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Bees grooming each other can boost colony immunity
Honeybees that specialise in grooming their nestmates (allogroomers) to ward off pests play a central role in the colony, finds a new UCL and University of Florence study published in Scientific Reports.
8h
UK excess deaths during pandemic reach 62,000
Fatalities in England and Wales are currently 24% higher than normal levels
6h
Hvis dansk græs skal erstatte sydamerikansk soja, vil det ændre landskabet
PLUS. Det kræver 40 pct. af Danmarks landbrugsareal – eller hvad der svarer til et areal på størrelse med Fyn og Sjælland tilsammen – hvis importeret soja til danske svin skal erstattes med græs i morgen.
13h
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LATEST

Pubs and restaurants to face new restrictions when they reopen
Hospitality sector will be one of last to relaunch following coronavirus lockdown
now
Discoveries of high-Chern-number and high-temperature Chern insulator states
The Quantum Hall effect (QHE) is one of the most important discoveries in physical sciences. Due to the one-dimensional (1-D) dissipationless edge states, QHE exhibits exotic transport properties with quantized Hall resistance of h/νe2 and vanishing longitudinal resistance. Here, h is Planck's constant, ν is Landau filling factor and e is electron charge. QHE usually originates from the formation
2min
Surgisphere and Their Data
So we have a very strange situation with some recent publications, one that deserves a closer look. The ones I refer to are the recent Lancet retrospective study on hydroxychloroquine use (blogged about here ), one of the hospital data studies on the effect of anti-angiotensin therapies on the outcomes of coronavirus patients, and a preprint about the use of Ivermectin against the coronavirus (me
9min
Trækfugle kommer med kæmpe-flåter: Kan bringe ebola-lignende sygdom til Danmark
Flere nye flåt-arter kan være ved at etablere sig i Danmark i disse år.
13min
App promises to improve pain management in dementia patients
University of Alberta computing scientists are developing an app to aid health-care staff to assess and manage pain in patients suffering from dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases.
16min
Understanding the role of cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in brain health
Researchers at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated that brain chemistry is sensitive to fitness and body composition.
16min
Tulane scientists find a switch to flip and turn off breast cancer growth and metastasis
Researchers at Tulane University School of Medicine identified a gene that causes an aggressive form of breast cancer to rapidly grow. More importantly, they have also discovered a way to "turn it off" and inhibit cancer from occurring. The animal study results have been so compelling that the team is now working on FDA approval to begin clinical trials and has published details in the journal Sci
16min
Blood markers predict Humboldt penguin nest type, reproductive success
Researchers looked at metabolic markers in the blood of 30 Humboldt penguins nesting in the Punta San Juan Marine Protected Area in Peru. The scientists discovered metabolic differences between penguins nesting in sheltered burrows and those in more exposed areas. Nesting success is critical to the Humboldt penguins' survival as a species.
27min
Climate change could dramatically reduce future US snowstorms
A new study suggests American winters late this century could experience significant decreases in the frequency, intensity and size of snowstorms. Under an unabated greenhouse gas emissions scenario, the study projects 28% fewer snowstorms on average per year over central and eastern portions of North America by the century's last decade.
27min
Marine biologists forecast the effects of oil platform decommissioning on fish communities
Biologists and fishermen alike know that offshore oil platforms function as de facto habitats for fish. The structures climb hundreds of feet into the water column, creating a prefab reef out in open water. But many of these platforms will soon be decommissioned, and government agencies are considering the potential ecological effects in deciding how this will be done.
29min
Two Studies Find That Humidity Prevents Coronavirus Spread
Two independent studies have identified a useful tool for stopping the coronavirus: humid air. According to the research, dry air not only hampers our lungs' ability to clear out respiratory viruses like SARS-CoV-2, but also makes it harder for our immune systems to fight it off once we've been infected, Newsweek reports. And on the contrary, relative humidity between 40 and 60 percent seems to m
30min
Scientists rush to defend Venezuelan colleagues threatened over coronavirus study
High-level politician suggests academy deserves retribution for publishing unwelcome COVID-19 estimates
31min
New model shows how diamond-carrying rocks formed in Northern Alberta
A new study by University of Alberta geologists is proposing a new model for explaining the eruption of diamond-bearing kimberlites in Northern Alberta.
31min
NASA analyzes Gulf of Mexico's reborn tropical depression soaking potential
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that strong storms from a redeveloped tropical cyclone were soaking parts of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Tropical Depression 03L is expected to generate heavy rainfall in the region.
31min
Marine biologists forecast the effects of oil platform decommissioning on fish communities
Biologists and fishermen alike know that offshore oil platforms function as de facto habitats for fish. The structures climb hundreds of feet into the water column, creating a prefab reef out in open water. But many of these platforms will soon be decommissioned, and government agencies are considering the potential ecological effects in deciding how this will be done.
31min
Spike-induced ordering: Stochastic neural spikes provide immediate adaptability to the sensorimotor system [Systems Biology]
Most biological neurons exhibit stochastic and spiking action potentials. However, the benefits of stochastic spikes versus continuous signals other than noise tolerance and energy efficiency remain largely unknown. In this study, we provide an insight into the potential roles of stochastic spikes, which may be beneficial for producing on-site adaptability…
32min
Habituation as a neural algorithm for online odor discrimination [Computer Sciences]
Habituation is a form of simple memory that suppresses neural activity in response to repeated, neutral stimuli. This process is critical in helping organisms guide attention toward the most salient and novel features in the environment. Here, we follow known circuit mechanisms in the fruit fly olfactory system to derive…
32min
Late-spring frost risk between 1959 and 2017 decreased in North America but increased in Europe and Asia [Ecology]
Late-spring frosts (LSFs) affect the performance of plants and animals across the world's temperate and boreal zones, but despite their ecological and economic impact on agriculture and forestry, the geographic distribution and evolutionary impact of these frost events are poorly understood. Here, we analyze LSFs between 1959 and 2017 and…
32min
Characterizing long-range search behavior in Diptera using complex 3D virtual environments [Ecology]
The exemplary search capabilities of flying insects have established them as one of the most diverse taxa on Earth. However, we still lack the fundamental ability to quantify, represent, and predict trajectories under natural contexts to understand search and its applications. For example, flying insects have evolved in complex multimodal…
32min
Specialized meltwater biodiversity persists despite widespread deglaciation [Ecology]
Glaciers are important drivers of environmental heterogeneity and biological diversity across mountain landscapes. Worldwide, glaciers are receding rapidly due to climate change, with important consequences for biodiversity in mountain ecosystems. However, the effects of glacier loss on biodiversity have never been quantified across a mountainous region, primarily due to a…
32min
Dynamics and functional diversity of the smallest phytoplankton on the Northeast US Shelf [Ecology]
Picophytoplankton are the most abundant primary producers in the ocean. Knowledge of their community dynamics is key to understanding their role in marine food webs and global biogeochemical cycles. To this end, we analyzed a 16-y time series of observations of a phytoplankton community at a nearshore site on the…
32min
A near full-length HIV-1 genome from 1966 recovered from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue [Evolution]
With very little direct biological data of HIV-1 from before the 1980s, far-reaching evolutionary and epidemiological inferences regarding the long prediscovery phase of this pandemic are based on extrapolations by phylodynamic models of HIV-1 genomic sequences gathered mostly over recent decades. Here, using a very sensitive multiplex RT-PCR assay, we…
32min
Tibetan PHD2, an allele with loss-of-function properties [Evolution]
Tibetans have adapted to the chronic hypoxia of high altitude and display a distinctive suite of physiologic adaptations, including augmented hypoxic ventilatory response and resistance to pulmonary hypertension. Genome-wide studies have consistently identified compelling genetic signatures of natural selection in two genes of the Hypoxia Inducible Factor pathway, PHD2 and…
32min
{beta}-Oxidation and autophagy are critical energy providers during acute glucose depletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Genetics]
The ability to tolerate and thrive in diverse environments is paramount to all living organisms, and many organisms spend a large part of their lifetime in starvation. Upon acute glucose starvation, yeast cells undergo drastic physiological and metabolic changes and reestablish a constant—although lower—level of energy production within minutes. The…
32min
Viral infection impacts transposable element transcript amounts in Drosophila [Genetics]
Transposable elements (TEs) are genomic parasites that are found in all genomes, some of which display sequence similarity to certain viruses. In insects, TEs are controlled by the Piwi-interacting small interfering RNA (piRNA) pathway in gonads, while the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway is dedicated to TE somatic control and…
32min
Epigenetic conversion of conventional T cells into regulatory T cells by CD28 signal deprivation [Immunology and Inflammation]
Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) can be generated in vitro by antigenic stimulation of conventional T cells (Tconvs) in the presence of TGF-β and IL-2. However, unlike Foxp3+ naturally occurring Tregs, such in vitro induced Tregs (iTregs) are functionally unstable mainly because of incomplete Treg-type epigenetic changes at Treg signature…
32min
Activin-A limits Th17 pathogenicity and autoimmune neuroinflammation via CD39 and CD73 ectonucleotidases and Hif1-{alpha}-dependent pathways [Immunology and Inflammation]
In multiple sclerosis (MS), Th17 cells are critical drivers of autoimmune central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and demyelination. Th17 cells exhibit functional heterogeneity fostering both pathogenic and nonpathogenic, tissue-protective functions. Still, the factors that control Th17 pathogenicity remain incompletely defined. Here, using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an establish
32min
CXCL5-mediated recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavity of Gdf15-deficient mice protects against abdominal sepsis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction condition caused by a dysregulated host response to an infection. Here we report that the circulating levels of growth and differentiation factor-15 (GDF15) are strongly increased in septic shock patients and correlate with mortality. In mice, we find that peptidoglycan is a potent ligand…
32min
Polygenic risk for skin autoimmunity impacts immune checkpoint blockade in bladder cancer [Immunology and Inflammation]
PD-1 and PD-L1 act to restrict T cell responses in cancer and contribute to self-tolerance. Consistent with this role, PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors have been associated with immune-related adverse events (irAEs), immune toxicities thought to be autoimmune in origin. Analyses of dermatological irAEs have identified an association with improved overall survival…
32min
Marginal zone SIGN-R1+ macrophages are essential for the maturation of germinal center B cells in the spleen [Immunology and Inflammation]
The mechanisms that regulate germinal center (GC) B cell responses in the spleen are not fully understood. Here we use a combination of pharmacologic and genetic approaches to delete SIGN-R1+ marginal zone (MZ) macrophages and reveal their specific contribution to the regulation of humoral immunity in the spleen. We find…
32min
TRM integrins CD103 and CD49a differentially support adherence and motility after resolution of influenza virus infection [Immunology and Inflammation]
Tissue-resident memory CD8 T (TRM) cells are a unique immune memory subset that develops and remains in peripheral tissues at the site of infection, providing future host resistance upon reexposure to that pathogen. In the pulmonary system, TRM are identified through S1P antagonist CD69 and expression of integrins CD103/β7 and…
32min
Transcriptional profiling identifies an androgen receptor activity-low, stemness program associated with enzalutamide resistance [Medical Sciences]
The androgen receptor (AR) antagonist enzalutamide is one of the principal treatments for men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, not all patients respond, and resistance mechanisms are largely unknown. We hypothesized that genomic and transcriptional features from metastatic CRPC biopsies prior to treatment would be predictive of de novo…
32min
Lumefantrine, an antimalarial drug, reverses radiation and temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma [Medical Sciences]
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive cancer without currently effective therapies. Radiation and temozolomide (radio/TMZ) resistance are major contributors to cancer recurrence and failed GBM therapy. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), through regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), provide mechanistic pathways contributing to the develop
32min
Combined loss of function of two different loci of miR-15/16 drives the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia [Medical Sciences]
Double knockout of the two miR-15/16 loci in mouse resulted in the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This result suggested that, at least, a fraction of human AMLs could be due to a similar mechanism. We analyzed the role of the two miR-15/16 clusters in 93 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)…
32min
KLF7 promotes pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis by up-regulating ISG expression and maintaining Golgi complex integrity [Medical Sciences]
Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive cancer with a dismal prognosis. Currently, there is no effective therapy for PDAC, and a detailed molecular and functional evaluation of PDACs is needed to identify and develop better therapeutic strategies. Here we show that the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 7 (KLF7) is…
32min
Imaging lutein and zeaxanthin in the human retina with confocal resonance Raman microscopy [Medical Sciences]
Lutein and zeaxanthin are xanthophyll carotenoids that are highly concentrated in the human macula, where they protect the eye from oxidative damage and improve visual performance. Distinguishing lutein from zeaxanthin in images of the human retina in vivo or in donor eye tissues has been challenging because no available technology…
32min
Hepsin enhances liver metabolism and inhibits adipocyte browning in mice [Medical Sciences]
Hepsin is a transmembrane serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. To date, the physiological function of hepsin remains poorly defined. Here we report that hepsin-deficient mice have low levels of blood glucose and lipids and liver glycogen, but increased adipose tissue browning and basal metabolic rates. The phenotype is…
32min
Tenofovir prodrugs potently inhibit Epstein-Barr virus lytic DNA replication by targeting the viral DNA polymerase [Microbiology]
Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous human γ-herpesvirus that establishes life-long infection and increases the risk for the development of several cancers and autoimmune diseases. The mechanisms by which chronic EBV infection leads to subsequent disease remain incompletely understood. Lytic reactivation plays a central role in the development of EBV-driven…
32min
Spatial mapping of polymicrobial communities reveals a precise biogeography associated with human dental caries [Microbiology]
Tooth decay (dental caries) is a widespread human disease caused by microbial biofilms. Streptococcus mutans, a biofilm-former, has been consistently associated with severe childhood caries; however, how this bacterium is spatially organized with other microorganisms in the oral cavity to promote disease remains unknown. Using intact biofilms formed on teeth…
32min
l-Arginine sensing regulates virulence gene expression and disease progression in enteric pathogens [Microbiology]
Microbiota, host and dietary metabolites/signals compose the rich gut chemical environment, which profoundly impacts virulence of enteric pathogens. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) engages a syringe-like machinery named type-III secretion system (T3SS) to inject effectors within host cells that lead to intestinal colonization and disease. We previously conducted a high-throughput screen.
32min
Host nutrient milieu drives an essential role for aspartate biosynthesis during invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection [Microbiology]
The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is capable of infecting a broad spectrum of host tissues, in part due to flexibility of metabolic programs. S. aureus, like all organisms, requires essential biosynthetic intermediates to synthesize macromolecules. We therefore sought to determine the metabolic pathways contributing to synthesis of essential precursors during…
34min
Absence of Sac2/INPP5F enhances the phenotype of a Parkinson's disease mutation of synaptoȷanin 1 [Neuroscience]
Numerous genes whose mutations cause, or increase the risk of, Parkinson's disease (PD) have been identified. An inactivating mutation (R258Q) in the Sac inositol phosphatase domain of synaptojanin 1 (SJ1/PARK20), a phosphoinositide phosphatase implicated in synaptic vesicle recycling, results in PD. The gene encoding Sac2/INPP5F, another Sac domain-containing protein, is…
34min
The {beta}-arrestin-biased {beta}-adrenergic receptor blocker carvedilol enhances skeletal muscle contractility [Pharmacology]
A decrease in skeletal muscle strength and functional exercise capacity due to aging, frailty, and muscle wasting poses major unmet clinical needs. These conditions are associated with numerous adverse clinical outcomes including falls, fractures, and increased hospitalization. Clenbuterol, a β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonist enhances skeletal muscle strength and hypertrophy; however,…
34min
Evaluation of plant sources for antiinfective lead compound discovery by correlating phylogenetic, spatial, and bioactivity data [Pharmacology]
Antibiotic resistance and viral diseases are rising around the world and are becoming major threats to global health, food security, and development. One measure that has been suggested to mitigate this crisis is the development of new antibiotics. Here, we provide a comprehensive evaluation of the phylogenetic and biogeographic patterns…
34min
Chloroplast Sec14-like 1 (CPSFL1) is essential for normal chloroplast development and affects carotenoid accumulation in Chlamydomonas [Plant Biology]
Plastid isoprenoid-derived carotenoids serve essential roles in chloroplast development and photosynthesis. Although nearly all enzymes that participate in the biosynthesis of carotenoids in plants have been identified, the complement of auxiliary proteins that regulate synthesis, transport, sequestration, and degradation of these molecules and their isoprenoid precursors have not been fully…
34min
Transcriptomic network analyses shed light on the regulation of cuticle development in maize leaves [Plant Biology]
Plant cuticles are composed of wax and cutin and evolved in the land plants as a hydrophobic boundary that reduces water loss from the plant epidermis. The expanding maize adult leaf displays a dynamic, proximodistal gradient of cuticle development, from the leaf base to the tip. Laser microdissection RNA Sequencing…
34min
Genomic evidence for convergent evolution of gene clusters for momilactone biosynthesis in land plants [Plant Biology]
Momilactones are bioactive diterpenoids that contribute to plant defense against pathogens and allelopathic interactions between plants. Both cultivated and wild grass species of Oryza and Echinochloa crus-galli (barnyard grass) produce momilactones using a biosynthetic gene cluster (BGC) in their genomes. The bryophyte Calohypnum plumiforme (formerly Hypnum plumaeforme) also produces momilactones
34min
Cognitive and brain development is independently influenced by socioeconomic status and polygenic scores for educational attainment [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Genetic factors and socioeconomic status (SES) inequalities play a large role in educational attainment, and both have been associated with variations in brain structure and cognition. However, genetics and SES are correlated, and no prior study has assessed their neural associations independently. Here we used a polygenic score for educational…
34min
Patterns of sociocognitive stratification and perinatal risk in the child brain [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
The expanding behavioral repertoire of the developing brain during childhood and adolescence is shaped by complex brain–environment interactions and flavored by unique life experiences. The transition into young adulthood offers opportunities for adaptation and growth but also increased susceptibility to environmental perturbations, such as the characteristics of social relationships, family…
34min
New spatial analyses of Australian wildfires highlight the need for new fire, resource, and conservation policies [Sustainability Science]
Extensive and recurrent severe wildfires present complex challenges for policy makers. This is highlighted by extensive wildfires around the globe, ranging from western North America and Europe to the Amazon and Arctic, and, most recently, the 2019–2020 fires in eastern Australia. In many jurisdictions, discussions after significant losses of life,…
34min
Correction for Pedercini et al., Harvesting synergy from sustainable development goal interactions [Correction]
SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE Correction for "Harvesting synergy from sustainable development goal interactions," by Matteo Pedercini, Steve Arquitt, David Collste, and Hans Herren, which was first published October 30, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1817276116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 23021–23028). The authors note that the following statement should be added to the Acknowledgments: "D.C….
34min
Correction for Sharma et al., Posttranscriptional regulation of interleukin-10 expression by hsa-miR-106a [Correction]
IMMUNOLOGY Correction for "Posttranscriptional regulation of interleukin-10 expression by hsa-miR-106a," by Amit Sharma, Manish Kumar, Jyotirmoi Aich, Manoj Hariharan, Samir K. Brahmachari, Anurag Agrawal, and Balaram Ghosh, which was first published March 23, 2009; 10.1073/pnas.0808743106 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 5761–5766). The authors note that Fig. 4C and Fig….
34min
Correction for Namouchi et al., Integrative approach using Yersinia pestis genomes to revisit the historical landscape of plague during the Medieval Period [Correction]
MICROBIOLOGY Correction for "Integrative approach using Yersinia pestis genomes to revisit the historical landscape of plague during the Medieval Period," by Amine Namouchi, Meriam Guellil, Oliver Kersten, Stephanie Hänsch, Claudio Ottoni, Boris V. Schmid, Elsa Pacciani, Luisa Quaglia, Marco Vermunt, Egil L. Bauer, Michael Derrick, Anne Ø. Jensen, Sacha Kacki,…
34min
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
Phylogenetically guided drug discovery Species-rich rainforests of Mount Halimun Salak National Park, Java, Indonesia. Multidrug-resistant bacteria have emerged as a major global public health threat resulting from high antibiotic use in healthcare and livestock, prompting the need to identify new antibiotics. Laura Holzmeyer, Anne-Kathrin Hartig, Jan Schnitzler, et al. (pp….
34min
Do puffins use tools? [Biological Sciences]
A recent article by Fayet et al. (1) reports two observations of wild puffins (Fratercula arctica) from two geographical locations touching different body parts with a stick. The behaviors are interpreted as unprecedented evidence of tool use in a seabird. However, there is another existing report of tool use in…
34min
Reply to Auersperg et al.: Puffin tool use is no fluke [Biological Sciences]
Auersperg et al. (1) question whether our observations (2) provide compelling evidence of tool use in puffins. While we welcome their possible alternative explanations in which birds picked up sticks for another purpose, then scratched only accidentally, we argue that 1) these other purposes are unlikely given the behavioral ecology…
34min
Simplified model assumptions artificially constrain the parameter range in which selection at the holobiont level can occur [Biological Sciences]
van Vliet and Doebeli (1) present a multilevel selection framework simulating host–microbiome evolutionary dynamics. The model explores the conditions under which the association between hosts and their "helper" microbiome—microbes that developed a trait that provides a benefit to the host at a cost to themselves—is strong enough to allow for…
34min
Reply to Daybog and Kolodny: Necessary requirements for holobiont-level selection are robust to model assumptions [Biological Sciences]
Daybog and Kolodny (1) extend our multilevel selection model for host–microbiome dynamics (2) by using a nonlinear relation between helper frequency and host fitness. They use a step function where host fitness increases 19-fold when the helper frequency reaches 1% and compare this to our linear response where host fitness…
34min
Oocyte aneuploidy—more tools to tackle an old problem [Genetics]
Meiosis generates a single-copy genome during two successive rounds of cell division after a single round of DNA replication. Failure to transmit exactly one copy of each chromosome during fertilization gives rise to aneuploid embryos resulting in infertility and congenital abnormalities such as Down's syndrome. Aneuploidy attributable to meiotic errors…
34min
A new pathway of macrophage cholesterol efflux [Medical Sciences]
Macrophage foam cells (i.e., cholesteryl ester-laden macrophages) are abundant in atherosclerotic plaques, and increased macrophage foam cell content is associated with plaque instability (1, 2). Macrophages are generally thought to unload surplus cholesterol via efflux mediated by the ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1 (ABCA1 and ABCG1) to apolipoprotein A1…
34min
Climate change and the aridification of North America [Environmental Sciences]
Discussions of droughts and their impacts often center on the lack of precipitation, just as assessments of hydrologic impacts under a changing climate most often focus on how average precipitation in a given locale is likely to change in the future. Within climate science, however, focus has begun to include…
34min
Evaluation of musculoskeletal phenotype of the G608G progeria mouse model with lonafarnib, pravastatin, and zoledronic acid as treatment groups [Applied Biological Sciences]
Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a uniformly fatal condition that is especially prevalent in skin, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal systems. A wide gap exists between our knowledge of the disease and a promising treatment or cure. The aim of this study was to first characterize the musculoskeletal phenotype of the homozygous…
34min
Induction of defense in cereals by 4-fluorophenoxyacetic acid suppresses insect pest populations and increases crop yields in the field [Agricultural Sciences]
Synthetic chemical elicitors, so called plant strengtheners, can protect plants from pests and pathogens. Most plant strengtheners act by modifying defense signaling pathways, and little is known about other mechanisms by which they may increase plant resistance. Moreover, whether plant strengtheners that enhance insect resistance actually enhance crop yields is…
34min
Rational design principles for giant spin Hall effect in 5d-transition metal oxides [Applied Physical Sciences]
Spin Hall effect (SHE), a mechanism by which materials convert a charge current into a spin current, invokes interesting physics and promises to empower transformative, energy-efficient memory technology. However, fundamental questions remain about the essential factors that determine SHE. Here, we solve this open problem, presenting a comprehensive theory of…
34min
Scaling of relaxation and excess entropy in plastically deformed amorphous solids [Applied Physical Sciences]
When stressed sufficiently, solid materials yield and deform plastically via reorganization of microscopic constituents. Indeed, it is possible to alter the microstructure of materials by judicious application of stress, an empirical process utilized in practice to enhance the mechanical properties of metals. Understanding the interdependence of plastic flow and microscopic…
34min
Cooperatively enhanced reactivity and "stabilitaxis" of dissociating oligomeric proteins [Applied Physical Sciences]
Many functional units in biology, such as enzymes or molecular motors, are composed of several subunits that can reversibly assemble and disassemble. This includes oligomeric proteins composed of several smaller monomers, as well as protein complexes assembled from a few proteins. By studying the generic spatial transport properties of such…
34min
Oscillating collective motion of active rotors in confinement [Applied Physical Sciences]
Due to its inherent out-of-equilibrium nature, active matter in confinement may exhibit collective behavior absent in unconfined systems. Extensive studies have indicated that hydrodynamic or steric interactions between active particles and boundary play an important role in the emergence of collective behavior. However, besides introducing external couplings at the single-particle…
34min
Kinetic analysis of amino acid radicals formed in H2O2-driven CuI LPMO reoxidation implicates dominant homolytic reactivity [Biochemistry]
Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) have been proposed to react with both O2 and H2O2 as cosubstrates. In this study, the H2O2 reaction with reduced Hypocrea jecorina LPMO9A (CuI-HjLPMO9A) is demonstrated to be 1,000-fold faster than the O2 reaction while producing the same oxidized oligosaccharide products. Analysis of the reactivity in…
34min
Global reconstruction reduces the uncertainty of oceanic nitrous oxide emissions and reveals a vigorous seasonal cycle [Biochemistry]
Assessment of the global budget of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) is limited by poor knowledge of the oceanic N2O flux to the atmosphere, of which the magnitude, spatial distribution, and temporal variability remain highly uncertain. Here, we reconstruct climatological N2O emissions from the ocean by training a supervised…
34min
Liquid-liquid phase separation of type II diabetes-associated IAPP initiates hydrogelation and aggregation [Biochemistry]
Amyloidoses (misfolded polypeptide accumulation) are among the most debilitating diseases our aging societies face. Amyloidogenesis can be catalyzed by hydrophobic–hydrophilic interfaces (e.g., air–water interface in vitro [AWI]). We recently demonstrated hydrogelation of the amyloidogenic type II diabetes-associated islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), a hydrophobic–hydrophilic interface-dependent p
34min
Two auxiliary factors promote Dmc1-driven DNA strand exchange via stepwise mechanisms [Biochemistry]
Homologous recombination (HR) is a universal mechanism operating in somatic and germ-line cells, where it contributes to the maintenance of genome stability and ensures the faithful distribution of genetic material, respectively. The ability to identify and exchange the strands of two homologous DNA molecules lies at the heart of HR…
34min
Physiological levels of folic acid reveal purine alterations in Lesch-Nyhan disease [Biochemistry]
Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND), caused by a deficient salvage purine pathway, is characterized by severe neurological manifestations and uric acid overproduction. However, uric acid is not responsible for brain dysfunction, and it has been suggested that purine nucleotide depletion, or accumulation of other toxic purine intermediates, could be more relevant. Here…
34min
Functional stability of water wire-carbonyl interactions in an ion channel [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Water wires are critical for the functioning of many membrane proteins, as in channels that conduct water, protons, and other ions. Here, in liquid crystalline lipid bilayers under symmetric environmental conditions, the selective hydrogen bonding interactions between eight waters comprising a water wire and a subset of 26 carbonyl oxygens…
34min
Kinetics of pHLIP peptide insertion into and exit from a membrane [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
To advance mechanistic understanding of membrane-associated peptide folding and insertion, we have studied the kinetics of three single tryptophan pHLIP (pH-Low Insertion Peptide) variants, where tryptophan residues are located near the N terminus, near the middle, and near the inserting C-terminal end of the pHLIP transmembrane helix. Single-tryptophan pHLIP variants…
34min
Multivalent assembly of KRAS with the RAS-binding and cysteine-rich domains of CRAF on the membrane [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Membrane anchoring of farnesylated KRAS is critical for activation of RAF kinases, yet our understanding of how these proteins interact on the membrane is limited to isolated domains. The RAS-binding domain (RBD) and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of RAF engage KRAS and the plasma membrane, unleashing the kinase domain from autoinhibition….
34min
Analysis of RAS protein interactions in living cells reveals a mechanism for pan-RAS depletion by membrane-targeted RAS binders [Cell Biology]
HRAS, NRAS, and KRAS4A/KRAS4B comprise the RAS family of small GTPases that regulate signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. RAS pathway abnormalities cause developmental disorders and cancers. We found that KRAS4B colocalizes on the cell membrane with other RAS isoforms and a subset of prenylated small GTPase family…
34min
Topoisomerase II{alpha} is essential for maintenance of mitotic chromosome structure [Cell Biology]
Topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A) is a core component of mitotic chromosomes and important for establishing mitotic chromosome condensation. The primary roles of TOP2A in mitosis have been difficult to decipher due to its multiple functions across the cell cycle. To more precisely understand the role of TOP2A in mitosis, we used…
34min
Split-TurboID enables contact-dependent proximity labeling in cells [Cell Biology]
Proximity labeling catalyzed by promiscuous enzymes, such as TurboID, have enabled the proteomic analysis of subcellular regions difficult or impossible to access by conventional fractionation-based approaches. Yet some cellular regions, such as organelle contact sites, remain out of reach for current PL methods. To address this limitation, we split the…
34min
Kinetochore protein Spindly controls microtubule polarity in Drosophila axons [Cell Biology]
Microtubule polarity in axons and dendrites defines the direction of intracellular transport in neurons. Axons contain arrays of uniformly polarized microtubules with plus-ends facing the tips of the processes (plus-end-out), while dendrites contain microtubules with a minus-end-out orientation. It has been shown that cytoplasmic dynein, targeted to cortical actin, removes…
34min
Ancient MAPK ERK7 is regulated by an unusual inhibitory scaffold required for Toxoplasma apical complex biogenesis [Cell Biology]
Apicomplexan parasites use a specialized cilium structure called the apical complex to organize their secretory organelles and invasion machinery. The apical complex is integrally associated with both the parasite plasma membrane and an intermediate filament cytoskeleton called the inner-membrane complex (IMC). While the apical complex is essential to the parasitic…
34min
Fluorescent Janus emulsions for biosensing of Listeria monocytogenes [Chemistry]
Here we report a sensing method for Listeria monocytogenes based on the agglutination of all-liquid Janus emulsions. This two-dye assay enables the rapid detection of trace Listeria in less than 2 h via an emissive signal produced in response to Listeria binding. The biorecognition interface between the Janus emulsions is…
34min
Nanovesicles displaying functional linear and branched oligomannose self-assembled from sequence-defined Janus glycodendrimers [Chemistry]
Cell surfaces are often decorated with glycoconjugates that contain linear and more complex symmetrically and asymmetrically branched carbohydrates essential for cellular recognition and communication processes. Mannose is one of the fundamental building blocks of glycans in many biological membranes. Moreover, oligomannoses are commonly found on the surface of pathogens such…
34min
Atomic fluctuations in electronic materials revealed by dephasing [Chemistry]
The microscopic origin and timescale of the fluctuations of the energies of electronic states has a significant impact on the properties of interest of electronic materials, with implication in fields ranging from photovoltaic devices to quantum information processing. Spectroscopic investigations of coherent dynamics provide a direct measurement of electronic fluctuations….
34min
Origin of transparency in scattering biomimetic collagen materials [Chemistry]
Living tissues, heterogeneous at the microscale, usually scatter light. Strong scattering is responsible for the whiteness of bones, teeth, and brain and is known to limit severely the performances of biomedical optical imaging. Transparency is also found within collagen-based extracellular tissues such as decalcified ivory, fish scales, or cornea. However,…
34min
Live-cell protein engineering with an ultra-short split intein [Chemistry]
Split inteins are privileged molecular scaffolds for the chemical modification of proteins. Though efficient for in vitro applications, these polypeptide ligases have not been utilized for the semisynthesis of proteins in live cells. Here, we biochemically and structurally characterize the naturally split intein VidaL. We show that this split intein,…
34min
Light-controlled twister ribozyme with single-molecule detection resolves RNA function in time and space [Chemistry]
Small ribozymes such as Oryza sativa twister spontaneously cleave their own RNA when the ribozyme folds into its active conformation. The coupling between twister folding and self-cleavage has been difficult to study, however, because the active ribozyme rapidly converts to product. Here, we describe the synthesis of a photocaged nucleotide…
34min
Kinetic diversity of amyloid oligomers [Chemistry]
The spontaneous assembly of proteins into amyloid fibrils is a phenomenon central to many increasingly common and currently incurable human disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Oligomeric species form transiently during this process and not only act as essential intermediates in the assembly of new filaments but also represent major…
34min
Contact-ID, a tool for profiling organelle contact sites, reveals regulatory proteins of mitochondrial-associated membrane formation [Chemistry]
The mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) has emerged as a cellular signaling hub regulating various cellular processes. However, its molecular components remain unclear owing to lack of reliable methods to purify the intact MAM proteome in a physiological context. Here, we introduce Contact-ID, a split-pair system of BioID with strong activity, for…
34min
foxl3, a sexual switch in germ cells, initiates two independent molecular pathways for commitment to oogenesis in medaka [Developmental Biology]
Germ cells have the ability to differentiate into eggs and sperm and must determine their sexual fate. In vertebrates, the mechanism of commitment to oogenesis following the sexual fate decision in germ cells remains unknown. Forkhead-box protein L3 (foxl3) is a switch gene involved in the germline sexual fate decision…
34min
Redundant and additive functions of the four Lef/Tcf transcription factors in lung epithelial progenitors [Developmental Biology]
In multicellular organisms, paralogs from gene duplication survive purifying selection by evolving tissue-specific expression and function. Whether this genetic redundancy is also selected for within a single cell type is unclear for multimember paralogs, as exemplified by the four obligatory Lef/Tcf transcription factors of canonical Wnt signaling, mainly due to…
34min
Thermogenic carbon release from the Central Atlantic magmatic province caused major end-Triassic carbon cycle perturbations [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The Central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP), the end-Triassic mass extinction (ETE), and associated major carbon cycle perturbations occurred synchronously around the Triassic–Jurassic (T–J) boundary (201 Ma). Negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) recorded in marine and terrestrial sediments attest to the input of isotopically light carbon, although the carbon sources remain…
34min
Global increase in major tropical cyclone exceedance probability over the past four decades [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Theoretical understanding of the thermodynamic controls on tropical cyclone (TC) wind intensity, as well as numerical simulations, implies a positive trend in TC intensity in a warming world. The global instrumental record of TC intensity, however, is known to be heterogeneous in both space and time and is generally unsuitable…
34min
In situ X-ray diffraction of silicate liquids and glasses under dynamic and static compression to megabar pressures [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Properties of liquid silicates under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions are critical for modeling the dynamics and solidification mechanisms of the magma ocean in the early Earth, as well as for constraining entrainment of melts in the mantle and in the present-day core–mantle boundary. Here we present in situ structural measurements…
34min
Inner Workings: Technique to study poop offers a snapshot of diets, ecosystems, and climate [Ecology]
Hundreds of thousands of eider ducks once nested on the remote, rocky beaches of the Canadian Arctic. But sometime late in the 19th century, eiders began to disappear. Inuit oral traditions recall declines well before most scientific seabird censuses came so far north in the 1970s, says paleolimnologist Jules Blais…
34min
NIH funding and the pursuit of edge science [Economic Sciences]
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) plays a critical role in funding scientific endeavors in biomedicine. Funding innovative science is an essential element of the NIH's mission, but many have questioned the NIH's ability to fulfill this aim. Based on an analysis of a comprehensive corpus of published biomedical research…
34min
Development of a long-acting direct-acting antiviral system for hepatitis C virus treatment in swine [Engineering]
Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of cirrhosis worldwide and kills more Americans than 59 other infections, including HIV and tuberculosis, combined. While direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatments are effective, limited uptake of therapy, particularly in high-risk groups, remains a substantial barrier to eliminating HCV. We developed…
34min
Ediacaran reorganization of the marine phosphorus cycle [Evolution]
The Ediacaran Period (635 to 541 Ma) marks the global transition to a more productive biosphere, evidenced by increased availability of food and oxidants, the appearance of macroscopic animals, significant populations of eukaryotic phytoplankton, and the onset of massive phosphorite deposition. We propose this entire suite of changes results from…
34min
An obȷective Bayesian analysis of life's early start and our late arrival [Evolution]
Life emerged on Earth within the first quintile of its habitable window, but a technological civilization did not blossom until its last. Efforts to infer the rate of abiogenesis, based on its early emergence, are frustrated by the selection effect that if the evolution of intelligence is a slow process,…
34min
The airborne lifetime of small speech droplets and their potential importance in SARS-CoV-2 transmission [Medical Sciences]
Speech droplets generated by asymptomatic carriers of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are increasingly considered to be a likely mode of disease transmission. Highly sensitive laser light scattering observations have revealed that loud speech can emit thousands of oral fluid droplets per second. In a closed, stagnant air…
34min
The myosin interacting-heads motif present in live tarantula muscle explains tetanic and posttetanic phosphorylation mechanisms [Physiology]
Striated muscle contraction involves sliding of actin thin filaments along myosin thick filaments, controlled by calcium through thin filament activation. In relaxed muscle, the two heads of myosin interact with each other on the filament surface to form the interacting-heads motif (IHM). A key question is how both heads are…
34min
Catalytic prior distributions with application to generalized linear models [Statistics]
A catalytic prior distribution is designed to stabilize a high-dimensional "working model" by shrinking it toward a "simplified model." The shrinkage is achieved by supplementing the observed data with a small amount of "synthetic data" generated from a predictive distribution under the simpler model. We apply this framework to generalized…
34min
New evidence on bed bug burden in urban neighborhoods
In the first study to use systematically collected data from multifamily housing inspections to track bed bug infestation, investigators including Christopher Sutherland at the University of Massachusetts Amherst "confirm what has long been suspected for bed bugs, but also for public health issues in general"—infestations are strongly associated with socioeconomic factors, including neighborhood i
37min
The EU rises to meet the Covid-19 crisis
A radical plan from Germany and France transforms Europe's possibilities
40min
New evidence on bed bug burden in urban neighborhoods
In the first study to use systematically collected data from multifamily housing inspections to track bed bug infestation, investigators including Christopher Sutherland at the University of Massachusetts Amherst "confirm what has long been suspected for bed bugs, but also for public health issues in general"—infestations are strongly associated with socioeconomic factors, including neighborhood i
40min
Molecular circuitry: Team breaks one-diode-one resistor electronics
An international team with ties to UCF has cracked a challenge that could herald a new era of ultra-high-density computing.
40min
New model shows how diamond-carrying rocks formed in Northern Alberta
A new study by University of Alberta geologists is proposing a new model for explaining the eruption of diamond-bearing kimberlites in Northern Alberta.
40min
NASA analyzes Gulf of Mexico's reborn tropical depression soaking potential
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that strong storms from a redeveloped tropical cyclone were soaking parts of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Tropical Depression 03L is expected to generate heavy rainfall in the region.
40min
Insurers should be willing to negotiate coronavirus claims to avoid courts being overwhelmed, study
Insurers should be open to negotiating coronavirus claims to avoid courts becoming overwhelmed with disputes, a new study warns.
40min
Dead Sea Scrolls 'puzzle' pieced together with DNA
Ancient DNA extracted from Dead Sea Scrolls by Tel Aviv University researchers permits a rare, unanticipated glimpse into world of Second Temple Judaism. The study was published today as the cover story in the journal Cell.
40min
New evidence on bed bug burden in urban neighborhoods
In the first study to use systematically collected data from multifamily housing inspections to track bed bug infestation, investigators including Christopher Sutherland at UMass Amherst 'confirm what has long been suspected for bed bugs, but also for public health issues in general' — infestations are strongly associated with socioeconomic factors, including neighborhood income, eviction rates a
40min
Trump's Antifa Obsession Is an Unconstitutional Distraction
The president says the US will designate antifa a terrorist organization. Can he do that? Probably not.
43min
A Brief History of Human Coronaviruses
Milder, cold-causing members of this pathogenic viral family long remained under the radar, although they aren't entirely harmless.
45min
Scientists Question Medical Data Used in Second Coronavirus Study
Medical records from a little-known company were used in two studies published in major journals. The New England Journal of Medicine has asked to see the data.
46min
Smart molecules could be key to computers with 100-times bigger memories
Computer hard drives of the future could be made up of smart molecules.
46min
From dark to light in a flash: Smart film lets windows switch autonomously
Researchers have developed a new easy-to-use smart optical film technology that allows smart window devices to autonomously switch between transparent and opaque states in response to the surrounding light conditions.
46min
Large simulation finds new origin of supermassive black holes
Computer simulations conducted by astrophysicists at Tohoku University in Japan, have revealed a new theory for the origin of supermassive black holes. In this theory, the precursors of supermassive black holes grow by swallowing up not only interstellar gas, but also smaller stars as well. This helps to explain the large number of supermassive black holes observed today.
46min
Sea snail venom could lead to better insulin for diabetics
A species of venomous sea snail preys on fish by emitting plumes of venom that stun and paralyze its prey. But the venom might be useful to humans, too. (Pixabay/) Most people don't have occasion to think about the many unstudied species of animals who live on the seafloor. But one species, the Conus geographus , has been particularly interesting to scientists recently. This species of venomous s
47min
Blood markers predict Humboldt penguin nest type, reproductive success
From March to December every year, Humboldt penguins nest in vast colonies on the Peruvian and Chilean coasts. The lucky ones find prime habitat for their nests in deep deposits of chalky guano where they can dig out sheltered burrows. The rest must look for rocky outcrops or other protected spaces that are more exposed to predators and environmental extremes.
52min
Isotopes – Improved process for medicine
Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers have discovered a better way to separate actinium-227, a rare isotope essential for an FDA-approved cancer treatment.
52min
Blood markers predict Humboldt penguin nest type, reproductive success
From March to December every year, Humboldt penguins nest in vast colonies on the Peruvian and Chilean coasts. The lucky ones find prime habitat for their nests in deep deposits of chalky guano where they can dig out sheltered burrows. The rest must look for rocky outcrops or other protected spaces that are more exposed to predators and environmental extremes.
52min
How to protect yourself online from misinformation right now
There wasn't a communications blackout in Washington, DC, on Sunday, but #dcblackout trended on Twitter anyway, thanks to some extremely distressing tweets telling people that, mysteriously, no messages were getting out from the nation's capital. The tweets, Reddit posts, and Facebook messages about the "blackout" got thousands of shares, fueled by pleas to spread the information widely and omino
55min
Trump's Grotesque Violation of the First Amendment
The contrast is striking: On May 28, Donald Trump demanded the First Amendment right of free speech for himself on privately owned social media, and then, four days later, declared war on the people, gathered on public property, as they sought, in the words of the amendment itself, "to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances." The right of assembly is an important Fir
57min
Finding food security underwater
A key to solving global hunger—which is predicted to intensify during the COVID-19 pandemic—may lie in the ocean. In fact, the ocean could produce up to 75 percent more seafood than it does today, and drive sustainable economic growth, according to Stanford's Rosamond Naylor and Jim Leape.
58min
Reflecting sunlight to cool the planet will cause other global changes
How can the world combat the continued rise in global temperatures? How about shading the Earth from a portion of the sun's heat by injecting the stratosphere with reflective aerosols? After all, volcanoes do essentially the same thing, albeit in short, dramatic bursts: When a Vesuvius erupts, it blasts fine ash into the atmosphere, where the particles can linger as a kind of cloud cover, reflecti
58min
Galactic star formation and supermassive black hole masses
Astronomers studying how star formation evolved over cosmic time have discovered that quiescent galaxies (galaxies that are currently not making many new stars) frequently have active galactic nuclei. These AGN accrete material onto hot circumnuclear disks, and the resultant energy is released in bursts of radiation, or as jets of particles moving at close to the speed of light. The suspicion is t
58min
Researchers evaluate 2020 census data privacy changes
After the U.S. Census Bureau announced that it was changing how it protects the identities of individuals for the 2020 Census, a Penn State-led research team began to evaluate how these changes may affect census data integrity.
58min
Climate change could dramatically reduce future US snowstorms
A new study led by Northern Illinois University scientists suggests American winters late this century could experience significant decreases in the frequency, intensity and size of snowstorms. Under an unabated greenhouse gas emissions scenario, the study projects 28% fewer snowstorms on average per year over central and eastern portions of North America by the century's last decade.
1h
Oil platforms' fishy future
Marine biologists forecast the effects of oil platform decommissioning on fish communities.
1h
Better patient identification could help fight the coronavirus
In a peer-reviewed commentary published in npj Digital Medicine, experts from Regenstrief Institute, Mayo Clinic and The Pew Charitable Trusts write that matching patient records from disparate sources is not only achievable, but fundamental to stem the tide of the current pandemic and allow for fast action for future highly contagious viruses.
1h
Oldest known parasite is a worm-like animal from 512 million years ago
Hundreds of fossil animals that lived more than 500 million years ago had worm-like objects attached to them – the oldest hard evidence of parasitism
1h
DNA analysis sheds new light on ancient biblical Dead Sea Scrolls
Analysis of DNA traces found on fragments of the ancient Dead Sea Scrolls is helping to piece them together, providing new insights into the history of Judaism and Christianity
1h
Genetically altered human cells can vary their transparency like squid
Humans cells can be genetically engineered to produce a squid protein that changes how transparent they are, which could lead to see-through patches of tissue
1h
NEJM places expression of concern on controversial study of drugs for COVID-19
As controversy swirls around two papers that used data from Surgisphere, the New England Journal of Medicine has placed an expression of concern on the relevant paper they published last month. Here's the expression of concern: On May 1, 2020, we published "Cardiovascular Disease, Drug Therapy, and Mortality in Covid-19," a study of the effect … Continue reading
1h
We know and run Walmart but are denied a voice
Group's response to Covid-19 shows why workers like me need a share in shaping policy
1h
COVID-19 drug development could benefit from approach used against flu
A new study has found that some antivirals are useful for more than helping sick people get better — they also can prevent thousands of deaths and hundreds of thousands of virus cases if used in the early stages of infection.
1h
Thousands of people will help scientists to track the long-term health effects of the coronavirus crisis
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01643-8 Cohort studies that follow populations over years have quickly pivoted to trace the pandemic's physical, mental and social consequences.
1h
Story tips: Shuffling atoms, thinning forests, fusion assembly and nuclear medicine
ORNL Story Tips: Shuffling atoms, thinning forests, fusion assembly and nuclear medicine.
1h
New technique takes 3D imaging an octave higher
A collaboration between Colorado State University and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign resulted in a new, 3D imaging technique to visualize tissues and other biological samples on a microscopic scale, with potential to assist with cancer or other disease diagnoses.Their technique, which allows specimens to generate light at double the frequency, or half the wavelength, of the incident li
1h
Blood markers predict Humboldt penguin nest type, reproductive success
In a new study, researchers looked at metabolic markers in the blood of 30 Humboldt penguins nesting in the Punta San Juan Marine Protected Area in Peru. The scientists discovered metabolic differences between penguins nesting in sheltered burrows and those in more exposed areas. Nesting success is critical to the Humboldt penguins' survival as a species.
1h
Small study demonstrates sample inactivation may lead to SARS-CoV-2 false negatives
A team of investigators led by Chaofeng Ma of Xi'an Center for Disease Control and Prevention hypothesized that viral inactivation may contribute to false negatives. They have now tested several inactivation methodologies to determine if and to what extent they reduce detectible virus in a clinical sample. The research appears May 29th in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, a publication of the
1h
Expression of certain genes may affect vulnerability to post-traumatic stress disorder
A new study suggest that whether certain genes are expressed may play a role in susceptibility to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
1h
These flexible feet help robots walk faster
Roboticists have developed flexible feet that can help robots walk up to 40 percent faster on uneven terrain such as pebbles and wood chips. The work has applications for search-and-rescue missions as well as space exploration.
1h
Latest climate models show more intense droughts to come
An analysis of new climate model projections shows southwestern Australia and parts of southern Australia will see longer and more intense droughts due to a lack of rainfall caused by climate change. But Australia is not alone. Across the globe, several important agricultural and forested regions in the Amazon, Mediterranean and southern Africa can expect more frequent and intense rainfall drought
1h
Pre-COVID-19 poll of older adults hints at potential impact of pandemic on eating habits
Few shopped for groceries online, and self-rating of healthy eating was higher among those who dined alone or at restaurants least, a new national U.S. poll finds.
1h
A better model for neutrophil-related diseases
Neutrophils are critical immune cells for antimicrobial defense, but they can exacerbate a number of diseases, perhaps including COVID-19. The traditional approaches to study neutrophils in animal models are limited in specificity and effectiveness. Scientists have now identified the problem and have developed a new, optimized model for studying the role of neutrophils in the context of disease.
1h
Bees grooming each other can boost colony immunity
Honeybees that specialise in grooming their nestmates (allogroomers) to ward off pests play a central role in the colony, finds a new UCL and University of Florence study published in Scientific Reports.
1h
Good night? Satellite data uncovers dolphins on the move at nighttime
More than 1,000 bottlenose dolphins live in Florida's Indian River Lagoon year-round. Although extensively studied, what they do at nighttime is still a mystery. Using satellite telemetry, scientists provide the first documentation that these dolphins have a larger range that encompasses more habitats than previously thought. They regularly leave the brackish waters of the estuarine system and, no
1h
Gene found that causes eyes to wither in cavefish
In a new study led by University of Maryland researchers, scientists discovered a gene that prevents blood flow to blind cavefish eyes during development. It is the same gene responsible for homocystinuria in humans.
1h
Evidence Suggests That the Entire Early Universe Was Rotating
Tilt-A-Whirl According to new data, the entire early universe was spinning like a planet or galaxy. The new theory is based on the observation that more galaxies are spinning counterclockwise than clockwise, New Scientist reports , whereas previous models expected a balance between the two directions. "There is no error or contamination that could exhibit itself through such unique, complex and c
1h
Israel battles surge in coronavirus infections in schools
Almost 10,000 students and teachers go into quarantine 2 weeks after schools reopen
1h
These methods from psychiatry can help you beat stress during the coronavirus pandemic
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01657-2 Clinical psychologist Luana Marques shares skills and advice to help scientists build resilience and mental and physical health.
1h
Immune cells multiply and diversify in mouse lungs at birth
An explosion in the number and types of immune cells in the lungs of newborn mice likely helps them adapt to breathing and protects them from infection, says a new study published today in eLife.
1h
Integrating behavioral health services into medical practices faces barriers
Many people do not receive treatment for their mental health problems because of a shortage of providers and lack of access to mental health services, but one solution is to integrate mental health treatment into medical care. A new study finds that integrating behavioral health services into physician medical practices faces cultural and financial barriers, but providing technical support and imp
1h
Discovery of long sought tiny explosions on the Sun
The mechanism responsible for heating the corona to two million degrees, especially for the quiet Sun, has remained an enduring mystery. Scientists have now found the first direct observational evidence in support of one of the proposed mechanisms for heating the quiet corona. They have discovered tiny flashes of radio light from all over the Sun, smoking guns for tiny magnetic explosions which co
1h
From dark to light in a flash: Smart film lets windows switch autonomously
Researchers have developed a new easy-to-use smart optical film technology that allows smart window devices to autonomously switch between transparent and opaque states in response to the surrounding light conditions.
1h
Gene discovery in fruit flies 'opens new doors' for hearing loss cure in elderly
Scientists at UCL have discovered sets of regulatory genes, which are responsible for maintaining healthy hearing. The finding, made in fruit flies, could potentially lead to treatments for age-related hearing loss (ARHL) in humans.
1h
New discovery could highlight areas where earthquakes are less likely to occur
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered specific conditions that occur along the ocean floor where two tectonic plates are more likely to slowly creep past one another as opposed to drastically slipping and creating catastrophic earthquakes.
1h
Smart molecules could be key to computers with 100-times bigger memories
Researchers have discovered a single molecule 'switch' that can act like a transistor and offers the potential to store binary information — such as the 1s and 0s used in classical computing.
1h
UK companies borrow £21bn through 'bounce back' loans
Banks fear smaller businesses will struggle to repay debt, with up to half at risk of default
1h
Ancient DNA Yields New Clues to Dead Sea Scrolls
A sensitive genetic fingerprinting technique could help scholars learn more from thousands of fragile parchment fragments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Ancient DNA Yields New Clues to Dead Sea Scrolls
A sensitive genetic fingerprinting technique could help scholars learn more from thousands of fragile parchment fragments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Backyard trampolines to entertain kids and adults
Bounce pads for the backyard. (Shaylin Wallace/) Even with iPads and Facetime, an old-fashioned device like a trampoline can still capture a kid's attention. It turns out that jumping is fun for even the most jaded kiddos, and manufacturers have added a load of safety features and bells and whistles that make them a fun centerpiece for any backyard that regularly hosts children. Things to conside
1h
Astronaut: SpaceX Ride Not as "Smooth" as NASA Space Shuttle
Bumpy Ride On Saturday, SpaceX shot its Crew Dragon spacecraft into orbit with human astronauts on board, becoming the first commercial spacecraft to do so. The astronauts who rode it up seem impressed with the vehicle overall — though NASA veteran Bob Behnken compared parts of the experience unfavorably to the now-retired Space Shuttle. "It was not quite the smooth ride the Space Shuttle was," B
1h
Some Commentary
It feels strange to be writing about biomedicine, even about a terrible pandemic, under the current circumstances. I was six years old in 1968 and was thus largely spared that year's events, so 2020 is now the year that in which I'm most fearful about what's happening in my country. My broad political opinions make it into this blog every so often, and it's obvious that I'm opposed to Donald Trum
1h
For This Tribe, Saving a River Means Saving the Sturgeon
The Yakama Nation has been raising fish to release back into the Columbia River for more than a decade. Now, its hatchery is also producing caviar.
1h
Ancient DNA is offering clues to puzzle of Dead Sea scrolls, say experts
Study may shed light on material and debated origins of some of the 25,000 fragments With myriad fragments and an extraordinary past, the Dead Sea scrolls are quite a puzzle. Now experts say ancient DNA has helped them piece together which fragments come from the same scrolls, as well as which texts may have travelled a distance, and how widespread the writings were. The scrolls are one of the mo
1h
1h
An important new tool for developing COVID-19 treatments, vaccines
Scientists have a new resource to help them better understand COVID-19 as they develop treatments and vaccines.
1h
Tiger snakes tell more about local wetlands' pollution levels
Tiger snakes living in Perth's urban wetlands are accumulating toxic heavy metals in their livers, suggesting that their habitats — critical, local ecosystems — are contaminated and the species may be suffering as a result.
1h
Some people are easily addicted to drugs, but others are not
Researchers have discovered that dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2s) in cholinergic interneurons (ChINs) play a crucial role in cocaine addiction.
1h
Large simulation finds new origin of supermassive black holes
Computer simulations conducted by astrophysicists have revealed a new theory for the origin of supermassive black holes. In this theory, the precursors of supermassive black holes grow by swallowing up not only interstellar gas, but also smaller stars as well. This helps to explain the large number of supermassive black holes observed today.
1h
Evidence supports physical distancing, masks, and eye protection to help prevent COVID-19
The systematic review was conducted by a large, international collaborative of researchers, front-line and specialist clinicians, epidemiologists, patients, public health and health policy experts of published and unpublished literature in any language.
1h
Killing coronavirus with handheld ultraviolet light device may be feasible
A personal, handheld device emitting high-intensity ultraviolet light to disinfect areas by killing the novel coronavirus is now feasible, according to researchers.
1h
Researchers map SARS-CoV-2 infection in cells of nasal cavity, bronchia, lungs
Researchers have characterized the specific ways in which SARS-CoV-2 infects the nasal cavity to a great degree — replicating specific cell types — and infects and replicates progressively less well in cells lower down the respiratory tract. The findings suggest the virus tends to become firmly established first in the nasal cavity, but in some cases the virus is aspirated into the lungs, where
1h
Atmospheric scientists identify cleanest air on Earth in first-of-its-kind study
A research group has identified an atmospheric region unchanged by human-related activities in the first study to measure bioaerosol composition of the Southern Ocean south of 40 degrees south latitude.
1h
Tracking fossil fuel emissions with carbon-14
Researchers have devised a breakthrough method for estimating national emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuels using ambient air samples and a well-known isotope of carbon that scientists have relied on for decades to date archaeological sites.
1h
New test method can offer safer dosages of hydroxychloroquine
Researchers have developed a new method to measure levels of the medication hydroxychloroquine in patients with the rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The analysis method may also be useful in other areas, such as in the treatment of COVID-19.
1h
Delaying COP26 is not a reason to delay climate action
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01621-0 Coronavirus has delayed climate talks by a year. But the planet doesn't have extra time, so action on global warming cannot be postponed.
1h
Molecular circuitry: International team breaks one-diode-one resistor electronics
An international team with ties to UCF has cracked a challenge that could herald a new era of ultra-high-density computing. For years engineers and scientists around the world have been trying to make smaller and faster electronics. Many teams are working on combining the diode and resistor into a single device. An international team of scientists and engineers have done it and their findings deta
1h
Families and communities are central to the recovery of Sierra Leone's former child soldiers
A study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that many of the former child soldiers of Sierra Leone have been accepted by their families and communities as they try to overcome their childhood trauma, according to a team led by Boston College School of Social Work Salem Professor in Global Practice, Theresa S. Betancourt
1h
New experiment design improves reproducibility
Extensive standardisation processes are supposed to increase the efficiency of experiments, thus reducing the number of animals needed. However, biological complexity, and in particular a dependence on the context of the individual experiments, often make it difficult to reproduce and generalise the results. In the current research journal 'Nature Reviews Neuroscience', an international team led b
1h
Researchers improve method that links genome to function for environmental single-cells
Cells are a little easier to understand, thanks to improved technology developed by a team of researchers based in China. Using a method called Raman-Activated Cell Ejection and Sequencing (RACE-Seq), the scientists were able to improve the success of identifying and sequencing individual cells from our environments to understand the cells' functions.
1h
COVID-19 drug development could benefit from approach used against flu
A new study from researchers at The University of Texas at Austin has found that some antivirals are useful for more than helping sick people get better — they also can prevent thousands of deaths and hundreds of thousands of virus cases if used in the early stages of infection.
1h
Genetic study reveals similarities and differences of COVID-19 and SARS viruses
Researchers have identified specific portions of the genetic codes of the COVID-19 and SARS viruses that may promote the viruses' lifecycles. The new technique is researchers' first tool for determining what genetic sequences stored as RNA — DNA's chemical cousin — are more stable. The research team named their technique Fate-seq because it aims to determine the fate of a genetic sequence, wheth
1h
Tuning the interfacial properties of 2D heterophases though tilt-angles
For devices based on atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials, the properties of the interface play important roles in determining their performances. Chinese scientists correlated the electronic states of the 2D 1T'/2H-MoTe2 (metallic/semiconducting) interface with its atomic structures and found that its contact characteristics are tilt angle-dependent, providing useful guidelines to tune
1h
Doubts about the Nerja cave art having been done by neanderthals
Prehistory research staff at the University of Cordoba is investigating the reliability of Uranium-thorium dating for a chronological study of Paleolithic art and is contesting that Neanderthals made the Paeolithic art in Spanish caves.
1h
Charting metabolic maps in the pursuit of new vaccines and antimicrobials
Researchers have made maps of the metabolic pathways of M. agalactiae and M. pneumoniae, two common bacteria that infect livestock and humans respectively. The results may accelerate the discovery of new vaccines and antimicrobial treatments. The research group will also use the maps to finetune an engineered version of M. pneumoniae so that it can treat human lung diseases in the future.
1h
Promising new method for producing tiny liquid capsules
Microcapsules for the storage and delivery of substances are tiny versions of the type of capsule used for fish oil or other liquid supplements. A new method for synthesizing microcapsules, reported in AIP Advances, creates microcapsules with a liquid core that are ideal for the storage and delivery of oil-based materials in skin care products. They also show promise in some applications as tiny b
1h
Possible physical trace of short-term memory found
How do we remember a phone number we were just about to call? Already Plato and Aristotle asked how memory is stored as changes in the brain. In a new study, Professor Peter Jonas and his group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), including first author David Vandael, found that short-term memory may be formed by storing vesicles of neurotransmitter. These vesicle pool
1h
Artificial tissue used to research uterine contractions
Throughout an individual's lifetime, the uterus undergoes spontaneous contractions of the uterine wall, which can induce uterine peristalsis, a specific wavelike contraction pattern. These contractions are important for many reproductive processes, but hyperperistalsis could impede fertility and lead to diseases, such as adenomyosis or endometriosis. In an APL Bioengineering article, researchers p
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Piecing together the Dead Sea Scrolls with DNA evidence
Piecing together the collection of more than 25,000 fragments of ancient manuscripts known as the Dead Sea Scrolls in order to understand their meaning has remained an incredibly difficult puzzle. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Cell on June 2 have used an intriguing clue to help in this effort: DNA "fingerprints" lifted from the animal skins on which the texts were written.
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Lab-grown miniature human livers successfully transplanted in rats
Using skin cells from human volunteers, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have created fully functional mini livers, which they then transplanted into rats. In this proof-of-concept experiment, the lab-made organs survived for four days inside their animal hosts.
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Discovery in human acute myeloid leukemia could provide novel pathway to new treatments
Researchers at Mount Sinai have discovered that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) stem cells are dependent on a transcription factor known as RUNX1, potentially providing a new therapeutic target to achieve lasting remissions or even cures for a disease in which medical advances have been limited.
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Finding balance between green energy storage, harvesting
Generating power through wind or solar energy is dependent on the abundance of the right weather conditions, making finding the optimal strategy for storage crucial to the future of sustainable energy usage. Research published in the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy identifies key indicators that will help achieve balance between green energy storage capacity and harvesting capability a
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Collision may explain asteroid Bennu's 'spinning top' shape
Researchers with NASA's first asteroid sample return mission, OSIRIS-REx, are gaining a new understanding of asteroid Bennu's carbon-rich material and signature "spinning-top" shape. Bennu, the target asteroid for the OSIRIS-REx mission, and Ryugu, the target of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hayabusa2 asteroid sample return mission, are composed of fragments of larger bodies that shatt
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How to support witnesses of harassment and build healthier workplaces | Julia Shaw
What makes you speak up — or not — when you see something you know is wrong? Memory scientist Julia Shaw explains the psychology of those who witness workplace discrimination and harassment — and shares actionable steps companies can take to support and amplify their voices.
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Mass production of individualized products
How can mass production methods be applied to individualized products? One answer is to use a combination of digital manufacturing technologies, for example by integrating digital printing and laser processing into traditional manufacturing processes. This paves the way for in-line product customization. Six Fraunhofer institutes have pooled their expertise to take the new process to the next leve
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New discovery could highlight areas where earthquakes are less likely to occur
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered specific conditions that occur along the ocean floor where two tectonic plates are more likely to slowly creep past one another as opposed to drastically slipping and creating catastrophic earthquakes.
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New method for more accurate determination of time of death at crime scenes
Researchers from Amsterdam UMC, the University of Amsterdam and the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI) – partners in the forensic research institution the Co van Ledden Hulsebosch Center—have developed a method that allows for a more accurate determination of the time of death at a crime scene. Existing methods can only give a window of several hours; the new method reduces this to less than an
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A new method for recycling plastics together
Recycling plastic faces several challenges, one of which is recycling different types of plastics together, because they have varying properties, each of which need to be addressed accordingly. Separating and treating each type of plastic adds to the cost of recycling plastic, which reduces the incentive to do so, despite the irreversible and detrimental biological cost of plastics in the environm
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Joined nano-triangles pave the way to magnetic carbon materials
Graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure made of carbon atoms with a thickness of only one atom, has numerous outstanding properties. These include enormous mechanical resistance and extraordinary electronic and optical properties. Last year a team led by the Empa researcher Roman Fasel was able to show that it can even be magnetic: they succeeded in synthesizing a molecule in the shape of
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The word 'bigot' is back. Here's why it's so powerful
Who, exactly, counts as a bigot? A new book on civil rights and marriage law considers the term closely. Linda McClain wants you to know that even though people can't physically be together right now, thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, they can still help reduce prejudiced and bigoted views through remote social interactions, whether through phone calls, Zooms, social media correspondence, or te
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Death rates for UK ethnic minorities up to double that of whites
Matt Hancock acknowledges that background is 'major risk factor' in pandemic
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Perfect optics through light scattering
Innovative technologies are the key to tackling some of society's key challenges—and many of these technologies have an optical system at their core. Examples include semiconductor lithography systems designed to create ever-smaller and more energy-efficient microchips, satellite-based high-resolution earth observation systems, and basic research in the field of gravitational-wave detection. In th
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Environmental justice defenders victims of violence and murder
Activists protesting against environmental injustices around the world suffer from high rates of criminalization, physical violence and murder. This is the result of a study developed by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) that presents the largest analysis of environmental conflicts to date. The study highlight
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Where do our brains process colors?
A new study identifies the neural networks that process light, particularly the areas of the brain that encode the colors we see. Scientific research has long shown that such colors are not inherent to the physical world, but rather a result of how our brains process light. "We've been able to show where it happens in the visual pathway, which is relatively early," says Steven Shevell, a professo
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New guidelines for assessment of bone density and microarchitecture in vivo with HR-pQCT
There is an urgent need for guidance and consensus on the methods for, and reporting of, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) imaging so that different studies can be compared to each other. This position paper, published by a joint working group from IOF, ASBMR and ECTS addresses the need for standardization of techniques and terminology, provides guidance on inte
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Development of a novel approach 'Tracing Retrogradely the Activated Cell Ensemble'
The neural circuitry teams at DANDRITE and PROMEMO introduce a novel approach in their latest publication, which selectively labels sensory inputs that are activated by a defined stimulus and directed to a region of interest in the brain.
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SUTD-led research powers longer lasting rechargeable batteries
The development of the new material directly addresses the shortage of lithium resources and high energy power supplies.
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On the hunt for megafauna in North America
Research from Curtin University has found that pre-historic climate change does not explain the extinction of megafauna in North America at the end of the last Ice Age.
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More efficient biosolar cells modelled on nature
Potential sources of renewable energy include protein complexes that are responsible for photosynthesis. However, their efficiency in technical applications still leaves much to be desired. For example, they cannot convert green light into energy. A research team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and the Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa has successfully closed this so-called green gap by c
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US founders feared distrust would undo democracy
The United States was celebrated as the world's first modern democracy, but its founders feared that distrust in government could be its undoing, the author of a new book says. Two decades ago, protestors disrupted a meeting of the World Trade Organization in Seattle with multiple days of demonstrations and property destruction. They punctuated their actions with a now-world-famous chant, "This i
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Solar Ring mission: A new concept of space exploration for understanding Sun and the inner heliosphere
With the development of science and technology, human activity has expanded from land, sea and sky to space and other planets. In the near future, deep space and other terrestrial planets will become the next main territory of humanity. The Sun is the nearest star in the universe. It affects the (interplanetary) space of our planets in many time scales. Thus, observing and understanding solar acti
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Charting metabolic maps in the pursuit of new vaccines and antimicrobials
A study in Cell Reports maps genes essential for the metabolic function of M. agalactiae and M. pneumoniae, two common bacteria that infect livestock and humans respectively. The map of M. agalactiae reveals insights that unlock routes to explore new vaccines and antimicrobials for veterinary applications. The results can also be used to finetune a re-engineered version of M. pneumoniae so that it
2h
Artificial tissue used to research uterine contractions
Advanced tissue engineering technologies allow scientists to mimic the structure of a uterus, enabling crucial research on fertility and disease.
2h
Promising new method for producing tiny liquid capsules
Microcapsules for the storage and delivery of substances are tiny versions of the type of capsule used for fish oil or other liquid supplements, such as vitamin D. A new method for synthesizing microcapsules, reported in AIP Advances, creates microcapsules with a liquid core that are ideal for the storage and delivery of oil-based materials in skin care products. They also show promise in some app
2h
Piecing together the Dead Sea Scrolls with DNA evidence
The collection of more than 25,000 fragments of ancient manuscripts known as the Dead Sea Scrolls include, among other ancient texts, the oldest copies of books of the Hebrew Bible. But finding a way to piece them all together in order to understand their meaning has remained an incredibly difficult puzzle, especially given that most pieces weren't excavated in an orderly fashion. Now, researchers
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How ecotourism can harm indigenous communities
Let's time travel to the post-COVID future. It's almost time for summer vacation and you're scrolling on your laptop looking for vacation ideas. Suddenly, an ad pops up from a travel agency: Join the environmentally conscious community and invest in ecotourism!
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Photonic crystals: 'even thin is functional'
Photonic crystals are the nanostructures that can manipulate photons by means of an energy gap, similar to how the semiconductors in computer chips manipulate electronic current. It was always thought that photonic crystals should be thick and bulky to be functional. Scientists from the University of Tokyo, the University of Electro-Communications in Tokyo, the Kyoto Institute of Technology and th
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Climate change presents African grazers with tricky decision
Lions limit their prey, such as zebra and gnu, in their options for adapting to global warming. This is what Leiden researcher Michiel Veldhuis, from the Institute of Environmental Sciences, and a group of international colleagues have discovered. The research was published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution.
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The Art of Transfection and Transduction
Download this poster to learn how optimized transfection and transduction achieve gene delivery success
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Charting metabolic maps in the pursuit of new vaccines and antimicrobials
A study in Cell Reports maps genes essential for the metabolic function of M. agalactiae and M. pneumoniae, two common bacteria that infect livestock and humans respectively. The map of M. agalactiae reveals insights that unlock routes to explore new vaccines and antimicrobials for veterinary applications. The results can also be used to finetune a re-engineered version of M. pneumoniae so that it
2h
Artificial tissue used to research uterine contractions
Advanced tissue engineering technologies allow scientists to mimic the structure of a uterus, enabling crucial research on fertility and disease.
2h
Climate change presents African grazers with tricky decision
Lions limit their prey, such as zebra and gnu, in their options for adapting to global warming. This is what Leiden researcher Michiel Veldhuis, from the Institute of Environmental Sciences, and a group of international colleagues have discovered. The research was published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution.
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Lockdown stress puts paid to a coronavirus baby boom
Couples reported their relationships improved in the pandemic, even if they had less sex
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'Plastic-free' fashion is not as clean or green as it seems
We have all become more aware of the environmental impact of our clothing choices. The fashion industry has seen a rise in "green," "eco" and "sustainable" clothing. This includes an increase in the use of natural fibres, such as wool, hemp, and cotton, as synthetic fabrics, like polyester, acrylic and nylon, have been vilified by some.
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The History of Immunotherapy
Download this poster to learn how immunotherapy advanced from mice to men!
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Watch a Tesla — Reportedly on Autopilot — Slam Into Flipped Truck
Slammed A video uploaded by Taiwanese media shows a Tesla Model 3 slamming into the roof of an overturned truck trailer, Jalopnik reports . The vehicle appears to slow down only an instant before plowing into the large, immobile box truck blocking two out of three lanes of traffic. Electrek suggests the vehicle applied its automatic emergency braking system, causing smoke to billow up right befor
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Study explores how Native Americans used sea otters
University of Oregon scientists are probing archaeological evidence for how indigenous peoples used sea otters, and their findings could help Alaskans confront growing numbers of the mammals and Oregonians who want to reintroduce them on the coast.
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Americans' deepening financial stress will make the coronavirus a lot harder to contain
Preventing deaths from COVID-19 depends on people who get it seeking treatment—which also allows authorities to track down whom they came in contact with to reduce spread.
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On the hunt for megafauna in North America
Research from Curtin University has found that pre-historic climate change does not explain the extinction of megafauna in North America at the end of the last Ice Age.
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Germany's Covid-19 spikes present fresh challenges as lockdown lifts
Outbreaks after family parties in Göttingen illustrate the problems of containing virus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Several gatherings of extended families in the north-western German city of Göttingen two weekends ago have resulted in a local spike of the coronavirus, which authorities say has highlighted the need to stick to physical distancing rules. Continue
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The Christians Who Loved Trump's Stunt
He wielded the Bible like a foreign object, awkwardly adjusting his grip as though trying to get comfortable. He examined its cover. He held it up over his right shoulder like a crossing guard presenting a stop sign. He did not open it. "Is that your Bible?" a reporter asked. "It's a Bible," the president replied. Even by the standards of Donald Trump's religious photo ops, the dissonance was str
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Controlling COVID-19 will carry devastating economic cost for developing countries
Many African countries quickly closed their borders and imposed lockdown. This meant that, until the beginning of May, no African country had more than 10,000 people affected, with South Africa, Egypt, Morocco or Algeria being the hardest hit.
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Extraordinary modulation of light polarization with dark plasmons in magnetoplasmonic nanocavities
Nanophotonics uses light polarization as an information carrier in optical communications, sensing, and imaging. Likewise, the state of polarization of light plays a key role in the photonic transfer of quantum information. In this framework, optical nanodevices enabling dynamic manipulation of light polarization at the nanoscale are key components for future nanophotonic applications.
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Environmental justice defenders victims of violence and murder
Grassroots movements halt environmental degradation in up to 27% of environmental conflicts worldwide, according to a study by the ICTA-UAB. Activists are victims of violence in 18% of cases, and of murder in 13%, and figures increase when indigenous peoples are involved.
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Tiger snakes tell more about local wetlands' pollution levels
Tiger snakes living in Perth's urban wetlands are accumulating toxic heavy metals in their livers, suggesting that their habitats — critical, local ecosystems — are contaminated and the species may be suffering as a result.
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In a Single Measure, Invariants Capture the Essence of Math Objects
When Lisa Piccirillo solved a decades-old mystery about the "Conway knot," she had to overcome the knot's uncanny ability to hoodwink some of the most powerful tools mathematicians have devised. Known as invariants, these tools form the backbone not just of knot theory but of many areas of mathematics, extracting essential features of mathematical objects and detecting when two objects are fundam
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McCarthy & Stone reports lower coronavirus death rate in its retirement housing
UK company urges government to boost investment in housing for elderly
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Supercomputer simulerer asteroidenedslaget, der udryddede dinosaurerne
PLUS. Nye simulationer fra Imperial College London afslører, at asteroiden, der udryddede dinosaurerne, ramte med den 'mest dødelige' vinkel.
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New $500 Cars Rarely Fail
Originally published in January 1917 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Valencia criticises Atalanta coach who attended match with Covid-19
Gian Piero Gasperini admits he had symptoms prior to Champions League match in Spain Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Spanish football club Valencia has criticised the coach of Italian team Atalanta for "putting the health of numerous people at risk'' after confessing he had symptoms of Covid-19 prior to the Champions League match between the two sides in March. I
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Football pitch of rainforest destroyed every six seconds
Vast tracts of pristine rainforest on three continents went up in smoke last year, with an area roughly the size of Switzerland cut down or burned to make way for cattle and commercial crops, researchers said Tuesday.
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India evacuates 10,000 from homes, virus hospital ahead of cyclone
More than 10,000 people, including some coronavirus patients, were moved to safer locations Tuesday as India's west coast braced for a cyclone, the first such storm to threaten Mumbai in more than 70 years.
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Some people are easily addicted to drugs, but others are not
Research team led by Prof. Joung-Hun Kim and Dr. Joo Han Lee of POSTECH and Dr. Ja Wook Koo of KBRI publishes new findings in Biological Psychiatry
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Recycling plastics together, simple and fast
Scientists successfully blended different types of plastics to be recycled together, providing a solution to the environmental problem of plastic waste and adding economic value to plastic materials.
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Large simulation finds new origin of supermassive black holes
Computer simulations conducted by astrophysicists at Tohoku University in Japan, have revealed a new theory for the origin of supermassive black holes. In this theory, the precursors of supermassive black holes grow by swallowing up not only interstellar gas, but also smaller stars as well. This helps to explain the large number of supermassive black holes observed today.
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Get it over with, or procrastinate? New research explores our decision-making process
New research from the UBC Sauder School of Business may have figured out why. The study, published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, reveals key insights into how excitement, anticipation and dread factor into people's decision-making.
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Making sense of nonsensical Covid-19 strategy
Before criticising their Covid-19 response, we should try to at least understand why the government acted as they did. We take a look at the latest SAGE minutes in an attempt to do so.
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The unusual molecular and isotopic content of planetary nebulae
Observations of planetary nebulae have revealed unusual molecular content and surprising enrichments of rare isotopes, challenging both chemical models as well as our current understanding of stellar nucleosynthesis.
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Enabling functional genomics studies in individual cells
Although the first complete sequence of the human genome was reported more than 15 years ago, the biological functions of large parts of the genome are not yet known. Scientists working in the field of functional genomics try to understand these functions, and how our genome determines our individual traits and the course of diseases. High-throughput methods, such as CRISPR–Cas9 genome editing, al
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Junior researchers hit by coronavirus-triggered hiring freezes
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01656-3 With student enrolment projected to fall, some US and UK institutions have halted recruitment.
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Survival of the littlest: the long-term impacts of being born extremely early
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01517-z Babies born before 28 weeks of gestation are surviving into adulthood at higher rates than ever, and scientists are checking in on their health.
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Enabling functional genomics studies in individual cells
Although the first complete sequence of the human genome was reported more than 15 years ago, the biological functions of large parts of the genome are not yet known. Scientists working in the field of functional genomics try to understand these functions, and how our genome determines our individual traits and the course of diseases. High-throughput methods, such as CRISPR–Cas9 genome editing, al
3h
An important new tool for developing COVID-19 treatments, vaccines
Biomedical scientists working with COVID-19 have a new tool to help them better understand the virus and feel confident about the structural models they are using in their research.
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Searching for new sources of matter–antimatter symmetry breaking in Higgs boson interaction with top quarks
When a particle is transformed into its antiparticle and its spatial coordinates inverted, the laws of physics are required to stay the same—or so we thought. This symmetry—known as CP symmetry (charge conjugation and parity symmetry) – was considered to be exact until 1964, when a study of the kaon particle system led to the discovery of CP violation.
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An important new tool for developing COVID-19 treatments, vaccines
Biomedical scientists working with COVID-19 have a new tool to help them better understand the virus and feel confident about the structural models they are using in their research.
3h
Good night? Satellite data uncovers dolphins on the move at nighttime
More than 1,000 bottlenose dolphins live in the Indian River Lagoon year-round. This estuarine system along the southeast coast of Florida is a narrow and convoluted ecosystem with interconnected bodies of water, a handful of ocean inlets, and numerous small rivers, creeks and canals that release freshwater into the lagoon. While this population of dolphins in the lagoon has been studied extensive
3h
Facebook 'Manage Activity' Is a Long Overdue Privacy Feature
The new Manage Activity feature will let you archive and bulk delete posts for the first time.
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Good night? Satellite data uncovers dolphins on the move at nighttime
More than 1,000 bottlenose dolphins live in the Indian River Lagoon year-round. This estuarine system along the southeast coast of Florida is a narrow and convoluted ecosystem with interconnected bodies of water, a handful of ocean inlets, and numerous small rivers, creeks and canals that release freshwater into the lagoon. While this population of dolphins in the lagoon has been studied extensive
3h
Light for lithography could pass printed fibers
University of Utah researchers have developed a printed fiber-based light modulating system that combines polymer printing and quantum wave optics, providing a new lithography platform.
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Statens Serum Institut talte usandt: Biologisk materiale gemmes til efter din død
Restmateriale fra SSI's corona-test vil blive gemt i Danmarks Nationale Biobank til brug for fremtidig forskning.
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Researcher harnessing supercomputers to unpack the coronavirus' 'spike' protein
Michael H. Peters, Ph.D., a professor in VCU's Department of Chemical and Life Science Engineering, is using powerful supercomputers at NASA's Ames Research Center in California to investigate the "spike" protein of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19.
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How a Crowdsourcing Challenge Turbocharged Brain Research During Lockdown
"I had a dream my paintbrush split while I was picking up brain slices. Nightmare scenario, right? Then I woke up and thought: I really miss the lab," a neuroscientist friend of mine recently lamented over a virtual happy hour. She's not alone. As the pandemic spread across the US, neuroscience labs shuttered their doors, leaving behind half-finished experiments, aging lab animals, and precious b
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Researcher harnessing supercomputers to unpack the coronavirus' 'spike' protein
Michael H. Peters, Ph.D., a professor in VCU's Department of Chemical and Life Science Engineering, is using powerful supercomputers at NASA's Ames Research Center in California to investigate the "spike" protein of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19.
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Smartphones empowering women in sub-Saharan Africa, evidence suggests
An international team of researchers has found evidence that shows giving women in sub-Saharan Africa smartphones leads to increased use of contraception, increased HIV testing and lower infant mortality rates. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of data from a wide variety of sources that document women's health and economic
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Stretchable variable color sheet that changes color with expansion and contraction
Toyohashi University of Technology research team have succeeded in developing a variable color sheet with a film thickness of 400 nanometers that changes color when stretched and shrunk. The developed stretchable color sheets are expected to be applied to adhesive-type display elements, as they can adhere to skin or be transferred to various electronic devices at room temperature utilizing the hig
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Global warming will lift agriculture weed threat
Invasive weeds pose a significant threat to global agriculture productivity — and their threat will become more pronounced if the Earth's climate is affected by increased greenhouse gas concentration, according a Flinders University climate researcher.
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Fujita Health University releases a preliminary report of Favipiravir Observational Study
Favipiravir (brand name Avigan) Observational Study Group (principal investigator: Dr. Yohei Doi, Fujita Health University) released a preliminary report of the Favipiravir Observational Study in Japan on the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases website. This preliminary report contains entries made to the study database by COB May 15, 2020, consisting of 2,158 patients who received favpir
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Study finds COVID-19 convalescent plasma therapy safe, with 76% patients improving
The first convalescent plasma transfusion trial results from Houston Methodist have been released. Of the study's 25 patients, 19 have improved and 11 have been discharged. With no adverse side effects caused by the therapy, the study concluded convalescent plasma is a safe treatment option for patients with severe COVID-19. This is the largest cohort assessed for outcomes related to convalescent
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NAU's Vulcan Project fossil fuel emissions show best match to carbon-14 measurements
Study findings take a dramatic step towards a greenhouse gas information system that can fundamentally change the way cities, states and the nation tackle the climate change problem.
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Latest climate models show more intense droughts to come
An analysis of new climate model projections by Australian researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes shows southwestern Australia and parts of southern Australia will see longer and more intense droughts due to a lack of rainfall caused by climate change. But Australia is not alone. Across the globe, several important agricultural and forested regions in the Amazon, Medite
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For world's poorest, coronavirus loss of income threatens ability to eat
The world's poorest—who have lost their incomes from illness or because of lockdowns—are disproportionately impacted by the coronavirus pandemic and, unless they receive enough support, hunger levels will soar and some countries may see rising violence, experts say.
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New optical technique provides more efficient probe of nanomagnet dynamics
The performance of magnetic storage and memory devices depends on the magnetization dynamics of nanometer-scale magnetic elements called nanomagnets. Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed a new optical technique that enables efficient analysis of single nanomagnets as small as 75 nanometers in diameter, enabling them to extract critical information for optimizing device performance.
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Detection of Crab Nebula shows viability of innovative gamma-ray telescope
Scientists in the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) consortium have detected gamma rays from the Crab Nebula using a prototype Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope (pSCT), proving the viability of the novel telescope design for use in gamma-ray astrophysics. The results were announced June 1 at the 236th meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS).
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The interconnectedness of human, animal and environmental health
The COVID-19 pandemic probably began with a single transmission of virus from an animal to a human.
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Ytringsfrihed for læger – en illusion?
Læger kritiserer ikke grundløst, og derfor må fyringer og sanktioner mod læger, som har benyttet deres ret til at ytre sig, være afgået ved døden, skriver pensioneret læge Finn Redke.
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The interconnectedness of human, animal and environmental health
The COVID-19 pandemic probably began with a single transmission of virus from an animal to a human.
3h
Interfacing gene circuits with microelectronics through engineered population dynamics
The ability to detect the growth of a bacterial colony by monitoring changes in impedance (a measure of resistance) across time reflects the impressive scientific progress connecting bacterial behavior with electrodes via synthetic biology. In a new report, M. Omar Din and a research team at the BioCircuits Institute, department of bioengineering and molecular biology at the University of Californ
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When determining sex, exceptions are the rule
For nearly a century, biologists have modeled the evolution of sex chromosomes—the genetic instructions that primarily determine whether an individual will develop into a male or female (or a certain mating type)—resulting in an impressive theoretical framework. Now, thanks to the publication of genomic data from a wide variety of non-model organisms, these theories are being tested against empiri
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Tags on pet dogs could monitor our chemical exposure
Dogs could be an important sentinel species for the long-term health effects of environmental chemicals, research shows. Researchers used silicone dog tags as passive environmental samplers to collect information about everyday chemical exposures. "Silicone monitoring devices are still relatively new, but they represent an inexpensive and effective way to measure exposure to the chemicals we enco
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Interfacing gene circuits with microelectronics through engineered population dynamics
The ability to detect the growth of a bacterial colony by monitoring changes in impedance (a measure of resistance) across time reflects the impressive scientific progress connecting bacterial behavior with electrodes via synthetic biology. In a new report, M. Omar Din and a research team at the BioCircuits Institute, department of bioengineering and molecular biology at the University of Californ
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Connecting the quantum internet
Researchers at the Kastler Brossel Laboratory in Paris have succeeded in implementing a novel "hybrid" entanglement swapping protocol, bringing within reach the connection of disparate platforms in a future, heterogeneously structured, quantum internet.
3h
When determining sex, exceptions are the rule
For nearly a century, biologists have modeled the evolution of sex chromosomes—the genetic instructions that primarily determine whether an individual will develop into a male or female (or a certain mating type)—resulting in an impressive theoretical framework. Now, thanks to the publication of genomic data from a wide variety of non-model organisms, these theories are being tested against empiri
3h
Få overblikket over ASCO
Den virtuelle ASCO-kongres bød på opløftende resultater, der varsler nye behandlingsmuligheder for lungekræft, ovariekræft og endetarmskræft, der for bare få år siden stort set var lig med en dødsdom.
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Extraordinary modulation of light polarization with dark plasmons in magnetoplasmonic nanocavities
Enhancing magneto-optical effects is crucial for the size reduction of key photonic devices based on non-reciprocal propagation of light and to enable active nanophotonics. In this direction, an international team lead by CIC Nanogune (Spain) theoretically proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel conceptual roadmap to boost magnetization-induced polarization modulation using multipolar dar
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Human lifelong immunity depends on APRIL
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) identified the protein APRIL as a key regulator of plasmacyte maintenance and immunoglobulin production in humans. They showed in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency and a mutation in the gene encoding APRIL that a lack of APRIL reduces levels of plasmacytes and immunoglobulins. These findings help us understand how APRIL regu
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Solar Ring mission: A new concept of space exploration for understanding Sun and the inner heliosphere
A new concept of space exploration, Solar Ring mission, is proposed to deploy six spacecraft in the ecliptic plane to observe the Sun and interplanetary space surrounding our planets. The successful accomplishment of the mission will advance our understanding of the space environment that hold our life and enhance our capability in expanding the next new territory of human. The article published i
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Discoveries of high-Chern-number and high-temperature Chern insulator states
Realizing multiple dissipationless edge states and increasing the working temperature of Chern insulator states are not only the most important research topics in physical sciences, but also expected to promote the development of low-consumption electronics and integrated circuits.
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Distance learning poses challenges for some families of children with disabilities
At a time when schools are closed due to COVID-19, many parents are juggling work, finances, child care and distance learning. It's a lot to manage. For parents of children with disabilities, some unique challenges have emerged.
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A Reddit Community Has Become a Memorial for Covid-19 Victims
Amid a pandemic, users have turned the subreddit r/LastImages into a digital shrine to remember loved ones lost to the disease.
3h
A genome-scale map of DNA methylation kinetics
While the first genome-wide DNA methylation map in mammalian cells was established over 10 years ago, such maps only provide snapshots and do not inform about the actual dynamics of this epigenetic mark. Researchers from the Schübeler group now quantified actual rates of methylation and demethylation for 860,404 individual CpGs in mouse embryonic stem cells. Their study reveals highly variable and
3h
Sundhedsøkonom om ny økonomiaftale: »Det er blevet hverdag«
Lægeforeningen frygter, at den netop indgåede økonomiaftale er et skridt i retning mod tidligere underfinanciering af sundhedsvæsenet. Kjeld Møller Pedersen medgiver, at økonomien i regionerne kan »blive snæver«.
3h
SpaceX's historic launch gives Australia's booming space industry more room to fly
At the weekend, Elon Musk's commercial giant SpaceX launched two NASA astronauts in a spacecraft named Crew Dragon which, from the inside, looked like a souped-up Tesla.
3h
The fury in US cities is rooted in a long history of racist policing, violence and inequality
The protests that have engulfed American cities in the past week are rooted in decades of frustrations. Racist policing, legal and extra-legal discrimination, exclusion from the major avenues of wealth creation and vicious stereotyping have long histories and endure today.
3h
A genome-scale map of DNA methylation kinetics
While the first genome-wide DNA methylation map in mammalian cells was established over 10 years ago, such maps only provide snapshots and do not inform about the actual dynamics of this epigenetic mark. Researchers from the Schübeler group now quantified actual rates of methylation and demethylation for 860,404 individual CpGs in mouse embryonic stem cells. Their study reveals highly variable and
3h
Astronomers capture a pulsar 'powering up'
A Monash-University-led collaboration has, for the first time, observed the full, 12-day process of material spiraling into a distant neutron star, triggering an X-ray outburst thousands of times brighter than our Sun.
3h
Two vital buffers against climate change are just offshore
A new study finds that about 31 million people worldwide live in coastal regions that are "highly vulnerable" to future tropical storms and sea-level rise driven by climate change. In some of those regions, however, powerful defenses are located just offshore.
3h
Region Midtjyllands kliniske ledelse er ude i en alvorlig klinisk vildfarelse om lavdosis CT
Vi håber, at regionens syv lægefaglige direktører genfinder den kliniske nysgerrighed og finder ud af, hvorfor Silkeborg signifikant var bedre til at stille diagnosen lungekræft i et tidligt stadie end andre hospitaler, skriver skriver Frede Olesen og Leif Vestergaard.
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Covid-19 spilling out of hospitals and care homes, says UK expert
Prof Neil Ferguson tells Lords committee cases will remain steady until September Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Coronavirus infections in hospitals and care homes are spilling into the community and sustaining the outbreak to the point that cases will remain steady until September, a leading scientist has warned. Prof Neil Ferguson, the head of the outbreak modelli
3h
Covid-19 death rate in England higher among BAME people
People of Bangladeshi origin face greatest danger of dying in pandemic, according to PHE Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Death rates from Covid-19 in England have been higher among people of black and Asian origin than any other ethnic group, a government-ordered inquiry has found. In addition, those people of black backgrounds are the ethnic group most likely to be
3h
How we're turning local environmental problems into global issues by engineering nature
The current coronavirus pandemic is a poignant example of our hyperconnected planet. A small, localized infection in Wuhan, China, rapidly spread around the world on transcontinental flight paths in a remarkable and transformative fashion.
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With St. Amand's matrix, town planners can ID at-risk archaeological sites
As sea level rise, extreme weather events and storm surge become more frequent and severe along the Maine coast, people who live there will move inland.
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When determining sex, exceptions are the rule
Thanks to new genomic data, long-held theories on sex chromosome evolution are now being tested against empirical evidence from nature — often with surprising results.
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An important new tool for developing COVID-19 treatments, vaccines
Scientists have a new resource to help them better understand COVID-19 as they develop treatments and vaccines.
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Good night? Satellite data uncovers dolphins on the move at nighttime
More than 1,000 bottlenose dolphins live in Florida's Indian River Lagoon year-round. Although extensively studied, what they do at nighttime is still a mystery. Using satellite telemetry, scientists provide the first documentation that these dolphins have a larger range that encompasses more habitats than previously thought. They regularly leave the brackish waters of the estuarine system and, no
4h
AI stock trading experiment beats market in simulation
Researchers in Italy have melded the emerging science of convolutional neural networks with deep learning — a discipline within artificial intelligence — to achieve a system of market forecasting with the potential for greater gains and fewer losses than previous attempts to use AI methods to manage stock portfolios. The team, led by Prof. Silvio Barra at the University of Cagliari, published th
4h
Does estrogen influence alcohol use disorder?
A new study from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago shows that high estrogen levels may make alcohol more rewarding to female mice.
4h
Coronavirus Global News Tracker: Latest Updates
Some lessons: We will live with the virus for a long time and you should be wearing a mask. Paris is reopening cafe terraces.
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Could corporations control territory in space? Under new US rules, it might be possible
Last weekend, NASA launched US astronauts to the International Space Station for the first time in a decade, in a rocket designed by Elon Musk's SpaceX.
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The Leadbeater's possum finally had its day in court. It may change the future of logging in Australia
The Federal Court last week ruled that VicForests—a timber company owned by the Victorian government—breached environmental laws when they razed the habitat of the critically endangered Leadbeater's possum and the vulnerable greater glider.
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Nine traits that'll keep you calm in a life-threatening situation
When faced with adversity, do you have the fortitude to keep going? (Pixabay/) This story was originally featured on Outdoor Life . The skills you've acquired and gear in your pack are often the difference in making it through a life and death situation. But you first need the mental fortitude to survive. Without the drive to survive—and a strong mindset—no piece of gear will save you. The most i
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The Leadbeater's possum finally had its day in court. It may change the future of logging in Australia
The Federal Court last week ruled that VicForests—a timber company owned by the Victorian government—breached environmental laws when they razed the habitat of the critically endangered Leadbeater's possum and the vulnerable greater glider.
4h
Expert discusses the literary roots of technological innovations
Associate professor of literature Sandy Alexandre's research spans late-19th century to present-day black American literature and culture. In 2019, Alexandre was awarded a prestigious Bose Research Grant, which supports her study of the under-explored phenomenon of ideas that first appear in speculative fiction becoming technological and social reality. SHASS Communications spoke to Alexandre rece
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Researchers find Wyoming pronghorn exhibit little genetic variation despite landscape obstacles
A University of Wyoming researcher led a study that showed Wyoming pronghorn exhibit little-to-no population genetic differentiation even though their range spans hundreds of kilometers, multiple mountain ranges and three major interstate highways.
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Sputnik moment or budget breaker: How will the pandemic alter research funding?
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01519-x Financial crises could spell trouble for science budgets but spending could surge in some countries: part 2 in a series on science after the pandemic.
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How scientific conferences will survive the coronavirus shock
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01521-3 Virtual meetings are becoming the norm under COVID-19 and winning over many researchers: part 3 in a series on science after the pandemic.
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Lavdosis-CT – fup og fakta
Syv lægefaglige direktørers debatindlæg om lavdosis CT er fyldt med fejl og misforståelser, skriver Ulrich Fredberg, tidligere ledende overlæge på Diagnostisk Center i Silkeborg.
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Researchers find Wyoming pronghorn exhibit little genetic variation despite landscape obstacles
A University of Wyoming researcher led a study that showed Wyoming pronghorn exhibit little-to-no population genetic differentiation even though their range spans hundreds of kilometers, multiple mountain ranges and three major interstate highways.
4h
States lose some Clean Water Act authority under new EPA rule
States have less say in issuing Clean Water Act permits under an EPA rule finalized Monday as the Trump administration and conservative lawmakers seek to speed energy projects.
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Music Synchronizes the Brains of Performers and Their Audience
The more people enjoy music, the more similar their brain activity is to that of the musician — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Hancock criticised by regulator over UK coronavirus testing figures
Daily numbers 'far from complete and comprehensible', says head of statistics body
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Chris Whitty 'vetoed lowering of coronavirus alert level'
No 10 says England's chief medical officer was responsible for keeping it at level four Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The decision for England's official coronavirus alert level to remain at four despite this week's easing of some lockdown restrictions was made by the chief medical officer, Downing Street has said, indicating he vetoed the government's wish for it
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As others pull together on a coronavirus vaccine, why is the UK siding with big pharma? | Nick Dearden
The UK has refused to support a WHO initiative to make Covid-19 treatments patent-free Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage "The most urgent shared endeavour of our lifetimes," is how Boris Johnson described the search for a coronavirus vaccine just a month ago. At the time, the prime minister urged countries to pull together and share their expertise. Yet if his governme
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Evolution: why it seems to have a direction and what to expect next
The diversity and complexity of life on Earth is astonishing: 8 million or more living species—from algae to elephants—all evolved from a simple, single-celled common ancestor around 3.5 billion years ago. But does that mean that evolution always and inevitably generates greater diversity and complexity, having a predictable direction?
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Music Synchronizes the Brains of Performers and Their Audience
The more people enjoy music, the more similar their brain activity is to that of the musician — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Evolution: why it seems to have a direction and what to expect next
The diversity and complexity of life on Earth is astonishing: 8 million or more living species—from algae to elephants—all evolved from a simple, single-celled common ancestor around 3.5 billion years ago. But does that mean that evolution always and inevitably generates greater diversity and complexity, having a predictable direction?
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With $3 billion PFAS cleanup price tag looming, Pentagon looks to industry for ideas
Staring down a $3 billion—and growing—tab to clean up water sources at military installations across the country that are contaminated with cancer-causing chemicals linked to firefighting foam, the Defense Department is now in discussions with private companies about potential cleanup solutions that might reduce the cost.
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Severely damaged sea urchin shows astonishing resilience
Together with his colleague Christian Neumann of the Natural History Museum in Berlin, Senckenberg scientist Max Wisshak documented a sea urchin's fight for survival on the ocean floor off Spitsbergen. In their study, recently published in the scientific journal Polar Biology, the researchers show that despite traumatic injuries—more than one third of its shell and several vital organs had been lo
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Severely damaged sea urchin shows astonishing resilience
Together with his colleague Christian Neumann of the Natural History Museum in Berlin, Senckenberg scientist Max Wisshak documented a sea urchin's fight for survival on the ocean floor off Spitsbergen. In their study, recently published in the scientific journal Polar Biology, the researchers show that despite traumatic injuries—more than one third of its shell and several vital organs had been lo
4h
Simulating failure to find the strength in composites
Fiber-reinforced composites are widely used in aerospace and other high-tech industries. Understanding how their microstructure and the strength of the fiber-matrix interfaces affect their failure properties can lead to manufacturing stronger materials. A recent study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign developed a model to identify the sensitivities of transverse cracking, one of th
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Researchers discover symmetry-breaking phase transitions after isotopic doping
A joint team, while exploring phase diagrams in dense H2–HD–D2 mixtures, has reported a new discovery in which they found counterintuitive effects of isotopic doping on the phase diagram of H2–HD–D2 molecular alloy.
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Fremtidens fjernvarmeværk i Esbjerg får vigtigt blåt stempel
PLUS. Forsyningsselskabet Din Forsyning har i samarbejde med Esbjerg og Varde kommuner nu endelig fået formelt lov til at etablere et grønt alternativt til det kulfyrede kraftvarmeværk i Esbjerg.
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Ashamed over my mental illness, I realized drawing might help me – and others – cope
I've lived much of my life with anxiety and depression, including the negative feelings – shame and self-doubt – that seduced me into believing the stigma around mental illness : that people knew I wasn't good enough; that they would avoid me because I was different or unstable; and that I had to find a way to make them like me. It took me some time – I'm a classic late bloomer – but just before
4h
The entire universe may once have been spinning all over the place
A strange asymmetry in the rotation of galaxies we see today hints that the early universe may have spun in a complicated dance
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Pembrolizumab viser god effekt på triple negativ brystkræft
Læger kan se frem til endnu et immunterapimiddel i deres arsenal til behandling af brystkræft. Først fik de atezolizumab, og nu viser et fase 3-studie med pembrolizumab også positive resultater.
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To gange antistofbehandling er nok til patienter med tarmkræft
Når Medicinrådet om kort tid skal tage stilling til, om patienter med BRAF-muteret kolorektalkræft i Danmark skal behandles med to eller tre gange målrettet terapi med antistoffer, bør de skele til et nyt studie, der viser, at to gange målrettet terapi virker lige så godt som tre gange målrettet terapi.
5h
Journalism Without Skepticism
A recent interview published in Scientific American is a good case study in what can happen when you have journalism without skepticism. By skepticism I mean a working knowledge of the discipline of scientific skepticism, which combines our current understanding of the philosophy of science, the nature of pseudoscience, critical thinking, mechanisms of self-deception, deliberate deception, and sp
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Migration is normal, accept it
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01604-1 Pull down the walls and assist those displaced by climate change, argues a book on the movement of people, animals and plants.
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Sánchez set to extend Spain's state of alert after deal with centrists
Ciudadanos gives PM support as country prepares for next stage of transition to 'new normal'
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We can soon thank butterfly tongues for better cancer treatments and vaccines
The blue morpho butterfly's scale structure could launch a thousand innovations. (Peter Wey/Deposit Photos/) For more than 130 million years, butterflies have graced our planet. For much of our own history we've enjoyed them, but never knew much about them. Over the past 10 years, that's changed. Using high-tech tools, science has discovered hitherto undreamed of truths about these "flying flower
5h
Time Has Lost All Meaning
Courtesy of Ai Weiwei Studio A pandemic changes the way we see ourselves, that's for sure. What is time? How do we use it, spend it? We make a phone call, have lunch, brew some coffee, apply makeup. Time can restart and begin anew, or it can hide entirely, get cut off, disappear. Time is more than what passes between this moment and another one, or the price required to finish a task. It seeds ou
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How to Sync and Access Your Data Across Devices (2020)
Here's how to open all your files—so you can switch between your phone and laptop seamlessly.
5h
Data centre stocks surge as world shelters online
Sector seen as a 'haven' by investors is outpacing even Big Tech since market's February peak
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Immunterapi på vej til patienter med særlig tarmkræft-mutation
Patienter med kolorektalkræft og dMMR-mutation kan måske snart få adgang til immunterapibehandling efter positive resultater i fase 3-forsøg med pembrolizumab. Glædeligt, også fordi der er relativt få bivirkninger, siger dansk onkolog.
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Scientists develop paper-based sensors for carbon dioxide
A new sensor for detecting carbon dioxide can be manufactured on a simple piece of paper, according to a new study by University of Alberta physicists.
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How to Use Masks during the Coronavirus Pandemic
What kinds of face coverings work for protection against COVID-19? How do you use them safely? A series of simple steps outlines the answers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Chicken 'memories' ease return to ancestral homeland
Organisms carry long-term "memories" of their ancestral homelands that improve their adaptation to environmental change, according to a new study. The study, for which researchers raised chickens on the Tibetan Plateau and an adjacent lowland site, provides new insights into how creatures adapt to changing environments. It's a topic that's especially relevant today in the context of rapid climate
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Sant och falskt om parfymer och kroppslukter
Om du någon gång sniffat dig yr i en parfymaffär, kanske du också stött på påståenden om att pH-värde, doftnoter och feromoner påverkar doften. Är dessa och andra påståenden sanna? Och vad får oss i slutändan att lukta gott – och äckligt? Kemiprofessorn Ulf Ellervik reder ut begreppen. För oss tvåbenta varelser med näsan högt ovanför marken är lukten inte längre ett livsavgörande sinne, på samma
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These Smart Contact Lenses Overlay Info Without Obscuring Your View
Maybe our eyes really need head-up displays. For a company that until recently was in stealth mode, high-powered Mojo Vision hasn't been shy about advertising its radical vision for the way we interact with computers. Skipping past all those bulky wearable designs and right into a science-fiction-worthy future it calls "invisible computing," the company is developing smart contact lenses that can
5h
Do all space satellites orbit the earth in the same direction?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts The successful launch of the SpaceX rocket Dragon, timed so that the Nasa astronauts onboard could rendezvous with the International Space Station, got me thinking: do all satellites orbit the earth in the same direction? If s
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How to Use Masks during the Coronavirus Pandemic
What kinds of face coverings work for protection against COVID-19? How do you use them safely? A series of simple steps outlines the answers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Universal virus detection platform to expedite viral diagnosis
The quick, accurate detection of a virus on a wide scale is the key to combating infectious diseases such as COVID-19. A new viral diagnostic strategy using reactive polymer-grafted, double-stranded RNAs will serve as a pre-screening tester for a wide range of viruses with enhanced sensitivity.
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French cafés reopen: 'We are alive again'
Customers take first taste of normal life in weeks, but recovery will be slow
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Universal virus detection platform to expedite viral diagnosis
The quick, accurate detection of a virus on a wide scale is the key to combating infectious diseases such as COVID-19. A new viral diagnostic strategy using reactive polymer-grafted, double-stranded RNAs will serve as a pre-screening tester for a wide range of viruses with enhanced sensitivity.
5h
Researchers propose new approach to enable high-spectral-efficiency noncoherent underwater acoustic communication
The seafloor wireless observation network (SON) plays an important role in real-time ocean observation. The nodes connect with each other via the acoustic link.
5h
Terahertz radiation can disrupt proteins in living cells
Researchers from the RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics and collaborators have discovered that terahertz radiation, contradicting conventional belief, can disrupt proteins in living cells without killing them.
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Out-evolving coronavirus by evolving our own scientific ingenuity and social practices
If there is one thing that the coronavirus pandemic has exposed, it is that there is much that we still don't know about the world around us. Forget about the trillions—okay, more than trillions—of galaxies in the universe that we'll never explore. Just at our feet or in the air around us are cohabitants of our own world—viruses—that occupy an odd liminal space, pushing our understanding of the me
5h
Researchers discover a new type of matter inside neutron stars
A Finnish research group has found strong evidence for the presence of exotic quark matter inside the cores of the largest neutron stars in existence. They reached this conclusion by combining recent results from theoretical particle and nuclear physics to measurements of gravitational waves from neutron star collisions.
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The cascade to criticality
Combined theoretical and experimental work has resulted in a novel mechanism through which criticality emerges in quasiperiodic structures—a finding that provides unique insight into the physics on the middle ground between order and disorder.
5h
Novel method to directly measure stress fields in transparent solids
Laser doppler vibrometer (LDV) technology is used to measure the vibration of an object's surface.
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Researchers develop a first-principles quantum Monte Carlo package called TurboRVB
First-principles quantum Monte Carlo is a framework used to tackle the solution of the many-body Schrödinger equation by means of a stochastic approach. This framework is expected to be the next generation of electronic structure calculations because it can overcome some of the drawbacks in density functional theory and wavefunction-based calculations. In particular, the quantum Monte Carlo framew
5h
DNA robbery in progress in Australia's copperback quail-thrush
Quailthrush are a group of songbirds unique to our region. They are widespread throughout Australia and New Guinea and there are eight recognized species.
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Boris Johnson urged to publish BAME Covid-19 review immediately
Keir Starmer says government must 'stop the excuses' amid claims delay is due to fears it could stoke tensions Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson is under pressure to immediately publish the findings of an inquiry into why black and minority ethnic groups have been disproportionately affected by coronavirus, after accusations that it has been delayed over
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How will the UK's new 14-day coronavirus quarantine work?
MPs raise concerns about potentially limited impact of measures compared with damage they could do to industry Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage All international arrivals into the UK, including returning British residents, will be required to self-isolate for 14 days . Continue reading…
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US voting data from millions of people is being traded on the dark web
High-profile breaches of voting data in the US and other countries have found their way on to the dark web, where they are being traded for as little as $9.99
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New technique takes 3-D imaging an octave higher
A collaboration between Colorado State University and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign resulted in a new, 3-D imaging technique to visualize tissues and other biological samples on a microscopic scale, with potential to assist with cancer or other disease diagnoses.
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Heavy metals present in snake livers raise environmental concerns
Tiger snakes living in Perth's urban wetlands are accumulating toxic heavy metals in their livers, suggesting that their habitats—critical, local ecosystems—are contaminated and the species may be suffering as a result.
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Latest climate models show more intense droughts to come
An analysis of new climate model projections by Australian researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes shows southwestern Australia and parts of southern Australia will see longer and more intense droughts due to a lack of rainfall caused by climate change.
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DNA robbery in progress in Australia's copperback quail-thrush
Quailthrush are a group of songbirds unique to our region. They are widespread throughout Australia and New Guinea and there are eight recognized species.
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Vedvarende energi overhaler kulforbrug i USA for første gang i århundreder
Amerikanerne brugte dampmaskiner og de første typer vandkraft sidste gang kul var en mindre energikilde end de vedvarende alternativer i USA.
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Global warming will heighten agriculture weed threat
Working with computer models to predict the likely impact of climate change on invasive weed propagation, Dr. Farzin Shabani from Flinders University's Global Ecology Lab found a likely increase in areas of habitat suitability for the majority of invasive weed species in European countries, parts of the US and Australia, posing a great potential danger to global biodiversity.
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A low-cost, high-performance multinary intermetallic compound as an active electrocatalyst for hydrogen production
To exploit hydrogen as a clean energy source for future, scientists have been striving to develop novel processes to produce hydrogen efficiently and cost-effectively. A team composed of scientists who specialize in structure materials at City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a high-performance electrocatalyst based on an innovative concept originally for developing alloys. The new el
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New OIDA report says photonics engineering is needed to commercialize quantum technology
Quantum technologies are expected to have major impacts in markets ranging from telecom and medicine to finance but advances in product engineering are necessary to bring the technologies to market, according to the newly released OIDA Quantum Photonics Roadmap: Every Photon Counts produced in collaboration with Corning.
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Global warming will heighten agriculture weed threat
Working with computer models to predict the likely impact of climate change on invasive weed propagation, Dr. Farzin Shabani from Flinders University's Global Ecology Lab found a likely increase in areas of habitat suitability for the majority of invasive weed species in European countries, parts of the US and Australia, posing a great potential danger to global biodiversity.
5h
Guidance for educators on how to address the protests across the U.S. and the world
Teachers logging into their virtual classrooms this week have a choice: Address the protests happening across the country, or try to move along with year end lessons.
5h
Exposing the World's Biggest Carbon Emitters
"Energy accountant" Richard Heede does research needed to hold major polluters accountable for their actions. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Snowball's chance in Earth and early signs of life
New research led by the University of St Andrews helps answer one of the most asked questions in geoscience, when did Earth start to become habitable to complex life?
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Zooming in on the origins of fast radio bursts
Astronomers have peered into the home galaxies of fast radio bursts, ruling out supermassive black holes as a cause and bringing us a step closer to understanding the origins of these mysterious signals from outer space.
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The WIRED Coronavirus Glossary
Too many Covid-19 buzzwords? Here's what they all mean.
6h
Rigorous Hand-Washing Will Be Part of Covid-19's New Normal
The simplest hygiene tasks are the toughest to maintain—take it from the health care experts who have advice about how to make the habit stick.
6h
Decoding the Universe
An insider's look at the history and sociology of modern cosmology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6h
Trump Is No Richard Nixon
As riots and looting have disordered cities across the United States, many have speculated that the troubles could help reelect President Donald Trump. The speculation is based on analogy. American cities were swept by riots in the mid-1960s, and then, in 1968, Richard Nixon campaigned on a pledge of "law and order" and won the presidency. As it was then, so it will be now—or so the punditry goes
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Pandemics rapidly reshape the evolutionary and ecological landscape and have cascading social, economic effects
Like human pandemics, plant pandemics are also associated with the coming of the Anthropocene and first started appearing with the rise of an interconnected world. Some of the first recorded pathogen outbreaks were associated with wheat, as recorded by the Romans (2100-1950 B.P.). In fact, the Romans had a god/goddess of rust (Robigus/Robigine) because these new pathogens were so feared. Feasts, p
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Pandemics rapidly reshape the evolutionary and ecological landscape and have cascading social, economic effects
Like human pandemics, plant pandemics are also associated with the coming of the Anthropocene and first started appearing with the rise of an interconnected world. Some of the first recorded pathogen outbreaks were associated with wheat, as recorded by the Romans (2100-1950 B.P.). In fact, the Romans had a god/goddess of rust (Robigus/Robigine) because these new pathogens were so feared. Feasts, p
6h
Solving the mysteries of water and air underground
Stand outside and look underneath your feet. There, perhaps under some grass, is the soil. On a dry day, all the spaces in the soil are filled with air. And some distance further down, those spaces are entirely water. So what's in between?
6h
Efforts to speed up police digital forensic analysis must be more efficient, study shows
Efforts by police forces to speed up digital forensic analysis could lead to oversights in evidence gathering and interpretation, a new study warns.
6h
Coronavirus and Brexit are a poisonous combination for UK business
With many companies reliant on state support, speaking out against the government may seem foolhardy
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Isaac Newton proposed curing plague with toad vomit, unseen papers show
Notes made in the shadow of a devastating outbreak show the great scientist sketching out some distinctly queasy remedies It is not as bad as suggesting injections of disinfectant. Isaac Newton's 17th-century prescription for plague – which blended powdered toad with toad vomit to form "lozenges" to drive away the contagion – has been revealed. Two unpublished pages of Newton's notes on Jan Bapti
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Two-meter distancing might halve infection risk compared to one meter
The news: Keeping people two meters apart from each other is far more effective than just one at reducing the risk of spreading coronavirus, according to a new analysis in The Lancet . The researchers combed through 172 observational studies across 16 countries. Using statistical analysis, they found that the risk of infection when people stand at least one meter away came to 3%, compared with 13
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Decoding the Universe
An insider's look at the history and sociology of modern cosmology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Should Ecologists Treat Male and Female Animals like 'Different Species'?
Creatures from albatross to loggerhead turtles will use different habitats, depending on their sex—a factor that is often not accounted for in conservation plans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Should Ecologists Treat Male and Female Animals like 'Different Species'?
Creatures from albatross to loggerhead turtles will use different habitats, depending on their sex—a factor that is often not accounted for in conservation plans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Extracellular vesicles play an important role in the pathology of malaria vivax
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in the pathogenesis of malaria vivax, according to a study led by researchers from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) and the Germans Trias i Pujol Health Science Research Institute (IGTP). The findings, published in Nature Communications, indicate that EVs from P. vivax patients communicate with spleen fibroblasts promoting the adhesion o
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Should Ecologists Treat Male and Female Animals like 'Different Species'?
Creatures from albatross to loggerhead turtles will use different habitats, depending on their sex—a factor that is often not accounted for in conservation plans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Samordning av digitala tjänster kan minska vårt bilberoende
Nya tjänster för aktiv och delad mobilitet kommer att påverka hur vi reser i framtiden. En förutsättning för att dessa tjänster ska bidra till ett mer hållbart transportsystem är att de knyts samman med den traditionella kollektivtrafiken. Lösningar som knyter samman flera olika mobilitetstjänster går i Sverige under beteckningen kombinerad mobilitet och inkluderar allt ifrån reseplanerare med kö
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Extracellular vesicles play an important role in the pathology of malaria vivax
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in the pathogenesis of malaria vivax, according to a study led by researchers from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) and the Germans Trias i Pujol Health Science Research Institute (IGTP). The findings, published in Nature Communications, indicate that EVs from P. vivax patients communicate with spleen fibroblasts promoting the adhesion o
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Researchers identify the process behind the organ-specific elimination of chromosomes in plants
Typically, each somatic cell in an organism holds the same amount of DNA. However, researchers have, for the first time, shed light on a process that leads to tissue-specific differences in DNA content in plants. With an unusually high efficiency rate of 100%, this programmed chromosome elimination mechanism could become a valuable genetic tool for plant breeding or medical applications.
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Kiselgeler kan ersätta Rhoca-Gil som tätningsmedel
Nya tätningsmedel som bygger på kiseldioxidpartiklar istället för monomerer är både miljövänliga och står emot grundvatten bra. Denna typ kan ersätta material som det skandalomsusade tätningsmedlet Rhoca-Gil, enligt en doktorsavhandling från Göteborgs universitet. Det var i början av nittiotalet, när borrningarna av tunneln under Hallandsåsen satte igång, som det upptäcktes att massor av vatten l
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Researchers identify the process behind the organ-specific elimination of chromosomes in plants
Typically, each somatic cell in an organism holds the same amount of DNA. However, researchers have, for the first time, shed light on a process that leads to tissue-specific differences in DNA content in plants. With an unusually high efficiency rate of 100%, this programmed chromosome elimination mechanism could become a valuable genetic tool for plant breeding or medical applications.
6h
UK coronavirus live: statistics watchdog calls government's testing data inadequate and misleading
News updates: MPs return to Westminster; statistics authority says testing data 'widely criticised and often mistrusted' UK coronavirus death toll nears 50,000, latest official figures show AI firm that worked with Vote Leave wins new coronavirus contract Critics round on No 10 over 'ridiculous' rules for 14-day quarantine 'Flora needs me': MP caring for wife hits out at Jacob Rees-Mogg's plan Co
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Pre-COVID-19 poll of older adults hints at potential impact of pandemic on eating habits
Most people in their 50s and older were capable home cooks just before COVID-19 struck America, but only 5% had ordered groceries online, according to a new national poll. The cooking skills that enabled half of older adults to eat dinner at home six or seven days a week may have served them well during the height of the pandemic. But they may need added support for grocery shopping as the pandemi
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Coronavirus Live Updates: Here's What We Know After 6 Months of Covid-19
Some lessons: We will live with the virus for a long time and you should be wearing a mask. Michigan has lifted stay-at-home orders, and France is preparing to reopen cafe terraces.
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More Students Are 'Stacking' Credentials en Route to a Degree
With record numbers of Americans jobless, some are turning to nontraditional programs that offer rewards for completing short courses on specific skills.
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We've Now Entered the Final Phase of the Trump Era
We are in the Götterdämmerung now, the final phase of the Trump era. We began with the axis of adults that imperfectly constrained him. We then entered the age of hubris and action during which he systematically rid himself of the adults and was free to follow his whims. The third phase was the reckoning as he began to bump up against the contradictions of his own approach, on China and Iran in p
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Anesthesiology group loses ten papers at once in one journal
A group of anesthesiology researchers in India has had 10 papers retracted from a single journal because of a "high rate of similarity from various other articles along with overwhelming evidence of data fabrication." The retractions came after one of the authors of the papers submitted a manuscript to a different journal whose editor sniffed … Continue reading
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Immunology with Pam — lockdown silver lining
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01629-6
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AGO-bound mature miRNAs are oligouridylated by TUTs and subsequently degraded by DIS3L2
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16533-w 3′ end of microRNAs binds to the PAZ domain of Argonaute (AGO) proteins. Here the authors show that terminal nucleotidyltransferases TUT4/7 and exonuclease DIS3L2 induce tailing and decay of 3' end exposed-microRNAs in AGO PAZ mutant expressing- or cancer cells.
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Modeling mitigation of influenza epidemics by baloxavir
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16585-y Here, the authors implement a mathematical model that describes how Baloxavir antiviral-induced inhibition of influenza virus replication in infected individuals affects the spread of the virus during epidemics, suggesting that both the scaling up and acceleration of treatment would avert substantial influenza m
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The impact of climate and antigenic evolution on seasonal influenza virus epidemics in Australia
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16545-6 Seasonal influenza epidemics vary in timing and size, but the causes of the variation remain unclear. Here, the authors analyse a 15-year city-level data set, and find that fluctuations in climatic factors do not predict onset timing, and that while antigenic change does not have a consistent effect on epidemic
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The tumour microenvironment shapes dendritic cell plasticity in a human organotypic melanoma culture
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16583-0 Conventional co-culture systems often lack physiological complexity of the tumor microenvironment. Here, the authors report an organotypic skin melanoma culture and use this model to investigate the tumor induced suppression on dendritic cells.
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Human beige adipocytes for drug discovery and cell therapy in metabolic diseases
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16340-3 Methods to generate beige adipocytes from a human cell source are inefficient. Here, the authors present a protocol that efficiently generates beige adipocytes from human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), which have potential utility in therapeutic development relating to metabolic diseases such as type 2 diab
7h
Stable isotopes show that earthquakes enhance permeability and release water from mountains
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16604-y The authors investigate the groundwater table changes in the Kumamoto region (Japan) following the 2016 Mw 7.0 Kumamoto earthquake. Through detailed isotope analysis the study shows how earthquakes can rupture the crust and generate new pathways for aquifers.
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Type I interferon sensing unlocks dormant adipocyte inflammatory potential
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16571-4 White adipose inflammation can occur in obesity and is at least in part mediated by inflammatory immune cells. Here the authors show that the Type I Interferon/Interferon alpha-beta receptor axis promotes an inflammatory, glycolysis associated adipocyte phenotype.
7h
Human norovirus targets enteroendocrine epithelial cells in the small intestine
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16491-3 Human norovirus pathogenesis is incompletely understood due to a lack of appropriate animal disease models. Here, Green et al. show norovirus replication in chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cells and other epithelial cells in tissue from a pediatric intestinal transplant recipient with severe gastroenteri
7h
Gene found that causes eyes to wither in cavefish
In a new study led by University of Maryland researchers, scientists discovered a gene that prevents blood flow to blind cavefish eyes during development. It is the same gene responsible for homocystinuria in humans.
8h
A better model for neutrophil-related diseases
Neutrophils are critical immune cells for antimicrobial defense, but they can exacerbate a number of diseases, perhaps including COVID-19. The traditional approaches to study neutrophils in animal models are limited in specificity and effectiveness. EPFL scientists have now identified the problem and have developed a new, optimized model for studying the role of neutrophils in the context of disea
8h
An optimal decision-making strategy emerges from non-stop learning
Unexpected results bring into question which decision-making strategies should be considered as optimal.
8h
Terahertz radiation can disrupt proteins in living cells
Researchers from the RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics and collaborators have discovered that terahertz radiation, contradicting conventional belief, can disrupt proteins in living cells without killing the cells.
8h
Process behind the organ-specific elimination of chromosomes in plants unveiled
Commonly, each somatic cell in an organism holds the same amount of DNA. However, researchers have, for the first time, shed light on a process, which leads to tissue-specific differing DNA content in plants. With an unusually high efficiency rate of 100%, this programmed chromosome elimination mechanism could become a valuable genetic tool for plant breeding or medical applications.
8h
Extracellular vesicles play an important role in the pathology of malaria vivax
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in the pathogenesis of malaria vivax, according to a study led by researchers from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) and the Germans Trias i Pujol Health Science Research Institute (IGTP). The findings, published in Nature Communications, indicate that EVs from P. vivax patients communicate with spleen fibroblasts promoting the adhesion o
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Palynological Age Control and Paleoenvironments of the Paleogene Strata in Eastern Dahomey Basin, Southwestern Nigeria
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65462-7
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Challenging human somatic testicular cell reassembly by protein kinase inhibition –setting up a functional in vitro test system
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65924-y
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Facile large-area uniform photolithography of membrane diffractive lens based on vacuum assisted self contact method
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65990-2
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Comparative assessment of faecal microbial composition and metabonome of swine, farmers and human control
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65891-4
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Metabolic reprogramming associated with progression of renal ischemia reperfusion injury assessed with hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65816-1 Metabolic reprogramming associated with progression of renal ischemia reperfusion injury assessed with hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]pyruvate
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Comparative transcriptomics of an arctic foundation species, tussock cottongrass (Eriophorum vaginatum), during an extreme heat event
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65693-8 Comparative transcriptomics of an arctic foundation species, tussock cottongrass ( Eriophorum vaginatum ), during an extreme heat event
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Extracellular vesicles produced by NFAT3-expressing cells hinder tumor growth and metastatic dissemination
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65844-x
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Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS)-induced layer-specific modulation of evoked responses in the sensory cortex of rats
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65745-z
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Hundreds of journals' editorial practices captured in database
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01628-7
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Resist pseudoscience with respect, not ridicule
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01626-9
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Heat and coronavirus can be twin killers
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01627-8
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Steve King's Racism Won't Be His Undoing
In the 24 years he's been in politics, Steve King, the Iowa Republican who has spoken of immigrants with " calves the size of cantaloupes " and cautioned that Americans cannot "restore our civilization with somebody else's babies," has never lost an election. That could change today. The 71-year-old is facing a slew of well-qualified candidates in the state's Republican primary. Interestingly, th
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Bees grooming each other can boost colony immunity
Honeybees that specialize in grooming their nestmates (allogroomers) to ward off pests play a central role in the colony, finds a new UCL and University of Florence study.
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Gene found that causes eyes to wither in cavefish
Mexican cavefish spend their entire lives in the dark. With no need for vision, many of them lost functional eyes. In more than 30 varieties of Mexican cavefish, the eyes stop developing as embryos grow into larvae. Although they are still the same species as a sighted, surface-dwelling fish (Astyanax mexicanus), the cave-dwelling varieties carry genetic mutations that scientists have yet to fully
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Masks Sold to Navajo Hospitals Don't Meet FDA Standards
One million masks purchased for Navajo hospitals do not meet FDA standards for use in a medical setting. A former Trump White House official won the contract to acquire the specialized respirator masks for the Indian Health Service just days after registering his company. Now the contract is under scrutiny.
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Bees grooming each other can boost colony immunity
Honeybees that specialize in grooming their nestmates (allogroomers) to ward off pests play a central role in the colony, finds a new UCL and University of Florence study.
8h
Gene found that causes eyes to wither in cavefish
Mexican cavefish spend their entire lives in the dark. With no need for vision, many of them lost functional eyes. In more than 30 varieties of Mexican cavefish, the eyes stop developing as embryos grow into larvae. Although they are still the same species as a sighted, surface-dwelling fish (Astyanax mexicanus), the cave-dwelling varieties carry genetic mutations that scientists have yet to fully
8h
Italien trodser privacy-bekymringer og lancerer corona-app
Mange italienerne virker modvillige til at tage den nye corona-app i brug.
8h
Climate change: older trees loss continue around the world
Every six seconds in 2019 the world lost an area of primary forest the size of a football pitch, a study says.
8h
Sidste offentlige DVB-transmission er sendt: Farvel til første generation digitalt tv
PLUS. Med et par måneders forsinkelse blev det sidste DVB-transmission til antenne-tv sendt i nat kl.00.01. Fremover kan du kun se antenne-tv med en DVB-T2-modtager.
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Pandemic research: UK must coordinate
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01654-5
8h
Här syns hur ketamin lindrar depression
I experimentella studier har ett sövningsmedel kallat ketamin visat sig ha snabb effekt vid svårbehandlad depression, något som Forskning & Framsteg tidigare skrivit om. Nu har svenska forskare använt så kallad positronemissionstomografi, PET, för att kunna studera ketaminets effekter i patienters hjärnor.
8h
Report on New Caledonia's coral reefs offers a glimmer of hope for the future
A new report from the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (KSLOF) provides a promising assessment of the status of coral reefs in New Caledonia. Released today, the Global Reef Expedition: New Caledonia Final Report summarizes the Foundation's findings from a research mission to study the health and resiliency of the coral reefs of New Caledonia, part of KSLOF's larger efforts to study the
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Report on New Caledonia's coral reefs offers a glimmer of hope for the future
A new report from the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (KSLOF) provides a promising assessment of the status of coral reefs in New Caledonia. Released today, the Global Reef Expedition: New Caledonia Final Report summarizes the Foundation's findings from a research mission to study the health and resiliency of the coral reefs of New Caledonia, part of KSLOF's larger efforts to study the
9h
Killing coronavirus with handheld ultraviolet light device may be feasible
A personal, handheld device emitting high-intensity ultraviolet light to disinfect areas by killing the novel coronavirus is now feasible, according to researchers at Penn State, the University of Minnesota and two Japanese universities.
9h
Atmospheric scientists identify cleanest air on Earth in first-of-its-kind study
Colorado State University Distinguished Professor Sonia Kreidenweis and her research group identified an atmospheric region unchanged by human-related activities in the first study to measure bioaerosol composition of the Southern Ocean south of 40 degrees south latitude.
9h
Sådan vil regeringen privatisere affaldssektoren
PLUS. Affaldsforbrænding skal ske på markedsvilkår, og regeringen vil indføre tvangsudbud på behandlingen af det genanvendelige husholdningsaffald.
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Ex-Harvard Professor Timothy Leary on Consciousness
submitted by /u/NixNonFix [link] [comments]
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The Neuroscience Behind 'Good' and 'Bad' Trips
submitted by /u/tahutahut [link] [comments]
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Extinction crisis 'poses existential threat to civilisation'
A study presents more evidence that the world is in the midst of a sixth mass extinction.
10h
No, Everything You Thought You Knew About Disease Is Not Wrong
The authors of this book are not doctors or scientists, but they try to convince readers that science-based medicine gets it all wrong, that germs don't cause disease, and that drugs and vaccines can't possibly work. No, the book gets it all wrong.
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Monster or Machine? A Profile of the Coronavirus at 6 Months
Our "hidden enemy," in plain sight.
10h
Going Viral, or Not, in the Milky Way
Is the pandemic a rehearsal for our own cosmic mortality?
10h
Thailand tempts wealthy travellers with luxurious lockdown
Passengers from abroad can move into a resort to avoid 'spartan' government quarantine
12h
'Going in the Wrong Direction': More Tropical Forest Loss in 2019
Brazil was responsible for more than a third of the total global loss in 2019.
12h
Carnegie Mellon tool automatically turns math into pictures
Some people look at an equation and see a bunch of numbers and symbols; others see beauty. Thanks to a new tool created at Carnegie Mellon University, anyone can now translate the abstractions of mathematics into beautiful and instructive illustrations. The tool enables users to create diagrams simply by typing an ordinary mathematical expression and letting the software do the drawing.
13h
Lesbian, gay, and bisexual older adults at higher risk for substance use
Middle-aged and older adults who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual have higher rates of using certain substances in the past year than those who identify as heterosexual, according to a new study led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine and the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU School of Global Public Health.
13h
Covid-19: is a second wave inevitable? – podcast
Ian Sample talks to Prof Carl Heneghan about the uncertainties in predicting future outbreaks of Covid-19 and what we can do to prevent them Continue reading…
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Covid-19: is a second wave inevitable?
Ian Sample talks to Prof Carl Heneghan about the uncertainties in predicting future outbreaks of Covid-19 and what we can do to prevent them. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
13h
UAE caught between US and China as powers vie for influence in Gulf
US snubbed Emirati offer to test staff for Covid-19 because of China privacy concerns
13h
The new era of quarantine: a muddled set of travel rules
Many governments have decided to isolate arrivals because of coronavirus despite little agreement about how to go about it
13h
Singapore tentatively reopens after two months of lockdown
Children return to school and businesses resume operations after virus batters economy
13h
This Is How Trump Wants to Be Seen
In the span of 20 minutes, President Donald Trump manufactured a moment meant to showcase two qualities he's never really displayed: physical courage and religious feeling. Americans have seen little of Trump in recent days as protests over the killing of George Floyd have erupted in the nation's cities. A president who's cultivated a tough-guy image seemed to be intimidated , cowering inside the
13h
European stocks rise even as protests roil US
Rally resumes in face of Covid-19 crisis and further disturbances in America
14h
Folketingsflertal vil lempe GDPR: »Det holder jo folk tilbage, hvis de er bange for at få en bøde«
Trods bredopbakning frygter kritikere, at en lempelse vil slække indsatsen for datasikkerheden. Socialdemokratiet forsikrer, at problematikken vil blive taget seriøst.
14h
Researchers develop method to probe phase transitions in 2-D materials
Phase transitions play an important role in materials. However, in two-dimensional materials, the most famous of which is graphene, phase transitions can be very difficult to study. Researchers from Delft University of Technology and the University of Valencia have developed a new method that helps to solve this problem. They suspended ultrathin layers of 2-D-materials over a cavity and tracked th
14h
Scotland's coronavirus record flattered by contrasts with south
Sturgeon seen as having handled crisis well, despite high death rate and care homes questions
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EY quits audit role at ventilator maker paid £79m by government
Penlon answered 'ventilator challenge' and received state money despite auditor quitting over accounts
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In Minneapolis, Neighbors Are Mobilizing—Offline
Worried about infiltration from extremist groups or police surveillance, residents are turning to pre-internet tactics to help protect homes and local stores.
15h
Top journal retracts study claiming masks ineffective in preventing COVID-19 spread
One of the world's leading medical journals has retracted a widely circulated paper published in April that concluded that "both surgical and cotton masks seem to be ineffective in preventing the dissemination of SARS–CoV-2 from the coughs of patients with COVID-19 to the environment and external mask surface." The study, published by the Annals of … Continue reading
16h
3 Words Mislead Online Regional Mood Analysis
Analyzing keywords on Twitter can offer a loose measure of the subject well-being of a community, as long as you don't count three words: good, love and LOL.
16h
Facebook Employees Take the Rare Step to Call Out Mark Zuckerberg
Some workers at the social media giant are publicly criticizing decisions not to remove or flag misleading posts by President Trump.
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The Atlantic Daily: Civil Unrest
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Phobymo To put it clinically, America is experiencing large-scale civil unrest following the death of George Floyd. But that description fails to capture the emotions on display in the country's
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Coronavirus live news: Dr Fauci says he hasn't spoken to Trump in two weeks as Pakistanis told to 'live with virus'
UK's 14-day quarantine rules criticised as 'ridiculous' ; Global deaths pass 375,000; Spain reports no new deaths for the first time since March . Follow the latest updates Fauci says he and Trump no longer in regular contact Pakistanis urged to 'live with the virus' Australia coronavirus updates – live Coronavirus latest: at a glance See all our coronavirus coverage 2.38am BST The ongoing corona
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1-day delay in social distancing led to 2.4 days of COVID spread
Places that took longer to begin implementing social distancing measures spent more time with the coronavirus rapidly spreading than did others that acted more quickly, a new analysis of outbreaks in 58 cities shows. In the new paper that will appear in Emerging Infectious Diseases , researchers studied cities throughout China and analyzed when first cases were detected, when social distancing me
16h
History Will Judge Trump's Enablers Harshly
As Donald Trump lays the groundwork for setting federal troops against the American population, Anne Applebaum asks: What causes people to abandon their principles in support of a corrupt regime? And how do they find their way back? Like the Vichy French in the 1940s or East Germans in 1945, high-ranking members of the Republican Party in 2020 America have chosen to accept an alien ideology that
16h
3 Words Mislead Online Regional Mood Analysis
Analyzing keywords on Twitter can offer a loose measure of the subject well-being of a community, as long as you don't count three words: good, love and LOL. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
To feel better, replace sitting with sleep or light activity
In new research, replacing long periods of sitting with sleep was associated with lower stress, better mood, and lower body mass index. In addition, substituting light physical activity was associated with improved mood and lower BMI across the next year, the study shows. Light activity can include walking around your home office while talking on the phone or standing while preparing dinner, says
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History Will Judge the Complicit
O n a cold March afternoon in 1949, Wolfgang Leonhard slipped out of the East German Communist Party Secretariat, hurried home, packed what few warm clothes he could fit into a small briefcase, and then walked to a telephone box to call his mother. "My article will be finished this evening," he told her. That was the code they had agreed on in advance. It meant that he was escaping the country, a
17h
Today's atmospheric carbon dioxide levels greater than 23 million-year record
A common message in use to convey the seriousness of climate change to the public is: 'Carbon dioxide levels are higher today than they have been for the past one million years!' This new study used a novel method to conclude that today's carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are actually higher than they have been for the past 23 million years.
17h
Loggerhead sea turtles host diverse community of miniature organisms
Researchers found that more than double the number of organisms than previously observed live on the shells of these oceanic reptiles, raising important questions about loggerhead sea turtle ecology and conservation.
17h
Loss of land-based vertebrates is accelerating
Analysis of thousands of vertebrate species reveals that extinction rates are likely much faster than previously thought. The researchers call for immediate global action, such as a ban on the wildlife trade, to slow the sixth mass extinction.
17h
U.S. Ruling Could Mean a Flood of New Claims Against Volkswagen
Judges on Monday cleared the way for counties to pursue the automaker, which has already paid more than $20 billion in federal penalties for cheating on pollution tests, under local laws.
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Medical Workers Should Use Respirator Masks, Not Surgical Masks
The surgical masks used in risky settings like hospitals offer much less protection against the coronavirus, an analysis found.
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NIH-halted study unveils its massive analysis of bat coronaviruses
But survey in China doesn't pinpoint animal source of COVID-19
17h
Tech Companies Denounce Racism. Will Silicon Valley Change?
The killing of George Floyd elicited corporate outrage, and some donations. But well-intentioned rhetoric has not always been followed by meaningful action.
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Amazon secures record low borrowing costs
Booming ecommerce group's $10bn fundraising is cheapest ever in US corporate bond market
18h
Evidence supports physical distancing, masks, and eye protection to help prevent COVID-19
The systematic review was conducted by a large, international collaborative of researchers, front-line and specialist clinicians, epidemiologists, patients, public health and health policy experts of published and unpublished literature in any language.
18h
The Lancet: Most comprehensive study to date provides evidence on optimal physical distancing, face masks, and eye protection to prevent spread of COVID-19
Keeping at least one metre from other people as well as wearing face coverings and eye protection, in and outside of health-care settings, could be the best way to reduce the chance of viral infection or transmission of COVID-19, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis synthesising all the available evidence from the scientific literature, published in The Lancet.
18h
Risk of infection could double if 2-metre rule reduced, study finds
Comprehensive study supports government's current physical distancing guidance Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Reducing physical distancing advice from 2 metres to 1 metre could double the risk of coronavirus infection, according to the most comprehensive study to date. The research, part-funded by the World Health Organization (WHO) and published in the Lancet, will
18h
Research supports 2-metre distancing rule
Wearing face and eye protection also cuts risk of transmitting the virus, Lancet report finds
18h
You might not recognize your office when it reopens again
Infectious disease experts fear that so-called "super spreaders" at marches could trigger new outbreaks of COVID-19. (Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . This past week, protests against police brutality in cities across the country have brought
19h
Study shows hydroxychloroquine's harmful effects on heart rhythm
The malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, which has been promoted as a potential treatment for Covid-19, is known to have potentially serious effects on heart rhythms. Now, a team of researchers has used an optical mapping system to observe exactly how the drug creates serious disturbances in the electrical signals that govern heartbeat.
19h
Christo Found Beauty in Realizing the Impossible
It takes a truly unique eye to see beauty in bureaucracy, to look at a snarl of planning regulations and NIMBYism and red tape and to convert it, through sheer imaginative alchemy, into art itself. And yet that quality is exactly what defined the work of Christo, who died on Sunday at the age of 84, and his partner, Jeanne-Claude, over the course of a 60-year career. "For me, the excitement begin
19h
Coronasmitte.dk blokeret for danskere i udlandet: Rigspolitiet melder om cyberangreb
Politiets websider er blokeret for adgang fra lande uden for rigsfællesskabet og Tyskland.
19h
Coronavirus Live Updates: Pandemic to Cost U.S. Economy $7.9 Trillion Over 10 Years
Michigan's governor lifted a stay-at-home order as other states announced steps to reopen. For a second day, Wuhan reported no new infections.
19h
Reducing inflammation boosts cognitive recovery after stroke, may extend treatment window
Reperfusion therapy, the gold standard in stroke treatment, returns blood flow to the affected brain area and must be administered within four hours of stroke to minimize hemorrhage risk. Even with successful return of blood flow, full brain function recovery is rare. Medical University of South Carolina researchers have shown in a preclinical stroke model that adding a unique compound to reduce b
19h
Report on New Caledonia's coral reefs offers a glimmer of hope for the future
The latest report from Global Reef Expedition scientists provides a promising assessment of coral reef health and resiliency in New Caledonia.
19h
Researchers map SARS-CoV-2 infection in cells of nasal cavity, bronchia, lungs
Researchers at UNC-Chapel Hill characterized the specific ways in which SARS-CoV-2 infects the nasal cavity to a great degree — replicating specific cell types — and infects and replicates progressively less well in cells lower down the respiratory tract. The findings suggest the virus tends to become firmly established first in the nasal cavity, but in some cases the virus is aspirated into the
19h
COVID-19 outbreak lasts days longer for each day's delay in social distancing
A new analysis of COVID-19 outbreaks in 58 cities has found that places that took longer to begin implementing social distancing measures spent more time with the virus rapidly spreading than others that acted more quickly. Epidemiological researchers have published research finding every day a city delayed implementing social distancing measures after the appearance of a first case added 2.4 days
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Study seeks to optimize comfort for patients removed from ventilators at end of life
A recently published paper reports on a study of the palliative ventilator withdrawal (PVW) procedure performed in intensive care units (ICU) at end of life.
19h
Climate change: May was sunniest calendar month on record in UK
Meteorologists say the switch from an extremely wet winter to an extremely dry spring is not "British".
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After 6 Months, Important Mysteries About Coronavirus Endure
Times journalists summarize some of the most critical things that scientists and public health officials have yet to understand.
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Six Months of Coronavirus: Here's Some of What We've Learned
Much remains unknown and mysterious, but these are some of the things we're pretty sure of after half a year of this pandemic.
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How to Read a Coronavirus Study, or Any Science Paper
Published scientific research, like any piece of writing, is a peculiar literary genre.
19h
Study: More Than 500 Vertebrates Poised To Go Extinct
Mass Extinction Over 500 land-based vertebrates — animals with spines — are on the brink of extinction. New research suggests that rates of animal extinction, explicitly caused by human activity, is accelerating to unsustainable levels. And by focusing on mammals , birds, amphibians, and reptiles, Earther reports that the scientists behind the study hope people will take note of the dire problem.
19h
Atmospheric scientists identify cleanest air on Earth in first-of-its-kind study
A research group at Colorado State University identified an atmospheric region unchanged by human-related activities in the first study to measure bioaerosol composition of the Southern Ocean south of 40 degrees south latitude.
20h
Researchers identify a moving target in small cell lung tumors
About 15% of lung cancers are classified as small cell lung cancer. Recent studies have indicated that four major subtypes of small cell lung cancer exist, yet approaches to tailor treatment of these subtypes have not yet become standard of care. Today in the journal Cancer Cell, scientists outline new findings about the origins of these lung cancer subtypes, paving the way for a new foundation to
20h
Researchers identify key immune checkpoint protein that operates within T cells
A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) has identified a protein within certain immune cells that is required for optimal immune responses to cancer. The findings, reported in the journal Science Advances, also suggest that the protein might be useful for predicting whic
20h
Killing coronavirus with handheld ultraviolet light device may be feasible
A personal, handheld device emitting high-intensity ultraviolet light to disinfect areas by killing the novel coronavirus is now feasible, according to researchers at Penn State, the University of Minnesota and two Japanese universities.
20h
Long-term use of rituximab associated with lower rates of AAV relapse
An extra 18 months of rituximab infusions was associated with lower rates of relapse compared with standard maintenance therapy in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV). These findings suggest that long-term rituximab use should be the standard of care. Findings from a randomized trial are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.
20h
A nice day for a quantum walk
Scientists have initiated a quantum random walk by shining lasers on a row of trapped ions. They showed that the observed locations of vibrations spreading out over time matched the predictions of quantum mechanics. This work may help elucidate unresolved questions in quantum chemistry and biology.
20h
Warmer temperatures slow COVID-19 transmission, but not by much
Researchers looked at the impact of temperature, precipitation, and UV index on COVID-19 case rates in the United States during the spring months of 2020. The findings reveal that while the rate of COVID-19 incidence does decrease with warmer temperatures up until 52 degrees F, further warmer temperatures do not decrease disease transmission significantly.
20h
How Americans are coping with COVID-19 stress
Almost overnight, the rapid emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and subsequent state and federal prevention measures dramatically altered daily behavior. A new study provides the first snapshot of the immediate impact of COVID-19 on Americans' stress levels, coping strategies, and adherence to public health guidelines.
20h
Extra choline may help pregnant women decrease negative effects of COVID-19 on their newborns
Pregnant women who take extra choline supplements may mitigate the negative impact that viral respiratory infections, including COVID-19, can have on their babies, according to a new study in the Journal of Psychiatric Research.
20h
Army Research Laboratory supporting Texas A&M research on armor performance
The United States Army Research Laboratory is lending support to a Texas A&M University research project investigating potential improvement of ballistic performance of armor materials. The project, led by Dr. Justin Wilkerson, assistant professor and James J. Cain '51 Faculty Fellow II in the J. Mike Walker '66 Department of Mechanical Engineering, focuses on identifying what damaging effects cou
20h
Academic emergency departments are always open to all who need care
"Academic emergency departments never deny emergency care to any person." That is the statement put forth in a commentary from the Board of Directors of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and the Senior Editorial Board of Academic Emergency Medicine journal. The commentary, to be published in the June issue of Academic Emergency Medicine, was written in response to recent news stories sta
20h
Undersøgelse: Road pricing kan fylde hullet efter registreringsafgiften
PLUS. Før Anders Eldrups kommission kommer med sit bud på en mulig omlægning af bilbeskatningen i Danmark, viser ny rapport, hvor Eldrup-kommissionen kan komme i mål.
20h
Across the cell membrane
Aquaporins and glucose transporters facilitate the movement of substances across biological membranes and are present in all kingdoms of life.Biophysicists used a supercomputer to explore the atomic behavior of these proteins. The research suggests glucose transporters function by using a gate on the extracellular side that opens and closes based on body temperature.
20h
Impact of children's loneliness today could manifest in depression for years to come
A rapid review into the mental health impacts of loneliness on children and young people concludes that there could be a spike in demand for mental health services in the years to come.
20h
Investor plans £15bn support for UK companies toiling with crisis loans
Business Growth Fund proposes state-backed scheme to aid indebted companies emerging from pandemic
20h

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