthropological Museum in Cuba. The sample

3h

The coronavirus pandemic requires us to understand food's murky supply chains

Six months ago, you may not have thought much about where your groceries were produced. But chances are you're thinking about it now.

3h

Researchers complete first-ever chromosomal-level genome sequencing of a freshwater sponge

Scientists have completed the first chromosomal-level genome sequence for a freshwater sponge—offering insight into how the sponge has evolved over 600 to 800 million years, and possibly leading to genetic tools to tackle challenges in maintaining clean freshwater and human health.

3h

Humans see just 4.7km into the distance. So how can we truly understand what the bushfires destroyed?

When the ashes from Australia's last bushfire season cooled, we were left with a few mind-boggling numbers: 34 human lives lost, more than a billion animals dead, and 18.6 million hectares of land burned.

3h

According to globular clusters, the universe is 13.35 billion years old

It is a widely accepted theory today that when the first stars formed in our universe approximately 13 billion years ago, they quickly came together to form globular clusters. These clusters then coalesced to others to form the first galaxies, which have been growing through mergers and evolving ever since. For this reason, astronomers have long suspected that the oldest stars in the universe are

3h

Researchers complete first-ever chromosomal-level genome sequencing of a freshwater sponge

Scientists have completed the first chromosomal-level genome sequence for a freshwater sponge—offering insight into how the sponge has evolved over 600 to 800 million years, and possibly leading to genetic tools to tackle challenges in maintaining clean freshwater and human health.

3h

Researchers study what would it take to make the Delaware River swimmable

From its source in New York's Catskill Mountains to its mouth in the Delaware Bay, the Delaware River serves many roles. Fifteen million people from four states drink its water. Several major cities lie on its shores. It's a place for commerce, for wildlife, and, increasingly, even in its urban stretches, for fishing, kayaking, and other recreation.

3h

Researchers make fish feed from food waste

Two major global environmental issues are food contamination and waste disposal. Professor Wong Ming-hung, Advisor (Environmental Science), and Dr. Brian Man Yu-bon, Assistant Professor, at the Department of Science and Environmental Studies at The Education University of Hong Kong (EdUHK) have a solution for both.

3h

Redesigning lithium-ion battery anodes for better performance

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have made progress toward a higher-capacity lithium-ion battery to meet rising consumer demand.

3h

New study offers roadmap for coal phase-out

Coal will need to be phased out of the world's economy to meet the climate change challenge, but this can work properly only if social objectives and local stakeholders are involved in the process, an international group of researchers argue in a paper published today.

3h

Follow the Money: How Digital Ads Subsidize the Worst of the Web

From Covid conspiracies to election scams, automated advertising software plays a large—and largely unseen—role.

3h

EcoReco L5+ Review: A City-Friendly, Sturdy Electric Scooter

If you want to avoid public transit, this e-scooter is an expensive but safe bet.

3h

Researchers make fish feed from food waste

Two major global environmental issues are food contamination and waste disposal. Professor Wong Ming-hung, Advisor (Environmental Science), and Dr. Brian Man Yu-bon, Assistant Professor, at the Department of Science and Environmental Studies at The Education University of Hong Kong (EdUHK) have a solution for both.

3h

Mug fra Chernobyl undersøges på ISS: Kan beskytte astronauter mod stråling

Astronauter på den internationale rumstation har fået svampe til at absorbere skadelige kosmiske stråler. I fremtiden kan svampene potentielt anvendes til kolonier på Mars.

3h

Madagascar: New mouse lemur species discovered

Group of researchers, from six countries, identified, genetically and morphologically, a new population of rats (Microcebus) that inhabit the same forests as another usual species previously described. The research investigation was published in two scientific articles, in Systematic Biology and in the American Journal of Primatology, and studied the smallest nocturnal primates. The work highlight

3h

1 in 100 blood donations in Canada have SARS-CoV-2 antibodies

Fewer than 1 in 100 blood donations in Canada have antibodies to the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, initial reports show. Canadian Blood Services and Canada's COVID-19 Immunity Task Force (CITF) released these initial results of the first 10,000 blood donor samples assessed for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies . This analysis reveals that over the period May 9 through June 8, 2020, fewer than 1% of

3h

When the First Farmers Arrived in Europe, Inequality Evolved

Forests gave way to fields, pushing hunter-gatherers to the margins—geographically and socially — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Why Is Bob Ross Still So Popular?

"Every day's a good day when you paint." —Bob Ross (1942–1995) S taring at the empty canvas on the easel in front of me, I couldn't understand how this— nothing —might somehow transform into even a rough approximation of the Bob Ross painting we were using as a model. That painting was classic Bob Ross: a snowy landscape bursting with color, a world of glimmering trees and vibrant shrubs around a

3h

Nu kan skalbaggar sända live-tv

Problemet med många av dagens små kameror är att de är avancerade och drar mycket ström, exempelvis smartphonekameror eller pillerkamerorna som sväljs inför en trådlös magundersökning. Storleksmässigt skulle de få plats på en skalbagges rygg, men de extra komponenterna som krävs för att driva kameran gör hela mekanismen för tung och hindrar skalbaggen från att röra sig.

4h

Bill Barr's Unconstitutional Campaign to Reelect the President

Throughout his first year in office, Bill Barr worked overtime to advance the personal and political interests of President Donald Trump, and to alter the structure of American government to confer virtually autocratic powers on the president, in accordance with views that Barr has held for several decades. Now, less than 100 days before the election, the attorney general's focus has narrowed and

4h

'Ghosts of Tsushima' Isn't Samurai Cinema—It's a Popcorn Flick

Sucker Punch's latest open-world videogame is fun enough and pretty enough but isn't interested in examining cultural tropes.

4h

The Age of Mass Surveillance Will Not Last Forever

The power to end it is in your hands.

4h

These 4 Covid-19 Vaccines Are Closest to Becoming Reality

There are hundreds of trials currently in the works. Here's everything you need to know about the ones edging ahead in the global race.

4h

Epos/Sennheiser Adapt 660 Review: On Par With Sony and Bose

These wireless noise-canceling headphones bring the heat, with sleek design and sound to match.

4h

Tiny mammals once scavenged meat from giant dinosaur carcasses

The first mammals probably mostly ate insects, but bite marks on a bone fragment suggest they occasionally scavenged meat from giant dinosaur carcasses

4h

Picturing God as a White Man Is Linked to Racial Stereotypes about Leaders

Pervasive racial images associated with the Almighty shape who people see as worthy of being in charge — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Picturing God as a White Man Is Linked to Racial Stereotypes about Leaders

Pervasive racial images associated with the Almighty shape who people see as worthy of being in charge — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

'Some papers can slip through the net,' says journal that published 5G-COVID-19 paper

We have heard back this morning from the publisher of a journal that yanked a paper that linked 5G cellphone technology and the novel coronavirus last week — a paper that scientific sleuth Elisabeth Bik mused was the "worst paper of 2020." The response to our request for comment from editor in chief Pio Conti … Continue reading

4h

Tracking space enterprises will change accounting, professor says

Emerging space businesses will drive new innovations in the accounting needed to provide an accurate picture of operations, says an associate professor of accounting at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) who has written a paper examining commerce in space.

4h

Scientists identify a cat in the UK infected with SARS-CoV-2

A team of scientists at the University of Glasgow has identified a cat in the UK that was infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

4h

Scientists identify a cat in the UK infected with SARS-CoV-2

A team of scientists at the University of Glasgow has identified a cat in the UK that was infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

4h

Trump's Effort to Provoke Violence Is Working

An outside agitator is stirring up violent protest in the streets of Portland, Oregon. His hand is at work in Seattle; Oakland, California; and Los Angeles, too. This agent provocateur set out to inflame protests simmering in these cities by making sure that armed hordes were in their midst, and it has worked: Many more protesters are out on the streets, throwing bricks at law-enforcement officer

4h

Tory MPs push businesses to reopen offices

Concern grows that homeworking is turning city centres around the UK into 'ghost towns'

4h

Space dust fossils are providing a new window onto Earth's past

To be a meteorite hunter means to search for the unutterably rare. On any given patch of land the size of Wales, an average of two olive-sized space rocks will fall in a year. Scientists and collectors are forced to go to extreme lengths to find them, searching in deserts and Antarctica where they have a chance of spotting the stones against a plain background. But if that sounds like a challenge,

4h

Research on metallic nanoparticles may lead to improved solar cells

In a new study, a research group at Uppsala University explain their outstanding success in harvesting "hot electron holes." The results of their work can be used to improve solar cells, photochemical reactions, and photosensors. The scientific article is published in Nature Materials.

4h

A growing stellar system directly fed by the mother cloud

For the first time, astronomers have observed a conveyor belt from the outskirts of a star-forming dense cloud directly depositing material near a pair of young forming stars. Scientists at the German Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) and the French Institut de Radioastonomie Millimétrique (IRAM) found that gas motions in the conveyor belt, dubbed a "streamer," mainly obey th

4h

Rare glassy metal discovered during quest to improve battery performance

Materials scientists studying recharging fundamentals made an astonishing discovery that could open the door to better batteries, faster catalysts and other materials science leaps.

4h

Salget står stille: Ingeniørtunge MAN nedlægger 270 stillinger i Danmark

Fyringerne hos den førende producent af dieselmotorer til shipping vil ramme afdelingerne i både Frederikshavn, Holeby og København.

4h

Small but self-imposing: Titanium alters behavior of host lattice atoms

Researchers from MIPT and their colleagues from Ural Federal University have combined optical and acoustic approaches and found that incorporating titanium atoms into barium hexaferrite leads to an unexpected substructure forming in the crystal lattice. The resulting material is promising for ultrafast computer memory applications. The findings were published in Scientific Reports.

4h

Astrophysicists investigate the possibility of life below the surface of Mars

Although no life has been detected on the Martian surface, a new study from astrophysicist and research scientist Dimitra Atri at the Center for Space Science at NYU Abu Dhabi finds that conditions below the surface could potentially support it. The subsurface—which is less harsh and has traces of water—has never been explored. According to Atri, the steady bombardment of penetrating galactic cosm

4h

Ferried across: Figuring out unconventional spin transport in quantum spin liquids

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Yokohama National University (YNU) have uncovered the peculiar mechanism by which spin perturbations travel through a seemingly unpassable region of a quantum spin liquid system. This new insight may represent another building block in next-generation electronics and even quantum computers.

4h

Fostering a sustainable use of phosphorus

Phosphorus is critical to food security, ecosystem functioning, and human activities. Urbanization and dietary changes, and in particular industrial use of P for chemical fertilizer production, have led to a declining trend, especially in recent decades. A study published in Nature Food provides some suggestions on how to address this critical issue while protecting food security.

4h

Hydrogel mimics human brain with memorizing and forgetting ability

Hokkaido University researchers have found a soft and wet material that can memorize, retrieve, and forget information, much like the human brain. They report their findings in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

4h

Will White People Forget About George Floyd?

Many people, of all races and ethnicities, are saying it feels different this time. With George Floyd's killing, white America has finally gotten its long-overdue wake-up call. And, yes, it feels different to me, too. What I'm troubled by, though, is that word feel . What if it feels different but isn't? Marriage vows, some would say, are merely testimony to the power of our present feelings, fee

5h

The Revenge of the Never Trumpers

Less than a year ago, the so-called Never Trump movement had been left for dead. President Donald Trump tweeted , in a statement remembered mainly because of its final phrase, that "the Never Trumper Republicans, though on respirators with not many left, are in certain ways worse and more dangerous for our Country than the Do Nothing Democrats. Watch out for them, they are human scum!" In retrosp

5h

The Brittle Star That Sees with Its Body

It turns out that eyes aren't necessary for vision — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

An Immune Protein Could Prevent Severe COVID-19–if It Is Given at the Right Time

The antiviral interferon might help early but exacerbate disease in later stages — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Congress' Big Tech CEO Hearing: What to Watch

Bezos, Cook, Pichai, and Zuck will all be in the Zoom where it happens.

5h

How to Plan and Cook Family Meals When You're in Lockdown

Have you poured 1800 bowls of cereal in the past five months? You are not alone.

5h

Tahlequah: Killer whale who carried dead calf for days is pregnant

Tahlequah captured the world's attention when spotted carrying her dead calf for 17 days.

5h

The Brittle Star That Sees with Its Body

It turns out that eyes aren't necessary for vision — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

An Immune Protein Could Prevent Severe COVID-19–if It Is Given at the Right Time

The antiviral interferon might help early but exacerbate disease in later stages — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

An Immune Protein Could Prevent Severe COVID-19–if It Is Given at the Right Time

The antiviral interferon might help early but exacerbate disease in later stages — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Seafood products made from cells should be labeled cell-based

Companies seeking to commercialize seafood products made from the cells of fish or shellfish should use the term "cell-based" on product labels, according to a Rutgers study—the first of its kind—in the Journal of Food Science.

5h

Seafood products made from cells should be labeled cell-based

Companies seeking to commercialize seafood products made from the cells of fish or shellfish should use the term "cell-based" on product labels, according to a Rutgers study—the first of its kind—in the Journal of Food Science.

5h

Seafood products made from cells should be labeled cell-based

Companies seeking to commercialize seafood products made from the cells of fish or shellfish should use the term "cell-based" on product labels, according to a Rutgers study – the first of its kind – in the Journal of Food Science. Both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and U.S. Department of Agriculture require food products to have a "common or usual name" on their labels so consumers can ma

5h

Researchers discover cell communication mechanism that drives cancer adaptation

Collaborative Cancer Research UK-funded studies from University of Oxford researchers have uncovered a new mechanism by which cancer cells adapt to the stresses they encounter as they grow and respond to therapies.

5h

Too many senior white academics still resist recognizing racism

Nature, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02203-w As a Black woman who is the chair of a university science department, people have questioned my right to exist at every stage.

6h

ITU jubler: Andelen af kvinder på softwareudvikling sætter rekord

ITU har siden 2015 fokuseret på at få flere kvindelige studerende, og selvom kønsfordelingen stadig er skæv er andelen er da også vokset.

6h

The Teaching That Works for Traumatized Students

Editor's Note: In the next five years, most of America's most experienced teachers will retire. The Baby Boomers are leaving behind a nation of more novice educators. In 1988, a teacher most commonly had 15 years of experience. Less than three decades later, that number had fallen to just three years leading a classroom . The Atlantic' s "On Teaching" project is crisscrossing the country to talk

6h

High-profile sleep researcher loses paper for duplication

A prominent sleep researcher whose work has come under intense scrutiny has lost a paper for duplication, aka self-plagiarism. Matthew Walker, of UC Berkeley, is the author of Why We Sleep, a bestselling treatise on the many woes of fatigue. Instantly popular, it was touted everywhere, from Bill Gates to The New York Times, which … Continue reading

6h

Exploring the common misconceptions regarding trans and non-binary identities

Trans and non-binary identities have existed for centuries. But modern science has given new ammunition to detractors. (Kyle/Unsplash/) Last month, a series of anti-trans tweets by author J.K. Rowling incited a maelstrom of anger, pain, and indignation. Specifically, Rowling opposed the phrase "people who menstruate" in an article, commenting on the social media platform, "I'm sure there used to

6h

Live Coronavirus News Updates and Analysis

Leaders of hard-hit states are considering new limits on businesses. Germany is dealing with a surge. President Trump shared a video with misleading coronavirus claims.

6h

Bringing Mars Rocks to Earth: Our Greatest Interplanetary Circus Act

NASA and the European Space Agency plan to toss rocks from one spacecraft to another before the samples finally land on Earth in 2031.

6h

#StopPandemicBias: scientists, share your privilege

Nature, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02234-3

6h

Make Black history core to degrees, tie tenure to anti-racism efforts

Nature, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02235-2

6h

COVID-19: save lives with open intellectual-property licences

Nature, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02233-4

6h

UK funders learn from COVID-19 'white-water ride'

Nature, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02236-1

6h

Covid-19 Isn't the Only Humanitarian Crisis Inside U.S. Prisons

State prisons today are severely underfunded, understaffed, overcrowded, and deteriorating — a system described by one Florida legislator as "bare and naked incarceration." While Covid-19 outbreaks disproportionally affect prisoners, deaths at the hands of corrections officers are overlooked and untracked.

6h

Laboratorium i Wuhan afviser: Virussen kom ikke herfra

PLUS. Lederen af coronavirusforskningen på Wuhan Institute of Virology afviser, at SARS-CoV-2 fandtes på instituttet før udbruddet og understreger, at Trump skylder en undskyldning.

6h

An immune receptor complex evolved in soybean to perceive a polymorphic bacterial flagellin

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17573-y Ralstonia solanacearum evades plant immunity by producing an atypical flagellin protein, thus causing bacterial wilt disease. Here, Wei et al. show that soybean has evolved a divergent flagellin receptor that recognises R. solanacearum flagellin and enhances wilt resistance when transferred to other plants.

7h

Butyrophilin-like proteins display combinatorial diversity in selecting and maintaining signature intraepithelial γδ T cell compartments

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17557-y Butyrophilin-like genes are emerging as central to tissue associated γδ T cell compartments. Here, the authors show that the butyropilin-like gene-products exert their effects as combinatorially diverse heteromers that differentially affect the selection and maintenance of skin-resident and gut-resident intraepi

7h

Neonatal genetics of gene expression reveal potential origins of autoimmune and allergic disease risk

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17477-x Some immune-mediated diseases may originate in early childhood. The authors mapped eQTLs and response eQTLs to various stimuli in neonatal myeloid cells and T cells, and revealed their potential role in immune-mediated diseases using colocalisation and Mendelian randomisation.

7h

Author Correction: Mutant p53 drives clonal hematopoiesis through modulating epigenetic pathway

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17555-0

7h

Author Correction: Evidence for a serpentinized plate interface favouring continental subduction

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17767-4

7h

Dissociable mesolimbic dopamine circuits control responding triggered by alcohol-predictive discrete cues and contexts

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17543-4 Alcohol craving can be enhanced by alcohol-associated cues and by alcohol-associated contexts. Here the authors investigate the role of the ventral tegmental area (VTA)-to-nucleus accumbens (NAc) core and VTA-to-NAc shell circuits in mediating these distinct aspects of alcohol seeking behaviour in rats.

7h

Assembly of a patchy protein into variable 2D lattices via tunable multiscale interactions

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17562-1 As nanoscale building blocks, proteins offer unique advantages, including monodispersity and atomically tunable interactions, but their self-assembly is limited compared to inorganic or polymeric nanoparticles. Here, the authors show modular self-assembly of an engineered protein into four physicochemically dist

7h

Cryptic evolved melts beneath monotonous basaltic shield volcanoes in the Galápagos Archipelago

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17590-x In this study the authors show that monotonous basaltic volcanoes can host a range of melts in their sub-volcanic systems, extending to rhyolitic compositions. The study implies that volcanoes which have produced monotonous basaltic lavas on long timescales could transition to more explosive, silica-rich eruptio

7h

The US needs a green stimulus – but must provide immediate relief first

In the depths of a downturn that has wiped out millions of jobs and trillions of dollars in wealth, a wide range of voices in the US are calling for a green stimulus to kick-start growth and lay the foundation for a more sustainable economy. That sentence could have been written a decade ago as easily as today. In 2009, amid skyrocketing unemployment and a crippled economy, President Barack Obama

7h

New machine learning method allows hospitals to share patient data — privately

Penn Medicine researchers have shown that an approach called federated learning is successful in the context of brain imaging, by being able to analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of brain tumor patients and distinguish healthy brain tissue from cancerous regions.

7h

Medieval medicine remedy could provide new treatment for modern day infections

Antibiotic resistance is an increasing battle for scientists to overcome, as more antimicrobials are urgently needed to treat biofilm-associated infections. However scientists from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick say research into natural antimicrobials could provide candidates to fill the antibiotic discovery gap.

7h

Gene variations at birth reveal origins of inflammation and immune disease

A study published in the journal Nature Communications has pinpointed a number of areas of the human genome that may help explain the neonatal origins of chronic immune and inflammatory diseases of later life, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and coeliac disease.

7h

Scientists reveal an explosive secret hidden beneath seemingly trustworthy volcanoes

An international team of volcanologists working on remote islands in the Galápagos Archipelago has found that volcanoes which reliably produce small basaltic lava eruptions hide chemically diverse magmas in their underground plumbing systems – including some with the potential to generate explosive activity. These volcanoes might undergo unexpected changes to sudden such activity in the future.

7h

Sweat science: Engineers detect health markers in thread-based, wearable sweat sensors

Engineers at Tufts University have created a first-of-its-kind, flexible electronic sensing patch that can be sewn into clothing to analyze sweat for multiple markers. The patch could be used to to diagnose and monitor acute and chronic health conditions or to monitor athletic performance.

7h

When Conservative Justices Revolt

Until two months ago, Leonard Leo was among the unambiguous winners of the Trump era. The bookish lawyer and architect of the conservative legal movement has spent the past three and a half years executing his decades-long vision of remaking the federal judiciary—he was instrumental in the Supreme Court appointments of Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch. But during the Court's term this summer, an

7h

Pandemic Is Overwhelming U.S. Public Health Capacity In Many States. What Now?

With the coronavirus spreading out of control in many parts of the U.S., some experts say the strategy of testing and tracing can't contain the pandemic until lockdowns bring case numbers down. (Image credit: Lynne Sladky/AP)

7h

Soap dodger: meet the doctor who says we have been showering wrong

Hand-washing aside, James Hamblin has not used soap for five years. He warns that our obsession with being clean is harming the microbiome that keeps us healthy When James Hamblin tells people he has not used soap in the shower for five years, they tend not to hold back in expressing their disgust. "It's one of the few remaining things for which we feel fine telling someone that they're gross," h

7h

Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. in Xenarthra mammals from Brazil, with evidence of novel 'Candidatus Anaplasma spp.'

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69263-w Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. in Xenarthra mammals from Brazil, with evidence of novel ' Candidatus Anaplasma spp.'

7h

Relative efficacy of three approaches to mitigate Crown-of-Thorns Starfish outbreaks on Australia's Great Barrier Reef

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69466-1

7h

7h

Scientists reveal an explosive secret hidden beneath seemingly trustworthy volcanoes

An international team of volcanologists working on remote islands in the Galápagos Archipelago has found that volcanoes which reliably produce small basaltic lava eruptions hide chemically diverse magmas in their underground plumbing systems—including some with the potential to generate explosive activity.

7h

Medieval medicine remedy could provide new treatment for modern day infections

Antibiotic resistance is an increasing battle for scientists to overcome, as more antimicrobials are urgently needed to treat biofilm-associated infections. However scientists from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick say research into natural antimicrobials could provide candidates to fill the antibiotic discovery gap.

7h

'Hidden Brain': How Psychology Was Misused In Teen's Murder Case

In 1979, dubious psychological techniques were used to put a teenager behind bars for life. These flawed ideas may still be at play in other criminal cases.

7h

Demand Surges For See-through Face Masks As Pandemic Swells

Face coverings are key to stopping spread of the coronavirus, but also slow communication, especially for people who don't hear well. Volunteers and companies suggest some transparent alternatives. (Image credit: Gregory Bull/AP)

7h

Medieval medicine remedy could provide new treatment for modern day infections

Antibiotic resistance is an increasing battle for scientists to overcome, as more antimicrobials are urgently needed to treat biofilm-associated infections. However scientists from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick say research into natural antimicrobials could provide candidates to fill the antibiotic discovery gap.

7h

Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a vaccine?

More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…

7h

Report links world's top meat firm to deforestation

Brazilian firm JBS, the world's biggest meat processing company, was again accused Monday of "laundering" cattle from ranches blacklisted for destroying the Amazon rainforest.

7h

These are the 10 most discussed tech topics during COVID-19

COVID is changing the world and our technology conversations are changing with it. As part of work identifying promising technology use cases to combat COVID , The Boston Consulting Group recently used contextual AI to analyze more than 150 million English language media articles from 30 countries published between December 2019 to May 2020. While the research reflects media coverage and not tech

7h

Douglas downgraded to tropical storm after skirting Hawaii

Hurricane Douglas was downgraded on Monday as it narrowly avoided the Hawaiian coast, after fears it would become only the third storm of its size to make landfall on the Pacific island chain since records began.

8h

Estimated 3 billion animals affected by Australia bushfires: study

Nearly three billion animals were killed or displaced by Australia's unprecedented 2019-20 wildfires in "one of the worst wildlife disasters in modern history", according to a report released Tuesday.

8h

Nu skal verdens største fusionsreaktor samles

Den eksperimentelle fusionsreaktor Iter er klar til at blive samlet, og i den anledning livestreamer partnerne begyndelsen af samlingen. Se med her.

8h

The best lessons on eradicating coronavirus come not from Spanish flu, but smallpox | Stephanie DeGooyer and Srinivas Murthy

Just like today, the US dragged its feet. But then came a moment of unprecedented global collaboration Since the outbreak of Covid-19 experts and commentators have often invoked the Spanish flu of 1918 as a useful precedent. But with various drug companies moving toward the advanced stages of vaccine testing, we should now shift our attention to the history of smallpox . Though smallpox is a diff

8h

Estimated 3 billion animals affected by Australia bushfires: study

Nearly three billion animals were killed or displaced by Australia's unprecedented 2019-20 wildfires in "one of the worst wildlife disasters in modern history", according to a report released Tuesday.

8h

Orca who carried her dead calf for 1,000 miles is pregnant

An orca known as Tahlequah, who raised worldwide concern when she carried her dead calf for 17 days and more than 1,000 miles almost two years ago, is pregnant, scientists said.

8h

Orca who carried her dead calf for 1,000 miles is pregnant

An orca known as Tahlequah, who raised worldwide concern when she carried her dead calf for 17 days and more than 1,000 miles almost two years ago, is pregnant, scientists said.

8h

UH and iconic watercress farm collaborate on sustainability research

University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa researchers and Sumida Farm farmers published a study this week detailing their collaboration to study the past, present and future of the multigenerational farm which produces 70 percent of Hawai'i's watercress. The study highlights that relationships with the broader community have enhanced Sumida Farm's ability to adapt and innovate their farm practices in re

8h

Scientists record rapid carbon loss from warming peatlands

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a direct relationship between climate warming and carbon loss in a peatland ecosystem. Their study published in AGU Advances provides a glimpse of potential futures where significant stores of carbon in peat bogs could be released into the atmosphere as greenhouse gases.

8h

New study reveals how day- and night-biting mosquitoes respond differently to colors of light and time of day

In a new study, researchers found that night- versus day-biting species of mosquitoes are behaviorally attracted and repelled by different colors of light at different times of day. Mosquitoes are among major disease vectors impacting humans and animals around the world and the findings have important implications for using light to control them.

8h

New study reveals how day- and night-biting mosquitoes respond differently to colors of light and time of day

In a new study, researchers found that night- versus day-biting species of mosquitoes are behaviorally attracted and repelled by different colors of light at different times of day. Mosquitoes are among major disease vectors impacting humans and animals around the world and the findings have important implications for using light to control them.

8h

A 'corny' solution to help fight the spread of the novel coronavirus

Inside the Mizzou Asphalt Pavement and Innovation Lab at the University of Missouri College of Engineering, Bill Buttlar normally leads a research team developing innovative ways to build better roads and stronger bridges. However, he's recently converted his lab to also produce an ethanol-based hand sanitizer for use during the COVID-19 pandemic to help with the increase in demand for the product

8h

8h

Mapping crystal shapes could fast-track 2-D materials

Materials scientists at Rice University and the University of Pennsylvania are calling for a collective, global effort to fast-track the mass production of 2-D materials like graphene and molybdenum disulfide.

8h

Link between education, income inequality has existed for a century

Income is inextricably linked to access to education in America and it has been for a century, according to a new study from researchers at Stanford University and Rice University.

8h

Safe work protocols can increase the likelihood the business will fail

There are conflicting predictions on the relationship between worker safety and organization survival. New research in the INFORMS journal Management Science finds organizations that provide a safe workplace have a significantly lower chance of survival because it costs to be safe.

8h

Why NASA Picked Jezero Crater for the Perseverance Rover

Jezero crater, the destination of the Perseverance rover, is a promising place to look for evidence of extinct Martian life.

8h

Too Much Mars? Let's Discuss Other Worlds

Two veteran space journalists discuss why so much attention and budget seems to be directed to the red planet.

8h

8h

8h

Shooting the Messenger: Activists Persecute Scientists Whose Findings They Don't Like

Alice Dreger's book recounts many instances of shooting the messenger, when scientists were persecuted for research findings that activists found objectionable. Social justice matters, but it should rely on science and reality, not ideology.

9h

China records biggest one-day rise in coronavirus cases since March

Xinjiang infections spark fears country is facing a fresh Covid-19 wave

9h

Rekordår for it-uddannelserne: Studerende vælter ind under coronakrisen

Stigningen i optaget på it-uddannelserne er større fra 2019-2020 end de sidste fem års stigning tilsammen. IT-Universitetet tilbyder hele 26 pct. flere studiepladser.

9h

10h

Studies demonstrate further evidence WTC responders are at risk for dementia

Two studies led by Stony Brook University researchers to be presented virtually at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference on July 28, 2020, indicate that World Trade Center (WTC) first responders are at risk for developing dementia.

10h

We are entering an era of pandemics – it will end only when we protect the rainforest | Peter Daszak

Reducing deforestation and the exploitation of wildlife are the first steps in breaking the chain of disease emergence Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage In late 2013, in the village of Meliandou in rural Guinea, a group of children playing near a hollow tree disturbed a small colony of bats hiding inside. Scientists think that Emile Ouamouno, who later became the first

11h

'Dad's a dictator, anything goes with Mum': how masks and distancing rules are dividing Britain

What do you do when your loved ones flout the law – or nag you about going out? As lockdown eases, attitudes to Covid-19 seem more polarised than ever Michael, a 35-year-old university lecturer from Sheffield, barely speaks to his brother nowadays. For years, they had been drifting apart over political differences such as Brexit. "He hates my leftwing, liberal beliefs as much as I hate his way of

11h

11h

Tracking symptoms with app an inexact predictor of coronavirus infection

A new piece in Family Practice indicates that tracking symptoms affiliated with the novel coronavirus through an app may not be a good predictor of the spread of the disease.

12h

Study reveals how renegade protein interrupts brain cell function in Alzheimer's disease

Dozens of molecules may tangle up with rogue bundles of tau, a protein that normally gives nerve fibers structure, to cause brain cell damage that contributes to neurodegenerative diseases, a new study shows.

12h

Covid-19: How risky is singing?

With evolving evidence on airborne transmission of Covid-19 and early super-spreading events linked to choir practices, musicians have been left wondering how risky it is to sing and play instruments in person. Investigating a listener question, Nicola Davis speaks to Prof Jonathan Reid about the science of aerosols and why he's getting musicians to sing into funnels — in the middle of an operatin

12h

Covid-19: How risky is singing? – podcast

With evolving evidence on airborne transmission of Covid-19 and early super-spreading events linked to choir practices, musicians have been left wondering how risky it is to sing and play instruments in person. Investigating a listener question, Nicola Davis speaks to Prof Jonathan Reid about the science of aerosols and why he's getting musicians to sing into funnels — in the middle of an operati

12h

'They want us to leave' — foreign workers under pressure in the Gulf

Resentment came to the boil during lockdowns amid squeeze on public services and growing competition for jobs

12h

13h

Ferried across: Figuring out unconventional spin transport in quantum spin liquids

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Yokohama National University uncover the peculiar mechanism by which spin perturbations travel through a seemingly unpassable region of a quantum spin liquid system. This new insight may represent another building block in next-generation electronics and even quantum computers.

14h

Almost 3 billion animals affected by Australian bushfires, report shows

Exclusive: megafires 'one of the worst wildlife disasters in modern history', say scientists Nearly 3 billion animals were killed or displaced by Australia's devastating bushfire season of 2019 and 2020, according to scientists who have revealed for the first time the scale of the impact on the country's native wildlife. The Guardian has learned that an estimated 143 million mammals, 180 million

14h

In Bee Shortage, Bubbles Could Help Pollinate

Soap bubbles are sticky enough to carry a pollen payload and delicate enough to land on flowers without harm.

14h

14h

The Atlantic Daily: Temper Your Expectations Around a Coronavirus Vaccine

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . THE ATLANTIC The development of a coronavirus vaccine won't end this pandemic overnight. Instead, it'll merely mark "the beginning of the end." Sarah Zhang, our staff writer covering health and s

15h

How space missions snatch pieces of other worlds and bring them back to Earth

Nature, Published online: 27 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02185-9 As NASA prepares to launch the first spacecraft that will collect samples from Mars, Nature looks at back at missions that have grabbed extraterrestrial material.

15h

Scientists record rapid carbon loss from warming peatlands

Scientists have demonstrated a direct relationship between climate warming and carbon loss in a peatland ecosystem. Their study provides a glimpse of potential futures where significant stores of carbon in peat bogs could be released into the atmosphere as greenhouse gases.

15h

How day- and night-biting mosquitoes respond differently to colors of light and time of day

In a new study, researchers found that night- versus day-biting species of mosquitoes are behaviorally attracted and repelled by different colors of light at different times of day. Mosquitoes are among major disease vectors impacting humans and animals around the world and the findings have important implications for using light to control them.

15h

Highly invasive lung cancer cells have longer 'fingers'

Tiny finger-like projections called filopodia drive invasive behavior in a rare subset of lung cancer cells. Analysis of molecular features distinguishing leader from follower cells focuses on filopodia and the MYO10 gene.

15h

Mapping crystal shapes could fast-track 2D materials

Materials scientists are calling for a collective, global effort to fast-track the mass production of 2D materials like graphene and molybdenum disulfide.

15h

In Bee Shortage, Bubbles Could Help Pollinate

Soap bubbles are sticky enough to carry a pollen payload and delicate enough to land on flowers without harm. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Microsoft og Google lægger an til bedre progressive webapps

Giganterne samarbejder om både konverteringsværktøjer og ny webfunktionalitet.

15h

Randomness theory could hold key to internet security

Researchers identified a problem that holds the key to whether all encryption can be broken — as well as a surprising connection to a mathematical concept that aims to define and measure randomness.

15h

How airway cells work together in regeneration and aging

Researchers have identified the process by which stem cells in the airways of the lungs switch between two distinct phases — creating more of themselves and producing mature airway cells — to regenerate lung tissue after an injury.

15h

Link between education, income inequality has existed for a century

Income is inextricably linked to access to education in America and it has been for a century, according to a new study.

15h

In Bee Shortage, Bubbles Could Help Pollinate

Soap bubbles are sticky enough to carry a pollen payload and delicate enough to land on flowers without harm. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Seismic waves help scientists 'see' chemical changes beneath a watershed

Chemical reactions deep below ground affect water quality, but methods for 'seeing' them are time-consuming, expensive and limited in scope. A research team found that seismic waves can help to identify these reactions under an entire watershed and protect groundwater resources.

15h

Carbon Emissions Are Chilling The Atmosphere 90 Km Above Antarctica

Something strange is happening at the edge of space.

15h

Invisible barriers cut down on cheating

Both see-through and pretend partitions promoted honesty in taking tests, psychology experiments show, suggesting simple environmental cues can nudge children to do the right thing.

15h

Rising temps put desert shrubs in high-efficiency mode

Research shows that one shrub, the brittlebush, is adapting, and showing a remarkable ability to respond to increased temperature and aridity.

15h

Hydrogel mimics human brain with memorizing and forgetting ability

Researchers have found a soft and wet material that can memorize, retrieve, and forget information, much like the human brain.

16h

A new way to target cancers using 'synthetic lethality'

Researchers report that inhibiting a key enzyme caused human cancer cells associated with two major types of breast and ovarian cancer to die and in mouse studies reduced tumor growth.

16h

A Cyberattack on Garmin Disrupted More Than Workouts

A ransomware hit and subsequent outage caused problems in the company's aviation services, including flight planning and mapping.

16h

Opposing climate change action gets more news coverage

When organizations take a stand against actions to combat climate change, they get more news coverage than their pro-climate action peers , according to the study. "The media is providing a distorted picture of how different groups feel on this issue." Rachel Wetts, an assistant professor in Brown University's sociology department who is affiliated with the Institute at Brown for Environment and

16h

Kelp found off Scotland dates back 16,000 years to last ice age

Experts from Heriot-Watt University's Orkney campus analysed the genetic composition of oarweed from 14 areas.

16h

Higher end of normal blood platelet count could indicate cancer

Blood platelet counts at the higher end of normal suggest a high risk of cancer in men aged 60 or over, and should be investigated, according to new University of Exeter research.

16h

Government urgently needs to gauge public perception of new track and trace app

One of the earliest studies to look at mass acceptance of tracing apps, undertaken by international researchers, including Lancaster University, suggests that privacy (which is generally prioritised by governments in terms of app design) is only the top consideration for a certain group of people. Others would place greater weighting on other considerations, such as how convenient it would be to u

16h

17h

Lockdown saw modest drop in China air pollution

Large improvements of air quality in China during the COVID-19 lockdown have been widely reported, but new research reveals that the two pollutants most harmful to human health, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone, were only slightly reduced.

17h

Inhaling pure oxygen could keep your brain younger for longer

Subjects take part in hyperbaric oxygen therapy in Florida. Many showed increased cognitive response after a three-month trial. (The Sagol Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Research/) No matter how much retinol cream and hair dye we slather on our faces and roots, we'll all succumb to age eventually. There's no cure for it, and it's much more than skin-deep—aging takes a severe toll on our neuro

17h

Listen: How Immunity Works

On this episode of the podcast Social Distance , Katherine Wells gets the results of her coronavirus and antibody tests. She has questions about what they mean, so an expert joins to explain the immune system (with help from James Hamblin's metaphors). Lisa Butterfield is a tumor immunologist who works in cancer immunotherapy. She's the vice president of research and development at the Parker Ins

17h

Artificial intelligence identifies prostate cancer with near-perfect accuracy

Study reports 98% sensitivity and 97% specificity in recognizing and characterizing prostate cancer using an artificial intelligence (AI) program.

17h

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image