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Scientists Test First COVID-19 Antibody Treatment on Humans
The first clinical trial for a COVID-19 antibody treatment for humans is now underway. The treatment was developed from the blood of a COVID-19 survivor who recovered from the disease back in February, at which point his immune system developed an immunity to the coronavirus, MIT Technology Review reports . The idea is to manufacture the underlying antibodies that provide that protection against
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Study shows today's atmospheric carbon dioxide levels greater than 23 million-year record
A common message in use to convey the seriousness of climate change to the public is: "Carbon dioxide levels are higher today than they have been for the past one million years!" This new study by Brian Schubert (University of Louisiana at Lafayette) and coauthors Ying Cui and A. Hope Jahren used a novel method to conclude that today's carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are actually higher than they have
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New biosensor visualizes stress in living plant cells in real time
Plant biologists have developed a new nanosensor that monitors foundational mechanisms related to stress and drought. The new biosensor allows researchers to analyze changes in real time as they happen involving kinases, enzymes that catalyze key biological activities in proteins. Certain kinases are essential since they are known to be activated in response to drought conditions, triggering the p
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Facebook Workers "Walk Out" Over Inaction on Trump Posts
President Donald Trump has started a war with Twitter over the social network's decision to add labels to several of his tweets, noting that one of them "violated the Twitter Rules about glorifying violence" and prominently fact-checking another. But Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg decided that his rival social network will do nothing about Trump's problematic posts — a decision that has many Facebo
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Loggerhead sea turtles host diverse community of miniature organisms
There is a world of life on the backs of loggerhead sea turtles, and it's more abundant and diverse than scientists knew.
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Loggerhead sea turtles host diverse community of miniature organisms
There is a world of life on the backs of loggerhead sea turtles, and it's more abundant and diverse than scientists knew.
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A beginner's guide to freshwater fishing
Learning to fish isn't hard once you know the basics. (Bob McNally/) This story originally featured on Field & Stream . For most serious anglers, it was their family and friends who showed them the basics of the sport. But not everyone was lucky enough to have been mentored to a lifetime of outdoor fun pursuing and catching fish. The good news is, learning to fish isn't difficult. And it offers n
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New biosensor visualizes stress in living plant cells in real time
Plant biologists have developed a new nanosensor that monitors foundational mechanisms related to stress and drought. The new biosensor allows researchers to analyze changes in real time as they happen involving kinases, enzymes that catalyze key biological activities in proteins. Certain kinases are essential since they are known to be activated in response to drought conditions, triggering the p
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Why asteroids Bennu and Ryugu have their signature 'spinning-top' shapes
Scientists with NASA's first asteroid sample return mission, OSIRIS-REx, are gaining a new understanding of asteroid Bennu's carbon-rich material and signature "spinning-top" shape. The team has discovered that the asteroid's shape and hydration levels provide clues to the origins and histories of this and other small bodies.
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Loggerhead sea turtles host diverse community of miniature organisms
An international team led by Florida State University researchers found that more than double the number of organisms than previously observed live on the shells of these oceanic reptiles, raising important questions about loggerhead sea turtle ecology and conservation.
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Study shows today's atmospheric carbon dioxide levels greater than 23 million-year record
A common message in use to convey the seriousness of climate change to the public is: 'Carbon dioxide levels are higher today than they have been for the past one million years!' This new study by Brian Schubert (University of Louisiana at Lafayette) and coauthors Ying Cui and A. Hope Jahren used a novel method to conclude that today's carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are actually higher than they have
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Future of Skin/Hair/Nail Care
I am curious what this reddit thinks the future of such would be: Is there new hair removal techniques being developed (maybe a reversible semi-permanent one)? Is there new products to assist the skin microbiome? Is there new and easier ways to prevent or reverse UV damage? What new clothing materials or production techniques are being created to be better or more gentle for the skin and hair? Et
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Platinum-free catalysts could make cheaper hydrogen fuel cells
submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]
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People don't seem to know how fast technology is moving why is that?
Before watching a bunch of videos on the matter starting with Aubrey de grey then going to ray kurzweil then peter diamandis and so many others I was actually oblivious to it to but..why? It's actually sneaking up on people and they have no idea. I was actually telling my dad and brother about this and they don't think it's moving that fast even after talking into detail about it ..so my question
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New AR app will let you model a virtual companion on anyone you want
submitted by /u/asentientai [link] [comments]
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BNP Paribas Accelerates Coal Phase Out for OECD Countries
submitted by /u/Wildlyeco [link] [comments]
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New Nextopic subreddit creation! We host future technology conferences.
Hello all, Nextopic is a frontier tech community based around exploring the opportunities and implications of future technologies. We host conferences approximately every financial quarter. We've just created a subreddit for future event information. If interested feel free to join at https://www.reddit.com/r/Nextopic/ ! Last conference found here: https://www.reddit.com/r/Nextopic/comments/gsxi4
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I still buy CDs & DVDs & here's why
Like most kids, my 6 year old has a hard time getting to sleep. A few years ago I decided to try a new tactic; audiobooks. I stumbled across a series called 'Classical Kids'. They take classical music from a composer and have a story take place around that composer and their music. Really neat actually! https://www.allmusic.com/album/the-classical-kids-collection-mw0000881055 She's been listening
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Thanks To Renewables And Machine Learning, Google Now Forecasts The Wind
submitted by /u/Data-Power [link] [comments]
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SpaceX Demo-2 crew opens hatch and enters space station
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
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New biosensor visualizes stress in living plant cells in real time
Plant biologists have long sought a deeper understanding of foundational processes involving kinases, enzymes that catalyze key biological activities in proteins. Analyzing the processes underlying kinases in plants takes on greater urgency in today's environment increasingly altered by climate warming.
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SpaceX captures the flag, beating Boeing in cosmic contest
The first astronauts launched by SpaceX declared victory Monday in NASA's cosmic capture-the-flag game.
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New biosensor visualizes stress in living plant cells in real time
Plant biologists have long sought a deeper understanding of foundational processes involving kinases, enzymes that catalyze key biological activities in proteins. Analyzing the processes underlying kinases in plants takes on greater urgency in today's environment increasingly altered by climate warming.
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Mass Extinctions Are Accelerating, Scientists Report
Five hundred species are likely to become extinct over the next two decades, according to a new study.
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E.P.A. Limits States' Power to Oppose Pipelines and Other Energy Projects
The agency tweaked the rules on how to apply the Clean Water Act, which New York and other states have used to fight fossil-fuel ventures.
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Conserving biodiverse 'slow lanes' in a rapidly changing world
The notion of conserving climate change refugia—areas relatively buffered from current climate change that shelter valued wildlife, ecosystems, and other natural resources—is only about 10 years old, but the field has matured enough that a leading journal has prepared a special issue on the topic.
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Scientists shed light on growth of black holes
Scientists at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian, and the Black Hole Initiative (BHI), have shed light on how black holes grow over time by developing a new model to predict if growth by accretion or by mergers is dominant, according to the results of a study presented today at the virtual 236th meeting of the American Astronomical Society and published simultaneously in The Astro
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New NiMH batteries perform better when made from recycled old NiMH batteries
A new method for recycling old batteries can provide better performing and cheaper rechargeable hydride batteries (NiMH) as shown in a new study.
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Conserving biodiverse 'slow lanes' in a rapidly changing world
The notion of conserving climate change refugia—areas relatively buffered from current climate change that shelter valued wildlife, ecosystems, and other natural resources—is only about 10 years old, but the field has matured enough that a leading journal has prepared a special issue on the topic.
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The Law-Enforcement Abuses That Don't Bother Trump
President Donald Trump has seen abusive law enforcement before—stared it in the face, called it by its name, denounced it. He did not, to be sure, see the killing of George Floyd—the latest African American man to be killed by a police officer—as a reason to condemn abusive policing, although video of Floyd's death prompted millions of Americans to recoil in horror and sparked outrage, protest, a
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COVID-19 outbreak lasts days longer for each day's delay in social distancing
A new analysis of COVID-19 outbreaks in 58 cities has found that places that took longer to begin implementing social distancing measures spent more time with the virus rapidly spreading than others that acted more quickly. Epidemiological researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have published research finding every day a city delayed implementing social distancing measures after the appe
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Study seeks to optimize comfort for patients removed from ventilators at end of life
A paper recently published online in the journal Chest reports on a study of the palliative ventilator withdrawal (PVW) procedure performed in intensive care units (ICU) at end of life.
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The cascade to criticality
Combined theoretical and experimental work unveils a novel mechanism through which criticality emerges in quasiperiodic structures — a finding that provides unique insight into the physics on the middle ground between order and disorder.
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New NiMH batteries perform better when made from recycled old NiMH batteries
A new method for recycling old batteries can provide better performing and cheaper rechargeable hydride batteries (NiMH) as shown in a new study.
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Dry air drives overlooked changes in how plants drink and breathe
New research suggests dry air combined with warmer temperatures may prompt bigger than expected changes in how water moves through plants. The adjustment may allow plants to survive with less water in future droughts, while downshifting how much carbon they absorb.
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Cancer cells cause inflammation to protect themselves from viruses
Researchers have uncovered how cancer cells protect themselves from viruses that are harmful to tumors but not to healthy cells. These findings could lead to improved viral treatments for the disease.
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Photos: The Works of Christo
Yesterday, May 31, the artist Christo Vladimirov Javacheff, better known as Christo, passed away in his home in New York City at the age of 84. Christo, along with his late wife and partner, Jeanne-Claude Denat de Guillebon, spent decades planning and building environmental artwork around the world, on massive scales: wrapping the German Reichstag building in fabric, placing thousands of colorful
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Lady Gaga Is Back and Smaller Than Ever
Fame is pain. That's always been one of Lady Gaga's messages. Whether via spiked shoulder pads, skyscraper heels, or raw-meat pleats, her early persona read as mad-scientist fashion model: someone shellacking and reshaping herself for the public's amusement. As she sang assaultively catchy songs about excess and applause while spurting blood or in gilded wheelchairs , she reminded viewers that th
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A remote control for neurons
A team led by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University has created a new technology that enhances scientists' ability to communicate with neural cells using light. Tzahi Cohen-Karni, associate professor of biomedical engineering and materials science and engineering, led a team that synthesized three-dimensional fuzzy graphene on a nanowire template to create a superior material for photothermall
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Genetic cause of difference in sexual development uncovered
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute, the Institut Pasteur and their clinical collaborators have identified a cause of testicular tissue developing in people with female chromosomes.
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Tracking fossil fuel emissions with carbon-14
Researchers from NOAA and the University of Colorado have devised a breakthrough method for estimating national emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuels using ambient air samples and a well-known isotope of carbon that scientists have relied on for decades to date archaeological sites.
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A boost for cancer immunotherapy
MIT engineers have found a way to boost the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy drugs called checkpoint inhibitors. They showed that if they treated mice with these drugs along with new nanoparticles that stimulate the immune system, the therapy became more powerful than checkpoint inhibitors given alone.
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Loss of land-based vertebrates is accelerating, according to Stanford biologist and others
Analysis of thousands of vertebrate species reveals that extinction rates are likely much faster than previously thought. The researchers call for immediate global action, such as a ban on the wildlife trade, to slow the sixth mass extinction.
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The human factor limits hope of climate fixes
Engineering the climate can help lower temperatures and reduce climate change impacts. New research shows that when accounting for human behaviour, climate engineering leads to significant economic and social risks. In a first-of-its-kind laboratory experiment, researchers found that both rational and irrational factors in the decision to fix the climate leads to welfare losses and increased inequ
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Your brain needs to be ready to remember?
What happens in the hippocampus even before people attempt to form memories may impact whether they remember. Study suggests 'encoding mode' may play an important role in memory formation.
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Theoretical breakthrough shows quantum fluids rotate by corkscrew mechanism
Scientists performed simulations of merging rotating superfluids, revealing a peculiar corkscrew-shaped mechanism that drives the fluids into rotation without the need for viscosity.
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Class of stellar explosions found to be galactic producers of lithium
Astrophysicists have combined theory with both observations and laboratory studies and determined that a class of stellar explosions, called classical novae, are responsible for most of the lithium in our galaxy and solar system.
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Monitoring environmental exposures in dogs could be early warning system for human health
Man's best friend may also be man's best bet for figuring out how environmental chemicals could impact our health.
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Theoretical breakthrough shows quantum fluids rotate by corkscrew mechanism
Scientists performed simulations of merging rotating superfluids, revealing a peculiar corkscrew-shaped mechanism that drives the fluids into rotation without the need for viscosity.
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Tracking fossil fuel emissions with carbon-14
Researchers from NOAA and the University of Colorado have devised a breakthrough method for estimating national emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuels using ambient air samples and a well-known isotope of carbon that scientists have relied on for decades to date archaeological sites.
22h
The human factor limits hope of climate fixes
Engineering the climate can help lower temperatures and reduce climate change impacts. New research shows that when accounting for human behavior, climate engineering leads to significant economic and social risks. In a first-of-its-kind laboratory experiment, researchers found that both rational and irrational factors in the decision to fix the climate leads to welfare losses and increased inequa
22h
A remote control for neurons
A team led by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University has created a new technology that enhances scientists' ability to communicate with neural cells using light. Tzahi Cohen-Karni, associate professor of biomedical engineering and materials science and engineering, led a team that synthesized three-dimensional fuzzy graphene on a nanowire template to create a superior material for photothermall
22h
Loss of land-based vertebrates is accelerating, study finds
In 2015, Stanford biologist Paul Ehrlich coauthored a study declaring the world's sixth mass extinction was underway. Five years later, Ehrlich and colleagues at other institutions have a grim update: the extinction rate is likely much higher than previously thought and is eroding nature's ability to provide vital services to people.
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Loss of land-based vertebrates is accelerating, study finds
In 2015, Stanford biologist Paul Ehrlich coauthored a study declaring the world's sixth mass extinction was underway. Five years later, Ehrlich and colleagues at other institutions have a grim update: the extinction rate is likely much higher than previously thought and is eroding nature's ability to provide vital services to people.
22h
Conserving biodiverse 'slow lanes' in a rapidly changing world
The notion of conserving climate change refugia — areas relatively buffered from current climate change that shelter valued wildlife, ecosystems, and other natural resources — is only about 10 years old, but the field has matured enough that a leading journal has prepared a special issue on the topic that offers a first 'look back at how far we've come and a view forward to the work that is stil
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New biosensor visualizes stress in living plant cells in real time
Plant biologists have developed a new nanosensor that monitors foundational mechanisms related to stress and drought. The new biosensor allows researchers to analyze changes in real time as they happen involving kinases, enzymes that catalyze key biological activities in proteins. Certain kinases are essential since they are known to be activated in response to drought conditions, triggering the p
22h
Global glacier melt raises sea levels and depletes once-reliable water source
The melting of glaciers and ice caps in places as diverse as the Himalayas and Andes mountain ranges, the Svalbard island group and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago has the dual effect of raising global sea levels and depleting freshwater resources that serve millions of people around the world.
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Study finds gender differences in active learning classrooms
Men participated more in an active learning course in science, technology, engineering and math, while women reported lower perceptions of their scientific abilities, were more aware of gender identity and more likely to feel judged based on gender, a new Cornell-led study has found.
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Orbital ordering triggers nucleation-growth behavior of electrons in an inorganic solid
A new study found that orbital ordering in a vanadate compound exhibits a clear nucleation-growth behavior. Their observation is the first of its kind, where electrons in an inorganic solid created two soft phases, and where the nucleation-growth behavior was observed due to the surface tension created between the phases.
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Allosaurus dabbled in cannibalism according to new fossil evidence
Rare fossil evidence of dinosaur cannibalism among the Allosaurus has been discovered. Scientists analyzed dinosaur bones found in the Mygatt-Moore Quarry in western Colorado, paying special attention to bite marks that were present on 2,368 of the bones. It's likely that the predatory carnivore only ate their already-dead peers during times when resources were scarce. Rare fossil evidence of din
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Kirigami grips could help seniors keep their footing
You've never seen a pair of snake skin shoes like this before. Researchers have developed pop-up shoe grips, inspired by snake skin, that can increase friction between the shoe and the ground. The assistive grips could be used, among other things, to reduce the risk of falling among older adults.
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Measuring ocean acidification along US coasts
Scientists have conducted an in-depth study that looks at carbon dioxide uptake and ocean acidification in the coastal oceans of North America.
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Squid studies suggest new route to therapy for ALS, targeting synaptic dysfunction
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most devastating adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. Patients, including the late actor/playwright Sam Shepard, become progressively weaker and eventually paralyzed as their motor neurons degenerate and die.
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Biophysicists elucidate mechanisms of neutral solute carriers
Some of the most essential processes on the planet involves water and energy entering and leaving cells.
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Class of stellar explosions found to be galactic producers of lithium
A team of researchers, led by astrophysicist Sumner Starrfield of Arizona State University, has combined theory with both observations and laboratory studies and determined that a class of stellar explosions, called classical novae, are responsible for most of the lithium in our galaxy and solar system.
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Biophysicists elucidate mechanisms of neutral solute carriers
Some of the most essential processes on the planet involves water and energy entering and leaving cells.
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Moves to soften UK quarantine plans amid Tory anger
Arrivals from some countries could be exempt from self-isolation rules for fear of damage to travel industry
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Book Excerpt from Some Assembly Required
In the prologue to the book, author Neil Shubin sets the stage for discussing the iterative repurposing that marks several transformational developments throughout evolution.
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Class of stellar explosions found to be galactic producers of lithium
A team of researchers, led by astrophysicist Sumner Starrfield of Arizona State University (ASU), has combined theory with both observations and laboratory studies and determined that a class of stellar explosions, called classical novae, are responsible for most of the lithium in our galaxy and solar system.
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Study finds gender differences in active learning classrooms
Men participated more in an active learning course in science, technology, engineering and math, while women reported lower perceptions of their scientific abilities, were more aware of gender identity and more likely to feel judged based on gender, a new Cornell-led study has found.
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Across the cell membrane
Aquaporins and glucose transporters facilitate the movement of substances across biological membranes and are present in all kingdoms of life. University of Texas at San Antonio biophysicist Liao Chen uses the Frontera supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to explore the atomic behavior of these proteins. His research suggests glucose transporters function by using a gate on the ext
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New study provides maps, ice favorability index to companies looking to mine the moon
A research team has created an Ice Favorability Index. The geological model explains the process for ice formation at the poles of the moon, and mapped the terrain, which includes craters that may hold ice deposits. The model, accounts for what asteroid impacts on the surface of the moon may do to deposits of ice found meters beneath the surface.
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Lessening water quality problems caused by hurricane-related flooding
June 1 is the start of hurricane season in the Atlantic, and with 2020 predicted to be particularly active, residents in coastal regions are keeping watchful eyes on the weather. Flooding is often the most damaging effect of tropical storms, and it can disproportionately affect vulnerable people and ecosystems. Researchers have studied water quality impacts of two recent hurricanes in North Caroli
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Like a treasure map, brain region emphasizes reward location
Neuroscientists found that a brain region called the lateral septum encodes spatial information with a special emphasis on the location of the reward.
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Orbital ordering triggers nucleation-growth behavior of electrons in an inorganic solid
A new study found that orbital ordering in a vanadate compound exhibits a clear nucleation-growth behavior. Their observation is the first of its kind, where electrons in an inorganic solid created two soft phases, and where the nucleation-growth behavior was observed due to the surface tension created between the phases.
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World Health Organization Confirms New Ebola Outbreak in the Congo
The Democratic Republic of the Congo is now fighting a new Ebola outbreak, the World Health Organization confirmed on Monday. The outbreak includes at least six infections and four fatalities in the country's Équateur Province, The Telegraph reports . The new outbreak poses a serious challenge, as the Democratic Republic of Congo is already fighting a much larger Ebola outbreak elsewhere in the c
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Reopened UK showrooms offer glimmer of hope for car industry
Business is slow but dealers are confident demand will increase
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Snapshot of a Super Sucker
Scientists are using biological suction cups as inspiration for new bioengineered tech.
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Climate Change Threatens the Ancient Wild Rice Traditions of the Ojibwe
Yields of native wild rice have shrunk due to temperature rise, shoreline erosion and other environmental problems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Covid-19 news: Health experts say UK contact tracing not robust enough
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Newspapers Refuse to Carry Liquor Ads
Originally published in November 1845 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Asymmetry found in spin directions of galaxies
The patterns formed by spiral galaxies show that the universe may have a defined structure and suggest that the early universe could have been spinning, according to a computational astronomer.
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The 160-year-old reason you're obsessed with your lawn
Cookie cutter-lawns can be traced back to the flight of rich Chicagoans, who were looking for a more tranquil, sprawled-out setting on the outskirts of the city. (David McBee/Pexels/) Just three miles outside Chicago lies Riverside, Illinois, a quiet 1,600-acre village that looks like a tidy Stepford suburb. Few people, however, know that it helped set the mold for many more 'burbs to come. In th
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A trial is under way of the first new antibody medicine developed to treat covid-19
The news: Patients have started to receive the first antibody drug developed specifically to treat covid-19. It's being tested in 32 patients at various doses in hospitals in the US. If it's shown to be safe, the drug, referred to as LY-CoV555, will be studied in non-hospitalized coronavirus patients later this summer. The big idea: The drug was developed in just three months. Researchers used bl
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America Has No President
Last night, as protests convulsed Washington, D.C., the White House went dark. All the lights were off. The windows of the president's official residence were darkened, and the floodlights outside extinguished. The country is sick, angry, and divided, but it also finds itself leaderless. Trump has never shown any inclination or ability to soothe or console in moments of crisis. He wants the trapp
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Democratic Republic of Congo declares new Ebola outbreak
Epidemic is fourth occurrence of the haemorrhagic fever in central African country in 3 years
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Teachers plead to delay reopening all England's primary schools
Full return to classes before summer holidays 'not practically possible' and confidence 'low'
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Tropical storm kills 17 in El Salvador and Guatemala
Rains from Tropical Storm Amanda left at least 17 dead and seven missing while causing extensive damage across El Salvador and Guatemala that pushed thousands of people into shelters amid the coronavirus pandemic.
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A good egg: Robot chef trained to make omelettes
A team of engineers have trained a robot to prepare an omelette, all the way from cracking the eggs to plating the finished dish, and refined the 'chef's' culinary skills to produce a reliable dish that actually tastes good.
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Glimmers of hope amid manufacturing's gloom
UK, eurozone and US surveys show upticks from historic lows
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Study finds that patterns formed by spiral galaxies show that the universe may have a defined structure
An analysis of more than 200,000 spiral galaxies has revealed unexpected links between spin directions of galaxies, and the structure formed by these links might suggest that the early universe could have been spinning, according to a Kansas State University study.
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Post-COVID minimum wage hikes may harm job seekers
If the post-pandemic economic return includes minimum-wage increases across a few or many states, some positive and negative effects for US workers will follow in the two years after implementation, according to new research. On the positive side, their study shows that minimum-wage hikes not only increase the wages of those workers but also create a positive "spillover" effect on the wages of ot
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NASA catches short-lived Tropical Storm Amanda
Tropical Storm Amanda, the first of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season, formed on Sunday, May 31, along the coast of Guatemala and quickly moved inland. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the storm as it was developing.
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UConn study examines how Americans are coping with COVID-19 stress
Almost overnight, the rapid emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and subsequent state and federal prevention measures dramatically altered daily behavior. A unique early study by researchers from the University of Connecticut provides the first snapshot of the immediate impact of COVID-19 on Americans' stress levels, coping strategies, and adherence to public health guidelines.
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Warmer temperatures slow COVID-19 transmission, but not by much
Researchers at Mount Auburn Hospital looked at the impact of temperature, precipitation, and UV index on COVID-19 case rates in the United States during the spring months of 2020. Published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, the findings reveal that while the rate of COVID-19 incidence does decrease with warmer temperatures up until 52 degrees F, further warmer temperatures do not decrea
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K-State study reveals asymmetry in spin directions of galaxies
The patterns formed by spiral galaxies show that the universe may have a defined structure and suggest that the early universe could have been spinning, according to a Kansas State University computational astronomer.
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How hydroxychloroquine causes heartbeat problems
Researchers have used an optical mapping system in animal models to observe exactly how the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine creates serious disturbances in the electrical signals that govern heartbeat. The malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, which some people have promoted as a potential treatment for COVID-19, is known to have potentially serious effects on heart rhythms. The new research found tha
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Science and politics: a complicated formula | Letters
Prof Ravi Mahajan and Alan Walker respond to Richard Horton's article in which he questions how scientists can stand by this government. Plus Philip Barber wonders why we are being led by science, while simultaneously disregarding it Richard Horton is correct to highlight the vital need for medical leadership during the Covid-19 pandemic ( How can any scientists stand by this government now? , 27
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Sustaining power of faith and folk tales | Brief letters
Reopening places of worship | Anagram origins | Stars | Margaret Meek Spencer | Uses for tights I do not to go to church much (save for inter-faith events), but I totally support calls from the clergy for places of worship to open in a way compatible with social distancing and other safety measures. If supermarkets can operate to feed our bodies, and bookshops to nourish our minds, then religious
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Controlling SpaceX's Crew Dragon is Like Playing A Video Game
Assuming Control It was a spectacular sight: on Sunday, SpaceX became the first commercial entity to safely deliver astronauts to the International Space Station. It's a new chapter in human spaceflight. And it's a future in which touchscreens and autonomous wayfinding lead the way — a far cry from the mazes of buttons, levers, and readouts we've seen in spacecraft cockpits preceding SpaceX's fut
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GPs not warned of lockdown easing for 'shielded' groups
Family doctors say additional freedoms were announced without any consultation
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A disunited UK emerges from the lockdown
The Westminster government has not carried other nations with it
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Scientists Are Testing Sewers For Coronavirus Outbreaks
Dirty Water To better track the coronavirus pandemic, scientists are rolling up their sleeves and searching for signs of the virus in wastewater treatment facilities and sewers. It's dirty work, but scientists say that scanning sewage for the coronavirus could give governments and health departments an early warning of a new outbreak, according to the Chicago Tribune . With pilots programs in the
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U.S. and Chinese Scientists Trace Evolution of Coronaviruses in Bats
Researchers whose canceled U.S. grant caused an outcry from other scientists urge preventive monitoring of viruses in southwestern China.
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Resistance to immunosurveillance favors cluster cancer metastasis
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine show that circulating cancer cell clusters are more resistant to NK-cell mediated destruction than single cancer cells, leading to more cluster metastasis.
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COVID-19 could be a seasonal illness
A study conducted in Sydney, Australia, during the early epidemic stage of COVID-19 has found an association between lower humidity and an increase in locally acquired positive cases. Researchers discovered a 1 percent decrease in humidity could increase the number of COVID-19 cases by 6 percent.
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Estrogen's role in the sex differences of alcohol abuse
Fluctuating estrogen levels may make alcohol more rewarding to female mice, according to new research in JNeurosci. Untangling the involved signaling pathways could unveil sex-based treatments for alcohol use disorders.
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Mice are shrinking, but are climate change and cities to blame?
According to a well-studied but controversial principle known as Bergmann's Rule, species tend to be larger in cold climates and smaller in warm ones. As human impacts heat the planet, will animals shrink over time?
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Monitoring environmental exposures in dogs could be early warning system for human health
Man's best friend may also be man's best bet for figuring out how environmental chemicals could impact our health. Researchers from North Carolina State University and Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment used silicone dog tags as passive environmental samplers to collect information about everyday chemical exposures, and found that dogs could be an important sentinel species for t
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Mice are shrinking, but are climate change and cities to blame?
According to a well-studied but controversial principle known as Bergmann's Rule, species tend to be larger in cold climates and smaller in warm ones. As human impacts heat the planet, will animals shrink over time?
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Return to the lab: scientists face shiftwork, masks and distancing as coronavirus lockdowns ease
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01587-z As scientists around the world return to work, they're encountering new safety rules and awkward restrictions — and sometimes writing the protocols themselves.
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Daily briefing: The oldest land animal ever found
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01646-5 Millipede-like fossil critter was found in Scotland. Plus: The risk of catching the coronavirus from infected animals and why universities will never be the same after the pandemic.
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Monitoring environmental exposures in dogs could be early warning system for human health
Man's best friend may also be man's best bet for figuring out how environmental chemicals could impact our health.
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The cascade to criticality
Combined theoretical and experimental work unveils a novel mechanism through which criticality emerges in quasiperiodic structures — a finding that provides unique insight into the physics on the middle ground between order and disorder.
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Mice are shrinking, but are climate change and cities to blame?
According to a well-studied but controversial principle known as Bergmann's Rule, species tend to be larger in cold climates and smaller in warm ones. As human impacts heat the planet, will animals shrink over time?
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Kirigami grips could help seniors keep their footing
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and MIT have developed pop-up shoe grips, inspired by snake skin, that can increase friction between the shoe and the ground. The assistive grips could be used, among other things, to reduce the risk of falling among older adults.
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Squid studies suggest new route to therapy for ALS, targeting synaptic dysfunction
Yuyu Song of Harvard Medical School was a Grass Fellow at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) when she took advantage of a powerful research organism in neuroscience, the local squid, to start asking how a mutant protein associated with familial ALS behaves under controlled conditions. Her study, recently published in eNeuro, clarifies the mechanisms underlying neural dysfunction in ALS, and al
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The Double Standard of the American Riot
Those who rebuke violent responses to injustice should ask themselves: How should the oppressed respond to their oppressors? (Morgan Smith) Since the beginning of this country, riots and violent rhetoric have been markers of patriotism. When our Founding Fathers fought for independence, violence was the clarion call. Phrases such as "Live free or die," "Give me liberty or give me death," and "Reb
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Operation Warp Speed selects billionaire scientist's COVID-19 vaccine for monkey tests
Innovative vaccine uses another virus to present two genes from the novel coronavirus
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Locked out: UK records sunniest month on record in May
Britain's national weather agency has confirmed what most people cooped up at home during the coronavirus lockdown may have guessed—May was the sunniest month on record.
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Cutting edge: Japanese paper art inspires a non-slip shoe
Scientists use kirigami techniques to create a sole with pop-up, high-friction spikes The Japanese art of paper cutting and folding, or kirigami, has led to mind-bending 3D structures from 2D sheets, including spectacular pop-up designs. But now researchers have been getting to grips with the technique for a very down-to-earth reason: creating non-slip shoes. Scientists have revealed they have de
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Forskere: Mystisk massedød blev udløst af kollaps i ozonlaget
Ny teori fremhæver klimaforandringer som årsag til massedød for 360 millioner år siden.
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New study provides maps, ice favorability index to companies looking to mine the moon
The 49ers who panned for gold during California's Gold Rush didn't really know where they might strike it rich. They had word of mouth and not much else to go on.
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Clever computing puts millions into charities' hands
Charities can now begin accessing millions of pounds more in donations thanks to a small shift in how people can donate.
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SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein Shares Sequence with a Human Protein
Eight amino acids are identical to part of the human epithelial sodium channel, leading researchers to suspect the virus might interfere with the channel's function.
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UK contact tracing plans criticised as lockdown begins to lift
As coronavirus lockdown restrictions are lifted in England, critics say the UK government is moving too quickly and that contact tracing systems designed to slow the spread of the virus aren't yet ready
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Measuring climate change
University of Delaware professor Wei-Jun Cai teamed with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists, as well as professors and professionals from numerous research institutes, to conduct an in-depth study that looks at carbon dioxide uptake and ocean acidification in the coastal oceans of North America.
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Extra choline may help pregnant women decrease negative effects of COVID-19 on their newborns
Pregnant women who take extra choline supplements may mitigate the negative impact that viral respiratory infections, including COVID-19, can have on their babies, according to a new study in the Journal of Psychiatric Research.
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Clever computing puts millions into charities' hands
Charities can now begin accessing millions of pounds more in donations thanks to a small shift in how people can donate.
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Female college students more affected academically by high alcohol use than men
Female college students appear to be more affected by high alcohol use than men, which may lead to less interest in academics, according to new research including by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
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Solubilizer Captisol enables body to absorb authorized COVID-19 drug therapy
Remdesivir's formulation includes the solubilizer Captisol, developed at the University of Kansas, which allows remdesivir be administered to the patient. Captisol was invented and patented by Valentino Stella, University Distinguished Professor Emeritus, and Roger Rajewski, research professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
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Convenient spit test helps women assess cancer risk from the comfort of their own homes
A SU2C 'Dream Team' co-funded by OCRAA and NOCC presented results at ASCO of "MAGENTA", the first large randomized clinical trial aimed at making genetic testing for cancer risk more accessible. Nearly 4000 participants used an at home spit-test and was randomly assigned to 4 arms, demonstrating genetic testing can be provided remotely and pre- and post-test genetic counseling can be skipped witho
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Push to scrap virtual Commons greeted with anger by MPs
Proposed end of partially online sittings raises health fears and prospect of 1km-long queues of members voting
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A new type of matter discovered inside neutron stars
A research group has found strong evidence for the presence of exotic quark matter inside the cores of the largest neutron stars in existence. The conclusion was reached by combining recent results from theoretical particle and nuclear physics to measurements of gravitational waves from neutron star collisions.
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Hot stars are plagued by giant magnetic spots, ESO data shows
Astronomers have discovered giant spots on the surface of extremely hot stars hidden in stellar clusters. Not only are these stars plagued by magnetic spots, some also experience superflare events, explosions of energy several million times more energetic than similar eruptions on the Sun. The findings help astronomers better understand these puzzling stars and open doors to resolving other elusiv
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The Milky Way has one very hot halo, astronomers find
The halo that surrounds our own Milky Way galaxy is much hotter than scientists once believed – and it may not be unique among galaxies.
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Gut Microbiome Composition Linked to Human Behavior
A study uncovers connections between the bacteria in our guts and our social lives.
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For Johnson, Covid-19 is now an economic crisis
For all the talk of 'following the science', the decisions have always been political
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Russian scientists to improve the battery for sensors
Researchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) approached the creation of a solid-state thin-film battery for miniature devices and sensors. Scientists were able to obtain the cathode material, lithium nickelate using the Atomic Layer Deposition method.
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New effective treatment for inflammatory diseases found
New research conducted by the University of Liverpool and AKL Research and Development Ltd (AKLRD), published in Inflammopharmacology, highlights the potential benefits of a new drug treatment on the human body's immune response in inflammation.
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New study provides maps, ice favorability index to companies looking to mine the moon
A University of Central Florida team has created an Ice Favorability Index. The geological model explains the process for ice formation at the poles of the moon, and mapped the terrain, which includes craters that may hold ice deposits. The model, which has been published in the peer-reviewed journal Icarus, accounts for what asteroid impacts on the surface of the moon may do to deposits of ice fo
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Dieting? Studies weigh in on opportunities and risks
Get the latest research findings on fad diets, losing weight and healthful eating at NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE, a virtual conference featuring leading nutrition experts from around the world.
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Study pinpoints top sources of empty calories for children and teens
A new study of children and teens found that more than 25% of the calories they consume were considered empty — those from added sugars and solid fats.
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Playing video games linked with unhealthy behaviors for college men
Results from a new study suggest that college men who play video games tend to exercise less and have poorer eating habits compared to non-gamers.
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Eating whole grains could help lower diabetes risk
A new analysis of more than 200,000 people found that eating high-quality carbohydrates, such as whole grains, was associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes.
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Do warning labels help people choose healthier drinks?
Warning labels on sugary drinks lead to healthier drink choices, according to new analysis of more than 20 studies examining these warnings.
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Researchers identify seasonal peaks for foodborne infections
Using a newly developed approach, researchers have identified seasonal peaks for foodborne infections that could be used to optimize the timing and location of food inspections.
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What One Woman's Shattered Career Reveals About the Music Industry
"I know it's easy to wonder what any woman in her right mind would be doing with hip-hop," the scholar and music journalist Joan Morgan wrote in a 1995 issue of Vibe magazine . "But there was sweetness in the beginning … Perhaps it was because we were being acknowledged as part of a whole." Morgan, who later coined the term hip-hop feminism , is among the many black women who appear in the new HB
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Universal virus detection platform to expedite viral diagnosis
The prompt, precise, and massive detection of a virus is the key to combat infectious diseases such as Covid-19. A new viral diagnostic strategy using reactive polymer-grafted, double-stranded RNAs will serve as a pre-screening tester for a wide range of viruses with enhanced sensitivity.
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SpaceX's Crew Dragon Docks with Space Station
The first-ever orbital flight of astronauts on a private spacecraft has been a historic success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New algorithm computes how to find those lost at sea
Predicting the locations of objects and people lost at sea is devilishly difficult. MIT and other institutions have developed a new algorithm that identifies floating "traps" that can attract floating craft and people. The new TRAPS system has just completed a successful first round of testing. When the first pieces of Malaysian Air Flight 370 finally turned up in July 2015, they were found on Ré
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Ny form av magnetism upptäckt i grundämnet neodym
Grundämnet neodym har visat sig ha en hittills okänd form av magnetism, uppbyggd av en blandning av magnetiska spiraler, enligt forskning från Uppsala universitet. Upptäckten kan bli användbart i utvecklingen av mer miljövänlig teknik. Ett materials magnetism kan användas inom en mängd olika områden. Med utvecklingen av grönare teknik i samhället förväntas behovet av nya och förbättrade magnetisk
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Did you solve it? The Zoom puzzle
The solution to today's puzzles Earlier today I set you three puzzles. 1) Deduce the Zoom algorithm for placing four faces, using the three screengrabs below taken from three different people's computers during the same meeting. For those who have never used Zoom before, the yellow outline tells you who is speaking, and doesn't affect the positions. The fourth screengrab from the same meeting is
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George Floyd and Ahmaud Arbery Deaths: The Everyday Health Harms of Racism
Police killings of black men gain widespread attention, but black men's life-and-death issues are ignored on a daily basis, a physician who studies health gaps explains.
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I Didn't Have Any Graduation Wisdom. So I Asked 19 Smart People Instead.
Editor's Note: This article is part of a series of commencement addresses commissioned by The Atlantic for students who will not be able to attend their graduations because of the pandemic. Find the collection here . In late January, I agreed to give a commencement speech at the high school I went to. I had vague ideas about what I might say—probably something about the perils of following predef
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Interstellar Object 'Oumuamua Might Be a Hydrogen Iceberg
This artist's impression shows the first interstellar asteroid, `Oumuamua. Observations from ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile and other observatories around the world show that this unique object was travelling through space for millions of years before its chance encounter with our star system. It seems to be a dark red highly-elongated metallic or rocky object, about 400 metres long, and is
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Live Coronavirus News Updates
"You see mass gatherings that could potentially be infecting hundreds and hundreds of people after everything we have done," New York's governor said. Hong Kong has banned an annual Tiananmen Square vigil, citing the virus.
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An MRI technique has been developed to improve the detection of tumors
A research group from the Moscow Center for Diagnostics & Telemedicine has created a physical model to maintain the quality of one of the most commonly used MRI pulse sequences: the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Since the sequence is highly sensitive to various types of tumors, the method will help to apply it to different MR scanners. Full details are available in the article published in the
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FloChiP, a new tool optimizing gene-regulation studies
EPFL scientists have developed FloChip, a new microfluidic take on the widely used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technique. By automating and cutting the cost of ChIP and sequential-ChIP, FloChIP has the potential to become a widely used tool for the study of chromatin biology and gene regulation.
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New NiMH batteries perform better when made from recycled old NiMH batteries
A new method for recycling old batteries can provide better performing and cheaper rechargeable hydride batteries (NiMH) as shown in a new study by researchers at Stockholm University.
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Finnish researchers have discovered a new type of matter inside neutron stars
A Finnish research group has found strong evidence for the presence of exotic quark matter inside the cores of the largest neutron stars in existence. The conclusion was reached by combining recent results from theoretical particle and nuclear physics to measurements of gravitational waves from neutron star collisions.
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Retraction Note: miR-34a blocks osteoporosis and bone metastasis by inhibiting osteoclastogenesis and Tgif2
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2273-1
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Ancient genomes link subsistence change and human migration in northern China
Northern China is among the first centers in the world where agriculture developed, but its genetic history remains largely unknown. Researchers have now analyzed 55 ancient genomes from China, finding new correlations between the intensification of subsistence strategies and human migration. This work provides a comprehensive archaeogenetic overview of northern China and fuels the debate about th
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The consequences of exploiting the ocean depths
A group of international experts has just published an article in the prestigious review Nature in which they suggest responses to question such as how organisms live in the Twilight zone and how diverse they are; which organic processes transform and consume the zone's organic material; and how the organic material is carried into and out of it
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Publication in Nature Communications highlights the preclinical development of SYNB1891
Synlogic today announced the publication in Nature Communications of preclinical data supporting its first clinical immuno-oncology program, SYNB1891, which is being evaluated in a Phase 1 clinical trial in patients with advanced solid tumors or lymphoma.
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A good egg: Robot chef trained to make omelettes
A team of engineers have trained a robot to prepare an omelette, all the way from cracking the eggs to plating the finished dish, and refined the 'chef's' culinary skills to produce a reliable dish that actually tastes good.
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Researchers have developed a first-principles quantum Monte Carlo package called TurboRVB
'TurboRVB' is a first-principles quantum Monte Carlo software package developed by Prof. Sandro Sorella (SISSA/Italy) and his collaborators. Very recently, Assist. Prof. Kosuke Nakano at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST/Japan) and his collaborators have published a review paper in The Journal of Chemical Physics [J. Chem. Phys. 152, 204121, 2020]. The published paper descr
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People sleep better when their office lets in more natural light
When employees work in an office with more natural light they perform better in strategic thinking tests and sleep 37 minutes more per night on average
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Elon Musk Just Absolutely Roasted the Russian Space Program
Except for occasional abrasive comments and other potshots , the relationship between NASA and the Russian space agency Roscosmos has remained relatively respectful even in the face of international tension between the two countries. But if a news conference on Saturday is any indication, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk isn't playing nice. First, some backstory. Back in 2014, Roscosmos chief Dmitry Rogozin,
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Researchers develop viable sodium battery
Researchers have created a sodium-ion battery that holds as much energy and works as well as some commercial lithium-ion battery chemistries, making for a potentially viable battery technology out of abundant and cheap materials. The team reports one of the best results to date for a sodium-ion battery.
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The true cost of financial dependence | Estelle Gibson
Giving up control of your finances — voluntarily or otherwise — can leave you powerless and, in some cases, confined to a cycle of abuse. In this personal talk, accountant Estelle Gibson shares her own story of recovering from financial dependence and provides actionable advice to empower others who desire the freedom that comes with being responsible for your own money.
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Climate change an imminent threat to glass sponge reefs
Warming ocean temperatures and acidification drastically reduce the skeletal strength and filter-feeding capacity of glass sponges, according to new UBC research.
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Telescope instrument is poised to begin its search for answers about dark energy
Even as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, or DESI, lies dormant within a telescope dome on a mountaintop in Arizona, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the DESI project has moved forward in reaching the final formal approval milestone prior to startup.
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Big vegetarians of the reef drive fish evolution
A new study reveals the diets of reef fish dictate how fast different species evolve. The breakthrough adds another piece to the fascinating evolutionary puzzle of coral reefs and the fishes that live on them.
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Desymmetrization of difluoromethylene groups by C–F bond activation
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2399-1
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Is the reproducibility crisis fuelling poor mental health in science?
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01642-9 An inability to focus during a weekend trip forced Jeff Clements to ponder often-overlooked drivers of academic mental health.
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Universities will never be the same after the coronavirus crisis
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01518-y How virtual classrooms and dire finances could alter academia: the first chapter in a week-long series on science after the pandemic.
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Underlying illness risk factors for severe COVID-19 or death
Age, male sex, obesity, and underlying illness have emerged as risk factors for severe COVID-19 or death in the UK, according to the largest cohort study to date.
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Disorder in fish shoals may reap rewards at dinner time
The advantages of animals foraging in an orderly group are well-known, but researchers have now found an element of unruly adventure can help fish in the quest for food.
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Scientists discover new forms of feldspars
In high-pressure experiments, scientists have discovered new forms of the common mineral feldspar. At moderate temperatures, these hitherto unknown variants are stable at pressures of Earth's upper mantle, where common feldspar normally cannot exist. The discovery could change the view at cold subducting plates and the interpretation of seismologic signatures.
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Researchers develop viable sodium battery
Researchers have created a sodium-ion battery that holds as much energy and works as well as some commercial lithium-ion battery chemistries, making for a potentially viable battery technology out of abundant and cheap materials. The team reports one of the best results to date for a sodium-ion battery.
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Ny blodanalys kan ge säkrare dosering av hydroxiklorokin
En ny analysmetod för att mäta nivåer av läkemedlet hydroxiklorokin hos patienter med den reumatiska sjukdomen systemisk lupus erythematosus (SLE), kan även visa sig användbar för andra områden inom sjukvården, som vid behandling av covid-19. Hydroxiklorokin användes ursprungligen för att behandla malaria, men visade sig också ha god effekt vid SLE och reumatoid artrit (RA). Idag rekommenderas de
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HIV-1 viral cores enter the nucleus collectively through the nuclear endocytosis-like pathway
How HIV-1 viral cores enter the nucleus through the undersized nuclear pore remains mysterious. By multi labelling of viral and cellular components and dynamically tracking, researchers observed that HIV-1 selectively gathered at the microtubule organization center, leading the nearby nuclear envelope to undergo deformation, invagination and restoration to form a nuclear vesicle in which the viral
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Employers could face legal action over COVID-19 exposure, expert warns
Employers across the UK could face legal action from employees who return to work and contract the COVID-19 virus, a leading health and safety expert has warned.
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Cancer cells cause inflammation to protect themselves from viruses
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have uncovered how cancer cells protect themselves from viruses that are harmful to tumors but not to healthy cells. These findings could lead to improved viral treatments for the disease.
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CeMM study reveals how a master regulator of gene transcription operates
Using TPD technology, CeMM researchers set out to understand set out to understand the primary role of a key regulator of transcription, the human Mediator complex. The recent study by Georg Winter's group discovered that Mediator particularly safeguards the transcription of a small set of cell-type-specifying genes. In collaboration with Patrick Cramer's lab at the MPI for Biophysical Chemistry,
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Climate change an imminent threat to glass sponge reefs
Warming ocean temperatures and acidification drastically reduce the skeletal strength and filter-feeding capacity of glass sponges, according to new UBC research. The findings, published in Scientific Reports, indicate that ongoing climate change could have serious, irreversible impacts on the sprawling glass sponge reefs of the Pacific Northwest and associated biodiversity — the only known reefs
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Smart textiles powered by soft transmission lines
EPFL researchers have developed electronic fibers that, when embedded in textiles, can collect a wealth of information about our bodies by measuring subtle and complex fabrics deformations. Their technology relies on transmission line theory and offers a host of applications, such as in health care and robotics.
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Climate action goes digital
More transparent and accessible to everyone: information and communication technologies bring opportunities for transforming traditional climate diplomacy. A proposal for a "partially digital" UN climate change conference has been just published in a Correspondence to Nature Climate Change by a team of researchers with the participation of CMCC Foundation.
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Hot stars are plagued by giant magnetic spots, ESO data shows
Astronomers using European Southern Observatory (ESO) telescopes have discovered giant spots on the surface of extremely hot stars hidden in stellar clusters. Not only are these stars plagued by magnetic spots, some also experience superflare events, explosions of energy several million times more energetic than similar eruptions on the Sun. The findings, published today in Nature Astronomy, help
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Coatings for shoe bottoms could improve traction on slick surfaces
MIT engineers, inspired by kirigami, the Japanese art of paper cutting, have designed a friction-boosting material that could be used to coat the bottom of your shoes, giving them a much stronger grip on ice and other slippery surfaces.
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Carbon nanotube transistors make the leap from lab to factory floor
A technique for making carbon nanotube transistors in large quantities paves the way for more energy efficient, 3D microprocessors.
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Stanford study shows dry air drives overlooked changes in how plants drink and breathe
New research suggests dry air combined with warmer temperatures may prompt bigger than expected changes in how water moves through plants. The adjustment may allow plants to survive with less water in future droughts, while downshifting how much carbon they absorb.
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Sea snail, human insulin hybrid could lead to better diabetes treatments
Nearly a century after insulin was discovered, an international team of researchers including University of Utah Health scientists report that they have developed the world's smallest, fully functional version of the hormone, one that combines the potency of human insulin with the fast-acting potential of a venom insulin produced by predatory cone snails. The finding, based on animal studies, coul
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Smart textiles made possible by flexible transmission lines
EPFL researchers have developed electronic fibers that, when embedded in textiles, can be used to collect data about our bodies by measuring fabric deformation. Their technology employs flexible transmission lines and offers a host of applications, including in the medical industry.
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The Milky Way has one very hot halo, astronomers find
The halo that surrounds our own Milky Way galaxy is much hotter than scientists once believed – and it may not be unique among galaxies. The new findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society, held online this week because of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Study in Chinese doctors shows mental toll of caring in the time of COVID-19
They worked in hospitals hundreds of miles from the epicenter of COVID-19. Their city locked down hard enough, and did enough testing, that it only had a few hundred cases of the disease. But hundreds of young Chinese doctors in a new study still experienced a sharp drop in mood, a rise in depression and anxiety symptoms, and a doubling of their fear of workplace violence, in the first month of th
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Mental health of young physicians in China during COVID-19 outbreak
Anxiety, depression, mood and fear of workplace violence were assessed in a group of young physicians in China before and during the COVID-19 outbreak.
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Association of COVID-19 outbreak with enrollment in cancer clinical trials
How the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with national enrollment in cancer clinical trials is investigated in this study.
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Pod-based e-cigarettes may foster greater nicotine dependence than other devices
Pod-based e-cigarettes' efficient delivery of nicotine may foster greater dependence than other types of e-cigarettes. Stronger health communication messages are needed around the consequences of using these devices.
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People with Type 1 diabetes spend $2,500 a year in health care costs
Adults and children with type 1 diabetes will spend an average of $2,500 a year out-of-pocket for health care — but insulin isn't always the biggest expense — new research suggests.
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When astrocytes attack: Stem cell model shows possible mechanism behind neurodegeneration
A new study published today in Neuron led by The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute's Valentina Fossati, Ph.D., creates astrocytes – an integral support cell in the brain — from stem cells and shows that in disease-like environments, these normally helpful cells can turn into neuron-killers.
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A return to the Licence Raj will stall India's reopening
The pandemic has become an unwelcome flashback to the red tape and slow growth of the past
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Detecting methane emissions during COVID-19
While carbon dioxide is more abundant in the atmosphere and therefore more commonly associated with global warming, methane is around 30 times more potent as a heat-trapping gas. Given its importance, Canadian company GHGSat have worked in collaboration with the Sentinel-5P team at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research to investigate hotspots of methane emissions during COVID-19.
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The hidden underwater map of the past
Major climate changes leading to great fluctuations in sea levels took place during the Quaternary period 2.58 million years ago. The sea receded during the glaciations, because the water ended up stored in huge ice masses; when the ice melted, the sea levels rose. So "in this work we analyzed the rocky undersea coastal platforms formed throughout the period: the situation of all these terraces, t
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Does anti-fake news regulation improve the quality of capital markets?
Fake news has repeatedly made the front page in recent years. With false information spreading fast and widely in today's socially-networked world, governments have grown increasingly concerned about the deliberate spread of misinformation.
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Big vegetarians of the reef drive fish evolution
A new study reveals the diets of reef fish dictate how fast different species evolve. The breakthrough adds another piece to the fascinating evolutionary puzzle of coral reefs and the fishes that live on them.
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The Inflated Promise of Genomic Medicine
COVID-19 has laid bare the need to reconsider the hope and money we invest in genetics research. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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To reel in job, study suggests casting multiple nets
The counterintuitive appeal of Stanford University sociologist Mark Granovetter's theory about "the strength of weak ties" being key to finding a job has steadily grown since he first published it in 1973.
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Researchers improve the synthesis of bismuth tungstate with an environmentally-friendly procedure
A multidisciplinary research team from the Universitat Jaume I (UJI) in collaboration with the Center for Development of Functional Materials (CDMF) of Brazil has shown for the first time the efficient synthesis of bismuth tungstate (Bi2WO6) through a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method and its subsequent femtosecond laser irradiation, which is responsible for the total crystallization of Bi2WO
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England rolls out 'Test and Trace' program to combat COVID-19
The program currently involves 25,000 contract tracers who are capable of tracing 10,000 contacts per day. Participation in the program is voluntary, though officials said it may become mandatory if necessary. The program will eventually include a smartphone app that records who you've come in close proximity to. England started a test-and-trace program on Thursday that aims to contain the spread
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FloChiP, a new tool optimizing gene-regulation studies
In the cell, proteins often interact directly with DNA to regulate and influence the expression of genes. For this to happen, proteins need to travel into the cell's nucleus where the DNA is tightly twisted and packed as chromatin, which forms the well-known chromosomes.
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How a new biotech rule will foster distrust with the public and impede progress in science
In May, federal regulators finalized a new biotechnology policy that will bring sweeping changes to the U.S. food system. Dubbed "SECURE," the rule revises U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations over genetically engineered plants, automatically exempting many gene-edited crops from government oversight. Companies and labs will be allowed to "self-determine" whether or not a crop should undergo
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FloChiP, a new tool optimizing gene-regulation studies
In the cell, proteins often interact directly with DNA to regulate and influence the expression of genes. For this to happen, proteins need to travel into the cell's nucleus where the DNA is tightly twisted and packed as chromatin, which forms the well-known chromosomes.
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How a new biotech rule will foster distrust with the public and impede progress in science
In May, federal regulators finalized a new biotechnology policy that will bring sweeping changes to the U.S. food system. Dubbed "SECURE," the rule revises U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations over genetically engineered plants, automatically exempting many gene-edited crops from government oversight. Companies and labs will be allowed to "self-determine" whether or not a crop should undergo
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The Milky Way has one very hot halo, astronomers find
The halo that surrounds our own Milky Way galaxy is much hotter than scientists once believed—and it may not be unique among galaxies.
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Nature retracts study touted as step toward treatments for bone diseases
A Nature study that could have provided a "potential therapeutic target for osteoporosis and bone metastases of cancer" has been retracted. Since being published in 2014 by researchers at UT Southwestern, MD Anderson and elsewhere, "miR-34a blocks osteoporosis and bone metastasis by inhibiting osteoclastogenesis and Tgif2" has been cited more than 200 times, according to … Continue reading
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Retail reopening: not such a lovely day
Fewer customers and higher expenses mean there will be no return to pre-pandemic profits
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Big vegetarians of the reef drive fish evolution
New research finds fish diets, not geography, dictate how fast species evolve.
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Developing a digital holography-based multimodal imaging system to visualize living cells
A Kobe University research group has successfully created 3D fluorescence and phase imaging of living cells based on digital holography. This technology will form a foundation for living cell imaging, which is indispensable in the life sciences field. It is also expected that using this technology to visualize stem cell processes in plants will increase our understanding of them.
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These flexible feet help robots walk faster
Roboticists at the University of California San Diego have developed flexible feet that can help robots walk up to 40 percent faster on uneven terrain such as pebbles and wood chips. The work has applications for search-and-rescue missions as well as space exploration.The researchers will present their findings at the RoboSoft conference which takes place virtually May 15 to July 15, 2020.
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Universal virus detection platform to expedite viral diagnosis?
The prompt, precise, and massive detection of a virus is the key to combat infectious diseases such as Covid-19. A new viral diagnostic strategy using reactive polymer-grafted, double-stranded RNAs will serve as a pre-screening tester for a wide range of viruses with enhanced sensitivity.
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Making matter out of light: High-power laser simulations point the way
Engineers at UC San Diego developed a set of simulations involving high-power lasers that could help us recreate the transformation of light into matter, and better understand what happened at the very beginning of the universe. The study offers a recipe for researchers at the Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) high-power laser facility to follow to produce pairs of matter and antimatter particles
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The hidden underwater map of the past
The UPV/EHU's Department of Mineralogy and Petrology explores the rocky, undersea, coastal platforms of the Quaternary to study the formation of the underwater landscape in the past. This research by the UPV/EHU has been published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Earth Science.
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Carbon Nanotube Transistors May Soon Give Waning Moore's Law a Boost
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have long been touted as a potential material to take us beyond the limits of faltering silicon chips, but they've proven tricky to manufacture. Now scientists have demonstrated a way to build CNT transistors in a commercial silicon fabrication plant. Essentially CNTs are rolled-up sheets of the one-atom-thick wonder material graphene . They are excellent semiconductors an
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MSN Fires Journalists, Replaces Them With AI
New Algorithm Over the weekend, Microsoft announced that it's laying off dozens of journalists, editors, and other workers at MSN and its other news divisions. While media layoffs are tragically widespread at the moment, Microsoft said that the layoffs had nothing to do with the COVID-19 pandemic, The Verge reports . Instead, it's part of the company's push over the last few months to automate jo
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How technology can contribute to maintaining political momentum for Paris Agreement ambitions
The 26th Conference of the Parties (COP26) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) was scheduled to be held in Glasgow, Scotland in November 2020, and was expected to gather thousands of negotiators, policymakers, researchers, journalists and campaigners.
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Study shows dry air drives overlooked changes in how plants drink and breathe
Plants drink up much of the water that falls to Earth. They take what they need before releasing it through tiny holes on the underside of their leaves, just as people release water vapor with every exhale.
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Hot stars are plagued by giant magnetic spots
Astronomers using European Southern Observatory (ESO) telescopes have discovered giant spots on the surface of extremely hot stars hidden in stellar clusters. Not only are these stars plagued by magnetic spots, some also experience superflare events, explosions of energy several million times more energetic than similar eruptions on the Sun. The findings, published today in Nature Astronomy, help
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Sea snail, human insulin hybrid could lead to better diabetes treatments
Nearly a century after insulin was discovered, an international team of researchers including University of Utah Health scientists report that they have developed the world's smallest, fully functional version of the hormone, one that combines the potency of human insulin with the fast-acting potential of a venom insulin produced by predatory cone snails. The finding, based on animal studies, coul
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Faster and greener purification process with carbon dioxide
In order for pharmaceuticals to be safe, they must be clean of pollutants. Carbon dioxide can be used to make the purification process more environmentally friendly, which may seem paradoxical since carbon dioxide is usually associated with a negative climate impact. However, if carbon dioxide is recovered from other existing processes and if the use of environmentally hazardous organic solvents i
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Sea snail, human insulin hybrid could lead to better diabetes treatments
Nearly a century after insulin was discovered, an international team of researchers including University of Utah Health scientists report that they have developed the world's smallest, fully functional version of the hormone, one that combines the potency of human insulin with the fast-acting potential of a venom insulin produced by predatory cone snails. The finding, based on animal studies, coul
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The Inflated Promise of Genomic Medicine
COVID-19 has laid bare the need to reconsider the hope and money we invest in genetics research. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Black Americans homeschool for different reasons than whites
When Michelle, a white stay-at-home mom, decided to homeschool her 8-year-old daughter, Emily, the decision was driven by what she saw as the lack of individualized attention at school.
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Improving teaching quality through qualitative feedback… using machines
Student Evaluation of Teaching, or SET, is commonly used in higher education as feedback for course instructors' performance. Students rate their teachers quantitatively, scoring their performance on a numerical scale on questions such as "Teacher is prepared for class" and "I have learnt a lot from this teacher."
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Virus buffets largest Arctic expedition in history
The multinational team on the biggest Arctic research mission ever undertaken were prepared for problems from polar bear attacks to major snowstorms or even issues with building a runway on ice.
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Urban green spaces can help pollinators: new research provides basic recommendations
Bee populations are experiencing a global decline as a result of climate change, parasites and pathogens, and pesticide exposure, as well as a lack of foraging resources due to human land use. The good news is that gardens and parks can be valuable sites for providing foraging resources to these urban pollinator communities because of their low pesticide use, complex landscapes, and protected envi
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Animals that can do math understand more language than we think
It is often thought that humans are different from other animals in some fundamental way that makes us unique, or even more advanced than other species. These claims of human superiority are sometimes used to justify the ways we treat other animals, in the home, the lab or the factory farm.
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Researchers control cattle microbiomes to reduce methane and greenhouse gases
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have learned to control the microbiome of cattle for the first time which could inhibit their methane production, and therefore reduce a major source of greenhouse gasses.
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Urban green spaces can help pollinators: new research provides basic recommendations
Bee populations are experiencing a global decline as a result of climate change, parasites and pathogens, and pesticide exposure, as well as a lack of foraging resources due to human land use. The good news is that gardens and parks can be valuable sites for providing foraging resources to these urban pollinator communities because of their low pesticide use, complex landscapes, and protected envi
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Theoretical breakthrough shows quantum fluids rotate by corkscrew mechanism
If a drop of creamer falls from a spoon into a swirling cup of coffee, the whirlpool drags the drop into rotation. But what would happen if the coffee had no friction—no way to pull the drop into a synchronized spin?
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Animals that can do math understand more language than we think
It is often thought that humans are different from other animals in some fundamental way that makes us unique, or even more advanced than other species. These claims of human superiority are sometimes used to justify the ways we treat other animals, in the home, the lab or the factory farm.
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Researchers control cattle microbiomes to reduce methane and greenhouse gases
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have learned to control the microbiome of cattle for the first time which could inhibit their methane production, and therefore reduce a major source of greenhouse gasses.
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New stretchable, self-healing and illuminating electronic material for wearables and soft robots
Imagine a flexible digital screen that heals itself when it cracks, or a light-emitting robot that locates survivors in dark, dangerous environments or carries out farming and space exploration tasks. A novel material developed by a team of NUS researchers could turn these ideas into reality.
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Jeddah gets caught in the rain
Urbanization could cause 26 percent more rain to fall over Jeddah city than over the surrounding desert during storms.
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Scientists pinpoint areas in boreal forests that offer refuge to plants and animals as climate gets warmer and drier
North America's boreal forests are warming and drying from climate change, but they still hold places that can offer refuge for plants and animals, according to University of Alberta scientists who have taken the lead in creating a guide to identify those areas.
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Scientists pinpoint areas in boreal forests that offer refuge to plants and animals as climate gets warmer and drier
North America's boreal forests are warming and drying from climate change, but they still hold places that can offer refuge for plants and animals, according to University of Alberta scientists who have taken the lead in creating a guide to identify those areas.
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Bacteria show their metal: An evolutionary path to survival
An investigation of two closely related proteins from a pathogenic bacterium has illustrated for the first time how evolution can shape the use of essential metals by enzymes.
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Aiming for an enduring relationship
Why do some couples stay together yet others split up? Timing and desire for commitment are key indicators, according to new insights from SMU Assistant Professor Kenneth Tan.
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Theoretical breakthrough shows quantum fluids rotate by corkscrew mechanism
Scientists performed simulations of merging rotating superfluids, revealing a peculiar corkscrew-shaped mechanism that drives the fluids into rotation without the need for viscosity.
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Urban green spaces can help pollinators — new research provides basic recommendations
Bee populations are experiencing a global decline as a result of climate change, parasites and pathogens, and pesticide exposure, as well as a lack of foraging resources due to human land use. The good news is that gardens and parks can be valuable sites for providing foraging resources to these urban pollinator communities because of their low pesticide use, complex landscapes, and protected envi
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Bacteria show their metal: An evolutionary path to survival
An investigation of two closely related proteins from a pathogenic bacterium has illustrated for the first time how evolution can shape the use of essential metals by enzymes.
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How to make the food and water Mars-bound astronauts will need for their mission
If we ever intend to send crewed missions to deep-space locations, then we need to come up with solutions for keeping the crews supplied. For astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS), who regularly receive resupply missions from Earth, this is not an issue. But for missions traveling to destinations like Mars and beyond, self-sufficiency is the name of the game.
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Team works to characterize ocean acidification throughout coastal North America
Among the Earth's biggest allies in the fight against global warming are the world's oceans. Since the industrial revolution, the burning of fossil fuels has caused carbon dioxide, the dominant greenhouse gas, to be released into the atmosphere. Approximately 25% of that carbon dioxide is taken each year from the atmosphere by the world's oceans—without which, the earth's atmosphere would have a h
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Astronomers find cosmic golden needle buried for two decades
Determined to find a needle in a cosmic haystack, a pair of astronomers time traveled through archives of old data from W. M. Keck Observatory on Mauankea in Hawaii and old X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to unlock a mystery surrounding a bright, lensed, heavily obscured quasar.
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What Australian birds can teach us about choosing a partner and making it last
Love, sex and mate choice are topics that never go out of fashion among humans or, surprisingly, among some Australian birds. For these species, choosing the right partner is a driver of evolution and affects the survival and success of a bird and its offspring.
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What heading back to the office means for our pets
As we head back to the office, and our time spent at home slowly lessens, we need to consider how our pets will fare with this change and what we can do to help them through the process.
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Turn off the porch light: 6 easy ways to stop light pollution from harming our wildlife
As winter approaches, marine turtle nesting in the far north of Australia will peak. When these baby turtles hatch at night, they crawl from the sand to the sea, using the relative brightness of the horizon and the natural slope of the beach as their guide.
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What Australian birds can teach us about choosing a partner and making it last
Love, sex and mate choice are topics that never go out of fashion among humans or, surprisingly, among some Australian birds. For these species, choosing the right partner is a driver of evolution and affects the survival and success of a bird and its offspring.
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What heading back to the office means for our pets
As we head back to the office, and our time spent at home slowly lessens, we need to consider how our pets will fare with this change and what we can do to help them through the process.
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Turn off the porch light: 6 easy ways to stop light pollution from harming our wildlife
As winter approaches, marine turtle nesting in the far north of Australia will peak. When these baby turtles hatch at night, they crawl from the sand to the sea, using the relative brightness of the horizon and the natural slope of the beach as their guide.
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Minute molecular movements might lead to more efficient biofuel cells
Leiden researchers have found minute movements in the laccase enzyme. This discovery could lead to the development of much more efficient biofuel cells. Publication in Biophysical Journal.
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Minute molecular movements might lead to more efficient biofuel cells
Leiden researchers have found minute movements in the laccase enzyme. This discovery could lead to the development of much more efficient biofuel cells. Publication in Biophysical Journal.
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Developing a digital holography-based multimodal imaging system to visualize living cells
A research group led by Kobe University's Professor MATOBA Osamu (Organization for Advanced and Integrated Research) has successfully created 3-D fluorescence and phase imaging of living cells based on digital holography. They used plant cells with fluorescent protein markers in their nuclei to demonstrate this imaging system.
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Two-thirds of tropical forests 'under threat in next decade'
Tropical forests can develop resistance to a warmer climate, but 71 percent will come under threat in the next decade if global average temperatures reach two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, a new study warns.
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Orbital ordering triggers nucleation-growth behavior of electrons in an inorganic solid
A new study by researchers from Waseda University and the University of Tokyo found that orbital ordering in a vanadate compound exhibits a clear nucleation-growth behavior.
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Forget 'murder hornets', European wasps in Australia decapitate flies and bully dingoes
The impacts of invasive mammals such as feral horses and feral cats have featured prominently in the media over the years.
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Forget 'murder hornets', European wasps in Australia decapitate flies and bully dingoes
The impacts of invasive mammals such as feral horses and feral cats have featured prominently in the media over the years.
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Researchers reveal traits of distribution and life-form spectra of alien species across China
The role of invasve species in China has attracted wide attention because noxious alien invasive species significantly threaten biodiversity, environment, and economies of the country. Therefore, studying the regional distribution and life-form spectra of alien species is essential to understand the process of invasion and to develop measures to manage alien species.
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How to get kids through the 'ambiguous loss' of rituals
With rituals like graduations canceled or moving online during the COVID-19 pandemic, Jennifer Greif Green, Alissa Greif Ovadia, and Geoffrey L. Greif explain how you can help your children handle the "ambiguous loss" that comes with those changes: Rituals provide societies honored methods of coming together to celebrate accomplishments, to mark commitments, and to say goodbye. We know to throw o
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Study in ICU finds 30.9% mortality rate from COVID-19
A new study suggests the mortality rate from COVID-19 may be lower than previous reports have indicated. As COVID-19 has become the leading cause of death in the US, researchers at Emory University report a lower number of deaths than what most have reported for critically ill COVID-19 patients using mechanical ventilation. The research and outcomes appear in the journal Critical Care Medicine .
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Environmental filtering structures functional strategies of bryophytes in cloud forest
The distribution and performance of bryophyte species vary with vertical gradients, as a result of changes in environmental factors, especially light. However, the role of functional traits in bryophyte species distribution, especially vertical distribution in forests, is fairly unknown, especially in subtropical forests. Furthermore, for bryophytes, very few studies have fully analyzed ecological
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Researchers reveal traits of distribution and life-form spectra of alien species across China
The role of invasve species in China has attracted wide attention because noxious alien invasive species significantly threaten biodiversity, environment, and economies of the country. Therefore, studying the regional distribution and life-form spectra of alien species is essential to understand the process of invasion and to develop measures to manage alien species.
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Scientists reveal energy exchange between troposphere and ionosphere in Congo Basin
The Earth's ionosphere, extending about 80 to 1,000 km above the Earth's surface, connects outer space and the middle atmosphere. It's an important part and key layer in the whole Sun-Earth system.
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Environmental filtering structures functional strategies of bryophytes in cloud forest
The distribution and performance of bryophyte species vary with vertical gradients, as a result of changes in environmental factors, especially light. However, the role of functional traits in bryophyte species distribution, especially vertical distribution in forests, is fairly unknown, especially in subtropical forests. Furthermore, for bryophytes, very few studies have fully analyzed ecological
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Video: The real risks of a pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic is a reflection on our society and shows us just how vulnerable we are, despite all the advanced mathematical models that are supposed to make policy- and decision-makers aware of the potential risks associated with a pandemic.
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How a Pea Aphid Decides to Make Wings or Not
Wing development in females is environmentally controlled, but in males, an insertion on the sex chromosome appears to dictate whether the insects grow wings, according to a study.
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Kan beteendeekonomi hjälpa oss ur coronakrisen?
Hur vi människor beter oss under en pandemi är centralt för hur väl vi klarar oss ur den. Så hur kan en liten knuff påverka vårt beteende i rätt riktning? Forskaren Nurit Nobel förklarar vetenskapen bakom att uppmuntra bra beteenden – och hur det kan hjälpa oss i coronatider. Puffning, eller nudge -teori, är ett begrepp som används i beteendeekonomi och som beskriver olika sätt att påverka männis
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Is it ethical to infect people for COVID-19 vaccine research?
A new paper outlines a set of guidelines to guide researchers on an ethical approach to deliberately infecting volunteers who have been given a vaccine candidate with COVID-19. This may significantly speed up the process of vaccine development and potentially save many lives, according to the paper. "…it is incorrect to rule out human challenge experiments as unethical in relation to COVID-19 vac
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Zynga acquires Turkey's Peak Games for $1.8bn
Maker of FarmVille buys Istanbul-based creator of Toon Blast and Toy Blast
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Large droplet sorting now possible at high speeds
Bioengineers from UCLA and University of Tokyo have significantly increased the speed at which large liquid droplets, potentially containing individual live cells, can be sorted intact and in bulk.
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Watch NASA Astronauts Give Zero-G Tour of SpaceX's New Capsule
Zero-G Tour After becoming the first humans in history to reach orbit in a commercial spacecraft , NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Douglas Hurley took the time to give us a tour of their new SpaceX ride. Touchscreen Future The Crew Dragon capsule can dock with the International Space Station completely autonomously . Astronauts, however, can take control at any time and make any adjustments of th
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Sämre villkor för funktionsnedsatta att möta vuxenlivet
Att bli vuxen innebär en rad konkreta förändringar, som att flytta hemifrån, börja studera eller arbeta, skapa nya relationer, ta mer eget ansvar och att skapa en vuxenidentitet. En ny rapport från Forte visar att unga med funktionsnedsättning ofta har sämre villkor att klara den övergången än jämnåriga utan funktionsnedsättning. Det finns ett stort behov av att förbättra stödet från samhället. P
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Artist Rachel Cabitt Is Trapped in a Quarantine Horror Film
Yes, the current experience is full of terror. But there's room for catharsis, too.
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Meet ACE2, the Enzyme at the Center of the Covid-19 Mystery
Since January, scientists have published more than 700 studies to figure out the molecule's link to risk for the disease—and to find possible treatments.
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In Mathematics, It Often Takes a Good Map to Find Answers
In the late 15th century, Leonardo da Vinci sketched plans for a flying machine that resembled a modern-day helicopter. Today, da Vinci's "aerial screw" appears fanciful and poignantly ahead of its time. While the device itself was too heavy to fly, the ideas behind it were sound, and those same ideas eventually allowed modern helicopters to take flight. Technology just had to advance over many c
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HP's new high-res VR headset aims for deeper immersion with less nausea
Notice the new tracking cameras on the outside of the headset. (HP /) Virtual reality's march toward mainstream acceptance has continued slowly along, but now HP is hoping its new $599 Reverb G2 headset will give players another attractive hardware option to compete with the Oculus Rift S. While HP doesn't have the most VR credibility on the block, it built the Reverb G2 in conjunction with vener
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Study resolves controversy surrounding tumor suppressor gene's role in pluripotent ESCs
The gene p53 is extremely important in cell biology and, hence, the world of cell replacement therapy. Its role is to regulate the cell cycle and halt the formation of tumors, leading to its nickname the "tumor suppressor gene." However, previous efforts to determine whether p53 is behind programmed cellular death (apoptosis) induced by DNA damage in pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) produce
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Biocompatible gold nanoparticles will accelerate individual cancer diagnosis and treatment
An international group of researchers from NUST MISIS and Clemson University (Clemson, U.S.) has proposed a new method for producing gold nanoparticles based on synthesis under the influence of ultraviolet radiation. The method excludes the use of aggressive chemical agents and the obtained nanoparticles are safe for the body and can be used for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The results a
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New properties of cosmic rays, silicon, magnesium and neon found by Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer aboard ISS
A very large team of researchers from around the globe has found new properties of the cosmic rays silicon, magnesium and neon using data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer aboard the International Space Station. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their study of the three elements and what they found out about them.
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Police officers accused of brutal violence often have a history of complaints by citizens
As protests against police violence and racism continue in cities throughout the U.S., the public is learning that several of the officers involved in the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis and Breonna Taylor in Louisville share a history of complaints by citizens of brutality or misconduct.
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Study resolves controversy surrounding tumor suppressor gene's role in pluripotent ESCs
The gene p53 is extremely important in cell biology and, hence, the world of cell replacement therapy. Its role is to regulate the cell cycle and halt the formation of tumors, leading to its nickname the "tumor suppressor gene." However, previous efforts to determine whether p53 is behind programmed cellular death (apoptosis) induced by DNA damage in pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) produce
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Astronomers Watch as Planets Are Born
High-resolution images of the debris disks around stars are revealing how solar systems form — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Out-of-sync brain waves may underlie learning deficit linked to schizophrenia
A new UC San Francisco study has pinpointed a specific pattern of brain waves that underlies the ability to let go of old, irrelevant learned associations to make way for new updates. The research is the first to directly show that a particular behavior can be dependent on the precise synchronization of high-frequency brain waves in different parts of the brain, and might open a path for developin
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K number: what is the coronavirus metric that could be crucial as lockdown eases?
The K value sheds light on how the transmission rate varies and can help identify clusters Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage When deciding how and when lockdown restrictions will be lifted across the UK, the government has said the R value , denoting how many people on average one infected person will themselves infect, is crucial. But experts say another metric is bec
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Scientists discover new forms of feldspars
In high-pressure experiments, scientists have discovered new forms of the common mineral feldspar. At moderate temperatures, these hitherto unknown variants are stable at pressures of Earth's upper mantle, where common feldspar normally cannot exist. The discovery could change the view at cold subducting plates and the interpretation of seismologic signatures, as the team around DESY scientist Ann
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Ep. 47: The Toll of the Culture of Silence in Animal Research
This month: Communicating about animal research with the public can open early career scientists up to social stigma and even campaigns that threaten their careers. But working with animals can be an emotionally taxing job — and silence could isolate scientists further and strengthen public misconceptions.
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Supply chain innovation can reduce coronavirus food shortages
Food security is an essential issue brought to light by COVID-19.
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Ancient genomes link subsistence change and human migration in northern China
While recent advances in ancient DNA analysis have established the major patterns of prehistoric human migration in western Eurasia, the population history of eastern Eurasia remains little understood. Northern China is of particular importance, as it harbored two of the world's earliest agricultural centers for millet farming: the Yellow and West Liao River basins. Both basins are famous for thei
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Orbital ordering triggers nucleation-growth behavior of electrons in an inorganic solid
A new study by researchers from Waseda University and the University of Tokyo found that orbital ordering in a vanadate compound exhibits a clear nucleation-growth behavior. Their observation is the first of its kind, where electrons in an inorganic solid created two soft phases, and where the nucleation-growth behavior was observed due to the surface tension created between the phases.
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Major gaps in HIV programs in Africa
HIV management in developing countries varies with socioeconomic and structural circumstances, with two Flinders University studies finding examples of key ways to close the gap for those worst affected in developing countries.The studies, just published in PLoS ONE journal, call for reforms to nutritional programs and for better treatment of HIV affected prisoners – providing guidance for several
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Jeddah gets caught in the rain
Understanding how storms unleash more rain over cities in the desert could help water security in Saudi Arabia.
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Coronavirus pandemic in Germany: Medical care in an adaptive healthcare system
The German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina has issued a fourth ad-hoc-statement on the coronavirus pandemic. It is dedicated to the topic: 'Medical Care and Patient-Oriented Research in an Adaptive Healthcare System'. The paper focuses on short- and medium-term aspects of medical and care services under the conditions of a sustained pandemic and identifies long-term measures that lead to a
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Study shows hydroxychloroquine's harmful effects on heart rhythm
The malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, which has been promoted as a potential treatment for Covid-19, is known to have potentially serious effects on heart rhythms. Now, a team of researchers has used an optical mapping system to observe exactly how the drug creates serious disturbances in the electrical signals that govern heartbeat.
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Structural changes: How the pandemic could influence architecture
Disease has often driven change in architecture and design. Cities cleared slums and opened up public spaces in response to the bubonic plague, and widened boulevards and added indoor plumbing due to yellow fever and cholera. The open-air sanitariums designed to treat tuberculosis and other pandemics inspired the streamlined look of modernist buildings and minimalist furniture, which leaves few pl
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Study investigates the nature of binary system 7 Vulpeculae
An international team of astronomers has conducted spectroscopic and photometric observations of a binary star known as 7 Vulpeculae. The new study, described in a paper published May 22 on arXiv.org, discloses more information about the properties of 7 Vulpeculae, shedding more light on the nature of this system.
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Millions in UK miss cancer screenings, tests and treatments due to Covid-19
More than 24,000 cases of cancer have gone undiagnosed according to Cancer Research UK Almost 2.5 million Britons have not been screened, tested or treated for cancer because the Covid-19 pandemic has led to "enormous disruption" of NHS care for the disease, experts have warned. More than 24,000 cases of cancer have gone undiagnosed as a result of the suspension of normal services while delays in
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New sunspots potentially herald increased solar activity
On May 29, 2020, a family of sunspots—dark spots that freckle the face of the sun, representing areas of complex magnetic fields—sported the biggest solar flare since October 2017. Although the sunspots are not yet visible (they will soon rotate into view over the left limb of the sun), NASA spacecraft spotted the flares high above them.
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Live Q&A: The future of furlough schemes
The FT's Claer Barrett and Daniel Thomas discuss the latest rule changes online at 12pm on Tuesday June 2
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Nudging out the coronavirus with behavioral economics
Human behavior is key in any pandemic. So how can a little nudge in the right direction change our behavior for the better? Researcher Nurit Nobel explains the science behind encouraging good behaviors—and how it can help us during the pandemic.
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A new theorem predicts that stationary black holes must have at least one light ring
Black holes, regions in space with such an intense gravitational field that no matter or radiation can escape from them, are among the most mysterious and fascinating cosmological phenomena. Over the past five years or so, astrophysicists collected the first observations of the strong gravitational forces around black holes.
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Grief on the Front Line–and Beyond
In their own voices, health care workers from across the country reflect on coping with the coronavirus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Protests in Minneapolis, country rooted in systemic racial issues, study finds
In 1967, a panel of experts sat down to understand why, for two years, black Americans across the country had rioted in anger and frustration, often burning down sections of cities such as Detroit, Los Angeles and Chicago. By 1968, a presidentially appointed group, known as the Kerner Commission, found answers: rampant white supremacy, structural racism, lack of opportunity and hope.
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It's tough to get seeds, but you can garden with scraps
Some of the fruits and vegetables you buy have seeds in them. Can you plant those? It depends. Here are answers to that question, courtesy of Chris Gunter , a professor of horticultural science at North Carolina State University and vegetable specialist for NC State Extension: There's been a dramatic surge in interest in gardening during the COVID-19 pandemic—and that's made it hard for home gard
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Researchers control cattle microbiomes to reduce methane and greenhouse gases
"Now that we know we can influence the microbiome development, we can use this knowledge to modulate microbiome composition to lower the environmental impact of methane from cows by guiding them to our desired outcomes," Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Prof Mizrahi says.
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Astronomers find cosmic golden needle buried for two decades
Astronomers made innovative use of their time while sheltering at home due to the pandemic by combing through W. M. Keck Observatory and NASA archive data. They rediscovered the first Einstein ring and found the distance of its source was never measured. The researchers are the first to make the calculation and found the quasar to be 10 billion light-years away, or a redshift of z=1.849.
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Study resolves controversy surrounding tumor suppressor gene's role in pluripotent ESCs
A new study released in STEM CELLS sorts through the maze of contradictions to finally determine that the multiple roles of p53 in cell cycle regulation and apoptosis are acquired during pluripotent stem cell differentiation.
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UTEP study examines COVID-19 stress, coping strategies, and well-being
Emre Umucu, Ph.D., assistant professor of rehabilitation counseling, and Beatrice Lee, an incoming rehabilitation counseling faculty member, examined the perceived stress levels and coping mechanisms related to COVID-19, and how coping affects well-being in people with self-reported chronic conditions and disabilities.
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Geometry of intricately fabricated glass makes light trap itself
Laser light traveling through ornately microfabricated glass has been shown to interact with itself to form self-sustaining wave patterns called solitons. The intricate design fabricated in the glass is a type of "photonic topological insulator," a device that could potentially be used to make photonic technologies like lasers and medical imaging more efficient.
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New data reveals significance of Perth super storm
Two drifting wave buoys deployed along the coast of Western Australia by researchers at The University of Western Australia have highlighted the significance of Perth's recent super storm, recording massive waves along 1000km of WA's coastline.
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Nanoparticles can make home refrigeration more accessible for low-income households
Power consumption of a home refrigerator can be cut by 29% while improving cooling capacity. Researchers replaced widely used but environmentally unfriendly R134a refrigerant with the more energy-efficient R600a dosed with multi-walled carbon nanotube nanoparticles (MWCNT). This drop-in refrigerant replacement can be deployed in the field by trained technicians, says an engineer from the Universit
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'Black nitrogen': Researchers discover new high-pressure material and solve a puzzle of the periodic table
In the periodic table of elements there is one golden rule for carbon, oxygen and other light elements: Under high pressures, they have similar structures to heavier elements in the same group of elements. But nitrogen always seemed unwilling to toe the line. However, high-pressure chemistry researchers of the University of Bayreuth have disproved this special status. Out of nitrogen, they created
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Upcycling e-waste trash into innovative treasure
Three poultry farmers in northern Ghana have found a new way to keep their eggs warm—by keeping them in a fridge.
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Artists explore new ways of knowing in a time of information overload
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01605-0 From mapping coronavirus to recording extinctions, Heather Houser describes the intersection of art and data visualization.
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One Free Press Coalition Spotlights Journalists Under Attack – June 2020
This month's list features four reporters sentenced to death in Yemen, among other news professionals whose civil rights are being threatened.
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Polar Grit X Review: Great Training Coach, Poor Backcountry Companion
The Grit X's FuelWise reminders will prevent your body from crashing, but the lack of onboard maps make this a difficult tracker to recommend for the backcountry.
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The interface of genomic information with the electronic health record
In an effort to provide practical guidance and important considerations regarding how genomic information can be incorporated into electronic health records, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) has released, ': a points to consider statement of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG).'
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Covering Coronavirus
— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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African scientists leverage open hardware
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01606-z A growing emphasis on do-it-yourself science is helping researchers to equip labs in resource-limited areas.
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What's the risk that animals will spread the coronavirus?
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01574-4 Researchers say there's an urgent need to find out whether animals can catch the virus and pass it to people.
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Tucatinib viser lovende resultater til patienter med brystkræft og hjernemetastaser
Det eksperimentelle lægemiddel tucatinib har i et fase 3-forsøg vist signifikant effekt ved markant at forlænge overlevelsen og tiden til sygdomsprogression hos kvinder med brystkræft og hjernetumorer. Dansk overlæge vil have fingre i midlet, så snart det bliver godkendt.
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Like a treasure map, brain region emphasizes reward location
In a study in rats, MIT neuroscientists found that a brain region called the lateral septum encodes spatial information with a special emphasis on the location of the reward.
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Lessening water quality problems caused by hurricane-related flooding
June 1 is the start of hurricane season in the Atlantic, and with 2020 predicted to be particularly active, residents in coastal regions are keeping watchful eyes on the weather. Flooding is often the most damaging effect of tropical storms, and it can disproportionately affect vulnerable people and ecosystems. Now, in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology , researchers study water quality impac
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First Amendment Rights—If You Agree With the President
The First Amendment is no good if it is used to protect one side of the political spectrum but disregarded for the other. Protests in response to the killing of George Floyd have been met with aggressive police tactics, including spraying tear gas and rubber bullets, and sweeping up journalists , elected officials , and hundreds of protesters in major cities such as Houston , New York , and Chica
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Drastiskt förändrad flora i Skåne
Studier från Lunds universitet pekar på att floran i Skåne förändrats drastiskt under 1900-talet och fram till idag. Den största minskningen av artrikedomen kan ses i skogsbygderna i norra och mellersta delarna av Skåne. – Jag blev förvånad av att det är klimatförändringen som har påverkat mest, säger forskaren Torbjörn Tyler vid Lunds universitet. Forskarnas studie baseras på inventeringar av ör
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Most common ocean organisms host virus in DNA
The most common group of organisms in the ocean and perhaps on the entire planet thrives despite of, or perhaps because of, the ability to host viruses in their DNA, report researchers. Part of the family of single-celled marine bacteria called SAR11 , these drifting organisms look like tiny jelly beans and have evolved to outcompete other bacteria for scarce resources in the oceans. The findings
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Why only half of Americans say they would get a COVID-19 vaccine
Masks won't be enough to protect us from COVID-19 in the long term. (Gustavo Fring/Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including a state-by-state breakdown of infection rates and the adverse effects of hydroxychloroquine . There aren't many lights at the end of the COVID-19 tunnel, but one of the few is a potential vaccine. Researchers around the world are rushing to create s
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Junk Science in the Courtroom
In the last 20 years I have been called to jury duty several times. Every time I was dismissed almost instantly, once I made it known that I am a professional skeptic. Apparently lawyers fear that kind of skepticism on their juries (at least one side always did). The same is true of many of my skeptical colleagues, so I am not an isolated case. Once my brother said during the process that he wrot
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Coronavirus Lockdowns May Raise Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution
Smarter cooking and cleaning can lessen the risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Coronavirus Lockdowns May Raise Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution
Smarter cooking and cleaning can lessen the risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Er urørt skov en mirakelkur eller falsk forhåbning?
PLUS. I mange hundrede år har der i danske skove været fokus på produktion af træ. Hvis skoven igen skal være 'naturlig', haster det med en håndfast indsats.
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Davos aims to coax elite out of isolation in January
World Economic Forum tests desire for networking in a post-coronavirus world
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An Onslaught of Crises Has Created a Modern Paradox
Never before have humans lived more comfortably. And yet today we're overwhelmed by crises, be it inequality or economic collapse or Covid, all exacerbating one another.
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Cities in Poorer Countries Are at Risk as Covid-19 Spreads
Hot spots are emerging in urban areas across Africa, Asia, and Latin America, where social distancing is challenging and missing work can mean not eating.
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The New Intimacy, Brought to You by Covid-19
Don't touch, but keep in touch! The pandemic has us living in an alternate corporeality.
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Lessening water quality problems caused by hurricane-related flooding
June 1 is the start of hurricane season in the Atlantic, and with 2020 predicted to be particularly active, residents in coastal regions are keeping watchful eyes on the weather. Flooding is often the most damaging effect of tropical storms, and it can disproportionately affect vulnerable people and ecosystems. Now, in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology, researchers study water quality impact
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Canada's farmland is a wise investment—during and after the coronavirus
COVID-19 has put the world's economies on pace for the most dramatic contraction since the Great Depression. With the world's major economies on track for the largest quarterly decline in history, Canadian farmland is an increasingly stable and resilient investment.
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Researchers develop biotechnological process for jasmonic acid production
Plants produce the hormone jasmonic acid as a defense response when challenged, making their leaves taste bad to predators. Biologists want to determine whether biological precursors and other variants of jasmonic acid lead to similar or different effects. But such derivatives of the hormone have so far been too expensive for experiments and difficult to come by. Researchers from the Faculties of
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Researchers develop biotechnological process for jasmonic acid production
Plants produce the hormone jasmonic acid as a defense response when challenged, making their leaves taste bad to predators. Biologists want to determine whether biological precursors and other variants of jasmonic acid lead to similar or different effects. But such derivatives of the hormone have so far been too expensive for experiments and difficult to come by. Researchers from the Faculties of
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Astronomers Confirm Earth-Like Planet Orbiting Nearest Star
This artist's impression shows the planet Proxima b orbiting in the Goldilocks zone around the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Solar System. The double star Alpha Centauri AB also appears in the image between the planet and Proxima itself. Image: ESO Scientists used to wonder if planets were common throughout the universe, and now we know: they are. Observations with grou
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Wall Street is little moved by protests roiling the US
Inequalities have burst into the open, but that has not yet shifted investor's long-term views
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Højdosis stråleterapi viser markant effekt på overlevelse ved lungekræft
Patienter med småcellet lungekræft har muligvis stor gavn af at blive behandlet med højdosis stråleterapi frem for lavdosis. I hvert fald viser et lille studie en markant stigning i overlevelsen efter to år.
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Becoming a Parent in the Age of Black Lives Matter
In a park about half a mile from my home is a wide-open field of grass, whose thin, uneven blades rise up past my ankles. The playground near the park is, like other playgrounds across the country, no longer open, surrounded by the orange-plastic fencing that has become unsettlingly familiar. Swings and seesaws and monkey bars that were once teeming with children sit in silence. Robins have begun
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Melanompatienter med høj kollagenproduktion reagerer dårligere på immunterapi
Research scientist Christina Jensen har i et studie vist, at patienter med melanomkræft har mindre effekt af immunterapien anti-PD1, hvis de har en høj kollagenproduktion målt i blodet.
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Olaparib øger chancerne for at overleve ovariekræft
Vedligeholdelsesterapi med PARP-hæmmeren olaparib forlænger overlevelsen med mere end ét år hos patienter med tilbagevendt ovariekræft og BRCA-mutation.
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Plum pickings: ancient fruit ripe for modern plates
A little-known indigenous fruit, which is one of the earliest-known plant foods eaten in Australia, could be the next big thing in bush foods.
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Avelumab viser lovende resultater ved sjælden gynækologisk kræftform
Et tidligt studie med immunterapien avelumab viser lovende resultater hos patienter med svangerskabs-trofoblastisk sygdom.
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Plum pickings: ancient fruit ripe for modern plates
A little-known indigenous fruit, which is one of the earliest-known plant foods eaten in Australia, could be the next big thing in bush foods.
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Sheep eyes are the window to their stressed out souls
Thermal imaging technology is being used by AgResearch scientists to gain greater insights into how livestock experience stress, and how that knowledge can help enhance animal welfare.
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Sheep eyes are the window to their stressed out souls
Thermal imaging technology is being used by AgResearch scientists to gain greater insights into how livestock experience stress, and how that knowledge can help enhance animal welfare.
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COVID generation faces 'dark age' of low social mobility—young Britons at risk of long-term damage to future life
The unprecedented economic and educational shocks of the COVID-19 pandemic could inflict long-term damage to young people's prospects in life, a new study finds.
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Video: How to discover your own fossil site
Have you ever wondered how a fossil site is discovered? Perhaps wondered what it would be like to find one of the rarest fossil finds in history? In this lecture, Lee Berger takes us back to the discovery of Malapa, a site that has been described as one of the most important fossil finds of the early 21st century and led to the discover of a new species of ancient human relative, the two million y
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Long childhoods and extended parenting help young crows grow smarter
Humans are unusual, even among primates, in the length of our "extended childhood." Scientists think that this period of childhood and adolescence, which gives us lots of time to explore, create, and learn, is a key reason why we are smart enough to learn skills that take years to master. But humans are not the only species with an extended childhood. Elephants, some bats, whales, dolphins, and so
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Bättre återvinning av batterier ger bättre nya batterier
Att mekanisk tvätta och separera återanvändbart material från gamla uttjänta batterier ger en bättre återvinning. Materialet kan användas direkt till bättre och billigare laddningsbara hydridbatterier, visar en ny studie av forskare vid Stockholms universitet. – Med den nya metoden kan det återvunna materialet direkt användas i nya batterier, säger Dag Noréus, professor vid Institutionen för mate
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Long childhoods and extended parenting help young crows grow smarter
Humans are unusual, even among primates, in the length of our "extended childhood." Scientists think that this period of childhood and adolescence, which gives us lots of time to explore, create, and learn, is a key reason why we are smart enough to learn skills that take years to master. But humans are not the only species with an extended childhood. Elephants, some bats, whales, dolphins, and so
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Particles trapped in twisted materials and quantum fingerprints identified
A paper by the Quantum Photonics Lab at Heriot-Watt, published today in top-tier Nature Materials, identifies how to trap interlayer excitons (IXs) and their quantum fingerprints. The IXs are trapped by the interaction of two sheets of atoms made of different transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), which are stacked together with a small twist to form a moiré pattern.
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The Protests Will Spread the Coronavirus
The wave of mass protests across the United States will almost certainly set off new chains of infection for the novel coronavirus, experts say. The virus seems to spread the most when people yell (such as to chant a slogan), sneeze (to expel pepper spray), or cough (after inhaling tear gas). It is transmitted most efficiently in crowds and large gatherings , and research has found that just a fe
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Dear Therapist: My Daughter Doesn't Care That I Want Her to Live Closer to Home
Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, Our daughter is engaged to a very nice man who is neither American nor of her religion. They are living together and working in his country. She is beautiful and talented, and has a graduate degree. She had a
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Could Covid-19 have reached the UK earlier than thought?
WHO is urging countries to investigate any suspicious deaths so virus can be better understood Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A day before the first confirmed fatality from coronavirus outside mainland China was reported on 2 February this year, the death of the influential guitarist and musician Andy Gill was announced. The 64-year-old, who fronted the post-punk ba
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How It Felt to Give My First Pelvic Exam
As a medical student, I found it surprisingly comfortable, because my "patient" was also my very patient instructor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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This Bot Hunts Software Bugs for the Pentagon
Mayhem emerged from a 2016 government-sponsored contest at a Las Vegas casino hotel. Now it's used by the military.
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Håller matteböckerna måttet – och hur används de egentligen?
Elever använder inte alltid matteboken såsom författaren avsett och ibland tränar de på helt andra saker än den pedagogiska poängen med övningarna. Det framkommer i en avhandling från Mittuniversitetet. – Min önskan är att alla barn ska se sig som matematiska individer, känna att matematik är något för dem. Samhället i stort behöver fler individer som väljer matematikkrävande utbildningar och yrk
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Junk bond nightmare of hair roots and split ends
In a fresh Covid-19 wave, Sally Beauty may beg for cash with nothing left for collateral
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Primark to reopen all English stores with social distancing in place
Fashion group warns measures will make it impossible for busier shops to achieve usual sales figures
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How It Felt to Give My First Pelvic Exam
As a medical student, I found it surprisingly comfortable, because my "patient" was also my very patient instructor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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From behind the Coronavirus Mask, an Unseen Smile Can Still Be Heard
Emotion researcher Ursula Hess explains why a facial expression can be detected when obscured by a face covering — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A Hidden COVID-19 Risk Factor: Your Boss
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . When the coronavirus first hit the United States, some politicians referred to it as the " great equalizer " because it supposedly didn't discriminate. But very soon, that proved not to be true. People of color are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, for example, and l
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From behind the Coronavirus Mask, an Unseen Smile Can Still Be Heard
Emotion researcher Ursula Hess explains why a facial expression can be detected when obscured by a face covering — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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From behind the Coronavirus Mask, an Unseen Smile Can Still Be Heard
Emotion researcher Ursula Hess explains why a facial expression can be detected when obscured by a face covering — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Coronavirus gives us a chance to transform our approach to the climate
Covid-19 has given us a glimpse of a world in which ways of life can be radically altered – it can be a turning point in our approach to the climate, if we choose to make it happen
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New review helps translate probiotic science into practical primary care recommendations
Probiotic supplements are widely available and are promoted as a general way to support the gut microbiome and promote health. A new publication in the Journal of Family Practice summarizes the latest evidence on using probiotics for a variety of specific health conditions, providing practical recommendations to assist primary care physicians in advising their patients. The article, authored by cu
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'Negligence' — a lot of it — leads to a retraction
Some words do more work in sentences than others. Take the example of the word "negligence," which in the case of the following retraction notice is a veritable beast of burden. The 2019 article, "Conservative management of subglottic stenosis with home based tracheostomy care: A retrospective review of 28 patients," appeared in the International Journal … Continue reading
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Gravearbejde til ny letbane: »Det er som en ormegård hver gang«
PLUS. Hovedstadens Letbane krydser otte kommuner og tusindvis af ledninger, hvis ejere må vige for infrastrukturen. Alene elnetselskabet Radius skal flytte på 750 kabler langs den 28 kilometer bane-strækning.
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Site-selective electrooxidation of methylarenes to aromatic acetals
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16519-8 Benzylic oxygenation of methylarenes is a direct but challenging method for aldehyde synthesis from simple starting materials. Here, the authors show an electrochemical, site-selective method for the oxidation of methyl benzoheterocycles to aromatic acetals without using chemical oxidants or transition metal cat
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Ancient genomes from northern China suggest links between subsistence changes and human migration
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16557-2 Northern China contains some of the world's earliest farming societies. Here, authors use 55 ancient genomes to trace the genetic history of human migrations across northern China for the last 7500 years, and document genetic changes mirroring shifts in subsistence strategy.
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AcrIF9 tethers non-sequence specific dsDNA to the CRISPR RNA-guided surveillance complex
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16512-1 The anti-CRISPR protein IF9 (AcrIF9) specifically inhibits the type I-F CRISPR adaptive immune system. Here, the authors present the cryo-EM structure of AcrIF9 in complex with the type I-F CRISPR RNA-guided surveillance complex (Csy) and a dsDNA bound Csy-AcrIF9 structure, and find that AcrIF9 binding to the Cs
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Triggering typical nemaline myopathy with compound heterozygous nebulin mutations reveals myofilament structural changes as pathomechanism
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16526-9 Nebulin-based nemaline myopathy is a heterogenous disease with unclear pathological mechanisms. Here, the authors generate a mouse model that mimics the most common genetic cause of the disease and demonstrate that muscle weakness in this model is associated with twisted actin filaments and altered tropomyosin a
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A genome-wide gain-of-function screen identifies CDKN2C as a HBV host factor
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16517-w Here the authors perform a gain-of-function screen and identify CDKN2C as a host factor for HBV replication, inducing cell cycle arrest and expression of HBV transcription enhancers. CDKN2C expression correlates with disease progression suggesting a potential role in HBV-induced liver disease.
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Evidence for simple volcanic rifting not complex subduction initiation in the Laxmi Basin
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16569-y Recently, Pandey et al proposed relict subduction initiation occurred along a passive margin in the northwest Indian Ocean. Here, Clift et al question the evidence for subduction initiation, suggesting that simpler rifting-related processes can more simply explain the available data for the Laxmi Basin.
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Specific fibroblast subpopulations and neuronal structures provide local sources of Vegfc-processing components during zebrafish lymphangiogenesis
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16552-7 How and where VEGF-C is processed in lymphangiogenesis is unclear. Here, the authors show that development of the zebrafish lymphatic system is locally restricted by Vegfc maturation causing lymphatic sprouting in certain regions, which is regulated by the metalloproteases ADAMTS3 and ADAMTS14.
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Ultrastrong coupling between nanoparticle plasmons and cavity photons at ambient conditions
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16524-x Achieving ultrastrong coupling requires demanding experimental conditions such as cryogenic temperatures, strong magnetic fields, and high vacuum. Here, the authors use plasmon-microcavity polaritons to achieve ultrastrong coupling at ambient conditions and without the use of magnetic fields.
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Which kind of face mask is the best protection against coronavirus?
Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply
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States Warn That Virus May Doom Climate Projects
A billion-dollar program to protect cities from climate change is at risk of failing because of the pandemic.
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Knep från kvantfysik släcker störande magnetfält
En spansk forskargrupp har använt ett materiatillstånd som kallas Bose-Einsteinkondensat och visat på ett sätt att använda det för känsliga mätningar. I ett Bose-Einsteinkondensat befinner sig många atomer i precis samma kvanttillstånd, och reagerar likadant. Men i det här fallet görs kondensatet på ett sätt som inte fryser fast partiklarnas spinn – en kvantmekanisk egenskap som matematiskt är som
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Remediation of diesel-contaminated soil enhanced with firefighting foam application
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65660-3
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Preparation of high drug-loading celastrol nanosuspensions and their anti-breast cancer activities in vitro and in vivo
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65773-9
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Postnatal loss of the insulin receptor in osteoprogenitor cells does not impart a metabolic phenotype
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65717-3
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Inhibition of PI3K by copanlisib exerts potent antitumor effects on Merkel cell carcinoma cell lines and mouse xenografts
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65637-2
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Implication of JAK1/STAT3/SOCS3 Pathway in Aging of Cerebellum of Male Rat: Histological and Molecular study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64050-z
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Successful selection of mouse sperm with high viability and fertility using microfluidics chip cell sorter
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65931-z
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Role of DNA-LL37 complexes in the activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells and monocytes in subjects with type 1 diabetes
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65851-y
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Scientists discover new forms of feldspars
In high-pressure experiments, scientists have discovered new forms of the common mineral feldspar. At moderate temperatures, these hitherto unknown variants are stable at pressures of Earth's upper mantle, where common feldspar normally cannot exist. The discovery could change the view at cold subducting plates and the interpretation of seismologic signatures, as the team around DESY scientist Ann
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Disorder in fish shoals may reap rewards at dinner time
The advantages of animals foraging in an orderly group are well-known, but research by the University of Bristol has found an element of unruly adventure can help fish in the quest for food.
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Ancient genomes link subsistence change and human migration in northern China
Northern China is among the first centers in the world where agriculture developed, but its genetic history remains largely unknown. In a new study published in Nature Communications, the eurasia3angle research group analyses 55 ancient genomes from China, finding new correlations between the intensification of subsistence strategies and human migration. This work provides a comprehensive archaeog
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Magnetic and electronic phase transitions probed by nanomechanical resonators
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16430-2 Electronics and magnetic phase transitions typically do not involve mechanical degrees of freedom directly, but their impact on thermodynamic properties affects the mechanical response of a material. Here the authors show that resonators made from 2D materials exhibit anomalies at phase transitions.
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Tetrameric architecture of an active phenol-bound form of the AAA+ transcriptional regulator DmpR
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16562-5 DmpR is a bacterial enhancer binding protein from the AAA+ family of ATPases that binds aromatic compounds and controls the transcription of genes involved in the degradation of toxic pollutants. Here, the authors present the crystal structure of phenol-bound DmpR, which forms a tetramer and discuss its signal t
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Hot carriers perspective on the nature of traps in perovskites
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16463-7 The benign nature of defects in lead halide perovskites is widely regarded as the basis for their outstanding optoelectronic properties. Here Righetto et al. overthrew this perception, revealing the defects' surprising potency to hot carriers and devised a strategy to suppress them.
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The central amygdala recruits mesocorticolimbic circuitry for pursuit of reward or pain
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16407-1 Brain disorders can create maladaptive attractions, such as in addiction or self-harming. Here the authors use multiple valence modes of the central amygdala to create such attractions, arbitrarily making rats into 'sucrose addicts' or 'cocaine addicts', or causing maladaptive attraction to shocks.
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Thin-film transistor-driven vertically stacked full-color organic light-emitting diodes for high-resolution active-matrix displays
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16551-8 To realize organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with improved resolution for display applications, a method for achieving high yield device fabrication is needed. Here, the authors report vertically-stacked transistor-driven full-color OLEDs with photolithography-processed intermediate electrodes.
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Urbanization and agricultural intensification destabilize animal communities differently than diversity loss
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16240-6 Environmental change and species diversity could jointly affect the stability of animal communities. Here the authors use citizen science data on bats, birds, and butterflies along urbanization and agricultural intensification gradients in France to show that both environmental change and diversity loss destabil
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Reply to 'Evidence for simple volcanic rifting not complex subduction initiation in the Laxmi Basin'
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16570-5 Recently, Pandey et al. proposed relict subduction initiation occurred along a passive margin in the northwest Indian Ocean, however, Clift et al. questioned their evidence for subduction initiation, suggesting that simpler rifting-related processes could more simply explain the available data. Here, Pandey et a
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Multi-site-mediated entwining of the linear WIR-motif around WIPI β-propellers for autophagy
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16523-y WIPI proteins are mammalian PROPPIN family phosphoinositide effectors that recognize a WIPI-interacting-region (WIR)-motif to recruit other regulators during autophagosome formation. Here, the authors combine structural and functional studies and present the crystal structure of human WIPI3 with a bound ATG2A WI
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Why we must teach students to solve big problems
Asking kids 'What do you want to be when you grow up?' is a question that used to make sense, says Jaime Casap. But it not longer does; the nature of automation and artificial intelligence means future jobs are likely to shift and reform many times over. Instead, educators should foster a culture of problem solving. Ask children: What problem do you want to solve? And what talents or passions do
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Disorder in fish shoals may reap rewards at dinner time
The advantages of animals foraging in an orderly group are well-known, but research by the University of Bristol has found an element of unruly adventure can help fish in the quest for food.
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Disorder in fish shoals may reap rewards at dinner time
The advantages of animals foraging in an orderly group are well-known, but research by the University of Bristol has found an element of unruly adventure can help fish in the quest for food.
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Government's Use of Algorithm Serves Up False Fraud Charges
Over a two-year period, the Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency used an automated system to charge more than 40,000 people, billing them about five times the original benefits, including repayment and fines of 400 percent plus interest. The agency later admitted 93 percent of the charges were erroneous.
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Starwatch: a subtle shadow on the face of the moon
Less spectacular than a total eclipse but no less interesting, the penumbral lunar eclipse to be seen on Friday will be well worth watching This week's astronomical event will be easy to see but hardly anyone will notice it. On 5 June, the full moon will clip the outer portion of Earth's shadow, creating a penumbral lunar eclipse. This is much subtler than a total lunar eclipse, in which the moon
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Coronavirus test and trace system 'creating false sense of security'
Ministers accused by city leaders and local councils of launching operation before it is ready to contain local outbreaks Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Ministers have been accused of creating a "false sense of security" by launching a test and trace system that is not yet capable of controlling local outbreaks. A series of concerns have been raised over the gaps in
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Nyckelgen i leukemi hittad
Akut myeloisk leukemi är en av de vanligaste formerna av blodcancer hos vuxna och är associerad med låg överlevnad. I Sverige insjuknar runt 350 personer årligen i denna aggressiva sjukdom som leder till att den normala blodbildningen hämmas. Nu har en forskargrupp vid Lunds universitet identifierat en av de gener som är grunden till att leukemistamcellerna överlever och förökar sig.
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Parkinson's disease may spread from brain to gut and vice versa
Research in baboons suggests that misfolded proteins linked to Parkinson's disease can travel from the brain to gut and vice versa – with both routes causing equal amounts of brain cell death
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Det lysner for elektriske motorcykler
Salgstallene for elektriske motorcykler er stadig meget små, men nu kan danske motorcyklister vælge mellem to mærker. Internationalt myldrer det frem med nye modeller.
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Wayward whale takes city break in Montreal
A young humpback whale that swam up one of Canada's major rivers and has been exploring the waters off Montreal for a few days was likely led astray while on a hunting trip, authorities have said.
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Wayward whale takes city break in Montreal
A young humpback whale that swam up one of Canada's major rivers and has been exploring the waters off Montreal for a few days was likely led astray while on a hunting trip, authorities have said.
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Ten years of ecosystem services matrix: Review of a (r)evolution
In recent years, the concept of Ecosystem Services (ES): the benefits people obtain from ecosystems, such as pollination provided by bees for crop growing, timber provided by forests or recreation enabled by appealing landscapes, has been greatly popularised, especially in the context of impeding ecological crises and constantly degrading natural environments.
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Ten years of ecosystem services matrix: Review of a (r)evolution
In recent years, the concept of Ecosystem Services (ES): the benefits people obtain from ecosystems, such as pollination provided by bees for crop growing, timber provided by forests or recreation enabled by appealing landscapes, has been greatly popularised, especially in the context of impeding ecological crises and constantly degrading natural environments.
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Quack Book Reviews: EMF*D
Über-quack Dr. Joe Mercola recently published a book claiming that 5G is the cause of all manner of health problems. Unsurprisingly, it's full of bad science, pseudoscience, and unproven claims.
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Can you solve it? The Zoom puzzle
How the ubiquitous app places our faces UPDATE: Solutions now up here. Today's first puzzle concerns Zoom. For those of you who have been hiding under a stone all lockdown, it is a video-conferencing app. 1) Deduce the Zoom algorithm for placing four faces, using the three screengrabs below taken from three different people's computers during the same meeting. For those who have never used Zoom b
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UK hospitals to trial five new drugs in search for coronavirus treatment
Exclusive: thirty hospitals looking to sign up hundreds of patients to take part in studies Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Five new drugs are to be trialled in 30 hospitals across the country in the race to find a treatment for Covid-19, it has emerged. Just days after global trials of hydroxychloroquine, the drug promoted by Donald Trump as a cure, were halted , Br
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Make Covid-19 recovery green, say business leaders
Well-known firms such as Asda and Lloyds Bank are urging ministers to prioritise the environment.
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Why Artificial Brains Need Sleep
submitted by /u/DeadPoolRace [link] [comments]
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Edward Bernays and Group Psychology : Manipulating the masses
submitted by /u/Truetree9999 [link] [comments]
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Coronavirus Live Updates: Hong Kong Bans Tiananmen Vigil, Citing Covid-19 Threat
It is the first time the June 4 event, which has been held annually since 1990, has been blocked. Protests in the United States have raised concerns about a second wave of infections.
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Vaccinmotstånd är inget nytt
Motstånd mot vaccinering är lika gammalt som vaccin Ända sedan Edward Jenners experiment i slutet på 1700-talet visade hur vaccinering med kokoppor kunde användas för att ge immunitet mot smittkoppor har det funnits vaccinmotståndare. Motståndarna förde fram varierande och komplexa argument baserade på hygieniska, religiösa och politiska skäl. När Storbritannien införde en lag om obligatorisk […]
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Researchers develop viable sodium battery
Washington State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have created a sodium-ion battery that holds as much energy and works as well as some commercial lithium-ion battery chemistries, making for a potentially viable battery technology out of abundant and cheap materials. The team reports one of the best results to date for a sodium-ion battery.
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Ten years of ecosystem services matrix: Review of a (r)evolution
One of the methods to assess Ecosystem Services (ES) – the benefits people obtain from ecosystems: the ES Matrix approach, has been increasingly used in the last decade. A review of its application, published in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal One Ecosystem, confirms its flexibility, appropriateness and utility for decision-making, as well as its ability to increase awareness. Nevertheless,
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Adherence to oral diabetes drugs may improve survival in diabetics with colorectal cancer
Among patients with both colorectal cancer and diabetes in Korea, those who had a high adherence to their oral diabetes medication had a significantly reduced risk of overall mortality compared with those with lower adherence.
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New test method can offer safer dosages of hydroxychloroquine
Researchers at Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital have developed a new method to measure levels of the medication hydroxychloroquine in patients with the rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The analysis method may also be useful in other areas, such as in the treatment of COVID-19. The study is being published in Arthritis Research and Therapy.
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Thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy being overdiagnosed, overtreated
The current practice of testing most pregnant women for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) may be leading to overdiagnosis and overtreatment, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191664
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June 2020 Interactive Crossword Puzzle
Try your hand at a sciency brainteaser.
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From the Crew Dragon to Mars: Cady Coleman on NASA's Path Forward
The veteran astronaut weighs in on the first US crewed flight since 2011, and what may come next.
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A revival stalled: coronavirus in America's rust-belt
The unemployment rate has soared in cities such as Detroit, which now face intensifying protests against police brutality
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Ireland plunged back into fight against deficit and job losses
Coronavirus hit to growth stokes tensions over spending as parties attempt to form coalition
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Six businesses finding an upside in the coronavirus crisis
Parts of the corporate world have benefited from changes to the way we work, talk, eat and shop
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Angrynomics, by Eric Lonergan and Mark Blyth
An ingenious solution for an unequal world brought into sharp relief by the coronavirus pandemic
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Mind Over Mood: Understanding Anxiety and Depression
Anxiety and depression are two of the most common conditions affecting mental health and overall quality of life, but there are tools for managing them. In this eBook, we'll explore how… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Father of Autoimmunity: A Profile of Noel Rose
By revealing that animals could develop immune responses against their own tissues, the physician-scientist established an entirely new field of science.
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Host Cells Release Exosomes to Sop Up Bacterial Toxins
During bacterial infection, autophagy proteins appear to regulate the release of cell-saving exosomes, which bear the brunt of toxin damage.
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Infographic: Synthetases and the Evolution of Circulatory Systems
Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases picked up new protein domains that participate in vasculature formation around the same time that organisms evolved key adaptations in the circulatory system.
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Left-Handed DNA Has a Biological Role Within a Dynamic Genetic Code
Once considered an unimportant curiosity, Z-DNA is now recognized to provide an on-the-fly mechanism to regulate how an RNA transcript is edited.
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Infographic: Vaccines on Film
How an experimental preparation technique could make vaccines easier to transport, store, and administer
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Contributors
Meet some of the people featured in the June 2020 issue of The Scientist.
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Confronting a Pandemic, 1957
Microbiologist Maurice Hilleman foresaw the global spread of a novel influenza strain in 1957. His vaccine saved hundreds of thousands of lives.
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Janelle Ayres Explores the Ways in Which Animals Tolerate Disease
The Salk Institute researcher was one of the first to show that killing a pathogen isn't the only way to survive an infection.
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Vaccines Without Vials, Fridges, or Needles
A novel preparation technique could facilitate vaccine preservation, transportation, and administration.
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The Infant Gut Microbiome and Probiotics that Work
The gut microbiome is more malleable in the first two years after birth, allowing probiotics to make their mark. Can we exploit this to improve infants' health?
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Infographic: DNA Isn't Always Right-Handed
When the nucleic acid spirals to the left, it takes on a zig-zag shape known as Z-DNA that appears to regulate RNA editing.
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When Your Supervisor Is Accused of Research Misconduct
Early career researchers face unique challenges when a senior collaborator becomes embroiled in allegations of scientific malpractice.
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Infographic: The Changing Infant Gut Microbiome
The microbial makeup of a newborn baby's intestines has changed dramatically over the past 100 years, and we are now beginning to understand how and why this matters.
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A Citizen Scientist Makes Her Mark in Microbiome Research
The BioCollective, a company that transforms whole stool samples into microbial metadata, is developing the US's first national microbiome reference material.
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The Gut's Influence on Sociability
Gut Microbiome Composition Linked to Human Behavior A study uncovers connections between the bacteria in our guts and our social lives.
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Ten Minute Sabbatical
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
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The Hidden World of Millipede Sex
Researchers use advanced imaging techniques to see what happens when a male and a female mate.
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How Squirrels Use Bird Chatter to Assess Safety
An undergraduate research project finds the animals are tuned in to reassuring information from other species.
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Infographic: How Cells Use Decoys to Defend Against Pathogens
Specialized exosomes sop up bacterial toxins, a study finds.
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Armchair Virologists
Pretending to be a javelin aficionado is one thing. Professing to have real insight into the ongoing pandemic is quite another.
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Protein Synthesis Enzymes Have Evolved Additional Jobs
Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which help translate the genetic code into protein, also function in angiogenesis, fat metabolism, and more.
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Did Contaminated Water Exacerbate Brazilian Babies' Zika Symptoms?
Elevated levels of a neurotoxin in northeastern Brazil's drinking water and a high incidence of microcephaly in the region led scientists to look for a link, and they found one.
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Revolutionary Repurposing
Evolution needn't make improbable leaps to facilitate transitions into uncharted biological territory. Adapting new uses for existing structures works just fine.
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Coronavirus: Belgian zoo comes back to life from lockdown
After two months without visitors, Pairi Daiza is welcoming the public back, but in smaller numbers.
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The little lights now packing a deadly punch
LEDs already light our houses but developments are making them even more powerful.
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Will UK wave of state aid recede with coronavirus?
Support for employees and business was intended to be short term but may prove hard to end
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Coronavirus: The mystery of asymptomatic 'silent spreaders'
Scientists have discovered more evidence about a strange and worrying feature of the coronavirus
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COVID Has Changed Soundscapes Worldwide
The Silent Cities project is collecting sound from cities around the planet during the coronavirus pandemic to give researchers a database of natural sound in areas usually filled with human-generated noise.
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COVID Has Changed Soundscapes Worldwide
The Silent Cities project is collecting sound from cities around the planet during the coronavirus pandemic to give researchers a database of natural sound in areas usually filled with… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The COVID Stress Scales
Danger. Deprivation. Xenophobia. Contamination. These are some of the fears related to COVID-19. Scores of COVID questionnaires have popped up recently to assess fear, anxiety, stress, and depression related to the novel coronavirus and its massive disruption to daily life. Most are freely available for use as research tools, but few have been validated and peer reviewed. (CSS) developed by Tayl
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New study shows how ketamine combats depression
The anaesthetic drug ketamine has been shown, in low doses, to have a rapid effect on difficult-to-treat depression. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet now report that they have identified a key target for the drug: specific serotonin receptors in the brain. Their findings, which are published in Translational Psychiatry, give hope of new, effective antidepressants.
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Conservation: Glimmer of hope for world's rarest primate
The discovery of a new breeding pair raises hope for the future of a critically endangered gibbon.
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Impact of children's loneliness today could manifest in depression for years to come
A rapid review into the mental health impacts of loneliness on children and young people concludes that there could be a spike in demand for mental health services in the years to come.
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ASCO 2020: UK-first study shows feasibility of genetic screening for prostate cancer
Genetic screening for prostate cancer in GP surgeries could be effective at picking up otherwise undiagnosed cases of the disease, a new pilot study shows.
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Extended parenting helps young birds grow smarter
The current study analyzes social and life-history data from several thousand songbirds, including 127 corvids, the family that includes jays, crows, ravens, and magpies. Results show that corvids are unusual in having larger brains and 'extended childhoods,' where parents provide the young with a safe haven to learn and practice skills they need to survive as adults. These findings shed light on
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UK business leaders call for green coronavirus recovery plan
Corporate bosses want future bailouts to be tied to net zero climate target
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How Much Color Do We Really See?
Most people don't notice massive color distortion in their peripheral vision.
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Will Protests Set Off a Second Viral Wave?
Across the country, mayors, public health experts and other officials worry that even though many protesters are wearing masks, the risk of new coronavirus cases will increase as thousands gather.
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Happy-Go-Lucky in the Time of COVID-19
New research highlights the risks of unrealistic optimism during the coronavirus pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Half the matter in the universe was missing. We found it hiding between galaxies.
Diligence, technological progress, and a little luck have together solved a 20-year mystery in the cosmos. (CSIRO/Alex Cherney/) J. Xavier Prochaska is a professor of Astronomy & Astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Jean-Pierre Macquart is an associate professor of Astrophysics at Curtin University. This story originally featured on The Conversation . In the late 1990s, cosmo
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The Police Can Still Choose Nonviolence
(Amandla Baraka) As protesters march against police brutality in cities around the nation, the police are out in force, ostensibly to quell violence and keep the peace—that's one of the core functions of a police department. But given that these protests are responding to police violence in the first place, there's no reason to believe that a massive show of police force will restore peace. It's
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UK banks warn 40%-50% of 'bounce back' borrowers will default
Lenders fear a 'PR disaster' if they have to pursue small businesses for bad debts
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In Historic First, SpaceX Successfully Launches NASA Astronauts Into Space
Elon Musk's rocket company came through, becoming the first private enterprise to put a human in orbit. The launch also restored America's ability to launch astronauts from its own soil.
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Emirates cuts jobs as coronavirus hammers aviation
Airline employs about 60,000 people but did not identify total number of redundancies
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Nevada home to 246M-year-old fossil of pregnant ichthyosaur
Autumn was closing in fast on northern Nevada when Martin Sander took one last look around the excavation site in the Augusta Mountains 150 miles (241 kilometers) east of Reno.
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The Congresswoman Pepper-Sprayed by Police
Joyce Beatty had never been pepper-sprayed before. Growing up in Dayton during the 1960s, the 70-year-old Ohio congresswoman remembers having to use a different water fountain from the white people in her community, and having to swim in a different public pool. Throughout her life and political career, which began in the state legislature in the late '90s, she'd taken part in many civil-rights d
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The America I Love Needs to Do Better
I immigrated to America in 1968. I had dreamed about coming here from the moment I saw images of the United States in elementary school. To me, the photos and film of towering skyscrapers, huge bridges, wide freeways, and Hollywood represented a land of limitless opportunity. I decided that this was where I belonged. America was in the middle of a race to the moon, and at the end of 1968, we watc
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How to Protest Safely in the Age of Surveillance
Law enforcement has more tools than ever to track your movements and access your communications. Here's how to protect your privacy if you plan to protest.
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Crime in a future where everyone has Basic needs covered
Hi everyone! I am a norwegian writer who's currently working on a sci-fi novel. The story has an optimistic future vision, where society has evolved, with the help of AI, to a point where everyone has basic needs (house, clothes, food, electricity, internet) covered for free. My question is: What kind of crimes would still be present in a society like this? submitted by /u/Sjakktrekk [link] [comm
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Multiverse Theory
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Different perceptions of A.I.
Hey, I have to write an essay for school and the thing I have to write about is how different generations perceive A.I. I looked on the internet for it but didn't really find anything useful, does anyone know where I can find a credible source about this subject? It would also be interesting to read about how different cultures or ethnicities perceive A.I., but the most important thing is how dif
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How We Broke the World
submitted by /u/Splenda [link] [comments]
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German firm introducing game-changing solar-wind-wave energy platform
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China's Baidu completes 'world's largest' autonomous vehicle test ground
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UK's Largest Solar Project Approved, Will Snub Government Subsidies
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Future tech and gadgets!!
What are some technologies and gadgets that we are close to making a reality? Which on is you favorite? What technology is still in the distance that you are really looking forward? submitted by /u/tybedrosian [link] [comments]
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In virus-hit South Korea, AI monitors lonely elders
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Test your ISS docking skills
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Designing an end to a toxic American obsession: The Lawn
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Japanese golf course becomes 100 MW solar park
submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]
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Microsoft lays off journalists to replace them with AI
submitted by /u/MsKim [link] [comments]
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