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Paleobotanist Brian Axsmith Dies

The University of South Alabama professor, who died of complications related to COVID-19, reconstructed the historic range of plants that once grew in the southeastern US.

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Empty Stadiums Are Boring. Here's How Sports Teams Hope They Can Keep Fans Interested From Home.

When no one is there to catch a fly ball, will you even want to watch?

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Caring for patients on COVID-19 units: an approach for hospitals

Toronto and Spanish physicians describe in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) an approach to create dedicated COVID-19 patient units, infection control protocols and care teams to help other hospitals safely care for patients.

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A risk-tailored approach to reopening during the COVID-19 pandemic

A tailored public health approach that accounts for variation in risks across populations, places and time could guide the next phase of Canada's coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) response, argue authors in a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

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Human activity threatens 50 billion years of vertebrate evolutionary history

A new study maps for the first time the evolutionary history of the world's terrestrial vertebrates: amphibians, birds, mammals and reptiles. It explores how areas with large concentrations of evolutionarily distinct species are being impacted by our ever-increasing 'human footprint.'

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Clinical trials in the era of digital engagement: A SWOG call to action

Social media is an integral part of medicine, and an increasingly important conduit for sharing information about clinical trials. In an article in JCO Clinical Cancer Informatics, researchers from SWOG Cancer Research Network pose provocative questions aimed at sparking discussion and creating consensus on how cancer clinical trial stakeholders can best interact on social platforms.

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Pushing photons

UC Santa Barbara researchers continue to push the boundaries of LED design a little further with a new method that could pave the way toward more efficient and versatile LED display and lighting technology.

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New Study Finds Hydroxychloroquine Did Not Prevent Covid-19

The first carefully controlled trial of hydroxychloroquine given to people exposed to the coronavirus did not show any benefit.

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No Evidence Hydroxychloroquine Is Helpful In Preventing COVID-19, Study Finds

A study of more than 800 health workers, first responders and others finds that taking hydroxychloroquine to prevent COVID-19 is no better than a placebo in preventing the illness. (Image credit: GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images)

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The need for conservation of natural springs in drying climate

Researchers have described the importance of springs in a drying climate.

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Pinpointing the origins of Jerusalem's Temple Mount

Integrating radiocarbon dating and microarchaeology techniques has enabled more precise dating of the ancient Wilson's Arch monument at Jerusalem's Temple Mount, according to a new study.

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Social status, not size, determines reproductive success for female mountain gorillas

Dominance rank among female mountain gorillas is not related to body size but does increase their reproductive output according to new research.

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Genetic outcomes of translocating bighorn sheep

Bighorn sheep have maintained a distinctive population genetic structure in Wyoming, even with historical population losses and translocations.

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Covid-19 news: NHS Test and Trace not tracing enough to be effective

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

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Mobile phones dial up empowerment for women

Nature, Published online: 01 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01623-y The connections and information provided by a mobile phone could improve women's well-being.

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Boris Johnson urges UK public not to flout lockdown rules

Test-and-trace chief Dido Harding unable to give data on how new system is working

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Brands Have Nothing Real to Say About Racism

As Americans protested police brutality and the killing of George Floyd over the past week, they were met with tear gas and law-enforcement batons. The whole ghastly spectacle— eyesight lost to rubber bullets , people beaten and sometimes killed in the streets , journalists arrested on television —was broadcast live on platforms like Twitter and Instagram. Behind the scenes, brand managers were w

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Airlines hit out at UK quarantine measures

Wizz Air chief says plan for incoming passengers is pointless and 'harsh'

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Women at lower risk for cardiovascular disease than men

Women's risk of falling ill with cardiovascular disease, and dying from it, is lower than that of men of the same age, irrespective of where in the world they live. This is shown by a study of, in total, more than 160,000 men and women in 27 countries. Scientists at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, are among those presenting the results.

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'Different techniques needed' to detect fingermarks on new banknotes

Techniques used to detect fingermarks on traditional cotton banknotes are not effective on Scottish banks' new polymer notes and different methods are required, according to a study by University of Strathclyde researchers.

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Gene therapy with a new base editing technique restores hearing in mice

Using a base editing technique, researchers from Boston Children's Hospital and the Broad Institute, have restored hearing in mice with a known recessive genetic mutation. Researchers repaired one single error in the Tmc1 gene known to cause a hereditary form of deafness. The one-time repair involved switching one incorrect DNA base in the gene with the correct version. This is the first time base

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A promise to restore hearing

For the first time, researchers have used base editing to restore partial hearing to mice with a recessive mutation in the gene TMC1 that causes complete deafness, the first successful example of genome editing to fix a recessive disease-causing mutation.

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A faster way to make antibody-drug conjugates

In a study published today in Science Advances, USC scientists describe a new technology to rapidly create a homogeneous type of ADC, which attaches to a specific site on the cancer cell, with improved efficiency and potentially enhanced stability, effectiveness and safety.

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'Unparalleled' discovery of ancient skeletons sheds light on mystery of when people started eating maize

The 'unparalleled' discovery of remarkably well-preserved ancient skeletons in Central American rock shelters has shed new light on when maize became a key part of people's diet on the continent.

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UNM researchers document the first use of maize in Mesoamerica

international team of researchers investigates the earliest humans in Central America and how they adapted over time to new and changing environments, and how those changes have affected human life histories and societies.

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Preliminary Criterion scores do not help counteract racial gap in NIH grant awards

A new scoring approach introduced in 2009 to curb bias during the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Enhanced Peer Review process did not mitigate the gap in preliminary overall impact scores between black and white principal investigators (PIs) for the years 2014 to 2016, a new study shows. Black investigators, on average, received worse preliminary scores for all five criteria – Significance, I

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CNIC researchers discover a system essential for limb formation during embryonic development

Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have identified a system that tells embryonic cells where they are in a developing organ

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Matching fossil fuel emissions to carbon-14 measurements

Study findings take a dramatic step towards a greenhouse gas information system that can fundamentally change the way cities, states and the nation tackle the climate change problem.

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Get it over with, or procrastinate? New research explores our decision-making process

When it's time to schedule a vacation, most people will do it right away. But when it comes to booking a root canal, some people will procrastinate while others will put it at the top of their to-do list. New research may have figured out why. The study reveals key insights into how excitement, anticipation and dread factor into people's decision-making.

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COVID-19 Vaccine, Monkeys and Bumblebees

A month's worth of cool science stories, summed up COVID-19 Vaccine, Monkeys and Bumblebees Video of COVID-19 Vaccine, Monkeys and Bumblebees Creature Wednesday, June 3, 2020 – 13:45 Alistair Jennings, Contributor (Inside Science) — In this monthly recap, Alistair Jennings from Inside Science sums up some of the most interesting recent science topics: Researchers working hard on a COVID-19 vacc

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High Temperatures Set Off Major Greenland Ice Melt–Again

An Arctic heat wave ushered in the start of the melt season two weeks earlier than average — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New Research: Mars May Have Once Had Rings

Two of Mars' moons, Phobos and Deimos, have mysterious orbits. Deimos in particular, which orbits the Red Planet so closely that it circles the planet three times in just a single Earth day, has astronomers puzzled. Its orbit is at a two degree angle, something that researchers have mostly glossed over — until now. "The fact that Deimos's orbit is not exactly in plane with Mars's equator was cons

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STK38 promotes ATM activation by acting as a reader of histone H4 ufmylation

The ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) kinase is rapidly activated following DNA damage and phosphorylates its downstream targets to launch DDR signaling. Recently, we and others showed that UFM1 signaling promotes ATM activation. We further discovered that monoufmylation of histone H4 at Lys 31 by UFM1-specific ligase 1 (UFL1) is an important step in the amplification of ATM activation. However

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Large equatorial seasonal cycle during Marinoan snowball Earth

In the equatorial regions on Earth today, the seasonal cycle of the monthly mean surface air temperature is 1 m) sand wedges were found near the paleoequator in the Marinoan glaciogenic deposits at ~635 million years ago, indicating a large seasonal cycle (probably >30°C). Through numerical simulations, we show that the equatorial seasonal cycle could reach >30°C at various continental locations

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Anti-twinning in nanoscale tungsten

Nanomaterials often surprise us with unexpected phenomena. Here, we report a discovery of the anti-twinning deformation, previously thought impossible, in nanoscale body-centered cubic (BCC) tungsten crystals. By conducting in situ transmission electron microscopy nanomechanical testing, we observed the nucleation and growth of anti-twins in tungsten nanowires with diameters less than about 20 nm

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Proximo-distal positional information encoded by an Fgf-regulated gradient of homeodomain transcription factors in the vertebrate limb

The positional information theory proposes that a coordinate system provides information to embryonic cells about their position and orientation along a patterning axis. Cells interpret this information to produce the appropriate pattern. During development, morphogens and interpreter transcription factors provide this information. We report a gradient of Meis homeodomain transcription factors al

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A VersaTile-driven platform for rapid hit-to-lead development of engineered lysins

Health care authorities are calling for new antibacterial therapies to cope with the global emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Bacteriophage-encoded lysins are a unique class of antibacterials with promising (pre)clinical progress. Custom engineering of lysins allows for the creation of variants against potentially any bacterial pathogen. We here present a high-throughput hit-to-lead dev

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Beneficial metabolic role of {beta}-arrestin-1 expressed by AgRP neurons

β-Arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2 have emerged as important signaling molecules that modulate glucose fluxes in several peripheral tissues. The potential roles of neuronally expressed β-arrestins in regulating glucose homeostasis remain unknown. We here report that mice lacking β-arrestin-1 (barr1) selectively in AgRP neurons displayed impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity when consuming

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NIH peer review: Criterion scores completely account for racial disparities in overall impact scores

Previous research has found that funding disparities are driven by applications' final impact scores and that only a portion of the black/white funding gap can be explained by bibliometrics and topic choice. Using National Institutes of Health R01 applications for council years 2014–2016, we examine assigned reviewers' preliminary overall impact and criterion scores to evaluate whether racial dis

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ITCZ shift and extratropical teleconnections drive ENSO response to volcanic eruptions

The mechanisms through which volcanic eruptions affect the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) state are still controversial. Previous studies have invoked direct radiative forcing, an ocean dynamical thermostat (ODT) mechanism, and shifts of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), among others, to explain the ENSO response to tropical eruptions. Here, these mechanisms are tested using ensembl

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Remote heteroepitaxy of GaN microrod heterostructures for deformable light-emitting diodes and wafer recycle

There have been rapidly increasing demands for flexible lighting apparatus, and micrometer-scale light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are regarded as one of the promising lighting sources for deformable device applications. Herein, we demonstrate a method of creating a deformable LED, based on remote heteroepitaxy of GaN microrod (MR) p – n junction arrays on c -Al 2 O 3 wafer across graphene. The use of

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Phospholipid distribution in the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is highly asymmetric, dynamic, and cell shape-dependent

The distribution of phospholipids across the inner membrane (IM) of Gram-negative bacteria is unknown. We demonstrate that the IMs of Escherichia coli and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are asymmetric, with a 75%/25% (cytoplasmic/periplasmic leaflet) distribution of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in rod-shaped cells and an opposite distribution in E. coli filamentous cells. In initially filamentous P

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Phase-dependent redox insulation in mussel adhesion

Catecholic 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl–alanine (Dopa) residues in mussel foot proteins (mfps) contribute critically to mussel ( Mytilus californianus ) plaque adhesion, but only if protected from oxidation at the adhesive-substratum interface. Dopa oxidation is thermodynamically favorable in seawater yet barely detectable in plaques; therefore, we investigated how plaques insulate Dopa-containing mfps a

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Coherent oscillations of a levitated birefringent microsphere in vacuum driven by nonconservative rotation-translation coupling

We demonstrate an effect whereby stochastic, thermal fluctuations combine with nonconservative optical forces to break detailed balance and produce increasingly coherent, apparently deterministic motion for a vacuum-trapped particle. The particle is birefringent and held in a linearly polarized Gaussian optical trap. It undergoes oscillations that grow rapidly in amplitude as the air pressure is

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The robustness of reciprocity: Experimental evidence that each form of reciprocity is robust to the presence of other forms of reciprocity

Prosocial behavior is paradoxical because it often entails a cost to one's own welfare to benefit others. Theoretical models suggest that prosociality is driven by several forms of reciprocity. Although we know a great deal about how each of these forms operates in isolation, they are rarely isolated in the real world. Rather, the topological features of human social networks are such that people

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CReP mediates selective translation initiation at the endoplasmic reticulum

Eukaryotic protein synthesis control at multiple levels allows for dynamic, selective responses to diverse conditions, but spatial organization of translation initiation machinery as a regulatory principle has remained largely unexplored. Here we report on a role of constitutive repressor of eIF2α phosphorylation (CReP) in translation of poliovirus and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–resident chap

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The effect of moire superstructures on topological edge states in twisted bismuthene homojunctions

Creating and controlling the topological properties of two-dimensional topological insulators is essential for spintronic device applications. Here, we report the successful growth of bismuth homostructure consisting of monolayer bismuthene and single-layer black phosphorus–like Bi (BP-Bi) on the HOPG surface. Combining scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy with noncontact atomic force micro

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Two centuries of settlement and urban development in the United States

Over the past 200 years, the population of the United States grew more than 40-fold. The resulting development of the built environment has had a profound impact on the regional economic, demographic, and environmental structure of North America. Unfortunately, constraints on data availability limit opportunities to study long-term development patterns and how population growth relates to land-us

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Early isotopic evidence for maize as a staple grain in the Americas

Maize is a cultigen of global economic importance, but when it first became a staple grain in the Americas, was unknown and contested. Here, we report direct isotopic dietary evidence from 52 radiocarbon-dated human skeletons from two remarkably well-preserved rock-shelter contexts in the Maya Mountains of Belize spanning the past 10,000 years. Individuals dating before ~4700 calendar years befor

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Calcium isotopic evidence for the mantle sources of carbonatites

The origin of carbonatites—igneous rocks with more than 50% of carbonate minerals—and whether they originate from a primary mantle source or from recycling of surface materials are still debated. Calcium isotopes have the potential to resolve the origin of carbonatites, since marine carbonates are enriched in the lighter isotopes of Ca compared to the mantle. Here, we report the Ca isotopic compo

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Continuous angle-tunable birefringence with freeform metasurfaces for arbitrary polarization conversion

Birefringence occurs when light with different polarizations sees different refractive indices during propagation. It plays an important role in optics and has enabled essential polarization elements such as wave plates. In bulk crystals, it is typically constrained to linear birefringence. In metamaterials with freeform meta-atoms, however, one can engineer the optical anisotropy such that light

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Sequence-based engineering of dynamic functions of micrometer-sized DNA droplets

DNA has the potential to achieve a controllable macromolecular structure, such as hydrogels or droplets formed through liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), as the design of its base sequence can result in programmable interactions. Here, we constructed "DNA droplets" via LLPS of sequence-designed DNA nanostructures and controlled their dynamic functions by designing their sequences. Specificall

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White nanolight source for optical nanoimaging

Nanolight sources, which are based on resonant excitation of plasmons near a sharp metallic nanostructure, have attracted tremendous interest in the vast research fields of optical nanoimaging. However, being a resonant phenomenon, this ideally works only for one wavelength that resonates with the plasmons. Multiple wavelengths of light in a broad range confined to one spot within a nanometric vo

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Synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates by ADP-ribosyl cyclases

Most of the current antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) in clinic are heterogeneous mixtures. To produce homogeneous ADCs, established procedures often require multiple steps or long reaction times. The introduced mutations or foreign sequences may cause high immunogenicity. Here, we explore a new concept of transforming CD38 enzymatic activity into a facile approach for generating site-specific ADCs

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Chemical trigger toward phase separation in the aqueous Al(III) system revealed

Although Al(III) hydrolysis, condensation, and nucleation play pivotal roles in the synthesis of Al-based compounds and determine their chemical behavior, we still lack experimental evidence regarding the chemistry of nucleation from solution. Here, by combining advanced titration assays, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and 27 Al–nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy,

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VapBC22 toxin-antitoxin system from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is required for pathogenesis and modulation of host immune response

Virulence-associated protein B and C toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are widespread in prokaryotes, but their precise role in physiology is poorly understood. We have functionally characterized the VapBC22 TA system from Mycobacterium tuberculosis . Transcriptome analysis revealed that overexpression of VapC22 toxin in M. tuberculosis results in reduced levels of metabolic enzymes and increased leve

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Noninvasive in vivo 3D bioprinting

Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has great potential in advancing clinical medicine. Currently, the in vivo application strategies for 3D-printed macroscale products are limited to surgical implantation or in situ 3D printing at the exposed trauma, both requiring exposure of the application site. Here, we show a digital near-infrared (NIR) photopolymerization (DNP)–based 3D printing tec

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Nitrogen in black phosphorus structure

Group V elements in crystal structure isostructural to black phosphorus with unique puckered two-dimensional layers exhibit exciting physical and chemical phenomena. However, as the first element of group V, nitrogen has never been found in the black phosphorus structure. Here, we report the synthesis of the black phosphorus–structured nitrogen at 146 GPa and 2200 K. Metastable black phosphorus–s

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Flux, toxicity, and expression costs generate complex genetic interactions in a metabolic pathway

Our ability to predict the impact of mutations on traits relevant for disease and evolution remains severely limited by the dependence of their effects on the genetic background and environment. Even when molecular interactions between genes are known, it is unclear how these translate to organism-level interactions between alleles. We therefore characterized the interplay of genetic and environm

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FloChiP, a new tool optimizing gene-regulation studies

Scientists have developed a tool called FloChip, a new microfluidic take on the widely used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technique. By automating and cutting the cost of ChIP and sequential-ChIP, FloChIP has the potential to become a widely used tool for the study of chromatin biology and gene regulation.

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Now I Understand Why My Parents Were So Strict

Gordon Parks / Gordon Parks Foundation When I was a child, I thought my parents were extremely unreasonable. In grade school, their strict rules kept me from going to classmates' sleepovers, and any playdates I did have had to take place in our home. I attended a predominantly white Catholic school, and as one of the four black kids in my class, I already struggled to fit in. Being the weird kid

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American Protest: Images From the Past 24 Hours

One week after the start of demonstrations over the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer, protests in cities and towns across the United States have been growing, despite curfews and aggressive policing methods in some places. Just yesterday, thousands of people took to the streets in Minneapolis, Orlando, New York, Denver, Boston, Seattle, Phoenix, Los Angeles, Houston, Washin

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Tests for Coronavirus Vaccine Need This Ingredient: Horseshoe Crabs

Modern medicine still depends on this animal's blood to test for bacteria in vaccines. And an alternative test requires further study.

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Social status, not size, determines reproductive success for female mountain gorillas

Dominance rank among female mountain gorillas is not related to body size but does increase their reproductive output according to research publishing June 3, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, led by Edward Wright from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany, and colleagues.

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Researchers discover a system essential for limb formation during embryonic development

Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have discovered a system that provides cells with information about their position within developing organs. This system, studied in developing limbs, tells cells what anatomical structure they need to form within the organ. The article, published today in Science Advances, shows that malfunctioning of this system causes

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Researchers study genetic outcomes of translocating bighorn sheep

Bighorn sheep have maintained a distinctive population genetic structure in Wyoming, even with historical population losses and translocations.

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Pinpointing the origins of Jerusalem's Temple Mount

Integrating radiocarbon dating and microarchaeology techniques has enabled more precise dating of the ancient Wilson's Arch monument at Jerusalem's Temple Mount, according to a study published June 3, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Johanna Regev from the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, and colleagues.

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Social status, not size, determines reproductive success for female mountain gorillas

Dominance rank among female mountain gorillas is not related to body size but does increase their reproductive output according to research publishing June 3, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, led by Edward Wright from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany, and colleagues.

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Data gaps hamper monitoring of heavy metals that threaten Arctic communities

Some Alaskan soils harbor elevated concentrations of heavy metals that can harm human health, but critical data gaps impede understanding of exposure risks for Arctic communities. Clarice Perryman of the University of New Hampshire, Durham, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on June 3, 2020.

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People try to do right by each other, no matter the motivation, study finds

People want to help each other, even when it costs them something, and even when the motivations to help don't always align, a new study suggests.

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Researchers document the first use of maize in Mesoamerica

Almost any grocery store is filled with products made from corn, also known as maize, in every aisle: fresh corn, canned corn, corn cereal, taco shells, tortilla chips, popcorn, corn sweeteners in hundreds of products, corn fillers in pet food, in soaps and cosmetics, and the list goes on.

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Researchers discover a system essential for limb formation during embryonic development

Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have discovered a system that provides cells with information about their position within developing organs. This system, studied in developing limbs, tells cells what anatomical structure they need to form within the organ. The article, published today in Science Advances, shows that malfunctioning of this system causes

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Mummified ankylosaur offers a rare glimpse of a dinosaur's last meal

With the help of a mummified fossil, paleontologists got an incredibly rare look at a dinosaur's last meal. (Illustration by Julius Csotonyi, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology /) A mummified armored dinosaur found in present-day Canada is giving paleontologists a peak into the eating habits of herbivores that lived 110 million years ago. Fossilized plants preserved in the carcass's belly revea

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Of course technology perpetuates racism. It was designed that way.

Today the United States crumbles under the weight of two pandemics: coronavirus and police brutality. Both wreak physical and psychological violence. Both disproportionately kill and debilitate black and brown people. And both are animated by technology that we design, repurpose, and deploy—whether it's contact tracing, facial recognition, or social media. We often call on technology to help solv

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Two lefties make a right — if you are a one-in-a-million garden snail

A global campaign to help find a mate for a left-coiling snail called 'Jeremy' has enabled scientists to understand how mirror-image garden snails are formed. The findings show that the rare left-spiraling shell of some garden snails is usually a development accident, rather than an inherited condition.

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The Guardian view on governing after lockdown: Boris Johnson's grip is weak | Editorial

It is hard for the public to trust a government that prioritises political messaging ahead of delivery There is no such thing as a total truce in Westminster, and a partial one rarely lasts long. The period when Labour felt obliged by a sense of duty in a national emergency to provide "constructive" opposition to the government is over. In parliament on Wednesday, Sir Keir Starmer accused Boris J

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Britain is out of step with its partners on quarantine

The pandemic has led to patchwork travel restrictions across the globe

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Discovery of ancient super-eruptions indicates the Yellowstone hotspot may be waning

Throughout Earth's long history, volcanic super-eruptions have been some of the most extreme events ever to affect our planet's rugged surface. Surprisingly, even though these explosions eject enormous volumes of material—at least 1,000 times more than the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens—and have the potential to alter the planet's climate, relatively few have been documented in the geologic rec

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The Importance of ADMET in Early Drug Discovery and Development

A conversation with Mandy Xu of Pharmaron about characterizing promising pharmacological compounds

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Collaborative research addresses need for conservation of springs in drying climate

A Northern Arizona University professor co-authored a paper on the importance of springs in a drying climate that is in the inaugural climate change refugia special edition of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

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Astronomers discover 30 degree arc of ultraviolet emission centered on the Big Dipper

Astronomers announced the discovery of a ghostly, almost perfectly circular, arc of ultraviolet emission centered on the handle of the Big Dipper and stretching 30 degrees across the Northern sky. If the arc were extended, it would completely encircle the Big Dipper with a diameter of 60 degrees.

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Live Coronavirus Updates

The Trump administration chose five companies as the most likely to produce a vaccine. The tally of new cases is rising in the U.S., partly because of expanded testing. Italy ends travel restrictions.

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Collaborative research addresses need for conservation of springs in drying climate

Hydrogeologist Abe Springer contributed results and implications on springs as refugia from his research group's springs ecohydrology research and helped develop a geomorphological-based classification system for springs ecosystems.

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Survey finds large increase in psychological distress reported among US adults during the COVID-19 pandemic

A new survey conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health during the COVID-19 pandemic found a more-than-threefold increase in the percentage of US adults who reported symptoms of psychological distress — from 3.9% in 2018 to 13.6% in April 2020.

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Why some older adults remember better than others

This work marks the beginning of an effort to better understand memory and memory loss in older adults using advanced imaging and data analysis techniques.

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Penn State researchers evaluate 2020 Census data privacy changes

After the US Census Bureau announced that it was changing how it protects the identities of individuals for the 2020 Census, a Penn State-led research team began to evaluate how these changes may affect census data integrity.

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Interventional radiologists modify protocol for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic

Radiologists who perform cross-sectional interventional procedures can take several steps to minimize the risks to patients and radiology personnel, including screening referred patients to decide which procedures can be postponed, using appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), minimizing the number of people involved in procedures, preserving PPE when possible, and applying proper room an

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New technique takes 3D imaging an octave higher

Members of the Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory at the University of Illinois recently published a paper in Nature Photonics that describes how to use harmonic optical tomography to image microscopic objects which are non-homogenous. The technique has promising applications in cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

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Precision spray coating could enable solar cells with better performance and stability

Although perovskites are a promising alternative to the silicon used to make most of today's solar cells, new manufacturing processes are needed to make them practical for commercial production. To help fill this gap, researchers have developed a new precision spray-coating method that enables more complex perovskite solar cell designs and could be scaled up for mass production.

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Patients with ARDS, COVID-19 face significant financial effects in recovery

Michigan Medicine researchers have been investigating the downstream effects of acute respiratory distress syndrome, or ARDS, for years. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, their work has relevance for hundreds of thousands of new patients.

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One-third of American households face troubles paying bills

The shutdown triggered by the coronavirus pandemic has caused massive layoffs and substantial financial hardships. A new survey finds that one-third of American households are having trouble paying their bills.

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Here be methane: Skoltech scientists investigate the origins of a gaping permafrost crater

Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues spent more than two years studying a 20-meter wide and 20-meter deep crater in the Yamal Peninsula in northern Russia that formed after an explosive release of gas, mostly methane, from the permafrost. They were able to deduce potential formation models for the discovered crater that has implications for geocryology and climate change studies.

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Oncotarget: Second line trastuzumab emtansine following horizontal dual blockade

Volume 11, Issue 22 of Oncotarget reported that despite relevant medical advancements, metastatic breast cancer remains an incurable disease.

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Discovery of ancient super-eruptions indicates the yellowstone hotspot may be waning

Throughout Earth's long history, volcanic super-eruptions have been some of the most extreme events ever to affect our planet's rugged surface. Surprisingly, even though these explosions eject enormous volumes of material — at least 1,000 times more than the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens–and have the potential to alter the planet's climate, relatively few have been documented in the geologic

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Respiratory virus builds 'doorbell' to trick its way into cells, researchers find

New research from UAlberta microbiologists has shed light on how the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)–one of the most common viral infections–breaks into our cells to cause infection. In a study published in the journal Nature, associate professor of medical microbiology and immunology David Marchant and an international team of researchers discovered that RSV tricks cells into letting it in by

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Innocent and highly oxidizing

Freiburg chemists produce new oxidants as a tool for preparative chemistry

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National survey gives insight into college-to-work experiences of recent college graduates

Recent college graduates with disabilities were as likely to be employed as their peers without disabilities with 90 percent of each group holding jobs after college. These findings reflect the pathways that have opened for people with disabilities since the ADA,. The Survey can also guide decision making made more complicated by the COVID economy; for example, encouraging transition-age students

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Anisotropy of spin-lattice relaxations in molecular magnets

Scientists from IFJ PAN in cooperation with researchers from the Nara Women's University (Japan) and the Jagiellonian University (Poland) took another important step towards building a functional quantum computer. Using material containing terbium ions and dedicated experimental tools, they performed a detailed analysis of dynamic magnetic properties in individual molecular magnets concerning thei

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One-third of American households face troubles paying bills

One-third of American families have lost income since the beginning of shutdown triggered by the coronavirus pandemic, with such losses striking families from all economic groups, according to a new nationally representative survey by the RAND Corporation.

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NASA infrared data shows Tropical Cyclone Nisarga strengthened before landfall

Satellite data of Tropical Cyclone Nisarga's cloud top temperatures revealed that the storm had strengthened before it began making landfall in west central India.

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Police brutality isn't about 'a few bad apples'

The problem of police brutality against black Americans isn't caused by "a few bad apples" on police forces, a new paper argues. Recently, Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was arrested and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter after a widely circulated video showed him kneeling on the neck of George Floyd for more than eight minutes. Floyd, a black man who the police suspected

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Graphene and 2D materials could move electronics beyond 'Moore's Law'

New developments in spintronics could lead to graphene being used as a building block for next-generation electronics.

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Next-generation cockroach-inspired robot is small but mighty

Dubbed HAMR-JR, a new microrobot is a half-scale version of the cockroach-inspired Harvard Ambulatory Microrobot or HAMR. About the size of a penny, HAMR-JR can perform almost all of the feats of its larger-scale predecessor, making it one of the most dexterous microrobots to date.

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Astronomers capture a pulsar 'powering up'

Astronomers have, for the first time, observed the full, 12-day process of material spiraling into a distant neutron star, triggering an X-ray outburst thousands of times brighter than our Sun.

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US biotech: Moderna's art

Shares soar after promising but preliminary results in trial of coronavirus vaccine

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Illinois taps Federal Reserve for $1.2bn emergency funding

First loan from $500bn municipal liquidity facility aimed at easing virus impact

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'It opens up a whole new universe': Revolutionary microscopy technique sees individual atoms for first time

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01658-1 Cryo-electron microscopy breaks a key barrier that will allow the workings of proteins to be probed in unprecedented detail.

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Satellites Are Tracking Poor Nations' Coronavirus Outbreaks

Humanitarian Surveillance In order to better coordinate aid and relief for coronavirus outbreaks in poorer nations, a scientist is training machine learning algorithms with phone data and satellite imagery . Ultimately, the goal is to identify the people who are in greater need by their phone activity and by spotting signs of economic turmoil or local COVID-19 outbreaks, University of California

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Oncotarget: Anticancer effect of physical activity is mediated

Volume 11, Issue 22 of Oncotarget reported that the goal of this study was to explore the involvement of mi RNAs in beneficial effects exerted by physical activity in breast cancer prevention.

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Video messages may help spread the word about antibiotic risks

Antibiotics are important drugs that can save lives, but using them too often can lead to dangerous strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. New Penn State research explores how to communicate risk while encouraging people to seek information on their own.

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NASA infrared data shows Tropical Cyclone Nisarga strengthened before landfall

Satellite data of Tropical Cyclone Nisarga's cloud top temperatures revealed that the storm had strengthened before it began making landfall in west central India.

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First do no harm — researchers urge halt in prescribing hydroxycholoroquine for COVID-19

Researchers urge a moratorium on prescribing chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, with or without azithromycin, to treat or prevent COVID-19, and caution that the reassuring safety profile of hydroxychloroquine may be more apparent than real. Safety data derive from decades of prescriptions by clinicians, primarily for their patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, both of which are of greater

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Priti Patel presses on with UK quarantine programme

Home secretary says measures essential to prevent second wave of coronavirus

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George Osborne urges UK to write off Covid-19 business debt

'Big act of forgiveness' better for billions owed by small companies, former chancellor says

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Near-atomic 'blueprint' reveals inner workings of drug target for cancer, other diseases

Van Andel Institute scientists have for the first time described the near-atomic level structure of a molecular pathway that plays critical roles in human development, blood pressure regulation, inflammation and cell death. The findings were published today in the journal Nature.

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Støtteparti om kanin-op-af-hatten-privatisering af affald: »Et fuldstændig elendigt forslag«

PLUS. Enhedslisten stærkt kritisk over for at privatisere danske affaldsforbrændingsanlæg. Radikale Venstre kræver garanti for positive klima- og miljøeffekter, hvis de skal stemme for.

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Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide could drop as carbon emissions are cut

Volcanic eruptions and human-caused changes to the atmosphere strongly influence the rate at which the ocean absorbs carbon dioxide, says a new study. The ocean is so sensitive to changes such as declining greenhouse gas emissions that it immediately responds by taking up less carbon dioxide.

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Near-atomic 'blueprint' reveals inner workings of drug target for cancer, other diseases

Van Andel Institute scientists have for the first time described the near-atomic level structure of a molecular pathway that plays critical roles in human development, blood pressure regulation, inflammation and cell death. The findings were published today in the journal Nature.

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Natural antibiotic resists 'superbugs'

A newly discovered natural antibiotic, teixobactin, could be effective in treating bacterial lung conditions such as tuberculosis and those commonly associated with COVID-19, according to the new study. As bacteria evolve, they develop strategies that undermine antibiotics and morph into "superbugs" that can resist most available treatments and cause potentially lethal infections. The new work co

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New test of dark energy and expansion from cosmic structures

A new paper has shown how large structures in the distribution of galaxies in the Universe provide the most precise tests of dark energy and cosmic expansion yet.

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Etching the road to a hydrogen economy using plasma jets

Hydrogen is a clean energy source that can be produced by splitting water molecules with light. However, it is currently impossible to achieve this on a large scale. In a recent breakthrough, scientists developed a novel method that uses plasma discharge in solution to improve the performance of the photocatalyst in the water-splitting reaction. This opens doors to exploring a number of photocatal

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Scientists decipher the role of carbon and the break-up of continents

An international collaboration has led scientists to new insights into the storage and dynamic transfer of carbon below thick and very old continental crust.

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Ultra-bright X-ray source awakens near a galaxy not so far away

A new ultra-bright source of X-rays has awakened in between our galactic neighbors the Magellanic Clouds, after a 26-year slumber. This is the second-closest such object known to date, with a brightness greater than a million Suns.

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Solar hydrogen production: Splitting water with UV is now at almost 100% quantum efficiency

Scientists have successfully split water into hydrogen and oxygen using light and meticulously designed catalysts, and they did so at the maximum efficiency meaning there was almost no loss and undesired side reactions. This latest breakthrough in solar hydrogen production makes the likelihood of scalable, economically viable hydrogen production more than likely, paving the way for humanity to mak

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Rivers help lock carbon from fires into oceans for thousands of years

The extent to which rivers transport burned carbon to oceans – where it can be stored for tens of millennia – is revealed in new research. The study calculates how much burned carbon is being flushed out by rivers and locked up in the oceans. Oceans store a surprising amount of carbon from burned vegetation, for example as a result of wildfires and managed burning. The research team describe it as

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16 Health Workers Talk About Their Battles With the Pandemic

WIRED's video team reached out to doctors, physician assistants, and paramedics, and asked them about their experiences treating Covid-19 patients.

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Ocean uptake of CO2 could drop as carbon emissions are cut

The ocean is so sensitive to declining greenhouse gas emissions that it immediately responds by taking up less carbon dioxide, says a new study. The authors say we may soon see this play out due to the COVID-19 pandemic lessening global fuel consumption; they predict the ocean could take up less CO2 in 2020 than in 2019.

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Near-atomic 'blueprint' reveals inner workings of drug target for cancer, other diseases

Van Andel Institute scientists have for the first time described the near-atomic level structure of a molecular pathway that plays critical roles in human development, blood pressure regulation, inflammation and cell death. The findings were published today in the journal Nature.

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Atomic blueprint of 'molecular machine' reveals role in membrane protein installation

Van Andel Institute scientists have revealed the first known atomic structure of a 'molecular machine' responsible for installing critical signaling proteins into cellular membranes. The findings, published today in Nature, shed new light on how this process works, and lay the foundation for potential future therapies for diseases like cancer, Alzheimer's and cystic fibrosis.

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Graphene and 2D materials could move electronics beyond 'Moore's Law'

A team of researchers based in Manchester, the Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland and the USA has published a new review on a field of computer device development known as spintronics, which could see graphene used as building block for next-generation electronics.

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Dead zone prediction: Larger than average; not near record

High rivers and high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus from farm and urban runoff mean a larger than average oxygen-starved record from 2017 is nearly 8,800 square miles (22,800 square kilometers).

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Exploring the neurological impact of air pollution

Air pollution has become a fact of modern life, with a majority of the global population facing chronic exposure. Although the impact of inhaling polluted air on the lungs is well known, scientists are just now beginning to understand how it affects the brain. A new article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, details how researchers are connect

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NASA finds heavy rainfall in Tropical Storm Cristobal

The third tropical cyclone of the Atlantic Ocean basin has been generating large amounts of rainfall over Mexico's Yucatan and parts of Central America. Using satellite data, NASA analyzed that heavy rainfall and provided forecasters with valuable cloud top temperature data to help assess the strength of the storm.

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Atomic blueprint of 'molecular machine' reveals role in membrane protein installation

Van Andel Institute scientists have revealed the first known atomic structure of a "molecular machine" responsible for installing critical signaling proteins into cellular membranes.

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What is a 'good death' during COVID-19?

There are ways we can prepare for the possibility of a family member or loved one dying during the COVID-19 pandemic, two experts argue. During the COVID-19 public health care crisis, thousands of people are dying in hospitals without loved-ones due to health concerns around the virus. Elissa Kozlov, a clinical psychologist and instructor at the Rutgers School of Public Health, and Johanna Schoen

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Atomic blueprint of 'molecular machine' reveals role in membrane protein installation

Van Andel Institute scientists have revealed the first known atomic structure of a "molecular machine" responsible for installing critical signaling proteins into cellular membranes.

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Monumental architecture at Aguada Fénix and the rise of Maya civilization

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2343-4 Lidar survey of the Maya lowlands uncovers the monumental site of Aguada Fénix, which dates to around 1000–800 bc and points to the role of communal construction in the development of Maya civilization.

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Author Correction: No upward trends in the occurrence of extreme floods in central Europe

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2391-9

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Tumour metabolites hinder DNA repair

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01569-1 Altered metabolism and genome instability are hallmarks of cancer. A mechanism now explains how three small molecules that accumulate in tumours connect abnormal metabolism to genomic problems by hindering DNA repair.

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Potential circadian effects on translational failure for neuroprotection

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2348-z Studies in rats and mice at different times of day suggest that the failure of neuroprotective strategies for stroke in translational studies might be related to the difference in circadian cycles between humans and rodents.

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Design of robust superhydrophobic surfaces

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2331-8 Water-repellent nanostructures are housed within an interconnected microstructure frame to yield mechanically robust superhydrophobic surfaces.

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A map of object space in primate inferotemporal cortex

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2350-5 Primate inferotemporal cortex contains a coarse map of object space consisting of four networks, identified using functional imaging, electrophysiology and deep networks.

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The CDK inhibitor CR8 acts as a molecular glue degrader that depletes cyclin K

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2374-x The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CR8 acts as a molecular glue compound by inducing the formation of a complex between CDK12–cyclin K and DDB1, which results in the ubiquitination and degradation of cyclin K.

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Coherent interaction between free electrons and a photonic cavity

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2321-x The strong interaction of coherent free electrons with a photonic-crystal cavity enables the measurement of the lifetimes of the cavity modes and provides a technique for multidimensional near-field imaging and spectroscopy.

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Light turned into exotic Laughlin matter

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01567-3 A Laughlin state is a phase of matter that has remarkable features, such as excitations that behave as a fraction of a particle. The long-sought creation of a photonic Laughlin state is a milestone for the field of quantum simulation.

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Observation of Laughlin states made of light

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2318-5 Pairs of photons in the Laughlin state are created by mimicking a fractional quantum Hall system using the synthetic magnetic field induced by a twisted optical cavity and Rydberg-mediated polariton interactions.

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Molecular architecture of the human 17S U2 snRNP

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2344-3 The cryo-EM structure of human U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) offers insights into what rearrangements are required for this snRNP to be stably incorporated into the spliceosome, and the role that the DEAD-box ATPase PRP5 may have in these rearrangements.

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Oncometabolites suppress DNA repair by disrupting local chromatin signalling

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2363-0 Metabolites that are elevated in tumours inhibit the lysine demethylase KDM4B, resulting in aberrant hypermethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 and decreased homology-dependent DNA repair.

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IGF1R is an entry receptor for respiratory syncytial virus

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2369-7 Respiratory syncytial virus enters cells by binding to cell-surface IGFR1, which activates PKCζ and induces trafficking of the NCL coreceptor to the RSV particles at the cell surface.

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India expands use of controversial drug for coronavirus despite safety concerns

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01619-8 Top medical agency says its studies show hydroxychloroquine can prevent infection, but regulators in other countries are investigating adverse effects.

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Displaced cratonic mantle concentrates deep carbon during continental rifting

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2328-3 Carbon dioxide and helium data support lateral advection of carbon-rich cratonic mantle below the East African Rift System, which concentrates deep carbon and causes active carbonatite magmatism near the craton edge.

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Insights into variation in meiosis from 31,228 human sperm genomes

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2347-0 Thousands of sperm genomes have been analysed with a new method called Sperm-seq, revealing interconnected meiotic variation at the single-cell and person-to-person levels, and suggesting chromosome compaction as a way to explain the relationships between diverse recombination phenotypes.

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Podcast: Lab-made skin grows its own hair

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01667-0 Listen to the latest science news, brought to you by Shamini Bundell and Nick Howe.

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Regenerative medicine could pave the way to treating baldness

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01568-2 Undifferentiated human stem cells have been coaxed to develop into skin-like structures in vitro. When engrafted onto mice, the structures produce hair — highlighting the potential of the approach for regenerative therapies.

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Selective prebiotic formation of RNA pyrimidine and DNA purine nucleosides

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2330-9 A prebiotic synthesis of the purine DNA nucleosides (deoxyadenosine and deoxyinosine) in which the pyrimidine RNA nucleosides (cytidine and uridine) persist has implications for the coexistence of DNA and RNA at the dawn of life.

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Repositioning of the global epicentre of non-optimal cholesterol

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2338-1 From 1980 to 2018, the levels of total and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased in low- and middle-income countries, especially in east and southeast Asia, and decreased in high-income western countries, especially those in northwestern Europe, and in central and eastern Europe.

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Revealing enigmatic mucus structures in the deep sea using DeepPIV

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2345-2 Advanced deep-sea imaging tools yield insights into the structure and function of mucus filtration houses built by midwater giant larvaceans.

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Hair-bearing human skin generated entirely from pluripotent stem cells

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2352-3 Skin organoids generated in vitro from human pluripotent stem cells form complex, multilayered skin tissue with hair follicles, sebaceous glands and neural circuitry, and integrate with endogenous skin when grafted onto immunocompromised mice.

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Structure of the ER membrane complex, a transmembrane-domain insertase

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2389-3 The cryo-electron microscopy structure of the ER membrane complex provides insight into its overall architecture, evolution and function in co-translational protein insertion.

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Large-scale early Maya sites in Mexico revealed by lidar mapping technology

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01570-8 Archaeology is transforming our view of how ancient Maya societies developed. Use of lidar technology has now led to the discovery that large, monumental structures that aid naked-eye astronomy were built unexpectedly early.

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Controlling free electrons with optical whispering-gallery modes

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2320-y The coupling between light and relativistic free electrons is enhanced through phase matching of electrons with optical whispering-gallery modes in dielectric microspheres and through extended modal lifetimes.

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Structures of human pannexin 1 reveal ion pathways and mechanism of gating

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2357-y Cryo-electron microscopy structures of the ATP-permeable channel pannexin 1 reveal a gating mechanism involving multiple distinct ion-conducting pathways.

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How DNA and RNA subunits might have formed to make the first genetic alphabet

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01566-4 Understanding the prebiotic origins of the nucleic acids is a long-standing challenge. The latest experiments support the idea that the first nucleic acid encoded information using a mixed 'alphabet' of RNA and DNA subunits.

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Did life emerge in the 'primordial soup' via DNA or RNA? Maybe both

Scientists have long debated which genetic information carrier—DNA or RNA—started life on Earth, but a new study suggests life could have begun with a bit of both. The research, led by scientists from the Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB), in Cambridge, shows for the first time how some of the building blocks of both DNA and RNA could have spontaneously formed an

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Synthetic red blood cells mimic natural ones, and have new abilities

Scientists have tried to develop synthetic red blood cells that mimic the favorable properties of natural ones, such as flexibility, oxygen transport and long circulation times. But so far, most artificial red blood cells have had one or a few, but not all, key features of the natural versions. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have made synthetic red blood cells that have all of the cells' n

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Did life emerge in the 'primordial soup' via DNA or RNA? Maybe both

Scientists have long debated which genetic information carrier—DNA or RNA—started life on Earth, but a new study suggests life could have begun with a bit of both. The research, led by scientists from the Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB), in Cambridge, shows for the first time how some of the building blocks of both DNA and RNA could have spontaneously formed an

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Ny rekord: Dumbo-blæksprutte filmet på ekstremt dybt vand

Blæksprutten svømmede hele syv kilometer nede i dybet, hvor der intet lys er.

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Exploring the neurological impact of air pollution

Air pollution has become a fact of modern life, with a majority of the global population facing chronic exposure. Although the impact of inhaling polluted air on the lungs is well known, scientists are just now beginning to understand how it affects the brain. A new article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, details how researchers are connect

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Studies of brain activity aren't as useful as scientists thought

Hundreds of published studies over the last decade have claimed it's possible to predict an individual's patterns of thoughts and feelings by scanning their brain in an MRI machine as they perform some mental tasks. But a new meta-analysis by researchers who have done much of the work in this area finds that those measurements are highly suspect when it comes to drawing conclusions about any indiv

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NASA finds heavy rainfall in Tropical Storm Cristobal

The third tropical cyclone of the Atlantic Ocean basin has been generating large amounts of rainfall over Mexico's Yucatan and parts of Central America. Using satellite data, NASA analyzed that heavy rainfall and provided forecasters with valuable cloud top temperature data to help assess the strength of the storm.

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Synthetic red blood cells mimic natural ones, and have new abilities

Scientists have tried to develop synthetic red blood cells that mimic the favorable properties of natural ones, such as flexibility, oxygen transport and long circulation times. But so far, most artificial red blood cells have had one or a few, but not all, key features of the natural versions. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have made synthetic red blood cells that have all of the cells' n

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Next-generation cockroach-inspired robot is small but mighty

Dubbed HAMR-JR, this microrobot developed by Harvard researchers is a half-scale version of the cockroach-inspired Harvard Ambulatory Microrobot or HAMR. About the size of a penny, HAMR-JR can perform almost all of the feats of its larger-scale predecessor, making it one of the most dexterous microrobots to date.

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Researchers identify secretion mechanisms for a protein necessary for maintaining healthy connective

Researchers have discovered that a defective form of the protein aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) from patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is retained in cells and induces cellular stress. This finding may provide targets for pharmacologic and therapeutic interventions in treating individuals with EDS as well as wound healing disorders and fibrosis.

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'Terminator' protein halts cancer-causing cellular processes

New research from the lab of Hening Lin, professor of chemistry and chemical biology in the College of Arts and Sciences, finds that a protein called TiPARP acts as a terminator for several cancer-causing transcription factors, including HIF-1, which is implicated in many cancers, including breast cancer. The research demonstrates that TiPARP, therefore, is a tumor suppressor.

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Why developing nerve cells can take a wrong turn

Loss of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme leads to impediment in growth of nerve cells / Link found between cellular machineries of protein degradation and regulation of the epigenetic landscape in human embryonic stem cells

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Early treatment linked to reduced joint damage in young adults with severe hemophilia A

Children with severe hemophilia A who receive early prophylaxis are less likely to have joint damage in young adulthood than those who begin treatment later, according to a new study in Blood Advances. While data suggest earlier initiation of prophylaxis provides some protection compared to later initiation of prophylaxis, prophylaxis does not fully prevent joint damage.

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Dig up any old email in your inbox. Even if it's in the trash.

You have a good chunk of your life in your inbox. Don't let anything go missing. (Torsten Dettlaff/Pexels/) You most likely have a mountain of messages archived in your inbox at the moment. And with more arriving every day, finding a particular email can be quite a challenge. Don't despair, though. There are ways you can unearth that correspondence, even if you only half-remember what it was abou

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'2040'

After an absurd period with a real-life gloomy corona pandemic, lock-down and unrest, it was quite refreshing to see visions for a sustainable future in a new documentary ' 2040 ' ( link to trailer ). Its message, through the voice of Damon Gameau, is about hope and is based on rational thinking. The video takes us to twenty years fast-forward to an imagined future. It makes good use of effects t

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Timeline: Human Coronavirus Discoveries

Download our poster of the biggest milestones, from the discovery of the viral family in humans in the 1960s to the identification of SARS-CoV-2.

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First life on Earth may actually have been built from both RNA and DNA

Many biologists suspect that the first life on Earth was based on RNA, but a new study suggests DNA could have been in the mix right from the start

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We've just found the largest and oldest Mayan monument yet

The 3000-year-old site of Aguada Fénix is the oldest and largest Mayan monument to be discovered and dates from a time before the society had a powerful ruling class

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Two-sided solar panels that track the sun produce a third more energy

Double-sided solar panels that track the sun as it moves in the sky would produce 35 per cent more energy and reduce the average cost of electricity by 16 per cent

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Boosting energy efficiency of 2-D material electronics using topological semimetal

Driven by the ever-increasing desires of the consumer market for smaller, lighter and smarter devices, the size of consumer electronics such as smartphones, tablets and laptops, have been continually shrinking while becoming more powerful in terms of performance over the years.

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First optical measurements of Milky Way's Fermi Bubbles probe their origin

Astronomers have for the first time measured the Fermi Bubbles in the visible light spectrum. The Fermi Bubbles are two enormous outflows of high-energy gas that emanate from the Milky Way and the finding refines our understanding of the properties of these mysterious blobs.

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Oldest and largest Maya structure discovered in southern Mexico

Site at Aguada Fénix found using lidar aerial laser technology Vast earth platform exceeds volume of Great Pyramid of Giza Scientists using an aerial remote-sensing method have discovered the largest and oldest-known structure built by the ancient Maya civilization – a colossal rectangular elevated platform built between 1000 and 800BC in Mexico's Tabasco state. Related: Into the light: how lidar

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Coronavirus Therapy Update (Remdesivir and Tocilizumab)

Let's circle back to remdesivir. We already have the results of the remdesivir Phase II trial that led to its Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA. But now come the first Phase III results , and it's safe to say that they're not making anyone happier. The news isn't bad, but you can't say it's particularly good, either. This was an open-label randomized trial comparing a 5-day course of the dru

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Here's How Deadly Military Tech Ended up in Police Hands

Clearance Sale For the last 23 years, the Pentagon has funneled over $7.4 billion of military gear, vehicles, and weaponry to more than 8,000 police departments . The "1033 program," created through 1997's National Defense Authorization, grants the military the power to pass surplus equipment to police who need only pay the cost of shipping, Wired reports . It's like a federal hand-me-down progra

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Etching the road to a hydrogen economy using plasma jets

Hydrogen is a clean energy source that can be produced by splitting water molecules with light. However, it is currently impossible to achieve this on a large scale. In a recent breakthrough, scientists at Tokyo University of Science, Japan, developed a novel method that uses plasma discharge in solution to improve the performance of the photocatalyst in the water-splitting reaction. This opens do

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New test of dark energy and expansion from cosmic structures

A new paper has shown how large structures in the distribution of galaxies in the Universe provide the most precise tests of dark energy and cosmic expansion yet.

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Study on COVID-19 and RMD provides reassurance to patients on immunosuppressive medication

A current study published in the run-up to the European Congress of Rheumatology of the EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) analysed, for the first time, 600 COVID-19 cases in rheumatic disease patients from 40 countries and investigated the impact of the choice of rheumatic disease therapy on potential hospitalization and the course of COVID-19. The results of the study will be presented i

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A New Psychotherapy Approach Offers Hope for Treating Hoarding Disorder

For many, hoarding is a deep, dark secret. But researchers are still unraveling the disorder's mysteries — and coming up with new treatments.

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Artificial intelligence can improve how chest images are used in care of COVID-19 patients

According to a recent report by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, artificial intelligence (AI) should be used to expand the role of chest X-ray imaging — using computed tomography, or CT — in diagnosing and assessing coronavirus infection so that it can be more than just a means of screening for signs of COVID-19 in a patient's lungs.

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Anisotropy of spin-lattice relaxations in molecular magnets

Scientists from IFJ PAN in cooperation with researchers from the Nara Women's University (Japan) and the Jagiellonian University (Poland) took another important step towards building a functional quantum computer. Using material containing terbium ions and dedicated experimental tools, they performed a detailed analysis of dynamic magnetic properties in individual molecular magnets concerning thei

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Neurobiology of Disease publishes results of AFFiRiS' antibody mAB C6-17 in Huntington's

Monoclonal antibody mAB C6-17 targeting human/mutant huntingtin protein (HTT/mutHTT) was developed and characterized. In vitro assay for testing cell-to-cell transmission of mutHTT was established. For the first time, capability of antibody to block mutHTT transmission in vitro was demonstrated. Results support potential of AFFiRiS' antibody-based concept for a new therapeutic targeting circulatin

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New TILDA research highlights online habits of older adults in the age of our 'new normal'

A new report from researchers at The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College entitled 'Internet access and use among adults aged 50 and over in Ireland' delves into the internet habits and behaviours of older adults in Ireland. The report outlines encouraging evidence that older adults are increasingly connected in the online world but urges Government to ensure that all citi

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Key gene in leukemia discovered

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the most common forms of blood cancer among adults and is associated with a low survival rate, and leads to the inhibition of normal blood formation. Now, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has identified one of the genes that is the basis for leukemia stem cells' survival and multiplication. The study is published in Cell Reports.

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Did life emerge in the 'primordial soup' via DNA or RNA? Maybe both

Scientists have long debated which genetic information carrier — DNA or RNA — started life on Earth, but a new study suggests life could have begun with a bit of both. The research, led by scientists from the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, in Cambridge, UK, shows for the first time how some of the building blocks of both DNA and RNA could have spontaneously formed and

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Unique cells found in lung cancer patients may predict survival

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer where tumor cells shed from the main tumor circulate in the blood and settle in other organs and metastasize. In some cases, surgery can remove the primary tumor, but investigators from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have identified a type of cell fusion between cancer cells and white blood cells called a tumo

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Scientists create smallest semiconductor laser

An international team of researchers announced the development of the world's most compact semiconductor laser that works in the visible range at room temperature. The laser is a nanoparticle of only 310 nanometers in size (which is 3,000 times less than a millimeter). The research article was published in ACS Nano.

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Discrimination may erase 'birthweight advantage' of black US immigrants in one generation

Black women have the highest prevalence of low birthweight babies, but black immigrants typically have much better outcomes than their US-born counterparts. However, this study finds the 'birthweight advantage' experienced by the foreign-born black population is lost within a single generation. The researchers point to discrimination and inequality as causes.

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Europe bets R&D spending will bring jobs to battered economy

Horizon Europe gets €13.5 billion to spend fast, spur growth

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Trump Gave Police Permission to Be Brutal

When the Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin dug his knee into the back of George Floyd's neck for nine minutes while Floyd pleaded for help, he was merely following the president's advice. "Please don't be too nice," Donald Trump told an audience of police officers on Long Island in 2017, in a speech largely focused on the MS-13 gang. The audience laughed. "When you see these thugs being th

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Surge in Covid cases reveals Singapore's blind spots

Packed dorm rooms spark rare outburst of public debate in city state

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Study in twins finds our sensitivity is partly in our genes

Some people are more sensitive than others — and around half of these differences can be attributed to our genes, new research has found.

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US threatens to bar Chinese airlines

Trump administration to halt flights unless American carriers are allowed back into China

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Scientists discover what an armored dinosaur ate for its last meal

More than 110 million years ago, a lumbering 1,300-kilogram, armor-plated dinosaur ate its last meal, died, and was washed out to sea in what is now northern Alberta. This ancient beast then sank onto its thorny back, churning up mud in the seabed that entombed it — until its fossilized body was discovered in a mine near Fort McMurray in 2011.

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Sweden's Hands-Off Approach to COVID Has Failed Dramatically

Sweden's approach to tackling the coronavirus was strikingly different than the rest of the world's. Rather than shutting down schools, restaurants, and gyms to curb community spread of the deadly virus, Sweden decided to leave its doors open, instead of enforcing most forms of social distancing. Only gatherings of over 50 people are still banned . Schools have remained open for students under th

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Obstructive sleep apnoea: Mandibular advancement device helps against daytime sleepiness

Obstructive sleep apnoea: mandibular advancement device helps against daytime sleepinessIn obstructive sleep apnoea, wearing a plastic splint in the mouth at night to keep the airways open mechanically is about as effective as positive airway pressure therapy with a sleep mask.

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Active particles with light-switchable propulsion direction and reversible interactions

Researchers from the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw, ETH in Zurich and the University of Cambridge have synthesized and analysed active microparticles self-propelling in a fluid and reversing their propulsion direction depending on the wavelength of illuminating light. A research article summarizing their work has recently been published in Nature Communications.

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Designing animal studies to improve research reproducibility and reduce animal use

At the invitation of the University of Bern, international experts worked out new recommendations for the design of animal studies. They encourage a paradigm shift to improve the reproducibility of scientific results and reduce animal numbers.

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Antiepileptic drugs are associated with a higher risk of mortality in persons with Alzheimer's

The use of antiepileptic drugs is associated with a higher risk of death among persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The results were published in Neurology.

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Breaking the mold: An unusual choice of material yields incredibly long-lasting batteries

Scientists from the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, develop a novel silica-based cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries, thereby enabling the realization of batteries that can last for over 2000 charge/discharge cycles. The possibility of successfully using the unconventional silica could spark a paradigm shift in rechargeable battery designs.

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Children improve their narrative performance with the help of rhythmic gestures

Gesture is an integral part of language development. Recent studies carried out by the same authors in collaboration with other members of the Prosodic Studies Group (GrEP) coordinated by Pilar Prieto, ICREA research professor Department of Translation and Language Sciences at UPF, have shown that when the speaker accompanies oral communication with rhythmic gesture, preschool children are observe

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Ultra-bright X-ray source awakens near a galaxy not so far away

A new ultra-bright source of X-rays has awakened in between our galactic neighbours the Magellanic Clouds, after a 26-year slumber. This is the second-closest such object known to date, with a brightness greater than a million Suns. The discovery is published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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Researchers develop sustainable method for extracting vanillin from wood processing waste

Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have developed a new sustainable method of extracting the flavoring agent vanillin from lignin, a component of wood.

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The broken mirror: Can parity violation in molecules finally be measured?

Scientists have long tried to experimentally demonstrate a certain symmetry property of the weak interaction – parity violation — in molecules. A new interdisciplinary effort led by a Mainz research group has now shown a realistic path to demonstrating this phenomenon. The approach includes aspects of nuclear, elementary particle, atomic and molecular physics as well as nuclear magnetic resonance

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ETH researchers deconstruct tissue repair

ETH researchers have deconstructed the mechanisms that control wound healing and scar formation in more detail. To this end, biologists and engineers have developed a new method that allows the biomechanical properties of the healing tissue to be measured in vivo for the first time.

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Study demonstrates association between exposure to air pollution and vascular damage

Researchers who analysed data from more than 3,000 people in India found gender-specific differences in sources of exposure and health outcomes.

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Black holes? They are like a hologram

Spherical, smooth and simple according to the theory of relativity, or extremely complex and full of information as, according to quantum laws, Stephen Hawking used to say? There is no single answer on how to describe these mysterious cosmic objects. New research now proposes a surprising solution to the dilemma: black holes 'appear' as three dimensional, just like holograms. The study which demon

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Cognitive behavior therapy tops other psychotherapies in reducing inflammation

A review of 56 randomized clinical trials finds that psychological and behavioral therapies may be effective non-drug treatments for reducing disease-causing inflammation in the body.

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App determines COVID-19 disease severity using artificial intelligence, biomarkers

A new mobile app can help clinicians determine which patients with the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) are likely to have severe cases. Created by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry, the app uses artificial intelligence (AI) to assess risk factors and key biomarkers from blood tests, producing a COVID-19 'severity score.'

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Epidemiology, clinical features, disease severity in pediatric patients with COVID-19

Epidemiology, clinical and laboratory features of 50 children hospitalized with COVID-19 in New York are examined in this case series.

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Tracking cancer's immortality factor

Canadian researchers discover how a key cancer mutation activates telomerase, the 'anti-aging enzyme' that makes tumour cells immortal.

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First optical measurements of Milky Way's Fermi Bubbles probe their origin

Using the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper telescope, astronomers have for the first time measured the Fermi Bubbles in the visible light spectrum. The Fermi Bubbles are two enormous outflows of high-energy gas that emanate from the Milky Way and the finding refines our understanding of the properties of these mysterious blobs.

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Scientists decipher the role of carbon and the break-up of continents

An international collaboration has led scientists to new insights into the storage and dynamic transfer of carbon below thick and very old continental crust currently published in the journal Nature titled, Displacement of cratonic mantle and lithospheric channeling concentrates deep carbon during continental rifting.

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Clinical, immune features of hospitalized pediatric patients with COVID-19

The immunologic features of mild and moderate COVID-19 in pediatric patients is described and compared in this case series.

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New laser system provides 3D reconstructions of living deep-sea animals and mucus filters

Living in an essentially zero-gravity environment, many deep-sea animals have evolved soft, gelatinous bodies and collect food using elaborate mucus filters. Until now, studying these delicate structures has been virtually impossible. A new study published in the journal Nature describes a unique laser-based system for constructing 3D models of diaphanous marine animals and the mucus structures th

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Largest, oldest Maya monument suggests importance of communal work

A University of Arizona discovery suggests that the Maya civilization developed more rapidly than archaeologists once thought and hints at less social inequality than later periods.

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Cholesterol levels dropping in Western nations — but rising in Asia

Cholesterol levels are declining sharply in Western nations, but rising in low- and middle-income nations – particularly in Asia, suggests the largest ever study of global cholesterol levels.

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Super water-repellent materials are now durable enough for the real world

Superhydrophobic materials have long promised surfaces that never needed cleaning, or medical equipment that no microbe could ever possibly stick to — but have always been let down by the fact they are very easily damaged. This week's front cover of Nature has been given to a new paper about armor-plated water repelling material that can take withstand anything the scientists could throw at it.

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Princeton team develops 'poisoned arrow' to defeat antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Poison is lethal all on its own — as are arrows — and together, they can take down the strongest opponents. A team of Princeton researchers have found an antibiotic that simultaneously punctures bacterial walls and destroys folate within their cells — killing like a poisoned arrow — while proving immune to antibiotic resistance.

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Double-sided solar panels that follow the sun prove most cost effective

Solar power systems with double-sided (bifacial) solar panels–which collect sunlight from two sides instead of one–and single-axis tracking technology that tilts the panels so they can follow the sun are the most cost effective to date, researchers report in the journal Joule. They determined that this combination of technologies produces almost 35% more energy, on average, than immobile single-

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Priti Patel urged to publish scientific advice behind UK quarantine move

Home secretary challenged over decision to introduce 14-day rule months into pandemic Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK home secretary is facing mounting calls to publish the scientific advice behind its controversial decision to enforce a 14-day quarantine period on all arrivals into the UK months after the pandemic began. In a statement to the Commons, Priti P

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"Barn med bra liv" är målet med assisterad befruktning

Barnets framtida välfärd. Och ett ansvarsfullt användande av skattepengar. Det är det viktigaste för personal på fertilitetskliniker vid bedömning av barnlösa par och kvinnor vad gäller rätt till assisterad befruktning. Det visar en intervjustudie från Linköpings universitet. I Sverige kan barnlösa par och ensamstående kvinnor få tillgång till fertilitetsbehandling som bekostas med offentliga med

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First optical measurements of Milky Way's Fermi Bubbles probe their origin

Using the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper telescope, astronomers have for the first time measured the Fermi Bubbles in the visible light spectrum. The Fermi Bubbles are two enormous outflows of high-energy gas that emanate from the Milky Way and the finding refines our understanding of the properties of these mysterious blobs.

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5 charts reveal key racial inequality gaps in the US

America is experiencing some of its most widespread civil unrest in years following the death of George Floyd. Floyd was killed in police custody in Minneapolis on 25 May, and his death has underscored the many ways race and ethnic background drives unequal experiences among many Americans. These charts help illustrate key gaps impacting everything from opportunity to health. 1. Wide educational

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Largest Known Maya Structure Found, More than 4,000 Feet Long and Nearly 3,000 Years Old

New find raises questions regarding size and timing of large settlements in Central America. 3D-Maya-Image.jpg 3D image of the recently recognized Maya site of Aguada Fenix, based on lidar. Image credits: Takeshi Inomata Rights information: May be used with this Inside Science story, with credit given. Culture Wednesday, June 3, 2020 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A gia

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New laser system provides 3-D reconstructions of living deep-sea animals and mucus filters

Living in an essentially zero-gravity environment, many deep-sea animals have evolved soft, gelatinous bodies and collect food using elaborate mucus filters. Until now, studying these delicate structures has been virtually impossible. A new study published in the journal Nature describes a unique laser-based system for constructing 3-D models of diaphanous marine animals and the mucus structures t

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Tracking cancer's immortality factor

Canadian scientists have achieved a first in the study of telomerase, an essential enzyme implicated in aging and cancer.

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Researchers develop 'poisoned arrow' to defeat antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Poison is lethal all on its own—as are arrows—but their combination is greater than the sum of their parts. A weapon that simultaneously attacks from within and without can take down even the strongest opponents, from E. coli to MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus).

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Fear of COVID-19 keeping more than half of heart attack patients away from hospitals

The number of heart attack patients seeking urgent hospital care has dropped by more than 50% during the COVID-19 outbreak, according to an extensive worldwide survey by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The findings are published in European Heart Journal – Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes (EHJ-QCCO)1 and shown graphically online.

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Syndrome linked to COVID-19 seems more common among children of African ancestry

An inflammatory syndrome in children and adolescents, believed to be linked to covid-19, seems to be more common among children of African ancestry, finds a small study from a hospital in Paris, published by The BMJ today.

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New research leads to lighter and greener bridges

A recently completed research project revealed the potential for reducing material used for a suspension bridge deck by more than 25 per cent — meaning a saving of up to 30 per cent of CO2 emissions.

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Lighting the way to porous electronics and sensors

Researchers from Osaka University have created porous titanium dioxide ceramic thin films, at high temperatures and room temperature. The thin ceramic films strongly adhere to glass and plastic surfaces. Gas sensing performance is dramatically improved compared with nonporous titanium-based sensors. The adherent porous films will be useful in many useful applications, such as viral detection and a

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How a molecular alarm system in plants protects them from danger

Some plants are known to possess an innate physiological defense machinery that helps them develop resistance against insects trying to feed on them. However, until now, it was not known exactly how these plants recognize "danger signals" from insects. In a new study, scientists in Japan have uncovered the molecular pathway that helps these plants to sense danger signals and respond to them. These

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Philippine volcanic eruption could prompt El Niño warming next winter

Climatological models suggest that gases from an erupting Philippine volcano could have significant impact on the global climate if more explosive eruptions occur.

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Astronomers capture a pulsar 'powering up'

A Monash-University-led collaboration has, for the first time, observed the full, 12-day process of material spiralling into a distant neutron star, triggering an X-ray outburst thousands of times brighter than our Sun.

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Så kan äldre kylskåp göras miljövänliga

På planeten jorden finns ungefär två miljarder hushållskylskåp i bruk, enligt FNs senaste rapport från 2018. Över en miljard av dessa använder det miljövänliga kylmedlet R600a, medan resten använder sig av mindre skonsamma alternativ, varav den substans som forskarna från universitetet i Johannesburg riktat in sig på är den vanligaste: R134a.

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Now is the time to switch to an encrypted communication app

Signal is open-sourced so you can tell what's happening behind-the-scenes. (Signal/) You may not have heard of the app called Signal, but its user experience feels similar to many other video call and chat apps you've probably used in the past. In recent years, Signal has become a go-to tool for journalists and others who want to ensure the privacy of their communications. With more chat app opti

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ITU-professor skal give danskerne troværdig viden i nyt opslagsværk

Siden 25. maj har man kunne tilgå viden på lex.dk, der er en onlineplatform redigeret af førende forskere.

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Pilotprojekt skal regulere Lollands elproduktion lokalt

PLUS. Med tilsammen 110 MW havvind bliver Hofor og Centrica aktører på et ganske lokalt regulerkraftmarked på Lolland. Det kommende halve år vil de kunne byde ind med fleksibilitet til specifikke transformerstationer, der skal aflastes i peak-situationer.

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First the trade war, then the pandemic. Now Chinese manufacturers are turning inward.

Ask Zhu Kaiyu about his factory, and he can rattle off a series of statistics meant to impress: 15,000 square meters, 800 employees, 300 machines, 5 million articles of clothing sold per year. Zhu opened his factory for knitted apparel in Dongguan, in China's Guangdong province, in 2002. He's proud to be the trusted manufacturing partner for foreign companies like Full Beauty Brands, the owner of

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SpaceX can now send humans to space. It just needs a market.

SpaceX achieved something historic this past weekend with its Demo-2 launch. The company's Crew Dragon vehicle became the first private spacecraft to take humans into orbit—a milestone for NASA, the American space industry, and the company itself. Afterwards, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine told reporters that the mission had helped establish the success of a new business model, where NASA is

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New laser system provides 3-D reconstructions of living deep-sea animals and mucus filters

Living in an essentially zero-gravity environment, many deep-sea animals have evolved soft, gelatinous bodies and collect food using elaborate mucus filters. Until now, studying these delicate structures has been virtually impossible. A new study published in the journal Nature describes a unique laser-based system for constructing 3-D models of diaphanous marine animals and the mucus structures t

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Largest, oldest Maya monument suggests importance of communal work

From the ground, it's impossible to tell that the plateau underfoot is something extraordinary. But from the sky, with laser eyes, and beneath the surface, with radiocarbon dating, it's clear that it is the largest and oldest Mayan monument ever discovered.

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Scientists decipher the role of carbon and the break-up of continents

University of New Mexico (UNM) Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Dr. Tobias Fischer and Syracuse University research fellow (now University of Auckland Lecturer), Dr. James Muirhead led an international team of interdisciplinary researchers to investigate the role of carbon in the break-up of continents.

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Tracking cancer's immortality factor

Canadian scientists have achieved a first in the study of telomerase, an essential enzyme implicated in aging and cancer.

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Researchers develop 'poisoned arrow' to defeat antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Poison is lethal all on its own—as are arrows—but their combination is greater than the sum of their parts. A weapon that simultaneously attacks from within and without can take down even the strongest opponents, from E. coli to MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus).

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Super water-repellent materials are now durable enough for the real world

Superhydrophobic surfaces repel water like nothing else. This makes them extremely useful for antimicrobial coatings, as bacteria, viruses and other pathogens cannot cling to their surfaces. However, superhydrophobic surfaces have one major flaw—they are extremely susceptible to cuts, scratches or dents. If a superhydrophobic surface gets damaged, the damaged area can trap liquids and the benefits

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An inexpensive technique shows how decisions light up the brain

A technique called COSMOS will help researchers understand how our brains work and aid in the development of new drugs. The inventors have created an instructional website to help other researchers build their own relatively-inexpensive COSMOS systems.

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Scientists detect Crab Nebula using innovative gamma-ray telescope

The prototype Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope (SCT) is part of an international effort, known as the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), which aims to construct the world's largest and most powerful gamma-ray observatory, with more than 100 similar telescopes in the northern and southern hemispheres.

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Armored Dinosaur's Last Meal Found Preserved in Its Fossilized Belly

The contents of this dino's stomach reveal what the 'living tank' actually ate.

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The NFL Is Suddenly Worried About Black Lives

On Saturday, National Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell had the nerve to put out a statement extending condolences to the families of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery—three African Americans who were killed by people who claimed to be enforcing the law. The league, Goodell insisted, was "committed to continuing the important work to address these systemic issues together w

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The link between climate change, health and poverty | Cheryl Holder

For the poor and vulnerable, the health impacts of climate change are already here, says physician Cheryl Holder. Unseasonably hot temperatures, disease-carrying mosquitoes and climate gentrification threaten those with existing health conditions, while wealthier people move to higher ground. In an impassioned talk, Holder proposes impactful ways clinicians can protect their patients from climate-

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Biden Has Changed—For the Better

When Joe Biden entered this presidential race, he was flayed as an ally of segregation. Kamala Harris chided him for his defense of busing. His opponents roundly portrayed him as an architect of mass incarceration and an apologist for Strom Thurmond—as a clubbable senator not particularly bothered about the moral character of the backs he slapped. These attacks were leveled not to suggest that Bi

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BBC betatester taleassistent: Beeb skal kunne forstå alle britiske accenter

BBC har i løbet af det sidste års tid udviklet på en taleassistent, der skal give briter adgang til meget af deres indhold med stemmen – uanset om de taler med Cockney- eller Brummie-accent.

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Eye, robot: Artificial intelligence dramatically improves accuracy of classic eye exam

But critics caution the online test isn't quite ready for prime time

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A Hydrogen Iceberg from a Failed Star Might Have Passed through Our Solar System

The interstellar visitor 'Oumuamua, discovered in 2017, may represent an entirely new type of astrophysical object, two astronomers say — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sea snail, human insulin hybrid could lead to better diabetes treatments

Nearly a century after insulin was discovered, an international team of researchers report that they have developed the world's smallest, fully functional version of the hormone, one that combines the potency of human insulin with the fast-acting potential of a venom insulin produced by predatory cone snails. The finding, based on animal studies, could jumpstart the development of insulin treatmen

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Cicadas Are Delightful Weirdos You Should Learn to Love

As Brood IX takes flight for the first time in 17 years, cicada lovers have their ears open.

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A Hydrogen Iceberg from a Failed Star Might Have Passed through Our Solar System

The interstellar visitor 'Oumuamua, discovered in 2017, may represent an entirely new type of astrophysical object, two astronomers say — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Graphene and 2-D materials could move electronics beyond 'Moore's law'

A team of researchers based in Manchester, the Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland and the U.S. has published a new review on a field of computer device development known as spintronics, which could see graphene used as building block for next-generation electronics.

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A new strategy for the optimal electroreduction of Co2 to high-value products

Researchers suggest that modulation of local CO2 concentration improves the selectivity, conversion rate, and electrode stability, and shed a new light on the electrochemical CO2 reduction technology for controlling emissions at a low cost.

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Solar hydrogen production: Splitting water with UV is now at almost 100% quantum efficiency

Scientists in Japan successfully split water into hydrogen and oxygen using light and meticulously designed catalysts, and they did so at the maximum efficiency meaning there was almost no loss and undesired side reactions. This latest breakthrough in solar hydrogen production makes the likelihood of scalable, economically viable hydrogen production more than likely, paving the way for humanity to

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Novel bioaccumulative compounds found in marine bivalves

The present study screened known and unknown organohalogen compounds present in mussel and sediment samples from Hiroshima Bay. The results provided scientific evidence that unknown mixed halogenated compounds are ubiquitous in the coastal environment and possess bioaccumulative potential as high as persistent organic pollutants.

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Discovery of proteins that regulate interorganelle communication

Korea Brain Research Institute (KBRI headed by Suh Pann-ghill) announced on June 2nd that a joint research team of KBRI (team led by Dr. Mun Ji-young), Seoul National University, and Pohang University of Science and Technology discovered proteins that engage in the formation of mitochondria associated membranes (MAMs), which are the cellular signaling hub.

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Tests for Coronavirus Vaccine Need This Ingredient: Horseshoe Crabs

Modern medicine still depends on this animal's blood to test for bacteria in vaccines. And an alternative test requires further study.

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Discovery of proteins that regulate interorganelle communication

Korea Brain Research Institute (KBRI headed by Suh Pann-ghill) announced on June 2nd that a joint research team of KBRI (team led by Dr. Mun Ji-young), Seoul National University, and Pohang University of Science and Technology discovered proteins that engage in the formation of mitochondria associated membranes (MAMs), which are the cellular signaling hub.

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Ultra-bright X-ray source awakens near a galaxy not so far away

A new ultra-bright source of X-rays has awakened in between our galactic neighbors the Magellanic Clouds, after a 26-year slumber. This is the second-closest such object known to date, with a brightness greater than a million Suns. The discovery is published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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Stretchable variable color sheet that changes color with expansion and contraction

A Toyohashi University of Technology research team has succeeded in developing a variable color sheet with a film thickness of 400 nanometers that changes color when stretched and shrunk. The developed stretchable color sheets are expected to be applied to adhesive-type display elements, as they can adhere to skin or be transferred to various electronic devices at room temperature utilizing the hi

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Slow-motion replays help referees make better decisions

Slow-motion replays used as part of the video assistant referee (VAR) system have a positive impact on decisions made on the field, new research suggests.

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Two new extinct primate species are found in the Ethiopia site of Gona

Sileshi Semaw from the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), is coauthor of a paper published in the Journal of Human Evolution about a large series of fossil cercopithecid primates named Pliopapio alemui and Kuseracolobus aramisi, two different new primate species dated between 4.8 and 4.3 million years ago known only from Gona and the Middle Awash study area in Eth

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How to Recognize and Avoid Common Thinking Traps

Your clever brain can work overtime building worst-case scenarios. Here's how to recognize and avoid common thinking traps so you don't get stuck — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to Recognize and Avoid Common Thinking Traps

Your clever brain can work overtime building worst-case scenarios. Here's how to recognize and avoid common thinking traps so you don't get stuck — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Parasitic worms in your shellfish lead a creepy but popular lifestyle

If you're an oyster lover, seeing a shaggy worm slither across your appetizer is revolting—even though such worms are harmless to people. An internet search using the keywords "oyster" and "worm" will bring up a large cache of images, each one less palatable than the next.

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The Headlines That Are Covering Up Police Violence

In light of the recent police killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Tony McDade , journalists are faced, once again, with the task of making sense of black protest for the American public. It bears asking what media professionals have learned, not just in the six years since the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, spurred national outrage, but also in the decades, and centurie

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Brain circuitry can create desire for stuff that hurts

Stimulating the brain's circuitry related to addiction can create strong desires even for something that hurts, according to a new study with rats. The researchers used a laser to excite neurons in rats' amygdala—a brain region that generates emotional responses—to create intense desires focused on particular targets. These targets, for different rats, were either sugar, cocaine, or even an objec

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Rainy season tends to begin earlier in Northern Central Asia

Researchers from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) of the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) found that the rainy season of northern Central Asia, which occurs in May-July in present-day, will shift to March-May at the end of the 21st century. The study was published in Environmental Research Letters.

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Forest visits in Switzerland affected by coronavirus lockdown

The lockdown that began in mid-March to contain the coronavirus epidemic had a marked effect on the forest visiting habits of the Swiss population, according to a unique comparison of two surveys conducted by the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) before and during the crisis.

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How pandemics past and present fuel the rise of mega-corporations

In June 1348, people in England began reporting mysterious symptoms. They started off as mild and vague: headaches, aches, and nausea. This was followed by painful black lumps, or buboes, growing in the armpits and groin, which gave the disease its name: bubonic plague. The last stage was a high fever, and then death.

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Parasitic worms in your shellfish lead a creepy but popular lifestyle

If you're an oyster lover, seeing a shaggy worm slither across your appetizer is revolting—even though such worms are harmless to people. An internet search using the keywords "oyster" and "worm" will bring up a large cache of images, each one less palatable than the next.

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Physicists hunt for room-temperature superconductors that could revolutionize the world's energy system

Waste heat is all around you. On a small scale, if your phone or laptop feels warm, that's because some of the energy powering the device is being transformed into unwanted heat.

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Study puts price tag on lost earnings from racial disparities in cancer mortality

A new American Cancer Society study puts a price tag on racial disparities in cancer mortality, finding that $3.2 billion in lost earnings would have been avoided in 2015 if non-Hispanic (NH) blacks had equal years of life lost from cancer deaths and earning rates as NH whites.

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'Excretion of sugar into stool'? New action of anti-diabetic drug discovered

A research team led by Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine's Professor OGAWA Wataru and Project Associate Professor NOGAMI Munenobu has discovered that metformin, the most widely prescribed anti-diabetic drug, causes sugar to be excreted in the stool.Taking advantage of the new bio-imaging apparatus PET-MRI, they revealed that metformin promotes the excretion of blood sugar from the large

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Boosting energy efficiency of 2D material electronics using topological semimetal

SUTD researchers discover a new way to boost the energy efficiency of 2D semiconductor electronics by synergizing 2D materials and topological semimetals.

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Scientist captures new images of Martian moon Phobos to help determine its origins

Christopher Edwards, assistant professor in NAU's Department of Astronomy and Planetary Science, just processed new images of the Martian moon Phobos that give scientists insight into the physical properties of the moon and its composition. The images of the small moon, which is about 25 kilometers (15 miles) in diameter, were captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey orbiter. When reviewed in combinat

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Bacteria fed by algae biochemicals can harm coral health

Though corals worldwide are threatened due to climate change and local stressors, the front lines of the battle are microscopic in scale. Under stress, many reefs that were formerly dominated by coral are shifting to systems dominated by turf and fleshy algae. A new study, published in PNAS on June 1 and led by researchers at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa and San Diego State University (

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Why have there been so many coronavirus deaths in the UK?

How the UK's handling of testing, contact tracing, protective equipment and lockdown led to one of the highest covid-19 death tolls in the world

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Bacteria fed by algae biochemicals can harm coral health

Though corals worldwide are threatened due to climate change and local stressors, the front lines of the battle are microscopic in scale. Under stress, many reefs that were formerly dominated by coral are shifting to systems dominated by turf and fleshy algae. A new study, published in PNAS on June 1 and led by researchers at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa and San Diego State University (

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New Jersey's small, networked dairy farms are a model for a more resilient food system

Cow's milk is a major part of many Americans' diets because it contains key vitamins and calcium. But milk consumption has suffered during the COVID-19 pandemic, along with other foods, including beef, eggs, fruit and vegetables. Economic shutdowns have severely disrupted supply chains that move food from farm to fork.

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Bolstering Africa's coronavirus detection efforts

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01607-y Molecular biologist Christian Happi is working around the clock to get testing available throughout the continent.

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Stepping up action on plastic pellets

Plastic is an incredibly useful material upon which much of our day-to-day life depends. The COVID-19 pandemic puts the importance of plastic in stark relief—protective personal equipment, intravenous tubes and soap dispensers all rely on plastic's properties.

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Scientists create smallest semiconductor laser that works in visible range at room temperature

An international team of researchers has announced the development of the world's most compact semiconductor laser that works in the visible range at room temperature. According to the authors of the research, the laser is a nanoparticle of only 310 nanometers in size (which is 3,000 times less than a millimeter) that can produce green coherent light at room temperature. The research article was p

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Here be methane: Scientists investigate the origins of a gaping permafrost crater

Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues spent more than two years studying a 20-meter wide and 20-meter deep crater in the Yamal Peninsula in northern Russia that formed after an explosive release of gas, mostly methane, from the permafrost. They were able to deduce potential formation models for the discovered crater that has implications for geocryology and climate change studies. Two pap

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Device generates power from shadows

A new device called a shadow-effect energy generator harnesses shadows to generate electricity, researchers report. This concept opens up new approaches in generating green energy under indoor lighting conditions. The shadow-effect energy generator (SEG) makes use of the contrast in illumination between lit and shadowed areas to generate electricity. "Shadows are omnipresent, and we often take th

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Fewer women die when insurance covers infertility treatments

When states require insurance companies to provide coverage of infertility treatments, 20% fewer mothers die during pregnancy, childbirth, or shortly after birth, research finds. Nearly 11% of women ages 15-44 and 21% of currently married, childless women report having difficulty getting pregnant and carrying a baby to term, but fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization can be expensive

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Artificial Kidneys Are a Step Closer With This New Tech

10 percent of the global population suffers from some form of kidney disease . That includes 37 million people in the US , 100,000 of whom pass away each year awaiting a kidney transplant. Our kidneys are crucial for keeping us alive and healthy. A sort of chemical computer that keeps our blood chemistry stable—whether we're eating a sugary birthday cake or a vitamin-filled salad—they prevent was

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Martian moon's orbit hints at an ancient ring of Mars

Scientists from the SETI Institute and Purdue University have found that the only way to produce Deimos's unusually tilted orbit is for Mars to have had a ring billions of years ago. While some of the more massive planets in our solar system have giant rings and numerous big moons, Mars only has two small, misshapen moons, Phobos and Deimos. Although these moons are small, their peculiar orbits hi

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New test of dark energy and expansion from cosmic structures

A new paper has shown how large structures in the distribution of galaxies in the Universe provide the most precise tests of dark energy and cosmic expansion yet.

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Coffee and Soup, in Pill Form, Make Soldiers Sick

Originally published in November 1895 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New research explores horizontal gene transfer

In science, as in life, timing can be everything.

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Humans and Neanderthals: Less different than polar and brown bears

Ancient humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans were genetically closer than polar bears and brown bears, and so, like the bears, were able to easily produce healthy, fertile hybrids according to a study, led by the University of Oxford's School of Archaeology.

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Scotland's parks call for guidance on safe reopening of public toilets

Action urged after reports of excrement left by visitors at country's beauty spots Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scotland's national parks are demanding urgent guidance on reopening public toilets safely and consistently, after weekend reports of besieged residents around the country's beaches and beauty spots discovering human excrement left by daytrippers. As par

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New research explores horizontal gene transfer

In science, as in life, timing can be everything.

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Humans and Neanderthals: Less different than polar and brown bears

Ancient humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans were genetically closer than polar bears and brown bears, and so, like the bears, were able to easily produce healthy, fertile hybrids according to a study, led by the University of Oxford's School of Archaeology.

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Researchers study genetic outcomes of great gray owl population in four states

When compared to some other bird species, researchers found that great gray owls seem to have lower genetic diversity. However, there's no evidence that the low genetic diversity is currently having a detrimental effect on the species. It may, however, affect the species' future adaptability.

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Stomach issues, history of substance abuse found in teen vaping study

A study of teens diagnosed with the vaping-linked respiratory disease EVALI revealed that most also had gastrointestinal symptoms and a history of psychosocial factors, including substance abuse.

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Scientist captures new images of Martian moon Phobos to help determine its origins

Christopher Edwards, assistant professor in Northern Arizona University's Department of Astronomy and Planetary Science, just processed new images of the Martian moon Phobos that give scientists insight into the physical properties of the moon and its composition.

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Bacteria fed by algae biochemicals can harm coral health

A new study led by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa and San Diego State University found that the outcome of the competition between coral and turf algae is determined by the assemblage of microbes at the interface where the contenders meet. The outcome is driven by bacteria that feed on algal-derived biochemicals, a phenomenon termed the Algal Feeding Hypothesis.

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Mindfulness improves decision-making, attention in children with autism

School-based mindfulness programs can improve decision-making skills and teach children with autism to focus attention and react less impulsively through breathing exercises that will allow them to reduce anxiety, according to Rutgers researchers.

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When Scientists Find Nothing: The Value of Null Results

Science is an endeavor of trial and error. Can we find a better way to share the "erroneous" trials? null-results.gif Image credits: Yuen Yiu Rights information: American Institute of Physics Physics Wednesday, June 3, 2020 – 09:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — How long would it have taken Edison to invent the lightbulb if he and his team of workers hadn't keep track of all the fail

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Will orcas thrive in the coronavirus pandemic's quieter waters? Scientists aim to find out

The coronavirus pandemic has upended and refocused orca field research in Northwest waters this season.

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Will orcas thrive in the coronavirus pandemic's quieter waters? Scientists aim to find out

The coronavirus pandemic has upended and refocused orca field research in Northwest waters this season.

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A Digital Locksmith Has Decoded Biology's Molecular Keys

The computational biologist Bruno Correia used to have a rule in his lab: No machine learning allowed. He didn't consider it real science. Now Correia has used it to detect potential interactions between proteins — the complex folded molecules responsible for many biological processes — 40,000 times faster than conventional methods. The journal Nature Methods featured his system on its cover in F

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Report: Deforestation, linked to pandemics, increased in 2019

Deforestation of tropical old-growth forests increased last year, according to new satellite data unveiled Tuesday, wiping out acreage roughly the size of Switzerland in a period when experts are raising alarms about the transmission of a variety of diseases, including the novel coronavirus, that jump between animals and humans.

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Report: Deforestation, linked to pandemics, increased in 2019

Deforestation of tropical old-growth forests increased last year, according to new satellite data unveiled Tuesday, wiping out acreage roughly the size of Switzerland in a period when experts are raising alarms about the transmission of a variety of diseases, including the novel coronavirus, that jump between animals and humans.

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Vilken påverkan får pandemin på äldres resande?

Hur reser äldre före, under och efter Coronapandemin och vad har det för konsekvenser för energieffektivt och hållbart resande? Forskare ska titta på hur äldres resvanor har förändrats, och vilken betydelse resandet har för välbefinnandet och möjligheten att leva det liv de vill. De ska också undersöka vad som krävs för att äldre ska ersätta sitt vardagliga bilresande med mer miljömässigt hållbar

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D-Day for donors as vaccines summit aims to raise $7.4bn

Coronavirus impact, Ugandan minister of health Jane Aceng, Trump and the WHO

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124 coronavirus vaccines are in development – but will any work?

Ten experimental vaccines for covid-19 are already being trialled in people but we don't know yet if it's possible to induce long-lasting immunity with a vaccine

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Science snapshots May 2020

World's forests are growing younger, US wind plant performance changes with age, and fungi food choices opens the door to better methods for producing bio-based products

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Counterintuitive phase behavior observed in isotopic hydrogen (H2-HD-D2) alloy

A joint team from the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, collaborating with researchers from the Center for High Pressure Science & Technology Advanced Research and University of Edinburgh, has reported a new discovery in which they found counterintuitive effects of isotopic doping on the phase diagram of H 2 -HD-D 2 molecular alloy.

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Study finds PFAS exposure may cause early menopause in women

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) exposure may cause menopause to occur two years earlier in women, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Living near oil and gas wells tied to low birth weights in infants

In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers found that pregnant rural California residents living within 0.62 miles (1 kilometer) of high-production oil and gas wells were 40% more likely to have low birth weight babies and 20% more likely to have babies who were small for their gestational age compared to people living farther away from wells. The results add to mounting evidence linki

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Spine surgeons face COVID-19 challenges worldwide

Spine surgeons across the world are experiencing effects of COVID-19, including canceled procedures, changes in clinical roles, anxiety and risk of exposure to the disease themselves due to insufficient protective equipment. An international team of researchers reported these findings recently in the Global Spine Journal.

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New pill could prevent anaphylaxis in people with food, drug allergies

For someone with a food or drug allergy, the risk of life-threatening anaphylactic shock lurks around every corner. A new Northwestern Medicine study shows there might be a pill that can be taken proactively to prevent mild to life-threatening anaphylaxis, no matter the cause.

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Discovery of proteins that regulate interorganelle communication

This groundbreaking discovery of the key factor in the formation of MAM is expected to contribute to research on Neurodegenerative Diseases.

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Rainy season tends to begin earlier in Northern Central Asia

The researchers found robust increase of annual mean precipitation at the end of the 21st century under all modelling scenarios over northern central Asia. Further analysis revealed a wetting trend in spring and a drying trend in summer, which would result in enhanced seasonality of precipitation over Central Asia and a shift of the rainy season in the northern Central Asia.

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Solar cells, phone displays and lighting could be transformed by nanocrystal assembly method

Smart phones, tablets and laptop displays, camera lenses, biosensing devices, integrated chips and solar photovoltaic cells are among the applications that could stand to benefit from an innovative method of nanocrystal assembly pioneered by Australian scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science. The researchers have used electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to demonstrate a highly

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Could an early antiviral block COVID-19 transmission?

Some antivirals can not only help sick people get better, but can also prevent hundreds of thousands of virus cases if people get them in the early stages of infection, researchers report. The study focused on influenza but also has implications for the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. By modeling the impact of a pair of leading flu drugs, the team found significant differences in effects betwee

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Human activities found to be contributing to an increase in extreme rainfall events in North America

A pair of researchers with Climate Research Division, Environment and Climate Change in Canada has found evidence that shows human activities have been contributing to an increase in extreme rainfall events in North America. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Megan Kirchmeier-Young and Xuebin Zhang describe their study, which involved an analysis of climat

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How bacteria fertilize soya

Plants need nitrogen in the form of ammonium if they are to grow. In the case of a great many cultivated plants, farmers are obliged to spread this ammonium on their fields as fertiliser. Manufacturing ammonium is an energy-intensive and costly process—and today's production methods also release large amounts of CO2.

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A Behind-the-Scenes Look at Maintaining Tourist Sites During COVID-19

Despite closures, essential workers are the ones holding down the fort at these popular travel destinations

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Get excited by neural networks

Researchers at the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo (UTokyo-IIS), used artificial intelligence to rapidly infer the excited state of electrons in materials. This work can help material scientists study the structures and properties of unknown samples and assist with the design of new materials.

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How bacteria fertilize soya

Plants need nitrogen in the form of ammonium if they are to grow. In the case of a great many cultivated plants, farmers are obliged to spread this ammonium on their fields as fertiliser. Manufacturing ammonium is an energy-intensive and costly process—and today's production methods also release large amounts of CO2.

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'We were packed like sardines': evidence grows of mass-event dangers early in pandemic

Research appears to back up stories of people who believe they got coronavirus at events UK government allowed to go ahead Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The last major football match played in England before all sport was suspended because of the coronavirus crisis was the European Champions League showpiece between Liverpool and Atletico Madrid . It was a thrillin

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Living near oil and gas wells linked to low birthweight in babies

Risk is greater in rural areas, according to study of nearly 3 million births over 10 years Living near active oil and gas wells during pregnancy increases the risk of low-birthweight babies, especially in rural areas, according to the largest study of its kind. Researchers analysed the records of nearly 3 million births in California to women living within 6.2 miles (10km) of at least one oil or

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Ledelsesansvar, tekniske kompetencer og et stærkt sammenhold lokker i Forsvaret

PLUS. Bjarke Pedersens job som våbenteknisk officer kan bedst sammenlignes med en projektleders, fordi det kræver overblik, bred forståelse af arbejdsopgaver og evnen til at motivere sit team. Risikoen for at blive sendt i krig vurderer han til gengæld til noget nær nul.

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How to Actually Fix America's Police

G eorge Floyd's death is the latest in a long series of brutal encounters between the police and the people they are supposed to serve. Police abuse has targeted people of every race and class, but members of vulnerable populations and minority groups, particularly young black men, are especially at risk. This is well known. The solutions are also well known. Prior tragedies have resulted in a st

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Everything You Need to Know Before Buying a Gaming PC

Prebuilt gaming computers are more affordable and more powerful than ever. Before you shell out for one, here's some advice.

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Kritik: Privatisering vil binde os til affaldsforbrænding de næste 30 år

PLUS. Regeringen vil privatisere de danske forbrændingsanlæg for at få færre anlæg og mindre import, men ifølge to erfarne affaldskonsulenter vil privatisering have den præcis modsatte virkning.

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Stellar 'snake' found in the cosmic neighborhood

Using data from various astronomical surveys, Chinese researchers have unveiled the presence of a quasi-tidal tail, dubbed stellar "snake" due to its morphology, in our cosmic neighborhood. The newly found structure could have implications for our understanding of formation and evolution of tidal tails. The finding is detailed in a paper published May 23 on arXiv.org.

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Researchers improve method that links genome to function for environmental single-cells

Cells are a little easier to understand, thanks to improved technology developed by a team of researchers based in China. Using a method called Raman-activated cell ejection and sequencing (RACE-Seq), the scientists were able to improve the success of identifying and sequencing individual cells from our environments to understand the cells' functions.

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Discovery of long-sought tiny explosions that super-heat the sun's corona

The sun is the brightest object in the sky and has been studied for hundreds of years, but it continues to hide some secrets. The visible sun is extremely hot, at a temperature of about 5500 degrees. Surprisingly, on top of this sits a layer of gas, called the corona, which has a temperature of almost 2 million degrees, over 300 times hotter than the actual surface of the sun. What heats up the co

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Research powers longer lasting rechargeable batteries

With the continuous improvement of electronics, the development of high-energy power supplies has become a key link in the future development of science and technology. However, the shortage of lithium resources and the difficulty of recycling have become important factors in limiting their development.

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Scientists clarify aspect of thin film solid-fluid interactions

Recent correspondence in Nature Materials by a team of campus researchers answers a long-time question that experimental physicist Narayanan Menon says is "one of those things you should be able to look up in a textbook, a very basic question. But when you do look into the literature, there's confusion, and it has been going on for decades. Our work isn't screaming 'new discovery,' but this basic

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Aluminum oxide crystal tested as a UV radiation sensor

Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a risk factor for skin cancer and other diseases. The risk increases when sunlight, the natural source of UV radiation, is combined with artificial sources such as UV lamps for medical therapy, among others. Detecting and measuring UV exposure in different environments was the scope of a research project conducted in Brazil at the São Paulo Federal Institu

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The nature of glass-forming liquids clarified

Glass is such a common material that you probably don't think about it much. It may surprise you to learn that researchers today still don't understand how glass forms. Figuring this out is important for glass industries and many other surprising applications of glasses.

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Researchers develop smart gold nanocages to break chemoresistance

Chemotherapeutic drugs are the cornerstone of the treatment for numerous malignancies. However, current chemotherapy is still far from being satisfactory due to severe side effects of the chemotherapeutic agents and drug resistance of cancer cells. Thus, constructing an ideal chemotherapeutic strategy to reverse drug resistance is needed.

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New survey reveals divide in vital uses of internet in southeast Ohio

A new Ohio University study brings needed attention to the digital divide issues in Appalachian southeast Ohio, a region lagging behind the rest of the nation. Lack of quality internet access, skills, and motivation are creating even more challenges as the nation and world transition to conducting vital business and communications to online environments during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Police Reform Is Popular. Rioting Is Not.

Over the weekend, Representative Ilhan Omar, a left-leaning Minnesota Democrat, lamented, "Every single fire set ablaze, every single store that is looted, every time our community finds itself in danger, it is time that people are not spending talking about getting justice for George Floyd." Once the fires are out, what is the best way to secure justice? The most promising national debate about

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Trump's Words Are Not Meaningless Ramblings

When the president advocates for a viewpoint or course of action, he does not do so merely as an influential public figure with millions of Twitter followers. He does it as the country's chief executive, charged not only with ensuring that the law is followed but also with the more basic task of saying what the law is. This is the legal reality at the heart of the struggle over President Donald T

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How to build better highways in plants

As a plant grows, it moves cellular material from its version of manufacturing sites to the cell wall construction zone. Transporter proteins, called motor proteins, are thought to move these cell wall cargo via a complex highway system made up of microtubule tracks. The position of these tracks must be stabilized so that cargo are delivered to the correct locations.

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The health of ecosystems based on the ground beetle

EPFL scientists just published an open tool for predicting the dynamics of ground beetle populations—important bioindicators for sustainable park management and for monitoring ecosystems—in Italy's Gran Paradiso National Park. The tool incorporates satellite and other remote sensing data.

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Researchers study genetic outcomes of great gray owl population in four states

A University of Wyoming researcher led a study of great gray owls in a four-state region, showing that range discontinuity could lead to genetic drift and subsequent loss of genetic diversity in these birds.

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Oförberedda växter extra klimatkänsliga

Växters tolerans mot värme och kyla beror på vad deras förfäder utsatts för. Särskilt känsliga för oväntade temperaturförändringar är växter i norr, som inte hunnit genomgå sina förberedelser för årstidsväxlingar. En global studie av temperaturtoleransen hos 1 028 arter, kan bidra till att förstå hur växterna svarar på ett förändrat klimat. Ekologer och växtforskare från Aberdeen University i Sko

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Lejon försvårar klimatanpassningen för bytesdjur

Risken att ätas av ett lejon kan påverka möjligheten för flera av Afrikas djur att anpassa sig till ett allt varmare klimat. Det menar ett internationellt forskarlag som med hjälp av viltkameror i skyddade områden i Sydafrika kunnat se att växtätare i områden med lejon är mindre aktiva under nätterna än i områden utan lejon. Forskarna betonar behovet av att inkludera predation i klimatförändrings

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How to build better highways in plants

As a plant grows, it moves cellular material from its version of manufacturing sites to the cell wall construction zone. Transporter proteins, called motor proteins, are thought to move these cell wall cargo via a complex highway system made up of microtubule tracks. The position of these tracks must be stabilized so that cargo are delivered to the correct locations.

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The health of ecosystems based on the ground beetle

EPFL scientists just published an open tool for predicting the dynamics of ground beetle populations—important bioindicators for sustainable park management and for monitoring ecosystems—in Italy's Gran Paradiso National Park. The tool incorporates satellite and other remote sensing data.

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Researchers study genetic outcomes of great gray owl population in four states

A University of Wyoming researcher led a study of great gray owls in a four-state region, showing that range discontinuity could lead to genetic drift and subsequent loss of genetic diversity in these birds.

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Experts debate saturated fat consumption guidelines for Americans

Should public health guidelines recommend reducing saturated fat consumption as much as possible? Nutrition experts are tackling that controversial question head-on in a new series of papers outlining key points of agreement–and disagreement — in how to interpret the evidence and inform health guidelines.

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Wizz Air chief hits out at UK quarantine plan for air passengers

Determination to push ahead with measure is unnecessarily 'harsh', says József Váradi

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Small Arctic coastal waterbodies, with big carbon release

Arctic coastal watersheds are some of the most threatened regions on Earth, having undergone substantial climatic, physical and biological changes with the warming of the Earth, scientists have found.

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To fight climate change, eco groups get political

Environmental non-governmental organizations are increasingly focused on advocacy in climate change politics and environmental justice, according to a new study. Regional disparities in human and financial resources largely determine how they do their work. Although non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have become powerful voices in world environmental politics , little is known of the global pi

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Public perception of scientists as trustworthy experts is likely to be negatively impacted by the COVID-19 crisis

The pandemic is likely to have a negative impact on trust in scientists, a paper has found. While the view of science itself as an important and reliable resource will likely remain unaffected, the perception of the trustworthiness and integrity of individual scientists could be "significantly" impacted, particularly among young people who have had exposure to the disease.

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High concentrations of polluted air found inside homes during 2018 wildfire smoke event

When wildfire smoke filled the skies of Oregon's southern Willamette Valley in 2018, many residents kept their doors closed and windows shut, thinking they were safe from polluted air.

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Novel bioaccumulative compounds found in marine bivalves

A research team in Ehime University found novel bioaccumulative compounds in mussels inhabiting Hiroshima Bay and suggested their unintentional (natural) formation in the environment. The findings were published on March 12, 2020 in Environmental Science & Technology and selected as a supplementary cover of the journal.

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The most popular textbook example of punctuated evolution debunked

Evolutionary biologists have for a long time disagreed on the rate of evolution when new species emerge. Are new species the result of gradual changes—as Charles Darwin suggested—or is evolution speeding up for short periods of time when new species evolve?

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Light-based system lays foundation for continuous monitoring of ocean plastic particles

Researchers have developed a new light-based method for identifying plastic particles in large volumes of water. The new system could help scientists better understand how tiny particles get distributed deep in the ocean.

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A new strategy for the optimal electroreduction of CO2 to high-value products

A KAIST research team presented three novel approaches for modulating local carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in gas-diffusion electrode (GDE)-based flow electrolyzers. Their study also empirically demonstrated that providing a moderate local CO2 concentration is effective in promoting Carbon–Carbon (C–C) coupling reactions toward the production of multi-carbon molecules. This work, featured in t

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The lack of affordable housing is getting worse in the U.S.

America is facing an affordable housing crunch—and it was getting worse even before the pandemic struck and eviscerated jobs and incomes.

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Pinpointing the effects of nanoconfinement on water

Researchers have spent decades studying the properties of water and how they change when there are disruptions to their normal behavior. Research on the topic has a wide range of applications, from biochemical systems to water desalination.

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The most popular textbook example of punctuated evolution debunked

Evolutionary biologists have for a long time disagreed on the rate of evolution when new species emerge. Are new species the result of gradual changes—as Charles Darwin suggested—or is evolution speeding up for short periods of time when new species evolve?

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Solar cells, phone displays and lighting could be transformed by nanocrystal assembly method

Smart phones, tablets and laptop displays, camera lenses, biosensing devices, integrated chips and solar photovoltaic cells are among the applications that could stand to benefit from an innovative method of nanocrystal assembly pioneered by Australian scientists.

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Scientists conduct topographic analysis and mineral retrieval based on Chang'e-4 data

China's Chang'e-4 probe achieved the first soft landing within the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin, which is the oldest, largest and deepest basin on the lunar farside. Technologies and software have been used in the Chang'e-4 mission for studies like lander localization, 3-D terrain reconstruction, hazard recognition, and visual localization of the rover.

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Odds of edible insects transmitting coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is negligible

The odds of insects that are produced for food or feed transmitting COVID-19 is negligible. That is the conclusion drawn by a team of entomologists, virologists, and insect disease experts of Wageningen University & Research (WUR) in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Groningen (UG) and the University of Copenhagen (UC).

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Researchers develop a sustainable method for extracting vanillin from wood processing waste

Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have developed a new sustainable method of extracting the flavoring agent vanillin from lignin, a component of wood. Large quantities of waste lignin accumulate during the production of pulp, an important raw material for making paper. The process the researchers describe in their article in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering

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Lighting the way to porous electronics and sensors

Many common household items and devices have a coating that improves performance. For example, the thin Teflon coating on cookware helps prevent food from sticking to the surface. However, it's difficult to prepare—at room temperature—the strongly adhering, high-performance ceramic coatings that are commonly used in many applications, such as electronics. Now, researchers from Japan have solved th

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Lægestafetten: De andre specialer har udvist stor respekt for os

Da valget stod mellem at blive læge eller dyrlæge, valgte infektionsmediciner Karina Kirk menneskekontakten. Under coronakrisen har hun haft mange ekstravagter i frontlinjen, men hun synes, at det er fascinerende, hvordan en lille organisme kan lægge en hel verden ned.

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Odds of edible insects transmitting coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is negligible

The odds of insects that are produced for food or feed transmitting COVID-19 is negligible. That is the conclusion drawn by a team of entomologists, virologists, and insect disease experts of Wageningen University & Research (WUR) in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Groningen (UG) and the University of Copenhagen (UC).

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The broken mirror: Can parity violation in molecules finally be measured?

Scientists have long tried to experimentally demonstrate a certain symmetry property of the weak interaction—parity violation—in molecules. So far, this has not been possible. A new interdisciplinary effort led by a research group at the at the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) has now shown a realistic path to demons

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City foxes are becoming more similar to domesticated dogs as they adapt to their environment

Urban red foxes are becoming more similar to domesticated dogs as they adapt to their city environment, according to a new analysis.

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Why coronavirus hits men harder: sex hormones offer clues

Data on prostate cancer patients, bald men suggest existing drugs could fight COVID-19

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The first task of my internship

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01664-3 How to solve a supply problem.

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City foxes are becoming more similar to domesticated dogs as they adapt to their environment

Urban red foxes are becoming more similar to domesticated dogs as they adapt to their city environment, according to a new analysis.

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Winning the COVID Marathon

The most important difference between the COVID-19 pandemic and all previous pandemics is the power of our science. We should acknowledge and maximize that.

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Meet the dads who can't quit pinewood derby racing—even after their kids are over it

After his first race in an adult league, Dan Inman says, "I decided to roll up my sleeves and figure out how to be competitive." (Heami Lee/) Popular Science 's Play issue is now available to everyone. Read it now, no app or credit card required. Dan Inman had anticipated this moment for months. It was the first Saturday of December 2018—tournament day—and he thought the cars he'd built could out

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Paging Dr. Hamblin: Does Vitamin D Help Fight COVID-19?

Editor's Note : Every Wednesday, James Hamblin takes questions from readers about health-related curiosities, concerns, and obsessions. Have one? Email him at paging.dr.hamblin@theatlantic.com . I have read that a higher vitamin-D level correlates with better outcomes for other coronaviruses such as SARS and MERS. Could skin color be one of the reasons black Americans and Hispanic Americans are d

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Love the parasite you're with—the entertaining life of unwelcome guests from flea circuses to Aliens

Bloodsucker, leech, tick—few things have a reputation worse than parasites. But these biological hangers-on also have a comic cultural history.

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The CFA's questionable refund refusal

We dive into the books of the prestigious finance exam body.

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Love the parasite you're with—the entertaining life of unwelcome guests from flea circuses to Aliens

Bloodsucker, leech, tick—few things have a reputation worse than parasites. But these biological hangers-on also have a comic cultural history.

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Predator snails fend off the invasion of barnacles in Japan

Introduced species can have tremendous ecological effects and can become a major threat to ecosystems. Invasion biology tries to understand the mechanisms that can limit and control the impacts of introduced species.

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'Video is fine': venture capitalists find the benefits in digital due diligence

Investors believe remote tours could level playing field for entrepreneurs

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Predator snails fend off the invasion of barnacles in Japan

Introduced species can have tremendous ecological effects and can become a major threat to ecosystems. Invasion biology tries to understand the mechanisms that can limit and control the impacts of introduced species.

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The seven seas of plastic and what governments are doing about it

Governments at every level have taken steps over the last decade to reduce the flow of plastic pollution into the world's oceans, according to a Duke University policy analysis published today. The analysis finds, however, that the vast majority of new policies have focused specifically on plastic shopping bags. More study needs to be done to determine they have worked.

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Kids in care at high risk of trouble with the law: study

One of the strongest predictors of whether a Manitoba youth will get into trouble with the law is being in the care of the child welfare system, a new study reveals.

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Stimulus that retrofits housing can reduce energy bills and inequity too

Stay-at-home orders and the economic crisis have increased the burden of energy costs on lower-income Australians. Poor housing quality and unequal access to home energy efficiency are hurting our most vulnerable households. With the next stage of the national recovery program expected to include cash grants for home renovation, now is the time to turn to housing retrofits that support health and

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Backyard gardeners around the world are helping to save Australia's deeply ancient Wollemi pine

As bushfires blackened forests last summer, one tree species was protected by a specialist team of firefighters: the Wollemi pine.

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Backyard gardeners around the world are helping to save Australia's deeply ancient Wollemi pine

As bushfires blackened forests last summer, one tree species was protected by a specialist team of firefighters: the Wollemi pine.

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Why does crowd noise matter?

Sporting codes are restarting as part of easing restrictions amid the coronavirus pandemic. In Australia, the NRL season has just restarted, the AFL will resume on June 11, and Super Netball will return on August 1.

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Podcast: To beat a pandemic, try prepping for a tsunami

Deep Tech is a new subscriber-only podcast that brings alive the people and ideas our editors and reporters are thinking about. Episodes are released every two weeks. We're making this episode—like much of the rest of our coronavirus coverage—free to everyone. "The reality is that there are two ways to look at responding" to a natural disaster, says Linda Kozlowski, a city councillor in Manzanita

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Building Kids' Resilience through Play Is More Crucial Than Ever

It helps with social, emotional, physical and cognitive skills—and with schools closed, it's more important than ever — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Building Kids' Resilience through Play Is More Crucial Than Ever

It helps with social, emotional, physical and cognitive skills—and with schools closed, it's more important than ever — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The pandemic is challenging China's breakneck race to the top of science

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01522-2 The country is rapidly gaining on the United States in research, but problems could slow its rise: part 5 in a series on science after the pandemic.

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Saudi Arabia poised to reverse extra production cuts as Opec+ meets

Kingdom could supply extra 1m barrels per day from July, sources say

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Met police twice as likely to fine black people over lockdown breaches – research

Clear disproportionality revealed in number of police arrests and fines in London Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Metropolitan police are facing claims of bias after figures showed that officers enforcing the coronavirus lockdown were more than twice as likely to issue fines to black people than white people. The Met, which covers London, issued 973 fines between

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Care home staff could be asked to work without PPE under council plan

Proposals suggest seeking volunteers to look after coronavirus patients without protective gear Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Health and social care workers could be asked to volunteer to look after people with Covid-19 without wearing protective equipment in the event of extreme shortages, according to proposals seen by the Guardian. Councils oversee a range of se

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Surgisphere: governments and WHO changed Covid-19 policy based on suspect data from tiny US company

Surgisphere, whose employees appear to include a sci-fi writer and adult content model, provided database behind Lancet and New England Journal of Medicine hydroxychloroquine studies The World Health Organization and a number of national governments have changed their Covid-19 policies and treatments on the basis of flawed data from a little-known US healthcare analytics company, also calling int

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Mark Zuckerberg Believes Only in Mark Zuckerberg

Why is he abetting Trump while civil rights leaders and his own employees rebuke him? It's about dominance.

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Protest Photography Safety Tips: Dos and Don'ts, How to Blur Faces, Essential Gear

Here's our guide to taking photos safely at a protest, what not to do, what gear to bring, and how to remove location data and blur faces before uploading to social media.

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You Should Be Feeling Miserable

One summer when I was about 7, a white girl almost drowned me. We were splashing around in Lake Winnepocket on a sunny afternoon. The lake was crowded as usual, and Kelly—as I will call her—offered to carry me out to the big rock. The big rock was about 25 feet from the shore, and served as a marker for where the lake bed took a sharp dip and got dangerously deep. Most of the younger kids who swa

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Forskares vägval påverkar studiernas resultat

70 forskargrupper inom hjärnavbildning har deltagit i en studie på initiativ av bland annat Handelshögskolan i Stockholm. De fick utgå från samma data och hypoteser – ändå blev resultaten olika för alla grupper, visar en ny artikel som publicerats i tidskriften Nature. Det beror på att forskarna var långt ifrån överens om hur analyserna skulle göras. 1) Varför blir det så stora skillnader när ni f

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Serviceeftersyn: Fortidens synder har gjort jernbanen »nedslidt, umoderne og udfordret«

PLUS. Udrulningen af signalprogram og andre moderniseringer er nu i en god gænge, konstaterer Transportministeriet. Men efterslæbet er stort, og bilerne er et billigere og hurtigere alternativ.

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How much do black lives matter to business? Davos plots 'great reset' for 2021; Chuka Umunna exclusive

Your guide to the investment and business revolution you can't afford to ignore

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Building Kids' Resilience through Play Is More Crucial Than Ever

It helps with social, emotional, physical and cognitive skills—and with schools closed, it's more important than ever — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Axa to defy regulators with dividend payment

Chief executive Thomas Buberl says the decision reflects a 'balanced approach'

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How to Transport Crucial Vaccines without Cooling

Unlike vials, flexible films could preserve medicines for long periods, with no refrigeration needed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How medical tech is transforming the human body in life — and death

Three new books show how science is pushing at the limits of our mortality

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Millioninvestering skal finde flere skadelige jordforureninger

Regeringen forventer at finde mellem 50 og 100 jordforureninger, der kan skade kystvand, søer og vandløb.

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America's Generals Must Stand Up to Trump

Military leaders are bred for two kinds of courage—the courage to expose themselves to hostile fire and the courage to assume responsibility for the gravest decisions anyone can make. Most of them, particularly in the upper ranks, demonstrate those qualities. But what they need now, in the face of an unprincipled and brutal commander in chief, is a different kind of bravery. The president raves o

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How bacteria fertilize soya

Soya and clover have their very own fertiliser factories in their roots, where bacteria manufacture ammonium, which is crucial for plant growth. Although this has long been common knowledge, scientists have only recently described the mechanism in detail. With biotechnology, this knowledge could now help make agriculture more sustainable.

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Huge amounts of carbon from forest fires ends up in the ocean

About a third of the black carbon created when plants are partially burned ends up in oceans via rivers, a finding that helps us model carbon storage and climate change

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Ellen evalueret: Elfærger langt billigere i drift end diesel

PLUS. Lavere omkostninger til energi og til besætning gør en fuld elektrisk færge langt mere økonomisk at drive end traditionelle dieselfærger, viser evaluering af det første lille år med elfærgen Ellen.

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Will the pandemic permanently alter scientific publishing?

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01520-4 The push for rapid and open publishing could take off — although financial pressures lie ahead: part 4 in a series on science after the pandemic.

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Race to be first to report first case of COVID-19 death during pregnancy leads to a retraction

A group of researchers in Iran has retracted their case report on what they claimed was the first known case of a pregnant woman who died of Covid-19. The reason: According to the corresponding author, another group of researchers in Iran, who had first seen the patient at their hospital, had beaten them to the … Continue reading

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Resist the Urge to Simplify the Story

Like most Americans, I am nowhere near any violence right now. Nevertheless, I am hearing and seeing violence on a series of screens: television screens, smartphone screens, computer screens. Even in a room as quiet as mine—outside the window I can see grass and trees—the cacophony is almost unbearable. It's as if different choruses are all singing at the same time, and not in harmony. In Salt La

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Coronavirus Live Updates: How the C.D.C. Failed to Keep Up

Epidemiologists said protests around the United States would almost certainly lead to more cases. Republicans are seeking a new city to host their convention.

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'Air bridge' linking UK to Portugal may be agreed by end of June

Portuguese foreign minister confirms talks with UK as experts express safety fears Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage An "air bridge" between the UK and Portugal could be agreed by the end of June, allowing tourists to bypass quarantine restrictions. It comes amid calls for blanket quarantine plans to be scrapped to aid the flailing tourism and hospitality sectors, desp

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DSAM fylder 50: Fra ringeagt til respekt

En praktiserende læge blev engang betragtet som eleven på bagerste række, der ikke formåede at blive andet. I dag udgør almenmedicinerne selve rygraden i sundhedsvæsenet.

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For Developing Countries, More Solar Power — and Maybe More Lead?

For advocates of renewable energy and climate change mitigation, more solar power in fast-growing nations like India would seem to be good news. But some public health researchers are concerned that the aggressive push for solar power has an overlooked downside: Potential spikes in lead poisoning.

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Nyt studie: Praktiserende læger er billigere og lige så gode som hospitalerne til at behandle diabetikere

Som følge af overenskomstaftalen fra 2018 er de praktiserende læger i gang med at overtage behandlingen med diabetespatienter med moderate symptomer fra hospitalerne. Ifølge et endnu ikke offentliggjort ph.d. projekt fra Dansk Center for Sundhedsøkonomi på Syddansk Universitet gør de praktiserende læger det langt billigere og med lige så god kvalitet som hospitalerne.

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SpaceX's astronaut launch is a boost for the International Space Station

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01620-1 NASA's partnership with SpaceX and its founder Elon Musk should recognize the global nature of space exploration and research.

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Efficient Closed-loop Maximization of Carbon Nanotube Growth Rate using Bayesian Optimization

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64397-3

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Infection by cyst nematodes induces rapid remodelling of developing xylem vessels in wheat roots

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66080-z

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Effects of rainfall manipulation and nitrogen addition on plant biomass allocation in a semiarid sandy grassland

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65922-0

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Electric discharge evidence found in a new class of material in the Chicxulub ejecta

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65974-2

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Author Correction: Fabrication of microfluidic device for Aflatoxin M1 detection in milk samples with specific aptamers

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64241-8

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Characterization of the wheat cultivars against Tilletia controversa Kühn, causal agent of wheat dwarf bunt

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65748-w

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GATA2 Regulates Constitutive PD-L1 and PD-L2 Expression in Brain Tumors

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65915-z

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Frontoparietal structural properties mediate adult life span differences in executive function

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66083-w

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Fælles konsultationer mellem patient, egen læge og onkolog hitter

Når praktiserende læger og onkologer har blot en enkelt fælles videosamtale med deres patienter, opnår de bedre koordination og afklaring af indbyrdes rollefordeling. Det viser ny forskning.

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Why we can't count on carbon-sucking farms to slow climate change

Corporations, politicians, and environmentalists have all embraced carbon farming as the feel-good climate solution of the moment. Several leading Democratic presidential contenders highlighted the potential to alter farming practices to suck up more carbon dioxide in their climate plans. And the presumptive nominee, Joe Biden, declared last summer : "Soil is the next frontier for storing carbon.

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PLO: Gode takter i ny økonomiaftale

PLO-formand er positivt stemt over økonomiaftale mellem Danske Regioner og regeringen. Det er endnu uvist, hvad den vil betyde for almen praksis, men formanden vil følge den på sidelinjen.

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Architect of Sweden's coronavirus strategy admits too many died

Anders Tegnell defends strategy but says there is 'potential for improvement' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Sweden's chief epidemiologist and the architect of its light-touch approach to the coronavirus has acknowledged the country has suffered too many deaths from Covid-19 and should have done more to curb the spread of the virus. Anders Tegnell, who has previousl

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RSPO3 impacts body fat distribution and regulates adipose cell biology in vitro

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16592-z Genetic variants at the RSPO3 locus are associated with waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI). Here, Loh et al. describe two independent RSPO3 signals that associate with body fat distribution, perform fine-mapping and explore the function of RSPO3 in human adipocyte biology and body fat distribution in zebrafis

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The characterization of Mediator 12 and 13 as conditional positive gene regulators in Arabidopsis

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16651-5 Mediator is a multiprotein complex required to activate gene transcription by RNAPII. Here, the authors report that MED12 and MED13 are conditional positive regulators that facilitate the expression of genes depleted in active chromatin marks and the induction of gene expression in response to environmental stim

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Orbitofrontal control of visual cortex gain promotes visual associative learning

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16609-7 The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) encodes expected outcomes and plays a key role in outcome-guided behavior. The authors show here that the top-down projection from the OFC to the visual cortex drives visual associative learning by modulating the response gain of V1 neurons to non-relevant stimuli.

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Fires prime terrestrial organic carbon for riverine export to the global oceans

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16576-z Black carbon is a recalcitrant and unique form of organic carbon formed from incomplete combustion. Here the authors use global sampling to reduce uncertainty in the flux of terrestrial black carbon to the oceans, predicting that 34% of black carbon produced by fires has an oceanic fate.

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Traceless native chemical ligation of lipid-modified peptide surfactants by mixed micelle formation

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16595-w Sequestration of reactants in lipid vesicles is a strategy prevalent in biological systems to raise the rate and specificity of chemical reactions. Here, the authors show that micelle-assisted reactions facilitate native chemical ligation between a peptide-thioester and a Cys-peptide modified by a lipid-like moi

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The RNA fold interactome of evolutionary conserved RNA structures in S. cerevisiae

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16555-4 Previous study identified in vivo structured mRNA regions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by dimethyl sulfate-sequencing. Here the authors use quantitative proteomics to identify protein interactors of 186 RNA folds in S. cerevisiae, providing functional links between RNA binding proteins and distinct mRNA fold.

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Slow easing of lockdowns may be better for global economy

The paper, published today in Nature Human Behaviour, is the first peer-reviewed study to comprehensively assess potential global supply chain effects of Covid-19 lockdowns, modelling the impact of lockdowns on 140 countries, including countries not directly affected by Covid-19.

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Rivers help lock carbon from fires into oceans for thousands of years

The extent to which rivers transport burned carbon to oceans – where it can be stored for tens of millennia – is revealed in new research.The study calculates how much burned carbon is being flushed out by rivers and locked up in the oceans.Oceans store a surprising amount of carbon from burned vegetation, for example as a result of wildfires and managed burning. The research team describe it as a

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New method predicts spin dynamics of materials for quantum computing

Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed a theoretical foundation and new computational tools for predicting a material's spin dynamics, a key property for building solid-state quantum computing platforms and other applications of spintronics.

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Get excited by neural networks

Scientists at The University of Tokyo introduced a new method for inferring the energy of the excited states of electrons in materials using machine learning. By rapidly predicting these values, this work can help better understand material properties and develop new substances.

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Ask an astronomer: What makes neutron stars so special?

Being outside of Earth's atmosphere while also being able to look down on the planet is both a challenge and a unique benefit for astronauts conducting important and innovative experiments aboard the International Space Station. NASA astrophysicist Michelle Thaller explains why one such project, known as NICER (Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer), is "one of the most amazing discoveries o

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Ledende overlæge fra OUH bliver lægelig direktør på Sygehus Sønderjylland

Peter Sørensen stopper som ledende overlæge på Onkologisk Afdeling på Odense Universitetshospital for at blive lægelig direktør på Sygehus Sønderjylland.

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Slow easing of lockdowns may be better for global economy: study

A cautious approach to easing lockdown restrictions that reduces the risk of later lockdowns may be better for the global supply chain in the long run, according to a new modeling study led by UCL and Tsinghua University.

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New doubts about the Neanderthal provenance of Nerja cave art

Dating cave art is a key issue for understanding human cognitive development. To understand the complexity of human evolution, it is vital to know whether the ability for abstraction and conveying reality involved in artistic development is unique to Homo sapiens or if it was shared with other species, or at what moment these abilities developed.

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Starmer escalates attack on Johnson over handling of virus crisis

Labour leader accuses UK prime minister of ignoring letter to forge consensus on schools' reopening

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Powerful Cyclone Nisarga makes landfall near Mumbai

Cyclone Nisarga ripped roofs off homes in a coastal town near Mumbai Wednesday after officials ordered offices and factories to shut and told people to stay home, reversing a move to ease a coronavirus lockdown in the Indian megacity.

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Unga brottsoffer får inte tillräckligt stöd

Trots att samhället erbjuder organiserat stöd till unga som utsatts för brott, är det svårt att veta vart man ska vända sig. Istället för att söka det stöd samhället erbjuder vänder sig unga hellre till familj och vänner, visar forskning. Ungdomar som har blivit utsatta för brott betraktar sig ofta inte som brottsoffer i traditionell mening, vilket gör att de inte alltid upplever att de får det s

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Is It Safe Yet To Get Your Physical Or A Dental Checkup?

Most preventive medical care that can't be handled via telehealth has taken a back seat in recent months, but that's starting to change. Here's what to ask when you schedule an in-person appointment. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Which kind of face mask is the best protection against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

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The virus has brought the digital future closer

Big Tech has shown it can be a responsible citizen but its power has increased

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Rivers help lock carbon from fires into oceans for thousands of years

The extent to which rivers transport burned carbon to oceans—where it can be stored for tens of millennia—is revealed in new research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA).

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New method predicts spin dynamics of materials for quantum computing

Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed a theoretical foundation and new computational tools for predicting a material's spin dynamics, a key property for building solid-state quantum computing platforms and other applications of spintronics.

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Dagens gode nyhed: Misbrug med danske kreditkort aftager

Selvom færre får misbrugt kortet, er der dog fortsat grund til at bruge den sunde fornuft – særligt hvis du handler på udenlandske hjemmesider.

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Boris Johnson creates new teams to oversee coronavirus recovery

Two committees formed as ministers fear cabinet has been sidelined during pandemic

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Ny metode kan føre til markant længere hængebroer

PLUS. Brodækkets vægt er en af de største udfordringer for lange hængebroer. Ny designmetode viser, at man potentielt kan undvære over 25 procent af stålet i et brodæk. Det muliggør store CO2-besparelser og længere spænd.

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Cristobal forms in Gulf of Mexico as season's third tropical storm

Tropical Storm Cristobal's formation in the Gulf of Mexico marks a new record as the earliest that the Atlantic hurricane season has seen its third named disturbance, US meteorologists said Tuesday.

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SpaceX launch marks first new craft to carry people to orbit in 17 years

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01603-2 The latest science news, in brief.

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Mexican zoo saves animals endangered by virus crisis

Kira, a two and a half year-old tiger, arrived at a zoo in Mexico's northeast in April after her owner could no longer feed her due to the coronavirus-induced economic collapse.

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Rebecca Christofferson (LSU) 3: Characterizing Understudied Arboviruses: Orthobunyaviruses in Rwanda

https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/arbovirus Rebecca Christofferson provides an overview of arboviruses, arthropod-borne viruses, like dengue and zika, and shares her work on characterizing understudied arboviruses like Bunyamwera, Batai, and Ngari. In part 1, Dr. Rebecca Christofferson provides an overview of arboviruses, arthropod-borne viruses, like dengue. Arthropods, such as mosquitoes, a

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Rebecca Christofferson (LSU) 2: Math and Mosquitoes

https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/arbovirus Rebecca Christofferson provides an overview of arboviruses, arthropod-borne viruses, like dengue and zika, and shares her work on characterizing understudied arboviruses like Bunyamwera, Batai, and Ngari. In part 1, Dr. Rebecca Christofferson provides an overview of arboviruses, arthropod-borne viruses, like dengue. Arthropods, such as mosquitoes, a

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Rebecca Christofferson (LSU) 1: Mosquito-Borne Arboviruses

https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/arbovirus Rebecca Christofferson provides an overview of arboviruses, arthropod-borne viruses, like dengue and zika, and shares her work on characterizing understudied arboviruses like Bunyamwera, Batai, and Ngari. In part 1, Dr. Rebecca Christofferson provides an overview of arboviruses, arthropod-borne viruses, like dengue. Arthropods, such as mosquitoes, a

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Mexican zoo saves animals endangered by virus crisis

Kira, a two and a half year-old tiger, arrived at a zoo in Mexico's northeast in April after her owner could no longer feed her due to the coronavirus-induced economic collapse.

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Pandemic could cost Australian universities $11 bn: lobby group

Australian universities could lose up to US$11 billion dollars as an indefinite coronavirus border closure locks out the foreign students who keep the sector afloat, the industry said Wednesday.

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Cyclone lashes India's business capital, 100,000 evacuated (Update)

A cyclone made landfall Wednesday south of India's financial capital of Mumbai, with storm surge threatening to flood beaches and low-lying slums as city authorities struggle to contain the coronavirus pandemic.

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Human waste could help combat global food insecurity

Researchers from Cornell University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan have proven it is possible to create nitrogen-rich fertilizer by combining the solid and liquid components of human waste.

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5 Takeaways on the C.D.C.'s Coronavirus Response

Early mistakes in testing, aging data systems, clashes with President Trump and an overly cautious culture shook confidence in the nation's premier public health agency.

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The C.D.C. Waited 'Its Entire Existence for This Moment.' What Went Wrong?

The technology was old, the data poor, the bureaucracy slow, the guidance confusing, the administration not in agreement. The coronavirus shook the world's premier health agency, creating a loss of confidence and hampering the U.S. response to the crisis.

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Jane Goodall: humanity is finished if it fails to adapt after Covid-19

Primatologist calls for overhaul of food habits to prevent a future pandemic Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Humanity will be "finished" if we fail to drastically change our food systems in response to the coronavirus pandemic and the climate crisis, the prominent naturalist Jane Goodall has warned. She blamed the emergence of Covid-19 on the over-exploitation of the

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Scientists engineer human cells with squid-like transparency

Octopuses, squids and other sea creatures can perform a disappearing act by using specialized tissues in their bodies to manipulate the transmission and reflection of light, and now researchers at the University of California, Irvine have engineered human cells to have similar transparent abilities.

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Scientists engineer human cells with squid-like transparency

Octopuses, squids and other sea creatures can perform a disappearing act by using specialized tissues in their bodies to manipulate the transmission and reflection of light, and now researchers at the University of California, Irvine have engineered human cells to have similar transparent abilities.

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New research deepens understanding of Earth's interaction with the solar wind

As the Earth orbits the sun, it plows through a stream of fast-moving particles that can interfere with satellites and global positioning systems. Now, a team of scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Princeton University has reproduced a process that occurs in space to deepen understanding of what happens when the Earth encounters this s

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Antibiotic-destroying genes widespread in bacteria in soil and on people

The latest generation of tetracyclines—a class of powerful, first-line antibiotics—was designed to thwart the two most common ways bacteria resist such drugs. But a new study from researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has found that genes representing yet another method of resistance are widespread in bacteria that live in the soil and on peo

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How to Watch This Friday's Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

It's eclipse season! And this is just the beginning.

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Study reveals continuous pathway to building blocks of life

Researchers have long sought to understand the origins of life on Earth. A new study conducted by scientists at the Institute for Advanced Study, the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI), and the University of New South Wales, among other participating institutions, marks an important step forward in the effort to understand the chemical origins of life. The findings of this study demonstrate how "

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Antibiotic-destroying genes widespread in bacteria in soil and on people

The latest generation of tetracyclines—a class of powerful, first-line antibiotics—was designed to thwart the two most common ways bacteria resist such drugs. But a new study from researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has found that genes representing yet another method of resistance are widespread in bacteria that live in the soil and on peo

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Study reveals continuous pathway to building blocks of life

Researchers have long sought to understand the origins of life on Earth. A new study conducted by scientists at the Institute for Advanced Study, the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI), and the University of New South Wales, among other participating institutions, marks an important step forward in the effort to understand the chemical origins of life. The findings of this study demonstrate how "

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Australian researchers set record for carbon dioxide capture

Researchers from Monash University and the CSIRO have set a record for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) using technology that resembles a sponge filled with tiny magnets.

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'Major gaps' in understanding how land-use changes affect spread of diseases

The quest to discover how new diseases—such as COVID-19—emerge and spread in response to global land-use change driven by human population expansion still contains "major gaps", researchers have claimed.

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Study casts doubt on usefulness of Ofsted ratings

The usefulness of Ofsted ratings as guides for parents and students in choosing a secondary school has been called into question by the findings of a new study.

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'Major gaps' in understanding how land-use changes affect spread of diseases

The quest to discover how new diseases—such as COVID-19—emerge and spread in response to global land-use change driven by human population expansion still contains "major gaps", researchers have claimed.

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Hypothesis of how the future may look due to automation

I got into an argument with someone over how the world will change due to automation. I don't know too much about the subject, but proposed one way for the world to develop, stating it to be purely speculation. The other person involved got mad because I apparently took too many leaps of faith and the hypothesis wasn't viable. So I'll ask here and get some more educated opinions: First, here is t

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U.S. Army's New Drone Swarm May Be A Weapon Of Mass Destruction

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6 ideas that would revolutionize the world…

I have 6 ideas for a social media website I wanted under the domain name of www.oooo.com … in that there are two sets of eyes representing two people… I like it because it's simple and it's where people can TRULY and EXPLICITLY get in touch with one another…. (it's not a stab at websites like Facebook or Google +…. it's just that I'm not the best writer)… Idea 1 Guardian Witness I came

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Biggest Solar Panel Maker Doubles Capacity With New Plant

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Cheap and nimble artificial muscles: HASEL (showcase)

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Google's Hidden CIA Connection – The Full Story

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Is it realistic for cultured meat and alternative protein to become a significant industry in the next decade?

Specifically I mean that in the near future (next decade or so), do you think we would see significant breakthrough in cultured meat and alternative protein to reach cost parity with farmed meat, and hence start expanding and capturing markets similar to how electric cars have took off in the last decade? submitted by /u/skysearch93 [link] [comments]

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Forskere: Vi har fundet den reneste luft på Jorden

Det er svært at finde et uberørt sted på Jorden, men Det Sydlige Ishav er fri for forurenende partikler.

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People who work in offices with more daylight sleep better at night

When employees work in an office with more natural light they perform better in strategic thinking tests and sleep 37 minutes more per night on average

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I am not a racist but…

Some geneticists have very unorthodox ideas. These might sound like racism or eugenics to simple folks, but it is really high science. UK Biobank is apparently on board.

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Coronavirus: Public told to cut water use amid surge in lockdown demand

Water companies are urging people to avoid using sprinklers and paddling pools during the lockdown.

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Country diary: this first wild rose will not be pigeon-holed

Crook, County Durham: Today's sweet briar could be the mongrel offspring of a dog rose – they hybridise so easily Spring, so eagerly anticipated, so riotous, has sashayed into summer. All that remains of crab apple, hawthorn and rowan blossom lies as petal confetti on the pavement. The blackcap in the copse I walk past daily is subdued, its melodious courtship tempered now by the caution of a par

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'Major gaps' in understanding how land-use changes affect spread of diseases

The quest to discover how new diseases — such as Covid-19 — emerge and spread in response to global land-use change driven by human population expansion still contains 'major gaps', researchers have claimed.

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Solving the mysteries of water and air underground

The mysterious capillary fringe has huge effects on the soil, and new research tells us how it works.

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COVID-19 spurs increase in self-care, new survey shows

The vast majority of U.S. adults (80%) say they will be more mindful about practicing self-care regularly once the pandemic is over, according to a new survey conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs. Nearly half of Americans (46%) also report that they are struggling to find ways to maintain their whole health (i.e., physical, mental, and spiritual health) dur

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Negative emotions cause stronger appetite responses in emotional eaters

A recent study at the University of Salzburg found that emotional eaters — people who use food to regulate negative emotions — had a stronger appetite response and found food to be more pleasant when experiencing negative emotions compared to neutral emotions. The findings further our understanding about emotional overeating, a risk factor for developing eating disorders such as bulimia, and the

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The nature of glass-forming liquids is more clear

Researchers from The University of Tokyo have found that attractive and repulsive interactions between particles are both essential to form structural order that controls the dynamics of glass-forming liquids. This knowledge will help understanding why a liquid becomes so viscous before glass formation.

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Association between outdoor light at night & breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women

Outdoor light at night was linked to a higher risk of breast cancer in a study published in the International Journal of Cancer.

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How do land-use changes affect the spread of diseases between animals and people?

Most new viruses and other pathogens that arise in humans are transmitted from other animals, as in the case of the virus that causes COVID-19. A recent review published in Mammal Review examines how changes in land-use–such as deforestation, urbanization, and conversion to agriculture–have affected such transmission.

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Certain personality traits may affect risk of 'pre-dementia'

A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society examined five personality traits–neuroticism, extraversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, and openness–and their links to pre-dementia conditions called motoric cognitive risk (MCR) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) syndromes.

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Age affects decisions related to breast cancer surgery

A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study indicates that breast cancer surgery is safe for patients who are older than 70 years of age, but age can influence the decision to undergo surgery.

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Wearable sensor may help to assess stress in healthcare workers

A wearable biosensor may help monitor stress experienced by healthcare professionals, according to a study published in Physiological Reports.

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What are the risks and benefits of low-dose aspirin?

Low-dose aspirin significantly lowers cardiovascular disease risk but increases the risk of bleeding, according to a review published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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High workload for ICU nurses may increase risk of organ failure for patients

For patients admitted to the intensive care unit in a hospital in Finland, increased workload for nurses and understaffing of nurses were linked with a higher likelihood that patients would experience multiple organ failure. The findings are published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing.

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Osteoporosis treatment may also protect against pneumonia

A recent study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research found that nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs) such as alendronate, which are widely used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis, are linked with lower risks of pneumonia and of dying from pneumonia.

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Covid-19 ends Australia's run of record growth

Canberra faces first recession in 29 years but economists say recovery has already begun

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Are we heading into another Depression?

Economists and analysts give their views on the global economy as countries relax coronavirus lockdowns

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Dealmaking: how's virtual due diligence working out?

Time-saving and reduced travel costs are clearly a benefit, but face-to-face meetings are missed

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Health experts fear US protests will lead to coronavirus surge

Crowds, chanting and mass arrests are risk factors that could fuel spread of Covid-19

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Swedish expert admits country should have had tighter coronavirus controls

Shift comes as Stockholm promises a commission to investigate approach to pandemic

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Coronavirus: UK farmers face brutal test ahead of Brexit

The pandemic has exposed tensions over food security that are now playing out in the UK- EU trade talks

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Scientists probe link between high altitude and low coronavirus cases

Bolivian team seeks to understand why low-lying areas have been hit harder than cities on higher ground

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Global stocks climb on hopes of economic recovery and stimulus

Wall Street on pace for fourth straight day of gains

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Aktindsigt: Sådan havnede hundredevis af danskere fejlagtigt i politiets it-systemer

En menneskelig fejl førte til, at mange hundrede personer blev tilknyttet sager, som de intet havde med at gøre. Politiet havde nemlig rod i systemet for sager med ukendte involveret.

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Hver sjette kernebruger af offentlig transport stiger om efter covid-19

PLUS. En del af de frafaldne tager nu bilen, og den grønne omstilling af transporten og kampen mod trængsel er sat tilbage på ubestemt tid.

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Lockdown leaves UK waste collectors feeling the pinch

Overall levels of rubbish down as businesses shut and consumers stay at home

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The best Nintendo Switch controllers for solo or party play

Switch it up. (Jippe Joosten via Unsplash/) While PlayStation and Xbox engage in their never ending battle for graphical supremacy, Nintendo confidently goes about its business innovating the way we play and unlocking the potential of the console system. The Nintendo Switch is part handheld, part console, designed to be the ultimate communal experience. But in order to take full advantage of its

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Convenient and stylish K-Cup coffee pod holders

Convenient storage for your K-Cups. (Helena Lopes via Unsplash/) Part of the joy of the K-Cup coffee experience is how much variety it offers. You don't have to commit to a bulky pound or two of a single type of coffee—grab a whole slew of tiny cups and experiment. The only problem with building your own countertop coffee shop is what, exactly, to do with all the little cups. Luckily, there is a

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Bioluminescence Helps Prey Avoid Hungry Seals

Prey animals flash biochemically produced light to confuse elephant seals hunting in the dark, but at least one seal turned the tables.

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Urban foxes may be self-domesticating in our midst

City living may have set the animals on the road to doglike features

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Blood vessel attack could trigger coronavirus' fatal 'second phase'

Damage to vessel lining may drive mysterious clotting disorders, inflammation

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The 'Japan model' that tackled coronavirus

Cluster control strategy helped but good timing mattered most of all, say experts

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Australian researchers set record for carbon dioxide capture

Researchers from Australia's Monash University and the CSIRO have set a record for carbon dioxide capture using Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs). The technology resembles a sponge filled with tiny magnets.

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Bioluminescence Helps Prey Avoid Hungry Seals

Prey animals flash biochemically produced light to confuse elephant seals hunting in the dark, but at least one seal turned the tables. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bioluminescence Helps Prey Avoid Hungry Seals

Prey animals flash biochemically produced light to confuse elephant seals hunting in the dark, but at least one seal turned the tables. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Blood plasma analysis could spot signs of ALS

Analysis of blood plasma could help identify diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, according to new research. The work sheds further light on a pathway involved in disease progression and appears to rule out an environmental neurotoxin as playing a role in ALS. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes deterioration of nerve cells in the brain an

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Switch 'turns off' breast cancer metastasis in mice

Researchers have identified a gene that causes an aggressive form of breast cancer to rapidly grow in animal models. More importantly, they have also discovered a way to "turn it off" and inhibit cancer from occurring. The study results have been so compelling that the team is now working on FDA approval to begin clinical trials. The researchers examined the role two genes play in causing triple

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Study in twins finds our sensitivity is partly in our genes

Some people are more sensitive than others — and around half of these differences can be attributed to our genes, new research has found.

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Unforced variations: Jun 2020

This month's open thread on climate science issues.

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Indigenous Alaskans probably didn't eat sea otters

Before fur traders decimated sea otter populations from Alaska to Oregon, ancestors of at least one Alaskan indigenous population, the Tlingit, hunted the mammals for their pelts but probably not for food, according to a new study. The findings could help Alaskans confront growing numbers of the mammals and Oregonians who want to reintroduce them on the coast. "Hunting sea otters and using sea ot

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The Atlantic Daily: Trump's Photo Op

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . The sea of protests in front of the White House was parted not by miracle, but by force. Last night, federal police used tear gas to clear a walking route to a nearby church so that the president

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A mysterious company's coronavirus papers in top medical journals may be unraveling

Scientists and journals express concern over influential studies of COVID-19 patient data that evaluated possible treatments such as hydroxychloroquine

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Depletion interactions modulate the binding between disordered proteins in crowded environments [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) abound in cellular regulation. Their interactions are often transitory and highly sensitive to salt concentration and posttranslational modifications. However, little is known about the effect of macromolecular crowding on the interactions of IDPs with their cellular targets. Here, we investigate the influence of crowding on the…

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A continuous reaction network that produces RNA precursors [Chemistry]

Continuous reaction networks, which do not rely on purification or timely additions of reagents, serve as models for chemical evolution and have been demonstrated for compounds thought to have played important roles for the origins of life such as amino acids, hydroxy acids, and sugars. Step-by-step chemical protocols for ribonucleotide…

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Perceiving transparency from opaque surface materials [Commentaries]

It is easy to marvel at the abilities of master painters and sculptors to depict draped cloth, especially in comparison with lesser artists whose depictions of cloth may often appear not quite right. Draped cloth is difficult to represent because its visible appearance is influenced by many factors, including the…

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Vulnerability to helpless behavior is regulated by the circadian clock component CRYPTOCHROME in the mouse nucleus accumbens [Neuroscience]

The nucleus accumbens (NAc), a central component of the midbrain dopamine reward circuit, exhibits disturbed circadian rhythms in the postmortem brains of depressed patients. We hypothesized that normal mood regulation requires proper circadian timing in the NAc, and that mood disorders are associated with dysfunctions of the NAc cellular circadian…

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Pore-scale investigation of the use of reactive nanoparticles for in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater source [Environmental Sciences]

Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles have excellent capacity for in situ remediation of groundwater resources contaminated by a range of organic and inorganic contaminants. Chlorinated solvents are by far the most treated compounds. Studies at column, pilot, and field scales have reported successful decrease in contaminant concentration upon injection of…

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Common homozygosity for predicted loss-of-function variants reveals both redundant and advantageous effects of dispensable human genes [Genetics]

Humans homozygous or hemizygous for variants predicted to cause a loss of function (LoF) of the corresponding protein do not necessarily present with overt clinical phenotypes. We report here 190 autosomal genes with 207 predicted LoF variants, for which the frequency of homozygous individuals exceeds 1% in at least one…

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P-hacking in clinical trials and how incentives shape the distribution of results across phases [Medical Sciences]

Clinical research should conform to high standards of ethical and scientific integrity, given that human lives are at stake. However, economic incentives can generate conflicts of interest for investigators, who may be inclined to withhold unfavorable results or even tamper with data in order to achieve desired outcomes. To shed…

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Why are momilactones always associated with biosynthetic gene clusters in plants? [Commentaries]

There is an emerging realization that plant genomes contain biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) for more specialized metabolism in certain cases (1). However, while horizontal gene transfer seems to drive the assembly of self-sufficient BGCs in microbes, the limitations of strict vertical gene transmission necessitate a distinct driving force for the…

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Remote nongenetic optical modulation of neuronal activity using fuzzy graphene [Engineering]

The ability to modulate cellular electrophysiology is fundamental to the investigation of development, function, and disease. Currently, there is a need for remote, nongenetic, light-induced control of cellular activity in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) platforms. Here, we report a breakthrough hybrid nanomaterial for remote, nongenetic, photothermal stimulation of 2D…

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A molecular tandem cell for efficient solar water splitting [Chemistry]

Artificial photosynthesis provides a way to store solar energy in chemical bonds. Achieving water splitting without an applied external potential bias provides the key to artificial photosynthetic devices. We describe here a tandem photoelectrochemical cell design that combines a dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell (DSPEC) and an organic solar cell (OSC) in…

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Organ of Corti size is governed by Yap/Tead-mediated progenitor self-renewal [Developmental Biology]

Precise control of organ growth and patterning is executed through a balanced regulation of progenitor self-renewal and differentiation. In the auditory sensory epithelium—the organ of Corti—progenitor cells exit the cell cycle in a coordinated wave between E12.5 and E14.5 before the initiation of sensory receptor cell differentiation, making it a…

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Plastid biogenesis in malaria parasites requires the interactions and catalytic activity of the Clp proteolytic system [Microbiology]

The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, contains an essential plastid called the apicoplast. Most apicoplast proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome and it is unclear how the plastid proteome is regulated. Here, we study an apicoplast-localized caseinolytic-protease (Clp) system and how it regulates organelle proteostasis. Using null and conditional…

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Natural cryptic variation in epigenetic modulation of an embryonic gene regulatory network [Genetics]

Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that direct animal embryogenesis must respond to varying environmental and physiological conditions to ensure robust construction of organ systems. While GRNs are evolutionarily modified by natural genomic variation, the roles of epigenetic processes in shaping plasticity of GRN architecture are not well understood. The endoderm GRN…

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