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Cautious optimism

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'Fool's gold' may be valuable after all

In a breakthrough new study, scientists and engineers at the University of Minnesota have electrically transformed the abundant and low-cost non-magnetic material iron sulfide, also known as "fool's gold" or pyrite, into a magnetic material.

9h

Moderna: Vores 30.000 mennesker store studie kan lede til en corona-vaccine inden jul

Tusindvis af amerikanere skal lægge arm og immunforsvar til et stort fase 3-studie, der i positivt udfald kan føre til en vaccine mod covid-19 inden for få måneder.

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LATEST

Researchers discover stem cells in optic nerve that preserve vision

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have for the first time identified stem cells in the region of the optic nerve, which transmits signals from the eye to the brain. The finding, published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), presents a new theory on why the most common form of glaucoma may develop and provides potential

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Tip sheet for joint statistical meetings Aug. 2 – 6, 2020

New research from Virtual Joint Statistical Meetings 2020 includes applications to COVID-19, sports, forensic science, AI, social media emoticons, climate change, stock market, criminal justice, undocumented immigrants, algorithmic fairness, US census, precision medicine, opioid crisis, and more. Complementary press registration is available.

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A centerpiece of EBRAINS' human brain atlas is presented in 'Science'

'Julich-Brain' is the name of the first 3D-atlas of the human brain that reflects the variability of the brain's structure with microscopic resolution.

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For Mates to Fuse Bodies, Some Anglerfish Have Lost Immune Genes

In most vertebrates, the absence of adaptive immunity would be catastrophic, but in some deep-sea angler fish species, it enables their "wild" and "wacky" mating habits.

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Scientists expose fascinating 'compartments' in bacteria

A new review article casts light on organelles, the internal compartments in bacterial cells that house and support functions essential for their survival and growth.

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Challenging a central dogma of chemistry: Energy flow in chemical reactions

Researchers have discovered that common chemical reactions accelerate Brownian diffusion by sending long-range ripples into the surrounding solvent.

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Antibiotics use early in life increases risk of inflammatory bowel disease later in life

Even short, single antibiotic courses given to young animals can predispose them to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) when they are older, according to new researchers. The study provides further evidence supporting the idea that the use of antibiotics in children under 1 year old disrupts the intestinal microbiota – the trillions of beneficial microorganisms that live in and on our bodies – that p

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Studying interactions between ground-nesting bees and soils

Research gives possible answers to increase pollinator populations on farms.

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Scientists Revive 100-Million-Year-Old Lifeforms

Wakey Wakey After scientists gave them a little snack, some 101.5-million-year-old bacteria sprang back to life after an extremely long nap. Researchers from the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology dug up chunks of clay from 70 meters beneath the ocean floor. They injected it with sugar and ammonia and, to their surprise, Ars Technica reports that colonies of bacteria quickly cho

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Argonne-led team finds special engines and fuels could cut air emissions and water use

Advanced fuels and new engine designs could reduce emissions and water use over the next 30 years, according for a new study led by Argonne scientists.

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CHOP researchers identify lab profiles that differentiate MIS-C from COVID-19 in children

Researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) report important data that differentiate MIS-C from severe COVID-19 in children and suggest that MIS-C is a post-infectious syndrome related to COVID-19 but distinct from Kawasaki disease. The findings were published today in The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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The best bar carts for a beautiful home

Everything where you need it to be. (Kyryll Ushakov via Unsplash/) Listen, it's time to stop storing your alcohol, bitters, bottles, shakers, and stirrers in your cabinets, random shelves, or countertops and get yourself a beautiful bar cart. There is nothing better than knowing exactly where your cocktail ingredients are at all times, whether you are entertaining or making drinks for one. Elevat

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Origami microbots: Centuries-old artform guides cutting-edge advances in tiny machines

Origami principles can unlock the potential of the smallest robots, enhancing speed, agility and control in machines no more than a centimeter in size.

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Keep cool in the pool: Novel chip sensor makes swimming pools safer

A new microchip that enables continuous monitoring of pH and chlorine levels in swimming pools will vastly improve water safety as new research shows it can deliver consistent and accurate pool chemistry for reliable pool management.

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Chinese and Russian hackers were just sanctioned by Europe for the first time

The European Union imposed its first-ever sanctions for cyberattacks on Thursday, targeting Russian, Chinese, and North Korean groups connected to several major hacking incidents. The action , which includes travel bans and asset freezes on individuals and organizations connected to ransomware and industrial espionage, follow earlier sanctions put in place by the United States. Retaliation for Ru

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Vaccine Candidate Delivers Protection In A Single Shot (In Monkeys)

Studies COVID-19 vaccine candidates in monkeys show promise of an effective vaccine, but it will large scale human trials to know for sure if they work. (Image credit: Steve Parsons/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

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Effective dandruff shampoos

Keep your shoulders clear. (Alex Blăjan via Unsplash/) Dandruff is a nuisance, from the snow-like flakes that dot your shoulders to an itchy, scaly scalp. If your hair is in need of some heavy duty TLC, dandruff shampoos can do the trick, offering long-lasting results with the help of active ingredients that target the root of the problem. Best of all, some formulas only need to be used a few tim

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Health workers report enough symptoms for depression diagnosis

Health care workers in the United States are struggling with a suite of mental-health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study. The researchers found that health care workers are at greater risk than the general public of experiencing health problems such as depression. "It was approximately 30% higher than the depressive symptoms score for the control group. You don't ex

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One-size does not fit all for post-disaster recovery, study finds

When a natural disaster strikes, it often takes years for vulnerable communities to recover, long after the news coverage fades and the rest of the world seems to move on. A new Portland State University study that followed 400 households after the 2015 Nepal earthquakes provides insight into better understanding the factors that contribute to resilience and change in short-term rural natural disa

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A Ticking Time Bomb: Tracing the Origin and Spread of SARS-CoV-2

Linda Saif will give a historical overview of SARS spillovers from animals to humans, and Neville Sanjana will describe recent work on a SARS-CoV-2 spike protein variant that increases human infectivity.

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Dusters that make it easier to keep your home clean

Keep your home dust-free. ( Samantha Gades /) There is so much that goes into keeping your home clean: vacuuming, mopping, sweeping, dishes, surfaces, and more. We know that with all that going on it can be hard to remember one very important task, dusting. It's often hard to notice dust accumulating but it's there and can have a detrimental effect on your health, belongings, and overall cleanlin

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NASA-NOAA satellite tracks Isaias' development, movement, soaking potential

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided visible imagery of the development and movement of Tropical Storm Isaias is it moved into the eastern Caribbean Sea. NASA's Aqua satellite provided temperature information that gave insight into Isaias' rainmaking potential.

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Even Facebook Is Pining for the Internet It Destroyed

There's a new app, and when isn't there? This one is called E.gg, and it looks like a mix of Tumblr and GeoCities: The "About" page features a dancing-baby GIF, against a background of a starry night sky, with text in deliberately nauseating shades of highlighter yellow and green. It calls out the "raw and exploratory spirit" of the "Early Internet," and reminisces about the days of "manically-bl

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Implementation of social distancing policies correlates with significant reduction in SARS-CoV-2 transmission

According to researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the implementation of social distancing policies corresponded with significant reductions in transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and reduced community mobility, both in the U.S. and globally, providing evidence that social distancing is a useful tool in preventing further spread of COVID-19.

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NASA-NOAA satellite tracks Isaias' development, movement, soaking potential

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided visible imagery of the development and movement of Tropical Storm Isaias is it moved into the eastern Caribbean Sea. NASA's Aqua satellite provided temperature information that gave insight into Isaias' rainmaking potential.

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Astrophysicists observe long-theorized quantum phenomena

At the heart of every white dwarf star—the dense stellar object that remains after a star has burned away its fuel reserve of gases as it nears the end of its life cycle—lies a quantum conundrum: as white dwarfs add mass, they shrink in size, until they become so small and tightly compacted that they cannot sustain themselves, collapsing into a neutron star.

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Mars-bound spaceship experiencing technical issues: NASA

Mars 2020, the spaceship carrying NASA's new rover Perseverance to the Red Planet, is experiencing technical difficulties and is running on essential systems only, the agency said Thursday.

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National Academies publishes guide to help public officials make sense of COVID-19 data

The National Academies has published a guide to help officials across the country interpret and understand different COVID-19 statistics and data sources as they make decisions about opening and closing schools, businesses and community facilities.

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FSU engineering researchers harness wind data to help meet energy needs in Florida

A new study from the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering shows how upcoming technological advances could make wind energy a hot commodity in the Sunshine State.

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Researchers find increase in comorbidities among hospitalized patients with heart failure

Melissa Caughey, PhD, instructor in the UNC/NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, is the senior author of a recently published study that shows an increase in comorbidities and mortality risk among hospitalized patients with acute decompensated HFpEF and HFrEF.

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Cell competition in the thymus is crucial in a healthy organism

The study published in Cell Reports demonstrates that the development of T lymphocytes lays on the coordination of signals followed by cells in order to ensure the maintenance of a healthy organism. The cells identified in the study integrate information regarding the needs of more mature cells and define their own development accordingly: adjusting the speed of the production of T lymphocytes and

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One-size does not fit all for post-disaster recovery, PSU study finds

A new Portland State University study that followed 400 households after the 2015 Nepal earthquakes provides insight into better understanding the factors that contribute to resilience and change in short-term rural natural disaster recovery.

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Read Barack Obama's Eulogy for John Lewis

Former President Barack Obama delivered a eulogy today honoring Representative John Lewis of Georgia, who died July 17 after a decades-long career in the House of Representatives. Lewis, a civil-rights icon who led the 1965 march in Selma, Alabama, across the Edmund Pettus Bridge and spoke at the March on Washington, spent his congressional years advocating for voting rights and equality for Blac

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Coronavirus Challenges in Primates, Compared

We have a sudden influx over the last few days of preclinical rhesus challenge studies with various coronavirus vaccines, and it's only natural to try to compare them. I have worked up a table with all four of the current results and the previously reported SinoVac inactivated virus vaccine, whose rhesus challenge numbers were officially published earlier this month. This is the closest to Phase

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Initiative Seeks to CT Scan Kenya's Unexplored Fossil Trove

A paleontologist at the National Museums of Kenya is spearheading an effort to make 3-D reconstructions of the institution's fossils available internationally.

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We May Be Able to Extract "Movies" of the Universe From Black Holes

Summer Blockbuster Ever since the first-ever image of a black hole was published last year, physicists have been scrambling to learn as much about it as they can. One of their astonishing new claims is that the swirling rings of light trapped in the orbit of the black hole Pōwehi can serve as a sort of historical record, New Scientist reports . The rings of photons could be like the rings of a tr

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Gut microbiome translates stress into sickle cell crises

A new study shows how chronic psychological stress leads to painful vessel-clogging episodes–the most common complication of sickle-cell disease (SCD) and a frequent cause of hospitalizations. The findings, made in mice, show that the gut microbiome plays a key role in triggering those episodes and reveals possible ways to prevent them. The research was conducted by scientists at Albert Einstein

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Your brain parasite isn't making you sick — here's why

The new discovery could have important implications for brain infections, neurodegenerative diseases and autoimmune disorders.

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Re-engineering antibodies for COVID-19

Catholic University of America researcher uses 'in silico' analysis to fast-track passive immunity

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'Heartless and reckless' to force shielding people back to work, says TUC

Exclusive: scientists demand to see evidence behind decision to drop shielding on 1 August 'I'd rather lose my job than my life': vulnerable people on the end of shielding Up to 2 million extremely vulnerable people shielding in England must not be forced to return to their workplaces, trade unions have declared amid concerns over rising coronavirus infection rates. The Trades Union Congress (TUC

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American parents are setting up homeschool "pandemic pods"

In the past few weeks, a new vocabulary has emerged in parenting groups on social media: pandemic pods, copods, microschools, homeschool pods . All describe cobbled-together groups of students who plan to study at home together this fall as the pandemic creeps into a new academic year. Homeschooling, this is not. As local and federal governments continue to squabble over the risks of sending kids

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Origami microbots: Centuries-old artform guides cutting-edge advances in tiny machines

Origami principles can unlock the potential of the smallest robots, enhancing speed, agility and control in machines no more than a centimeter in size.

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Older Americans receive cancer screenings past recommended age

Older Americans may be receiving cancer screenings not recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

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LSU health pathologists publish first report on likely MIS involving the heart

A team of LSU Health New Orleans pathologists published what is believed to be the first case report on pathologic findings of vasculitis of the small vessels of the heart, which likely represents multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS).

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Obesity linked to social ties in older women, more so than in men

Women who lack social ties have a greater likelihood of being obese, according to new UBC research published today in PLOS One. Men, on the other hand, were less likely to be obese if they lived alone and had a smaller social network.

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Social media users are more likely to believe bunk COVID facts

People who get their news from social media are more likely to have misperceptions about COVID-19, according to a new study. Those that consume more traditional news media have fewer misperceptions and are more likely to follow public health recommendations like social distancing, the researchers report. In their study in Misinformation Review , researchers looked at the behavioral effects of exp

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New method lets scientists peer deeper into ocean

Researchers have advanced a new way to see into the ocean's depths, establishing an approach to detect algae and measure key properties using light. A new article reports using a laser-based tool, lidar, to collect these measurements far deeper than has been typically possible using satellites.

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Young kids could spread COVID-19 as much as older children and adults, study suggests

Researchers have discovered that children younger than 5 years with mild to moderate COVID-19 have much higher levels of genetic material for the virus in the nose compared to older children and adults. The findings point to the possibility that the youngest children transmit the virus as much as other age groups.

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Microsoft's new Flight Simulator looks real enough to scratch your air-travel itch

Realistic graphics extend to the ground and the air. (Microsoft /) It's a very bad time for aviation: The pandemic has people understandably wary about flying, and has spurred airlines to send beloved but aged aircraft like the 747 into retirement earlier than they had planned. Planes are grounded; air traffic is down. By one metric, air travel demand is down by 65 to 70 percent globally when mea

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Whatever Your Budget, Now You Can Own a Historic Piece of the Manhattan Project

Over the last few years, the folks at Mini Museum have been providing regular everyday people with incredible opportunities to own priceless scientific and historical artifacts . To date, they've shipped almost 1,000,000 specimens encompassing more than 150 different subjects, spanning billions of years of history, to more than 40,000 customers in 120 different countries. But their latest offerin

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Fauci Says Coronavirus Can Infect You Through Your Eyeballs

The White House's top infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci told ABC News that "if you have goggles or an eye shield, you should use it." Wearing face shields was "not universally recommended," he said, "but if you really want to be complete, you should probably use it if you can." "You have mucosa in the nose, mucosa in the mouth, but you also have mucosa in the eye," Fauci explained. "Theoret

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Presenting a SARS-CoV-2 mouse model to study viral responses and vaccine candidates

Researchers who generated a strain of SARS-CoV-2 that can infect mice used it to produce a new mouse model of infection that may help facilitate testing of COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics.

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Challenging a central dogma of chemistry

Steve Granick, Director of the IBS Center for Soft and Living Matter and Dr. Huan Wang, Senior Research Fellow, report together with 5 interdisciplinary colleagues in the July 31 issue of the journal Science that common chemical reactions accelerate Brownian diffusion by sending long-range ripples into the surrounding solvent.

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Economic and food supply chain disruptions endanger global food security

COVID-19 has led to a global economic slowdown that is affecting all four pillars of food security – availability, access, utilization, and stability. The greatest threats are to food accessibility, due to income losses and disruptions in supply chains – particularly for more nutritious foods and the world's poor.

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Immune functions traded in for reproductive success

Researchers at the MPI of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg, Germany, and the University of Washington in Seattle, USA, for the first time, investigate the phenomenon of sexual parasitism in deep-sea anglerfish. The scientists show that this very rare mode of reproduction is associated with the loss of adaptive immunity. In the course of evolution, however, the animals have reorganized the

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New understanding of CRISPR-Cas9 tool could improve gene editing

Of the CRISPR-Cas9 tools created to date, base editors have gotten lots of attention because of their seemingly simple editing: they neatly replace one nucleic acid with another, in many cases all that should be needed to fix a genetic disease. UC Berkeley scientists have now determined the structure of the latest base editor as it swaps out nucleic acids, showing why it can go off target but also

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Hengduan Mountain alpine flora history shown to be longest on Earth

Researchers from the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences showed that the alpine flora of the Hengduan Mountains has continuously existed far longer than any other flora on Earth. They also illustrated how modern biotas have been shaped by past geological and climatic events.

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How global responses to COVID-19 threaten global food security

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has forced nations worldwide to implement unprecedented social measures to stem the rapid spread of the virus.

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Despite decline, distribution of air pollution highlights socioeconomic disparities

While the level of fine particulate air pollution has declined considerably over the last several decades, a new study finds that its distribution has remained largely unchanged.

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A new, physics-based model predicts imminent large solar flares

Severe space weather could be forecast with greater accuracy and reliability than ever before, according to a new study, which presents a physics-based method for predicting imminent large solar flares.

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Loss of adaptive immunity helps deep sea anglerfish fuse with their mates

The discovery of altered adaptive immunity in anglerfish helps explain how the creatures are able to temporarily or permanently fuse with their mates without experiencing immune rejection.

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Ancient mountain formation and monsoons helped create a modern biodiversity hotspot

In a new study in Science, researchers examined the plant life in the China's Hengduan Mountains, the Himalaya Mountains, and the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Using DNA to build family trees of species, they learned that the diversity of plants in that region today can be traced back to newly-formed mountain ranges 30 million years ago, and monsoons that came later. It's a concrete example of how climat

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Stay or leave? A tale of two virus strategies revealed by math

By modeling experimentally measured characteristics of cells infected with hepatitis C in the lab, researchers in Japan found that one virus strain was roughly three times more likely to use copied genetic code to create new viruses compared to another, which instead tended to keep more copies inside an infected cell to accelerate replication. Understanding specific strategies adopted by viruses t

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The Power of Perseverance: NASA's Latest Rover Headed for Mars

NASA announced a successful liftoff for its latest Mars rover, Perseverance (also known as the Mars 2020 Rover) on Thursday. If all goes well, the vehicle will reach the Red Planet in February. At first glance, Perseverance looks like a repeat of Curiosity. The two spacecraft are built on a similar platform, but Perseverance has larger, more robust wheels with a larger diameter. These are intende

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New Analysis Method Predicts Disruptive Solar Flares

The method may be able to improve solar flare prediction using only satellite images of the sun. SolarFlare_topNteaser.jpg An image of a solar flare captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory on Oct. 2, 2014. Image credits: NASA/SDO Space Thursday, July 30, 2020 – 14:00 Meredith Fore, Contributor (Inside Science) — Solar flares — violent explosions on the surface of the sun — can send blas

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Earn up to a $1000 Bitcoin Bonus With a BlockFi Interest Bearing Crypto Account

When it comes to crypto investment strategies, until recently your only real option was to buy assets, hold on to them until the price went up, and then sell. However, now there's a smarter way to invest in cryptocurrencies. Thanks to an innovative crypto startup called BlockFi, you can actually put your crypto holdings to work earning compound interest , significantly increasing your Bitcoin, Et

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Air Quality Disparities Persist Despite Overall Gains

A new study finds that the U.S. places with the most polluted air in the 1980s remain the most polluted today. Poor people and people of color are more likely to live in places with dirty air. (Image credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

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News at a glance

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Lizard man

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Simple swaps of CO2

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Lowering the entropy

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Cleaner skies

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ANGEL2 is a member of the CCR4 family of deadenylases with 2',3'-cyclic phosphatase activity

RNA molecules are frequently modified with a terminal 2',3'-cyclic phosphate group as a result of endonuclease cleavage, exonuclease trimming, or de novo synthesis. During pre-transfer RNA (tRNA) and unconventional messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing, 2',3'-cyclic phosphates are substrates of the tRNA ligase complex, and their removal is critical for recycling of tRNAs upon ribosome stalling. We identi

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Human fetal microglia acquire homeostatic immune-sensing properties early in development

Microglia, immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), are important for tissue development and maintenance and are implicated in CNS disease, but we lack understanding of human fetal microglia development. Single-cell gene expression and bulk chromatin profiles of microglia at 9 to 18 gestational weeks (GWs) of human fetal development were generated. Microglia were heterogeneous at all stu

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Boosted molecular mobility during common chemical reactions

Mobility of reactants and nearby solvent is more rapid than Brownian diffusion during several common chemical reactions when the energy release rate exceeds a threshold. Screening a family of 15 organic chemical reactions, we demonstrate the largest boost for catalyzed bimolecular reactions, click chemistry, ring-opening metathesis polymerization, and Sonogashira coupling. Boosted diffusion is al

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Exceptional plasticity in the bulk single-crystalline van der Waals semiconductor InSe

Inorganic semiconductors are vital for a number of critical applications but are almost universally brittle. Here, we report the superplastic deformability of indium selenide (InSe). Bulk single-crystalline InSe can be compressed by orders of magnitude and morphed into a Möbius strip or a simple origami at room temperature. The exceptional plasticity of this two-dimensional van der Waals inorgan

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Human-specific ARHGAP11B increases size and folding of primate neocortex in the fetal marmoset

The neocortex has expanded during mammalian evolution. Overexpression studies in developing mouse and ferret neocortex have implicated the human-specific gene ARHGAP11B in neocortical expansion, but the relevance for primate evolution has been unclear. Here, we provide functional evidence that ARHGAP11B causes expansion of the primate neocortex. ARHGAP11B expressed in fetal neocortex of the commo

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Cooling and entangling ultracold atoms in optical lattices

Scalable, coherent many-body systems can enable the realization of previously unexplored quantum phases and have the potential to exponentially speed up information processing. Thermal fluctuations are negligible and quantum effects govern the behavior of such systems with extremely low temperature. We report the cooling of a quantum simulator with 10,000 atoms and mass production of high-fidelit

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In-cell architecture of an actively transcribing-translating expressome

Structural biology studies performed inside cells can capture molecular machines in action within their native context. In this work, we developed an integrative in-cell structural approach using the genome-reduced human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae . We combined whole-cell cross-linking mass spectrometry, cellular cryo–electron tomography, and integrative modeling to determine an in-cell archi

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Direct reversible decarboxylation from stable organic acids in dimethylformamide solution

Many classical and emerging methodologies in organic chemistry rely on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) extrusion to generate reactive intermediates for bond-forming events. Synthetic reactions that involve the microscopic reverse—the carboxylation of reactive intermediates—have conventionally been undertaken using very different conditions. We report that chemically stable C(sp 3 ) carboxylates, such as a

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Allele-specific open chromatin in human iPSC neurons elucidates functional disease variants

Most neuropsychiatric disease risk variants are in noncoding sequences and lack functional interpretation. Because regulatory sequences often reside in open chromatin, we reasoned that neuropsychiatric disease risk variants may affect chromatin accessibility during neurodevelopment. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)–derived neurons that model developing brains, we identified thousa

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DNA capture by a CRISPR-Cas9-guided adenine base editor

CRISPR-Cas–guided base editors convert A•T to G•C, or C•G to T•A, in cellular DNA for precision genome editing. To understand the molecular basis for DNA adenosine deamination by adenine base editors (ABEs), we determined a 3.2-angstrom resolution cryo–electron microscopy structure of ABE8e in a substrate-bound state in which the deaminase domain engages DNA exposed within the CRISPR-Cas9 R-loop

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Rational synthesis of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons directly on metal oxide surfaces

Atomically precise graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) attract great interest because of their highly tunable electronic, optical, and transport properties. However, on-surface synthesis of GNRs is typically based on metal surface–assisted chemical reactions, where metallic substrates strongly screen their designer electronic properties and limit further applications. Here, we present an on-surface synth

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Disparities in PM2.5 air pollution in the United States

Air pollution at any given time is unequally distributed across locations. Average concentrations of fine particulate matter smaller than 2.5 micrometers in diameter (PM 2.5 ) have fallen over time. However, we do not know how the spatial distribution of PM 2.5 has evolved. Here, we provide early evidence. We combine 36 years of PM 2.5 concentrations measured over ~8.6 million grid cells with geo

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Ancient orogenic and monsoon-driven assembly of the worlds richest temperate alpine flora

Understanding how alpine biotas formed in response to historical environmental change may improve our ability to predict and mitigate the threats to alpine species posed by global warming. In the world's richest temperate alpine flora, that of the Tibet-Himalaya-Hengduan region, phylogenetic reconstructions of biome and geographic range evolution show that extant lineages emerged by the early Oli

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Genomic surveillance reveals multiple introductions of SARS-CoV-2 into Northern California

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread globally, with >365,000 cases in California as of 17 July 2020. We investigated the genomic epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 in Northern California from late January to mid-March 2020, using samples from 36 patients spanning nine counties and the Grand Princess cruise ship.

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A physics-based method that can predict imminent large solar flares

Solar flares are highly energetic events in the Sun's corona that affect Earth's space weather. The mechanism that drives the onset of solar flares is unknown, hampering efforts to forecast them, which mostly rely on empirical methods. We present the -scheme, a physics-based model to predict large solar flares through a critical condition of magnetohydrodynamic instability, triggered by magnetic

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New Products

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The function of the thymus and its impact on modern medicine

The lymphoid system is intimately involved in immunological processes. The small lymphocyte that circulates through blood into lymphoid tissues, then through the lymph and back to the blood through the thoracic duct, is able to initiate immune responses after appropriate stimulation by antigen. However, the lymphocytes found in the thymus are deficient in this ability despite the fact that the th

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Structural insights into differences in G protein activation by family A and family B GPCRs

Family B heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein (G protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism. Recent structures of family B GPCR-G s protein complexes reveal a disruption in the α-helix of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) not observed in family A GPCRs. To investigate the functional impact of this structural difference, we compared the structure an

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Census director dodges legislators' questions about Trump memo on undocumented residents

Democrats see political influence as Republicans defend order to exclude noncitizens

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Three COVID-19 Patients Land in the ER. Here's How the Virus Damaged Their Hearts

These patient cases from an emergency room in New York City show the coronavirus affects more than the lungs. The heart can also suffer.

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Gut microbes and stress team up to make a painful disease worse

Nature, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02263-y A type of gut bacterium worsens the inflammatory response and cardiovascular problems in mice.

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Simple swaps of CO2

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Lowering the entropy

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The Male Anglerfish's Evolutionary Solution to Female Rejection

Commingling tissues and blood would normally prompt a massive immune response. These deep sea lovers found a workaround.

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Many beloved garden flowers originated in this mountain hot spot—the oldest of its kind on Earth

Monsoons helped create the rich alpine plant diversity of Asia's Hengduan Mountains

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Meet Lizard Man, a reptile-loving biologist tackling some of the biggest questions in evolution

Tiny Caribbean islands are his test tubes for studies of competition, invasive species, and adaptations

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New understanding of CRISPR-Cas9 tool could improve gene editing

Within a mere eight years, CRISPR-Cas9 has become the go-to genome editor for both basic research and gene therapy. But CRISPR-Cas9 also has spawned other potentially powerful DNA manipulation tools that could help fix genetic mutations responsible for hereditary diseases.

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Stay or leave? A tale of two virus strategies revealed by math

As small and relatively simple as they may be, even viruses have strategies. Now, researchers in Japan report that they can evaluate two of these strategies through a combination of biology and math, providing a new tool for insight into viruses that could be used to develop better treatments.

2h

Ancient mountain formation and monsoons helped create a modern biodiversity hotspot

One of the big questions in biology is why certain plants and animals are found in some places and not others. Figuring out how species evolve and spread, and why some places are richer in species than others, is key to understanding and protecting the world around us. Mountains make a good laboratory for scientists tackling these questions: mountains are home to tons of biodiversity, in part due

2h

Plastics, pathogens and baby formula: What's in your shellfish?

The first landmark study using next-generation technology to comprehensively examine contaminants in oysters in Myanmar reveals alarming findings: the widespread presence of human bacterial pathogens and human-derived microdebris materials, including plastics, kerosene, paint, talc and milk supplement powders.

2h

New method lets scientists peer deeper into ocean

Researchers have advanced a new way to see into the ocean's depths, establishing an approach to detect algae and measure key properties using light. A new article reports using a laser-based tool, lidar, to collect these measurements far deeper than has been typically possible using satellites.

2h

'Drawn-on-skin' electronics offer breakthrough in wearable monitors

Researchers have reported a new form of electronics known as 'drawn-on-skin electronics,' allowing multifunctional sensors and circuits to be drawn on the skin with an ink pen.

2h

New understanding of CRISPR-Cas9 tool could improve gene editing

Within a mere eight years, CRISPR-Cas9 has become the go-to genome editor for both basic research and gene therapy. But CRISPR-Cas9 also has spawned other potentially powerful DNA manipulation tools that could help fix genetic mutations responsible for hereditary diseases.

2h

Stay or leave? A tale of two virus strategies revealed by math

As small and relatively simple as they may be, even viruses have strategies. Now, researchers in Japan report that they can evaluate two of these strategies through a combination of biology and math, providing a new tool for insight into viruses that could be used to develop better treatments.

2h

Ancient mountain formation and monsoons helped create a modern biodiversity hotspot

One of the big questions in biology is why certain plants and animals are found in some places and not others. Figuring out how species evolve and spread, and why some places are richer in species than others, is key to understanding and protecting the world around us. Mountains make a good laboratory for scientists tackling these questions: mountains are home to tons of biodiversity, in part due

2h

Challenging a central tenet of chemistry

Steve Granick, Director of the IBS Center for Soft and Living Matter and Dr. Huan Wang, Senior Research Fellow, report together with 5 interdisciplinary colleagues in the July 31 issue of the journal Science that common chemical reactions accelerate Brownian diffusion by sending long-range ripples into the surrounding solvent.

2h

Economic and food supply chain disruptions endanger global food security

COVID-19 has led to a global economic slowdown that is affecting all four pillars of food security—availability, access, utilization, and stability—according to a new article from researchers at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), published in the journal Science. Agricultural and food markets are facing continuous disruptions due to labor shortages caused by lockdowns, as we

2h

AJR study associates coronavirus disease (COVID-19) with large vessel occlusion strokes

COVID-19 is associated with large vessel occlusion (LVO) stroke but not small vessel occlusion stroke. After stratification for race and ethnicity, the risk of LVO stroke among patients with COVID-19 was 2.4 times as high among patients without COVID-19. Physicians should lower their suspicion threshold for LVO stroke in COVID-19 patients presenting with acute neurologic symptoms. This open-access

2h

North Atlantic climate far more predictable following major scientific breakthrough

North Atlantic atmospheric pressure patterns, the key driving force behind winter weather in Europe and eastern North America, are highly predictable, enabling advanced warning of whether winters in the coming decade are likely to be stormy, warm and wet or calm, cold and dry. Insights and perspectives from a pivotal study on Nature, with the contribution of the CMCC Foundation.

2h

Why America Is Afraid of TikTok

Z hang Yiming embodies what the United States wanted China to be . He is the founder and chief executive of a company, ByteDance, that owns a wildly popular social-media platform, TikTok. He is a serial entrepreneur, having built multiple apps and search engines. Zhang's story is one not of a copycat or a cost-cutter—the tired stereotypes of the Chinese business owner—but of an innovator. For mos

2h

Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover Mission to Red Planet successfully launched

NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover mission is on its way to the Red Planet to search for signs of ancient life and collect samples to send back to Earth.

2h

Pooling strategy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic: A solution for mass population screening of SARS-CoV-2

In a report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, researchers at Augusta University and PerkinElmer Genomics describe a cheaper, rapid, and accurate pooling strategy for the RT-PCR-based detection of SARS-CoV-2 in clinical samples. This assay has a significant impact on large-scale population screening in the wake of the current COVID-19 pandemic.

2h

Group-based smoking cessation help US inmates quit tobacco

Behavioral and nicotine replacement therapies offered together can help people who are incarcerated quit smoking, according to Rutgers researchers.

2h

Inside a Houston Hospital During a Coronavirus Surge

In the past seven days, the state of Texas has reported more than 52,000 new cases of COVID-19 and has attributed more than 2,300 deaths to the disease. Health-care workers continue to struggle to accommodate and care for an increasing number of people needing hospitalization as cases have surged in Texas, Florida, and California. Callaghan O'Hare, a photographer with Reuters, spent time inside H

3h

Amazing Electron Microscope Images Show Antibodies Fighting the Coronavirus

Scientists armed with an electron microscope managed to catch the first real glimpse of antibodies attacking the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, which causes the pandemic-causing COVID-19. The antibodies, which are foot-soldier proteins produced by the immune system, came from blood samples of recovered patients . By pitting those antibodies against samples of the virus and watching them fight, the Calif

3h

Los Angeles Accelerates Efforts to Electrify Its Infamous Traffic

The city aims to add more electric chargers and to convert its bus fleet to meet its emissions-reduction goals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Mexico City just outlawed gay conversion therapy. These cities have not

Mexico City has just issued a ban protecting its citizens from "conversion therapy." "Conversion therapy" is a loose term covering a wide variety of "treatments" which claim to alter a person's sexuality. With the law, Mexico City joins a small club of countries, provinces, and municipalities with such a law. In a win for LGBT+ individuals, the regional congress of Mexico City passed legislation

3h

Lifestyle changes could delay or prevent 40% of dementia cases – study

Addressing 12 factors such as excessive drinking and air pollution exposure may have significant effect, experts say Excessive drinking, exposure to air pollution and head injuries all increase dementia risk, experts say in a report revealing that up to 40% of dementia cases worldwide could be delayed or prevented by addressing 12 such lifestyle factors. Around 50 million people around the world

3h

Chinese Navy Installs Generators to Power Rail Guns, Energy Weapons

20 Megawatt Upgrade China is installing massive, 20 megawatt generators to its warships to power high-energy weapons, including lasers and rail guns, the South China Morning Post reports . The turbo generators increase power-generating capacity fourfold on the warships, which would technically allow them to rely fully on electric propulsion alone, according to SCMP . That means faster response ti

3h

Using protons to tune interlayer forces in van-der-Waals materials

A Chinese-Australian collaboration has demonstrated for the first time that interlayer coupling in a van der Waals (vdW) material can be largely modulated by a protonic gate, 'injecting' protons into the device. The same weak interlayer forces that make vdW materials so easy to separate (eg, the famous Scotch-tape method of isolating graphene) also limit these materials' applications in future tec

3h

Looking up to the Joneses: Consequences of the perceptions of white wealth

Before the era of COVID-19, research suggested that premature deaths among white Americans were rising. Even before the era of COVID-19, these findings were surprising. As Dr. Cooley explains, "These trends were puzzling to us because white people, on average, have more wealth than other racial groups and are generally privileged in our society." As a result, Cooley and colleagues questioned wheth

3h

Mask Resistance During a Pandemic Isn't New — in 1918 Many Americans Were 'Slackers'

As the US battled the 1918 influenza pandemic, some communities staged contentious battles against wearing masks. Sound familiar?

3h

Daily Briefing: NASA's Perseverance rover blasts off for Mars

Nature, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02271-y The most complex rover ever sent to the red planet will attempt to collect rock samples for return to Earth. Plus: the origin of Stonehenge's giant stones, and three questions to ask yourself before quitting your PhD.

3h

Researchers map mechanisms in the largest CRISPR system

The largest and most complex CRISPR system has been visualized by researchers in a new study. The system may have potential applications in biomedicine and biotechnology, the researchers believe.

3h

Phillips group exactly solves experimental puzzle in high temperature superconductivity

A team of theoretical physicists has for the first time exactly solved a representative model of the cuprate problem, the 1992 Hatsugai-Kohmoto (HK) model of a doped Mott insulator.

3h

Black phosphorus future in 3D analysis, molecular fingerprinting

Many compact systems using mid-infrared technology continue to face compatibility issues when integrating with conventional electronics. Black phosphorus has garnered attention for overcoming these challenges thanks to a wide variety of uses in photonic circuits. Research highlights the material's potential for emerging devices ranging from medical imaging to environment monitoring, assessing prog

3h

Controlling streams of liquid metal at room temperature

Researchers have demonstrated a technique that allows them to produce streams of liquid metal at room temperature. By applying a low voltage to the liquid metal, the researchers were able to tune its surface tension across at least three orders of magnitude.

3h

Tandem catalytic system efficiently converts carbon dioxide to methanol

Chemists have used a tandem catalytic system to efficiently convert carbon dioxide to methanol. By encapsulating multiple catalysts involved in the tandem process in nanoporous materials called metal-organic frameworks, the team reports achieving superior performance by eliminating catalyst incompatibility. The method could be applied to other tandem catalytic processes, allowing more efficient ac

3h

Major depressive episodes far more common than previously believed, new Yale study finds

The number of adults in the United States who suffer from major depressive episodes at some point in their life is far higher than previously believed, a new study by the Yale School of Public Health finds.

3h

Looking up to the Joneses: Consequences of the perceptions of white wealth

In a pair of studies, social psychologists propose that widespread perceptions that white people are wealthy, and that Black people are poor, may shape the way people experience their own status.

3h

Does porn cause erectile dysfunction…or not?

According to UW Health, around 5 percent of men that are 40 years old have complete erectile dysfunction. That number increases to about 15 percent by age 70. While there are many things that can cause or contribute to ED (such as high blood pressure, smoking, the use of drugs or alcohol, depression, and anxiety), there has been wide debate over the impacts of pornography use. Several studies out

3h

How to Make Sure You're Wearing Your Mask Right

There's a correct way to put face masks on and take them off.

3h

Team simultaneously synthesizes dicarboxylic acids and hydrogen from diols

Every year, the chemical industry makes trillions of dollars synthesizing the countless chemical compounds we use every day.

4h

New method lets scientists peer deeper into ocean

Researchers have advanced a new way to see into the ocean's depths, establishing an approach to detect algae and measure key properties using light. A paper published in Applied Optics reports using a laser-based tool, lidar, to collect these measurements far deeper than has been typically possible using satellites.

4h

Tierra del Fuego: Marine ecosystems from 6,000 to 5,000 years ago

Global warming will modify the distribution and abundance of fish worldwide, with effects on the structure and dynamics of food networks. However, making precise predictions on the consequences of this global phenomenon is hard without having a wide historical perspective.

4h

Researchers discover a new and unique class of carbohydrate receptors

An international team of researchers led by Aarhus University are the first to determine the crystal structure of an exopolysaccharide receptor. The results give insight into how plants and microbes communicate, and this knowledge can hopefully be used for more sustainable agriculture where microbes play an important role.

4h

'Drawn-on-skin' electronics offer breakthrough in wearable monitors

Researchers have reported a new form of electronics known as 'drawn-on-skin electronics,' allowing multifunctional sensors and circuits to be drawn on the skin with an ink pen.

4h

4h

Study highlights mental health risks facing healthcare workers during pandemic

A new study finds healthcare workers in the United States are struggling with a suite of mental-health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study reports healthcare workers are at greater risk than the general public of experiencing health problems such as depression.

4h

Quantum chip fabrication paves way for scalable processors

An Army-funded project marks a turning point in the field of scalable quantum processors, producing the largest quantum chip of its type using diamond-based qubits and quantum photonics.

4h

NASA finds Post-Tropical Low Douglas crossing a line

The strong wind shear that weakened Douglas to a tropical storm early on July 29 has further weakened it to a post-tropical low-pressure area. NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared view of those remnants, headed across the International Date Line in the Pacific Ocean.

4h

The Lancet: 40% of dementia cases could be prevented or delayed by targeting 12 risk factors throughout life

Modifying 12 risk factors over the lifecourse could delay or prevent 40% of dementia cases, according to an update to The Lancet Commission on dementia prevention, intervention, and care, which is being presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC 2020).

4h

Tierra del Fuego: Marine ecosystems from 6,000 to 5,000 years ago

Global warming will modify the distribution and abundance of fish worldwide, with effects on the structure and dynamics of food networks. However, making precise predictions on the consequences of this global phenomenon is hard without having a wide historical perspective.

4h

Researchers discover a new and unique class of carbohydrate receptors

An international team of researchers led by Aarhus University are the first to determine the crystal structure of an exopolysaccharide receptor. The results give insight into how plants and microbes communicate, and this knowledge can hopefully be used for more sustainable agriculture where microbes play an important role.

4h

University redundancies, furloughs and pay cuts might loom amid the pandemic, survey finds

Nature, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02265-w Academic administrators are mostly optimistic about the effects of COVID-19 on institutional finances, but others predict tough times.

4h

ALMA finds possible sign of neutron star in supernova 1987A

Two teams of astronomers have made a compelling case in the 33-year-old mystery surrounding Supernova 1987A. Based on observations of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and a theoretical follow-up study, the scientists provide new insight for the argument that a neutron star is hiding deep inside the remains of the exploded star. This would be the youngest neutron star known t

4h

Noise Exposure May Cause Even More Hearing Loss Than Doctors Thought

Study attributes age-related hearing loss to hair cells — the same sense organs that are damaged by loud noises. 0-hearing-test-shutterstock_1219524448.jpg Image credits: Peakstock/ Shutterstock Human Thursday, July 30, 2020 – 11:45 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Researchers have long debated why so many people lose their hearing as they age. Some have argued that the problem lie

4h

The Big Story: The Decline of the American World

Join Atlantic staff writer Tom McTague and editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg for a live conversation about how international perception of the U.S. has shifted from adoration and emulation to pity and disdain.

4h

En ny verden åbner sig: Sådan indtager vi Mars i din levetid

Om 40 år har vi en base på Mars med plads til 80-100 mennesker, vurderer forsker.

4h

NASA finds Post-Tropical Low Douglas crossing a line

The strong wind shear that weakened Douglas to a tropical storm early on July 29 has further weakened it to a post-tropical low-pressure area. NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared view of those remnants, headed across the International Date Line in the Pacific Ocean.

4h

Social distancing varies by income in United States

Wealthier communities went from being the most mobile before the COVID-19 pandemic to the least mobile, while poorer areas have gone from the least mobile to the most mobile, according to a new study.

4h

Plastics, pathogens and baby formula: What's in your shellfish?

The first landmark study using next-generation technology to comprehensively examine contaminants in oysters in Myanmar reveals alarming findings: the widespread presence of human bacterial pathogens and human-derived microdebris materials, including plastics, kerosene, paint, talc and milk supplement powders.

4h

Stunning space butterfly captured by telescope

Resembling a butterfly with its symmetrical structure, beautiful colors, and intricate patterns, this striking bubble of gas—known as NGC 2899—appears to float and flutter across the sky in this new picture from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). This object has never before been imaged in such striking detail, with even the faint outer edges of the planetary nebula glowing over the background star

4h

'A win for the Everglades': 5,000 pythons removed in state-sponsored capture program

Florida's fight against the invasive Burmese python has hit a new milestone: 5,000 snakes captured in the Everglades since wildlife managers started paying hunters to remove the destructive constrictors in 2017.

4h

Tierra del Fuego: marine ecosystems from 6,000 to 5000 years ago

Global warming will modify the distribution and abundance of fish worldwide, with effects on the structure and dynamics of food networks. However, making precise predictions on the consequences of this global phenomenon is hard without having a wide historical perspective.

4h

New method lets scientists peer deeper into ocean

Researchers have advanced a new way to see into the ocean's depths, establishing an approach to detect algae and measure key properties using light. A paper published in Applied Optics reports using a laser-based tool, lidar, to collect these measurements far deeper than has been typically possible using satellites.

4h

Two for the price of one

Kyoto University researchers develop a safer and more efficient way to produce dicarboxylic acid. Using an iridium catalyst bound to a bipyridonate ligand, researchers were able to synthesize dicarboxylic acids from aqueous diols, with the added benefit of generating hydrogen as a byproduct.

4h

ALMA finds possible sign of neutron star in supernova 1987A

Based on ALMA observations and a theoretical follow-up study, scientists suggest that a neutron star might be hiding deep inside the remains of Supernova 1987A.

4h

Researchers describe structure of SARS-CoV-2 proteins suitable for design of new drugs

Group of researchers at IOCB Prague determined and analyzed the precise structure of the Nsp16 and Nsp10 protein complex of the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. They identified several fundamental characteristics, which can be targeted by inhibitors that suppress the activity of the Nsp16 and Nsp10 protein complex and may, in the future, serve as drugs to combat many coronaviruses.

4h

Study suggests new approach to improve radiation therapy resistance in glioblastoma

Laboratory research paves the way for a clinical trial to see if an FDA-approved drug used to prevent organ transplant rejection can work against glioblastoma, an aggressive type of brain tumor.

4h

Plastics, pathogens and baby formula: What's in your shellfish?

The first landmark study using next-generation technology to comprehensively examine contaminants in oysters in Myanmar reveals alarming findings: the widespread presence of human bacterial pathogens and human-derived microdebris materials, including plastics, kerosene, paint, talc and milk supplement powders.

4h

Magnetic gold nanohybrid will help fight cancer

A team of NUST MISIS scientists, together with colleagues from Russia and Germany, have presented a detailed study of magnetite-gold nanohybrids. In the future, such nanoparticles can help in theranostics—the diagnostics and subsequent therapy of oncological diseases. The results of the work have been published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry B.

4h

'A win for the Everglades': 5,000 pythons removed in state-sponsored capture program

Florida's fight against the invasive Burmese python has hit a new milestone: 5,000 snakes captured in the Everglades since wildlife managers started paying hunters to remove the destructive constrictors in 2017.

4h

'It's real.' Latinos, African Americans most likely to view pollution as a serious health threat

Latinos and African Americans are more likely to view pollution as a serious health threat than other groups, according to a new statewide study by the Public Policy Institute of California.

4h

New study confirms extensive gas leaks in the North Sea

During expeditions to oil and gas reservoirs in the central North Sea in 2012 and 2013, scientists of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (Germany) became aware of a phenomenon that had been hardly recognized before. They discovered that methane bubbles emerged from the seabed around abandoned wells. The gas originates from shallow gas pockets, which lie less than 1000 meters deep

4h

Exploring Underwater Caves and 22 Other Smithsonian Programs Streaming in August

Exploring Underwater Caves, Battle of Midway, Economics + Harry Potter. Don't miss out

4h

Children May Carry Coronavirus at High Levels, Study Finds

The research does not prove that infected children are contagious, but it should influence the debate about reopening schools, some experts said.

4h

Rising Seas Could Menace Millions Beyond Shorelines, Study Finds

As climate change raises sea levels, storm surges and high tides will push farther inland, a team of researchers says.

4h

Nursing homes aren't equipped to provide life-saving A/C in the event of a power outage

Older folks are at a higher risk of heat-related health issues (Elien Dumon/Unsplash/) Soon after Hurricane Irma barreled up the length of Florida's coast in 2017, temperatures began rising at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, a nursing home located about 20 miles north of Miami. The storm had knocked out the air conditioning, and the facility's backup generator didn't have the capaci

4h

What's This? A Bipartisan Plan for AI and National Security

Republican Will Hurd and Democrat Robin Kelly want more Pentagon spending, a Cold War-style "hotline," and a curb on chip exports to China.

4h

Rapid test for the determination of antibodies against Sars-Cov-2

Researchers present a test that determines the amount of neutralizing antibodies within a short period of time.

4h

Single-shot COVID-19 vaccine protects non-human primates

A leading COVID-19 vaccine candidate raised neutralizing antibodies and robustly protected non-human primates (NHPs) against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

4h

Researchers discover a new and unique class of carbohydrate receptors

An international team of researchers led by Aarhus University are the first to determine the crystal structure of an exopolysaccharide receptor. The results give insight into how plants and microbes communicate, and this knowledge can hopefully be used for more sustainable agriculture where microbes play an important role.

4h

Stunning space butterfly captured by ESO telescope

Resembling a butterfly with its symmetrical structure, beautiful colours, and intricate patterns, this striking bubble of gas — known as NGC 2899 — appears to float and flutter across the sky in this new picture from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). This object has never before been imaged in such striking detail, with even the faint outer edges of the planetary nebula glowing over the backgrou

4h

DNA targeting and interference by a bacterial Argonaute nuclease

Nature, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2605-1

4h

Microbiota-derived metabolite promotes HDAC3 activity in the gut

Nature, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2604-2

4h

China Allegedly Hacked the Vatican, Other Catholic Computer Systems

Holy Hack State-backed Chinese hackers allegedly targeted both the Vatican and the Catholic Diocese of Hong Kong in a months-long attack. The attacks, first spotted by the cybersecurity firm Recorded Future, occurred as the Vatican and Chinese government prepare for a round of diplomatic negotiations, according to The Associated Press . China called the accusation "groundless speculation," but Re

4h

As rich people locked down for COVID-19, the poor moved more

Wealthier communities went from being the most mobile before the COVID-19 pandemic to the least mobile, according to a new study. Meanwhile, poorer areas have gone from the least mobile to the most mobile, the researchers report. The study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences used anonymized data from mobile device location pings between January and April 2020 to find that socia

4h

Helicopter parents should step back and watch, study recommends

Researchers conducted the world's first data-driven study of parenting classes based on the Respectful Approach intervention. The Respectful Approach, modeled on Resources for Infant Educators (RIE)TM, guides parents to treat young children as capable and independent humans who can flourish if given safe space and freedom from too much adult direction.

4h

Whale airway mucus reveals likely poor health during migration

Researchers have linked the burden of humpback whales' annual migration to depleted microbial diversity in their airways – an indicator of overall health.

5h

Remote islands: Stepping stones to understanding evolution

Researchers have investigated evolutionary and ecological changes in ants in the South Pacific archipelago of Fiji to examine a controversial theory for how evolution occurs on islands.

5h

Healing an Achilles' heel of quantum entanglement

Researchers have solved a 20-year-old problem in quantum information theory on how to calculate entanglement cost — a way to measure entanglement — in a manner that's efficiently computable, useful, and broadly applicable in several quantum research areas.

5h

Researchers synthesize nanoparticles tailored for special applications

Whether in innovative high-tech materials, more powerful computer chips, pharmaceuticals or in the field of renewable energies, nanoparticles form the basis for a whole range of new technological developments. Due to the laws of quantum mechanics, such particles measuring only a few millionths of a millimeter can behave completely differently in terms of conductivity, optics or robustness than the

5h

Faster LEDs for wireless communications from invisible light

Researchers have solved a major problem for optical wireless communications—the process by which light carries information between cell phones and other devices. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) pulse their light in a coded message that recipient devices can understand.

5h

Researchers make major, concerning microplastics discovery

Researchers from University College Cork have discovered that microplastics (plastic pieces smaller than 5 mm) in our freshwaters are being broken down into even smaller nanoplastics (smaller than 1 µm, at least five thousand times smaller in size) by a type of freshwater invertebrate animal, and that this may happen much faster than previously estimated.

5h

New study confirms extensive gas leaks in the North Sea

At abandoned oil & gas wells in the North Sea, considerable quantities of the potent greenhouse gas methane escape uncontrolled into the water. These leaks account for the dominant part of the total methane budget of the North Sea. This is shown in a new study recently published by researchers from GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control. It confirms earlier st

5h

Coastal cities leave up to 75% of seafloor exposed to harmful light pollution

New research is the first in the world to quantify the extent to which biologically important artificial light is prevalent on the seafloor and could, in turn, be having a detrimental effect on marine species.

5h

Immune cell steroids help tumours suppress the immune system, offering new drug targets

Tumours found to evade the immune system by telling immune cells to produce immunosuppressive steroids. Researchers discovered that immune T cells from mouse skin and breast tumours secrete steroids, and that preventing this steroid production reduced growth of tumours in mice. The study found that either removing a key steroid-producing gene, or switching it off with a drug, dramatically slowed t

5h

The enemy within: Safeguarding against the spread of intracellular bacteria

Melbourne researchers have revealed the multiple, intertwined cell death systems that prevent the spread of the 'intracellular' bacterium Salmonella, an important cause of typhoid fever which kills more than 100,000 people annually.

5h

Cell antennas lacking in Fragile X syndrome, study finds

Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found fewer structures called primary cilia in the brains of mice born with Fragile X syndrome. This provides a clue into possibly treating neurodevelopmental disorders. The research is in Stem Cell Reports.

5h

Coastal flooding set to get more frequent, threatening coastal life and global GDP

Coastal flooding across the world is set to rise by around 50 per cent due to climate change in the next 80 years, endangering millions more people and trillions of US dollars more of coastal infrastructure, new research shows.

5h

Age-related differences in nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 levels in patients with COVID-19

Age-related differences in nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 levels in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 were investigated in this observational study.

5h

Risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission during flexible laryngoscopy

Researchers review evidence on the risks of aerosolization and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from patients to health care workers during endoscopy of the upper aerodigestive tract.

5h

Outcomes in radiotherapy-treated patients with cancer during COVID-19

The delivery of radiotherapy in 209 patients with cancer during the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan, China, is evaluated in this case series.

5h

Changes in opioid use after hip, knee replacement

Researchers looked at changes in opioid prescribing rates and level of pain control in patients who had hip or knee replacement in the U.S. from 2014 to 2017.

5h

Hearing loss linked to neurocognitive deficits in childhood cancer survivors

Research shows that severe hearing loss in childhood cancer survivors is associated with neurocognitive deficits independent of type of therapy.

5h

Transcranial stimulation to prevent fear memories from returning

A research group at the University of Bologna developed a new non-invasive experimental protocol to alter the memory of learned fear experiences, thus paving the way for treatments to overcome traumatic events

5h

Copper-catalyzed enantioselective trifluoromethylation of benzylic radicals developed

Scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have developed the first copper-catalyzed enantioselective trifluoromethylation of benzylic radicals via a copper-catalyzed radical relay strategy.

5h

Young kids could spread COVID-19 as much as older children and adults

A study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago discovered that children younger than 5 years with mild to moderate COVID-19 have much higher levels of genetic material for the virus in the nose compared to older children and adults. Findings, published in JAMA Pediatrics, point to the possibility that the youngest children transmit the virus as much as other age groups.

5h

Climate change: Coastal flooding could threaten up to 20% of global GDP

Coastal flooding events could threaten assets worth up to 20% of the global GDP by 2100, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. The areas predicted to be most impacted by flooding are north-west Europe, south-east and east Asia, north-east USA and northern Australia, according to the authors.

5h

First gene knockout in a cephalopod is achieved at Marine Biological Laboratory

A team at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has achieved the first gene knockout in a cephalopod using the squid Doryteuthis pealeii, an exceptionally important research organism in biology for nearly a century. The milestone study is reported in the July 30 issue of Current Biology. The team used CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to knock out a pigmentation gene in squid embryos, which eliminated p

5h

Inbreeding detrimental for survival

Biologists have long known that inbreeding can be detrimental. Inbreeding results in less genetic variation, making species more vulnerable if changes occur that require them to adapt.

5h

Remote islands: Stepping stones to understanding evolution

For millions of years, remote islands have been hotbeds of biodiversity, where unique species have flourished. Scientists have proposed different theories to explain how animals and plants colonize and evolve on islands but testing ideas for processes happening over long time scales has always been a challenge.

5h

In defence mode: This is how Zika virus protects key parts of its genome

To fight viruses, cells can deploy defense enzymes that progressively destroy viral genome strands starting from one of the two strand ends. However, this degradation mechanism is not effective against epidemic viruses such as Zika. In fact, the defense enzyme jams at precise points of the viral genome, which put up a strenuous resistance by assuming 'defensive' conformation. This is how the virus

5h

'Good' virus for common infection

Australian researchers have shown how viruses can be used to save lives, developing the potential use of bacteriophages in bandages to treat life-threatening golden staph infections which may not respond to traditional antibiotics.

5h

Grief tweets about Mars rover sound very 'human'

It's hard for people to discern tweets about the "death" of NASA's Opportunity rover from those about the deaths of humans, research finds. "RIP Oppy" sounds like a condolence for a human, or at least a pet, but it's actually a phrase from social media about NASA's Opportunity rover project, which ceased communications from Mars in 2018. This series of images shows simulated views of a darkening

5h

Inbreeding detrimental for survival

Biologists have long known that inbreeding can be detrimental. Inbreeding results in less genetic variation, making species more vulnerable if changes occur that require them to adapt.

5h

Remote islands: Stepping stones to understanding evolution

For millions of years, remote islands have been hotbeds of biodiversity, where unique species have flourished. Scientists have proposed different theories to explain how animals and plants colonize and evolve on islands but testing ideas for processes happening over long time scales has always been a challenge.

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Post-pandemic brave new world of agriculture

Robots working in abattoirs, sky-high vertical farms, more gene-edited foods in our supermarkets and automated farming systems could all help guarantee food supply in the next pandemic.

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In defence mode: This is how Zika virus protects key parts of its genome

To fight viruses, cells can deploy defense enzymes that progressively destroy viral genome strands starting from one of the two strand ends. However, this degradation mechanism is not effective against epidemic viruses such as Zika. In fact, the defense enzyme jams at precise points of the viral genome, which put up a strenuous resistance by assuming 'defensive' conformation. This is how the virus

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'Good' virus for common infection

Australian researchers have shown how viruses can be used to save lives, developing the potential use of bacteriophages in bandages to treat life-threatening golden staph infections which may not respond to traditional antibiotics.

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Underwater robots reveal daily habits of endangered whales

Research has revealed the daily habits of the endangered Mediterranean sperm whale. The recordings confirmed the whales' widespread presence in the north-western Mediterranean Sea and identified a possible hotspot for sperm whale habitat in the Gulf of Lion, as well as different foraging strategies between different areas.

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Bees' buzz is more powerful for pollination, than for defense or flight

Buzzing by bees during flower pollination is significantly more powerful than that used for defense or flight, according to a new study.

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What jigsaw puzzles tell us about child development

New research shows that children only learn to do jigsaw puzzles once they have reached a certain stage of development. Three-year-olds use trial and error, but four-year-olds are able to use information in the picture to complete the puzzles. The research team say this understanding is the foundation of learning to draw and paint.

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Climate-change-driven flooding could endanger 200 million people—in 30 years

Rising tides and storm surges will devastate economies and communities around the globe, if we don't dramatically cut greenhouse-gas emissions and bolster shoreline protection. By the end of the century, increased coastal flooding driven by swelling ocean levels will endanger more than 250 million people and nearly $13 trillion worth of coastal buildings and infrastructure, according to a new stu

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Nytt blodprov upptäcker Alzheimers sjukdom tidigt och effektivt

Alzheimers sjukdom är svårdiagnosticerad vilket gör det svårt att ge bästa möjliga behandling. Nu har internationella forskare identifierat en biomarkör som gör det möjligt att upptäcka Alzheimer med ett enkelt blodprov – redan innan de första symtomen utvecklats. Metoden har samma tillförlitlighet som dyra och mer komplicerade metoder. Alzheimers sjukdom uppstår cirka 20 år innan symtom blir tyd

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New research shows that a 'cheat day' might not be that bad

A new study at the University of Bath found that binge eating on occasion doesn't have major metabolic consequences. 14 healthy young men were instructed to eat pizza until full or to keep going until they couldn't eat another bite. Their blood sugar levels were similar to having eaten normally and blood lipids levels were only slightly higher than normal. The eternal diet dilemma: to have a chea

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The pandemic may change what we eat

The pandemic may raise widespread awareness of the production, processing, and distribution of food to new heights. Restaurant and meat plant closures due to the coronavirus crisis are forcing farmers to dispose of their products—from killing livestock to dumping milk and plowing under produce—while shoppers are facing empty grocery store shelves. Here, Brianne Donaldson , assistant professor of

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Rise in coastal flooding poses threat to global economy

Study warns expected 50% increase over next the 80 years could hit assets worth 20% of world's GDP

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A Quarter of Bangladesh Is Flooded. Millions Have Lost Everything.

The country's latest calamity illustrates a striking inequity of our time: The people least responsible for climate change are among those most hurt by its consequences.

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The First Gene-Altered Squid Has Thrilled Biologists

Scientists have modified the genes of a squid, and genetically-altered octopuses could be coming soon. (Image credit: Karen Crawford)

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Gorilla relationships limited in large groups

Mountain gorillas that live in oversized groups may have to limit the number of strong social relationships they form, new research suggests.

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Music training may not make children smarter after all

Music training does not have a positive impact on children's cognitive skills, such as memory, and academic achievement, such as maths, reading or writing, according to a study published in Memory & Cognition.

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Higher BPA levels linked to more asthma symptoms in children

Children in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore tended to have more asthma symptoms when levels of the synthetic chemical BPA (Bisphenol A) in their urine were elevated, according to a new study.

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Why Are Plants Green? To Reduce the Noise in Photosynthesis.

From large trees in the Amazon jungle to houseplants to seaweed in the ocean, green is the color that reigns over the plant kingdom. Why green, and not blue or magenta or gray? The simple answer is that although plants absorb almost all the photons in the red and blue regions of the light spectrum, they absorb only about 90% of the green photons. If they absorbed more, they would look black to ou

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Remote islands: Stepping stones to understanding evolution

In a new study published in Evolution, researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) and collaborators from the University of the Ryukyus investigated evolutionary and ecological changes in ants in the South Pacific archipelago of Fiji to examine a controversial theory for how evolution occurs on islands.

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TU Graz researchers synthesize nanoparticles tailored for special applications

"Core-shell" clusters pave the way for new efficient nanomaterials that make catalysts, magnetic and laser sensors or measuring devices for detecting electromagnetic radiation more efficient.

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Post-pandemic brave new world of agriculture

Recent events have shown how vulnerable the meat processing industry is to COVID-19. Professor Robert Henry says reducing risk of spreading infection in a future pandemic will require automation. But is the public ready for robots slaughtering and eviscerating animals to reduce the risk of infectious disease? And while there is ongoing resistance to GMOs and gene edited foods, Professor Henry says

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What the million-mile battery means for electric cars

It is mainly about greater reliability

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A strange material may make protective helmets more so

It absorbs impact energy more effectively

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First gene knockout in cephalopod achieved

A team at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has achieved the first gene knockout in a cephalopod using the squid Doryteuthis pealeii, an exceptionally important research organism in biology for nearly a century. The milestone study, led by MBL Senior Scientist Joshua Rosenthal and MBL Whitman Scientist Karen Crawford, is reported in the July 30 issue of Current Biology.

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Coastal flooding set to get more frequent, threatening coastal life and global GDP

Coastal flooding across the world is set to rise by around 50 percent due to climate change in the next 80 years, endangering millions more people and trillions of US dollars more of coastal infrastructure, new research shows.

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Copper-catalyzed enantioselective trifluoromethylation of benzylic radicals developed

Scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have developed the first copper-catalyzed enantioselective trifluoromethylation of benzylic radicals via a copper-catalyzed radical relay strategy.

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Whistleblowers bring receipts, journal retracts swiftly

A group of researchers in China have lost a 2018 paper after whistleblowers informed the journal that the authors had misreported their data. The paper, "Long‐term outcomes of 530 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients with minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy," appeared in the Journal of Surgical Oncology, a Wiley publication. It has been cited five … Continue reading

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First gene knockout in cephalopod achieved

A team at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has achieved the first gene knockout in a cephalopod using the squid Doryteuthis pealeii, an exceptionally important research organism in biology for nearly a century. The milestone study, led by MBL Senior Scientist Joshua Rosenthal and MBL Whitman Scientist Karen Crawford, is reported in the July 30 issue of Current Biology.

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Strange, Giant Cloud Reappears on Mars

Volcano Cloud The European Space Agency's Mars Express, a camera-equipped Mars orbiter, is keeping close tabs on a mysterious "elongated cloud" appearing over the 20 kilometer tall Arsia Mons volcano near the Red Planet's equator. The spacecraft, and other ones like it, have been following the strange cloud's evolution since 2009 . Now, new images revealed this week by the ESA show that the cloud

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Trump Can't Postpone the Election—But He's Trying to Destroy Its Legitimacy

In his latest assault on the American electoral system, President Donald Trump today proposed postponing the November election. "With Universal Mail-In Voting (not Absentee Voting, which is good), 2020 will be the most INACCURATE & FRAUDULENT Election in history," Trump tweeted , offering no evidence for a debunked assertion. "It will be a great embarrassment to the USA. Delay the Election until

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Silent stadiums change sports for fans at home

Professional sports leagues around the world are crafting strategies to deal with the effect the absence of crowd noise will have on games after hiatuses due to the outbreak of COVID-19. "It's easy to overlook the importance of the auditory experience with something like a sporting event," says Laurie Heller , a professor of psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. "You don't think about the cro

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In defence mode: this is how Zika virus protects key parts of its genome

To fight viruses, cells can deploy defence enzymes that progressively destroy viral genome. However, this degradation mechanism is not effective against epidemic viruses like Zika. In fact, the defence enzyme jams at precise points of the viral genome, which assumes a "defensive" conformation. This is how the virus succeeds at protecting important pieces of its RNA inside infected cells, as demons

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Single-shot COVID-19 vaccine protects non-human primates

A leading COVID-19 vaccine candidate, developed at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, creates the groundwork for a newly launched COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial.

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Helicopter parents should step back and watch, study recommends

As part of her PhD at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia, Mandy Richardson conducted the world's first data-driven study of parenting classes based on the Respectful Approach intervention.The Respectful Approach, modelled on Resources for Infant Educators (RIE)TM, guides parents to treat young children as capable and independent humans who can flourish if given safe space and freedom from

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Rapid test for the determination of antibodies against Sars-Cov-2

To determine immunity to Sars-Cov-2 and the effectiveness of potential vaccines, the amount of neutralising antibodies in the blood of recovered or vaccinated individuals must be determined. A traditional neutralisation test usually takes two to three days and must be carried out with infectious coronaviruses in a laboratory complying to biosafety level 3. A Swiss-German research team has launched

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Faster LEDs for wireless communications from invisible light

Researchers have solved a major problem for optical wireless communications – the process by which light carries information between cell phones and other devices. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) pulse their light in a coded message that recipient devices can understand.

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Investment, health policy changes are key for new Alzheimer’s treatments

Two new USC reports describe a challenging obstacle course for patients to access Alzheimer's disease treatments once they become available.

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Laughter acts as a stress buffer — and even smiling helps

People who laugh frequently in their everyday lives may be better equipped to deal with stressful events – although this does not seem to apply to the intensity of laughter. These are the findings reported by a research team from the University of Basel in the journal Plos One.

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Don't blame cats for destroying wildlife – shaky logic is leading to moral panic

A number of conservationists claim cats are a zombie apocalypse for biodiversity that need to be removed from the outdoors by "any means necessary"—coded language for shooting, trapping and poisoning. Various media outlets have portrayed cats as murderous superpredators. Australia has even declared an official "war" against cats.

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Why the U.S. Space Force just hired this handsome horse

U.S. Space Force has acquired a new horse named Ghost. The horse is part of the Conservation Military Working Horse program. The horses help patrol a large territory, supporting threatened species. The U.S. Space Force isn't yet as formidable as its name promises, but it does now have a horse named "Ghost." The 5-year-old mustang joins the Conservation Military Working Horse program, itself a rec

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Don't blame cats for destroying wildlife – shaky logic is leading to moral panic

A number of conservationists claim cats are a zombie apocalypse for biodiversity that need to be removed from the outdoors by "any means necessary"—coded language for shooting, trapping and poisoning. Various media outlets have portrayed cats as murderous superpredators. Australia has even declared an official "war" against cats.

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How Juneau, Alaska responds to yearly glacier floods

Every year, residents who live near the banks of the Mendenhall River in Juneau, Alaska know that sometime in summer, their streets will flood. At some point, even in the absence of recent rain, the river will rise and overflow through the roads and into houses. All of this is the work of glacier dynamics several miles away from downtown Juneau.

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Energy is a basic need, and many Americans are struggling to afford it in the COVID-19 recession

Several months into the COVID-19 pandemic crisis, lower-income families are struggling to pay their energy bills. That's a big concern during extreme events like summer heat waves, which can be deadly—especially for elderly people, young children, people of color and the poor.

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Adjusting planter parameters to match field conditions can maximize emergence and yield

Planter performance is a critical component when laying the foundation for a successful crop season. Environmental and soil conditions can significantly impact crop germination and emergence and help or hinder development of an adequate crop stand early in the season. Adjusting specific planter components and settings to match current field conditions can ensure maximized emergence and increase yi

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New research finds crises such as COVID-19 pandemic threaten support for Title IX

A new study by a pair of researchers including Elizabeth Sharrow, associate professor of public policy and history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has found that male student-athletes and those with sexist attitudes exhibit "alarmingly" low levels of support for ensuring the maintenance of equality and sexual harassment policy under Title IX as a result of the COVID-19 crisis and its i

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'Fool's gold' may be valuable after all

In a breakthrough new study, scientists and engineers have electrically transformed the abundant and low-cost non-magnetic material iron sulfide, also known as 'fool's gold' or pyrite, into a magnetic material.

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Alzheimer's risk factors may be measurable in adolescents and young adults

Risk factors for Alzheimer's dementia may be apparent as early as our teens and 20s.

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Adjusting planter parameters to match field conditions can maximize emergence and yield

Planter performance is a critical component when laying the foundation for a successful crop season. Environmental and soil conditions can significantly impact crop germination and emergence and help or hinder development of an adequate crop stand early in the season. Adjusting specific planter components and settings to match current field conditions can ensure maximized emergence and increase yi

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Spin, spin, spin: researchers enhance electron spin longevity

The electron is an elementary particle, a building block on which other systems evolve. With specific properties such as spin, or angular momentum, that can be manipulated to carry information, electrons are primed to advance modern information technology. An international collaboration of researchers has now developed a way to extend and stabilize the lifetime of the electron's spin to more effec

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Investigational breast cancer vaccine plus immune therapy work well in tandem

A vaccine for HER2-positive breast cancers that is being tested in a clinical trial at Duke Cancer Institute is part of an effective, two-drug strategy for enlisting the immune system to fight tumors, according to a Duke-led study in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

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It pays to major in fields with close ties to jobs, study shows

College graduates make more money if they major in fields with close ties to jobs, according to a new study from the Houston Education Research Consortium (HERC), part of Rice University's Kinder Institute for Urban Research and School of Social Sciences.

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The future of work is flexible, says new study

New research from the University of Kent and the University of Birmingham has found that mass homeworking during the COVID-19 lockdown has presented significant challenges for parents, particularly mothers, but has also changed the way that many people intend to work in the future.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan kan en faldskærm virke på Mars?

En læser undrer sig over, hvordan rumsonder kan lande med en faldskærm på Mars, når man tænker på det lave lufttryk. Fysiker fra Aarhus Universitet forklarer.

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NASA Goes Looking for Tiny Ancient Martians

The very first time NASA put a robot on Mars, it was looking for one thing: life. When scientists examined the mission's early findings, they sent for champagne. They were convinced they'd discovered proof, quietly metabolizing, in the soil. But the data turned out to be muddled, and one experiment designed to detect organic molecules found none, not even simple ones that astronauts had found on

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This molecule helps sweet-toothed protein complex sense sugar

In order to grow and thrive, cells need sugar. A repertoire of cellular mechanisms turn unwieldy molecules of glucose and fructose into versatile building blocks for making useful molecules such as lipids, and energy to fuel necessary processes in the cell. But for any of these things to happen, the cells need to sense when sugars are present in the first place—and scientists are still unraveling

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Partnerships with bankrupt companies could be double-edged sword for investors

The list of companies that have filed for bankruptcy during the first half of 2020 reads like a "who's who" of major retailers and recognized brands. Consumers may know J.C. Penney, Hertz, Neiman Marcus, J. Crew and Pier 1, but the carnage also includes tech firms previously seen to have much potential.

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Increasing Arctic freshwater is driven by climate change

New, first-of-its-kind research from CU Boulder shows that climate change is driving increasing amounts of freshwater in the Arctic Ocean. Within the next few decades, this will lead to increased freshwater moving into the North Atlantic Ocean, which could disrupt ocean currents and affect temperatures in northern Europe.

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This molecule helps sweet-toothed protein complex sense sugar

In order to grow and thrive, cells need sugar. A repertoire of cellular mechanisms turn unwieldy molecules of glucose and fructose into versatile building blocks for making useful molecules such as lipids, and energy to fuel necessary processes in the cell. But for any of these things to happen, the cells need to sense when sugars are present in the first place—and scientists are still unraveling

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Legacies of historical human activities in Medieval forest dynamics of the Italian peninsula

When historians and paleoecologists work directly together to study the past (what is called a consilience-driven approach) we are able to develop much more nuanced explanations for the role of people (or climate) as a cause of past abrupt environmental change. The joint histories of socioeconomic change, developed from archival sources, and ecologic change, reconstructed from pollen analysis of l

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Are young trees or old forests more important for slowing climate change?

Forests are thought to be crucial in the fight against climate change—and with good reason. We've known for a long time that the extra CO₂ humans are putting in the atmosphere makes trees grow faster, taking a large portion of that CO₂ back out of the atmosphere and storing it in wood and soils.

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Why the U.S. Space Force just hired this handsome horse

U.S. Space Force acquires a new horse named Ghost. The horse is part of the Conservation Military Working Horse program. The horses help patrol a large territory, supporting threatened species. The U.S. Space Force isn't yet quite as formidable as its name promises but it does now have a horse named "Ghost." The 5-year-old mustang joins the Conservation Military Working Horse program, itself a re

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Epitaxial antiperovskite/perovskite heterostructures for materials design

Engineered heterostructures or layered materials made with complex oxide materials are a rich source of emergent technical phenomena and applications. Materials scientists aim to develop new materials functionalities by interfacing oxide perovskites with substrates containing dissimilar crystallographic properties, in a vastly unexplored avenue. In a new report, Camilo X. Quintela and an internati

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How to protect yourself from media manipulation on energy issues and other contentious matters

When my kids were little, we would play a game during the TV commercials.

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Solar-powered animal tracker transforms how researchers collect data on animals in wild

A new solar-powered animal tracker promises to transform the collection of environmental and behavioural data, greatly improving animal welfare.

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Ny typ av herpesbehandling kan bekämpa obotliga virusinfektioner

Behandlingar mot humana herpesvirus leder ofta till resistens. En helt ny metod riktar sig mot fysikaliska egenskaper i virusets arvsmassa i stället för mot virala proteiner som förändras av mutationer i virusets arvsmassa. Behandlingen består av nya molekyler som penetrerar virusets proteinhölje och hindrar generna från att lämna viruset för att infektera cellen. Herpesvirusinfektioner är livsl

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Pre/postnatal lead exposure affects neurodevelopment in Japanese children

A study conducted over the past 18 years has found differences between lead exposure effects in young Japanese boys versus girls.

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Peering into the secrets of phages to see how they kill bacterial superbugs

A research collaboration involving Monash University has made an exciting discovery that may eventually lead to targeted treatments to combat drug-resistant bacterial infections, one of the greatest threats to global health.

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Monash scientists expose fascinating 'compartments' in bacteria

A review paper by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI), published in the high-impact journal Nature Reviews Microbiology, casts light on organelles, the internal compartments in bacterial cells that house and support functions essential for their survival and growth.

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Whale 'snot' reveals likely poor health during migration

UNSW researchers have linked the burden of humpback whales' annual migration to depleted microbial diversity in their airways – an indicator of overall health.

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'Good' virus for common infection

Australian researchers have shown how viruses can be used to save lives, developing the potential use of bacteriophages in bandages to treat life-threatening golden staph infections which may not respond to traditional antibiotics. Targeting multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ('golden staph') in diabetic foot ulcers, Flinders University microbiology researchers have joined infectious diseas

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Keep safe and cool in the pool: Novel chip sensor makes swimming pools safer

A new microchip that enables continuous monitoring of pH and chlorine levels in swimming pools will vastly improve water safety and hygiene for more than 2.7 million Australians as new research shows it can deliver consistent and accurate pool chemistry for reliable pool management.

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A Year After Gene Therapy, Boys With Muscular Dystrophy Are Healthier and Stronger

Two and a half years ago, a study published in Science Advances detailed how the gene editing tool CRISPR/Cas-9 repaired genetic mutations related to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). The study was a proof of concept, and used induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). But now a similar treatment has not only been administered to real people, it has worked and made a difference in their quality of

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Metalliska nanopartiklar kan ge bättre solceller

Uppsalaforskare har lyckats väl med att samla upp så kallade "heta elektronhål" i halvledare. Koncentrationen av sådana laddningar, som skapas vid ljusabsorption av vissa metalliska nanopartiklar, förlänger halvledarnas livslängd så att de kan användas i solceller och fotosensorer. Det är sedan tidigare känt att vissa metalliska nanopartiklar kan absorbera ljus och i processen frigöra positiva oc

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Solar-powered animal tracker transforms how researchers collect data on animals in wild

A new solar-powered animal tracker promises to transform the collection of environmental and behavioural data, greatly improving animal welfare.

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One-quarter of native mammals now at risk of extinction in Britain

The first official Red List for British Mammals, led by a University of Sussex professor, shows that 11 of the 47 mammals native to Britain are classified as being at imminent risk of extinction.

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Under climate change, winter will be the best time for bush burn-offs, and that could be bad news for public health

At the height of last summer's fires, some commentators claimed "greenies" were preventing hazard reduction burns—also known as prescribed burns—in cooler months. They argued that such burns would have reduced the bushfire intensity.

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Enslaved people's health was ignored from the country's beginning, laying the groundwork for today's health disparities

Some critics of Black Lives Matter say the movement itself is racist. Their frequent counterargument: All lives matter. Lost in that view, however, is a historical perspective. Look back to the late 18th century, to the very beginnings of the U.S., and you will see Black lives in this country did not seem to matter at all.

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Caught in the act: Microscopy reveals key detail in retrovirus replication

A protein that is critical for retrovirus replication may select viral genetic material for packaging within the nuclei of host cells, rather than in the cytoplasm, as was previously believed. The research, led by a team at Penn State College of Medicine, could have implications for the development of therapeutics that target this protein.

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Aboard the Diamond Princess, a Case Study in Aerosol Transmission

A computer model of the cruise-ship outbreak found that the virus spread most readily in microscopic droplets light enough to linger in the air.

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Pandemics have sparked anti-Asian hate crimes before

This is not the first time in American history that a health crisis has sparked anti-Asian hate crimes, say researchers. In the American Journal of Criminal Justice , researchers looked at how anti-Asian hate crimes— including verbal harassment and physical violence—during the COVID-19 pandemic have furthered the historical "othering" of Asian Americans and reproduced inequalities. "Sickness cult

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One-quarter of native mammals now at risk of extinction in Britain

The first official Red List for British Mammals, led by a University of Sussex professor, shows that 11 of the 47 mammals native to Britain are classified as being at imminent risk of extinction.

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Caught in the act: Microscopy reveals key detail in retrovirus replication

A protein that is critical for retrovirus replication may select viral genetic material for packaging within the nuclei of host cells, rather than in the cytoplasm, as was previously believed. The research, led by a team at Penn State College of Medicine, could have implications for the development of therapeutics that target this protein.

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Syv måneders rejse er begyndt: Nu er Nasa's rover og drone på vej mod Mars

Efter en succesrig opsendelse er Nasas seneste Mars-robot Perseverance på vej mod den røde planet.

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America has corn and Asia has rice. It's time Australia had a native staple food

Most countries have a staple food: native, fast-growing and easy-to-store plants high in carbohydrates.

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Nasa launches rover in mission to find signs of ancient life on Mars – video

Nasa's most sophisticated rover yet, Perseverance, has successfully blasted off from Florida's Cape Canaveral on a $2.7bn mission to search for traces of ancient life on Mars. Perseverance will travel for about seven months before attempting to land on the Jerezo crater, which scientists suspect could bear evidence of potential past microbial life on Mars. The car-sized, six-wheel scientific vehi

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NASA Has Launched the Most Ambitious Mars Rover Ever Built: Here's What Happens Next

Perseverance will stow away rocks for eventual delivery to Earth and will listen for Martian sounds for the first time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Adjusting planter parameters to match field conditions can maximize emergence and yield

Planter performance is a critical component when laying the foundation for a successful crop season. Environmental and soil conditions can significantly impact crop germination and emergence and help or hinder development of an adequate crop stand early in the season. Adjusting specific planter components and settings to match current field conditions can ensure maximized emergence and increase yi

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ISOLDE reveals fundamental property of astatine, the rarest element on Earth

A team of researchers using the ISOLDE nuclear-physics facility at CERN has measured for the first time the so-called electron affinity of the chemical element astatine, the rarest naturally occurring element on Earth. The result, described in a paper just published in Nature Communications, is important for both fundamental and applied research. As well as giving access to hitherto unknown proper

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America has corn and Asia has rice. It's time Australia had a native staple food

Most countries have a staple food: native, fast-growing and easy-to-store plants high in carbohydrates.

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If our reality is a video game, does that solve the problem of evil?

Pandemics and natural disasters cause pain and suffering to millions worldwide and can challenge the very foundations of human belief systems. They can be particularly challenging for those who believe in an all-knowing and righteous God. The Lisbon earthquake of 1755, for example, shook the previously unquestioned faith of many and led Voltaire to question whether this really could be the best of

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Images of antibodies as they neutralize the COVID-19 virus

As the COVID-19 pandemic spread across the globe in the first half of 2020, researchers worldwide worked around-the-clock to understand and combat it.

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NASA Blasts Off Most Sophisticated Mars Mission in Human History

Blast Off At exactly 7:50 am EDT this morning, NASA successfully launched its Perseverance rover mission to Mars. The rover, with its Ingenuity Mars Helicopter in tow, blasted off from Cape Canaveral, Florida atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. A small earthquake prior to launch luckily didn't cause any delays, as CNN reports . "This is the first time in history where we're going to Mar

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Coastal cities leave up to 75% of seafloor exposed to harmful light pollution

The global expansion of coastal cities could leave more than three quarters of their neighbouring seafloor exposed to potentially harmful levels of light pollution.

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Having clients from many industries can hurt the effectiveness of auditing firms

A recent study finds that when an accounting firm has an industry diversified client portfolio, the quality of the firm's audits suffers—and the more industry sectors it audits, the worse those audits are.

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Researchers develop new toolkit for social justice action

When protests erupted over the death of George Floyd and ongoing systemic racism in the United States in the spring, entrepreneur David Dennis was reminded of the stories his mother had told him of the civil rights movement in the 1960s. He said he hadn't imagined that civil unrest would affect another generation.

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Images of antibodies as they neutralize the COVID-19 virus

As the COVID-19 pandemic spread across the globe in the first half of 2020, researchers worldwide worked around-the-clock to understand and combat it.

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Long-standing tension in the Standard Model addressed

The best-known particle in the lepton family is the electron, a key building block of matter and central to our understanding of electricity. But the electron is not an only child. It has two heavier siblings, the muon and the tau lepton, and together they are known as the three lepton flavors. According to the Standard Model of particle physics, the only difference between the siblings should be

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Physicists discover mechanism for the formation of blood platelets

Blood platelets, also called thrombocytes, are all-important cells with a diameter of between only 0.0015 and 0.003 millimeters. They have the task of resealing injuries to the blood vessels as quickly as possible, for which they constantly patrol the bloodstream, ready to react immediately to any leaks. However, the biological capabilities of the organism alone are not sufficient to ensure that t

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For hundreds of years, the mysteries of Mars have fascinated humans

Mars seems so far away, even though it's been close to people for so long.

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Paradigm-shifting theory highlights the importance of substrate flexibility in enzymatic reactions

Leiden chemists have proposed a new model for enzymatic reactions in which the flexibility of the substrate is much more important than previously thought. Their results are paradigm-shifting and could have major implications for drug research and enzyme engineering. Publication in Angewandte Chemie.

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Incorporating ferromagnetism and superconductivity in a single layer of molecular superlattice

NUS scientists have demonstrated an interlayer-space-confined chemical design (ICCD) method for the synthesis of single-atom doped tantalum disulfide (TaS2) molecular superlattice, where ferromagnetism was successfully introduced in the superconducting TaS2 layers.

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We Need to Talk About Ventilation

I recently took a drive-through COVID-19 test at the University of North Carolina. Everything was well organized and efficient: I was swabbed for 15 uncomfortable seconds and sent home with two pages of instructions on what to do if I were to test positive, and what precautions people living with or tending to COVID-19 patients should take. The instructions included many detailed sections devoted

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Physicists discover mechanism for the formation of blood platelets

Blood platelets, also called thrombocytes, are all-important cells with a diameter of between only 0.0015 and 0.003 millimeters. They have the task of resealing injuries to the blood vessels as quickly as possible, for which they constantly patrol the bloodstream, ready to react immediately to any leaks. However, the biological capabilities of the organism alone are not sufficient to ensure that t

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Paradigm-shifting theory highlights the importance of substrate flexibility in enzymatic reactions

Leiden chemists have proposed a new model for enzymatic reactions in which the flexibility of the substrate is much more important than previously thought. Their results are paradigm-shifting and could have major implications for drug research and enzyme engineering. Publication in Angewandte Chemie.

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Ten dead whales found on Indonesian beach, one saved by locals

Ten whales were found dead on an Indonesian beach Thursday, officials said, with images showing locals rushing to push a still-living member of the stricken pod back into the sea.

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Ten dead whales found on Indonesian beach, one saved by locals

Ten whales were found dead on an Indonesian beach Thursday, officials said, with images showing locals rushing to push a still-living member of the stricken pod back into the sea.

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Thin tissue flutter can damage replacement heart valves

High-fidelity computational models of replacement heart valves show that thinner tissues can flap and flutter, which can damage valves and even the blood that flows by, researchers report. Imagine that you're in the middle of the aorta, the body's pipeline for oxygen-rich blood, looking back toward the heart's primary pump, the left ventricle. The ventricle muscle contracts and the aortic heart v

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Two more polymorphs found for red-orange-yellow

A trio of researchers at Université de Montréal has discovered two more polymorphs for ROY, bringing the total to 10. In their paper published in Journal of the American Chemical Society, Alexandre Levesque, Thierry Maris and James Wuest, describe the process they used to create the polymorphs and why they believe they have found a new way to increase polymorphic diversity.

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Growing toll from monsoon floods hampers South Asia virus efforts

The death toll from monsoon floods across South Asia has increased to more than 340 people over recent weeks, with villages still submerged and tens of thousands displaced as authorities battle with rising coronavirus cases.

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Increasing Arctic freshwater is driven by climate change

New, first-of-its-kind research from the University of Colorado Boulder shows that climate change is driving increasing amounts of freshwater in the Arctic Ocean. Within the next few decades, this will lead to increased freshwater moving into the North Atlantic Ocean, which could disrupt ocean currents and affect temperatures in northern Europe.

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NIH researchers discover new set of channels connecting malaria parasite and blood cells

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions have discovered another set of pore-like holes, or channels, traversing the membrane-bound sac that encloses the deadliest malaria parasite as it infects red blood cells. The channels enable the transport of lipids–fat-like molecules–between the blood cell and parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite draws lipids from t

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NASA launches Mars rover to look for signs of ancient life

The biggest, most sophisticated Mars rover ever built—a car-size vehicle bristling with cameras, microphones, drills and lasers—blasted off for the red planet Thursday as part of an ambitious, long-range project to bring the first Martian rock samples back to Earth to be analyzed for evidence of ancient life.

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10 email alerts you'll actually want in your inbox

Email is that old dog you can still teach new tricks. (Yogas Design/Unsplash/) Say what you want about email, but it has done a lot for us over the last 50 years or so—and there's still room to grow. With the right tools, services, and apps, you can get the most out of your inbox and extend its usefulness beyond those nagging messages from your boss or the annoying updates from your local gym. 1.

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Nasa launches Mars mission in search of evidence of ancient life

Perseverance rover will also trial technologies for future expeditions including oxygen production Nasa's new car-sized robotic spacecraft is on its way to Mars in a mission to search for evidence of ancient life. The Perseverance rover successfully blasted off from the Cape Canaveral air force station in Florida on Thursday at 7.50am local time (1250 BST), onboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas

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Covid-19: England had highest excess death levels in Europe by end of May

While England did not have highest peak mortality, it had longest continuous period of excess mortality, data shows Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage England had the highest levels of excess deaths in Europe in the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic, according to data showing the effect of the virus across the continent. Data analysis released by the Office for Nat

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Spoofing rammer danskere: "Jeg kan intet gøre"

Flere danskere oplever, hvordan deres telefonnumre er blevet brugt til spoofing.

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Children Stream on Twitch—Where Potential Predators Find Them

A WIRED investigation found dozens of channels belong to children apparently under 13 and anonymous chat participants sending inappropriate messages their way.

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NASA has launched the most ambitious Mars rover ever built: here's what happens next

Nature, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02257-w Perseverance will stow away rocks for eventual delivery to Earth, and will listen for Martian sounds for the first time.

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Bygg din egen mätare för växthusgaser

Forskare vid Linköpings universitet, har tagit fram en enkel mätare för flöden av växthusgaser. Och gjort byggbeskrivningen tillgänglig för alla som vill bygga en egen. Delarna finns i många elektronikbutiker och kostar som mest ett par tusen kronor. Mätaren byggs av billiga och lätt tillgängliga delar och ger data om halter av metan, koldioxid, temperatur och luftfuktighet. – Hittills har mätins

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Fler översvämningar i Europa de senaste 30 åren

Den nuvarande perioden med översvämningar i Europa är exceptionell jämfört med de senaste 500 åren, enligt en ny kartläggning. Analysen, gjord i samarbete mellan 42 europeiska universitet, är den första som har jämfört översvämningar över flera århundraden. – Vi kom fram till att de senaste tre decennierna var bland de mest översvämningsrika i Europa under de senaste 500 åren, och att denna perio

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Don't Be Fooled by Big Tech's Anti-China Sideshow

During Wednesday's antitrust hearing, tech CEOs leaned into the same pernicious argument to distract from the fact that US tech companies do bad things too.

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How Do You Make Movies in a Pandemic? Ask Horror Directors

With Hollywood productions largely shut down, more filmmakers are making use of computer screens—something genre films have been doing for years.

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Outburst of the X-ray transient MAXI J1727–203 investigated with NICER

Using the NICER instrument, astronomers have conducted a detailed X-ray spectral and variability study of an outburst from an X-ray transient source known as MAXI J1727-203. Results of this investigation could shed more light on the true nature of this source. The study is detailed in a paper published July 22 on arXiv.org.

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Partnerships with bankrupt companies could be double-edged sword for investors

New research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that when a company is in bankruptcy, its advertising and research and development investments can cut both ways. They increase the odds of surviving for some bankrupt companies and decrease the odds for others.

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Research brief: 'Fool's gold' may be valuable after all

In a breakthrough new study, scientists and engineers at the University of Minnesota have electrically transformed the abundant and low-cost non-magnetic material iron sulfide, also known as 'fool's gold' or pyrite, into a magnetic material.

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Best place on Earth to see stars is at remote site in Antarctica, study shows

Stars viewed from a place called Dome A in Antarctica can finally be seen without their twinkle — which means in much greater detail.

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The Scientific Question Machine

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Vintage Scientific American Covers by Fish Illustrator Stanley Meltzoff

The latest science book recommendations from our editors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why is Donald Trump Jr amplifying a quack who believes in 'demon sperm'? | Moustafa Bayoumi

The latest conspiracy theory is yet another example of how Americans are being misled by rightwing quacks If you happened to be thinking that the one thing the tumultuous year of 2020 has been missing is arguments over demon sperm, then all I can say to you is this: I've got good news. Related: US coronavirus deaths near 150,000 as 21 states declared 'red zone' for infection spikes Continue readi

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Se opsendelsen: Kæmpe Mars-robot fyret ud på en syv måneder lang rejse

Se videoen af Nasas nyeste marsrobot blive sendt afsted.

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New maps of chemical marks on DNA pinpoint regions relevant to many developmental diseases

In research that aims to illuminate the causes of human developmental disorders, Salk scientists have generated 168 new maps of chemical marks on strands of DNA—called methylation—in developing mice.

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MIT: 'Snowball Earth' Came From Huge Drop in Sunlight

ice sheet. Credit: Stephen Hudson / CC BY 2.5 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antarctic_Plateau#/media/File:AntarcticaDomeCSnow.jpg The last ice age on Earth ended about 11,000 years ago, but that was just a few flurries compared to so-called Snowball Earth scenarios. Scientists believe Earth experienced several of these periods when the entire surface was covered by ice and snow. New research from

7h

Researchers enhance electron spin longevity

The electron is an elementary particle, a building block on which other systems evolve. With specific properties such as spin, or angular momentum, that can be manipulated to carry information, electrons are primed to advance modern information technology. An international collaboration of researchers has now developed a way to extend and stabilize the lifetime of the electron's spin to more effec

8h

Machine learning model may perfect 3-D nanoprinting

Two-photon lithography (TPL)—a widely used 3-D nanoprinting technique that uses laser light to create 3-D objects—has shown promise in research applications but has yet to achieve widespread industry acceptance due to limitations on large-scale part production and time-intensive setup.

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New maps of chemical marks on DNA pinpoint regions relevant to many developmental diseases

In research that aims to illuminate the causes of human developmental disorders, Salk scientists have generated 168 new maps of chemical marks on strands of DNA—called methylation—in developing mice.

8h

Desert Fireball Network scientists find two meteorites in two weeks

Curtin University researchers have discovered two meteorites in a two week period on the Nullarbor Plain—one freshly fallen and the other from November 2019.

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Scientists expose fascinating 'compartments' in bacteria

Bacteria—tiny and in some cases deadly single-celled organisms—are far more complex than commonly thought.

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Scientists expose fascinating 'compartments' in bacteria

Bacteria—tiny and in some cases deadly single-celled organisms—are far more complex than commonly thought.

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The varnishing point: Where science meets art

In 2014, the art conservation world was thrown into chaos when the company producing MS2A varnish shut down. No one else had the technical knowledge to continue making the go-to varnish for art conservators worldwide.

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Whale snot reveals likely poor health during migration

Whale-watching season is delighting the viewing public along the east Australian coast but while it's a boon for the tourism industry, for the majestic humpback whale it's potentially a time of less optimal health.

8h

Quantum machines learn 'quantum data'

Skoltech scientists have shown that quantum enhanced machine learning can be used on quantum (as opposed to classical) data, overcoming a significant slowdown common to these applications and opening a "fertile ground to develop computational insights into quantum systems." The paper was published in the journal Physical Review A.

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Trust in data privacy increases during pandemic

COVID-19 has seen Australians become more trusting of organizations and governments when it comes to their personal data and privacy, according to new research.

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Whale snot reveals likely poor health during migration

Whale-watching season is delighting the viewing public along the east Australian coast but while it's a boon for the tourism industry, for the majestic humpback whale it's potentially a time of less optimal health.

8h

New study unravels secret to subduction

A new study by an international team of researchers offers new clues about where and how subduction starts on Earth, the process behind our most deadly volcanic eruptions.

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Unusual electron sharing found in cool crystal

A team of scientists led by Nagoya University in Japan has detected a highly unusual atomic configuration in a tungsten-based material. Until now, the atomic configuration had only been seen in trihydrogen, an ion that exists in between star systems in space. The findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, suggest further studies could reveal compounds with interesting electronic pro

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Team proposes new integrated power-exhaust control solution for fusion reactor steady-state operation

The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) team has proposed a new integrated control solution to tackle key problems in divertor power exhaust for the steady state operation of tokamak fusion reactor.

8h

American Cancer Society updates guideline for cervical cancer screening

An updated cervical cancer screening guideline from the American Cancer Society reflects the rapidly changing landscape of cervical cancer prevention in the United States, calling for less and more simplified screening.

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Smelter rekordhurtigt: Mængden af arktisk havis har aldrig været mindre

Den usædvanligt varme sommer kan gøre det svært at danne tilstrækkelige mængder havis henover efteråret og vinteren, hvilket kan forøge smeltningen endnu mere til sommer næste år. Det advarer forsker fra DMI om.

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The NBA's Uneasy Return Follows an Age-Old Script

Updated at 9:03 a.m. ET on July 30, 2020. Earlier this month, in the days following the first full moon of the summer solstice, NBA athletes and personnel who were scattered around the world amid the coronavirus pandemic descended on Orlando, Florida, and entered a bubble. It was an act of purification with ripples in time that span nearly 2,800 years. In another era, Orlando would have been Elis

8h

Putting Copper in Hospitals

The evidence for this has been building over the last few years, and we are now at the point where it is reasonable to act on the evidence. Replacing wood, plastic, and stainless steel surfaces in hospitals with those either made of copper or embedded with copper significantly reduces bacteria and viruses (microbial burden, or MB) on those surfaces. I am always suspicious of claims of ancient use

8h

Netflix's Fake-News Thriller 'The Hater' Is Way Too Real

The Polish crime flick represents a shift in how filmmakers imagine the role of the internet in the stories they tell.

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An Olympian-turned-scientist helped a $1 million basketball tournament tip off amid COVID-19

As major U.S. sports leagues struggle to restart during the pandemic, Tara Kirk Sell saw contest as a "model experiment" for reopening society

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Almost 50% of teens report stalking or harassment by partner

Stalking and harassment are startlingly common in American teen relationships, according to a new study. The findings, published in the journal Youth & Society , are part of the first national study of nonphysical youth dating abuse , and indicate that 48% of 12- to 18-year-olds who have been in a relationship have been stalked or harassed by a partner, and 42% have stalked or harassed a partner.

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J&J Covid-19 vaccine performs well in early tests

Experimental inoculation elicits 'robust' immune response when used on animals

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Study reveals palaeovegetation and palaeoclimate changes across Triassic-Jurassic transition in south China

The Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) transition interval (ca. 200 Ma) is characterized by a major mass extinction in which major biotic turnover occurred in both marine and terrestrial realms. However, studies on the terrestrial response to this event are still limited, especially in the eastern Tethys region of eastern Asia.

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The four types of climate denier, and why you should ignore them all | Damian Carrington

The shill, the grifter, the egomaniac and the ideological fool: each distorts the urgent global debate in their own way A new book, described as " deeply and fatally flawed " by an expert reviewer, recently reached the top of Amazon's bestseller list for environmental science and made it into a weekly top 10 list for all nonfiction titles. How did this happen? Because, as Brendan Behan put it, "t

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Researchers conduct first simultaneous imaging and spectral study on a solar fan-spine

Fan-spine magnetic topology is favorable for the occurrence of solar flares through null-point reconnection.

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Cephalopod Sinoceras chinense discovered outside China for the first time

Sinoceras chinense is a kind of extinct cephalopod mollusk that flourished in the late Ordovician. It is regarded as the index fossil of the Upper Ordovician Pagoda Formation on the Yangtze Platform of South China, with a likely age of early Katian.

9h

Epigenetics and cell diversity in the embryo

A research team at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin has explored the role of factors in embryonic development that do not alter the sequence of DNA, but only epigenetically modify its "packaging". In the scientific journal Nature, they describe how regulatory mechanisms contribute to the formation of different tissues and organs in early mouse embryos.

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Epigenetics and cell diversity in the embryo

A research team at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin has explored the role of factors in embryonic development that do not alter the sequence of DNA, but only epigenetically modify its "packaging". In the scientific journal Nature, they describe how regulatory mechanisms contribute to the formation of different tissues and organs in early mouse embryos.

9h

China Has Squandered Its First Great Opportunity

Foreign-policy observers have long debated: What if Beijing were handed a golden opportunity to strut on the world stage, absent a more powerful United States? Would it seize the opportunity, acting for the good of all and convincing the globe of its peaceful intentions? Or would it pursue a cramped vision of national interest? The world has inadvertently run that very experiment since January. T

9h

Chemists craft molecular scalpels to clear unwanted proteins from cell surfaces

When scientists find a potentially dangerous protein on a cell, they might imagine shrinking themselves down to become tiny surgeons, cutting out just the problematic molecule and leaving the healthy parts of the cell intact. While deft hands and sharp instruments would never be able to excise a single protein from the surface of a cell, a new molecular tool could make cellular surgery easier, acc

9h

Return of the extremely elongated cloud on Mars

A mysteriously long, thin cloud has again appeared over the 20-km-high Arsia Mons volcano on Mars.

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Sticking the landing on Mars: High-powered computing aims to reduce guesswork

Future spacecrafts bound for the moon or beyond will benefit from high-powered computer simulations underway at the University of Michigan that model the particulate mayhem set in motion by rocket thruster-powered landings.

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New imaging system creates pictures by measuring time

A radical new method of imaging that harnesses artificial intelligence to turn time into visions of 3-D space could help cars, mobile devices and health monitors develop 360-degree awareness.

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LIVE Nasa sender kæmperobot til Mars

Mars-roveren Perseverance er i dag blevet opsendt af Nasa med kurs mod Mars.

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Chemists craft molecular scalpels to clear unwanted proteins from cell surfaces

When scientists find a potentially dangerous protein on a cell, they might imagine shrinking themselves down to become tiny surgeons, cutting out just the problematic molecule and leaving the healthy parts of the cell intact. While deft hands and sharp instruments would never be able to excise a single protein from the surface of a cell, a new molecular tool could make cellular surgery easier, acc

9h

Virologists divided over plans to change virus-naming rules during the pandemic

Nature, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02243-2 Researchers say now is bad time to introduce a system for naming viral species, when scientists are focused on the coronavirus outbreak.

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Plants Have Hormones, Too, and Tweaking Them Could Improve Food Supply

Crops sense and respond to drought, pests and other stressors in surprising ways, researchers are discovering — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Bose Headphones and Bluetooth Speakers Are on Sale

Looking for a great pair of noise-canceling cans or workout earbuds? A ton of audio devices from the brand are discounted right now.

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Covid-19 Data in the US Is an 'Information Catastrophe'

The order to reroute CDC hospitalization figures raised accuracy concerns. But that's just one of the problems with how the country collects health data.

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There's No Such Thing as Family Secrets in the Age of 23andMe

DNA tests are cheap and ubiquitous. For some donor-conceived people, they can unearth long-buried truths about their ancestry—and lead to unorthodox reunions.

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AI Is All the Rage. So Why Aren't More Businesses Using It?

A big study by the US Census Bureau finds that only about 9 percent of firms employ tools like machine learning or voice recognition—for now.

9h

The Mystery of Titan's Expanding Orbit

A surprising discovery in the outer solar system could change our ideas about moons that orbit giant planets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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As a Covid-19 survivor, I don't have blind faith in health experts. Here's why | Fiona Lowenstein

Since contracting Covid-19, I have witnessed first-hand the limitations of expert advice for a novel pandemic As Covid-19 spreads across the United States, it leaves a slew of misinformation and conspiracy theories in its wake. The racist myths and Trumpian attempts to discredit public health officials are driven by a fundamental disbelief in science and the experts who understand it. The rise of

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Plants Have Hormones, Too, and Tweaking Them Could Improve Food Supply

Crops sense and respond to drought, pests and other stressors in surprising ways, researchers are discovering — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Plants Have Hormones, Too, and Tweaking Them Could Improve Food Supply

Crops sense and respond to drought, pests and other stressors in surprising ways, researchers are discovering — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Trump's Attempt at an Un-Trumpian Image

"I'm being nice today," President Donald Trump said last Friday, at a ceremony to award the Presidential Medal of Freedom to the former congressman and Olympic athlete Jim Ryun. And Trump has been nice— nice is a very relative term in this case—at least since last week, when he unexpectedly revived the fabled tradition of regular White House briefings on the coronavirus pandemic. You probably rem

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Journal retracted 46 articles in one fell swoop for faked peer review

In Retraction Watch world, it's like finding long-buried and forgotten treasure. A now-defunct journal retracted nearly four dozen papers in a single sweep, citing questions about the integrity of the peer review process for the articles. The Open Automation and Control Systems Journal, formerly published by Bentham, released a list of 46 articles, which it … Continue reading

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This super 'sponge' releases steam when the Sun shines

Nature, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02255-y A curious gel can soak up water vapour from the air and swell to enormous size without bursting.

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Matematikere stopper hjælp til forudsigende politisoftware

Amerikanske matematikere vil ikke længere hjælpe politiet med at lave fremskrivninger for potentiel kriminalitet, de er nemlig bange for, at det understøtter systemisk racisme.

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The Tech Companies Already Won

Like many professional families, mine is spending most of our time at home. I watch our younger daughter while my wife works, then we swap. I cheat, though, letting my daughter watch Amazon Prime Video on her iPad while I Slack on mine. Everywhere in the house, the pandemic takes things away and technology offers recompense. My son, a recent college graduate, works upstairs, doing digital marketi

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'Success Addicts' Choose Being Special Over Being Happy

" How to Build a Life " is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Imagine reading a story titled "The Relentless Pursuit of Booze." You would likely expect a depressing story about a person in a downward alcoholic spiral. Now imagine instead reading a story titled "The Relentless Pursuit of Success." That would be an inspiring story, wouldn't it? Maybe—bu

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Hvidhajer i fremgang: Nu skal droner hjælpe med at undgå angreb

Stik mod tendens i resten af verden, så møder californiske surfere flere hvidhajer. Nu bliver hajernes opførsel gennemgået med teknologisk tættekam.

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Small crustacean can fragment microplastics in four days, study finds

'Completely unexpected' finding is significant as harmful effects of plastic might increase as particle size decreases Small crustaceans can fragment microplastics into pieces smaller than a cell within 96 hours, a study has shown . Until now, plastic fragmentation has been largely attributed to slow physical processes such as sunlight and wave action, which can take years and even decades. Conti

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The safest way to eat at your favorite restaurant during the pandemic

Think twice before sitting down, especially without a mask. (Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . The clink of wine glasses, the buzz of laughter and constant conversation, a pair of familiar eyes smiling at you across the table, skimming through

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A coronavirus vaccine could split America

In the battle between public science and anti-vaxxer sentiment, science is heavily outgunned

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Killer of Rafiki, Uganda's rare silverback mountain gorilla, jailed

The Ugandan hunter said that he had killed the animal in self defence when he was attacked.

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UK extends coronavirus isolation period from seven to 10 days

Decision not based on new evidence but is reaction to rising European infections Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage People who have tested positive for Covid-19 or who have symptoms will now have to self-isolate for 10 days, rather than seven, the UK government has said in a move that aligns the country with the World Health Organization's advice. The decision by the ch

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Single-shot Ad26 vaccine protects against SARS-CoV-2 in rhesus macaques

Nature, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2607-z

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ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine prevents SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in rhesus macaques

Nature, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2608-y

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Immune network dysregulation precedes clinical diagnosis of asthma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69494-x

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Uncovering unique plasticity in life history of an endangered centenarian fish

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69911-1

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Lipoxins, RevD1 and 9, 13 HODE as the most important derivatives after an early incident of ischemic stroke

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69831-0

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Erbium emission in Er:Y2O3 decorated fractal arrays of silicon nanowires

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69864-5 Erbium emission in Er:Y 2 O 3 decorated fractal arrays of silicon nanowires

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In vitro selection for adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to ABO antigens does not affect PfEMP1 and RIFIN expression

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69666-9 In vitro selection for adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum -infected erythrocytes to ABO antigens does not affect PfEMP1 and RIFIN expression

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Presence of resveratrol in wild Arachis species adds new value to this overlooked genetic resource

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68648-1

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The Dangers of an Unwitnessed Pandemic

The aloneness experienced by Covid-19 patients is one of the most heartbreaking aspects of the pandemic. Health care workers aside, few will witness firsthand the intense suffering and death that the coronavirus has wrought. That's left us emotionally unequipped, as a society, to make the right decisions.

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Headline news: Botox injections may lessen depression

By analyzing the FDA database of adverse drug effects, UC San Diego researchers discovered that people who received Botox injections — not just in the forehead — reported depression significantly less often than patients undergoing different treatments for the same conditions.

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Physician practices with more female doctors have smallest gender pay gaps

A study shows female physicians have more equitable income when they work in practices with more doctors who are women. The analysis shows a 12 percent relative difference in income for practices with equal numbers of female and male physicians, compared with a 20 percent income difference in practices dominated by men. The findings offer important evidence that workplace diversity can help reduce

11h

Live Coronavirus News Updates and Analysis

Herman Cain died after being hospitalized with the virus. People in Britain with virus symptoms will now have to isolate for 10 days instead of seven.

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A Covid Patient Goes Home After a Rare Double Lung Transplant

Mayra Ramirez was the first of a small but growing number of people whose only hope of surviving the coronavirus was to replace their lungs.

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Strategies to enable large-scale proteomics for reproducible research

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17641-3 Clinical proteomics critically depends on the ability to acquire highly reproducible data over an extended period of time. Here, the authors assess reproducibility over four months across different mass spectrometers and develop a computational approach to mitigate variation among instruments over time.

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The SecA motor generates mechanical force during protein translocation

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17561-2 The ATPase SecA drives Sec-dependent protein translocation across the bacterial plasma membrane. Here, the authors combine kinetic translocation measurements with single-molecule force spectroscopy and demonstrate that the SecA motor generates mechanical force to unfold and translocate preproteins.

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Hybrid Fourier-domain mode-locked laser for ultra-wideband linearly chirped microwave waveform generation

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17264-8 Linearly chirped microwave waveforms with high time-bandwidth products would have important applications but are difficult to achieve. Here the authors generate such a waveform in a photonic setting by implementing a micro-disk resonator as a tunable optical bandpass filter in a Fourier-domain mode-locked laser.

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Post-replicative pairing of sister ter regions in Escherichia coli involves multiple activities of MatP

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17606-6 Protein, MatP, binds to and delays segregation of the ter region of the bacterial chromosome before cell division. Here, the authors show that MatP displays multiple activities to promote optimal pairing of sister ter regions until cell division.

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Escape from nonsense-mediated decay associates with anti-tumor immunogenicity

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17526-5 The transcripts generated by frameshifts and indels in cancer are frequently degraded by nonsense mediated decay. Here, the authors show that some of these transcripts can escape this degradation mechanism and their prevalence correlates with tumour response to immunotherapy.

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Polypeptide formation in clusters of β-alanine amino acids by single ion impact

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17653-z Formation of peptide bonds in cold gas-phase environments might represent a prebiotic synthesis route of polypeptides. Here, the authors show the formation of up to tetra-peptide species in the collision of He2+ ions, with kinetic energies typical for solar wind ions, with cold β-alanine clusters.

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Immunoprophylactic and immunotherapeutic control of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17644-0 Current preclinical models to investigate human HR + breast cancer progression and response to immunotherapy in vivo are limited. Here, the authors demonstrate that mammary tumours driven by a synthetic progestin combined with an oral carcinogen recapitulate several immunobiological features of human HR + breast

11h

Paraventricular hypothalamus mediates diurnal rhythm of metabolism

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17578-7 Defective rhythmic metabolism is associated with high-fat diet feeding and obesity. The authors show that the clock gene BMAL1 drives paraventricular hypothalamic neuron activity via rhythmic GABAergic neurotransmission, and that this mediates diurnal metabolism and diet-induced obesity.

11h

How many Mars missions have been successful?

Getting to the Red Planet is challenging, and so it working out how many have failed.

11h

Nät av potatisskal kan ge mer ålgräs

Genom att grundförstärka sjöbotten med ett nät gjort på potatisskal kan förutsättningarna för att ålgräs ska rota sig öka betydligt. Det visar försök gjorda av en forskare, bland annat från Göteborgs universitet. Metoden kan bidra till att motverka utarmningen av kustnära ekosystem. För att efterlikna naturens egna processer har forskargruppen konstruerat kvadratmeterstora nät av potatisskal. Nät

11h

Biblioterapi – böcker på recept

Blir man frisk av att läsa en roman, en novell eller en dikt? Ja, enligt forskare inom biblioterapi. Både självhjälpsböcker och skönlitteratur kan leda till bättre psykiskt välbefinnande.

12h

Kids with higher BPA levels may have more asthma symptoms

Children in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore tended to have more asthma symptoms when they had elevated levels of the synthetic chemical BPA in their urine, according to a new study. While some products, including baby bottles, no longer contain BPA (Bisphenol A), exposures to BPA remain almost universal, and there are still concerns that, especially in childhood, those exposures might have

12h

What kind of face mask best protects against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

12h

Compounds show promise in search for tuberculosis antibiotics

Compounds tested for their potential as antibiotics have demonstrated promising activity against one of the deadliest infectious diseases – tuberculosis (TB).

12h

AstraZeneca bucks industry trend with rise in first-half profits

Drugmaker believes its potential Covid-19 vaccine 'can be distributed in a very reasonable way'

12h

Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a vaccine?

More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…

12h

Carpe diem: Invasive fish feeds hungry in South Africa's lockdown

It is just before sunrise and volunteers are hauling nets full of gleaming, wriggling carp out of Groenvlei Lake.

12h

Study finds dangerous mercury levels in Amazon fish

Nearly one-third of the fish in the Brazilian Amazon state of Amapa have such high levels of mercury caused by illegal mining that they are dangerous for human consumption, according to a new study.

12h

Carpe diem: Invasive fish feeds hungry in South Africa's lockdown

It is just before sunrise and volunteers are hauling nets full of gleaming, wriggling carp out of Groenvlei Lake.

12h

Mars-bound: NASA's life-seeking rover Perseverance set for launch

NASA's latest Mars rover Perseverance launches Thursday on an astrobiology mission to look for signs of ancient microbial life—and to fly a helicopter-drone on another world for the first time.

12h

Self-isolation for Covid-19 symptoms extended to 10 days across UK

Chief medical officers of all four nations announce measures amid fears of 'second wave'

12h

The world on a billionaire's budget

The world's wealthiest are prospering. As of February 2017, there were about 2,000 billionaires in the world . This micro-elite controls over US$7.6 trillion , an increase of 18 percent from 2016. A billionaire's spending power is difficult to grasp, both because most people do not correctly intuit large numbers , and because a billion dollars far outstrips most people's experience. What does a h

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13h

'We give patients their voices back': the speech therapists on the Covid-19 frontline

The work of speech and language therapists like Sally Archer is often overlooked, but they have been vital in fighting Covid-19 I lead a group of NHS speech and language therapists at St Thomas' hospital in London. I decided to become a speech and language therapist because the job is so varied. But I never thought it would lead me to the centre of a pandemic. My profession is often misunderstood

13h

Tropical Storm Isaias heads for Hispaniola with heavy rain

Heavy rains drenched the eastern Caribbean as a weather system strengthened into Tropical Storm Isaias late Wednesday while it passed south of Puerto Rico and headed for Hispaniola carrying the threat of flooding and landslides.

13h

Tropical storm may delay 1st SpaceX crew's return to Earth

Tropical weather barreling toward Florida could delay this weekend's planned return of the first SpaceX crew.

13h

Social distancing varies by income in US

Wealthier communities went from being the most mobile before the COVID-19 pandemic to the least mobile, while poorer areas have gone from the least mobile to the most mobile, according to a study by the University of California, Davis.

13h

Nondestructive positron beams probe damage, support safety advances in radiation environments

A multi-institution team has used positron beams to probe the nature of radiation effects, providing new insight into how damage is produced in iron films. This exploration can improve the safety of materials used in nuclear reactors and other radiation environments.

13h

New current that transports water to major 'waterfall' discovered in deep ocean

An international team discovered a previously unrecognized ocean current that transports water to one of the world's largest "waterfalls" in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Bank Channel Overflow into the deep North Atlantic. While investigating the pathways that water takes to feed this major waterfall, the research team identified a surprising path of the cold and dense water flowing at depth

13h

Report provides new framework for understanding climate risks, impacts to US agriculture

Agricultural production is highly sensitive to weather and climate, which affect when farmers and land managers plant seeds or harvest crops. These conditions also factor into decision-making, when people decide to make capital investments or plant trees in an agroforestry system.

13h

Cosmic tango between the very small and the very large

While Einstein's theory of general relativity can explain a large array of fascinating astrophysical and cosmological phenomena, some aspects of the properties of the universe at the largest-scales remain a mystery. A new study using loop quantum cosmology—a theory that uses quantum mechanics to extend gravitational physics beyond Einstein's theory of general relativity—accounts for two major myst

13h

Are cover crops negatively impacting row crops?

Winter cover crops benefit soil health and can suppress weeds in subsequent row crops but may also lead to lower yields. Some farmers and agronomists speculate that allelopathic chemicals released by cover crops may be the cause for some of the observed yield reductions, but cause-and-effect relationships are rarely established. We know that allelopathic cover crops inhibit weed seed germination a

13h

Are cover crops negatively impacting row crops?

Winter cover crops benefit soil health and can suppress weeds in subsequent row crops but may also lead to lower yields. Some farmers and agronomists speculate that allelopathic chemicals released by cover crops may be the cause for some of the observed yield reductions, but cause-and-effect relationships are rarely established. We know that allelopathic cover crops inhibit weed seed germination a

13h

13h

Shell and Total escape underlying losses on strong oil trading

Energy majors took combined writedowns of $24.9bn in second quarter on fall in oil prices

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13h

Forskere kortlægger mekanismer i det største CRISPR-system

Det største og mest komplicerede CRISPR-system er blevet visualiseret af forskere fra Københavns…

13h

Mennesker, der bor på Mars: Er det muligt eller ren science fiction?

Et nyt eksperiment på Mars skal forsøge at producere ilt til en fremtidig marsbase.

15h

TV tonight: the stuff of life – our genes – under the microscope

A comprehensive look at the experiments that could eradicate cancer. Plus: spiced chicken skewers on chef Tom Kerridge's barbecue. Here's what to watch tonight Continue reading…

15h

Alzheimer's risk factors may be measurable in adolescents and young adults

Risk factors for Alzheimer's dementia may be apparent as early as our teens and 20s, according to new research reported at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference® (AAIC®) 2020.

15h

Is there lyfe on Mars? New concept broadens search for alien organisms

Research suggests standard definition of life may be too restrictive for complexities of space When the Perseverance rover takes off from Cape Canaveral in Florida as scheduled on Thursday it will be Nasa's first mission to the surface of the red planet with the primary goal of finding signs of past life. For astrobiologists, this search for life beyond Earth can be compared to a game of darts. H

15h

Seeking life on Mars: Nasa prepares to launch its latest rover

Perseverance mission aims to land on crater to search for possible microbial Martians Nasa's most sophisticated rover yet is due to blast off for Mars on a mission to answer one of the most profound questions: did life ever emerge on another planet? Mission controllers have set their sights on the 28-mile-wide (45km) Jezero crater north of the planet's equator. The landing site is one of the most

15h

Detecting sample swaps in diverse NGS data types using linkage disequilibrium

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17453-5 Parallelized analysis in clinical genomics can lead to sample or data mislabelling, and could have serious downstream consequences. Here the authors present a tool to quantify sample genetic relatedness and detect such mistakes, and apply it to thousands of datasets from the ENCODE consortium.

15h

Standard Chartered profits tumble as virus prompts loan losses

Lender warns further Covid-19 outbreaks could hit performance in second half

15h

NASA Launches Perseverance Rover to Mars, Capping Summer of Missions to Red Planet

The third and final mission to the red planet of the month lifted off on Thursday.

15h

Global report: Australia sees record daily case rise as global infections pass 17m

State of Victoria reports 723 new cases and 13 deaths; US deaths pass 150,000; Japan lifts ban on re-entry or some foreign residents Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Australia has reported a record rise in coronavirus infections and deaths, with the state of Victoria announcing more than 700 new cases and 13 deaths, as the state continues to battle significant outbrea

15h

13 gange så varm som Solen: Nu bliver verdens største fusionsreaktor samlet

Formålet med Iter-reaktoren er at vise, at man kan skabe CO2-fri energi ved at efterligne Solen.

16h

Are cover crops negatively impacting row crops?

Research investigates if chemicals released by cover crops may be the cause for yield reductions

16h

Inflammation induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction studied in organoids

For this study, the 3D brain organoid was used to model the effects of oxygen deprivation and inflammation on blood brain barrier function to better understand what is happening in a human brain during an ischemic stroke.

16h

Most women treated in New York City for gynecologic cancers

Women receiving standard treatment in New York City for ovarian, uterine, and cervical cancers are not at increased risk of being hospitalized for or dying from COVID-19 due to their cancer, a new study shows.

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16h

How Red Sea 'supercorals' are resisting the climate crisis

Ian Sample speaks to marine biologist Prof Maoz Fine about his surprising research on the relationship between increasing ocean temperatures and the Red Sea's coral reefs. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

16h

How Red Sea 'supercorals' are resisting the climate crisis – podcast

Ian Sample speaks to marine biologist Prof Maoz Fine about his surprising research on the relationship between increasing ocean temperatures and the Red Sea's coral reefs Continue reading…

16h

How safe is air travel during coronavirus pandemic?

Aviation industry battles to restore confidence that flying is not as risky as it may seem

16h

Outbreaks highlight disparities in UK test and trace regimes

A regionally run service in Wales has proved agile, while central control has hampered English efforts

17h

Scientists make quantum technology smaller

A way of shrinking the devices used in quantum sensing systems has now been developed.

18h

Accelerated bone deterioration in last 70 years at famous Mesolithic peat bog in peril

Alarming results from a 2019 survey of well-known archaeological site Ageröd reveal drastic bone and organic matter deterioration since the site's initial excavations in the 1940s, suggesting action is needed to preserve findings from Ageröd and similar sites, according to a new study.

18h

Researchers map mechanisms in the largest CRISPR system

The largest and most complex CRISPR system has been visualized by researchers in a new study. The system may have potential applications in biomedicine and biotechnology, the researchers believe.

18h

The Price of Life Is Death, but Sex Improves the Exchange Rate – Issue 88: Love & Sex

Epidemics have a way of making one wonder about death. To put it plainly, in the raw form it takes as it first rises from our hearts: Why? Why on Earth does it have to be this way? In The Plague , Albert Camus ' novel of harrowing disease in an Algerian city, Father Paneloux, a faithful Jesuit, steps to the pulpit and offers his explanation. "This same pestilence which is slaying you," Paneloux s

18h

You Want to See My Data? I Thought We Were Friends! – Facts So Romantic

Stuart Ritchie is a Lecturer in the Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre at King's College London. His new book, Science Fictions: How Fraud, Bias, Negligence and Hype Undermine the Search for Truth , explains the ideas in this comic, by Zach Weinersmith, in more detail, telling shocking stories of scientific error and misconduct. It also proposes an abundance of ideas for how to r

18h

The Big Tech Hearing Proved Congress Isn't Messing Around

Partisan antics aside, lawmakers on the antitrust subcommittee dished out some serious, probing questions to the CEOs of Amazon, Google, Facebook, and Apple.

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18h

Smaller habitats worse than expected for biodiversity

Biodiversity's ongoing global decline has prompted policies to protect and restore habitats to minimize animal and plant extinctions. However, biodiversity forecasts used to inform these policies are usually based on assumptions of a simple theoretical model describing how the number of species changes with the amount of habitat. A new study shows that the application of this theoretical model und

18h

'Quantum negativity' can power ultra-precise measurements

Scientists have found that a physical property called 'quantum negativity' can be used to take more precise measurements of everything from molecular distances to gravitational waves.

18h

Phillips group exactly solves experimental puzzle in high temperature superconductivity

A team of theoretical physicists has for the first time exactly solved a representative model of the cuprate problem, the 1992 Hatsugai-Kohmoto (HK) model of a doped Mott insulator.

18h

Biphilic surfaces reduce defrosting times in heat exchangers

Engineers have discovered a way to significantly improve the defrosting of ice and frost on heat exchangers.

18h

The Facebook and Amazon Documents That Captivated the Hearing

Here's a look at how Mark Zuckerberg plotted the Instagram acquisition. Plus: Inside Amazon's plan to take down Diapers.com.

18h

The Atlantic Daily: Congress Wakes Up to the Danger of Tech Giants

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . SHUTTERSTOCK / THE ATLANTIC The four tech CEOs testifying before the House antitrust subcommittee today appeared, fittingly, in digital form only. A delay at the start of the proceedings left rep

18h

Amazonian Indigenous territories are crucial for conservation

A new study shows that Indigenous territories represent around 45% of all the remaining wilderness areas in the Amazon, comprising an area of three times the surface of Germany. At a time when the Amazon forests face unprecedented pressures, overcoming divergences and aligning the goals of wilderness defenders and Indigenous peoples is paramount to avoid further environmental degradation.

19h

How to mix old tires and building rubble to make sustainable roads

A recycled blend brings together construction and tire waste, to deliver both environmental and engineering benefits. The material offers a zero-waste solution to a massive environmental challenge – construction, renovation and demolition account for about 50% of the waste produced annually worldwide, while around 1 billion scrap tires are generated globally each year.

19h

Arguments between couples: Our neurons like mediation

When couples argue, mediation improves the outcome of the confrontation. But that's not all: mediation is also linked to heightened activity in key regions of the brain belonging to the reward circuit. This is the first time that a controlled, randomized study has succeeded in demonstrating the advantages of mediation for couple conflicts and identifying a related biological signature.

19h

Potential preterm births in high risk women predicted to 73% accuracy, by new technique

A new technique that can spot a potential preterm birth in asymptomatic high-risk women, with up to 73% accuracy months before delivery, has been developed by scientists.

19h

Extinction: Quarter of UK mammals 'under threat'

Review of UK mammals finds that a quarter of native species are at "imminent threat of extinction".

19h

Cosmic tango between the very small and the very large

A new study using the theory of quantum loop cosmology accounts for two major mysteries about the large-scale structure of our universe.

19h

New current that transports water to major 'waterfall' discovered in deep ocean

An international team discovered a previously unrecognized ocean current that transports water to one of the world's largest 'waterfalls' in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Bank Channel Overflow into the deep North Atlantic.

19h

Simulating quantum 'time travel' disproves butterfly effect in quantum realm

Using a quantum computer to simulate time travel, researchers have demonstrated that, in the quantum realm, there is no 'butterfly effect.' In the research, information–qubits, or quantum bits–'time travel' into the simulated past.

19h

19h

LRCH1 deficiency enhances LAT signalosome formation and CD8+ T cell responses against tumors and pathogens [Immunology and Inflammation]

CD8+ T cells play pivotal roles in eradicating pathogens and tumor cells. T cell receptor (TCR) signaling is vital for the optimal activation of CD8+ T cells. Upon TCR engagement, the transmembrane adapter protein LAT (linker for activation of T cells) recruits other key signaling molecules and forms the "LAT…

19h

Overcoming Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities: Stabilizing and destabilizing liquid-metal streams via electrochemical oxidation [Engineering]

Liquids typically form droplets when exiting a nozzle. Jets––cylindrical streams of fluid—can form transiently at higher fluid velocities, yet interfacial tension rapidly drives jet breakup into droplets via the Rayleigh–Plateau instability. Liquid metal is an unlikely candidate to form stable jets since it has enormous interfacial tension and low viscosity….

19h

A multilayered repair system protects the mycobacterial chromosome from endogenous and antibiotic-induced oxidative damage [Microbiology]

Oxidative damage to DNA is a threat to the genomic integrity and coding accuracy of the chromosomes of all living organisms. Guanine is particularly susceptible to oxidation, and 8-oxo-dG (OG), when produced in situ or incorporated by DNA polymerases, is highly mutagenic due to mispairing with adenine. In many bacteria,…

19h

Lsh/HELLS is required for B lymphocyte development and immunoglobulin class switch recombination [Immunology and Inflammation]

Mutation of HELLS (Helicase, Lymphoid-Specific)/Lsh in human DNA causes a severe immunodeficiency syndrome, but the nature of the defect remains unknown. We assessed here the role of Lsh in hematopoiesis using conditional Lsh knockout mice with expression of Mx1 or Vav Cre-recombinase. Bone marrow transplantation studies revealed that Lsh depletion…

19h

Popular repugnance contrasts with legal bans on controversial markets [Economic Sciences]

We study popular attitudes in Germany, Spain, the Philippines, and the United States toward three controversial markets—prostitution, surrogacy, and global kidney exchange (GKE). Of those markets, only prostitution is banned in the United States and the Philippines, and only prostitution is allowed in Germany and Spain. Unlike prostitution, majorities support…

19h

Superconductivity enhancement in phase-engineered molybdenum carbide/disulfide vertical heterostructures [Applied Physical Sciences]

Stacking layers of atomically thin transition-metal carbides and two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenides, could lead to nontrivial superconductivity and other unprecedented phenomena yet to be studied. In this work, superconducting α-phase thin molybdenum carbide flakes were first synthesized, and a subsequent sulfurization treatment induced the formation of vertical h

19h

Social distancing responses to COVID-19 emergency declarations strongly differentiated by income [Economic Sciences]

In the absence of a vaccine, social distancing measures are one of the primary tools to reduce the transmission of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus, which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We show that social distancing following US state-level emergency declarations substantially varies by income. Using…

19h

Metformin treatment of the C9orf72 ALS/FTD mouse: Almost too good for words [Commentaries]

The regulation of protein synthesis is critically important for the normal development and function of the brain. Protein synthesis misregulation accompanies and in some cases underlies a diverse set of developmental and neurodegenerative diseases. They include Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (1). Although…

19h

Opinion: Here's how we restore productivity and vigor to the biomedical research workforce in the midst of COVID-19 [Social Sciences]

The first known case of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) was reported in China in November 2019; in the United States, the first reported case was on January 22.* Essential stay-at-home mandates worldwide have helped mitigate the exponential growth in hospitalizations and death and have led to gradual reopenings in China,…

19h

InsP7 is a small-molecule regulator of NUDT3-mediated mRNA decapping and processing-body dynamics [Cell Biology]

Regulation of enzymatic 5′ decapping of messenger RNA (mRNA), which normally commits transcripts to their destruction, has the capacity to dynamically reshape the transcriptome. For example, protection from 5′ decapping promotes accumulation of mRNAs into processing (P) bodies—membraneless, biomolecular condensates. Such compartmentalization of mRNAs temporarily removes them from the translatable.

19h

Timing social distancing to avert unmanageable COVID-19 hospital surges [Applied Biological Sciences]

Following the April 16, 2020 release of the Opening Up America Again guidelines for relaxing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) social distancing policies, local leaders are concerned about future pandemic waves and lack robust strategies for tracking and suppressing transmission. Here, we present a strategy for triggering short-term shelter-in-place orders when…

19h

An ErbB2 splice variant lacking exon 16 drives lung carcinoma [Medical Sciences]

Lung cancer causes more deaths annually than any other malignancy. A subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is driven by amplification and overexpression or activating mutation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) ERBB2. In some contexts, notably breast cancer, alternative splicing of ERBB2 causes skipping of exon 16, leading…

19h

FROG/B reporter gives bright insights into redox biology [Commentaries]

Fluorescence spectroscopy has contributed to advances in biochemistry that we now take for granted. Many biological and chemical processes of great importance in both nature and technology were uncovered using this versatile technique. The finding of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) has revolutionized cell labeling and molecular…

19h

Ancestral roles of atypical cadherins in planar cell polarity [Developmental Biology]

Fat, Fat-like, and Dachsous family cadherins are giant proteins that regulate planar cell polarity (PCP) and cell adhesion in bilaterians. Their evolutionary origin can be traced back to prebilaterian species, but their ancestral function(s) are unknown. We identified Fat-like and Dachsous cadherins in Hydra, a member of phylum Cnidaria a…

19h

Rational design to control the trade-off between receptor affinity and cooperativity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cooperativity enhances the responsiveness of biomolecular receptors to small changes in the concentration of their target ligand, albeit with a concomitant reduction in affinity. The binding midpoint of a two-site receptor with a Hill coefficient of 1.9, for example, must be at least 19 times higher than the dissociation constant…

19h

Morphological profiling of tubercle bacilli identifies drug pathways of action [Microbiology]

Morphological profiling is a method to classify target pathways of antibacterials based on how bacteria respond to treatment through changes to cellular shape and spatial organization. Here we utilized the cell-to-cell variation in morphological features of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli to develop a rapid profiling platform called Morphological Evaluation and Understanding…

19h

Single-cell RNA-seq analysis revealed long-lasting adverse effects of tamoxifen on neurogenesis in prenatal and adult brains [Neuroscience]

The CreER/LoxP system is widely accepted to track neural lineages and study gene functions upon tamoxifen (TAM) administration. We have observed that prenatal TAM treatment caused high rates of delayed delivery and fetal mortality. This substance could produce undesired results, leading to data misinterpretation. Here, we report that administration of…

19h

Nu er der masker nok: Leverandører melder sig klar til mundbind i offentlig transport

PLUS. Skal danskerne til at bruge mundbind i kollektiv transport, bliver der brug for mindst 17 millioner om måneden. Det kan godt lade sig gøre, lyder det fra central nøgleperson, mens supermarkeder er gået på storindkøb.

19h

New drug targets for lethal brain cancer discovered

More than 200 genes with novel and known roles in glioblastoma – the most aggressive type of brain cancer – offer promising new drug targets. Researchers from the Sanger Institute and their collaborators engineered a new mouse model to show for the first time how a mutation in the well-known cancer gene, EGFR initiates glioblastoma, and works with a selection from more than 200 other genes to driv

20h

One in three children have dangerous levels of lead in their blood

About 800 million children, mostly in developing countries, 'will have had risky exposure' One in three children around the world have concentrations of lead in their blood at levels likely to cause significant long-term health damage, new research has found. About 800 million children and young people under the age of 19 are likely to have blood levels of lead at or above 5 micrograms per decili

20h

Nasa Mars 2020: First aircraft to fly on another planet

Ingenuity is a 1.8kg (4lb) helicopter that will ride to Mars inside Nasa's Perseverance rover.

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20h

Mars 2020 Launch: NASA's Perseverance Rover Ready for Journey to the Red Planet

The mission will not only search for evidence of ancient martian life, but also test a method for plucking usable oxygen straight from Mars' thin air. Oh, it also has a helicopter.

21h

Underwater robots reveal daily habits of endangered whales

Research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) has revealed the daily habits of the endangered Mediterranean sperm whale. The recordings confirmed the whales' widespread presence in the north-western Mediterranean Sea and identified a possible hotspot for sperm whale habitat in the Gulf of Lion, as well as different foraging strategies between different areas.

21h

Vaping linked with heart problems

In adolescents the use of e-cigarettes doubles the risk of starting to smoke traditional cigarettes, states a position paper published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). "Vaping is marketed towards teenagers and the tobacco industry uses celebrities to promote it as being healthier than smoking," said senior author Profess

21h

Coronavirus live news: Brazil sees record daily cases as Hong Kong on brink of 'large-scale outbreak'

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam urges people to stay indoors as much as possible ; Brazil reports nearly 70,000 new infections overnight ; France sees highest new daily cases in a month . Follow the latest updates US passes 150,000 coronavirus deaths amid fresh surge in cases Obey rules to avoid second Covid-19 lockdown, leaders warn Twenty-one US states declared 'red zone' for infection spikes Italy

21h

21h

Will Covid-19 tame China's wildlife trade?

Under global scrutiny over the pandemic's outbreak, the state is now clamping down on the market in exotic species

21h

Underwater robots reveal daily habits of endangered whales

Not all humans are morning people. Neither, according to a new study, are all sperm whales—at least when it comes to foraging for food.

21h

Say goodbye to the beloved banana

The world's most popular edible variety is about to be wiped out by a fungal invader. Again. We've already lost Gros Michel bananas, which were the world's favorite until the 1960s. The solution? Possibly genetic editing, but more likely a greater availability of exotic varieties. They're certainly among the most convenient fruits. Bananas are compact, tidy, bundles of potassium and deliciousness

21h

Underwater robots reveal daily habits of endangered whales

Not all humans are morning people. Neither, according to a new study, are all sperm whales—at least when it comes to foraging for food.

21h

Researchers Solve A Question About Stonehenge Megaliths' Origin

Scientists found that the outer stones of the prehistoric structure originated about 15 miles away from where the structure stands. (Image credit: Adrian Dennis/AFP via Getty Images)

21h

The Tech Giants Are Dangerous, and Congress Knows It

When Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg testified on Capitol Hill two years ago, the hearings were an embarrassing exercise in congressional cluelessness. They furthered a cliché: The doddering American political elite, who sometimes seemed to confuse Messenger with the passenger pigeon, would never have the savvy to keep up with the dynamism of Big Tech, let alone regulate it. The House Judiciary Subcom

21h

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Study reveals where first cases of COVID-19 outside China may have originated based on case travel histories

"Our findings suggest that travel from just a few countries with substantial SARS-CoV-2 transmission may have seeded additional outbreaks around the world before the characterisation of COVID-19 as a pandemic on March 11, 2020", says Dr Fatimah Dawood from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), USA, who co-led the research.

22h

Publisher Correction: Discovery and engineering of colchicine alkaloid biosynthesis

Nature, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2606-0

22h

Author Correction: Microbial habitability of Europa sustained by radioactive sources

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 July 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69041-8

22h

Pandemic resurrects old Australian border dispute

A 19th-century surveying error created a complicated tripoint on the Murray River in eastern Australia. Officially, the dispute about the zigzag border between South Australia and Victoria was settled in 1914. COVID-19 is making life so difficult for the locals that now they want to switch sides again. Straight, but with a little swerve South Australia's eastern border looks like one of those uns

22h

Old Vaccines May Stop the Coronavirus, Study Hints. Scientists Are Skeptical.

Certain vaccines may provide broad protection against infections. But new research doesn't prove these vaccines can turn back the coronavirus, experts said.

22h

Anti-vaxx groups spend nearly $1 billion on social media

The Center for Countering Digital Hate found that anti-vaxx groups reach 58 million users on social media, earning the platforms roughly $1B in revenue. The Center's founder, Imran Ahmed, says giving anti-vaxxers attention feeds the algorithms, further perpetuating the noise. In this interview with Big Think, Ahmed says the best thing we can do is offer credible information to change the algorith

22h

Eels Don't Have Sex Until the Last Year of Their Life – Issue 88: Love & Sex

Fishing for eels was a primal childhood experience for Patrik Svennson. On summer nights his father would take him down to a small stream near their home in Sweden. It was a magical place, surrounded by willow trees, with bats swooping through the moonlight. They barely talked as they set their fishing lines along the bank. "It was what me and my father did together. We fished for eels," he recal

22h

Nutrisystem review: The key to losing weight—and keeping it off

The societal and economic consequences of obesity cannot be ignored. The economic impact is up to $190 billion every year in America. Americans spend up to $2.5 billion each year on popular weight-loss programs. Weight loss is big business. Thousands of influencers try to coax you in with brightly colored videos and overproduced photos on Instagram. They guarantee their method works for everybody

23h

Rapid antibody development yields possible treatment for yellow fever

Researchers have developed a potential treatment for yellow fever. The drug, a purified antibody that targets the virus, has shown success in early-stage clinical trials in Singapore. It was developed by an international team led by MIT Professor Ram Sasisekharan.

23h

In HEPA we trust: making the indoors safer during COVID

As schools and offices prepare to reopen, Syracuse University Professor Jianshun 'Jensen' Zhang offers a three-step plan to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) and help prevent the spread of COVID indoors. Zhang's plan is detailed in a recent editorial published in the journal Science and Technology for the Built Environment entitled 'Integrating IAQ control strategies to reduce the risk of asymptoma

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New current that transports water to major 'waterfall' discovered in deep ocean

An international team discovered a previously unrecognized ocean current that transports water to one of the world's largest 'waterfalls' in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Bank Channel Overflow into the deep North Atlantic

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Nondestructive positron beams probe damage, support safety advances in radiation environments

A multi-institution team has used positron beams to probe the nature of radiation effects, providing new insight into how damage is produced in iron films.

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Two new medicines may curb serious respiratory disease in infants

Monoclonal antibody and maternal vaccine both show promise against respiratory syncytial virus