Search Posts

Nyheder2020juli29

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS?
Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

SARS-CoV-2-reactive T cells in healthy donors and patients with COVID-19
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2598-9
8h
How to mix old tires and building rubble to make sustainable roads
A recycled blend developed by Australian researchers brings together construction and tyre waste, to deliver both environmental and engineering benefits.The material offers a zero-waste solution to a massive environmental challenge – construction, renovation and demolition account for about 50% of the waste produced annually worldwide, while around 1 billion scrap tyres are generated globally each
6h
CD4 T cell-intrinsic role for the T helper 17 signature cytokine IL-17: Effector resistance to immune suppression [Immunology and Inflammation]
Untoward effector CD4+ T cell responses are kept in check by immune regulatory mechanisms mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. CD4+ T helper 17 (Th17) cells, characterized by IL-17 production, play important roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases (such as arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, among…
21h

LATEST

Pregnant Black and Hispanic women five times more likely to be exposed to coronavirus
Researchers found the rate of virus exposure among Black and Hispanic women to be five times higher than among White and Asian women.
2min
Social distancing varies by income in US
Wealthier communities went from being the most mobile before the COVID-19 pandemic to the least mobile, while poorer areas have gone from the least mobile to the most mobile, according to a UC Davis study.
11min
Report provides new framework for understanding climate risks, impacts to US agriculture
A new USDA report focuses on how agricultural systems are impacted by climate change and offers a list of 20 indicators that provide a broad look at what's happening across the country.
11min
COVID-19 risk model uses hospital data to guide decisions on social distancing
With communities throughout the United States combating surges in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Northwestern University have created a framework that helps policymakers determine which data to track and when to take action to protect their communities. The model specifies a series of trigger points to help local entities know when to tigh
11min
Experimental Blood Test Could Flag Alzheimer's
New studies show that elevated levels of a form of tau called p-tau217 can accurately distinguish Alzheimer's disease from other forms of dementia, and perhaps even predict it.
13min
Tailored light inspired by nature
An international research team has develop for the first time light fields using caustics that do not change during propagation. With the new method, the physicists cleverly exploit light structures that can be seen in rainbows or when light is transmitted through drinking glasses.
16min
Nasa moon mission asks US universities to develop technology
Fund will offer up to $2m to rapidly find ways of locating water or building power systems Nasa has asked American universities to propose new technologies that will help the space agency conduct sustainable exploration of the moon. Successful applicants will receive up to $2m (£1.5m) from the newly inaugurated lunar surface technology research (Lustr) opportunity to rapidly develop technology in
20min
Artificial brain gives robot the smarts for complex tasks
Engineers have developed an artificial brain system with touch and vision sensors to make a smarter robot. Picking up a can of soft drink may be a simple task for humans, but this is a complex task for robots. It has to locate the object, deduce its shape, determine the right amount of strength to use, and grasp the object without letting it slip. Most of today's robots operate solely based on vi
22min
COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
1. Cardiac Endotheliitis and Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome After COVID-19 ; 2. Body Mass Index and Risk for Intubation or Death in SARS-CoV-2 Infection
32min
Cosmic tango between the very small and the very large
A new study using the theory of quantum loop cosmology accounts for two major mysteries about the large-scale structure of our universe.
32min
Should you really be behind the wheel after concussion?
Even after all of their symptoms are gone, people who have had a concussion take longer to regain complex reaction times, the kind you need in most real-life driving situations on the road, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Virtual Conference from July 31 to August 1, 2020.
32min
We've finally figured out where Stonehenge's giant boulders came from
Most of the 50 huge boulders used to build Stonehenge's iconic architecture have a chemical composition that suggests they came from a site 25 kilometres away
44min
Half of Nobel prizes in science go to just five research fields
Scientists in just five research fields – including neuroscience and atomic physics – scooped up more than half of the Nobel prizes awarded for science in recent decades
44min
Boosting gut microbes helps protect mice against Alzheimer's disease
A prebiotic supplement that promotes good gut bacteria seems to protect against an Alzheimer's-like disease in mice and will soon be tested in a clinical trial
44min
Covid-19 news: Young people may be driving spikes in cases, says WHO
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
44min
The best view of the stars from Earth is on a hill in Antarctica
The best place on Earth from which to look at the night sky is a hill of ice in Antarctica – a telescope built there could take clearer images than could happen anywhere else
44min
First results of an upgraded device highlight lithium's value for producing fusion
Lithium, the silvery metal that powers smart phones and helps treat bipolar disorders, could also play a significant role in the worldwide effort to harvest on Earth the safe, clean and virtually limitless fusion energy that powers the sun and stars. First results of the extensively upgraded Lithium Tokamak Experiment-Beta (LTX-β) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics L
53min
NASA follows potential tropical cyclone 9 into eastern Caribbean
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Potential Tropical Cyclone 9 after it moved into the Eastern Caribbean Sea and continued bringing heavy rainfall and gusty winds to the Leeward Islands, the U.S. and British Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.
53min
US energy use hit 30-year low during pandemic shutdowns
U.S. energy consumption plummeted to its lowest level in more than 30 years this spring as the nation's economy largely shut down because of the coronavirus, federal officials reported Wednesday.
53min
Study solves mystery origin of Stonehenge's iconic boulders
Stonehenge, a Neolithic wonder in southern England, has vexed historians and archaeologists for centuries with its many mysteries: How was it built? What purpose did it serve? Where did its towering sandstone boulders come from?
53min
NASA follows potential tropical cyclone 9 into eastern Caribbean
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Potential Tropical Cyclone 9 after it moved into the Eastern Caribbean Sea and continued bringing heavy rainfall and gusty winds to the Leeward Islands, the US and British Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.
54min
First results of an upgraded device highlight lithium's value for producing fusion
Initial results of the LTX-β at PPPL show that the enhancements significantly improve performance of the plasma that will fuel future fusion reactors.
54min
Disaster Management Is Too White, Official Tells Congress
More diversity is needed to reverse long-standing inequities in disaster response policies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
54min
2020's final Mars mission poised for blastoff from Florida
The summer's third and final mission to Mars—featuring NASA's most elaborate life-hunting rover—is on the verge of liftoff.
59min
Study sheds light on the evolution of the earliest dinosaurs
The classic dinosaur family tree has two subdivisions of early dinosaurs at its base: the Ornithischians, or bird-hipped dinosaurs, which include the later Triceratops and Stegosaurus; and the Saurischians, or lizard-hipped dinosaurs, such as Brontosaurus and Tyrannosaurus.
1h
COVID-19 Vaccine, Sharks and Mezcal
A month's worth of cool science stories, summed up. COVID-19 Vaccine, Sharks and Mezcal Video of COVID-19 Vaccine, Sharks and Mezcal Creature Wednesday, July 29, 2020 – 15:30 Alistair Jennings, Contributor (Inside Science) — Researchers published two notable papers this month about the results of trials on new vaccines for the new coronavirus. One comes from a set of laboratories in China, the
1h
Experimental COVID-19 vaccine protects upper and lower airways in nonhuman primates
Two doses of an experimental vaccine to prevent COVID-19 induced robust immune responses and rapidly controlled the coronavirus in the upper and lower airways of rhesus macaques exposed to SARS-CoV-2, scientists report.
1h
Genetically similar fungi cause severe infections in different hospitals
Present in the human digestive tract, species of Candida can cause bloodstream infections in patients treated in hospital intensive care units. An international study involving 16 hospitals found isolates with high levels of virulence
1h
Hackers Broke Into Real News Sites to Plant Fake Stories
A disinfo operation broke into the content management systems of Eastern European media outlets in a campaign to spread misinformation about NATO.
1h
Loss of bees threatens US crop yields
A lack of pollinators like bees is leading to reduced crop yields for apples, cherries, and blueberries across the United States, researchers report. Most of the world's crops depend on honeybees and wild bees for pollination, so declines in both managed and wild bee populations raise concerns about food security, according to the new study. "We found that many crops are pollination-limited, mean
1h
Why NASA's Perseverance Mars Rover Uses Nuclear Energy
Radioactive plutonium is crucial for keeping this and other power-hungry deep-space missions warm and working for yeras on end — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Pimavanserin reduced symptoms of dementia-related psychosis in phase 3 trial
New data presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference indicates that pimavanserin leads to a robust reduction in the severity of psychosis symptoms during the 12 week open-label phase of the study, regardless of the underlying dementia subtype or the severity of participants' dementia.
1h
Talbot helps ID muscle gene that, when altered, causes joint disease
Jared Talbot is part of a 32-member international research team that identified a gene that, when altered, can cause bent fingers and toes, clubfoot, scoliosis, and short stature. The team discovered that partial loss of the protein coding gene MYLPF (myosin light chain, phosphorylatable, fast skeletal muscle) results in a disorder called distal arthrogryposis (DA) that's present at birth.
1h
FSU biologist uses genome database to investigate cancer cells
Florida State University Professor of Biological Science David Gilbert is using the latest information about the human genome as a guide to better understand cancer.
1h
5 things that happen to your brain when you learn a new language
Learning a new language has been shown to sharpen your cognitive abilities while helping stave off dementia as you age. A University of Chicago study found that businesspeople make better decisions when weighing problems in a non-native tongue. Juggling multiple languages lets bilingual speakers switch between tasks with less stress and more control than monolinguists. In an increasingly globaliz
1h
Alaskan seismometers record the northern lights
An aurora sightseeing tour leader in Alaska, was lucky enough to photograph a 'eruption' of brilliant pink light in the night skies one night in February.
1h
Decreased iron levels in seawater make mussels loosen their grip
Mussels secrete sticky plaques that help them attach to wet surfaces, such as rocks on the beach. These adhesive structures are rich in iron, which is thought to help make the attachments strong yet flexible. Now, researchers have shown that mussels form weaker attachments in iron-deficient seawater, revealing a possible consequence of altered iron bioavailability in oceans.
1h
New fabrication method brings single-crystal perovskite devices closer to viability
Nanoengineers have developed a new method to fabricate perovskites as single-crystal thin films, which are more efficient for use in solar cells and optical devices than the current state-of-the-art polycrystalline forms of the material. Their fabrication method — which uses standard semiconductor fabrication processes — results in flexible single-crystal perovskite films with controlled area, t
1h
Marine Corps Bans Service Members From Mining Bitcoin on Military Devices
Crypto Ban According to a Tuesday U.S. Marine Corps memo , service members are now banned from mining cryptocurrency on any government-issued phones or devices. It's an unusual announcement, and like mattress warning labels or "do not shake the vending machine" signs, probably something that no one thought to ban until it actually became a problem. But, as CoinDesk reports , the military seems wo
1h
How a crystalline sponge sheds water molecules
How does water leave a sponge? In a new study, scientists answer this question in detail for a porous, crystalline material made from metal and organic building blocks — specifically, cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate, 5-aminoisophthalic acid and 4,4'-bipyridine. Using advanced techniques, researchers studied how this crystalline sponge changed shape as it went from a hydrated state to a dehydrated
1h
Pregnant Black and Hispanic women five times more likely to be exposed to coronavirus
Black and Hispanic pregnant women in Philadelphia are five times as likely as white and Asian women to have been exposed to the novel coronavirus, according to a new study led by Scott Hensley, Ph.D., an associate professor of Microbiology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Karen Marie Puopolo, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Pediatrics and neonatologist a
1h
Anti-Asian racism during COVID-19 has historical ties in United States
Anti-Asian hate crimes during health crises are unfortunately not new, according to a new academic paper examining the history of this phenomenon. The research team, including an Iowa State University criminal justice researcher, looked at how anti-Asian hate crimes during the COVID-19 pandemic have furthered the historical 'othering' of Asian Americans and reproduced inequalities.
1h
Researchers outline need for evaluation of gene expression profiling in melanoma
A consensus statement published today in JAMA Dermatology cautions against routine use of currently available GEP tests for patients with cutaneous melanoma.
1h
Scientists Awaken Deep Sea Bacteria After 100 Million Years
The microbes had survived on trace amounts of oxygen, and were able to feed and multiply once revived in the lab.
2h
A neural network that spots similarities between programs could help computers code themselves
Computer programming has never been easy. The first coders wrote programs out by hand, scrawling symbols onto graph paper before converting them into large stacks of punched cards that could be processed by the computer. One mark out of place and the whole thing might have to be redone. Nowadays coders use an array of powerful tools that automate much of the job, from catching errors as you type
2h
Butterfly genomics: Monarchs migrate and fly differently, but meet up and mate
A new study confirms that while the eastern and western butterflies fly differently, they are genetically the same.
2h
Breakthrough method for predicting solar storms
Extensive power outages and satellite blackouts that affect air travel and the internet are some of the potential consequences of massive solar storms. These storms are believed to be caused by the release of enormous amounts of stored magnetic energy due to changes in the magnetic field of the sun's outer atmosphere – something that until now has eluded scientists' direct measurement. Researchers
2h
Expert: We need to prep for COVID-19 vaccine distribution now
Once a COVID-19 vaccine is proven to be both safe and effective, governments, industry, and health care providers will face the considerable task of figuring out how to distribute the vaccine fairly and efficiently. This is precisely the sort of challenge Julie Swann has spent her professional life preparing for. Swann, department head and professor of the industrial and systems engineering at No
2h
2h
Study sheds light on the evolution of the earliest dinosaurs
Geological evidence suggests the known dinosaur groups diverged early on, supporting the traditional dinosaur family tree.
2h
The Guardian view on Covid-19's resurgence: we can make ourselves safer | Editorial
The picture in Europe and further afield is grim. But we must not resign ourselves to a large-scale recurrence of coronavirus Is the brief respite over? In England, and other European nations hit hard by coronavirus, bars and cafes have reopened, and people have begun to fly abroad again for holidays. Guests have gathered for weddings. Babies have met their grandparents for the first time. Though
2h
UK health leaders call for government to seek total elimination
Scientists predict 43 to 84 people will still be dying from Covid-19 every day by mid-August Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists advising the government have predicted that between 43 and 84 people will still be dying from Covid-19 every day by mid-August, as health leaders called on the government to adopt a "zero Covid" approach and seek total elimination of
2h
How to Watch NASA Launch Its New Perseverance Mars Rover
NASA's new rover is its biggest, most autonomous yet and may lead us to the first signs of ancient life on the Red Planet.
2h
Whence Came Stonehenge's Stones? Now We Know
Last year archaeologists pinpointed the origin of many of the ancient monument's massive stones. A new study identifies the source of the rest.
2h
A safer cell therapy harnesses patient T cells to fight multiple myeloma
A treatment for multiple myeloma that harnesses the body's cancer-fighting T cells was safe in humans and showed preliminary signs of effectiveness, according to a clinical trial involving 23 patients with relapsed or treatment-resistant disease.
2h
Slowing down a 'helper' cell may someday make vaccines more effective for seniors
Suppressing IL-10 production from 'Tfh 10' cells within the immune systems of older people could make influenza vaccines more effective, according to new research led by experts from Cincinnati Children's.
2h
Scientists make quantum technology smaller
A way of shrinking the devices used in quantum sensing systems has been developed by researchers at the UK Quantum Technology Hub Sensors and Timing, which is led by the University of Birmingham.
2h
CNIC scientists discover the mechanism of competition between mitochondrial genomes coexisting
The study, published in Science Advances, reveals that cells can detect the presence of different mitochondrial genomes and select among them according to their effect on metabolic status
2h
Most of Stonehenge's large boulders share origin in west woods, Wiltshire
Most of the hulking sandstone boulders — called sarsens – that make up the United Kingdom's famous Stonehenge monument appear to share a common origin 25 kilometers away in West Woods, Wiltshire, according to an analysis of the stones' chemical composition. The findings support the theory that the stones were brought to Stonehenge at around the same time,
2h
Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis
Scientists have discovered a new way of killing the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), using a toxin produced by the germ itself.
2h
Eyckian Lamb of God reveals her secrets
Two non-invasive chemical imaging modalities were employed to help understand the changes made over time to the Lamb of God, the focal point of the Ghent Altarpiece (1432) by Hubert and Jan Van Eyck. Two major results were obtained: a prediction of the facial features of the Lamb of God that had been hidden beneath non-original overpaint dating from the 16th century (and later), and evidence for a
2h
Researchers find therapeutic targets to fight SARS-CoV-2
Researchers from HSE University have developed new approaches for regulating the expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 enzymes, which play a crucial role in cell infection with SARS-CoV-2. The scholars discovered that small non-coding microRNA (miRNA) molecules are capable of performing a targeted decrease in ACE2 and TMPRSS2. The results of the study have been published in PLOS ONE journal.
2h
Mystery of origin of Stonehenge megaliths solved
Archaeologists have pinpointed the source of the stones to an area 15 miles north of the site.
2h
NASA Prepares to Launch the Mars Rover Perseverance
On July 30, NASA is set to launch a car-sized rover named Perseverance and a robotic helicopter named Ingenuity to the planet Mars, to search for signs of past microbial life and examine the Martian climate and geology in an area known as Jezero crater. If all goes according to schedule, the Mars 2020 mission will land its robotic explorers on Mars on February 18, 2021, after six and a half month
2h
Listen: 'The Most Magical Place on Earth'
On this episode of the podcast Social Distance, staff writer Graeme Wood makes his first visit to Walt Disney World in the midst of a pandemic. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published. What follows is an edited and condensed transcript of their conversation. Katherine We
2h
Chiral shape fluctuations and the origin of chirality in cholesteric phases of DNA origamis
Lyotropic cholesteric liquid crystal phases are ubiquitously observed in biological and synthetic polymer solutions, characterized by a complex interplay between thermal fluctuations and entropic and enthalpic forces. The elucidation of the link between microscopic features and macroscopic chiral structure, and of the relative roles of these competing contributions on phase organization, remains
2h
Thermostable small-molecule inhibitor of angiogenesis and vascular permeability that suppresses a pERK-FosB/{Delta}FosB-VCAM-1 axis
Vascular permeability and angiogenesis underpin neovascular age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. While anti-VEGF therapies are widely used clinically, many patients do not respond optimally, or at all, and small-molecule therapies are lacking. Here, we identified a dibenzoxazepinone BT2 that inhibits endothelial cell proliferation, migration, wound repair in vitro, network f
2h
Accelerating thrombolysis using a precision and clot-penetrating drug delivery strategy by nanoparticle-shelled microbubbles
Conventional thrombolytic drugs for vascular blockage such as tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) are challenged by the low bioavailability, off-target side effects and limited penetration in thrombi, leading to delayed recanalization. We hypothesize that these challenges can be addressed with the targeted and controlled delivery of thrombolytic drugs or precision drug delivery. A porous and magne
2h
Voltage-induced ferromagnetism in a diamagnet
Increasingly impressive demonstrations of voltage-controlled magnetism have been achieved recently, highlighting potential for low-power data processing and storage. Magnetoionic approaches appear particularly promising, electrolytes and ionic conductors being capable of on/off control of ferromagnetism and tuning of magnetic anisotropy. A clear limitation, however, is that these devices either e
2h
Origins of the sarsen megaliths at Stonehenge
The sources of the stone used to construct Stonehenge around 2500 BCE have been debated for over four centuries. The smaller "bluestones" near the center of the monument have been traced to Wales, but the origins of the sarsen (silcrete) megaliths that form the primary architecture of Stonehenge remain unknown. Here, we use geochemical data to show that 50 of the 52 sarsens at the monument share
2h
A supramolecular platform for controlling and optimizing molecular architectures of siRNA targeted delivery vehicles
It requires multistep synthesis and conjugation processes to incorporate multifunctionalities into a polyplex gene vehicle to overcome numerous hurdles during gene delivery. Here, we describe a supramolecular platform to precisely control, screen, and optimize molecular architectures of siRNA targeted delivery vehicles, which is based on rationally designed host-guest complexation between a β-cyc
2h
2h
2h
Gut dysbiosis contributes to amyloid pathology, associated with C/EBP{beta}/AEP signaling activation in Alzheimers disease mouse model
The gut-brain axis is bidirectional, and gut microbiota influence brain disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β/asparagine endopeptidase (C/EBPβ/AEP) signaling spatiotemporally mediates AD pathologies in the brain via cleaving both β-amyloid precursor protein and Tau. We show that gut dysbiosis occurs in 5xFAD mice, and is associated with escalation of the C
2h
All twist and no bend makes raft edges splay: Spontaneous curvature of domain edges in colloidal membranes
Using theory and experiments, we study the interface between two immiscible domains in a colloidal membrane composed of rigid rods of different lengths. Geometric considerations of rigid rod packing imply that a domain of sufficiently short rods in a background membrane of long rods is more susceptible to twist than the inverse structure, a long-rod domain in a short-rod membrane. The midplane ti
2h
Cryo-EM structures of the air-oxidized and dithionite-reduced photosynthetic alternative complex III from Roseiflexus castenholzii
Alternative complex III (ACIII) is a multisubunit quinol:electron acceptor oxidoreductase that couples quinol oxidation with transmembrane proton translocation in both the respiratory and photosynthetic electron transport chains of bacteria. The coupling mechanism, however, is poorly understood. Here, we report the cryo-EM structures of air-oxidized and dithionite-reduced ACIII from the photosynt
2h
Cell identity and nucleo-mitochondrial genetic context modulate OXPHOS performance and determine somatic heteroplasmy dynamics
Heteroplasmy, multiple variants of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the same cytoplasm, may be naturally generated by mutations but is counteracted by a genetic mtDNA bottleneck during oocyte development. Engineered heteroplasmic mice with nonpathological mtDNA variants reveal a nonrandom tissue-specific mtDNA segregation pattern, with few tissues that do not show segregation. The driving force for t
2h
Crustal thickening and endogenic oxidation of magmatic sulfur
Porphyry ore deposits, Earth's most important resources of copper, molybdenum, and rhenium, are strongly associated with felsic magmas showing signs of high-pressure differentiation and are usually found in places with thickened crust (>45 kilometers). This pattern is well-known, but unexplained, and remains an outstanding problem in our understanding of porphyry ore deposit formation. We approac
2h
A new method for accurate in vivo mapping of human brain connections using microstructural and anatomical information
Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive imaging modality that has been extensively used in the literature to study the neuronal architecture of the brain in a wide range of neurological conditions using tractography. However, recent studies highlighted that the anatomical accuracy of the reconstructions is inherently limited and challenged its appropriateness. Several solutions have
2h
A new mechanism for void-cascade interaction from nondestructive depth-resolved atomic-scale measurements of ion irradiation-induced defects in Fe
The nondestructive investigation of single vacancies and vacancy clusters in ion-irradiated samples requires a depth-resolved probe with atomic sensitivity to defects. The recent development of short-pulsed positron beams provides such a probe. Here, we combine depth-resolved Doppler broadening and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopies to identify vacancy clusters in ion-irradiated Fe and
2h
On-demand spin-state manipulation of single-photon emission from quantum dot integrated with metasurface
The semiconductor quantum dot (QD) has been successfully demonstrated as a potentially scalable and on-chip integration technology to generate the triggered photon streams that have many important applications in quantum information science. However, the randomicity of these photon streams emitted from the QD seriously compromises its use and especially hinders the on-demand manipulation of the s
2h
Atomically deviated Pd-Te nanoplates boost methanol-tolerant fuel cells
The methanol crossover effect in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) can severely reduce cathodic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance and fuel efficiency. As a result, developing efficient catalysts with simultaneously high ORR activity and excellent antipoisoning methanol capability remains challenging. Here, we report a class of Pd-Te hexagonal nanoplates (HPs) with a Pd 20 Te 7 phase th
2h
Breaking the absorption limit of Si toward SWIR wavelength range via strain engineering
Silicon has been widely used in the microelectronics industry. However, its photonic applications are restricted to visible and partial near-infrared spectral range owing to its fundamental optical bandgap (1.12 eV). With recent advances in strain engineering, material properties, including optical bandgap, can be tailored considerably. This paper reports the strain-induced shrinkage in the Si ba
2h
IL-10-producing Tfh cells accumulate with age and link inflammation with age-related immune suppression
Aging results in profound immune dysfunction, resulting in the decline of vaccine responsiveness previously attributed to irreversible defects in the immune system. In addition to increased interleukin-6 (IL-6), we found aged mice exhibit increased systemic IL-10 that requires forkhead box P3–negative (FoxP3 – ), but not FoxP3 + , CD4 + T cells. Most IL-10–producing cells manifested a T follicula
2h
Structural mechanism of two gain-of-function cardiac and skeletal RyR mutations at an equivalent site by cryo-EM
Mutations in ryanodine receptors (RyRs), intracellular Ca 2+ channels, are associated with deadly disorders. Despite abundant functional studies, the molecular mechanism of RyR malfunction remains elusive. We studied two single-point mutations at an equivalent site in the skeletal (RyR1 R164C) and cardiac (RyR2 R176Q) isoforms using ryanodine binding, Ca 2+ imaging, and cryo–electron microscopy (
2h
Dual mode standoff imaging spectroscopy documents the painting process of the Lamb of God in the Ghent Altarpiece by J. and H. Van Eyck
The ongoing conservation treatment program of the Ghent Altarpiece by Hubert and Jan Van Eyck, one of the iconic paintings of the west, has revealed that the designs of the paintings were changed several times, first by the original artists, and then during later restorations. The central motif, The Lamb of God, representing Christ, plays an essential iconographic role, and its depiction is impor
2h
Thermally assisted nanotransfer printing with sub-20-nm resolution and 8-inch wafer scalability
Nanotransfer printing (nTP) has attracted considerable attention due to its good pattern resolution, process simplicity, and cost-effectiveness. However, the development of a large-area nTP process has been hampered by critical reliability issues related to the uniform replication and regular transfer printing of functional nanomaterials. Here, we present a very practical thermally assisted nanot
2h
A nucleotidyltransferase toxin inhibits growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis through inactivation of tRNA acceptor stems
Toxin-antitoxin systems are widespread stress-responsive elements, many of whose functions remain largely unknown. Here, we characterize the four DUF1814-family nucleotidyltransferase-like toxins (MenT 1–4 ) encoded by the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis . Toxin MenT 3 inhibited growth of M. tuberculosis when not antagonized by its cognate antitoxin, MenA 3 . We solved the structures of
2h
A dielectric metasurface optical chip for the generation of cold atoms
Compact and robust cold atom sources are increasingly important for quantum research, especially for transferring cutting-edge quantum science into practical applications. In this study, we report on a novel scheme that uses a metasurface optical chip to replace the conventional bulky optical elements used to produce a cold atomic ensemble with a single incident laser beam, which is split by the
2h
FCA orders finance firms to protect 24m vulnerable customers
Regulator warns Covid-19 has increased number of people at risk of being exploited
2h
Ancient bones in disturbed peat bogs are rotting away, alarming archaeologists
Changing conditions in wetlands threaten archaeological remains
2h
Long-lost relic may reveal origins of Stonehenge
Rock core drilled out more than 50 years ago points to birthplace of monument's giant stones
2h
On Tomorrow's Launch, NASA Is Sending Spacesuit Chunks to Mars
NASA's fifth Mars rover, Perseverance, is scheduled to finally blast off into space tomorrow morning . Besides a whole host of fascinating scientific instruments, the rover will also be carrying small bits of space suit to the Martian surface. The goal is to find out how different materials react to the unique Martian environment, in an effort to design a spacesuit meant for the first astronauts
2h
Engineers Built "Giant Atoms" That Enhance Quantum Computers
Big Chonker Scientists found a new way to improve the fragile and error-prone qubits that make up a quantum computing circuit — and it's strange. Qubits tend to make errors and can rapidly decay as they transmit information. So a team of MIT engineers built artificial, superconducting "giant atoms" by coupling together multiple cubits-worth of regular atoms. These giant atoms are easier to contro
2h
Vaccines for flu and pneumonia could reduce your chances of getting Alzheimer's
Two teams of medical researchers found that people who got the seasonal flu or pneumonia vaccine were less likely to develop Alzheimer's compared with those who didn't get either of the two vaccines. (Unsplash/) Two common vaccines may come with an unexpected benefit, preliminary research indicates. Two teams of medical researchers found that people who got the seasonal flu or pneumonia vaccine w
2h
Archaeologists discover likely source of Stonehenge's giant sarsen stones
Stones in Wiltshire woodland found to be exact match for majority of site's sarsens Today West Woods in Wiltshire is a popular spot for hikers, dog walkers and mountain bikers, famed for its bluebells in the springtime. Stick to the footpaths and it is easy to miss the hefty flat stones hidden in the undergrowth. But groundbreaking scientific research published on Wednesday reveals that, 4,500 ye
2h
Scientists discover the mechanism of competition between mitochondrial genomes coexisting
Research at the Centro Nacional de Investigadores Cardiovasculares (CNIC) has identified the mechanism of competition between distinct mitochondrial genomes coexisting in the same cell. The study, published today in Science Advances, examines why the simultaneous presence of more than one variant of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in a cell is rejected in most cells, which select a single mtDNA variant
2h
Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis
The toxin can block the use of important amino acids required by the bacteria to produce essential proteins needed for survival.
2h
Researchers find therapeutic targets to fight SARS-CoV-2
Researchers from HSE University have developed new approaches for regulating the expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 enzymes, which play a crucial role in cell infection with SARS-CoV-2. The scholars discovered that small non-coding microRNA (miRNA) molecules are capable of performing a targeted decrease in ACE2 and TMPRSS2. The results of the study have been published in PLOS ONE.
2h
Scientists discover the mechanism of competition between mitochondrial genomes coexisting
Research at the Centro Nacional de Investigadores Cardiovasculares (CNIC) has identified the mechanism of competition between distinct mitochondrial genomes coexisting in the same cell. The study, published today in Science Advances, examines why the simultaneous presence of more than one variant of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in a cell is rejected in most cells, which select a single mtDNA variant
2h
Accelerated bone deterioration in last 70 years at famous Mesolithic peat bog in peril
Alarming results from a 2019 survey of well-known archaeological site Ageröd reveal drastic bone and organic matter deterioration since the site's initial excavations in the 1940s, suggesting action is needed to preserve findings from Ageröd and similar sites, according to a study published July 29, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Adam Boethius from Lund University, Sweden, and colleag
2h
Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis
The toxin can block the use of important amino acids required by the bacteria to produce essential proteins needed for survival.
2h
Researchers find therapeutic targets to fight SARS-CoV-2
Researchers from HSE University have developed new approaches for regulating the expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 enzymes, which play a crucial role in cell infection with SARS-CoV-2. The scholars discovered that small non-coding microRNA (miRNA) molecules are capable of performing a targeted decrease in ACE2 and TMPRSS2. The results of the study have been published in PLOS ONE.
2h
Imaging technology reveals historical layers of Eyckian Lamb of God
Two non-invasive chemical imaging modalities were employed to help understand the changes made over time to the Lamb of God, the focal point of the Ghent Altarpiece (1432) by Hubert and Jan Van Eyck. Two major results were obtained: a prediction of the facial features of the Lamb of God that had been hidden beneath non-original overpaint dating from the 16th century (and later), and evidence for a
2h
Scientists make quantum technology smaller
A way of shrinking the devices used in quantum sensing systems has been developed by researchers at the UK Quantum Technology Hub Sensors and Timing, which is led by the University of Birmingham.
2h
Nobel prize-winning work is concentrated in minority of scientific fields
From 1995 to 2017, work that was awarded a Nobel Prize in Medicine, Physics, or Chemistry clustered in just a few scientific disciplines. John Ioannidis of Stanford University and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on July 29, 2020.
2h
New maps of chemical marks on DNA pinpoint regions relevant to many developmental diseases
In research that aims to illuminate the causes of human developmental disorders, scientists have generated 168 new maps of chemical marks on strands of DNA — called methylation — in developing mice. The data can help narrow down regions of the human genome that play roles in diseases such as schizophrenia and Rett Syndrome.
2h
Newer PFAS contaminant detected for first time in Arctic seawater
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), found in many household products and food packages, have raised concerns because of their persistence and possible toxicity to people and wildlife. Because the compounds don't break down naturally, they have become environmental contaminants. Now, researchers have studied the transport of 29 PFAS into and out of the Arctic Ocean, detecting a newer compou
2h
How Hurricanes Have Shaped the Course of U.S. History
A new book examines the 500-year record of devastating storms affecting the nation's trajectory
2h
Why NASA Is Headed Back to Mars with the Rover Perseverance
Find out why the next mission to Mars is so exciting on the National Air and Space Museum's podcast AirSpace
2h
One Mystery of Stonehenge's Origins Has Finally Been Solved
Detailed testing of the chemical signature of the Neolithic monument's most prominent large stones pinpointed where they came from — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
One Mystery of Stonehenge's Origins Has Finally Been Solved
Detailed testing of the chemical signature of the Neolithic monument's most prominent large stones pinpointed where they came from — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
NASA's new Mars rover is bristling with tech made to find signs of alien life
Deep down, our drive to explore Mars has always been about figuring out the story of life in our solar system. Are we alone? Were we always? Or is life on Earth descended from Martian progenitors? NASA is now on the verge of launching its most ambitious effort ever to chip away at those questions, in the form of a high-tech rover called Perseverance and a scheme to return some of the samples it f
3h
Smart devices, a cohesive system, a brighter future
If you need a reason to feel good about the direction technology is going, look up Dell Technologies CTO John Roese on Twitter. The handle he composed back in 2006 is @theICToptimist. ICT stands for information and communication. This podcast episode was produced by Insights, the custom content arm of MIT Technology Review. It was not produced by MIT Technology Review's editorial staff. "The reas
3h
Florida and California report record jumps in coronavirus deaths
Fatalities on the rise after surge in cases across US sunbelt region in recent weeks
3h
Transforming e-waste into a strong, protective coating for metal
A typical recycling process converts large quantities of items made of a single material into more of the same. However, this approach isn't feasible for old electronic devices, or "e-waste," because they contain small amounts of many different materials that cannot be readily separated. Now researchers report a selective, small-scale microrecycling strategy, which they use to convert old printe
3h
Newer PFAS contaminant detected for first time in Arctic seawater
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), found in many household products and food packages, have raised concerns because of their persistence and possible toxicity to people and wildlife. Because the compounds don't break down naturally, they have become environmental contaminants. Now, researchers have studied the transport of 29 PFAS into and out of the Arctic Ocean, detecting a newer compou
3h
Estimating bisphenol exposures in the Australian population
Once found in bottles, food containers, cash register receipts and electronics, bisphenol A (BPA) has been phased out of many products because of health concerns and government regulations. As a result, the production and use of BPA analogs, which are unregulated and poorly understood, have increased. Now, by analyzing urine samples and wastewater, researchers report how human exposure to bispheno
3h
Astronomers pinpoint the best place on Earth for a telescope: High on a frigid Antarctic plateau
Dome A, the highest ice dome on the Antarctic Plateau, could offer the clearest view on Earth of the stars at night, according to new research. The challenge? The location is one of the coldest and most remote places on Earth.
3h
Study sheds light on the evolution of the earliest dinosaurs
Geological evidence suggests the known dinosaur groups diverged early on, supporting the traditional dinosaur family tree.
3h
Nvidia Crushes New MLPerf Tests, but Google's Future Looks Promising
So far, there haven't been any upsets in the MLPerf AI benchmarks. Nvidia not only wins everything, but they are still the only company that even competes in every category. Today's MLPerf Training 0.7 announcement of results isn't much different. Nvidia started shipping its A100 GPUs in time to submit results in the Released category for commercially available products, where it put in a top-of-
3h
New fabric could help keep you cool in the summer, even without A/C
Air conditioning and other space cooling methods account for about 10% of all electricity consumption in the U.S., according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Now, researchers have developed a material that cools the wearer without using any electricity. The fabric transfers heat, allows moisture to evaporate from the skin and repels water.
3h
A Dead Star Gave Off Something Scientists Have Never Seen Before
An international team of astronomers say they observed a magnetar — the remains of a dead star with an extremely powerful magnetic field — unleash a burst of high-energy radiation made up of X-rays and radio waves that have never previously been observed. It was likely a type of mysterious cosmic outburst referred to as fast radio burst (FRB), which have long puzzled astronomers. But thanks to a
3h
Cutting power needs may boost brain-machine interfaces
By tuning in to a subset of brain waves, researchers have dramatically reduced the power requirements of neural interfaces while improving their accuracy. The discovery could lead to long-lasting brain implants that can both treat neurological diseases and enable mind-controlled prosthetics and machines. The researchers estimate a 90% drop in power consumption of neural interfaces by utilizing th
3h
Let's watch some of the world's biggest tech CEOs speak in front of Congress
'It takes a lot to get Tim Cook, Sundar Pichai, Jeff Bezos, and Mark Zuckerberg in the same room. It's happening today at an anti-trust hearing happening in Congress. Officially, the hearing is called: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 6: Examining the Dominance of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. If past hearings are any indicator, however, we can expect a sweeping range of questions r
3h
These Stunning Infographics and Charts Turn Science Facts into Cannabis Art
These days more and more people are using cannabinoid products for their health and wellness applications. However, these applications and benefits are so numerous and varied, you practically need a chart to keep track of them all. Luckily, a company called Goldleaf is actually making such charts and infographics. And unlike what you're probably imagining, they look so good, you're going to want
3h
Coronavirus: the four potential vaccines bought up by UK
Britain takes its stockpile to 250m doses after most recent agreement Coronavirus: UK signs deal for 60m doses of potential vaccine Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Four potential Covid-19 vaccines have been secured so far by the UK , which aims to buy up to 12 to ensure that the country has one or more that work as soon as possible. They are: Continue reading…
3h
Soundtrap by Spotify Lets You Record, Edit, and Collaborate With Anyone, Anywhere
With so many people stuck at home, there are probably more amateur musicians recording music now than at any other point in history. So if you're one of them, and you've got sounds in your head that you want to share with the world, Soundtrap by Spotify gives you everything you need to create and collaborate in your own virtual "everywhere studio." Best of all, you can try it for free. Soundtrap
3h
Adopt a Whale Shark and Other Ocean Science Projects You Can do at Home
These fun and easy marine science activities will help researchers better understand and protect Earth's oceans.
3h
What Would Happen if You Fell Into a Black Hole?
If you plummeted into a black hole, your body would be ripped apart in a process called "spaghettification."
3h
The Last Love of Jonas Salk – Issue 88: Love & Sex
The first time they met, French artist Françoise Gilot seemed more interested in her salad than in Jonas Salk—somewhat embarrassing for her friend Chantal Hunt, who had insisted she join them for lunch. Chantal's husband, John Hunt, the executive vice president of the Salk Institute, had invited Salk to their home to discuss "Institute issues." Gilot had warned Chantal that she was tired from com
3h
RNA sequences involved in regulating gene expression identified
By studying RNA-binding proteins, a research consortium has identified genomic sites that appear to code for RNA molecules that influence gene expression.
3h
Lead released in Notre Dame Cathedral fire detected in Parisian honey
Elevated levels of lead have been found in samples of honey from hives downwind of the Notre Dame Cathedral fire, collected three months after the April 2019 blaze.
3h
How stony-iron meteorites form
Meteorites give us insight into the early development of the solar system. A scientific team has for the first time simulated the formation of a class of stony-iron meteorites, so-called pallasites, on a purely experimental basis.
3h
Hot urban temperatures and tree transpiration
The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscienceaibs.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.
3h
UC San Diego scientists part of special package of studies describing human genome
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine are among the contributors to a package of 10 studies in the journal Nature , describing the latest results from the ongoing Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project, a worldwide effort led by the NIH to understand how the human genome functions.
3h
Sense of normalcy bounces back fast: New study
Forthcoming in the Journal of Applied Psychology, a study of subjects during the outset of the COVID-19 crisis shows that psychological recovery can take place even while a person is still in the throes of a stressful experience. That's significant; previous research has suggested that recovery processes start after stressors abate.
3h
How a crystalline sponge sheds water molecules
How does water leave a sponge?
3h
Scientists develop realistic canine bite sleeve to improve training
Army scientists designed and developed a realistic canine bite sleeve trainer to improve the performance of military and civilian K9s. Military working dogs often serve an essential role in military operations.
3h
Will Kids Follow the New Pandemic Rules at School?
Across the country, schools have outlined the precautions they'll take as they reopen their campuses this fall. If and when kids return, schools are planning outdoor "mask breaks" in Denver , one-way hallways in Northern Virginia , and shortened in-person school weeks in New York City , among many , many other safeguards against coronavirus outbreaks. Included in these reopening plans are a numbe
3h
Daily Briefing: Scientists wake up 100-million-year-old microbes
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02259-8 Bacteria from ancient sea-floor sediments have been revived after lying dormant for eons. Plus: Pluto's dark side reveals its secrets, and the world's largest nuclear-fusion experiment starts assembly
3h
Breakthrough method for predicting solar storms
Extensive power outages and satellite blackouts that affect air travel and the internet are some of the potential consequences of massive solar storms. These storms are believed to be caused by the release of enormous amounts of stored magnetic energy due to changes in the magnetic field of the sun's outer atmosphere—something that until now has eluded scientists' direct measurement. Researchers b
4h
Scientists develop realistic canine bite sleeve to improve training
Army scientists designed and developed a realistic canine bite sleeve trainer to improve the performance of military and civilian K9s. Military working dogs often serve an essential role in military operations.
4h
High time to open up ecological research
Share the code and data behind the research please. It's easy, but it will have a major positive impact on progress and trust in science. That is the clear message from a new paper in PLOS Biology. An international team of ecologists found that currently, only about a quarter of the scientific papers in their field publicly shares computer code for analyses. "To make the science of ecology more tr
4h
Butterfly genomics: Monarchs migrate and fly differently, but meet up and mate
Each year, millions of monarch butterflies migrate across eastern North America to fly from as far north as the U.S.-Canadian border to overwinter in central Mexico—covering as much as 3,000 miles. Meanwhile, on the other side of the Rocky Mountains, western monarchs generally fly 300 miles down to the Pacific Coast to spend the winter in California. It was long believed that the eastern and weste
4h
Hvordan så de romerske kejsere ud? Kunstig intelligens giver et godt bud
Ved hjælp af skulpturer, buster og mønter har en computer lavet fotorealistiske billeder.
4h
Melting Arctic sea ice during the summer of 2018
A study details the changes that occurred in the Arctic in September of 2018, a year when nearly 10 million kilometers of sea ice were lost throughout the summer. Its findings give an overview of how sea ice has receded over the 40 years of the satellite era and show how the summer's extensive decline is linked to global atmospheric processes as far south as the tropics.
4h
Strange dismembered star cluster found at Galaxy's edge
Astronomers have found the remnant of strange dismembered globular cluster at the edge of the Milky Way, upending theories about how heavy elements formed in early stars.
4h
Study: A plunge in incoming sunlight may have triggered 'snowball Earths'
Global ice ages may have been triggered by sharp declines in incoming sunlight, research finds.
4h
Nasa Mars rover: Perseverance robot poised for launch
The one-tonne vehicle will search for signs of Martian life and prepare rocks to send home to Earth.
4h
Alaskan seismometers record the northern lights
Aaron Lojewski, who leads aurora sightseeing tours in Alaska, was lucky enough to photograph a "eruption" of brilliant pink light in the night skies one night in February.
4h
Healing an Achilles' heel of quantum entanglement
Louisiana State University Associate Professor of Physics Mark M. Wilde and his collaborator have solved a 20-year-old problem in quantum information theory on how to calculate entanglement cost—a way to measure entanglement—in a manner that's efficiently computable, useful, and broadly applicable in several quantum research areas.
4h
COVID-19: Social media users more likely to believe false information
A new study led by researchers at McGill University finds that people who get their news from social media are more likely to have misperceptions about COVID-19. Those that consume more traditional news media have fewer misperceptions and are more likely to follow public health recommendations like social distancing.
4h
Subsidies, weather, and financial education promote agricultural insurance adoption
A new University of Maryland-led study shows that subsidies can help people continually purchase insurance products, but only if they have the financial literacy to understand the benefits of the policy and have the experience of seeing the benefits in action. In a new paper published in American Economic Review, researchers conducted the first ever experimental study to look at the impact of subs
4h
High time to open up ecological research
Share the code and data behind the research please. It's easy, but it will have a major positive impact on progress and trust in science. That is the clear message from a new paper in PLOS Biology. An international team of ecologists found that currently, only about a quarter of the scientific papers in their field publicly shares computer code for analyses. "To make the science of ecology more tr
4h
Researchers uncover how cells interact with supporting proteins to heal wounds
When we get a wound on our skin, the cells in our bodies quickly mobilize to repair it. While it has been known how cells heal wounds and how scars form, a team led by researchers from Washington University in St. Louis has determined for the first time how the process begins, which may provide new insight into wound healing, fibrosis and cancer metastasis.
4h
Transforming e-waste into a strong, protective coating for metal
A typical recycling process converts large quantities of items made of a single material into more of the same. However, this approach isn't feasible for old electronic devices, or 'e-waste,' because they contain small amounts of many different materials that cannot be readily separated. Now, in ACS Omega, researchers report a selective, small-scale microrecycling strategy, which they use to conve
4h
New fabric could help keep you cool in the summer, even without A/C
Air conditioning and other space cooling methods account for about 10% of all electricity consumption in the U.S., according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed a material that cools the wearer without using any electricity. The fabric transfers heat, allows moisture to evaporate from the skin and repels wat
4h
Butterfly genomics: Monarchs migrate and fly differently, but meet up and mate
Each year, millions of monarch butterflies migrate across eastern North America to fly from as far north as the U.S.-Canadian border to overwinter in central Mexico—covering as much as 3,000 miles. Meanwhile, on the other side of the Rocky Mountains, western monarchs generally fly 300 miles down to the Pacific Coast to spend the winter in California. It was long believed that the eastern and weste
4h
NASA's Terra Satellite finds no strong storms left in Tropical Storm Douglas
Strong wind shear has been the undoing of Tropical Storm Douglas. NASA's Terra satellite provided infrared data revealed the tropical cyclone was devoid of strong storms, indicating wind shear has weakened it.
4h
US should consider 'stay-at-home' cooling options during pandemic
A new study from Australian scientists at the forefront of climate and health modeling suggests electric fans and water dousing could be a viable stay-at-home cooling strategy as the United States (US) anticipates extreme heat.
4h
Researchers pinpoint how sorbent materials catch and release carbon
A key component of ambient direct air capture (DAC) systems that remove carbon dioxide from the air is the sorbent material that is used to first capture the carbon and then to release it. Certain sorbent materials can pull carbon dioxide from the air as it flows over the material. It then releases the carbon when water is applied. As the material dries again, it absorbs carbon, and so on.
4h
Tailored light inspired by nature
Modern applications such as high resolution microsopy or micro- or nanoscale material processing require customized laser beams that do not change during propagation. This represents an immense challenge since light typically broadens during propagation, a phenomenon known as diffraction. So-called propagation-invariant or non-diffracting light fields therefore do not seem possible at first glance
4h
How stony-iron meteorites form
Meteorites give us insight into the early development of the solar system. Using the SAPHiR instrument at the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), a scientific team has for the first time simulated the formation of a class of stony-iron meteorites, so-called pallasites, on a purely experimental basis.
4h
Astronomers pinpoint the best place on Earth for a telescope: High on a frigid Antarctic plateau
au, could offer the clearest view on Earth of the stars at night, according to new research by an international team from China, Australia and the University of British Columbia (UBC). The challenge? The location is one of the coldest and most remote places on Earth. The findings were published today in Nature.
4h
Lead released in Notre Dame Cathedral fire detected in Parisian honey
Elevated levels of lead have been found in samples of honey from hives downwind of the Notre Dame Cathedral fire, collected three months after the April 2019 blaze.
4h
NZ-China agreement has brought strong economic gains
An Otago economist argues New Zealand should expand its trade agreements in the wake of COVID-19, as his new research shows the country benefited from the NZ-China free trade agreement.
4h
Katherine Hoffman, 'Eternal' Florida State Figure, Dies at 105
From the 1930s to the 2010s, as a student, professor and distinguished alumna, she was a model citizen in support of the school. She died of Covid-19.
4h
How a crystalline sponge sheds water molecules
How does water leave a sponge? In a new study, scientists answer this question in detail for a porous, crystalline material made from metal and organic building blocks — specifically, cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate, 5-aminoisophthalic acid and 4,4'-bipyridine. Using advanced techniques, researchers studied how this crystalline sponge changed shape as it went from a hydrated state to a dehydrated
4h
Breakthrough method for predicting solar storms
Extensive power outages and satellite blackouts that affect air travel and the internet are some of the potential consequences of massive solar storms. These storms are believed to be caused by the release of enormous amounts of stored magnetic energy due to changes in the magnetic field of the sun's outer atmosphere – something that until now has eluded scientists' direct measurement. Researchers
4h
Engineers find thinner tissues in replacement heart valves create problematic flutter
Iowa State and University of Texas engineers have developed high-fidelity computational models of replacement heart valves to examine the performance of biological tissues built into the valves. They found that thinner tissues can flap and flutter, which can damage the valves and even the blood that flows by.
4h
The mysterious case of man who can read letters—but not numbers—exposes roots of consciousness
With a condition that's "too strange for words," patient can do mental math but cannot recognize numerals
4h
Close relatives of the novel coronavirus may have circulated in bats for decades before jumping to humans
Close relatives of the virus behind COVID-19 likely circulated in bats for decades before the viruses made their jump into humans last yeaafix
4h
GlaxoSmithKline warns of hit to vaccines business
UK drugmaker says earnings forecast will be under threat unless immunisation rates pick up
4h
Plutonium-238 to help power perseverance on Mars
After its long journey to Mars beginning this summer, NASA's Perseverance rover will be powered across the planet's surface in part by plutonium produced at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
4h
Close relatives of the novel coronavirus may have circulated in bats for decades before jumping to humans
Close relatives of the virus behind COVID-19 likely circulated in bats for decades before the viruses made their jump into humans last yeaafix
4h
Tailored meta-grid of nanoparticles boosting performance of light-emitting diodes
Introducing the newly designed 'meta-grid' of nanoparticles into the epoxy casing of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) offers a substantial improvement of their light output, besides increasing lifetime, according to the scientists who invented it. A 'meta-grid' is a specially designed, optimized two-dimensional array of metallic nanoparticles, which needs to be placed at a specific location within the
4h
Is the Earth's transition zone deforming like the upper mantle?
In a recently published paper in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, researchers from the Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University and the University of Lille combine numerical modeling of dislocation glide and results from diffusion experiments to revisit the rheology of wadsleyite, ringwoodite and majorite garnet under geological strain rates across the transition zone of the Earth's mantl
4h
NASA Venus Rover Designed For "Exploring Hell"
Hellscape NASA just unveiled the winner of its Venus rover design contest, dubbed the " Exploring Hell " challenge. The submissions were surprisingly on-brand: Some had hellish names like "DEMoN Fire Sensor" and "SPIDER," Popular Mechanics reports . But jokes aside, the name of the contest is a fair description of what these rovers would need to survive. No spacecraft has survived longer than 50
4h
Color your hair at home with these trusted boxed dyes
Choose your color. ( Tim Mossholder via Unsplash/) Whether driven by impulse, necessity, or boredom, chances are you've considered dyeing your hair for a new look. Salon coloring is pricey and time-consuming, but luckily there are reliable and affordable boxed dyes you can use at home. Here are the best boxed hair dyes to revamp, retouch, and rejuvenate your color. Smooths and strengthens. (Amazo
4h
Meet Perseverance, JPL's newest Mars rover
NASA's newest Mars rover is called Perseverance, and it has already lived up to the name.
4h
New method developed to extract antibiotic residue in food from animal sources
Coccidiosis is a kind of intestinal illness that affects different groups of animals. It inhibits the absorption of nutrients and growth so that, at times, the animal dies, thus producing financial losses in the livestock industry. In order to fight this disease, antibiotics like coccidiostats are prescribed, which are effective drugs in treating the illness but that also can cause cardiovascular
4h
How Physics Found a Geometric Structure for Math to Play With
In the early 1800s, William Rowan Hamilton discovered a new kind of geometric space with nearly magical properties. It encoded motion and mathematics into a single, glinting geometric object. This phenomenon birthed a field called symplectic geometry. Over the last few decades it has grown from a small collection of insights into a dynamic area of research with deep connections to more areas of m
4h
UMMS scientists lead effort to annotate human genome
UMass Medical School scientists Jill Moore, PhD, Zhiping Weng, PhD, and MD/PhD students Michael Purcaro and Henry Pratt are lead authors on the latest publication of data from the ambitious ENCODE project to annotate the human genome.
4h
Subsidies, weather, and financial education promote agricultural insurance adoption
A University of Maryland-led study shows that subsidies can help people continually purchase insurance, but only if they have the financial literacy to understand the benefits and have the experience of seeing the policy in action. In a new paper published in American Economic Review, researchers conducted the first ever experimental study to look at the impact of subsidies. This paper provides in
4h
Reviews find children not major source of COVID-19, but family stress is high
The review found among children who were infected, transmission was traced back to community and home settings or adults, rather than amongst children within daycares or schools even in jurisdictions where schools remained open or have since reopened.
4h
Alaskan seismometers record the northern lights
Aaron Lojewski, who leads aurora sightseeing tours in Alaska, was lucky enough to photograph a "eruption" of brilliant pink light in the night skies one night in February. The same perturbations of the Earth's magnetic field that lit up the sky for Lojewski's camera were also captured by seismometers on the ground, a team of researchers reports in the journal Seismological Research Letters.
4h
High time to open up ecological research
Share code and data behind the research please. It's easy, but it will have a major positive impact on progress and trust in science. That is the clear message from a new paper in PLOS Biology. An international team of ecologists found that currently, only about a quarter of the scientific papers in their field publicly shares computer code for analyses. "To make the science of ecology more transp
4h
Healing an Achilles' heel of quantum entanglement
Louisiana State University Associate Professor of Physics Mark M. Wilde and his collaborator have solved a 20-year-old problem in quantum information theory on how to calculate entanglement cost–a way to measure entanglement–in a manner that's efficiently computable, useful, and broadly applicable in several quantum research areas.
4h
New insights into wound healing
Research from a multidisciplinary team led by Washington University may provide new insights into wound healing, scarring and how cancer spreads
4h
COVID-19: Social media users more likely to believe false information
A new study led by researchers at McGill University finds that people who get their news from social media are more likely to have misperceptions about COVID-19. Those that consume more traditional news media have fewer misperceptions and are more likely to follow public health recommendations like social distancing.
4h
Owl discovered that hunted like a hawk 55 million years ago
Paleontologists have described in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology a large owl that killed medium-sized mammals with its feet and claws some 55 million years ago.
4h
Cholesterol-lowering drug improved function of heart's arteries
In a pilot study of people living with HIV or high levels of cholesterol, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers found that a six-week course of a cholesterol-lowering medication improved the function of the coronary arteries that provide oxygen to the heart.
4h
Night-time exposure to blue light associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer
New study uses satellite images of outdoor lighting in Barcelona and Madrid.
4h
Stem cell 'therapy' injuries more widespread than we knew
Grotesque side effects from unproven 'stem cell' therapies are more common than we realized, reports a team of researchers led by UConn Health in Annals of Neurology on July 29. And despite the dangers, many neurologists feel ill-equipped to warn and educate their patients.
4h
Global report: obey rules to avoid second Covid-19 lockdown, leaders warn
Countries around the world battle to contain rises in numbers of new infections Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage France's health minister, Olivier Véran, has warned that the struggle with coronavirus virus will be long, and that a second national lockdown will be avoided only if people stick to physical distancing rules. His comments came as the US death toll from the
4h
Forntida kungahall grävs ut i Östergötland
Fordom ansågs att den så kallade Askahögen var en gravhög. Men formen är speciell, avlång och platt ovanpå, vilket gjorde att forskare ansåg den vara en platå för en gästabudshall. Det bekräftades av arkeologerna Andreas Viberg och Martin Rundkvist, som 2014 undersökte högen med georadar och fann tydliga spår av stolphål. – Vi såg alla stolphål och en härd i mitten. Det var klockrent, eftersom ing
4h
For young female athletes, losing weight may not improve performance
Heavier young women at healthy weights had superior fitness
4h
DARPA Deploys Tiny Satellite That Could Take Best Pictures of Space Ever
Enhance! A tiny military satellite may be able to take the sharpest pictures yet of extremely distant and difficult to spot objects out in space. DARPA, the Pentagon's research division, recently deployed what they call the Deformable Mirror (DeMi) CubeSat from the International Space Station, according to a press release . Over the next year, the toaster-sized satellite will use its camera to fo
4h
Build a wireless charger right into a table
A smooth tabletop hides the power beneath. (Whitson Gordon/) Ever since I got a phone with wireless charging, it's been hard to go back. Plugging my phone into the wall feels time-consuming and archaic, and with rumors of a port-less iPhone on the horizon , it's clear that wireless charging is here to stay. It's too bad those little circular pads are so ugly. While there are chargers that disguis
4h
New blood test shows great promise in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease
A new blood test demonstrated remarkable promise in discriminating between persons with and without Alzheimer's disease and in persons at known genetic risk may be able to detect the disease as early as 20 years before the onset of cognitive impairment, according to a large international study.
4h
The Real Reason for Daylight Saving Time: Gas
Originally published in August 1908 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Transforming e-waste into a strong, protective coating for metal
A typical recycling process converts large quantities of items made of a single material into more of the same. However, this approach isn't feasible for old electronic devices, or "e-waste," because they contain small amounts of many different materials that cannot be readily separated. Now, in ACS Omega , researchers report a selective, small-scale microrecycling strategy, which they use to conv
4h
New fabric could help keep you cool in the summer, even without A/C (video)
Air conditioning and other space cooling methods account for about 10% of all electricity consumption in the U.S., according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed a material that cools the wearer without using any electricity. The fabric transfers heat, allows moisture to evaporate from the skin and repels wat
4h
C&EN names top 50 chemical companies
After being dethroned last year, German chemical giant BASF is once again number one in C&EN's annual Global Top 50 list of chemical companies for 2019. Chemical & Engineering News , the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, reports that a shakeup in the international chemical markets was brewing even before the upheaval caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.
4h
Butterfly genomics: Monarchs migrate and fly differently, but meet up and mate
A new study confirms that while the eastern and western butterflies fly differently, they are genetically the same. The journal Molecular Ecology published the findings, led by evolutionary biologists at Emory University.
4h
NASA's Terra Satellite finds no strong storms left in Tropical Storm Douglas
Strong wind shear has been the undoing of Tropical Storm Douglas. NASA's Terra satellite provided infrared data revealed the tropical cyclone was devoid of strong storms, indicating wind shear has weakened it.
4h
Exercise and PRP promising for shoulder pain in wheelchair users with spinal cord injury
"Conservative treatments that provide alternatives to surgery are needed for wheelchair users with spinal cord injury who have recalcitrant shoulder pain. Injection of PRP (platelet-rich plasma), which may promote healing of the injured tendon, combined with a graduated home-based exercise program, is a potential option for these individuals. Based on our pilot study, a larger randomized controlle
4h
Room temperature superconductivity creeping toward possibility
The possibility of achieving room temperature superconductivity took a tiny step forward with a recent discovery by a team of Penn State physicists and materials scientists.
4h
US should consider 'stay-at-home' cooling options during pandemic
A new study from Australian scientists at the forefront of climate and health modelling suggests electric fans and water dousing could be a viable stay-at-home cooling strategy as the United States (US) anticipates extreme heat.
4h
Sanofi/GSK: boosterism
Both companies stand to benefit from the spotlight on immunisation
5h
Covid-19: Infectious coronaviruses 'circulating in bats for decades'
Research suggests a close ancestor of the coronavirus emerged in bats between 40 and 70 years ago.
5h
What's So Abstract About Scientific Abstracts?
The etymological root of the word links nonrepresentational art and the history of scientific publications. Vassily_Kandinsky,_1923_-_Composition_8,_huile_sur_toile,_140_cm_x_201_cm,_Musée_Guggenheim,_New_York.jpg Composition VIII by Wassily Kandinsky Rights information: Public domain Culture Wednesday, July 29, 2020 – 11:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — The two meanings of the word
5h
Could prior exposure to common cold viruses affect the severity of SARS-CoV-2 symptoms?
A study led by Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics (MPIMG) shows that some healthy individuals possess immune cells capable of recognizing the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. The reason for this might be found in prior infections with 'common cold' coronaviruses. Whether or not this cross-reactivity has a protective effect on the clinical course
5h
Fracture risk associated with bisphosphonate drug holidays
Bisphosphonates have been shown to reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures. To avoid possible side effects of long-term therapy, many patients take a drug holiday after several years of bisphosphonate therapy. Researchers have examined the implications of such drug holidays on fracture risk. They found that in patients who had previously suffered a vertebral fracture, a longer bisphosphonate dru
5h
Gender gaps in surgical specialties may take decades to close
Among the largest resident specialties in the US, little progress has been made in closing the gender gap, with most of the largest residencies demonstrating a less than 1 percent increase in women trainees per year.
5h
Tailored meta-grid of nanoparticles boosting performance of light-emitting diodes
Increase in light extraction efficiency will benefit energy savings amid overwhelming usage of LEDs in today's world. Towards this goal, scientists from IIT Guwahati and Imperial College London invented a 'meta-grid', a tailored layer of plasmonic nanoparticles, for introducing into the epoxy casing of an LED. Their technique revealed optimal design parameters for such meta-grids to produce greate
5h
How stony-iron meteorites form
Meteorites give us insight into the early development of the solar system. Using the SAPHiR instrument at the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), a scientific team has for the first time simulated the formation of a class of stony-iron meteorites, so-called pallasites, on a purely experimental basis.
5h
Arguments between couples: Our neurons like mediation
When couples argue, mediation improves the outcome of the confrontation. But that's not all: mediation is also linked to heightened activity in key regions of the brain belonging to the reward circuit. This is the main conclusion of a study carried out by the University of Geneva. This is the first time that a controlled, randomised study has succeeded in demonstrating the advantages of mediation
5h
These Scientists Are Testing an Experimental COVID Vaccine on Themselves
An impressive scoop by the MIT Technology Review : Using simple lab tools, a ragtag group of scientists cobbled together their own grey-market COVID-19 vaccine — and instead of jumping through the usual hoops for a clinical trial, they're testing it on themselves. The group calls itself the Rapid Deployment Vaccine Collaborative (Radvac.) Led by celebrity Harvard geneticist George Church, the tea
5h
Clarifying the difference between liking and wanting drugs
submitted by /u/tlapointe [link] [comments]
5h
5h
5h
Dr. Erik Won – Neurotech & PTSD with a Navy Surgeon — FitMind
submitted by /u/liammccl [link] [comments]
5h
Brain Implant: Current Developments and the Future
submitted by /u/annaioanna [link] [comments]
5h
5h
Tripping On Nothing? (Mind)Set & Setting In Psychedelic Experiences
submitted by /u/pShepp [link] [comments]
5h
Deep Reinforcement Learning and its Neuroscientific Implications
submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]
5h
5h
The Latest Repurposing News (Two Parter: IL-6 and Apilimod)
As everyone knows, there have been a lot of attempts to repurpose existing therapies for the coronavirus pandemic. I've covered several of these along the way, but it's time for some updates. The work that's been going on not only adds to our knowledge about treatment for infected patients, but it should – ideally – also show what clinical research is like and why we have to do all these trials.
5h
Spring School Closures Over Coronavirus Saved Lives, Study Asserts
But, experts caution, the findings highlight a period when few precautions were in place, and do not apply to current discussions about reopening schools.
5h
A large-scale binding and functional map of human RNA-binding proteins
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2077-3 A combination of five assays is used to produce a catalogue of RNA elements to which RNA-binding proteins bind in human cells.
5h
Index and biological spectrum of human DNase I hypersensitive sites
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2559-3 High-resolution maps of DNase I hypersensitive sites from 733 human biosamples are used to identify and index regulatory DNA within the human genome.
5h
The gut microbiome switches mutant p53 from tumour-suppressive to oncogenic
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2541-0 In two mouse models of intestinal cancer, mutant p53 has an oncogenic effect in the distal gut but a tumour-suppressive effect in the proximal gut, and these opposing properties are determined by the gut microbiome.
5h
Landscape of cohesin-mediated chromatin loops in the human genome
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2151-x A map of cohesin-mediated chromatin loops in 24 types of human cells identifies loops that show cell-type-specific variation, indicating that chromatin loops may help to specify cell-specific gene expression programs and functions.
5h
North Atlantic climate far more predictable than models imply
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2525-0 Current models are too noisy to predict climate usefully on decadal timescales, but two-stage post-processing of model outputs greatly improves predictions of decadal variations in North Atlantic winter climate.
5h
Expanded encyclopaedias of DNA elements in the human and mouse genomes
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2493-4 The authors summarize the data produced by phase III of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, a resource for better understanding of the human and mouse genomes.
5h
Rethinking extinctions that arise from habitat loss
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02210-x Does the loss of species through habitat decline follow the same pattern whether the area lost is part of a large or a small habitat? An analysis sheds light on this long-running debate, with its implications for conservation strategies.
5h
Night-time measurements of astronomical seeing at Dome A in Antarctica
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2489-0 The night-time seeing (the extent to which a star's light is blurred by the atmosphere) at Dome A, the highest part on the Antarctic plateau, can be as good as 0.13 arcseconds above a height of only 8 metres.
5h
Why skin grows bigger as you stretch it
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02253-0 Skin's unusual response to stretching is finally explained, and the latest in a huge effort to map DNA.
5h
Lysosome-targeting chimaeras for degradation of extracellular proteins
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2545-9 Lysosome-targeting chimaeras—in which a small molecule or antibody is connected to a glycopeptide ligand to form a conjugate that can bind a cell-surface lysosome-shuttling receptor and a protein target—are used to achieve the targeted degradation of extracellular and membrane proteins.
5h
Spatiotemporal DNA methylome dynamics of the developing mouse fetus
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2119-x Analysis of 168 methylomes from 12 mouse tissues at 9 developmental stages sheds light on the epigenetic and regulatory landscape during mammalian fetal development.
5h
Na+ controls hypoxic signalling by the mitochondrial respiratory chain
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2551-y Na+ controls the function of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system and hypoxic redox signalling through an unexpected interaction with phospholipids.
5h
Waveguide quantum electrodynamics with superconducting artificial giant atoms
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2529-9 Superconducting giant atoms are realized in a waveguide by coupling small atoms to the waveguide at multiple discrete locations, producing tunable atom–waveguide coupling and enabling decoherence-free interactions.
5h
The Phoenix stellar stream rose from the ashes of an ancient star cluster
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02046-5 Observations of a star system called the Phoenix stellar stream offer the first evidence of vanished star clusters that had extremely low levels of heavy elements. Their remnants might cast light on the early assembly of the Milky Way.
5h
Global reference mapping of human transcription factor footprints
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2528-x A high-density DNase I cleavage map from 243 human cell and tissue types provides a genome-wide, nucleotide-resolution map of human transcription factor footprints.
5h
Perspectives on ENCODE
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2449-8 The authors summarize the history of the ENCODE Project, the achievements of ENCODE 1 and ENCODE 2, and how the new data generated and analysed in ENCODE 3 complement the previous phases.
5h
Mechanisms of stretch-mediated skin expansion at single-cell resolution
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2555-7 Single-cell analysis in a mouse model of skin stretching shows that stretching causes a transient expansion bias in a population of epidermal stem cells, which is associated with chromatin remodelling and changes in transcriptional profiles.
5h
New class of molecule targets proteins outside cells for degradation
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02211-w Molecules have previously been made that induce protein destruction inside cells. A new class of molecule now induces the degradation of membrane and extracellular proteins — opening up avenues for drug discovery.
5h
Author Correction: The evolutionary history of lethal metastatic prostate cancer
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2581-5
5h
A fabrication process for flexible single-crystal perovskite devices
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2526-z A solution-based lithography-assisted epitaxial-growth-and-transfer method is used to fabricate single-crystal hybrid perovskites on any surface, with precise control of the thickness, area and chemical composition gradient.
5h
Expanded ENCODE delivers invaluable genomic encyclopedia
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02139-1 The third phase of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has generated the most comprehensive catalogue yet of the functional elements that regulate our genes.
5h
Occupancy maps of 208 chromatin-associated proteins in one human cell type
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2023-4 ChIP–seq and CETCh–seq data are used to analyse binding maps for 208 transcription factors and other chromatin-associated proteins in a single human cell type, providing a comprehensive catalogue of the transcription factor landscape and gene regulatory networks in these cells.
5h
Epigenetic regulator function through mouse gastrulation
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2552-x An experimental and analytical pipeline is used to assess, at the single-cell level, complex transcriptional and morphological mutant phenotypes that occur in mouse embryos during gastrulation.
5h
Ecosystem decay exacerbates biodiversity loss with habitat loss
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2531-2 Analysis of 123 studies of assemblage-level abundances of focal taxa from fragmented habitats finds that increasing fragmentation has a disproportionately large effect on biodiversity loss, supporting the ecosystem decay hypothesis.
5h
An RNA vaccine drives immunity in checkpoint-inhibitor-treated melanoma
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2537-9 Results of an exploratory interim analysis from a phase I trial show that an RNA vaccine targeted towards four melanoma-associated antigens produces durable objective responses in patients with melanoma that are accompanied by strong CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell immunity.
5h
Deep strong light–matter coupling in plasmonic nanoparticle crystals
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2508-1 Photons and plasmons hybridize into polaritons in three-dimensional crystals of plasmonic nanoparticles, leading to deep strong light–matter coupling and the breakdown of the Purcell effect.
5h
The changing mouse embryo transcriptome at whole tissue and single-cell resolution
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2536-x RNA expression is quantified at a tissue level in seventeen mouse tissues across embryonic development, and at the single-cell level in the developing limb.
5h
An atlas of dynamic chromatin landscapes in mouse fetal development
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2093-3 Analysis of chromatin state and accessibility in mouse tissues from twelve sites and eight developmental stages provides a comprehensive view of chromatin dynamics.
5h
Stretch exercises for stem cells expand the skin
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02158-y Stretching the skin of mice reveals that mechanical strain is communicated by a subpopulation of stem cells that proliferate and promote mechanical resistance, and so generate extra skin.
5h
The tidal remnant of an unusually metal-poor globular cluster
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2483-6 The Phoenix stream in the Milky Way halo is shown to be a tidally disrupted remnant of an unusually metal-poor globular cluster, which was possibly destroyed during Galactic evolution.
5h
Simulating quantum 'time travel' disproves butterfly effect in quantum realm
Using a quantum computer to simulate time travel, researchers have demonstrated that, in the quantum realm, there is no "butterfly effect." In the research, information—qubits, or quantum bits—'time travel' into the simulated past. One of them is then strongly damaged, like stepping on a butterfly, metaphorically speaking. Surprisingly, when all qubits return to the 'present,' they appear largely
5h
Amazonian Indigenous territories are crucial for conservation
"In this paper we show that supporting Indigenous peoples' rights is in the interest of the conservation agenda," explains Dr. Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares, the first author of the study, from the University of Helsinki. "The future of a substantial proportion of the Amazon's biodiversity depends largely on coordinated action to support and strengthen indigenous peoples' rights across the entire re
5h
Research team exactly solves experimental puzzle in high temperature superconductivity
Forty-five years after superconductivity was first discovered in metals, the physics giving rise to it was finally explained in 1957 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity.
5h
3-D touchless interactive display detects finger humidity to change color
A novel three-dimensional (3-D) touchless interactive display can change color based on the distance of the user's finger from the screen by detecting subtle shifts in ambient relative humidity, according to a new study. The technology may find future applications in wearable electronics and electronic skins (e-skins) that artificially mimic human skin's ability to sense pressure, temperature, and
5h
Scientists prove bird ovary tissue can be preserved in fossils
A research team led by Dr. Alida Bailleul from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has put one controversy to rest: whether or not remnants of bird ovaries can be preserved in the fossil record.
5h
Biphilic surfaces reduce defrosting times in heat exchangers
Ice formation and accumulation are challenging concerns for several industrial applications including heating ventilation air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) systems, aircraft, energy transmission, and transportation platforms. Frost formation on heat exchangers, for example, reduces heat transfer efficiency and results in significant economic losses. Moreover, defrosting and de-icing tech
5h
Is the Earth's transition zone deforming like the upper mantle?
In a recently published paper in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, researchers from the Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University and the University of Lille combine numerical modeling of dislocation glide and results from diffusion experiments to revisit the rheology of wadsleyite, ringwoodite and majorite garnet under geological strain rates across the transition zone of the Earth's mantl
5h
Sea slugs: discovering other inhabitants in the Barcelona coasts
A study on marine biodiversity has identified seventy-three species of sea slugs in the coasts of Barcelona, an anthropized environment due to the urban metropolis.
5h
Tailored light inspired by nature
An international research team with Prof. Cornelia Denz from the Institute of Applied Physics at the University of Münster (Germany) develop for the first time light fields using caustics that do not change during propagation. With the new method, the physicists cleverly exploit light structures that can be seen in rainbows or when light is transmitted through drinking glasses.
5h
Bees' buzz is more powerful for pollination, than for defence or flight
Buzzing by bees during flower pollination is significantly more powerful than that used for defense or flight, according to a new study from experts at the University of Stirling.
5h
Study provides new insight on colorectal cancer growth
A new study by researchers at the University of Kentucky identifies a novel function of the enzyme spermine synthase to facilitate colorectal cancer growth.
5h
Potential preterm births in high risk women predicted to 73% accuracy, by new technique
A new technique that can spot a potential preterm birth in asymptomatic high-risk women, with up to 73% accuracy months before delivery, has been developed by scientists at the University of Warwick.
5h
Reopening K-12 schools during COVID-19 pandemic
This article summarizes recommendations made in a National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report about how to safely reopen and operate elementary and secondary schools for the 2020-2021 school year, which emphasizes the need for partnerships with public health officials and community leaders, and for transparent communication of risks and rewards that will result from every poli
5h
Astronomers pinpoint the best place on Earth for a telescope: High on a frigid Antarctic plateau
Dome A, the highest ice dome on the Antarctic Plateau, could offer the clearest view on Earth of the stars at night, according to new research by an international team from China, Australia and the University of British Columbia (UBC). The challenge? The location is one of the coldest and most remote places on Earth.
5h
New maps of chemical marks on DNA pinpoint regions relevant to many developmental diseases
In research that aims to illuminate the causes of human developmental disorders, Salk scientists have generated 168 new maps of chemical marks on strands of DNA — called methylation — in developing mice. The data can help narrow down regions of the human genome that play roles in diseases such as schizophrenia and Rett Syndrome.
5h
Researchers pinpoint how sorbent materials catch and release carbon
A key component of ambient direct air capture systems that remove carbon dioxide from the air is the sorbent material that is used to first capture the carbon and then to release it. In a new paper in Joule, researchers lay out exactly how some of these sorbent materials capture and release carbon, a finding that could lead to the smarter design of sorbent materials at the heart of all carbon remo
5h
Association between statewide school closure, COVID-19 incidence, mortality in US
This population epidemiology study estimates associations of school closures in the U.S. and the timing of those closures in March with change in daily COVID-19 incidence and mortality through the first week of May, accounting for other existing public health interventions.
5h
ENCODE3: Interpreting the human and mouse genomes
An international consortium of approximately 500 scientists, led in part by researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, reports on the completion of Phase 3 of the ENCODE project, providing a resource for scientists to understand how genetic variation shapes human health and disease.
5h
Put down that cup of earl gray tea!
Cancer mutations are not necessarily bad actors, in and of themselves. In fact, in certain micro-environments like the gut, these mutations can actually help the body to fight cancer, not spread it. However, if the gut microbiome produces high levels of metabolites, like those found in certain bacteria and antioxidant rich foods like black tea and hot cocoa, then it acts as a particularly hospitab
5h
Gender gap in surgical residencies
Researchers identified surgical specialties with the lowest percentage of female resident physicians and looked at the changes over a decade in the percentage of women in different specialties.
5h
Mood homeostasis before, during COVID-19 lockdown
Mood homeostasis (the ability to stabilize your mood with mood-modifying activities) before and during the COVID-19 lockdown among Dutch students was investigated in this observational study.
5h
Face-touching behaviors before, during COVID-19 pandemic
Videos recorded in public transportation stations, streets and parks among the general population in China, Japan, South Korea, Western Europe and in the United States were used to analyze mask-wearing and face-touching behavior in public areas before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.
5h
Characteristics of nursing homes with residents infected with COVID-19
Characteristics of nursing homes that reported COVID-19 cases in 23 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.
5h
Bringing RNA into genomics
By studying RNA-binding proteins, a research consortium known as ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) has identified genomic sites that appear to code for RNA molecules that influence gene expression.
5h
'Giant atoms' enable quantum processing and communication in one
MIT researchers have introduced a quantum computing architecture that can perform low-error quantum computations while also rapidly sharing quantum information between processors. The work represents a key advance toward a complete quantum computing platform.
5h
Discovered: Remnant of ancient globular cluster that's 'the last of its kind'
A team of astronomers discovered a stellar stream composed of the remnants of an ancient globular cluster that was torn apart by the Milky Way's gravity 2 billion years ago, when Earth's most-complex lifeforms were single-celled organisms. This surprising finding upends conventional wisdom about how these celestial objects form.
5h
Scientists at the CNIC and IIS Princesa decipher a key mechanism in hypoxia
The findings represent an important advance in the understanding of cell physiology and could be exploited in the future to treat diseases in which hypoxia plays a role
5h
Smaller habitats worse than expected for biodiversity
Biodiversity's ongoing global decline has prompted policies to protect and restore habitats to minimize animal and plant extinctions. However, biodiversity forecasts used to inform these policies are usually based on assumptions of a simple theoretical model describing how the number of species changes with the amount of habitat. A new study published in the journal Nature shows that the applicati
5h
The stars that time forgot
Scientists led by astronomers at the University of Sydney and Carnegie Observatories have found the remnant of strange dismembered globular cluster at the edge of the Milky Way, upending theories about how heavy elements formed in early stars.
5h
NIH-funded project details the inner workings of the human and mouse genome
The ENCODE project is an NHGRI-led international effort to learn how all of the genome functions, not just genes. With the completion of its latest plane, ENCODE researchers have added millions of candidate DNA "switches" from the human and mouse genomes that appear to regulate when genes are turned on and a new registry that assigns a portion of these DNA switches to useful biological categories.
5h
New fabrication method brings single-crystal perovskite devices closer to viability
Nanoengineers at UC San Diego developed a new method to fabricate perovskites as single-crystal thin films, which are more efficient for use in solar cells and optical devices than the current state-of-the-art polycrystalline forms of the material. Their fabrication method–which uses standard semiconductor fabrication processes–results in flexible single-crystal perovskite films with controlled
5h
Researchers map mechanisms in the largest CRISPR system
The largest and most complex CRISPR system has been visualized by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study. The system may have potential applications in biomedicine and biotechnology, the researchers believe.
5h
A snapshot of melting Arctic sea ice during the summer of 2018
A study appearing July 29 in the journal Heliyon details the changes that occurred in the Arctic in September of 2018, a year when nearly 10 million kilometers of sea ice were lost throughout the summer. Its findings give an overview of how sea ice has receded over the 40 years of the satellite era and show how the summer's extensive decline is linked to global atmospheric processes as far south a
5h
Amazonian Indigenous territories are crucial for conservation
"In this paper we show that supporting Indigenous peoples' rights is in the interest of the conservation agenda," explains Dr. Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares, the first author of the study, from the University of Helsinki. "The future of a substantial proportion of the Amazon's biodiversity depends largely on coordinated action to support and strengthen indigenous peoples' rights across the entire re
5h
Paper called "unscholarly, overtly racist" earns an editor's note
The journal that recently ran a controversial essay on poverty and race has flagged it with an editor's note letting readers know about an investigation into the work. As we reported last week, Society, a Springer Nature title, published a paper by Lawrence Mead, of New York University, who argued that poor Blacks and Hispanics … Continue reading
5h
Missed wind patterns are throwing off climate forecasts of rain and storms
Climate models could improve by capturing hidden predictability
5h
A snapshot of melting Arctic sea ice during the summer of 2018
As sea ice in the Arctic retreats further and melts faster every decade, scientists are racing to understand the vulnerabilities of one of the world's most remote and unforgiving places. A study appearing July 29 in the journal Heliyon details the changes that occurred in the Arctic in September of 2018, a year when nearly 10 million kilometers of sea ice were lost over the course of the summer. T
5h
ENCODE consortium identifies RNA sequences that are involved in regulating gene expression
The human genome contains about 20,000 protein-coding genes, but the coding parts of our genes account for only about 2 percent of the entire genome. For the past two decades, scientists have been trying to find out what the other 98 percent is doing.
5h
ENCODE3: Interpreting the human and mouse genomes
Scientists around the world have access to a rich trove of information through the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE)—annotated versions of the human and mouse genomes that are vital for interpreting their genetic codes. In the July 29, 2020 issue of the journal Nature, an international consortium of approximately 500 scientists reports on the completion of Phase 3 of an ongoing project, an ach
5h
Discovered: Remnant of ancient globular cluster that's 'the last of its kind'
A team of astronomers including Carnegie's Ting Li and Alexander Ji discovered a stellar stream composed of the remnants of an ancient globular cluster that was torn apart by the Milky Way's gravity 2 billion years ago, when Earth's most-complex lifeforms were single-celled organisms. This surprising finding, published in Nature, upends conventional wisdom about how these celestial objects form.
5h
'Giant atoms' enable quantum processing and communication in one
MIT researchers have introduced a quantum computing architecture that can perform low-error quantum computations while also rapidly sharing quantum information between processors. The work represents a key advance toward a complete quantum computing platform.
5h
Researchers map mechanisms in the largest CRISPR system
The largest and most complex CRISPR system has been visualized by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study. The system may have potential applications in biomedicine and biotechnology, the researchers believe.
5h
New fabrication method brings single-crystal perovskite devices closer to viability
Nanoengineers at UC San Diego developed a new method to fabricate perovskites as single-crystal thin films, which are more efficient for use in solar cells and optical devices than the current state-of-the-art polycrystalline forms of the material.
5h
Smaller habitats worse than expected for biodiversity
The ongoing decline of global biodiversity has prompted policies to protect and restore habitats to minimize animal and plant extinctions. However, biodiversity forecasts used to inform these policies are usually based on assumptions of a simple theoretical model describing how the number of species changes with the amount of habitat.
5h
Saved by the Saxons! The disgusting 10th-century potion that could beat superbugs
Made from cow's bile, garlic and onions, Bald's eyesalve was meant to cure styes, but scientists believe it could deal with antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections Name: Bald's eyesalve. Age: 1,000 years old. Continue reading…
5h
ENCODE consortium identifies RNA sequences that are involved in regulating gene expression
The human genome contains about 20,000 protein-coding genes, but the coding parts of our genes account for only about 2 percent of the entire genome. For the past two decades, scientists have been trying to find out what the other 98 percent is doing.
5h
ENCODE3: Interpreting the human and mouse genomes
Scientists around the world have access to a rich trove of information through the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE)—annotated versions of the human and mouse genomes that are vital for interpreting their genetic codes. In the July 29, 2020 issue of the journal Nature, an international consortium of approximately 500 scientists reports on the completion of Phase 3 of an ongoing project, an ach
5h
Researchers map mechanisms in the largest CRISPR system
The largest and most complex CRISPR system has been visualized by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study. The system may have potential applications in biomedicine and biotechnology, the researchers believe.
5h
Smaller habitats worse than expected for biodiversity
The ongoing decline of global biodiversity has prompted policies to protect and restore habitats to minimize animal and plant extinctions. However, biodiversity forecasts used to inform these policies are usually based on assumptions of a simple theoretical model describing how the number of species changes with the amount of habitat.
5h
A new method is developed to extract antibiotic residue in food from animal sources
The procedure simplifies and cheapens the process to extract coccidiostats, medicine used to treat an intestinal illness in animals but that can cause health risks for humans at high doses
5h
Electrochemical doping: researchers improve carbon nanotube transparent conductors
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from Aalto University have discovered that electrochemical doping with ionic liquid can significantly enhance the optical and electrical properties of transparent conductors made of single-walled carbon nanotube films.
5h
Aerobic exercise could have the final say on fatty livers
Trinity College Dublin study is the first to demonstrate significant improvements in biopsy-measured liver outcomes in a metabolic associated fat liver disease (MAFLD) cohort following an exercise-only intervention, without clinically significant weight loss.
5h
5h
Högfluorerade kemikalier ökar risken för diabetes och celiaki hos spädbarn
Risken för typ 1-diabetes och celiaki kan öka hos barn om mödrarna utsatts för vanligt förekommande högfluorerade kemikalier under graviditeten. Det visar ny forskning vid Örebro universitet. – Vårt resultat visar på vikten att fortsätta undersöka mer exakt vilka av dessa kemikalier som påverkar mödrar och små barn, säger Tuulia Hyötyläinen, professor i kemi vid Örebro universitet. Hon och kolleg
6h
Positiv bivirkning? Masker forpurrer ansigtsgekendelse
Der kan være tale om et midlertidigt tilbageslag for ansigtsgenkendelses-teknologien, fortæller forskerne bag undersøgelsen.
6h
Amazonian Indigenous territories are crucial for conservation
A new study from the University of Helsinki shows that Indigenous territories represent around 45% of all the remaining wilderness areas in the Amazon, comprising an area of three times the surface of Germany. At a time when the Amazon forests face unprecedented pressures, overcoming divergences and aligning the goals of wilderness defenders and Indigenous peoples is paramount to avoid further env
6h
Trying to listen to the signal from neurons
Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a coaxial cable-inspired needle-electrode. The microscale coaxial needle-electrode has two electrodes in the needle, enabling differential recordings to be made at very close distances. The microscale electrode reduces tissue damage compared to conventional electrodes. These advantages of the coaxial electrode enable high-quality recording of neuron
6h
How women and men forgive infidelity
Men and women react differently to different types of infidelity. But new findings about how we forgive unfaithfulness on the part of our partners surprised researchers.
6h
Pluto's dark side spills its secrets — including hints of a hidden ocean
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02082-1 Images of the dwarf planet's far side are revealing possible signs of liquid water, mysterious shards of ice and new theories for the frigid world's birth.
6h
U.S. to disclose UFO findings from Pentagon task force
Since 2007, a Pentagon task force has been collecting data on unidentified aerial phenomenon. Earlier this year, the Pentagon published three videos showing encounters between Navy pilots and strange-moving flying objects. The former head of the Pentagon task force believes U.S. officials have collected artifacts from crashed aircraft. In April, the Pentagon released three videos taken by Navy pi
6h
They tried to tame the Klamath River. They filled it with toxic algae instead.
The Klamath River (Bob Wick/Bureau of Land Management/) Jeremy Deaton writes for Nexus Media , a nonprofit climate change news service. You can follow him @deaton_jeremy . This story originally featured on Nexus Media News . Read more on the perils of America's aging dam infrastructure here . The Karuk people define themselves by the Klamath River, just as the Romans did the Tiber or the Egyptian
6h
Indoor hammocks to lounge in year-round
Elevated comfort. (Drew Coffman via Unsplash/) You don't need to go camping to experience sleep and solitude suspended in a hammock. In fact, you don't even need to go outside. Hammocks can make an ideal rainy day reading nook or snug napping spot in any home. They also take pressure off your spine and engage the vestibular system while you sway, producing an adrenaline rush that actually helps c
6h
Så sker det: NASA's store rover med helikopter rejser til Mars
Torsdag kl. 13.50 drager roveren Perseverance mod Mars for blandt andet at samle sten sammen til senere afhentning.
6h
Adverse effects from cancer drug trials explained
Certain type of cancer drugs that promote the death of cells can actually be harmful if combined with other treatments that damage our DNA, RNA or proteins, researchers have found.
6h
Biphilic surfaces reduce defrosting times in heat exchangers
Miljkovic, along with researchers in his group, have discovered a way to significantly improve the defrosting of ice and frost on heat exchangers. Their findings, 'Dynamic Defrosting on Superhydrophobic and Biphilic Surfaces,' have been published in Matter.
6h
Simulating quantum 'time travel' disproves butterfly effect in quantum realm
Using a quantum computer to simulate time travel, researchers have demonstrated that, in the quantum realm, there is no 'butterfly effect.' In the research, information–qubits, or quantum bits–'time travel' into the simulated past.
6h
Lead released in Notre Dame Cathedral fire detected in Parisian honey
Elevated levels of lead have been found in samples of honey from hives downwind of the Notre Dame Cathedral fire, collected three months after the April 2019 blaze.
6h
COVID-19 provides rare opportunities for studying natural and human systems
Researchers at Stanford and other institutions hypothesize outcomes of the pandemic's unprecedented socioeconomic disruption and outline research priorities for advancing our understanding of humans' impact on the environmentWatch related video: https://youtu.be/jd9Jb6OInlM
6h
Växtrötter matar bakterier och ökar permafrostens utsläpp
Det är svårt att göra säkra klimatprognoser när det är oklart hur mycket kol som släpps ut av tinande permafrost i Arktis. En studie från Stockholm och Umeå universitet visar att den så kallade primingeffekten kan orsaka ytterligare utsläpp av 40 miljarder ton kol från permafrost år till 2100. Priming är en mekanism där socker från växtrötter påskyndar bakteriernas nedbrytning av jorden. I permaf
6h
Do antibiotics in early life increase IBD risk later?
Even short, single antibiotic courses early in life can predispose mice to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) when they are older, research finds. The study in Genome Medicine provides further evidence supporting the idea that the use of antibiotics in children under one year old disrupts the intestinal microbiota—the trillions of beneficial microorganisms that live in and on our bodies—that play a
6h
Cars Will Soon Be Able to Sense and React to Your Emotions
Imagine you're on your daily commute to work, driving along a crowded highway while trying to resist looking at your phone. You're already a little stressed out because you didn't sleep well, woke up late, and have an important meeting in a couple hours, but you just don't feel like your best self. Suddenly another car cuts you off, coming way too close to your front bumper as it changes lanes. Y
6h
Phillips group exactly solves experimental puzzle in high temperature superconductivity
A team of theoretical physicists at the Institute for Condensed Matter Theory (ICMT) in the Department of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, led by Illinois Physics Professor Philip Phillips, has for the first time exactly solved a representative model of the cuprate problem, the 1992 Hatsugai-Kohmoto (HK) model of a doped Mott insulator. The team has published its findings
6h
Image processing algorithm allows indoor drones to fly autonomously
A research team from Japan has developed a single-camera machine vision algorithm, making it possible for lightweight hovering indoor robots to guide themselves by identifying and interpreting reference points on a tiled floor. The technology opens the door to a new breed of functional, low-cost drones with potentially wide-ranging uses.
6h
Germany's Covid-19 fears grow over 'reckless' partygoers
Authorities warn of rise in cases after shocking footage of young revellers in Spain and Bulgaria Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Young Germans partying abroad on Europe's beaches and ignoring physical distancing rules are becoming an increasing cause of concern at home, as coronavirus cases continue to rise across the world. Following widespread reports earlier this
6h
The Scientist Speaks Podcast – Episode 7
Brains in the Palm of your Hand: 3D Organoid Cell Culture
6h
Storm pummels Caribbean with heavy wind, rain en route to US
Heavy rains pummeled the eastern Caribbean on Wednesday due to a weather system headed to Puerto Rico and other islands that was expected to develop into a tropical storm and unleash flooding and landslides.
6h
COVID-19 provides rare opportunities for studying natural and human systems
Like the legendary falling apple that hit Isaac Newton and led to his groundbreaking insight on the nature of gravity, COVID-19 could provide unintended glimpses into how complex Earth systems operate, according to a new Stanford-led paper. The perspective, published July 29 in Nature Reviews Earth & Environment, hypothesizes outcomes of unprecedented changes in human activity wrought by worldwide
6h
Routine gas flaring is wasteful, polluting and undermeasured
If you've driven through an area where companies extract oil and gas from shale formations, you've probably seen flames dancing at the tops of vertical pipes. That's flaring—the mostly uncontrolled practice of burning off a byproduct of oil and gas production. Over the past 10 years, the U.S. shale oil and gas boom has made this country one of the world's top five flaring nations, just behind Russ
7h
Genomes reveal the source of bat 'superpowers'
New research reveals the genetic material that codes for bat adaptations and "superpowers." Those bat powers include the ability to fly , to use sound to move effortlessly in complete darkness, to tolerate and survive potentially deadly viruses , and to resist aging and cancer . The project, called Bat1K , sequenced the genome of six widely divergent living bat species. Although other bat genomes
7h
Tsetse flies nurse their young, and understanding this unusual strategy could help fight the disease they spread
Tsetse flies are bloodthirsty. Natives of sub-Saharan Africa, tsetse flies can transmit the microbe Trypanosoma when they take a blood meal. That's the protozoan that causes African sleeping sickness in people; without treatment, it's fatal, and millions of people are at risk due to the bite of a tsetse fly.
7h
How climate change impacts prescribed burning days
Climate change in eastern Australia will shift when hazard reduction burning occurs but for most areas the number of suitable days remains unchanged. In some places, there will even be increases. Queensland is the only exception where the window for hazard reduction burning declines. However, climate change also increases the frequency and intensity of inversion layers, meaning it is more likely a
7h
NZ-China agreement has brought strong economic gains, Otago research
An Otago economist argues New Zealand should expand its trade agreements in the wake of COVID-19, as his new research shows the country benefited from the NZ-China free trade agreement.University of Otago Economics Lecturer Dr Murat Ungor and his former Masters student, Sam Verevis collaborated on the paper What has New Zealand gained from the FTA with China: Two counterfactual analyses, which has
7h
The gender pay gap that no one is paying attention to
That women are paid less than male colleagues is a stubborn fact in the U.S. workplace.
7h
Tsetse flies nurse their young, and understanding this unusual strategy could help fight the disease they spread
Tsetse flies are bloodthirsty. Natives of sub-Saharan Africa, tsetse flies can transmit the microbe Trypanosoma when they take a blood meal. That's the protozoan that causes African sleeping sickness in people; without treatment, it's fatal, and millions of people are at risk due to the bite of a tsetse fly.
7h
NASA's Perseverance Mars rover and Ingenuity helicopter set to launch
NASA's Perseverance rover, which will look for signs of past or present life on Mars and test Ingenuity, the first interplanetary helicopter, is set to launch on 30 July
7h
Okänd bromsmolekyl bakom världens mest sällsynta blodgrupp
Det finns en blodgrupp så sällsynt att man bara känner till ett tiotal människor som har den, varav en enda är blodgivare. Efter närmare 30 år har forskare i Lund och Bristol nu löst gåtan. Blodgruppen MAM-negativ uppstår när det cancerrelaterade proteinet EMP3 saknas på de röda blodkropparnas yta. Då och då dyker det upp patienter som behöver en blodtransfusion, men som har en så sällsynt blodgr
7h
A method to predict the properties of complex quantum systems
Predicting the properties of complex quantum systems is a crucial step in the development of advanced quantum technologies. While research teams worldwide have already devised a number of techniques to study the characteristics of quantum systems, most of these have only proved to be effective in some cases.
7h
With Perseverance and a little MOXIE, MIT is going to Mars
On July 30, a two-week window of opportunity opens for Perseverance—the newest Mars rover, forged in the spirit of human curiosity—to begin its journey toward the Red Planet with a launch from the Cape Canaveral Space Launch Center on the eastern Florida coast. With MIT's help, this latest NASA mission will build upon the legacy of its roving laboratory predecessors and dig deeper than ever before
7h
Bees' buzz is more powerful for pollination than for defense or flight
Buzzing by bees during flower pollination is significantly more powerful than that used for defense or flight, according to a new study from experts at the University of Stirling.
7h
Sea slugs: Discovering other inhabitants in the Barcelona coasts
A study on marine biodiversity has identified seventy-three species of sea slugs in the coasts of Barcelona, an anthropized environment due to the urban metropolis. In this group of gastropod molluscs, the most abundant in the urban coasts are sea hares, according to the article coordinated by the tenure university lecturer Manuel Ballesteros, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Resea
7h
Bees' buzz is more powerful for pollination than for defense or flight
Buzzing by bees during flower pollination is significantly more powerful than that used for defense or flight, according to a new study from experts at the University of Stirling.
7h
Sea slugs: Discovering other inhabitants in the Barcelona coasts
A study on marine biodiversity has identified seventy-three species of sea slugs in the coasts of Barcelona, an anthropized environment due to the urban metropolis. In this group of gastropod molluscs, the most abundant in the urban coasts are sea hares, according to the article coordinated by the tenure university lecturer Manuel Ballesteros, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Resea
7h
Black swan genome could be our secret weapon to combat next pandemic
Scientists have mapped the genome of the black swan in an effort to understand immune responses to the deadly 'bird flu' virus and better protect public health.
7h
COVID-19 research: Anti-viral strategy with double effect
When the SARS-CoV-2 virus penetrates human cells, it lets the human host cell produce proteins for it. One of these viral proteins, called PLpro, is essential for the replication and rapid spread of the virus. An international team of researchers led by Goethe University and University Hospital Frankfurt has now discovered that the pharmacological inhibition of this viral enzyme not only blocks vi
7h
Major climate initiative in the Northeastern US benefits children's health
A new study by researchers from the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health reports that the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) has been successful in reducing fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions and substantially improving children's health, both major co-benefits of this climate policy. These findings are pub
7h
COVID-19 may cause deadly blood clots
COVID-19 may increase the risk of blot cots in women who are pregnant or taking estrogen with birth control or hormone replacement therapy, according to a new manuscript published in the Endocrine Society's journal, Endocrinology.
7h
Scientists prove bird ovary tissue can be preserved in fossils
A research team led by Dr. Alida Bailleul from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has proved that remnants of bird ovaries can be preserved in the fossil record.
7h
Media coverage fostered support for gun control in wake of NZ mosque shootings
Media coverage of the March 2019 Christchurch mosque shootings contributed to an increase in public support for gun control, a study by researchers at the University of Otago, Wellington has found.
7h
New Space satellite pinpoints industrial methane emissions
Methane may not be as abundant in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, but with a global warming potential many times greater than carbon dioxide, monitoring and controlling industrial emissions of this potent gas is imperative to helping combat climate change. GHGSat is a New Space initiative that draws on Copernicus Sentinel-5P data for mapping methane hotspots—and its Claire satellite has now coll
7h
Black swan genome could be our secret weapon to combat next pandemic
Scientists have mapped the genome of the black swan in an effort to understand immune responses to the deadly 'bird flu' virus and better protect public health.
7h
Innovative treatment prevents spread of bacteria across metal surfaces
Researchers at Purdue University have developed a treatment to infuse a hardened metal surface with naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides.
7h
Economists warn of 'widespread costs' from lockdown
Blanket restrictions on economic activity should be lifted and replaced with measures targeted specifically at groups most at risk, say economists.
7h
Gold nanosensor spots difference between dengue, Zika
A new class of nanosensor developed in Brazil could more accurately identify dengue and Zika infections, a task that is complicated by their genetic similarities and which can result in misdiagnosis.
7h
Bacteria-eating viruses could provide a route to stability in cystic fibrosis
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02109-7 Phage therapy is broadening the treatment landscape for people with drug-resistant infections.
7h
Gene therapy could offer an inclusive cure for cystic fibrosis
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02111-z After three decades of false starts, gene therapy against the disease is in new clinical trials — and there is even hope of a cure.
7h
How much protein function needs to be restored in cystic fibrosis?
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02114-w Knowing the percentage of function that is required to eliminate disease symptoms could help to shape treatment in the coming years and ensure sufferers don't slip through the net.
7h
A simple test could extend cystic-fibrosis treatments to those left behind
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02107-9 Sweat-chloride measurements could be used to develop and approve drugs for rare mutations in cystic fibrosis.
7h
Cystic fibrosis
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02105-x Innovative therapies are bringing hope to people with this inherited lung disorder.
7h
The coronavirus pandemic has forced rapid changes in care protocols for cystic fibrosis
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02112-y Lockdowns have accelerated the drive towards telemedicine for people with cystic fibrosis — but the system needs critical appraisal.
7h
The gender gap in cystic fibrosis
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02110-0 Despite advances in therapies for people with the genetic disease, women seem to have poorer outcomes.
7h
In utero intervention to stem the damage of cystic fibrosis
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02108-8 To safeguard organs, therapies must tackle this hereditary disease in the womb.
7h
Research round-up: Cystic fibrosis
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02115-9 Molecular pathways of inflammation, the cystic fibrosis microbiome and other highlights from clinical trials and laboratory studies.
7h
Cystic fibrosis drugs target the malformed proteins at the root of the disease
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02106-w New combinations of molecules put many patients on the path to good health. But those with rarer mutations are, for now, left behind.
7h
Living, breathing proof
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02113-x A cadre of older patients with cystic fibrosis have defied the life expectancy associated with their illness. They're inspiring and educating others about surviving with the disease long-term.
7h
Landlord-leaning eviction courts are about to make the coronavirus housing crisis a lot worse
The United States is on the verge of a potentially devastating eviction crisis right in the middle of a deadly pandemic.
7h
Researchers discover triple-layered leading-edge of solar coronal mass ejections
In a study published in The Astrophysical Journal, Dr. MEI Zhixing in Yunnan Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his colleagues reported a Magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) numerical study on the coronal mass ejection (CME). They presented a high-resolution 3-D resistive MHD simulation to investigate the large-scale structure of the CME due to the eruptive solar prominence/filament, and
7h
Miniature telescope demonstration focuses on sharpening view of distant objects in space
A recently deployed DARPA CubeSat seeks to demonstrate technology that could improve imaging of distant objects in space and allow powerful space telescopes to fit into small satellites. DARPA's Deformable Mirror (DeMi) CubeSat deployed from the International Space Station July 13, beginning the technology demonstration of a miniature space telescope with a small deformable mirror called a microel
7h
The Fantasy and the Cyberpunk Futurism of Singapore
Revisiting William Gibson's 1993 essay on the city-state took me back to my home, where future is past.
7h
How to Spot—and Avoid—Dark Patterns on the Web
You've seen them before: the UX ploys designed to trick you into spending money, or make it nearly impossible to unsubscribe. Here's what to look out for.
7h
FDA and consumers might go for 'cell-based seafood' label
Companies seeking to commercialize seafood products made from the cells of fish or shellfish should use the term "cell-based" on product labels, according to a new study. Both the US Food and Drug Administration and US Department of Agriculture require food products to have a "common or usual name" on their labels so consumers can make informed choices about what they're purchasing. The study by
7h
Average BAME Covid-19 patient decades younger than white Britons in study
Oldham hospital data shows south Asian patients are 31 years younger than white counterparts on average Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage People of south Asian heritage admitted to hospital with coronavirus are on average 31 years younger than white British Covid-19 patients, according to a study of inpatients in a town with one of England's highest infection rates. Do
7h
Unused buildings will make good housing in the world of COVID-19
We are entering an era of profound change in how we work, learn, socialize and live with COVID-19. Many people will adjust to this new world order and work remotely at home if they don't have to attend an office or other workplace. This, in turn, will create an opportunity to adapt unused buildings, which were needed for the previous economy, for the new ways of living and working. Buildings could
7h
How refugees resolve disputes: Insights from a Ugandan settlement
Typically, refugee camps or settlements, whether in Greece, Jordan or Libya, are seen as lawless environments. They are characterized by a lack of structure, rules and norms.
7h
Engineers work out why fallen leaves on train tracks are so slippery
A team of engineers at the University of Sheffield has found an explanation for the extreme slipperiness of train tracks when leaves have fallen on them. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A, the group describes testing the interaction of leaves with iron in their lab, and what they learned from it.
7h
Extended X-ray emission detected from the radio galaxy 4C 63.20
Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, an international team of astronomers has conducted deep imaging observations of a high-redshift radio galaxy known as 4C 63.20. The observational campaign has revealed an extended X-ray emission from this source. The finding is reported in a paper published July 20 on the arXiv pre-print paper.
7h
Antibiotics use early in life increases risk of inflammatory bowel disease later in life
Even short, single antibiotic courses given to young animals can predispose them to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) when they are older, according to Rutgers researchers. The study, published in Genome Medicine, provides further evidence supporting the idea that the use of antibiotics in children under 1 year old disrupts the intestinal microbiota – the trillions of beneficial microorganisms that
7h
GDP Is the Wrong Tool for Measuring What Matters
It's time to replace gross domestic product with real metrics of well-being and sustainability — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Analyzing chromatin status of poised genes may provide powerful tool to predict transcription potential
In eukaryotic cells, the genomic DNA is hierarchically packaged by histones into chromatin. Chromatin structure and its plasticity play an important role in the activation and silencing of gene transcription, and determine the cell fate during differentiation and development. Therefore, it is an important issue for scientific frontier to study the chromatin status and transcription potentials of t
7h
Google vil forbinde USA, Storbritannien og Spanien via nyt søkabel
Et kabel ved navn Grace Hopper bliver Googles fjerde undersøiske datakabel, der skal optimere den transatlantiske båndbredde. Kablet forventes færdigt i 2022.
7h
To Make Oxygen on Mars, NASA's Perseverance Rover Needs MOXIE
A new tool from the space agency may produce the gas, completing the next step for planning a round trip voyage
7h
Analyzing chromatin status of poised genes may provide powerful tool to predict transcription potential
In eukaryotic cells, the genomic DNA is hierarchically packaged by histones into chromatin. Chromatin structure and its plasticity play an important role in the activation and silencing of gene transcription, and determine the cell fate during differentiation and development. Therefore, it is an important issue for scientific frontier to study the chromatin status and transcription potentials of t
8h
How to mix old tires and building rubble to make sustainable roads
Researchers have shown how a blend of old tires and building rubble could be used as a sustainable road-making material, in a zero-waste solution to boost recycling and support the circular economy.
8h
Supervision of school principals should focus on instructional leadership, according to research
Research on the evolving role of principal supervisors from Vanderbilt's Peabody College of education and human development was included in two of three reports released July 21 by the Wallace Foundation, a national philanthropy that seeks to improve learning for marginalized children. The reports examine the benefits gained by shifting the role of principal supervisors to focus on improving instr
8h
My talk with Jane Goodall: Vegetarianism, animal welfare and the power of children's advocacy
This month marks 60 years since Dame Jane Goodall first ventured into the wilds of Gombe, Tanzania, at the tender age of 26 to study the behavior of chimpanzees. She has devoted her life to species conservation and campaigned tirelessly for a healthier environment.
8h
My talk with Jane Goodall: Vegetarianism, animal welfare and the power of children's advocacy
This month marks 60 years since Dame Jane Goodall first ventured into the wilds of Gombe, Tanzania, at the tender age of 26 to study the behavior of chimpanzees. She has devoted her life to species conservation and campaigned tirelessly for a healthier environment.
8h
Improving energy efficiency, reducing emissions would save money for oilsands producers: study
Investment in new energy-efficient, greenhouse gas mitigation strategies by oilsands producers could net them some important profits, according to a model developed by a research group at the University of Alberta.
8h
Steps toward room-temperature superconductivity
The possibility of achieving room temperature superconductivity took a tiny step forward with a recent discovery by a team of Penn State physicists and materials scientists.
8h
New survey finds large racial divide in concern over ability to pay for COVID-19 treatment
People of color are far more likely to worry about their ability to pay for healthcare if diagnosed with COVID-19 than their White counterparts, according to a new survey from nonprofit West Health and Gallup. By a margin of almost two to one (58% vs. 32%), non-White adults report that they are either 'extremely concerned' or 'concerned' about the potential cost of care. That concern is three time
8h
Association of COVID-19 inflammation with activation of the C5a–C5aR1 axis
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2600-6
8h
A vaccine targeting the RBD of the S protein of SARS-CoV-2 induces protective immunity
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2599-8
8h
Papain-like protease regulates SARS-CoV-2 viral spread and innate immunity
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2601-5
8h
The quantum Hall effect continues to reveal its secrets to mathematicians and physicists
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02230-7 A transformative experiment is yielding fresh insights 40 years after the effect's discovery — and energizing transdisciplinary collaborations.
8h
Trash can rap
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02245-0 Something fresh.
8h
Discovery of metal-breathing bacteria can change electronics
Scientists discover Shewanella oneidensis bacterium can "breathe in" certain metals and compounds. The bacteria produces a material that can be used to transfer electrons. Applications of the finding range from medical devices to new generation of sensors. Researchers discovered an unusual property of a bacteria that can "breathe" in some metal and sulfur compounds and create materials that can i
8h
How COVID-19 worsens hunger in India, the world's largest food basket
India is one of the world's largest food producers. Ironically, the country is also home to the largest population of hungry people and one-third of the world's malnourished children. The Global Hunger Index ranks India 102nd among 117 countries.
8h
Researchers make proton pump of respiratory chain work in artificial polymer membrane
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems in Magdeburg, the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam, and the University of Halle are one step closer towards a synthetically constructed cell. They have used an enzyme found in bacteria to assemble one crucial part of the respiratory chain—essential for the energy metabolism in many cells—a
8h
Curlicued research tool propels fast-moving fluids for study by neutrons
What do the loopy straws that children like to sip drinks through have in common with cutting-edge science? Ask Ryan Murphy and his colleagues at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where the team has thought up a creative way to explore the properties of fluids under extreme conditions.
8h
Solutions to northern Australia's mammal decline crisis
Northern Australia's mammals have suffered catastrophic declines over the last 30 years. A major new study has found that protecting and recovering habitat by improving fire management and reducing feral cattle, horses and buffaloes is the best approach to address the crisis.
8h
A new measure of disaster resilience for Australian communities
Research has developed the first national snapshot of disaster resilience to help governments, local organizations and emergency services improve their communities' resilience to natural hazards.
8h
How climate change will impact prescribed burning days
As the Bushfire Royal Commission investigates the deadly "Black Summer" and how it could have been prevented, research from the Climate the ARC Center of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) and Climate Change Research Center at the University of New South Wales shows how climate change may alter prescribed burning in the future across Australia.
8h
Peering into the secrets of phages to see how they kill bacterial superbugs
A research collaboration involving Monash University has made an exciting discovery that may eventually lead to targeted treatments to combat drug-resistant bacterial infections, one of the greatest threats to global health.
8h
How stingless bees are able to make tall spiral nests
A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge, Universidad de Granada and University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, has discovered how certain types of stingless bees are able to build their nests in tall spiral shapes. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes applying lessons learned from the study of crystals to better understand how bees c
8h
Clean Arctic skies are a window to Earth in 1850
Satellite data over the Southern Hemisphere clarifies the makeup of global clouds since the Industrial Revolution—and suggests clouds then were not so different than clouds today, according to a new study. The research tackles one of the largest uncertainties in today's climate models—the long-term effect of tiny atmospheric particles on climate change. The researchers used remote, pristine parts
8h
Solutions to northern Australia's mammal decline crisis
Northern Australia's mammals have suffered catastrophic declines over the last 30 years. A major new study has found that protecting and recovering habitat by improving fire management and reducing feral cattle, horses and buffaloes is the best approach to address the crisis.
8h
Peering into the secrets of phages to see how they kill bacterial superbugs
A research collaboration involving Monash University has made an exciting discovery that may eventually lead to targeted treatments to combat drug-resistant bacterial infections, one of the greatest threats to global health.
8h
How stingless bees are able to make tall spiral nests
A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge, Universidad de Granada and University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, has discovered how certain types of stingless bees are able to build their nests in tall spiral shapes. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes applying lessons learned from the study of crystals to better understand how bees c
8h
Influx of electric vehicles accelerates need for grid planning
A new PNNL report says the western US bulk power system can reliably support projected growth of up to 24 million electric vehicles through 2028, but challenges will arise as EV adoption grows beyond that threshold. The study is the most comprehensive of its kind, integrating multiple variables not evaluated before, such as growth in commercial delivery fleets and long-haul trucks, as well as larg
8h
Decreased iron levels in seawater make mussels loosen their grip
Mussels secrete sticky plaques that help them attach to wet surfaces, such as rocks on the beach. These adhesive structures are rich in iron, which is thought to help make the attachments strong yet flexible. Now, researchers reporting in Environmental Science & Technology have shown that mussels form weaker attachments in iron-deficient seawater, revealing a possible consequence of altered iron b
8h
Estimating bisphenol exposures in the Australian population
Once found in bottles, food containers, cash register receipts and electronics, bisphenol A (BPA) has been phased out of many products because of health concerns and government regulations. As a result, the production and use of BPA analogs, which are unregulated and poorly understood, have increased. Now, by analyzing urine samples and wastewater, researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science
8h
Newer PFAS compound detected for first time in Arctic seawater
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), found in many household products and food packages, have raised concerns because of their persistence and possible toxicity to people and wildlife. Because the compounds don't break down naturally, they have become environmental contaminants. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have studied the transport of 29 PFAS into
8h
Scientists strapped tiny cameras to beetles to get a bug's-eye view of the world
A tiny camera for a tiny adventure photographer. (Mark Stone/University of Washington/) Ever wondered what the world would look like if you were a foot taller or shorter than you are right now? Even a few inches might make the world seem a little different. You might see more tops of people's heads if you're tall, or have to twist your head up if you're short. But if you were the size of a beetle
8h
8h
Newer PFAS compound detected for first time in Arctic seawater
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), found in many household products and food packages, have raised concerns because of their persistence and possible toxicity to people and wildlife. Because the compounds don't break down naturally, they have become environmental contaminants. Now, researchers reporting in Environmental Science & Technology have studied the transport of 29 PFAS into and o
8h
Decreased iron levels in seawater make mussels loosen their grip
Mussels secrete sticky plaques that help them attach to wet surfaces, such as rocks on the beach. These adhesive structures are rich in iron, which is thought to help make the attachments strong yet flexible. Now, researchers reporting in Environmental Science & Technology have shown that mussels form weaker attachments in iron-deficient seawater, revealing a possible consequence of altered iron b
8h
Estimating bisphenol exposures in the Australian population
Once found in bottles, food containers, cash register receipts and electronics, bisphenol A (BPA) has been phased out of many products because of health concerns and government regulations. As a result, the production and use of BPA analogs, which are unregulated and poorly understood, have increased. Now, by analyzing urine samples and wastewater, researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science
8h
Preventing The Next Pandemic
Scientists saw the pandemic coming, but world leaders failed to listen. How can we prevent and minimize the next one?
8h
Scientists go the distance in electron transfer study
Electron movement—what scientists call electron transfer—powers many of life's functions. For example, a good deal of the energy we derive from the foods we eat is captured by a process that removes electrons from food molecules, like sugar or fat, and transfers them to the oxygen we breathe.
8h
Fujifilm X-T4 Review: The Best of Both Worlds for Hybrid Shooters
The company's latest APS-C mirrorless camera marries still photo pedigree with new video smarts, giving hybrid shooters the best of both worlds.
8h
Why Do I Keep Refusing to Install OS Updates?
Our tech advice columnist is here to help.
8h
NASA's Mars Rover Will Be Powered by US-Made Plutonium
In 2015, Oak Ridge National Laboratory produced the first plutonium fuel in the US in nearly 30 years. Now it's headed to another planet.
8h
Sea level rise: Impacts to property and regional planning solutions
A new study reveals that urgent action is needed to protect billions of dollars in real estate investment across South Florida due to impacts of sea level rise over the next several decades. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Center for Urban and Environmental Solutions (CUES) in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science have published a new report, "Protecting South Florida: A Discuss
9h
Paging Dr. Hamblin: My Grandma Is Angry I Won't Take Her to the Salon
Editor's Note: Every Wednesday, James Hamblin takes questions from readers about health-related curiosities, concerns, and obsessions. Have one? Email him at paging.dr.hamblin@theatlantic.com . Dear Dr. Hamblin, My grandmother recently lost her husband and son, and was in a car accident that broke her hip and back. Because she has significant hearing and vision loss, she was told she would never
9h
Virgin Galactic releases virtual tour of new 'space plane' – video
Virgin Galactic has revealed the interior of its centrepiece space plane, showing off a cabin with custom seats and a 'space mirror', in a virtual tour of what its passengers can expect to experience on flights to the edge of space Virgin Galactic offers peek inside new space plane for tourists Continue reading…
9h
Studying radioactive aluminum in stellar systems unlocks formation secrets
An international team of astronomers including Stella Offner of the University of Texas at Austin has proposed a new method for the formation of aluminum-26 in star systems that are forming planets. Because its radioactive decay is thought to provide a heat source for the building blocks of planets, called planetesimals, it's important for astronomers to know where aluminum-26 comes from. Their re
9h
Before COVID-19, U.S. fishing years marked by milestones in sustainability
Two announcements today from NOAA Fisheries offer a "snapshot in time" of the population status of U.S. federal fisheries in 2019, and the economic performance of commercial fishing, recreational fishing, and related businesses in 2017.
9h
Electrochemical doping: Researchers improve carbon nanotube transparent conductors
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from Aalto University have discovered that electrochemical doping with ionic liquid can significantly enhance the optical and electrical properties of transparent conductors made of single-walled carbon nanotube films. The results were published in the journal Carbon.
9h
Deadpool fly among new species named by scientists
During the past year CSIRO scientists have given scientific names to 165 new species, including tributes to Marvel characters Deadpool, Thor, Loki, and Black Widow along the way.
9h
New method determines planetary regolith thermal conductivity
A new analytic model for calculating the effective thermal conductivity of planetary regolith allows scientists to better understand the connections between the physical and thermal properties of planetary surfaces and the processes that depend on them, according to Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Stephen E. Wood, author of "A Mechanistic Model for the Thermal Conductivity of Planetar
9h
Deadpool fly among new species named by scientists
During the past year CSIRO scientists have given scientific names to 165 new species, including tributes to Marvel characters Deadpool, Thor, Loki, and Black Widow along the way.
9h
New evidence for fragmentation of energy release in solar flares
Type III radio bursts from the sun are signatures of energetic (∼1–100 keV) electrons, accelerated at the reconnection sites, propagating upward through the corona into the interplanetary medium along open magnetic field lines. The emission mechanism of the bursts is widely believed to be due to coherent plasma processes. The bursts are observed typically in the frequency range ≈1GHz–10kHz, which
9h
New method to filter extracellular vesicles to improve diagnostics options
Researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Rochester discovered an alternative to successfully purify biological particles to better understand how cells communicate with one another.
9h
Using light to tune interlayer forces in van der Waals materials
A Chinese-Australian collaboration has demonstrated for the first time that interlayer coupling in a van der Waals (vdW) material can be largely modulated by a protonic gate, which inject protons to devices from an ionic solid.
9h
How plantains and carbon nanotubes can improve cars
A luxury automobile is not really a place to look for something like sisal, hemp, or wood. Yet automakers have been using natural fibers for decades. Some high-end sedans and coupes use these in composite materials for interior door panels, for engine, interior and noise insulation, and internal engine covers, among other uses.
9h
World tiger population grows but SE Asia threats 'critical': WWF
Tiger populations in five countries are making a comeback but the endangered species still faces major threats such as poaching, conservation group WWF and the Indian government said.
9h
New method to filter extracellular vesicles to improve diagnostics options
Researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Rochester discovered an alternative to successfully purify biological particles to better understand how cells communicate with one another.
9h
World tiger population grows but SE Asia threats 'critical': WWF
Tiger populations in five countries are making a comeback but the endangered species still faces major threats such as poaching, conservation group WWF and the Indian government said.
9h
Podcast: Canada's narwhals skewer Silicon Valley's unicorns
Toronto and the corridor that stretches west to Kitchener and Waterloo is already Canada's capital of finance and technology—and naturally, the region's leaders want to set an example for the rest of the world. That's part of the reason why in 2017, municipal organizations in Toronto tapped Google's sister company Sidewalk Labs to redevelop a disused waterfront industrial district as a high-tech
9h
Purity Politics Makes Nothing Happen
Nearly 30 years ago, the PBS program Firing Line convened a debate about the War on Drugs, which has contributed more than any other criminal-justice policy to deadly street violence in Black neighborhoods and the police harassment, arrest, and mass incarceration of Black Americans. Revisiting the debate helps clarify what it will take to end that ongoing policy mistake. Congressman Charlie Range
9h
China Is What Orwell Feared
N orthwest of Beijing's Forbidden City, outside the Third Ring Road, the Chinese Academy of Sciences has spent seven decades building a campus of national laboratories. Near its center is the Institute of Automation, a sleek silvery-blue building surrounded by camera-studded poles. The institute is a basic research facility. Its computer scientists inquire into artificial intelligence's fundament
9h
Anthony Fauci Explains Why the US Still Hasn't Beaten Covid
The director of NIAID talks about vaccines, school reopenings, hostility toward science, and the lessons we'll learn when (yes, when) we recover.
9h
13 Smart Home Deals on Dyson Vacs, Sleep Tech, and More
We found sales on vacuums, sound machines, gardening gadgets, and other tech to make your day a little less stressful.
9h
Selfies, Screens, and Our Violent Love of Wildlife
Even as wild places crumble and collapse, people's emotional connection to nature intensifies—but who bears the costs of our fawning over cute animals online?
9h
Madonna's Instagram flagged for spreading coronavirus misinformation
The singer claimed a vaccine had been found but was being concealed to 'let the rich get richer' Instagram has deleted a post by Madonna in which the pop star shared a coronavirus conspiracy theory with her 15 million followers. She captioned the video with claims that a vaccine for Covid-19 has "been found and proven and has been available for months". She continued: "They would rather let fear
9h
Belgium, Luxembourg and Croatia may join Spain on England's Covid-19 quarantine list
Ministers monitoring potential second wave of pandemic in parts of Europe Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Travellers returning to England from Belgium and Luxembourg could have quarantine restrictions reimposed in the next two days, as ministers grapple to contain any fresh threat from a potential second wave of coronavirus in some European countries. Related: Testin
9h
The Mars Rover and the Story of a Curious Little Girl
An e-mail from Brazil reminds the author of how important it is to inspire young women to love science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Strongest Evidence Yet Shows Air Pollution Kills
The finding comes as the Trump administration has been rolling back clean air regulations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Poverty Is a Choice
We live in what often feels like a biblically terrible time, marked by mass extinctions, deep recessions, epidemics, climate emergencies, inequality, and forever wars. But one thing, at least, has gotten better. More than 1 billion people have escaped extreme poverty—so many, so fast, that the world might be able to declare, within a decade, the end of this most miserable form of deprivation. "Th
10h
Strongest Evidence Yet Shows Air Pollution Kills
The finding comes as the Trump administration has been rolling back clean air regulations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
MP3 fylder 25 år
Berømt og berygtet. MP3 fylder i år 25, og har i sin levetid været med til at ændre musikindustrien for evigt.
10h
Firbenet robot holder balancen på to ben
Robotter på fire ben er ikke længere et særsyn, men de kræver plads for at kunne bevæge sig. Nu har italienske forskere skabt en firbenet robot, der kan holde balancen på to ben – og måske gå på line.
10h
USC-Children's Hospital Los Angeles researcher out following misconduct probe
An infectious diseases researcher found by a federal U.S. watchdog to have "recklessly" faked data in grants worth millions left his job as the investigation was coming to a close, Retraction Watch has learned. As we reported last week, Prasadarao Nemani, of Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and the University of Southern California (USC), "engaged … Continue reading
10h
Go Memorize a Poem
One tribute to the late John Lewis began by noting his love of W. E. Henley's "Invictus"; it seems to have been Nelson Mandela's favorite too, as affirmed in Morgan Freeman's reading of the poem . During his bare half century on Earth, Henley was chronically ill with tuberculosis and other ailments, which led, among other things, to the amputation of his left leg. He died in 1903, at the beginnin
10h
Live Coronavirus Updates
In Iran, religious ceremonies and college-entrance exams are in limbo. Big U.S. retailers are mandating masks, but enforcement is an issue.
10h
Zika virus infection in pregnancy and adverse fetal outcomes in São Paulo State, Brazil: a prospective cohort study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69235-0
11h
11h
Development and long-term evaluation of a new 68Ge/68Ga generator based on nano-SnO2 for PET imaging
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69659-8 Development and long-term evaluation of a new 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator based on nano-SnO 2 for PET imaging
11h
LncRNA MALAT1 facilitates lung metastasis of osteosarcomas through miR-202 sponging
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69574-y
11h
Continuous scanning for Bragg coherent X-ray imaging
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69678-5
11h
Climate change models predict decreases in the range of a microendemic freshwater fish in Honduras
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69579-7
11h
Plant endophytes promote growth and alleviate salt stress in Arabidopsis thaliana
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69713-5
11h
Electro-haptic stimulation enhances speech recognition in spatially separated noise for cochlear implant users
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69697-2
11h
'Quantum negativity' can power ultra-precise measurements
Scientists have found that a physical property called 'quantum negativity' can be used to take more precise measurements of everything from molecular distances to gravitational waves.
11h
Decline in US cardiac deaths slowing, while county-level disparities grow
Steady progress in reducing the rates of premature cardiac death in the US began slowing in 2011, largely due to rising rates of out-of-hospital premature cardiac deaths, especially among younger adults. County-level disparities in premature cardiac death rates across the US have widened over the past two decades.
11h
Testing for Covid-19 on arrival in UK is no 'silver bullet', says minister
Downing Street continues to come under pressure over quarantine plans Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Testing passengers for Covid-19 on arrival in the UK is "not a silver bullet", the culture secretary, Oliver Dowden, has said, as Downing Street continues to come under pressure over quarantine plans. Dowden said people could initially test negative before the virus
11h
Quantum advantage in postselected metrology
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17559-w In quantum metrology (as well as computing) it is not easy to pinpoint the specific source of quantum advantage. Here, the authors reveal a link between postselection and the unusually high rates of information per final measurement in general quantum parameter-estimation scenarios.
11h
Developmental GABA polarity switch and neuronal plasticity in Bioengineered Neuronal Organoids
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17521-w Brain organoids are important tools to study early development and disease but little is known of their network activity and plasticity. Here the authors generate iPSC-derived neuronal organoids that display early network formation and maturation with evidence for a GABA polarity switch and long-term potentiatio
11h
Gradual polyploid genome evolution revealed by pan-genomic analysis of Brachypodium hybridum and its diploid progenitors
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17302-5 Existing plant pan-genomic studies usually report considerable intraspecific whole gene presence-absence variation. Here, the authors use pan-genomic approach to reveal gradual polyploid genome evolution by analyzing of Brachypodium hybridum and its diploid progenitors.
11h
Ex vivo editing of human hematopoietic stem cells for erythroid expression of therapeutic proteins
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17552-3 A platform for systemic therapeutic transgene expression independent of patient mutations needs a safe and highly transcribed locus. Here the authors ex vivo edit HPSCs using CRISPR-Cas9 to integrate transgenes under the α-globin promoter to achieve erythroid specific expression.
11h
Advances in asymmetric organocatalysis over the last 10 years
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17580-z Organocatalysis has become a major pillar of (asymmetric) catalysis. Here, the authors discuss recent trends in organocatalytic activation modes for challenging stereoselective transformations and the emerging integration with other fields, such as photoredox catalysis and electrosynthesis.
11h
Optomechanical mass spectrometry
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17592-9 The use of one dimensional devices in nanomechanical mass spectrometry leads to a trade-off between analysis time and resolution. Here, the authors report single-particle mass spectrometry using integrated optomechanical resonators, impervious to particle position, stiffness or shape.
11h
The sponge effect and carbon emission mitigation potentials of the global cement cycle
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17583-w Cement plays a dual role in the carbon cycle like a sponge. Here, the authors employ a dynamic model to quantify such sponge effect and concluded that deep decarbonization of the global cement cycle will require radical technology advancements and widespread deployment of material efficiency measures.
11h
The balancing act of urban conservation
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17539-0 As investment in urban conservation grows, researchers must balance the needs of residents and conservation targets. We discuss some of the challenges we have encountered and the importance of taking a transdisciplinary approach informed by design and social knowledge.
11h
Heathrow says UK travel policy amounts to 'quarantine roulette'
Biggest UK airport slumps to £1bn loss in first half on collapse in passenger numbers
11h
The unexpected key to student engagement? Dignity.
Respect and dignity are sometimes conflated, but Cultures of Dignity founder Rosalind Wiseman argues that they are very different. Dignity, according to Wiseman, is the essential and inextricable worth of a person. Respect is the admiration for someone's actions, which often involves how they treat others. The rub comes when people in positions of authority and respect (for example, our elders) b
11h
A Viral Epidemic Splintering Into Deadly Pieces
There's not just one coronavirus outbreak in the United States. Now there are many, each requiring its own mix of solutions.
11h
To Land Perseverance Rover in One Piece, NASA Made Improvements
The United States has an unparalleled record of success on the red planet's surface, but NASA's engineers aren't resting on their laurels.
11h
Kerry James Marshall's Black Birds Take Flight in a New Series
Inspired by John James Audubon, the painter explores the societal "pecking order" in two works that dovetail with "this mystery about whether or not Audubon himself was Black."
11h
This Moss Uses Quartz as a Parasol
In the Mojave Desert, a translucent crystal offers bryophytes much-needed respite from the heat of the sun.
11h
The Mysterious Life of Birds Who Never Come Down
Swifts spend all their time in the sky. What can their journeys tell us about the future?
11h
'Quantum negativity' can power ultra-precise measurements
Scientists have found that a physical property called 'quantum negativity' can be used to take more precise measurements of everything from molecular distances to gravitational waves.
11h
In India's Chennai, River Restoration Lands Hardest on the Poor
The problem, critics say, is that the implementation of these otherwise well-intentioned river clean-up programs weighs heavily on — and with little regard for — the thousands of low-income inhabitants eking out already difficult lives in dozens of informal communities along the city's rivers.
11h
Harvested Antibodies Now Being Tested As A Prevention Tool Against COVID-19
Scientists are now checking to see if purified blood serum from people who have recovered from COVID-19 might be more than a useful treatment. Perhaps it's a way to prevent disease in someone else. (Image credit: Lindsey Wasson/Reuters)
11h
Airbus to build 'first interplanetary cargo ship'
The European aerospace company will make a huge satellite to bring Mars rocks back to Earth.
12h
Dinosaur retraction, Neanderthal pain and EU budget woe
Nature, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02204-9 The latest science news, in brief.
12h
Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a vaccine?
More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
12h
Computer-vision indtager sporten: Næste store skridt bliver at få det til at virke i serie 2
PLUS. Teknologierne transfer learning og knowledge graphs gør computer vision klar til kampstart – når billedet er høj nok kvalitet.
12h
What kind of face mask best protects against coronavirus?
Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply
12h
EU støtter udvidet universitetssamarbejde
Universitetsalliancen 4EU+, som Københavns Universitet er medlem af, har fået EU-midler til…
13h
13h
Tropical storm warning issued for Puerto Rico, Caribbean
Forecasters on Tuesday issued a tropical storm warning for Puerto Rico and other parts of the Caribbean, saying a disturbance in the Atlantic is likely to soon strengthen into a tropical storm that might reach the U.S. mainland.
13h
Elevated troponin levels are associated with early neurological worsening in ischemic stroke with atrial fibrillation
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69303-5
13h
Physiological impact and comparison of mutant screening methods in piwil2 KO founder Nile tilapia produced by CRISPR/Cas9 system
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69421-0
13h
13h
Indigenous people vital for understanding environmental change
Grassroots knowledge from Indigenous people can help to map and monitor ecological changes and improve scientific studies, according to Rutgers-led research.
13h
Study finds first African carder bees to reach Western Australia
Curtin research has recorded the first known appearance of Pseudoanthidium (Immanthidium) repetitum, the African carder bee, in Western Australia and has highlighted the need to closely monitor the impacts of such introduced species on the ecosystem.
13h
Indigenous people vital for understanding environmental change
Grassroots knowledge from Indigenous people can help to map and monitor ecological changes and improve scientific studies, according to Rutgers-led research.
13h
Study finds first African carder bees to reach Western Australia
Curtin research has recorded the first known appearance of Pseudoanthidium (Immanthidium) repetitum, the African carder bee, in Western Australia and has highlighted the need to closely monitor the impacts of such introduced species on the ecosystem.
13h
Using artificial intelligence to smell the roses
A pair of researchers at the University of California, Riverside, has used machine learning to understand what a chemical smells like—a research breakthrough with potential applications in the food flavor and fragrance industries.
13h
13h
Researchers discover 'Marie Kondo' protein which aids in organizing fruit fly embryos
Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have discovered a protein in fruit fly embryos, dubbed Marie Kondo, that destroys maternal proteins. Much like namesake, author and clutter consultant Marie Kondo, this gene removes unnecessary molecules, keeping embryos organized.
13h
Researchers discover 'Marie Kondo' protein which aids in organizing fruit fly embryos
Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have discovered a protein in fruit fly embryos, dubbed Marie Kondo, that destroys maternal proteins. Much like namesake, author and clutter consultant Marie Kondo, this gene removes unnecessary molecules, keeping embryos organized.
13h
14h
Svært at vende tilbage til job efter hjernerystelse
Personer med langvarige følger efter hjernerystelse oplever, at det er svært at vende tilbage…
14h
Coronavirus: UK signs deal for 60m doses of potential vaccine
GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi Pasteur could supply vaccine by early next year if successful UK signs deal for fourth potential coronavirus vaccine Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Britain has become one of the biggest buyers of potential vaccines against Covid-19, following an agreement to purchase a fourth vaccine that takes the UK stockpile to 250m doses so far. In a w
14h
UK strikes deal for 60m Covid-19 vaccine doses with Sanofi and GSK
Advance purchase agreement depends on clinical trials starting in September
14h
Monsanto gets injunction against California's mandated cancer warning for glyphosate
A federal district court permanently enjoined California from requiring a cancer warning for glyphosate on First Amendment grounds. The battle between the law and science continues.
15h
Global report: downsized hajj pilgrimage begins amid Covid-19 restrictions
US deaths near 150,000; half of people living in Mumbai slums have had the coronavirus; China records 100 new cases Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Muslim pilgrims have begun the annual hajj in the holy city of Mecca in a dramatically downsized version as the hosts, Saudi Arabia, try to prevent any outbreaks of coronavirus during the five-day pilgrimage. The hajj, on
15h
VIDEO Mennesker har udforsket Mars i 55 år: Her er, hvad vi har lært
Jagten efter liv har udviklet sig fra idéen om marsmænd med skovle til mikroskopiske biosignaturer.
16h
For rufous hummingbirds, migration looks different depending on age and sex
Plucky, beautiful and declining in numbers at about a 2% annual rate, the rufous hummingbird makes its long annual migration in different timing and route patterns based the birds' age and sex.
16h
Curtin research finds first African carder bees to reach Western Australia
Curtin research has recorded the first known appearance of Pseudoanthidium (Immanthidium) repetitum, the African carder bee, in Western Australia and has highlighted the need to closely monitor the impacts of such introduced species on the ecosystem.
16h
How plantains and carbon nanotubes can improve cars
Researchers from the University of Johannesburg have shown that plantain, a starchy type of banana, is a promising renewable source for an emerging type of lighter, rust-free composite materials for the automotive industry. The natural plantain fibres are combined with carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin to form a natural fibre-reinforced hybrid polymer nanocomposite material. The composite has 31% m
16h
How the brain senses smell
An Italian-American research conducted by researchers at the IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) in Rovereto (Italy) and Harvard University in Boston (Usa) explains for the first time the mechanisms used by our brain to recognize specific smells. Thanks to this result, researchers will be able to think about the realization of an artificial sense of smell, to be t
16h
Pediatric experts offer tips for children's mental health in transition back to school
In a recent survey of school-aged parents conducted by Nationwide Children's Hospital, 2 out of 5 parents said that they had concerns about their child's social and emotional wellbeing as they head back to school. Concerns about transitioning back to school will be different depending on the age of a child.
16h
Studying interactions between ground-nesting bees and soils
Research gives possible answers to increase pollinator populations on farms.
16h
Exposure to environmental chemicals may disrupt sleep during menopause
For menopausal women who have difficulty sleeping, it might be because of chemicals in the environment. A new study based on data from the Midlife Women's Health Study suggests that exposure to various chemicals, such as phthalates, found in hundreds of products used daily, is associated with sleep disruptions in midlife women. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of
16h
Telemedicine can help safety net providers expand access to medical specialists
The use of telemedicine has grown rapidly during the coronavirus pandemic, but it's unclear whether those gains will ge permanent. A new study finds that safety net medical providers can substantially increase their patients' access to specialists with modest investments in new staff and technology to expand telemedicine.
16h
Indigenous people vital for understanding environmental change
Grassroots knowledge from indigenous people can help to map and monitor ecological changes and improve scientific studies, according to Rutgers-led research. The study, published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, shows the importance of indigenous and local knowledge for monitoring ecosystem changes and managing ecosystems. The team collected more than 300 indicators developed by indigenous peopl
16h
Americans are consuming less sugar but more nonnutritive sweeteners
A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that between 2002 and 2018 purchases by US households of foods and beverages containing caloric sweetener (CS, i.e., sugar) declined while purchases of products containing both caloric sugars and nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS, i.e., sugar substitutes) increased. Beverages accounted for most of the pro
16h
Some scientists are taking a DIY coronavirus vaccine, and nobody knows if it's legal or if it works
Preston Estep was alone in a borrowed laboratory, somewhere in Boston. No big company, no board meetings, no billion-dollar payout from Operation Warp Speed, the US government's covid-19 vaccine funding program. No animal data. No ethics approval. What he did have: ingredients for a vaccine. And one willing volunteer. Estep swirled together the mixture and spritzed it up his nose. Nearly 200 covi
16h
Virgin Galactic offers peek inside new space plane for tourists
Inside of VSS Unity unveiled, showing the cabin in which six passengers will be able to float in zero gravity on the edge of space Virgin Galactic has revealed the interior of its centrepiece space plane, showing off a cabin with new custom seats and a "space mirror" in a virtual tour of what its passengers can expect to experience on flights to the edge of space. For $250,000 a ticket, passenger
16h
'One big wave' – why the Covid-19 second wave may not exist
With no evidence of seasonal variations, the WHO warns the initial coronavirus pandemic is continuing and accelerating Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Covid-19 pandemic is currently unfolding in "one big wave" with no evidence that it follows seasonal variations common to influenza and other coronaviruses, such as the common cold, the World Health Organization ha
16h
'Silver bullet' to beat Covid-19 unlikely, warns UK vaccine chief
Kate Bingham of government task force plays down hopes of lifetime immunity despite recent positive trial results
16h
Politiet om egne it-fejl: Langt flere personer tilkoblet forkerte sager end vi troede
Rigspolitiet har afsluttet undersøgelsen af de fejlagtige personregistreringer, og er klar med tiltag til at forhindre fremtidige fejl. Nogle af de registreredes persondata er blevet delt med advokater og fremlagt i retssager, de intet havde med at gøre.
17h
Somebody read the comments…
This post is just to highlight an interesting paper that's just been published that analyzed the comment threads here and at WUWT. Out now in Science Communication! We find that users in comment sections of climate change blogs mostly deploy polarizing strategies, which ultimately do not resolve framing differences. #openaccess https://t.co/6vs5fif9EW pic.twitter.com/gIGyWPeuRR — Christel van Eck
17h
Australia's Covid-19 response shows we can confront major crises. Threats to our planet should be next | Ian Chubb
During the pandemic, we saw ideological nonsense and prejudice mostly put aside – and we saw what we could accomplish when it was Carl Sagan – one of my heroes and a scientist with a gift for communicating complex ideas in accessible ways – wrote back in 1994: "If we continue to accumulate only power and not wisdom, we will surely destroy ourselves … If we become even slightly more violent, short
17h
Global stocks steady ahead of Federal Reserve decision
Investors also watch US lawmakers' struggles to reach a deal on pandemic relief
18h
Climate change: Coastal erosion 'to threaten more Australian homes'
See the damage done by waves – and the problem will only get worse with climate change, experts say.
18h
18h
A dog strays and goes 90 km to find his old home
submitted by /u/aminy159 [link] [comments]
19h
If prosthetics become fully autonomous with all of the sensorineural functions of your normal hand, would you voluntarily amputate and upgrade your limbs?
I feel as even though deus ex is fiction, the premise of individuals being discriminated against because their limbs are non organic could be plausible. Would you still do it? submitted by /u/bibbidybum [link] [comments]
19h
19h
19h
Laser inversion enables multi-materials 3-D printing
submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]
19h
Fuel Cell Champion Hyundai pushes EVs to Challenge Tesla
submitted by /u/GlowingGreenie [link] [comments]
19h
19h
Scientists get closer to blood test for Alzheimer's disease
submitted by /u/Sorin61 [link] [comments]
19h
Virgin Galactic's spacecraft has six passenger seats and lots of windows
submitted by /u/filosoful [link] [comments]
19h
19h
19h
19h
19h
19h
19h
19h
A Possible Weapon Against the Pandemic: Printing Human Tissue
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
19h
World's largest nuclear fusion project begins assembly in France
submitted by /u/DrDolce [link] [comments]
19h
19h
19h
19h
19h
19h
19h
19h
Princess Anne: Fly-tipping 'a major irritation'
The Princess Royal is the guest editor of Country Life magazine this week, to mark her 70th birthday.
19h
19h
Acute exercise has beneficial effects on the immune system during prostate cancer
New research published this week in Experimental Physiology found that in prostate cancer survivors, a moderate bout of exercise kept the cell count of certain type of immune cells at a normal level, suggesting the exercise is safe for prostate cancer survivors. After 24 hours after a moderate bout of cycling, the immune cell count of natural killer (NK) cells, part of the body's first line of def
19h
The Atlantic Daily: 'The U.S. Is Simply Not Ready for Big Films to Return'
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . The Tenet debut moved abroad, a major theater made a concession, and Emmy nominations landed. We explain what it all means BRYAN ANSELM / REDUX Christopher Nolan's highly anticipated Tenet will d
19h
To alvorlige altan-ulykker på fire år vækker bekymring blandt fagfolk: Ingen kender omfanget
PLUS. Det er nødvendigt med obligatoriske tilsyn af særligt ældre altaner for at forhindre ulykker, mener forskere. Fem unge kom til skade i weekenden, da en altan i Kolding kollapsede
19h
Ecuador on alert over huge Chinese fishing fleet off Galapagos Islands
Ecuador is on alert due to the appearance of a fleet of fishing vessels off the Galapagos Islands.
19h
Decline of bees, other pollinators threatens US crop yields
Crop yields for apples, cherries and blueberries across the United States are being reduced by a lack of pollinators, according to new research, the most comprehensive study of its kind to date. Most of the world's crops depend on honeybees and wild bees for pollination, so declines in both managed and wild bee populations raise concerns about food security, notes the study.
20h
20h
Music training may not make children smarter after all
Music training does not have a positive impact on children's cognitive skills, such as memory, and academic achievement, such as maths, reading or writing, according to a study published in Memory & Cognition.
20h
Trump defends hydroxychloroquine after sharing viral video
A week after apparent reset, president complains about popularity of top public health official
20h
'Once-in-a-lifetime' opportunity for more sustainable food
An independent review of the UK's food policy calls for a new green revolution.
20h
Local opposition to Alaska's Pebble Mine grows as the project reaches the next milestone
Male sockeye salmon are among the prized resources in the proposed site of the Pebble Mine. (Bjorn Dihle/) Editor's note: Bjorn Dihle is a lifelong resident of Alaska, and an advocate for Alaska's wild habitat and natural resources. You can find him on Instagram and Facebook . This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . Today, a host of conservation and news organizations received via the U.
20h
Bringing Mars back to Earth
An audacious mission to bring rock samples from Mars back to Earth is about to begin – find out more with our illustrated guide
21h
Team pinpoints the origin story of SARS-CoV-2
The lineage that gave rise to the SARS-CoV-2, the virus that is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, has been circulating in bats for decades, researchers report. They also warn it likely includes other viruses with the ability to infect humans. The discoveries, which researchers made by reconstructing the evolutionary history of SARS-CoV-2, have implications for the prevention of future pandem
21h
Pandemic fight costs 500X more than preventing one
The failure to protect tropical rainforests has cost trillions of dollars stemming from the coronavirus pandemic, according to new research. The pandemic has wreaked economic havoc and caused historic levels of unemployment in the United States and around the world. For decades, scientists and environmental activists have been trying to draw the world's attention to the many harms caused by the r
21h
Coronavirus live news: US deaths near 150,000 as Italy extends state of emergency
Trump blames US case surge on protesters; WHO warns pandemic is "one big wave", not seasonal; Air travel not expected to recover until 2024. Follow the latest updates Covid-19 still accelerating, warns WHO, as restrictions return in Europe Twitter limits Donald Trump Jr's account for posting misinformation Clapped out of ICU, dead days later: the secondary impact of Covid-19 Outbreak in Xinjiang
21h
What jigsaw puzzles tell us about child development
New research shows that children only learn to do jigsaw puzzles once they have reached a certain stage of development. Three-year-olds use trial and error, but four-year-olds are able to use information in the picture to complete the puzzles. The research team say this understanding is the foundation of learning to draw and paint.
21h
Decline of bees, other pollinators threatens US crop yields
Crop yields for apples, cherries and blueberries across the United States are being reduced by a lack of pollinators, according to Rutgers-led research, the most comprehensive study of its kind to date. Most of the world's crops depend on honeybees and wild bees for pollination, so declines in both managed and wild bee populations raise concerns about food security, notes the study in the journal
21h
Study: A plunge in incoming sunlight may have triggered 'snowball earths'
Global ice ages may have been triggered by sharp declines in incoming sunlight, research finds.
21h
Gorilla relationships limited in large groups
Mountain gorillas that live in oversized groups may have to limit the number of strong social relationships they form, new research suggests.
21h
ADHD services map reveals major gaps in care, failing the vulnerable
New research has called for urgent action after creating a map that identifies gaps in services for adults with ADHD across the UK, leaving vulnerable people struggling to access vital support and treatment.
21h
Stop Saying Facebook Is 'Too Big to Moderate'
The social media company could surely enforce its own rules on false and harmful posts—it just needs to cut into its massive profit margins.
21h
The human cerebellum has almost 80% of the surface area of the neocortex [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The surface of the human cerebellar cortex is much more tightly folded than the cerebral cortex. It was computationally reconstructed for the first time to the level of all individual folia from multicontrast high-resolution postmortem MRI scans. Its total shrinkage-corrected surface area (1,590 cm2) was larger than expected or previously…
21h
Aggresomal sequestration and STUB1-mediated ubiquitylation during mammalian proteaphagy of inhibited proteasomes [Biochemistry]
The 26S proteasome, a self-compartmentalized protease complex, plays a crucial role in protein quality control. Multiple levels of regulatory systems modulate proteasomal activity for substrate hydrolysis. However, the destruction mechanism of mammalian proteasomes is poorly understood. We found that inhibited proteasomes are sequestered into the insoluble aggresome via HDAC6- and…
21h
Two distinct amphipathic peptide antibiotics with systemic efficacy [Medical Sciences]
Antimicrobial peptides are important candidates for developing new classes of antibiotics because of their potency against antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Current research focuses on topical applications and it is unclear how to design peptides with systemic efficacy. To address this problem, we designed two potent peptides by combining database-guided discovery with structure-based…
21h
Spatial and morphological reorganization of endosymbiosis during metamorphosis accommodates adult metabolic requirements in a weevil [Evolution]
Bacterial intracellular symbiosis (endosymbiosis) is widespread in nature and impacts many biological processes. In holometabolous symbiotic insects, metamorphosis entails a complete and abrupt internal reorganization that creates a constraint for endosymbiont transmission from larvae to adults. To assess how endosymbiosis copes—and potentially evolves—throughout this major host-tissue reorganizat
21h
Progression from remodeling to hibernation of ribosomes in zinc-starved mycobacteria [Microbiology]
Zinc starvation in mycobacteria leads to remodeling of ribosomes, in which multiple ribosomal (r-) proteins containing the zinc-binding CXXC motif are replaced by their motif-free paralogues, collectively called C− r-proteins. We previously reported that the 70S C− ribosome is exclusively targeted for hibernation by mycobacterial-specific protein Y (Mpy), which binds…
21h
Nonstandard conditionally specified models for nonignorable missing data [Systems Biology]
Data analyses typically rely upon assumptions about the missingness mechanisms that lead to observed versus missing data, assumptions that are typically unassessable. We explore an approach where the joint distribution of observed data and missing data are specified in a nonstandard way. In this formulation, which traces back to a…
21h
Algorithms as discrimination detectors [Computer Sciences]
Preventing discrimination requires that we have means of detecting it, and this can be enormously difficult when human beings are making the underlying decisions. As applied today, algorithms can increase the risk of discrimination. But as we argue here, algorithms by their nature require a far greater level of specificity…
21h
Haplotype networks of SARS-CoV-2 infections in the Diamond Princess cruise ship outbreak [Microbiology]
The Diamond Princess cruise ship was put under quarantine offshore Yokohama, Japan, after a passenger who disembarked in Hong Kong was confirmed as a coronavirus disease 2019 case. We performed whole-genome sequencing of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) directly from PCR+ clinical specimens and conducted a phylogenetic analysis…
21h
The optic nerve lamina region is a neural progenitor cell niche [Developmental Biology]
Retinal ganglion cell axons forming the optic nerve (ON) emerge unmyelinated from the eye and become myelinated after passage through the optic nerve lamina region (ONLR), a transitional area containing a vascular plexus. The ONLR has a number of unusual characteristics: it inhibits intraocular myelination, enables postnatal ON myelination of…
21h
Combined metabolome and transcriptome analysis reveals key components of complete desiccation tolerance in an anhydrobiotic insect [Biochemistry]
Some organisms have evolved a survival strategy to withstand severe dehydration in an ametabolic state, called anhydrobiosis. The only known example of anhydrobiosis among insects is observed in larvae of the chironomid Polypedilum vanderplanki. Recent studies have led to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying anhydrobiosis and the…
21h
HCMV-induced signaling through gB-EGFR engagement is required for viral trafficking and nuclear translocation in primary human monocytes [Microbiology]
Previous analysis of postentry events revealed that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) displays a unique, extended nuclear translocation pattern in monocytes. We determined that c-Src signaling through pentamer engagement of integrins is required upon HCMV entry to avoid sorting of the virus into late endosomes and subsequent degradation. To follow up on…
21h