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Coronavirus Rips Into Regions Previously Spared

As the West settles into a grinding battle with the disease, the virus surges across the Middle East, Africa, Latin America and South Asia.

29min

A 'Strawberry moon' eclipse is happening on Friday. Here's how to watch it from home

Two lunar events will occur on Friday: a full moon and a penumbral eclipse. A penumbral eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the Earth's outer shadow, causing the moon to appear slightly darker. The eclipse will only be visible to some countries, but the Virtual Telescope Project is providing a livestream. The first full moon of June — known as the Strawberry moon — will rise on Friday, Ju

21min

A Sweaty Update to the Mood Ring

Testers who wore these devices that track sweatiness found the data useful for monitoring emotions and managing stress. hand-ring-mood-ring-rainbow.jpg Image credits: Katie Ruiz Technology Wednesday, June 3, 2020 – 14:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Remember mood rings — the beachfront gift shop trinkets that change their shimmering colors depending on your body temperature? Resea

52min

LATEST

High blood pressure linked to increased risk of dying from COVID-19

Patients with raised blood pressure have a two-fold increased risk of dying from the coronavirus COVID-19 compared to patients without high blood pressure, according to new research published in the European Heart Journal. In addition, the study found that patients with high blood pressure who were not taking medication to control the condition were at even greater risk of dying from COVID-19.

4min

Coronavirus lockdown wildlife recordings appeal

Scientists want people to send them recordings of their wildlife experiences under the lockdown.

8min

Climate computing power 'needs more cash'

A top climate scientist has called for more investment in climate computing.

8min

Two Huge Covid-19 Studies Are Retracted After Scientists Sound Alarms

The reports, published in two leading journals, were retracted after authors could not verify an enormous database of medical records.

29min

Listen: How Limiting Protests Will Spread the Virus

Protests responding to the killing of George Floyd have now spread to every state in the country and even internationally. Public-health experts have warned that the protests will lead to a spike in coronavirus infections, but what role does the policing of the protests play in that dynamic? Staff writer James Hamblin and executive producer Katherine Wells discuss on the podcast Social Distance :

42min

Use loss of taste and smell as key screening tool for COVID-19, researchers urge

King's College London researchers have called for the immediate use of additional COVID-19 symptoms to detect new cases, reduce infections and save lives.

48min

Applying symptom tracking to COVID-19 outpatient care using famotidine

Researchers are developing methods to test COVID-19 treatments on non-hospitalized patients. The Northwell-CSHL team of clinicians/researchers used famotidine as a proof-of-concept that outpatient symptom tracking may accelerate prioritization of effective drug regimens to be pursued more rigorously in clinical trials.

48min

Widely available indigestion drug may curb COVID-19 symptoms in mild to moderate disease

A widely available and inexpensive drug that is used to ease the symptoms of indigestion may prove a worthy contender for treating COVID-19 infection in those whose disease doesn't require admission to hospital, suggest the findings of a small case series, published online in the journal Gut.

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Remdesivir: Ebola drug endorsed as a coronavirus treatment in Australia

Taskforce says doctors treating adults with moderate, severe or critical Covid-19 should consider using drug to aid recovery times The antiviral drug remdesivir has been recommended for the treatment of Covid-19 patients in Australia, by the national taskforce bringing together the country's peak health groups. The National Covid-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce said Australian doctors treating adu

1h

Author Correction: Quantifying the dynamics of failure across science, startups and security

Nature, Published online: 05 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2325-6

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Author Correction: A conserved dendritic-cell regulatory program limits antitumour immunity

Nature, Published online: 05 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2326-5

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'I would not recommend this.' A scientist's hydroxychloroquine trial—and his advice to Trump

A study found the drug doesn't prevent COVID-19 in people who were in close contact with a patient

1h

Two elite medical journals retract coronavirus papers over data integrity questions

Mysterious company Surgisphere declined to provide access to hospital data used to evaluate drugs in COVID-19 patients

1h

Google: Foreign Hackers Targeting Both Trump and Biden Campaigns

Long-Range Phishing Multiple groups of foreign hackers reportedly have their sights trained on the 2020 U.S. Presidential election, according to a Google cybersecurity researcher. Both major political parties' nominees have been targeted, The Verge reports . But different countries are targeting different candidates: state-backed hackers from China targeted Biden staffers, while hackers from Iran

1h

Precision spray coating could enable solar cells with better performance and stability

Although perovskites are a promising alternative to the silicon used to make most of today's solar cells, new manufacturing processes are needed to make them practical for commercial production. To help fill this gap, researchers have developed a new precision spray-coating method that enables more complex perovskite solar cell designs and could be scaled up for mass production.

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New research leads to lighter and greener bridges

A recently completed research project revealed the potential for reducing material used for a suspension bridge deck by more than 25 per cent — meaning a saving of up to 30 per cent of CO2 emissions.

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Astronomers Discover "Mirror Image" of Our Solar System

Mirror World Scientists have discovered a distant exoplanet that closely resembles the Earth, orbiting a star that resembles our Sun — almost, they say, as though they were looking in a mirror at our own solar system. Scientists can't yet tell whether the exoplanet, given the name KOI-456.01, could support life. But, according to a Max Planck Society press release , it looks like a strong candida

1h

Why the U.S. has had more vice presidents than presidents

Initially, the vice presidency was a consolation prize for the runner-up in the Electoral College. For a total of almost 38 years – about one-sixth of U.S. history – the office of vice president has been vacant. As this map shows, Richard Nixon remains the only vice president to date born west of the Rockies. Hail Columbia Here's a strange fact about America's top executives that you may not have

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Germany Is Requiring All Gas Stations Get Electric Car Chargers

Gas and Electric Germany will require all future gas stations to feature electric car charging ports, in a move to boost demand for electric cars, Reuters reports . The move is also in large part to help alleviate "range anxiety," one of the major reasons people chose a gas vehicle over an electric one. "Internationally this puts Germany in the leading group of battery electric vehicle support,"

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Racism is undeniably a public health issue

People of color are also significantly more likely to experience lower-quality healthcare, have less access to resources like education, and to experience prejudice in their professional and personal lives. (Unsplash/) Over the past couple weeks, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has faded into the background of national discourse as thousands across the country have taken to the streets to protest o

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Leukemia immune profiles predict drug resistance and benefits of immunotherapy

By analyzing 442 samples from three groups of children and adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), researchers have identified new immune classes of the disease that predict the likelihood of drug resistance and positive responses to immunotherapy.

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Women are not more likely to die of cirrhosis than men, despite fewer liver transplants

Prior studies suggested women might have higher mortality of cirrhosis of the liver than men. Women are also less likely to receive liver transplantation. But the research was unclear. A comprehensive new Northwestern Medicine study shows women are not more likely to die of liver cirrhosis than men, demonstrating that this liver disease affects men and women similarly.

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Lancet, NEJM Retract Surgisphere's Studies on COVID-19 Patients

All authors other than company founder and CEO Sapan Desai were "unable to complete an independent audit of the data," The Lancet states.

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Tear Gassing Protesters Could Increase Their Risk for COVID-19

The chemicals irritate the skin, eyes and throat. Research suggests that exposure may also raise someone's risk of contracting respiratory illnesses.

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Self-assembling, biomimetic composites possess unusual electrical properties

Sometimes, breaking rules is not a bad thing. Especially when the rules are apparent laws of nature that apply in bulk material, but other forces appear in the nanoscale.

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Low ratings of workplace safety climate by hospital nurses linked to higher risk of injury

Compared to other groups of healthcare practitioners, nurses may have the poorest perceptions of workplace safety climate and the highest rates of injuries and sick time, suggests a single-hospital study in the May/June issue of the Journal of Healthcare Management, an official publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio

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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

Serodiagnostics for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Related Coronavirus-2.

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New antibody technology for monitoring MS patients may have potential in COVID-19 testing

A new study by Queen Mary University of London has demonstrated the effectiveness of using a novel light technology to monitor anti-drug antibodies in the treatment of MS, which leads to drug resistance and treatment failure. The technology has also been applied to COVID-19 for potential use in antibody testing to determine whether someone has previously been infected with the virus.

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Identifying survivors at high risk of secondary cancers

St. Jude researchers look at the combined effect of cancer treatments and inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes.

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Argentine paleontologists discover small carnivorous dinosaur

Fossilized remains of a new species of dinosaur that lived 90 million years ago have been discovered in Patagonia, Argentine paleontologists announced on Thursday.

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Self-assembling, biomimetic composites possess unusual electrical properties

Sometimes, breaking rules is not a bad thing. Especially when the rules are apparent laws of nature that apply in bulk material, but other forces appear in the nanoscale.

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Sea Level 101: What Determines the Level of the Sea?

Lots of forces are at work on the world's ocean, and NASA studies them all. When it comes to sea level, NASA does much more than just measure it; they also seek to understand it. But for non-scientists, fathoming the forces that determine sea levels around the world can sometimes be a bit daunting, so here's a little guide to some of the basics. Let's dive in. Waves in the Bathtub Most of the tim

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Scientists made a single-cell-resolution map of brain genes in humans and other primates

A group of scientists led by Philipp Khaitovich, a professor at Skoltech, conducted a large-scale study of gene expression in 33 different brain regions of humans, chimpanzees, macaques and bonobos using the single-cell-resolution transcriptomics technologies and made a map of the different brain regions with their specific cell structures. Such maps are highly valuable for the human evolution res

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3D facial scans could speed diagnoses for children with rare genetic diseases

Now an international team led by scientists and clinicians from the University of Colorado, University of Calgary, and University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has developed a prototype tool based on three-dimensional (3D) facial imaging that could shorten that diagnostic odyssey by making it easier for clinicians to diagnose genetic syndromes.

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Crops sprayed with 'barcoded' spores could help trace food poisoning

Food poisoning outbreaks could be traced by spraying crops with microbial spores that have DNA 'barcodes', which have been shown to persist for months

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NASA ocean ecosystem mission preparing to make waves

NASA's Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem mission, or PACE, has successfully passed its design reviews and moved into its construction and testing phase, preparing to advance the fields of global ocean and atmospheric science when it launches in 2023.

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New image of a cancer-related enzyme in action helps explain gene regulation

New images of an enzyme in action as it interacts with the chromosome could provide important insight into how cells—including cancer cells—regulate their genes.

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Covid-19: Lancet retracts paper that halted hydroxychloroquine trials

Retraction made after Guardian investigation found inconsistencies in data How doubt snowballed over Covid-19 drug research Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Lancet paper that halted global trials of hydroxychloroquine for Covid-19 because of fears of increased deaths has been retracted after a Guardian investigation found inconsistencies in the data. The lead auth

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New image of a cancer-related enzyme in action helps explain gene regulation

New images of an enzyme in action as it interacts with the chromosome could provide important insight into how cells—including cancer cells—regulate their genes.

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Opioid addiction treatment is more widely available, but only for adults

Primary care providers have expanded access to buprenorphine for adults, but use of the opioid addiction treatment has decreased among the youngest patients, find researchers at Columbia University.

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Cannabis in Michigan: New report documents trends before recreational legalization

Nearly twelve years ago, Michigan voters approved the use of medical cannabis by residents with certain health conditions. A year and a half ago, they voted to approve its use by all adults, for any reason. What happened between those two dates is the focus of a comprehensive new report.

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NASA infrared imagery indicates Cristobal's heavy rainmaking capabilities

One of the ways NASA observes tropical cyclones is by using infrared data that provides temperature information and indicates storm strength. The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite gathered that data and revealed Cristobal has the potential to generate heavy rainfall. That rainfall is now soaking Mexico and portions of Central America as Cristobal meanders.

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SpaceX Launches 60 More Starlink Satellites

SpaceX launches 60 Starlink satellites with a single Falcon 9 rocket. SpaceX is fresh of its historic crewed launch that sent astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station (ISS), but it's not taking any time off to celebrate. The company has just launched yet another batch of Starlink internet satellites , and it did so with one of the "most reused" rockets in history.

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Lancet, NEJM retract controversial COVID-19 studies based on Surgisphere data

Two days after issuing expression of concerns about controversial papers on Covid-19, The Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine have retracted the articles because a number of the authors were not granted access to the underlying data. The Lancet paper, "Hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine with or without a macrolide for treatment of COVID-19: a … Continue reading

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European holiday destinations push for UK 'travel corridor'

Greece, Turkey and Spain among those keen to welcome Britons from next month

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'Like Trash in a Landfill': Carbon Dioxide Keeps Piling Up in the Atmosphere

Levels of planet-warming carbon dioxide reached another record in May, the month when they normally peak.

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SpaceX Sent NASA Astronauts Into Orbit Using Linux

Club Penguin This past weekend, Elon Musk-led private space company SpaceX made history by launching a pair of NASA astronauts into orbit, an accomplishment that could upset the balance of the international space industry. According to a terrific breakdown by ZDNet , the historic launch also contributed to a shift in power from proprietary software to open source — by running the Falcon 9 rocket

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Ancient DNA provides new insights into the early peopling of the Caribbean

According to a new study by an international team of researchers from the Caribbean, Europe and North America, the Caribbean was settled by several successive population dispersals that originated on the American mainland.

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Mangroves at risk if carbon emissions not reduced by 2050, international scientists predict

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), and an international research team have predicted that by 2050, mangroves will not be able to survive rising sea-levels if global carbon emissions are not reduced.

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New technique retains nipple color in men after breast reduction

Surgeons at UT Southwestern Medical Center have pioneered a new technique that prevents nipple discoloration and preserves shape in men who undergo breast reduction surgery following significant weight loss.

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Responding to COVID-19: New early-view articles in the Hastings Center report

Responding to COVID-19: Vaccine rationing and social justice; ethical challenges for nurses; and more. Early-view essays in the Hastings Center Report.

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Revisiting "Otherness" in light of current events

Editorial Note: NeuWrite San Diego stands in solidarity with those using their voices to protest racial inequality and systemic violence by individuals and institutions against the Black community in response to the murder of George Floyd. We believe that Black Lives Matter. In lieu of bringing our readers new neuroscience content at this time, we […]

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Do same-sex couples resolve conflicts in a healthier way?

A 12-year long study by the Gottman Institute examines the differences between how same-sex couples and different-sex couples resolve conflicts. Overall, the relationship satisfaction and quality were about the same across all couple types (gay, straight, lesbian). However, the study did find some differences in how same-sex and different-sex couples argue, including using humor to diffuse tense

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New image of a cancer-related enzyme in action helps explain gene regulation

New images of an enzyme in action as it interacts with the chromosome could provide important insight into how cells–including cancer cells — regulate their gene

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Uncuffing nitric oxide production: Beta-arrestin2 complexes regulate NO levels

In a new report, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina have uncovered one of the mechanisms regulating the production of nitric oxide (NO) in liver endothelial cells. A protein complex, centered around beta-arrestin2, modulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity and may provide a novel therapeutic target to restore NO production following liver injury.

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New study reveals areas of brain where recognition and identification occur

Using "sub-millimeter" brain implants, researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), have been able to determine which parts of the brain are linked to facial and scene recognition.

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Daily briefing: Some 'non-lethal' crowd-control weapons can cause serious harm

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01689-8 Some crowd-control weapons can cause serious injury, permanent disabilities or death. Plus: how the COVID-19 pandemic will change science, and a breakthrough technique for imaging molecules

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Online directory makes free science talks easier to find in coronavirus era

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01687-w Real-time listings help researchers keep track of ballooning numbers of accessible talks.

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Fake Ad For "Black Mirror Season 6" Is Just an Actual Mirror

Black Mirror IRL Madrid-based creative school Brother has created a fake advertisement for Netflix show "Black Mirror" — except that in a dark reflection of our tumultuous historical moment, it's just an actual mirror fixed to a bus canopy, suggesting that the real world has become as fraught as the dystopian show. The stunt quickly went viral, with hundreds of thousands sharing images of the ad.

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Meet the Organizers of #BlackBirdersWeek

Many of us had shared experiences of racism while being black outdoors, say Ashley Gary, Sheridan Alford, Chelsea Connor and Joseph Saunders

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Researchers study alternative training tools designed to improve Soldier performance

As the US Army revamps its small arms training and raises rifle qualification standards, researchers are studying alternative training and tools to help improve Soldier performance.

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A major study just found hydroxychloroquine doesn't prevent COVID-19

The anti-malarial pills may be a bust when it comes to COVID-19 (Julie Viken/Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . The final nail doesn't seem to be in the coffin yet for hydroxychloroquine , but more evidence now suggests that the anti-malarial dru

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Protests over killings of black people could erode racism, researcher says

Researcher says stereotypes will fall away as people come to see themselves as on the same side

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Udlandet ringer: Dansk teknologi vil overvåge om danskerne holder corona-afstanden

Nyt værktøj kan spotte, hvor folk stimler sammen – og forudse, hvor de kommer til at gøre det i fremtiden.

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The risks of lifting lockdowns prematurely are very large

The UK entered the lockdown too late and is now leaving too early

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BIOCAD presents results of clinical trial proving efficacy of netakimab at EULAR 2020

BIOCAD presents results of clinical trial proving efficacy of netakimab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2020). Four abstracts present the results from an international randomized double-blind phase 3 clinical trial (PATERA) which demonstrate netakimab decreases disease activity and reduces skin manifestation of psoriatic arthritis thro

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Silicon 'neurons' may add a new dimension to computer processors

Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering shows that energy constraints on a system, coupled with an intrinsic property of systems, push silicon neurons to create a dynamic, at-a-distance communication that is more robust and efficient than traditional computer processors. And it may teach us something about biological brains.

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NASA infrared imagery indicates cristobal's heavy rainmaking capabilities

One of the ways NASA observes tropical cyclones is by using infrared data that provides temperature information and indicates storm strength. The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite gathered that data and revealed Cristobal has the potential to generate heavy rainfall. That rainfall is now soaking Mexico and portions of Central America as Cristobal meanders.

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DNA-barcoded microbial spores can trace origin of objects, agricultural products

Harvard researchers have developed synthetic microbial spores that can be safely introduced onto objects and surfaces at a point of origin, such as a field or manufacturing plant, and be detected and identified months later. The approach can help determine the source of foodborne illnesses.

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Discovery unlocks 'hot' electrons for more efficient energy use

Researchers have demonstrated how a technique using a scanning tunneling microscope integrated with lasers and other optical components reveals the energy distribution of hot electrons.

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Novel switch protein that 'turns on' sperm for fertilization

Researchers from Osaka University and Baylor College of Medicine discovered a signaling cascade in which the testicular protein NELL2 travels through the lumen to induce differentiation of the epididymis, secretion of the protease OVCH2, and subsequent sperm maturation. These findings will help in diagnosis and pharmacological research into infertility and male contraceptives. The study illustrate

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Restoring vision by gene therapy

Latest scientific findings give hope for people with incurable retinal degeneration.

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Ancient genomic insights into the early peopling of the Caribbean

According to a new an international team of researchers from the Caribbean, Europe and North America, the Caribbean was settled by several successive population dispersals that originated on the American mainland.

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Revealed: How cancer develops resistance to treatment

Garvan researchers reveal the tactic that cancer cells use to adapt and evade treatment.

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Revealed from ancient sediment: Mangrove tolerance to rising sea levels

The growth and decline of mangrove forests during the final stages of Holocene deglaciation offers a glimpse into how the ecosystems will respond to the rapidly rising seas projected for the future, according to a new study.

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Using genetically engineered, barcoded microbes to track food contamination and more

Synthetic spores programmed with DNA barcodes provide a highly flexible, high-resolution system for tagging and tracking the provenance of an object.

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Analysis of ancient genomes suggests Caribbean settled by three colonization events

The islands of the Caribbean were settled and resettled by at least three successive waves of colonists from the American mainland, according to a new study, which presents new findings from an examination of ancient DNA from 93 early Caribbean islanders.

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Nontargeted mass spectrometry reveals PFAS substitutes in New Jersey soils

Using a nontargeted mass-spectral approach, researchers identified the presence of chloro-perfluoro-polyether-carboxylate compounds (ClPFPECAs) in soils across the state of New Jersey.

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Disrupted sleep increases the risk of cardiovascular disease by promoting inflammation

Sleep disruption has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis, but the mechanism has been unclear. A new study in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Raphael Vallat, Vyoma Shah, and Matthew Walker of the University of California at Berkeley and colleagues reveals that fragmented sleep exacerbates atherosclerosis and may raise the risk of stroke via an effect on inf

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Mangrove trees won't survive sea-level rise by 2050 if emissions aren't cut

Mangrove trees — valuable coastal ecosystems found in Florida and other warm climates – won't survive sea-level rise by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions aren't reduced, according to a Rutgers co-authored study in the journal Science. Using sediment data from the last 10,000 years, an international team led by Macquarie University in Australia estimated the chances of mangrove survival based on ra

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Plant detectives develop new way to trace global spread of major plant disease

A team led by Oregon State University scientists has developed a way to potentially thwart the spread of a disease-causing bacterium that harms more than hundred plant species worldwide, an advance that could save the nursery industry billions of dollars a year.

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Successful detailed tracking of major plant disease's global spread

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their Oregon State University collaborators have developed a new, highly detailed genetic way to trace the spread of Agrobacterium, one of the world's most important bacterial plant pathogens, according to research just published in Science.

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Probiotics with top-performing Lactobacillus strains may improve vaginal health

Vaginal Lactobacillus bacterial strains largely perform better than strains currently used in probiotics for vaginal health, according to a study published June 4 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Jo-Ann Passmore of the University of Cape Town, and colleagues. The findings suggest that a vaginal health probiotic that includes top-performing vaginal Lactobacillus strains may improve trea

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Patients who use doctors' online portals stay healthier

People who engage with health care providers through online patient portals spend less time in the hospital, cutting medical costs, according to a new study published in the June 2020 issue of MIS Quarterly.

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Why Trump Is So Obsessed With Antifa

This nation has been roiled with anguish and anger this past week over the police and extrajudicial killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery, and yet the White House is engaging in the same old rhetorical tactics of divisive scapegoating. Only now that rhetoric comes in the service of ominous ends: President Donald Trump relies on the shadowy specter of "antifa"—a label for a d

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The Facebook Groups Where People Pretend the Pandemic Isn't Happening

"Has anyone seen my friend Josh?" a man at a crowded concert asked last week. "I went to the bar for beers and now I can't find him." "Josh? Where are youuu," a woman chimed in. "I brought enough earplugs for everyone! I know it seems lame, but you'll hear the show a lot better and undistorted," another attendee offered shortly after. Losing track of a friend in a packed bar or screaming to be he

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10 Reasons to Ignore AI Safety

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Artificial Intelligence and Space Mining: the Gateway to Infinite Riches

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From the Library: Do androids dream of electric sheep?

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Bill Gates And Big Oil Are Chasing The Nuclear Fusion Dream

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The Future of Solar Is Double-Sided Panels that Follow the Sun

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Robots Eventually to Replace Cops

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Neuromorphic Computing: The Next-Level Artificial Intelligence

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AMC Theatres has 'substantial doubt' it can remain in business

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Gammelt dna giver ny indsigt i de tidlige befolkninger i Caribien

Caribien blev befolket flere gange af forskellige bølger af populationsspredninger, som kom fra…

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Ancient DNA reveals diverse origins of Caribbean's earliest inhabitants

Genetic links hint at early migration from North America

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Tory nerves fray as UK's virus death toll nears 40,000

Mood in Westminster has darkened amid growing criticism of PM's handling of pandemic

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Covid-19 news: People in the UK are sleeping less well under lockdown

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

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Covid-19: Social 'bubbles' unlikely to be allowed soon in the UK

Social "bubbles" that would allow small groups of family or friends to have close contact indoors during the covid-19 crisis look unlikely to begin any time soon in the UK, judging from new minutes of government meetings and modelling by researchers

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News at a glance

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The pandemic's first major research scandal erupts

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Double trouble

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Not just settling

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From bottom to top

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Enforced editing

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The structure of human CST reveals a decameric assembly bound to telomeric DNA

The CTC1-STN1-TEN1 (CST) complex is essential for telomere maintenance and resolution of stalled replication forks genome-wide. Here, we report the 3.0-angstrom cryo–electron microscopy structure of human CST bound to telomeric single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which assembles as a decameric supercomplex. The atomic model of the 134-kilodalton CTC1 subunit, built almost entirely de novo, reveals the o

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Photoelectron spectra of alkali metal-ammonia microjets: From blue electrolyte to bronze metal

Experimental studies of the electronic structure of excess electrons in liquids—archetypal quantum solutes—have been largely restricted to very dilute electron concentrations. We overcame this limitation by applying soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to characterize excess electrons originating from steadily increasing amounts of alkali metals dissolved in refrigerated liquid ammonia microjets

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Giant thermopower of ionic gelatin near room temperature

Harvesting heat from the environment into electricity has the potential to power Internet-of-things (IoT) sensors, freeing them from cables or batteries and thus making them especially useful for wearable devices. We demonstrate a giant positive thermopower of 17.0 millivolts per degree Kelvin in a flexible, quasi-solid-state, ionic thermoelectric material using synergistic thermodiffusion and th

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Iridium-catalyzed acid-assisted asymmetric hydrogenation of oximes to hydroxylamines

Asymmetric hydrogenations are among the most practical methods for the synthesis of chiral building blocks at industrial scale. The selective reduction of an oxime to the corresponding chiral hydroxylamine derivative remains a challenging variant because of undesired cleavage of the weak nitrogen-oxygen bond. We report a robust cyclometalated iridium(III) complex bearing a chiral cyclopentadienyl

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Nontargeted mass-spectral detection of chloroperfluoropolyether carboxylates in New Jersey soils

The toxicity and environmental persistence of anthropogenic per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are of global concern. To address legacy PFAS concerns in the United States, industry developed numerous replacement PFAS that commonly are treated as confidential information. To investigate the distribution of PFAS in New Jersey, soils collected from across the state were subjected to nontarg

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Restoring light sensitivity using tunable near-infrared sensors

Enabling near-infrared light sensitivity in a blind human retina may supplement or restore visual function in patients with regional retinal degeneration. We induced near-infrared light sensitivity using gold nanorods bound to temperature-sensitive engineered transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. We expressed mammalian or snake TRP channels in light-insensitive retinal cones in a mouse mod

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A fractional corner anomaly reveals higher-order topology

Spectral measurements of boundary-localized topological modes are commonly used to identify topological insulators. For high-order insulators, these modes appear at boundaries of higher codimension, such as the corners of a two-dimensional material. Unfortunately, this spectroscopic approach is only viable if the energies of the topological modes lie within the bulk bandgap, which is not required

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Thresholds of mangrove survival under rapid sea level rise

The response of mangroves to high rates of relative sea level rise (RSLR) is poorly understood. We explore the limits of mangrove vertical accretion to sustained periods of RSLR in the final stages of deglaciation. The timing of initiation and rate of mangrove vertical accretion were compared with independently modeled rates of RSLR for 78 locations. Mangrove forests expanded between 9800 and 750

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PIRs mediate innate myeloid cell memory to nonself MHC molecules

Immunological memory specific to previously encountered antigens is a cardinal feature of adaptive lymphoid cells. However, it is unknown whether innate myeloid cells retain memory of prior antigenic stimulation and respond to it more vigorously on subsequent encounters. In this work, we show that murine monocytes and macrophages acquire memory specific to major histocompatibility complex I (MHC-

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MTOR signaling orchestrates stress-induced mutagenesis, facilitating adaptive evolution in cancer

In microorganisms, evolutionarily conserved mechanisms facilitate adaptation to harsh conditions through stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM). Analogous processes may underpin progression and therapeutic failure in human cancer. We describe SIM in multiple in vitro and in vivo models of human cancers under nongenotoxic drug selection, paradoxically enhancing adaptation at a competing intrinsic fitnes

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NELL2-mediated lumicrine signaling through OVCH2 is required for male fertility

The lumicrine system is a postulated signaling system in which testis-derived (upstream) secreted factors enter the male reproductive tract to regulate epididymal (downstream) pathways required for sperm maturation. Until now, no lumicrine factors have been identified. We demonstrate that a testicular germ-cell–secreted epidermal growth factor–like protein, neural epidermal growth factor–like–lik

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Barcoded microbial system for high-resolution object provenance

Determining where an object has been is a fundamental challenge for human health, commerce, and food safety. Location-specific microbes in principle offer a cheap and sensitive way to determine object provenance. We created a synthetic, scalable microbial spore system that identifies object provenance in under 1 hour at meter-scale resolution and near single-spore sensitivity and can be safely in

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Seafloor microplastic hotspots controlled by deep-sea circulation

Although microplastics are known to pervade the global seafloor, the processes that control their dispersal and concentration in the deep sea remain largely unknown. Here, we show that thermohaline-driven currents, which build extensive seafloor sediment accumulations, can control the distribution of microplastics and create hotspots with the highest concentrations reported for any seafloor setti

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New Products

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Comment on "RNA-guided DNA insertion with CRISPR-associated transposases"

Strecker et al . (Research Articles, 5 July 2019, p. 48) described a system for exploiting a Tn7-type transposon-encoded CRISPR-Cas system to make RNA-guided, programmable insertions. Although this system has great promise, we note that the well-established biochemistry of Tn7 suggests that the particular system used may insert not only the transposon but also the entire donor plasmid.

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Response to Comment on "RNA-guided DNA insertion with CRISPR-associated transposases"

Rice et al . suggest that the CRISPR-associated transposase ShCAST system could lead to additional insertion products beyond simple integration of the donor. We clarify the outcomes of ShCAST-mediated insertions in Escherichia coli , which consist of both simple insertions and integration of the donor plasmid. This latter outcome can be avoided by use of a 5' nicked DNA donor.

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Unexpected conservation and global transmission of agrobacterial virulence plasmids

The accelerated evolution and spread of pathogens are threats to host species. Agrobacteria require an oncogenic Ti or Ri plasmid to transfer genes into plants and cause disease. We developed a strategy to characterize virulence plasmids and applied it to analyze hundreds of strains collected between 1927 and 2017, on six continents and from more than 50 host species. In consideration of prior ev

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Theres plenty of room at the Top: What will drive computer performance after Moores law?

The miniaturization of semiconductor transistors has driven the growth in computer performance for more than 50 years. As miniaturization approaches its limits, bringing an end to Moore's law, performance gains will need to come from software, algorithms, and hardware. We refer to these technologies as the "Top" of the computing stack to distinguish them from the traditional technologies at the "

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The History and Future of Telescopes on the Moon

For generations, astronomers have dreamed of building telescopes on the lunar farside.

5h

The Big Story: Protest and Policing in America

Ibram X. Kendi, the director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University and a contributing writer at The Atlantic , joins senior editor Yoni Appelbaum for a live conversation about the choice he says Americans face: racism or anti-racism.

5h

Plant detectives develop new way to trace global spread of major plant disease

A team led by Oregon State University scientists has developed a way to potentially thwart the spread of a disease-causing bacterium that harms more than hundred plant species worldwide, an advance that could save the nursery industry billions of dollars a year.

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Mangrove trees won't survive sea-level rise by 2050 if emissions aren't cut

Mangrove trees—valuable coastal ecosystems found in Florida and other warm climates—won't survive sea-level rise by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions aren't reduced, according to a Rutgers co-authored study in the journal Science.

5h

Discovery unlocks 'hot' electrons for more efficient energy use

Highly energetic, "hot" electrons have the potential to help solar panels more efficiently harvest light energy.

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DNA-barcoded microbial spores can trace origin of objects, agricultural products

Every year, an estimated 48 million Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses, resulting in some 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This public health problem is compounded by billions in economic damage from product recalls, highlighting the need to rapidly and accurately determine the sources of foodborne illnesses.

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Ancient genomic insights into the early population of the Caribbean

The Caribbean was one of the last regions of the Americas to be settled by humans. Now, a new study published in the journal Science sheds light on how the islands were settled thousands of years ago.

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Novel switch protein that 'turns on' sperm for fertilization

For a sperm to fertilize an egg, the sperm must first mature in a man's epididymis. Now, an international team of researchers has identified a chain of events in which a protein secreted by the testis travels in the luminal fluid, binds to a receptor on the epididymis to induce its differentiation and secretion of a second protein that matures the sperm and enables each sperm to be motile in femal

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Minneapolis Launched a Groundbreaking Climate Plan, But Left Minorities Out

Experts and affected communities say environmental justice must be a key component of efforts to address climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Advances in nanoparticles as anticancer drug delivery vector: Need of this century

This review article provides a summary of current advances in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) as anticancer drug-delivery vectors.

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Plant detectives develop new way to trace global spread of major plant disease

A team led by Oregon State University scientists has developed a way to potentially thwart the spread of a disease-causing bacterium that harms more than hundred plant species worldwide, an advance that could save the nursery industry billions of dollars a year.

5h

DNA-barcoded microbial spores can trace origin of objects, agricultural products

Every year, an estimated 48 million Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses, resulting in some 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This public health problem is compounded by billions in economic damage from product recalls, highlighting the need to rapidly and accurately determine the sources of foodborne illnesses.

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Novel switch protein that 'turns on' sperm for fertilization

For a sperm to fertilize an egg, the sperm must first mature in a man's epididymis. Now, an international team of researchers has identified a chain of events in which a protein secreted by the testis travels in the luminal fluid, binds to a receptor on the epididymis to induce its differentiation and secretion of a second protein that matures the sperm and enables each sperm to be motile in femal

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Do face coverings reduce risk and spread of coronavirus?

As UK announces compulsory face coverings on public transport, what is scientific evidence behind measure? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Related: Face coverings to be made compulsory on public transport in England Continue reading…

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A Civil Rights Expert Explains the Social Science of Police Racism

Columbia University attorney Alexis J. Hoag discusses the history of how we got to this point and the ways that researchers can help reduce bias against black Americans throughout the legal system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Trump Has Imprisoned Himself in the White House

President Donald Trump is trapped inside the White House, as a tall and imposing wall is erected around him, and prison guards stand watch . The fencing is intended to keep other people out, of course, and to provide security for the White House. But walls don't just keep people out—they keep people in too, a reality dramatized by the fact that some of those standing watch are officers of the Fed

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Face masks to be made compulsory on public transport in England

Passengers will have to wear coverings from June 15 as government approach hardens

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The best gaming headphones for an immersive experience

Great audio and clear communication for your online contests. (Alex Haney via Unsplash/) As much as virtual reality is now the standard for immersive gaming, you'd be surprised what a really great pair of headphones can do not only for putting you in the game but for keeping you connected to your teammates and opponents. There are plenty of brands and options to consider. Do you want something wi

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Watch Harvard's Penny-Sized Robot Scuttle Around Like a Cockroach

Run, HAMR-Jr, Run! Researchers at Harvard have created a tiny cockroach-inspired robot that's only about the size of a penny and weighs just 0.3 grams. It can run, jump, carry heavy payloads relative to its size — and scuttle really, really fast. In fact, the robot "can run about 14 body lengths per second, making it not only one of the smallest but also one of the fastest microrobots," according

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A Civil Rights Expert Explains the Social Science of Police Racism

Columbia University attorney Alexis J. Hoag discusses the history of how we got to this point and the ways that researchers can help reduce bias against black Americans throughout the legal system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Civil Rights Expert Explains the Social Science of Police Racism

Columbia University attorney Alexis J. Hoag discusses the history of how we got to this point and the ways that researchers can help reduce bias against black Americans throughout the legal system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Curfews Halt Transit Services—and Leave Riders Stranded

The suspension of services like Lyft, Uber, and Citi Bike has left protesters and essential workers scrambling for a way to get home.

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New discovery may lead to effective and natural treatment for Parkinson's disease

McLean Hospital researchers have identified two molecules naturally produced by the body that stimulate the production of dopamine, the molecule that is in short supply in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease.

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IU researchers grow hairy skin from human stem cells

Building on years of groundbreaking discoveries in stem cell research, scientists from Indiana University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School have determined how to grow hairy skin using human stem cells–developing one of the most complex skin models in the world.

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Hackers targeting UK research labs amid vaccine race – GCHQ chief

China among hostile states believed to be trying to steal secrets during pandemic Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Britain's intelligence agencies are working urgently to prevent hackers from hostile states, including China, trying to steal the secrets of a potential coronavirus vaccine, the head of GCHQ has said. Giving a rare interview to the Cheltenham science fest

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Religiøse tåger: 2.700 år gamle hashspor fundet på alter i Israel

Tyder på at forfædrene til kristendommen brugte hash i deres ritualer.

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Scientists Tap the World's Most Powerful Computers in the Race to Understand and Stop the Coronavirus

In The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, the haughty supercomputer Deep Thought is asked whether it can find the answer to the ultimate question concerning life, the universe, and everything. It replies that, yes, it can do it, but it's tricky and it'll have to think about it. When asked how long it will take it replies, "Seven-and-a-half million years. I told you I'd have to thi

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Cyprus study shows big pollutant drop during lockdown

Researchers in Cyprus offered more evidence on Thursday that a two-month lockdown benefited the Mediterranean island nation's environment.

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Experts: Spotlight on art is one upside of lockdowns

One benefit of this extended stay-at-home period during the COVID-19 pandemic is a spotlight on the importance of arts in everyday life, experts argue. Art of all types has proven to be a key outlet for millions of Americans looking for entertainment and fulfillment while isolating, working, and educating at home. Several weeks of social distancing and lockdown have left many scrambling for ways

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New Zealanders' attitudes changed after pandemic lockdown

In the first few weeks of the lockdown of New Zealand in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, residents reported a slight increase in mental distress but higher levels of confidence in the government, science and the police, as well as greater patriotism, according to new research.

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Coronavirus linked to stroke in otherwise healthy young people

Preliminary observations suggest a high incidence of COVID-19 in stroke patients, including younger patients who were otherwise healthy.

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Largest, oldest Maya monument suggests importance of communal work

A new discovery suggests that the Maya civilization developed more rapidly than archaeologists once thought and hints at less social inequality than later periods.

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Merkel leads a bolder eurozone crisis response

ECB shows its resolve after Berlin's well-designed stimulus plan

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CO2 levels in atmosphere hit new highs despite lockdowns

Accumulation of warming gas reaches record level despite brief environmental respite

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Butterfly-inspired nanotech makes natural-looking pictures on digital screens

Taking inspiration from nature's nanotech that creates the stunning color of butterfly wings, a University of Central Florida researcher is creating technology to make extremely low-power, ultra-high-definition displays and screens that are easier on the eyes.

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New clues on how lipid emulsions prevent liver disease in preterm babies

New evidence links the microbiome and gut bile acids to lipid emulsion prevention of liver disease in preterm babies.

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UCF's butterfly-inspired nanotech makes natural-looking pictures on digital screens

The new technology creates digital displays that are lit by surrounding light and are more natural looking than current display technologies that rely on energy-intensive bright lights hidden behind screens. The findings were published Wednesday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Some types of prostate cancer may not be as aggressive as originally thought

UCLA researchers analyzed gene-expression patterns in the most aggressive prostate cancer grade group and found that this grade of cancer can actually be subdivided into four subtypes with distinct differences. The findings may affect how people are treated for the disease.

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HPV vaccines that work in US women may miss the target in women from other countries

Most cervical cancers are caused by persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV). Different vaccines are available to protect against HPV. Researchers at Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have shown a very different prevalence of hrHPV in Honduras compared to the United States, and concluded that the same vaccination programs that target hrHPV st

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Careers advice for class of 2020

The graduate jobs market has been turned upside down by the coronavirus pandemic. Navigating the months ahead to ensure your long-term career prospers could be tricky, if not daunting. Here are some expert tips on how to make a positive start.

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New material, modeling methods promise advances in energy storage

The explosion of mobile electronic devices, electric vehicles, drones and other technologies have driven demand for new lightweight materials that can provide the power to operate them. Researchers from the University of Houston and Texas A&M University have reported a structural supercapacitor electrode made from reduced graphene oxide and aramid nanofiber that is stronger and more versatile than

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'Artificial chemist' combines AI, robotics to conduct autonomous R&D

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University at Buffalo have developed a technology called "Artificial Chemist," which incorporates artificial intelligence (AI) and an automated system for performing chemical reactions to accelerate R&D and manufacturing of commercially desirable materials.

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Messaging App Releases Face-Blurring Tool to Keep Protesters Safe

Blurring Faces Encrypted messaging app Signal has announced a new tool that allows users to blur faces in pictures uploaded to the app from Android and iOS. The announcement comes in support of the Black Lives Matter protests that have been occurring around the globe. "At Signal, we support the people who have gone into the streets to make their voices heard," Signal co-founder Moxie Marlinspike

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Egg-based coating preserves fresh produce

Eggs that would otherwise be wasted can be used as the base of an inexpensive coating to protect fruits and vegetables.

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DNA crossovers can drive healthy, abnormal sperm, egg cell division

Human genetic diversity wouldn't be possible without DNA crossovers in egg and sperm cells. Two studies provide new insights into how crossovers go right — and wrong, leading to infertility, miscarriages and birth defects.

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Vital buffers against climate change are just offshore

A new study finds that about 31 million people worldwide live in coastal regions that are 'highly vulnerable' to future tropical storms and sea-level rise driven by climate change. But in some of those regions, powerful defenses are located just offshore, in the forms of mangroves and coral reefs, key buffers that could help cushion the blow against future tropical storms and rising waters.

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Showtime for photosynthesis

Using a unique combination of nanoscale imaging and chemical analysis, researchers have revealed a key step in the molecular mechanism behind the water splitting reaction of photosynthesis, a finding that could help inform the design of renewable energy technology.

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A potential new weapon in the war against superbugs

Researchers have shown that a newly discovered natural antibiotic, teixobactin, could be effective in treating bacterial lung conditions such as tuberculosis and those commonly associated with COVID-19.

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Australia's ancient geology controls the pathways of modern earthquakes

New research near Uluru in Australia's arid center shows that rock structures formed deep within the ancient Gondwana supercontinent controlled the rupture pathways of one of Australia's largest modern earthquakes.

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Breaking the mold: An unusual choice of material yields incredibly long-lasting batteries

Scientists have developed a novel silica-based cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries, thereby enabling the realization of batteries that can last for over 2000 charge/discharge cycles. The possibility of successfully using the unconventional silica could spark a paradigm shift in rechargeable battery designs.

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Respiratory virus builds 'doorbell' to trick its way into cells

New research from microbiologists has shed light on how the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) — one of the most common viral infections — breaks into our cells to cause infection. Researchers discovered that RSV tricks cells into letting it in by essentially ringing a doorbell that calls its receptor to the virus waiting at the door.

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Innocent and highly oxidizing

Chemists produce new oxidants as a tool for preparative chemistry.

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Atomic blueprint of 'molecular machine' reveals role in membrane protein installation

Scientists have revealed the first known atomic structure of a 'molecular machine' responsible for installing critical signaling proteins into cellular membranes. The findings shed new light on how this process works, and lay the foundation for potential future therapies for diseases like cancer, Alzheimer's and cystic fibrosis.

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Near-atomic 'blueprint' reveals inner workings of drug target for cancer, other diseases

Scientists have for the first time described the near-atomic level structure of a molecular pathway that plays critical roles in human development, blood pressure regulation, inflammation and cell death.

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'Artificial chemist' combines AI, robotics to conduct autonomous R&D

Researchers have developed a technology called 'Artificial Chemist,' which incorporates artificial intelligence and an automated system for performing chemical reactions to accelerate R&D and manufacturing of commercially desirable materials.

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New material, modeling methods promise advances in energy storage

The explosion of mobile electronic devices, electric vehicles, drones and other technologies have driven demand for new lightweight materials that can provide the power to operate them. New research led by a UH engineer suggests advances in energy storage.

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Universal preoperative COVID-19 screening improves pediatric patient safety

Universally screening pediatric patients for COVID-19 before they undergo surgical procedures has allowed hospitals to improve safety by identifying all patients who test positive for the virus, half of whom have no symptoms, according to new research led by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The study, which analyzed universal screening procedures at CHOP and two other major children's h

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Beating COVID-19 through genomic research

Next-generation sequencing of the COVID-19 virus is providing powerful metagenomic data, which, combined with clinical data, will inform the search for effective treatments.

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Electric current helps dampen tics in people with Tourette's syndrome

Applying an electric current to the wrist can lessen the frequency of tics associated with Tourette's syndrome, because it stimulates brainwaves that keep us motionless

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Egg-based coating preserves fresh produce

Eggs that would otherwise be wasted can be used as the base of an inexpensive coating to protect fruits and vegetables.

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Showtime for photosynthesis

Using a unique combination of nanoscale imaging and chemical analysis, researchers have revealed a key step in the molecular mechanism behind the water splitting reaction of photosynthesis, a finding that could help inform the design of renewable energy technology.

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Breaking the mold: An unusual choice of material yields incredibly long-lasting batteries

Scientists have developed a novel silica-based cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries, thereby enabling the realization of batteries that can last for over 2000 charge/discharge cycles. The possibility of successfully using the unconventional silica could spark a paradigm shift in rechargeable battery designs.

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New role assigned to a human protein in transcription and genome stability

Transcription of genetic information is a fundamental process for life. If it does not work correctly, the consequences for the organism range from lethality to defects during development, genetic diseases, insufficient response to infections and stresses or propensity to develop cancer, given its pleiotropic effect. For this reason, it is important to know in depth the process by which this 'DNA

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Solar Panel-Like Device Generates Power From Darkness

Dark Energy A strange new device — think of it as a Bizarro World version of solar panels — is capable of generating electricity from darkness. The gadget, dubbed a "shadow-effect energy generator," is a solar cell-like material that generates an electrical current when part of it is in the light and the other part isn't, Science News reports . While the electric current from the proof-of-concept

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WHO says it did not see Surgisphere data that halted virus drug trial

Authors retract Lancet and NEJM studies after company declines to transfer data sets

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Environmental damage from fog reduction is observable from outer space, find hydrologists

A new study led by ecohydrologists at IUPUI has shown for the first time that it's possible to use satellite data to measure the threat of climate change to ecological systems that depend on water from fog.

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New role assigned to a human protein in transcription and genome stability

Transcription of genetic information is a fundamental process for life. If it does not work correctly, the consequences for the organism range from lethality to defects during development, genetic diseases, insufficient response to infections and stresses or propensity to develop cancer, given its pleiotropic effect. For this reason, it is important to know in depth the process by which this 'DNA

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NASA finds Nisarga's remnants over Central India

Tropical Cyclone Nisarga made landfall in west central India on June 4, and the next day NASA's Terra satellite provided a look at the remnants of the storm.

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GSA publishes articles on COVID-19 and aging; plus infographics on agesim and immunity

The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are now publishing scientific articles on COVID-19, and all are free to access. The Society has also released two new infographics on ageism and immunity.

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Deep Biases Prevent Diverse Talent from Advancing

A new study indicates that underrepresented students in science-related fields are innovating at high rates—but not reaping commensurate rewards.

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People try to do right by each other, no matter the motivation, study finds

Sociologists found that people overwhelmingly chose to be generous to others — even to strangers, and even when it seems one motivation to help might crowd out another.

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Uber Says Rides During "Party Hours" Are Keeping it Afloat

Happy Hour Uber expected that its sharp drop in business due to the pandemic would be corrected as people started going back to work — but instead, people are calling rides to go socialize. On a conference call with Bank of American analysts, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi laid out the main factors that have led to a moderate bounce-back in Uber's business, according to Business Insider . And while t

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COVID-19 Can Last for Several Months

F or Vonny LeClerc , day one was March 16. Hours after British Prime Minister Boris Johnson instated stringent social-distancing measures to halt the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, LeClerc, a Glasgow-based journalist, arrived home feeling shivery and flushed. Over the next few days, she developed a cough, chest pain, aching joints, and a prickling sensation on her skin. After a week of bed rest, she sta

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I Can't Breathe: Braving Tear Gas in a Pandemic

The first time I was teargassed, in Istanbul, Turkey, I thought I was going to die. Overwhelming pain flooded my eyes, nose, throat, and lungs. I couldn't breathe. The most recent time I was teargassed, in November in Hong Kong, I paused to assess the situation, and nonchalantly reached for my mask in my backpack. I had ducked into a building in the middle of Hong Kong's swirling protests and had

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Expert tips for avoiding the 'time famine' trap

In a world that's always online, it's easy to feel like we have insufficient time for ourselves, or to spend with our families and loved ones. Working out what you need to get done each day, and how long it will take, will allow you to create priorities on which you can focus your available time. If you find the traditional methods of mindfulness meditation too difficult, then meditative practice

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Almost everything you know about cheese is wrong

A cheese shop will give you tons of options you may not find in the grocery store. (Stan Horaczek /) A bag of pre-shredded cheese from the supermarket can really come in handy if you're in a hurry and looking for a quick fix of salt and fat. Unfortunately, many pre-shredded cheeses also come with a dose of cellulose, which is essentially wood pulp. It sounds scarier than it is: cellulose is a com

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Fluorescence bioimaging: Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of living subjects

Scientists can monitor biomolecular processes in live tissue by noninvasive optical methods, such as fluorescence imaging. However, the fluorescent dyes used for that purpose are often rather unstable, and photobleaching, lack of specificity, and poor pharmacokinetics are recurrent issues. Scientists have now developed a molecular shield that stabilizes near-infrared fluorescent dyes and enhances

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Wearable sensor may help to assess stress in healthcare workers

A wearable biosensor may help monitor stress experienced by healthcare professionals, according to a new study.

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Games Don't Do Enough to Combat Toxicity at Launch

Riot Games has cutting-edge moderation tools at its disposal. Few of them are present in Valorant, which launched this week.

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With faster cell modeling towards the vaccine and cure for COVID-19

Researchers from the Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering 'Giulio Natta' of the Politecnico di Milano and the Pediatric Research Center, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences 'L. Sacco ', University of Milan have recently published an article in the scientific journal Theranostics, which will help the international scientific community to understand the mechanisms o

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Environmental damage from fog reduction is observable from outer space, find hydrologists

A study led by ecohydrologists at IUPUI is the first to show it's possible to use satellite data to understand how fog reduction from climate change is harming vegetation in ecologically rare regions.

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Atherosclerosis — How a microRNA protects vascular integrity

Ludwig-Maximilian-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have discovered a hitherto unknown molecular function of a specific microRNA that preserves integrity of the endothelium and reduces the risk of atherosclerosis.

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Deadly bacterial infection in pigs deciphered

New-born piglets often die painfully from infection with an intestinal bacterium. A team of researchers from 3 faculties at the University of Bern has now discovered how the bacterium causes fatal intestinal bleeding. They have thus made a breakthrough in veterinary research. Promising prospects for vaccinations and medications for use in humans too have now opened up.

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Fluorescence bioimaging: Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of living subjects

Scientists can monitor biomolecular processes in live tissue by noninvasive optical methods, such as fluorescence imaging. However, the fluorescent dyes used for that purpose are often rather unstable, and photobleaching, lack of specificity, and poor pharmacokinetics are recurrent issues. Scientists have now developed a molecular shield that stabilizes near-infrared fluorescent dyes and enhances

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Against the Insurrection Act

Senator Tom Cotton argued Wednesday in The New York Times that given the rioting and looting in multiple U.S. cities, "it's past time to support local law enforcement with federal authority." Some governors have mobilized the National Guard, the Arkansas Republican observed, yet others refuse to or are still overwhelmed. "In these circumstances," he wrote, "the Insurrection Act authorizes the pre

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The galaxy's brightest explosions go nuclear with an unexpected trigger: pairs of dead stars

White dwarf binaries could drive type Ia supernovae, critical as cosmic yardsticks

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Största mayatemplet hittades under grönskan

Dolt under en matta av grönska har arkeologer hittat grunden till ett enormt mayatempel i Mexiko, Aguada Fénix. Det är största och äldsta mayatemplet som någonsin upptäckts.

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Osteoporosis treatment may also protect against pneumonia

A recent study found that nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs) such as alendronate, which are widely used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis, are linked with lower risks of pneumonia and of dying from pneumonia.

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What are the risks and benefits of low-dose aspirin?

Low-dose aspirin significantly lowers cardiovascular disease risk but increases the risk of bleeding, according to a new review.

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Certain personality traits may affect risk of 'pre-dementia'

A study examined five personality traits — neuroticism, extraversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, and openness — and their links to pre-dementia conditions called motoric cognitive risk (MCR) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) syndromes.

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Strong Chinese demand puts copper in a bull market

Consumption of metal after easing of lockdowns boosts price by 20% from March lows

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Growth factors and Parkinson's disease — Where next?

Growth factors such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) were initially thought to be exciting new treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD), but trials have been disappointing. A panel of prominent leaders in the field convened to discuss whether there is a future for this approach and what any future PD trial involving GDNF and other GDNF family neurotrophic factors should conside

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Egg-based coating preserves fresh produce

Eggs that would otherwise be wasted can be used as the base of an inexpensive coating to protect fruits and vegetables.

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Study links malaria risk in deforestation hotspots to demand for agricultural commodities

The international trade in timber, tobacco, cocoa, coffee and cotton accounts for a high proportion of malaria risk in exporter countries, according to a collaborative study by scientists in Brazil and Australia published in Nature Communications.

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Two vital buffers against climate change are just offshore

A new study finds that about 31 million people worldwide live in coastal regions that are 'highly vulnerable' to future tropical storms and sea-level rise driven by climate change. But in some of those regions, powerful defenses are located just offshore, in the forms of mangroves and coral reefs, key buffers that could help cushion the blow against future tropical storms and rising waters, accord

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NASA finds Nisarga's remnants over Central India

Tropical Cyclone Nisarga made landfall in west central India on June 4, and the next day NASA's Terra satellite provided a look at the remnants of the storm.

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Why we should trust registered clinical trials

In a time when we have to rely on clinical trials for COVID-19 drugs and vaccines, a new study brings good news about the credibility of registered clinical trials. In the past, concerns have been raised about selective reporting or even manipulation, with suspicious concentration of clinical trials immediately above the statistical significance threshold. Observing all the trials registered in Cl

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Largest study to date of electronic dental records reviews understudied populations

The largest study to date of electronic dental records (EDRs) delves into both previously inaccessible data and data from understudied populations with the ultimate goal of improving oral treatment outcomes. Researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University evaluated EDRs of 217,887 patients containing more than 11 million observations, with observation periods as long as 37 years.

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Adult-Born Neurons Strengthen Memories While Mice Sleep

The activation of young brain cells in adult mice is necessary not just for forming memories, but consolidating them during rapid eye movement sleep, a study shows.

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As the Pandemic Hits Campus Finances, Faculty Face Layoffs

Many colleges and universities across the US have lost millions of dollars in revenue due to COVID-19.

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CO2 levels hit record high despite emissions dip from coronavirus

Global lockdown has done little to slow the rise in atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, meaning that the coronavirus pandemic will have no impact on climate change

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Psykisk hälsa går djupare än huden vid psoriasis

Personer med hudsjukdomen psoriasis har ofta även andra fysiska sjukdomar som i ännu högre grad än hudsjukdomen bidrar till ökad risk att drabbas av psykisk ohälsa som depression, ångest och i värsta fall självmord. Det visar en ny studie vid Umeå universitet. – Nu kan vi för första gången visa hur de olika sjukdomarna samverkar och bidrar till psykisk ohälsa hos de drabbade. Det visar att vården

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UK's furlough scheme to cost less than expected, says watchdog

Focus on part-time and low-paid workers set to limit government outlay, according to OBR

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The Protesters Deserve the Truth About the Coronavirus

For weeks before the egregious police killing of George Floyd sparked protests, public-health experts and much of the press were singularly focused on COVID-19. News coverage of the pandemic frequently cast protests against stay-at-home orders and the closures of businesses and churches as risky, if not irresponsible. "Public-health officials say the coronavirus can easily be spread by people pac

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New studies show how DNA crossovers can drive healthy, abnormal sperm, egg cell division

Human genetic diversity wouldn't be possible without DNA crossovers in egg and sperm cells. Two studies from Harvard Medical School provide new insights into how crossovers go right–and wrong, leading to infertility, miscarriages and birth defects.

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Childhood trauma affects the timing of motherhood

Women who have experienced childhood trauma become mothers earlier than those with a more stable childhood environment shows a new study conducted in collaboration between the University of Turku and the University of Helsinki in Finland. The trauma children experience form living in war zones, natural disasters or perhaps even epidemics can have unexpected effects that resurface later in their li

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redHUMAN: Deciphering links between genes and metabolism

Scientists at EPFL have developed a new method that simplifies the processing of genetic-metabolic data by picking up changes in metabolism, a hallmark of numerous diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's. The new method, named redHUMAN, is robust and features guaranteed predictability.

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Mortality of mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients is lower than previously reported reveals study in Critical Care Medicine

An online first study published in Critical Care Medicine indicates the actual mortality rate of adults with critical illness from COVID-19 is less than what was previously reported.

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Molecular landscape of the hematopoietic stem cell cradle

Researchers from the group of Catherine Robin at the Hubrecht Institute characterized the molecular landscape of the aorta where all hematopoietic stem cells are initially formed in zebrafish, chicken, mouse and human embryos. Understanding the regulatory function of the local HSC microenvironment will pave the way for improved HSC production in vitro and clinical cell therapy for blood related di

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Study shows some infants can identify differences in musical tones at six months

New research from neuroscientists at York University suggests the capacity to hear the highs and lows, also known as the major and minor notes in music, may come before you take a single lesson; you may actually be born with it. The study examined the capacity of six-month-old infants to discriminate between a major and a minor musical tone sequence with a unique method that uses eye movements and

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Showtime for photosynthesis

Using a unique combination of nanoscale imaging and chemical analysis, an international team of researchers has revealed a key step in the molecular mechanism behind the water splitting reaction of photosynthesis, a finding that could help inform the design of renewable energy technology.

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COVID-19 in pediatric surgical patients at 3 US children's hospitals

This study assessed how many pediatric patients presenting for surgery at three tertiary care children's hospitals across the US had COVID-19.

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Peatland drainage in Southeast Asia adds to climate change

Study reveals drainage, deforestation of the region's peatlands, which leads to fires, greenhouse emissions, land subsidence.

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Mothers ensure their offspring's success through epigenetics

Parents pass genes along to their offspring which equip them for their future life. In recent years, research has shown that the reality is much more complex and that parents endow much more than just genes. A new study in Cell by the laboratory of Asifa Akhtar at the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics reveals that active epigenetic modifications are also passed from one generat

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Sleep, death and … the gut?

A new study finds a causal link between sleep deprivation and death. In sleep-deprived fruit flies, death is preceded by the accumulation of molecules known as reactive oxidative species in the gut. When fruit flies were given antioxidant compounds that neutralize ROS, sleep-deprived flies remained active and had normal lifespans. The findings may one day inform new approaches to counteract the ha

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High-protein diets help insects to fight against blood parasites

Scientists studying insects have identified a crucial biological mechanism responsible for increasing their survival against blood parasites. The finding, in which a high protein diet is linked to increased survival, could be a key stepping-stone to discovering how diet could help us fight parasitic blood infections.

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Stimulating research gives new treatment hope for Tourette Syndrome

New research has found that delivering electrical pulses to the wrist can significantly reduce the amount and severity of tics experienced by individuals with Tourette Syndrome (TS), giving new hope for an effective treatment.

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Eat less and live a long healthy life? Study shows 'not in all cases'

The assumption that dietary restriction (and drugs that mimic its effects) will extend both lifespan and healthspan jointly has come under question, based on research involving 160 genetically distinct strains of fruit fly. Noting that results may foreshadow what will happen in humans eating a Spartan diet, researchers report that thirteen percent of the strains were more vigorous, yet died sooner

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Adult neurogenesis essential for sleep-induced memory consolidation in mice

Adult neurogenesis, in which new neurons are generated within the hippocampus in the fully developed adult brain, occurs in mice — but how new neurons are functionally integrated into existing brain circuitry has remained largely unknown. A study publishing June 4 in the journal Neuron shows an important new role for neurons generated during adulthood in consolidating memories during sleep in mic

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Discovery of a novel gene involved in DNA damage repair and male fertility

A research group from the Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics (IMEG) at Kumamoto University, Japan has discovered that the gene C19ORF57 plays a critical role in meiosis. The gene appears to be related to the cause of male infertility and could be a big step forward for reproductive medicine.

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Holidaymakers need to think like futures traders

Buying an airline ticket has become a form of investing in options

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Discovery of a novel gene involved in DNA damage repair and male fertility

A research group from the Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics (IMEG) at Kumamoto University, Japan has discovered that the gene C19ORF57 plays a critical role in meiosis. The gene appears to be related to the cause of male infertility and could be a big step forward for reproductive medicine.

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A touch of gold and silver

Metals are usually characterized by good electrical conductivity. This applies in particular to gold and silver. However, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, together with partners in Pisa and Lund, have now discovered that some precious metals lose this property if they are thin enough. The extreme of a layer only one atom thick thus behaves like a sem

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Nothing changes: Lockdown gender gap remains firm

While the world has been thrown into chaos by COVID-19, gender inequality has survived the pandemic intact, according to a report from Oxford's Department of Sociology, with women still carrying out most housework and childcare, although they are disproportionately exposed to the virus—as the majority of front-line health workers.

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Why Sleep Deprivation Kills

Inside a series of tubes in a bright, warm room at Harvard Medical School, hundreds of fruit flies are staying up late. It has been days since any of them have slept: The constant vibrations that shake their homes preclude rest, cling as they might to the caps of the tubes for respite. Not too far away in their own tubes live other sleepless flies, animated with the calm persistence of those cons

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UK banks told not to assume losses on longer loan holidays

Regulator in renewed bid to prevent accounting rules restricting availability of credit

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The World Left Obama's Soothing Rhetoric Behind

Barack Obama may be the greatest presidential orator in modern American history. But his comments yesterday about the killing of George Floyd were awkward and strained. The reason is that Obama told the same story about America that he's been telling since he entered national politics 15 years ago. It's a hopeful story about a country that is more united than divided. And it's never felt more dis

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Rovdjur hindrar växtätares klimatanpassning

Forskare vid Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU, har deltagit i en storskalig studie som handlar om aktivitetsmönstren hos växtätare och rovdjur i Afrika. Studien är baserad på bildmaterial från viltkameror utplacerade i 32 skyddade områden i Sydafrika. Den innefattar 29 arter av växtätare, från harar till elefanter – samt stora rovdjur som lejon, hyenor och leoparder.

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We test a home antibody kit for tracking Covid-19

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01677-y Easy-to-use postal tests may be important for monitoring community transmission.

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How to beat isolation? Academic feedback groups fit the bill, and promote growth as scholars and humans

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01432-3 Researchers share tips for supporting research and life at a distance.

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How a lab happiness programme is helping me through the COVID-19 crisis

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01686-x I was cynical at first, but it's proved a powerful tool, says Ellen J. Wehrens.

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Egg-based coating preserves fresh produce

Eggs that would otherwise be wasted can be used as the base of an inexpensive coating to protect fruits and vegetables, according to Rice University researchers.

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Pandemic-fueled job losses exacerbating preexisting inequalities among workers

The sharp spike in job losses due to the COVID-19 pandemic were disproportionately concentrated in lower-paying occupations and industries, with the most acute impact felt among women, minorities, younger workers and less-educated workers, according to new research co-written by a University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign labor economist.

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New visa restrictions will make the US economic downturn worse

The Trump administration is expected to set limits on a popular program that allows international students to work in the U.S. after graduation while remaining on their student visas. The restrictions on the Optional Practical Training (OPT) program are designed to help American graduates seeking jobs during the pandemic-fueled economic downturn; however, the move is likely to further hurt the eco

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Peatland drainage in Southeast Asia adds to climate change

In less than three decades, most of Southeast Asia's peatlands have been wholly or partially deforested, drained, and dried out. This has released carbon that accumulated over thousands of years from dead plant matter, and has led to rampant wildfires that spew air pollution and greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

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Mothers ensure their offspring's success through epigenetics

Parents pass genes along to their offspring traits that equip them for life. In recent years, research has shown that the reality is much more complex and that parents endow much more than just genes. A new study in Cell by the laboratory of Asifa Akhtar at the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics reveals that active epigenetic modifications are also passed from one generation to

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A study proposes the low genetic diversity of the Neanderthals as the principal cause of their extinction

What caused the disappearance of Homo neanderthalensis, a species which apparently possessed as many capacities as Homo sapiens? There are several theories attempting to explain this: the climate, competition, low genetic diversity. Daniel Garcia Martínez, a researcher at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has participated in a study published in the Journal o

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Virtual metabolic humans, Harvey and Harvetta, novel computational models for personalised medicine

We are all unique. Our health is determined by our inherent genetic differences combined with our lifestyles and the environments in which we live. This unique identity means that a "one size fits all" approach is no longer accepted as the best way to manage our individual health. There is a demand for new "personalised" approaches to better manage our health and to target therapies to achieve opt

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New learning spaces: Interaction between stakeholders and development of a school's operational culture

New modern physical school spaces require open communication between stakeholders in order to be transformed into meaningful learning environments, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. Pre-existing pedagogies or good practices as such cannot be transferred from one space to another.

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Scientists aim gene-targeting breakthrough against COVID-19

Scientists at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have joined forces with a research team at Stanford to aim a gene-targeting, antiviral agent called PAC-MAN against COVID-19.

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AWE 2020: Leading AR Conference Goes Online, With an Assist from VR

Like other industry conferences, AWE (Augmented World Expo) 2020 went entirely virtual this year. Unlike conferences on, say, security or IT infrastructure, AWE and its companion VR Expo rely very heavily on in-person experiences. So in addition to moving all the main conference tracks to video, AWE did a large-scale experiment with "Side Events" held in various VR settings like AltspaceVR. There

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New study reveals cracks beneath giant, methane gushing craters

250-million-year-old cracks in the seafloor feed greenhouse gas methane into giant craters in the Barents Sea. More than 100 craters, presently expelling enormous amounts of the greenhouse gas into the ocean, are found in the area.

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Biochemical alterations revealed in patients with Lesch-Nyhan disease

An international study by the Institute of Neuroscience of the UAB (INC-UAB), Emory University and Hospital Universitario La Paz, published in the PNAS journal, shows that patients suffering from Lesch-Nyhan, a rare neurological disease, present biochemical alterations in skin cells (fibroblasts), urine and cerebrospinal fluid. Researchers have also discovered why these alterations had not been ob

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Mothers ensure their offspring's success through epigenetics

Parents pass genes along to their offspring traits that equip them for life. In recent years, research has shown that the reality is much more complex and that parents endow much more than just genes. A new study in Cell by the laboratory of Asifa Akhtar at the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics reveals that active epigenetic modifications are also passed from one generation to

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Virtual metabolic humans, Harvey and Harvetta, novel computational models for personalised medicine

We are all unique. Our health is determined by our inherent genetic differences combined with our lifestyles and the environments in which we live. This unique identity means that a "one size fits all" approach is no longer accepted as the best way to manage our individual health. There is a demand for new "personalised" approaches to better manage our health and to target therapies to achieve opt

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Platform turbo-boosts development of new antibiotics

Harmful bacteria react less and less to common antibiotics. The infections they cause are therefore increasingly deadly. World health therefore urgently needs alternative antibacterial agents. "Our VersaTile platform gives the development of new antibiotics a super boost", say researchers at Ghent University and KU Leuven.

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Scientists aim gene-targeting breakthrough against COVID-19

A team of scientists from Stanford University is working with researchers at the Molecular Foundry, a nanoscience user facility located at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), to develop a gene-targeting, antiviral agent against COVID-19.

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Manufacturers call for more state help to save jobs

Coronavirus bailout loan schemes still not helping larger, strategically important companies, MPs told

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New Papua New Guinea research solves archaeological mysteries

New research which "fills in the blanks" on what ancient Papuan New Guineans ate, and how they processed food, has ended decades-long speculation on tool use and food stables in the highlands of New Guinea several thousand years ago.

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Platform turbo-boosts development of new antibiotics

Harmful bacteria react less and less to common antibiotics. The infections they cause are therefore increasingly deadly. World health therefore urgently needs alternative antibacterial agents. "Our VersaTile platform gives the development of new antibiotics a super boost", say researchers at Ghent University and KU Leuven.

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Scientists aim gene-targeting breakthrough against COVID-19

A team of scientists from Stanford University is working with researchers at the Molecular Foundry, a nanoscience user facility located at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), to develop a gene-targeting, antiviral agent against COVID-19.

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Scientists Gene-Hack Human Cells to Turn Invisible

Active Camo By tinkering with the genetics of human cells, a team of scientists gave them the ability to camouflage. To do so, they took a page out of the squid's playbook, New Atlas reports . Specifically, they engineered the human cells to produce a squid protein known as reflectin, which scatters light to create a sense of transparency or iridescence. Not only is it a bizarre party trick, but

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redHUMAN: Deciphering links between genes and metabolism

In the last two decades, the life sciences have seen a growing partnership with information technology. The main drive behind this is the need to process and integrate enormous volumes of data from different fields including genetics, biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, and physiology in order to gain a deeper understanding of biological systems, processes, and even entire organisms.

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The Crew Dragon mission is a success for SpaceX and for NASA

The most eagerly anticipated space mission for a decade or more

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The lost instruments of Teotihuacan will soon be heard again

An ancient city is about to have its "soundscape" recorded

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Scientists aim gene-targeting breakthrough against COVID-19

Scientists at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have joined forces with a research team at Stanford to aim a gene-targeting, antiviral agent called PAC-MAN against COVID-19.

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Breaking the mold: An unusual choice of material yields incredibly long-lasting batteries

The tremendous increase in the use of mobile technology, wearable electronics, and a wide range of portable devices in general over the past few decades, has driven scientists worldwide to seek out the next breakthrough in rechargeable batteries. Lithium-sulfur batteries (LSBs)—composed of a sulfur-based cathode and lithium anode submerged in a liquid electrolyte—are promising candidates to replac

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Scientists propose novel method to synthesize atomic dispersed Cu-N-C catalyst

Non-noble metal nitrogen doped carbon material (M-N-C) catalysts are considered as potential alternatives for precious metals, due to their abundance, biocompatibility, environmental benign and high catalytic performance.

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Study investigates eco-hydrological influence of banana plantations in Xishuangbanna

Banana plantations in Yunnan Province account for over one-fifth of the total planted area of China, serving as a pillar industry for local farmers. However, hydrological threats caused by the rapid expansion of banana agriculture have received little attention from the local government.

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redHUMAN: Deciphering links between genes and metabolism

In the last two decades, the life sciences have seen a growing partnership with information technology. The main drive behind this is the need to process and integrate enormous volumes of data from different fields including genetics, biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, and physiology in order to gain a deeper understanding of biological systems, processes, and even entire organisms.

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Exploring new ways to see the Higgs boson

The ATLAS and CMS collaborations presented their latest results on new signatures for detecting the Higgs boson at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. These include searches for rare transformations of the Higgs boson into a Z boson—which is a carrier of one of the fundamental forces of nature—and a second particle. Observing and studying transformations that are predicted to be rare helps advance our u

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Alternative cement recipes—A recipe for eco-concrete

It is the most widely used product in the world. Cement is indispensable yet its reputation has become quite tainted in the course of the ongoing climate debate. Mixed with water, sand and gravel, it results in concrete, on which our modern world is built. However, the frugal material is in the limelight primarily because of another property: The production of one ton of cement causes around

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Trial shows hydroxychloroquine has no benefit over placebo in preventing COVID-19

Today, researchers published the results from the first randomized clinical trial testing hydroxychloroquine for the post-exposure prevention of COVID-19.

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Chronic stress? Limiting inflammatory signaling to specific brain circuits

Chronic stress is associated with the pathogenesis of psychological disorders such as depression. A study is the first to identify the role of a neuronal receptor that straddles the intersection between social stress, inflammation, and anxiety in rodent models of stress. Findings suggest the possibility of developing better medications to treat the consequences of chronic stress by limiting inflam

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Small see-through container improves plant micrografting

A transparent container allows easy and quick grafting of very young plants, with benefits for agriculture and plant research.

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Construction of new learning spaces calls for interaction between stakeholders and development of school's operational culture

New modern physical school spaces require open communication between stakeholders in order to be transformed into meaningful learning environments, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. Pre-existing pedagogies or good practices as such cannot be transferred from one space to another.

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International study approaches new therapeutic strategies for lung cancer

The international study "Resistance to targeted therapies as a multifactorial, gradual adaptation to inhibitor specific selective pressures", recently published in the scientific journal Nature Communication, has taken a further step in the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat lung cancer.

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New alcohol genes uncovered

Do you have what is known as problematic alcohol use? Then statistically you will also be particularly genetically predisposed to develop e.g. depression and insomnia. And to become dependent on drugs and tobacco. This is shown by a new international study in which researchers from iPSYCH are involved.

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Psoriasis patients' mental health is more than skin-deep

A new study from Umeå University, Sweden, shows that other somatic diseases have even more impact on patients' mental health than their skin symptoms, highlighting the importance of holistic patient care.

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New Visa restrictions will make the US economic downturn worse

Research on visa restrictions designed to help American graduates seeking jobs during the pandemic-fueled economic downturn are likely to further hurt the economy, according to new UC San Diego research on immigrant rights.

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What is tear gas?

In the past week, there have been reports of tear gas being used to control crowds protesting the death of George Floyd, so questions have arisen on the dangers of crowd control chemicals.

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NASA: Russia May Be Forced to Launch Cosmonauts With SpaceX

Flip the Script For the past decade, NASA has relied on Russian space agency Roscosmos to launch its astronauts to the International Space Station. But soon, a NASA spokesperson told Forbes , Russia could be forced to hire its rival SpaceX to send cosmonauts into orbit. "The expectation is cosmonauts will fly on Crew Dragon and Boeing Starliner and vice versa," NASA spokesperson Stephanie Schierh

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GPS mystery is making ships appear to teleport and move in circles

Ships from around the world are mysteriously sending false reports of their locations. It could be due to a new kind of GPS spoofing device, which is making the vessels appear to circle a point near San Francisco

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Why #oddlysatisfying videos are so oddly satisfying

Watching videos of different tasks being completed is oddly satisfying and reminds us of pre-lockdown life, says Annalee Newitz

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A nature-inspired coating to keep drugs from breaking down too early

Chemists have developed a coating that could make certain medications and other materials more stable by covering them with an outer layer much thinner than the width of a human hair.

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Micro-pipette probe for tuning the volume and particle concentration of liquids

At the PME department, a micro-sized pipette probe has been developed for handling multiple liquids. It is the first time that such a small probe can dose fluid volume, and simultaneously control the concentration of particles inside the fluid. This new tool opens up applications in the field of single cell biology and localized chemistry. Imagine being able to manipulate a single cell with the sa

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Human Earth-Borers Really Dig Tunnels

Originally published in January 1867 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Community service and suspended sentences have significant impact on reoffending, study finds

Greater use of non-custodial sentences could aid in reducing the rate of re-offending, new UCD research has found.

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GmSWEET10a and GmSWEET10b coordinately regulate yield and quality

Cultivated soybeans were domesticated from wild soybeans in China over a period of 5,000 years, and then widely spread all over the world. Soybean has been a major, multiuse crop that globally makes up 56% of oilseed production and more than 25% of the protein used in food and animal feed. With the increase of world population and the change of diet structure, the global demand for soybeans is inc

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GmSWEET10a and GmSWEET10b coordinately regulate yield and quality

Cultivated soybeans were domesticated from wild soybeans in China over a period of 5,000 years, and then widely spread all over the world. Soybean has been a major, multiuse crop that globally makes up 56% of oilseed production and more than 25% of the protein used in food and animal feed. With the increase of world population and the change of diet structure, the global demand for soybeans is inc

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New role assigned to a human protein in transcription and genome stability

DNA-RNA hybrids, or R loops, are structures that generate genomic instability, a common feature of tumor cells. This article states that the human protein UAP56 / DDX39B has a key role in the elimination of DNA-RNA hybrids that are accidentally generated during transcription, guaranteeing the integrity of the genome, as well as a correct gene expression.

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Not children, but 'super-happy families' the aim of assisted reproduction

Researcher Judith Lind has studied how staff at fertility clinics view the assessments that childless couples and women undergo in order to access assisted reproduction. It emerges in the interviews that the assessment of the potential parents is based on the child's future welfare and on the responsible use of public resources.

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Fluorescence bioimaging

Scientists can monitor biomolecular processes in live tissue by noninvasive optical methods, such as fluorescence imaging. However, the fluorescent dyes used for that purpose are often rather unstable, and photobleaching, lack of specificity, and poor pharmacokinetics are recurrent issues. US scientists have developed a molecular shield that stabilizes near-infrared fluorescent dyes and enhances t

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Temperament affects children's eating habits

Temperamental children are at greater risk for developing unhealthy eating habits.

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No smoke, but still hazardous

A more sensitive technique shows cigarette alternative may be more hazardous than manufacturer testing had found.

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The most viewed videos in Spain about COVID-19 on YouTube

Researchers at UPV have analyzed about 40,000 videos about COVID-19 posted on YouTube up to April 30th. Resistiré 2020 and Canciones del Coronavirus, by El Rubius: the most viewed and liked videos in Spain about COVID-19 on YouTube.

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Insight into protein misfolding could open up new approaches to treat Parkinson's disease

Researchers have uncovered a link between the structure of the protein alpha-synuclein and its likelihood to misfold and aggregate.

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How can you sleep during a solo sailing race?

Weeks of sailing on a 6 meters boat, nothing but the ocean for four thousand miles. A research group of the University of Bologna studied the sleeping strategies and profiles (chronotypes) of the skippers who took part in the Mini Transat La Boulangère

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For acute myeloid leukemia, genetic testing is often worth the wait

New tailored therapies offer exciting prospects for treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but taking advantage of them may require waiting a week or more for genetic testing before starting treatment, posing a dilemma for doctors and patients facing this deadly and often fast-moving disease. A new study bolsters the evidence that this approach is safe for most patients under careful clinical over

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New microscopy method provides unprecedented look at amyloid protein structure

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are often accompanied by amyloid proteins in the brain that have become clumped or misfolded. A newly developed technique that measures the orientation of single molecules is enabling optical microscopy to be used, for the first time, to reveal nanoscale details about the structures of these problematic proteins.

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New method predicts spin dynamics of materials for quantum computing

Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed a theoretical foundation and new computational tools for predicting a material's spin dynamics, a key property for building solid-state quantum computing platforms and other applications of spintronics.

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Association between outdoor light at night and breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women

Outdoor light at night was linked to a higher risk of breast cancer in a recent study.

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The nature of glass-forming liquids is more clear

Researchers have found that attractive and repulsive interactions between particles are both essential to form structural order that controls the dynamics of glass-forming liquids. This knowledge will help understanding why a liquid becomes so viscous before glass formation.

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Ekar som knoppar tidigt slipper kräsen fjärilsmal

Tidpunkten för ekarnas knoppsprickning avgör i vilken utsträckning träden blir infekterade av den snedstreckade ekstyltmalen. Om knopparna spricker vid fel tillfälle kan ekbladen bli så uppätna att det saknas utrymme för andra växtätande insekter. Den nya forskningen ger även insikt i hur samspelet mellan växter och insekter påverkas av ett förändrat klimat. När en stor del av ekarnas blad blir v

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Paper-based technology advances earlier cancer detection

Washington State University researchers have developed a technology that is more than 30 times more sensitive than current lab-based tests in finding early stage cancer biomarkers in blood.

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US university to trial Covid-19 checker app linked to campus access

Kansas staff and students will have to answer questions about symptoms in order to enter buildings

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US jobless claims ease as economy struggles to reopen

Almost 1.9m filed for benefits last week but slower pace of applications suggests some are returning to work

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Paper-based technology advances earlier cancer detection

Washington State University researchers have developed a technology that is more than 30 times more sensitive than current lab-based tests in finding early stage cancer biomarkers in blood.

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Stable and functional dyes for near-infrared fluorescence imaging of living subjects

Scientists can monitor biomolecular processes in live tissue by noninvasive optical methods, such as fluorescence imaging. However, the fluorescent dyes used for that purpose are often rather unstable, and photobleaching, lack of specificity, and poor pharmacokinetics are recurrent issues. US scientists have developed a molecular shield that stabilizes near-infrared fluorescent dyes and enhances t

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Researchers shine a light on racial disparities in peer review scores for NIH grants

In 2011, a study published in Science found that Black applicants for the prestigious and highly competitive National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 research grants were 10 percentage points less likely to receive funding than their white counterparts. NIH R01 grants provide four or five years of independent support and can be crucial to a junior faculty member's chances for promotion, tenure and

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Research empowers efforts to plan smarter, more resilient cities

Over the past 200 years, the population of the United States has grown more than 40-fold to an estimated 328 million, with 81% of the population living in an urban area. Cities, as we know them, are constantly changing and up until now, the absence of long-term data has limited our understanding of how our cities have become what they are today.

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Meet the hard-working microbes that make your favorite cheeses

Data from UMass Boston and Dairy Connection Inc. (Infographic by Sara Chodosh/) Every bite of cheese you've ever taken owes its funk and flavor to the community of microbes living inside it. The original cheese just had whatever microbes happened to be living on the farm, but today cheesemakers deliberately inoculate their dairy with specific types of bacteria and mold. Some organisms are common

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The best ways to get your iced coffee fix

Beat the heat with some cold coffee. (Blake Wisz via Unsplash/) It's almost as subtle as the changing of the seasons. You just know it when you feel it, that moment when you have to start packing the hot coffee and start breaking out the cold brews. To get your day started with the appropriate amount of caffeine (and the least amount of sweat), we found cold brew coffee machines that offer innova

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Hydroxychloroquine doesn't prevent COVID-19 after exposure

Hydroxychloroquine is not effective in preventing the development of COVID-19 when taken after exposure to prevent infection, clinical trial results show. The trial is the first completed double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of hydroxychloroquine for disease prevention. "While we had hope this drug would work in this context, our study demonstrates that hydroxychloroquine is no bett

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Scientists aim gene-targeting breakthrough against COVID-19

Scientists at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have joined forces with a research team at Stanford to aim a gene-targeting, antiviral agent called PAC-MAN against COVID-19.

9h

New microscopy method provides unprecedented look at amyloid protein structure

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are often accompanied by amyloid proteins in the brain that have become clumped or misfolded. A newly developed technique that measures the orientation of single molecules is enabling optical microscopy to be used, for the first time, to reveal nanoscale details about the structures of these problematic proteins.

9h

One-of-a-kind microscope enables breakthrough in quantum science

Technion Professor Ido Kaminer and his team have made a dramatic breakthrough in the field of quantum science: a quantum microscope that records the flow of light, enabling the direct observation of light trapped inside a photonic crystal.

9h

Can Whole-Body Vibration Training Make You Fit?

Whole-body Vibration Training promises some impressive fitness and health benefits. But is shakin' it on a vibrating platform as good for you as regular old exercise? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Hydroxychloroquine For Avoiding Infection?

Most readers will have heard that this paper appeared in the NEJM late yesterday afternoon: it's something that we haven't had so far, an actual randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled hydroxychloroquine trial. This one was for post-exposure prophylaxis, a mode of treatment made famous by President Trump when he stated several times that he was taking the drug after people in the White Hou

9h

Footage captured of cephalopod at deepest ocean level ever observed

A pair of researchers, one with Newcastle University in the U.K, the other the National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C., has captured video footage of a cephalopod at the deepest ocean level ever observed. In their paper published in the journal Marine Biology, Alan Jamieson and Michael Vecchione describe how they used "landers" to capture video remotely at the bottom of the Indian Oc

9h

Arrays of strontium Rydberg atoms show promise for use in quantum computers

A team of researchers at California Institute of Technology has found that arrays of strontium Rydberg atoms show promise for use in a quantum computer. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the researchers describe their study of quantum entangled alkaline-earth Rydberg atoms arranged in arrays and what they learned about them. In the same issue, Wenhui Li, with the National Uni

9h

Footage captured of cephalopod at deepest ocean level ever observed

A pair of researchers, one with Newcastle University in the U.K, the other the National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C., has captured video footage of a cephalopod at the deepest ocean level ever observed. In their paper published in the journal Marine Biology, Alan Jamieson and Michael Vecchione describe how they used "landers" to capture video remotely at the bottom of the Indian Oc

9h

Brain scans offer clues to memory trouble

The memory recall processes in the brains of older adults can look very similar to those previously observed in the brains of young adults, according to a new study. For those seniors who had more trouble remembering, however, evidence for these processes was noticeably diminished. "Some individuals exhibit remarkable maintenance of memory function throughout late adulthood, whereas others experi

9h

Why the Jurassic Coast Is One of the Best Fossil-Collecting Sites on Earth

Along a famed stretch of English coastline, amateurs and professionals collect 200-million-year-old treasures before they are reclaimed by the waves

9h

Researcher discusses discovery of exoplanets and his special method

René Heller from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research already made the scientific community take notice when he and his team discovered no fewer than 18 previously overlooked exoplanets in the data from the Kepler Space Telescope. Now they succeeded again, this time in finding a somewhat Earth-like planet orbiting a sun-like star. What is so special about the new method of Dr. Heller

10h

How cells solve their identity crisis

Cancer is often the result of DNA mutations or problems with how cells divide, which can lead to cells 'forgetting' what type of cell they are or how to function properly. Now, Professor Martin Hetzer and a team of scientists have provided clarity into how new cells remember their identity after cell division. These memory mechanisms could explicate problems that occur when cell identity is not ma

10h

Paper-based technology advances earlier cancer detection

Washington State University researchers have developed a technology that is more than 30 times more sensitive than current lab-based tests in finding early stage cancer biomarkers in blood.

10h

Discovery of a novel gene involved in DNA damage repair and male fertility

A research group from the Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics (IMEG) at Kumamoto University, Japan has discovered that the gene C19ORF57 plays a critical role in meiosis. The gene appears to be related to the cause of male infertility and could be a big step forward for reproductive medicine.

10h

Immune from chronic stress? Limit inflammatory signaling to specific brain circuits

Chronic stress is associated with the pathogenesis of psychological disorders such as depression. A study is the first to identify the role of a neuronal receptor that straddles the intersection between social stress, inflammation, and anxiety in rodent models of stress. Findings suggest the possibility of developing better medications to treat the consequences of chronic stress by limiting inflam

10h

Coronavirus linked to stroke in otherwise healthy young people

Preliminary observations suggest a high incidence of COVID-19 in stroke patients, including younger patients who were otherwise healthy.

10h

Wording of vaccination messages influences behavior

An experiment by Washington State University researchers revealed that relatively small differences in messages influenced people's attitudes about the human papillomavirus or HPV vaccine, which has been shown to help prevent cancer.

10h

Sharp drop in Australia's bad cholesterol levels — but rising in Asia and Pacific

The proportion of Australians with bad cholesterol levels has dropped significantly, while Asian and Pacific countries recorded a sharp rise, according to the world's largest study on the condition.

10h

A potential new weapon in the war against superbugs

Researchers in Melbourne, Australia have shown that a newly discovered natural antibiotic, teixobactin, could be effective in treating bacterial lung conditions such as tuberculosis and those commonly associated with COVID-19.

10h

Mass general model projects sharp rise in alcohol-related liver disease

A new analysis by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Georgia Tech indicates that cases of alcohol-related liver disease will rise dramatically in the coming years without drastic steps to reduce high-risk drinking rates.

10h

UMN trial shows hydroxychloroquine has no benefit over placebo in preventing COVID-19

Today, University of Minnesota Medical School researchers published the results from the first randomized clinical trial testing hydroxychloroquine for the post-exposure prevention of COVID-19.

10h

New Papua New Guinea research solves archaeological mysteries

New research which 'fills in the blanks' on what ancient Papuan New Guineans ate, and how they processed food, has ended decades-long speculation on tool use and food stables in the highlands of New Guinea several thousand years ago.

10h

In-person 'retail therapy' may be gone for good

Retail isn't going back to normal, says a professor of marketing and psychological science. For merchants, expecting a return to pre-pandemic business is not a strategy for success, says Eric Spangenberg, dean of the University of California, Irvine's Paul Merage School of Business. Those who can innovate and put together the best alternatives to business as usual, he says, will be in the stronge

10h

UK government paid £1.7bn to private groups for coronavirus contracts

Analysis reveals how taxpayer money has been spent under emergency provisions that allow procurement rules to be bypassed

10h

A tiny arctic shrub reveals secrets of plant growth on Svalbard

The polar willow (Salix polaris) may not seem like much when you look at it—just a jumble of tiny green leaves in a dense mat that pokes out of the tundra.

10h

A tiny arctic shrub reveals secrets of plant growth on Svalbard

The polar willow (Salix polaris) may not seem like much when you look at it—just a jumble of tiny green leaves in a dense mat that pokes out of the tundra.

10h

Russia struggles to clean up Arctic river fuel spill

Russian emergency workers and marine clean-up specialists on Thursday intensified efforts to clean up a major fuel spill that environmentalists say is the first such accident in the Arctic polar region.

10h

Asian tiger mosquito gains ground in Illinois

Researchers report that the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has become more abundant across Illinois in the past three decades. Its spread is problematic, as the mosquito can transmit diseases—like chikungunya or dengue fever—to humans.

10h

This startup is using AI to give workers a "productivity score"

In the last few months, millions of people around the world stopped going into offices and started doing their jobs from home. These workers may be out of sight of managers, but they are not out of mind. The upheaval has been accompanied by a reported spike in the use of surveillance software that lets employers track what their employees are doing and how long they spend doing it. Companies have

10h

Asian tiger mosquito gains ground in Illinois

Researchers report that the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has become more abundant across Illinois in the past three decades. Its spread is problematic, as the mosquito can transmit diseases—like chikungunya or dengue fever—to humans.

10h

Slut med lægemiddelannoncer i Ugeskrift for Læger

Lægeforeningen foreslår at skrotte lægemiddelannoncer i Ugeskrift for Læger. Men lægemiddelannoncer leverer rent faktisk relevant og transparent information om nye lægemidler, siger direktør i Lif.

10h

Kolesterolnivåerna sjunker i väst – men stiger i Asien

Människors nivåer av det som brukar kallas dåligt kolesterol sjunker kraftigt i västvärlden, men stiger i låg- och medelinkomstländer, särskilt i Asien. Det framgår av en omfattande global studie där forskare vid Göteborgs universitet medverkar. Bakom studien, publicerad i tidskriften Nature, står hundratals forskare världen över. Deras data utgörs av uppmätta kolesterolvärden hos 102,6 miljoner

10h

Small see-through container improves plant micrografting

A transparent container made by Nagoya University researchers allows easy and quick grafting of very young plants, with benefits for agriculture and plant research.

10h

Alien frog invasion wreaks havoc on natural habitat

Indiscriminate feeding by an alien population of the carnivorous spotted-thighed frog — could severely affect the native biodiversity of southern Australia according to a new study by the University of South Australia.

10h

Australia's ancient geology controls the pathways of modern earthquakes

New research near Uluru in Australia's arid centre shows that rock structures formed deep within the ancient Gondwana supercontinent controlled the rupture pathways of one of Australia's largest modern earthquakes.

10h

Technology for cloud efficiency for databases during data-intensive COVID-19 pandemic

A Purdue team created a technology called OPTIMUSCLOUD — which is designed to help achieve cost and performance efficiency for cloud-hosted databases.

10h

Scientists discover that nicotine promotes spread of lung cancer to the brain

Among people who have the most common type of lung cancer, up to 40% develop metastatic brain tumors, with an average survival time of less than six months. But why non-small-cell lung cancer so often spreads to the brain has been poorly understood.

10h

Intranasal delivery of MSCs provides hope for treating Alzheimer's disease

In the attempt to find a possible cure for Alzheimer's disease, mesenchymal stem cells and their derived extracellular vesicles are being investigated for therapeutic purposes thanks to their protective and anti-inflammatory properties.

10h

New Zealanders' attitudes changed after pandemic lockdown

In the first few weeks of the lockdown of New Zealand in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, residents reported a slight increase in mental distress but higher levels of confidence in the government, science and the police, as well as greater patriotism, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

10h

Continued nicotine use promotes brain tumors in lung cancer patients, study suggests

Researchers have discovered that nicotine promotes the spread of lung cancer cells into the brain, where they can form deadly metastatic tumors. The study, which will be published June 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that nicotine replacement therapies may not be suitable strategies for lung cancer patients attempting to quit smoking. In addition, the researchers show that the

10h

Study ties stroke-related brain blood vessel abnormality to gut bacteria

In a nationwide study, NIH funded researchers found that the presence of abnormal bundles of brittle blood vessels in the brain or spinal cord, called cavernous angiomas (CA), are linked to the composition of a person's gut bacteria. Also known as cerebral cavernous malformations, these lesions which contain slow moving or stagnant blood, can often cause hemorrhagic strokes, seizures, or headaches

10h

UT Health San Antonio study shows Nox4 protein may predict untreatable kidney cancer

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio researchers confirmed the role of a certain protein, Nox4, in the development of high-grade kidney cancer. The researchers also showed that a higher level of the protein can be used as a marker to predict in humans which tumors will develop treatment resistance and progress more rapidly.

10h

Study finds political bias skews perceptions of verifiable fact

Politics has seeped into every corner of our lives. Even announcements once thought above rank partisanship, such as states letting voters mail their ballots this fall and the death toll from the COVID-19 pandemic, now ignite accusations of political bias. Research by Harvard economists finds that politics don't just influence people's attitudes about economic issues and policies, it shapes their

10h

Scientists tap the world's most powerful computers in the race to understand and stop the coronavirus

In "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" by Douglas Adams, the haughty supercomputer Deep Thought is asked whether he can find the answer to the ultimate question concerning life, the universe and everything. He replies that, yes, he can do it, but it's tricky and he'll have to think about it. When asked how long it will take him he replies, "Seven-and-a-half million years. I told you I'd have to

10h

A mirror image of Earth and sun

Among the more than 4,000 known exoplanets, KOI-456.04 is something special: less than twice the size of Earth, it orbits a sun-like star. And it does so with a star-planet distance that could permit planetary surface temperatures conducive to life. The object was discovered by a team led by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Göttingen. Its host star, called Kepler-160, actually

10h

Researchers in Brazil Struggle to Get Solid COVID-19 Death Counts

After combing through data on public death notices in Minas Gerais state, scientists say the coronavirus death toll in the country is worse than reported.

10h

Scientists tap the world's most powerful computers in the race to understand and stop the coronavirus

In "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" by Douglas Adams, the haughty supercomputer Deep Thought is asked whether he can find the answer to the ultimate question concerning life, the universe and everything. He replies that, yes, he can do it, but it's tricky and he'll have to think about it. When asked how long it will take him he replies, "Seven-and-a-half million years. I told you I'd have to

10h

After Explosion, SpaceX Still Hoping to Launch Starship This Year

Ambitious Goals Despite a massive explosion that obliterated the fourth prototype of its Starship spacecraft, SpaceX is still planning on an orbital test launch of the vehicle before the end of the year. Starship — a different project than SpaceX's Crew Dragon, which successfully launched with two astronauts on board over the weekend — is meant to eventually ferry up to 100 passengers as far as t

10h

Lægerne kan ikke følge deres egne retningslinjer

Medicinrådets anbefalinger gør det umuligt for lægerne at hjælpe en række patienter med at nå de mål for LDL-kolesterol, som de seneste danske og europæiske guidelines sætter.

10h

Danske læger underkender europæiske retningslinjer

Nye europæiske retningslinjer for forebyggelse og behandling af hjerte-kar-sygdom bliver ikke 100 pct. indarbejdet i Danmark. Danske læger mener, at evidensen bag en række af anbefalingerne er for usikker. DSAM roser, og Hjerteforeningen er indforstået med den danske enegang.

10h

Britain's quarantine plan for travellers is too little too late | Devi Sridhar

As countries that implemented travel bans early on in the coronavirus pandemic begin to open up, the UK is only just getting started Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage When the next pandemic hits – and it's a question of when, not if – it will be vital that we did all we could at this moment to learn the lessons taught to us by coronavirus. One key lesson has been the e

10h

Chemists produce new oxidants as a tool for preparative chemistry

Chemical oxidation, the selective removal of electrons from a substrate, represents one of the most important transformations in chemistry. However, most common oxidants often show disadvantages such as undesired side reactions. The chemist Marcel Schorpp and colleagues from the group of Prof. Dr. Ingo Krossing from the Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry at the University of Freiburg

10h

Unga med dålig kondition och fetma löper ökad risk för kronisk sjukdom

Personer med dålig kondition eller fetma i övre tonåren, löper ökad risk för svår hjärt-kärlsjukdom som vuxna – och därmed behöva sjukersättning på grund av kroniskt nedsatt arbetsförmåga. Men redan en mindre förbättring av konditionen kan leda till lägre risk, enligt forskning vid bland annat Linköpings universitet. – Vi ser i studien att både fetma och dålig kondition är två väldigt starka risk

10h

We can't blame all the indirect health damage on the lockdown

With or without it, the collateral damage from the virus would have been severe.

10h

Live Coronavirus News Updates

The geography of the illness is changing, and new infections top 100,000 a day. Israel's Parliament is shut down after a lawmaker contracted the virus. The U.S. Labor Department reports 1.9 million Americans filed new claims for unemployment benefits last week.

10h

Australia's ancient geology controls the pathways of modern earthquakes

New research near Uluru in Australia's arid center shows that rock structures formed deep within the ancient Gondwana supercontinent controlled the rupture pathways of one of Australia's largest modern earthquakes.

10h

SENSEI gets quiet: Scientists demonstrate particle detector for dark matter

What makes for a good dark matter detector? It has a lot in common with a good teleconference setup: You need a sensitive microphone and a quiet room.

10h

How African feminists are helping to sustain peace in a pandemic

Throughout the COVID-19 crisis, African feminists have been essential in responding with care to the challenges facing their communities. COVID-19 cases are on the rise in Africa, but not at the exponential rate experienced in other parts of the world, suggesting the success of early prevention measures. Yet, grassroots feminists also point out that the pandemic has laid bare inequalities that hav

10h

PTF1J2224+17 is a polar, new study confirms

German astronomers have conducted photometric observations of a cataclysmic variable (CV) star known as PTF1J2224+17. Results of the observational campaign confirm that this object is a polar, as suggested by previous studies. The new findings are presented in a paper published May 27 on arXiv.org.

10h

Asian tiger mosquito gains ground in Illinois

Researchers report that the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has become more abundant across Illinois in the past three decades. Its spread is problematic, as the mosquito can transmit diseases — like chikungunya or dengue fever — to humans.

10h

Best Pet Supplies and Tips for Kittens and Puppies (2020)

Shelters across the country are emptying as people adopt pets while stuck at home. We've rounded up the gear you'll need for a smooth transition.

10h

Tesla's Cybertruck Could Be Ripped, Mean, and Super Green

Elon Musk has a chance to create the world's first "circular car."

10h

Social bubbles may be the best way for societies to emerge from lockdown

The news: Holing up with groups of friends or neighbors or other families during lockdown has given many people, especially those stuck home alone, a way to relieve isolation without spreading covid-19. These groups are known as bubbles , and new computer simulations described in Nature today show they may really work. Why this matters: As countries around the world leave or get ready to leave lo

10h

Lungemedicinere: Risiko for permanente lungeskader efter COVID-19 skal afklares

COVID-19 kan skabe varige skader i lungerne, selv om patienten er erklæret rask. Derfor er det ifølge flere lungemedicinerne vigtigt, at der bliver fulgt op på alle de patienter, der bliver udskrevet. Flere steder er der sat gang i forskning på området, og et af dem er i Region Midtjylland.

10h

Michael HotTiger of Zurich, patron of biomedical ethics

University of Zurich and its Unispital has so much trouble with their medical professors right now. I wish to help.

10h

Sundhedsøkonom: Screening af lungekræft kan blive dyrt uden et grundigt forarbejde

Et program for screening af lungekræft i Danmark er både dyrt og kompliceret, hvis det ikke planlægges grundigt og gennemføres effektivt, siger professor i sundhedsøkonomi, Jes Søgaard.

11h

S vender 180 grader: Nu er affaldsforbrænding ikke kritisk infrastruktur

PLUS. Regeringens forslag om privatisering af affaldsforbrændingsanlæg som vejen mod mindre forbrænding og import af affald til fordel for øget genanvendelse har mødt bred kritik, men Socialdemokratiets klimaordfører forsvarer ideen.

11h

Team finds the biggest, oldest Maya monument

The Maya civilization may have developed more rapidly than archaeologists once thought, according to new research. The findings also hint at less social inequality than in later periods. From the ground, it's impossible to tell that the plateau underfoot is something extraordinary. But from the sky, with laser eyes, and beneath the surface, with radiocarbon dating, it's clear that it is the large

11h

Afskaf udokumenterede behandlingsgarantier og lad lægerne prioritere

En genindførelse af 30-dages garantien virker helt urealistisk i et sundhedsvæsen, der allerede inden COVID-19 var hårdt presset på økonomien, skriver formand og næstformand i Dansk Ortopædisk Selskab.

11h

The Racist Roots of Fighting Obesity

Prescribing weight loss to black women ignores barriers to their health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

North Pacific Subtropical High models predict summer monsoons, reduced typhoon landfalls

The western North Pacific Subtropical High (WNPSH) is a key atmospheric circulation system strongly that influences weather and climate over the entire East and Southeast Asia. It determines the strength and position of the Mei-yu Front (or Baiu/Changma Front) and the trajectories of typhoon and western Pacific tropical cyclones. How it will change in the future concerns the livelihood of many mil

11h

Small protein, big impact: ProQ found to aid in DNA repair

Meningococci are bacteria that can cause life-threatening meningitis and sepsis. These pathogens use a small protein with a large impact: The RNA-binding protein ProQ is involved in the activation of more than 250 bacterial genes.

11h

Djur och natur ger goda förutsättningar för barn med autism

Husdjuren gav tröst, möjlighet till reglering av känslor och motverkade stress. Den motoriska utvecklingen stimulerades. Kontakt med djur och natur skapar goda förutsättningar för psykologisk utveckling hos unga med autism, visar en undersökning gjord av Kristina Byström, forskarstuderande och psykolog vid Habiliteringen Skövde. De idag mest vanliga behandlingsmodellerna för yngre barn med autism

11h

Small protein, big impact: ProQ found to aid in DNA repair

Meningococci are bacteria that can cause life-threatening meningitis and sepsis. These pathogens use a small protein with a large impact: The RNA-binding protein ProQ is involved in the activation of more than 250 bacterial genes.

11h

Black holes? They are like a hologram

According to new research by SISSA, ICTP and INFN, black holes could be like holograms, in which all the information to produce a three-dimensional image is encoded in a two-dimensional surface. As affirmed by quantum theories, black holes could be incredibly complex, and concentrate an enormous amount of information in two dimensions, like the largest hard disks that exist in nature. This idea al

11h

New studies show how DNA crossovers can drive healthy, abnormal sperm, egg cell division

In the famous words of movie character Forrest Gump, "Life is like a box of chocolates; you never know what you're gonna get."

11h

New studies show how DNA crossovers can drive healthy, abnormal sperm, egg cell division

In the famous words of movie character Forrest Gump, "Life is like a box of chocolates; you never know what you're gonna get."

11h

Back from extinction: a world first effort to return threatened pangolins to the wild

Pangolins are one of the most illegally trafficked animals on the planet and are suspected to be linked to the current coronavirus pandemic.

11h

Back from extinction: a world first effort to return threatened pangolins to the wild

Pangolins are one of the most illegally trafficked animals on the planet and are suspected to be linked to the current coronavirus pandemic.

11h

Observing topological edge states using moiré patterns

NUS physicists have found a new way to create and tune the topological edge states in two-dimensional (2-D) topological insulators (TIs) for potential spintronic device applications.

11h

Gör anonymiserade tentor rättningen mer rättvis?

Efter att samtliga salstentor anonymiserades på Stockholms universitet 2009, fick personer med utländskklingande namn något sämre betyg än tidigare. Det skulle kunna tolkas som att denna grupp blev positivt diskriminerad innan anonymiseringsreformen. Men denna trend syntes även en period före reformen, vilket tyder på att något annat än själva anonymiseringsreformen kan ligga bakom. Anonymisering

11h

Large-scale preparation of polymer-based room-temperature phosphorescence via click chemistry

Polymer-based room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) materials can be efficiently developed by covalently embedding phosphors into the polymer matrix. The process is still, however, highly challenging on a large-scale due to inefficient binding engineering and time-consuming covalent reactions. In a new report on Science Advances, Rui Tian, and a team of research scientists at the State Key Labora

11h

A Drop in Commercial Flights Is Bad for Hurricane Forecasts

Passenger jets and cruise ships normally gather key weather data. But full docks and empty skies make it hard to predict the details of incoming storms.

11h

The World Was Primed for Protest Conspiracy Theories

For some, it's a sort of mental self-preservation, for others it's a concerted strategy to win the former category over to their way of thinking.

11h

How to Make Your Virtual Jam Session Sound—and Look—Good

You know those videos of musicians rocking out from their living rooms, laid out in a grid? Here's how they're made.

11h

Genetics is not why more BAME people die of coronavirus: structural racism is | Winston Morgan

Yes, more people of black, Latin and south Asian origin are dying, but there is no genetic 'susceptibility' behind it From the start of the coronavirus pandemic, there has been an attempt to use science to explain the disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on different groups through the prism of race. Data from the UK and the US suggests that people categorised as black, Hispanic (Latino) and south

11h

ECB boosts bond-buying stimulus package by €600bn

Central bank ratchets up efforts to prevent eurozone slipping into deflationary spiral

11h

Racial wealth gap worse for families with children

It's hard for families with kids to save money. In the U.S., it's even harder when the family is black, a new study finds.

11h

Could manufacturing aid Australia's economic recovery?

Following a federal government call for the reignition of domestic industrial activity, University of Sydney experts comment on the role of advanced manufacturing and boosting the digital workforce in Australia's post-coronavirus economy.

11h

fMRI Researcher Questions fMRI Research

This is an important and sobering study, that I fear will not get a lot of press attention – especially in the context of current events. It is a bit wonky, but this is exactly the level of knowledge one needs in order to be able to have any chance of consuming and putting into context scientific research. I have discussed fMRI previously – it stands for functional magnetic resonance imaging. It

11h

Work resumes in support of stockpile modernization

The effort to resume hands-on work in support of stockpile modernization programs reached a major milestone May 7 with the successful execution of a focused experiment at the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The experiment is the first using high explosives at the Laboratory since Alameda County issued a shelter-in-place order March 16

12h

Putting the customer first is no longer the best marketing strategy

Businesses that want to thrive in the 21st century need to throw out the old marketing playbook that puts the customer first, according to new research from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin.

12h

Rewilding: rare birds return when livestock grazing has stopped

After a particularly long week of computer based work on my Ph.D., all I wanted was to hike somewhere exciting with a rich wildlife. A friend commiserated with me—I was based at Newcastle University at the time, and this particular friend wasn't keen on the UK's wilderness, its moorlands and bare uplands, compared to the large tracts of woodland and tropical forests that can be found more readily

12h

The coronavirus outbreak could make it quicker and easier to trial drugs

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01524-0 Remote clinical trials and other changes could permanently alter pharmaceutical development: part 7 in a series on science after the pandemic.

12h

Dna från Dödahavsrullarna löser historiska gåtor

Forskare vid Uppsala universitet har, tillsammans med kollegor i Israel, lyckats utvinna dna ur de över 2 000 år gamla Dödahavsrullarna. Informationen om djuren, vars skinn använts till pergament, gör det möjligt för historiker att dra slutsatser om vilka textfragment som hör ihop. Och hur representativa texterna verkligen är för judendomen vid den tiden. Dödahavsrullarna består av 25 000 fragmen

12h

The sensitive strain sensor that can detect the weight of a feather

Physicists have created the most sensitive strain sensor ever made, capable of detecting a feather's touch.

12h

12h

How to Avoid Spreading Misinformation About the Protests

There isn't always time, during a crisis, to be reflective in the face of harmful information. Here's a useful rule of thumb.

12h

All This Chaos Might Be Giving You 'Crisis Fatigue'

Your body is well adapted to handle temporary stresses, but it's overwhelmed by the constant, unrelenting pressures of this horrible year.

12h

Curfews Can Quell Violence—but Also Spark More Protests

Researchers say the stay-home orders can encourage police abuse and pit residents against law enforcement.

12h

Rethinking Humanity's Ties to Nature

The lesson from the pandemic is not to retreat from the natural world but to become a better steward — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Contagious Amoeba Vampirizes Gum Cells [Video]

An amoeba spread by respiratory droplets, kisses and eating utensils may be a serious (and creepy) gum disease pathogen — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Ny bundrekord for dansk CO2-emission

PLUS. Den danske udledning af CO2 var rekordlav i 2019. Mere vindkraft og lavt kulforbrug er nogle af årsagerne.

12h

The sensitive strain sensor that can detect the weight of a feather

Physicists have created the most sensitive strain sensor ever made, capable of detecting a feather's touch.

12h

Records reveal new trends in Australian temperature extremes

Researchers have developed Australia's longest daily temperature record, identifying a decrease in cold extremes and an increase in heatwaves since 1838.

12h

Rethinking Humanity's Ties to Nature

The lesson from the pandemic is not to retreat from the natural world but to become a better steward — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Small see-through container improves plant micrografting

A type of plant grafting that requires a tremendous amount of precision and skill has now been made faster and easier thanks to a simple transparent container. Researchers at Nagoya University have developed a micrografting device that guides seedling growth and facilitates the grafting of the embryonic shoots of one plant onto the tiny stalks of another. The new device shows potential for facilit

12h

NASA fosters innovative ways to understand biodiversity

The yellow-billed cuckoo has soft brown wings, a white belly, a long tail with black and white spots, and is running out of places to live. The cuckoo's population in its native breeding range in the eastern United States has declined in recent decades due to urbanization, heat waves and other factors. Climate change will likely further reduce its suitable habitat.

12h

Alien frog invasion wreaks havoc on natural habitat

Indiscriminate feeding by an alien population of the carnivorous spotted-thighed frog—could severely affect the native biodiversity of southern Australia according to a new study by the University of South Australia.

12h

Small see-through container improves plant micrografting

A type of plant grafting that requires a tremendous amount of precision and skill has now been made faster and easier thanks to a simple transparent container. Researchers at Nagoya University have developed a micrografting device that guides seedling growth and facilitates the grafting of the embryonic shoots of one plant onto the tiny stalks of another. The new device shows potential for facilit

12h

Image: OSIRIS-REx swoops over sample site Osprey

This view of sample site Osprey on asteroid Bennu is a mosaic of images collected by NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft on May 26. A total of 347 PolyCam images were stitched together and corrected to produce the mosaic, which shows the site at 0.2 inches (5 mm) per pixel at full size. The spacecraft took these images during an 820-foot (250-meter) reconnaissance pass over the site, which is the closest

12h

NASA fosters innovative ways to understand biodiversity

The yellow-billed cuckoo has soft brown wings, a white belly, a long tail with black and white spots, and is running out of places to live. The cuckoo's population in its native breeding range in the eastern United States has declined in recent decades due to urbanization, heat waves and other factors. Climate change will likely further reduce its suitable habitat.

12h

Can standardized testing capture learning potential?

However much they are dreaded and bemoaned, standardized tests remain a big part of the education landscape. And for everyone concerned—test takers, educators and even the nation's employers—that's both boon and bane.

12h

Alien frog invasion wreaks havoc on natural habitat

Indiscriminate feeding by an alien population of the carnivorous spotted-thighed frog—could severely affect the native biodiversity of southern Australia according to a new study by the University of South Australia.

12h

Sustainable plastics vital for greener world

Creating sustainable plastics is vital for the future of our environment, a new report says.

12h

Levitated timepiece sets new benchmark

A new mechanical "clock" has been created by an international team of researchers, led by scientists at the University of St Andrews, which could test the fundamental physics of gravity.

13h

Study proposes new strategies for social distancing

Lifting the lockdown in favor of strategic distancing, could lead to improved compliance with official recommendations and 'keep the curve' flat, in terms of COVID-19 infections, according to a report today from Oxford researchers.

13h

Coronavirus and the Flu: A Looming Double Threat

The two could come together, making things worse—or our new hygiene habits may actually reduce the flu's spread — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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World leaders must fund a Covid-19 vaccine plan before it's too late for millions | Gro Harlem Brundtland and Elizabeth Cousens

This week's Global Vaccine Summit comes at a crucial point in history. Governments must not miss their chance to save lives Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Gro Harlem Brundtland is former director-general of the World Health Organization Elizabeth Cousens is president of the UN Foundation Google any list of the most successful public health interventions of this cent

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Coronavirus and the Flu: A Looming Double Threat

The two could come together, making things worse—or our new hygiene habits may actually reduce the flu's spread — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

How to come out to your parents as a science communicator

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01676-z Friends, family, peers and professors might struggle to understand your motivations for leaving the lab to work in science communication.

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Scientists' worlds will shrink in the wake of the pandemic

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01523-1 Researchers expect long-term changes that reduce travel for work and conferences: part 6 in a series on science after the pandemic.

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Daily briefing: More than 500 species of vertebrates are on the brink of extinction

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01671-4 "We're eroding the capabilities of the planet to maintain human life and life in general." Plus: the huge cohort studies pivoting to COVID-19, and the long-term health effects of being born extremely early.

13h

This robot can tell when sewers need repairing by scratching the walls

A four-legged robot that wades through water and climbs over obstacles can detect when the concrete in underground sewerage tunnels needs repair

13h

Live Coronavirus Updates: New Cases Multiply Worldwide

The geography of the illness is changing. Brazil now has nearly as many deaths a day as the United States, and Egypt is seeing exponential growth in patients.

13h

Why Obama Chose to Speak Out Now

Updated at 9:26 a.m. ET on June 4, 2020. Barack Obama didn't want to outshine Joe Biden. He never wants to be seen as speaking for all black Americans. But the former president was too worried about the condition of the country to stay silent about George Floyd's death and the protests that have followed. It was going to take more than the statement he put out on Friday, writing that Floyd's kill

13h

The Best Way to Handle Your Decline Is to Confront It Head On

Editor's Note: " How to Build a Life " is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. As a kid, I was sure that all old people must be afraid of death. As I have gotten older, however, it turns out that this is mostly wrong. There are, certainly, people my age (56) who are morbidly afraid of dying—there's even a diagnosable psychiatric condition for this fear,

13h

Three Reasons Stocks Are Rising

In an age punctuated with almost biblical chaos—plague, brutality, and surreal images of the president posing with a holy book he fumbles like a strange cut of meat—there has been one queasy and bizarre constant: "… and stocks rose." On Wednesday, U.S. deaths from COVID-19 officially surpassed 100,000, and stocks rose. On Friday, the Commerce Department reported that GDP plummeted nearly 5 perc

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Slow but steady: Anesthesiology researcher with more than 100 retractions will earn two more

Score one for responsiveness. In mid-May, we reported on the retraction of three review articles by Joachim Boldt, whose papers continue to fall despite his having been exposed as a fraudster a decade ago. At the time, we wondered why another journal, Anesthesia & Analgesia, hadn't also pulled reviews by Boldt that it had published … Continue reading

13h

Drive-in cinemas: the one good thing to come out of all this?

'The experience demands a large convertible, not something that seemed essential in the British climate'

13h

Stora stjärnor stör de mindre

Unga stjärnhopar är ovanliga i Vintergatan, men de som finns ger en intressant möjlighet att studera hur stjärnor och stjärnsystem bildas och utvecklas. På bilden från rymdteleskopet Hubble ser vi en stjärnhop i stjärnbilden Kölen, som bedöms vara mellan en och två miljoner år gammal.

13h

Philippine volcanic eruption could prompt El Nino warming next winter

Climatologists have found that if an ongoing Philippine volcanic eruption becomes more violent, the gases released are likely to produce an El Niño event during the 2020-21 winter, a more intense polar vortex and warming across Eurasia.

14h

Why developing nerve cells can take a wrong turn

A group of scientists from CECAD has found a mechanism by which neurodevelopmental diseases concerning neurons can be explained. The loss of a certain enzyme, UBE2K, impedes the differentiation of stem cells by silencing the expression of genes important for neuronal differentiation and, therefore, the development and generation of neurons. More specifically, UBE2K regulates the levels and activat

14h

Single molecules captured on video at an unprecedented 1,600 frames per second

A team including researchers from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Tokyo has successfully captured video of single molecules in motion at 1,600 frames per second. This is 100 times faster than previous experiments of this nature. They accomplished this by combining a powerful electron microscope with a highly sensitive camera and advanced image processing. This method could aid man

14h

Active particles with light-switchable propulsion direction and reversible interactions

Researchers from the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw, ETH in Zurich and the University of Cambridge have synthesized and analysed active microparticles self-propelling in a fluid and reversing their propulsion direction depending on the wavelength of illuminating light. A research article summarising their work has recently been published in Nature Communications.

14h

Why developing nerve cells can take a wrong turn

A group of scientists from CECAD has found a mechanism by which neurodevelopmental diseases concerning neurons can be explained. The loss of a certain enzyme, UBE2K, impedes the differentiation of stem cells by silencing the expression of genes important for neuronal differentiation and, therefore, the development and generation of neurons. More specifically, UBE2K regulates the levels and activat

14h

Etching the road to a hydrogen economy using plasma jets

Hydrogen is a clean energy source that can be produced by splitting water molecules with light. However, it is currently impossible to achieve this on a large scale. In a recent breakthrough, scientists at Tokyo University of Science, Japan, have developed a novel method that uses plasma discharge in solution to improve the performance of the photocatalyst in the water-splitting reaction. This ope

14h

Coronavirus: Can superspreading be stopped?

Identifying superspreading events could be crucial in the fight against the virus, scientists say.

14h

Science Alone Can't Solve Covid-19. The Humanities Must Help.

During the Covid-19 crisis, decision makers have arguably become better at listening to scientists and following their directives. But the pandemic has also exposed social problems that go beyond science. Here, the humanities and social sciences must play the leading role in crafting a response.

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Ny metod kan ge unik insikt i den mänskliga hjärnans utveckling

Med en ny modell av den tidiga fosterhjärnan ska forskare kunna studera de allra tidigaste stadierna av den mänskliga hjärnan för att förstå hur olika regioner i hjärnan bildas. På sikt hoppas forskarna att kunskapen ska bidra till att kunna producera nervceller för behandling av olika typer av neurologiska sjukdomar.

14h

Pericyte FAK negatively regulates Gas6/Axl signalling to suppress tumour angiogenesis and tumour growth

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16618-6 Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is required for tumour angiogenesis and growth. Here, the authors show that deletion of pericyte FAK upregulates Gas6-Axl mediated Cyr61 production, which increases endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis, while elevating tissue factor production to enhance tumour cell prolife

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Extent of N-terminus exposure of monomeric alpha-synuclein determines its aggregation propensity

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16564-3 In Parkinson's disease (PD) the monomeric protein alpha-synuclein (aSyn) misfolds and aggregates into insoluble fibrils. Here the authors use NMR measurements and hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and find that the more solvent exposed the N-terminus of aSyn is, the more aggregation prone its conform

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Highly efficient phosphor-glass composites by pressureless sintering

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16649-z Phosphor-glass/ceramic composites are attractive for high-power white light-emitting diodes, but interfacial reaction leads to loss of quantum efficiency. Here the authors report a reduction sintering method for embedment of phosphors into silica glass with limited interfacial reaction.

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REV7 is required for processing AID initiated DNA lesions in activated B cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16632-8 REV7 has emerged as a critical regulator of DNA double-strand breaks repair. Here, the authors show that REV7 is crucial for both antibody class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation in activated B cells, in addition to their survival upon AID-deamination.

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Structural and functional evidence of bacterial antiphage protection by Thoeris defense system via NAD+ degradation

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16703-w The Thoeris defense system is a recently discovered bacterial defense system that protects bacteria against phage infection and consists of the two genes thsA and thsB. Here, the authors present the crystal structures of Bacillus cereus ThsA and ThsB and show that ThsA is a NAD+ cleaving enzyme.

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Precise capture and dynamic relocation of nanoparticulate biomolecules through dielectrophoretic enhancement by vertical nanogap architectures

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16630-w Label-free trapping of nanoparticles via dielectophoretic forces is traditionally done with electrodes in a horizontal gap layout. Here, the authors present a vertical nanogap architecture, which allows for precise capture and spatiotemporal manipulation of nanoparticles and molecular assemblies.

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The Mi-2 nucleosome remodeler and the Rpd3 histone deacetylase are involved in piRNA-guided heterochromatin formation

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16635-5 In S. pombe, small non-coding RNA mediates heterochromatin formation by recruiting the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase complex. Here, the authors show that fly nucleosome remodeler Mi-2 and histone deacetylase Rpd3 are involved in piRNA-dependent transcriptional silencing of transposable elements.

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Reversible single crystal-to-single crystal double [2+2] cycloaddition induces multifunctional photo-mechano-electrochemical properties in framework materials

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15510-7 Porous coordination frameworks that undergo reversible structural transformations are promising for sensing, switching and separations. Here, the authors report an electroactive framework that exhibits a reversible single crystal-to-single crystal double [2+2] photocyclisation, leading to property changes.

14h

Future of the western North Pacific Subtropical High: Weaker or stronger?

With correction by observed sea surface temperature, under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5, a high greenhouse gas emission scenario, the models will tend to agree on a future intensification of the western North Pacific Subtropical High (WNPSH) with 45% of the uncertainty reduced, which implies stronger East Asian summer monsoon with increased rainfall but reduced typhoon landfa

14h

Small protein, big impact

In meningococci, the RNA-binding protein ProQ plays a major role. Together with RNA molecules, it regulates processes that are important for pathogenic properties of the bacteria.

14h

Thermoelectric properties of graphene-like nanoribbon studied from the perspective of symmetry

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66073-y

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Gentle stroking stimuli induce affiliative responsiveness to humans in male rats

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66078-7

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Cell-free expression tools to study co-translational folding of alpha helical membrane transporters

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66097-4

14h

The Real Threats to America's Cities

A fter years of revival and resurgence, the nation's largest metropolitan areas are now being squeezed by external threats and an internal eruption along their deepest fault line—one that could fracture their political influence in the years to come. America's cities have already faced almost four years of persistent hostility from President Donald Trump, who has reviled them as dirty, chaotic, a

14h

Racism Won't Be Solved by Yet Another Blue-Ribbon Report

O n January 29, 1943 , Robert Hall was seized from his home in Baker County, Georgia. Three white police officers, charging Hall with the theft of a tire, drove him to the county courthouse. When they arrived, officers pulled him from the squad car and pummeled him with their fists and a two-pound baton for nearly 30 minutes. Hall fell unconscious. The officers dragged him feetfirst through the s

14h

Regeringen dropper lovforslag om adgang til hemmelige telefonnumre

Et nyt lovforslag skulle give Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed adgang til hemmelige telefonnumre. Folketingets Lovsekretariat satte spørgsmål ved, om proceduren bag ændringsforslaget var i overensstemmelse med grundloven.

14h

NIH Director Hopes For At Least 1 Safe And Effective Vaccine By Year's End

Dr. Francis Collins says some candidates for a coronavirus vaccine will be ready to start large-scale human trials as early as next month. Scaling up production may start before tests are complete. (Image credit: University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP)

14h

Managing the Majestic Jumbo Flying Squid

Warming waters attributed to climate change help fill people's pockets and dinner plates.

14h

Don't Thank the Virus for Saving the Climate Yet

There are lessons to be learned — and some benefits already — but it's complicated. (Of course!)

14h

'His Body Doesn't Belong to Me'

I'm proud of my partner's work as a doctor during Covid-19. So why is it giving me flashbacks to my experiments with open relationships?

14h

Mangel på specialister forsinker opgradering af Aarhus-Langå

PLUS. Rejsende med tog fra Aalborg til Aarhus må vente endnu et år på at få sat hastigheden op på strækningen. Banedanmark mangler valideringressoucer, skriver transportministeren i et brev til Folketingets Transportudvalg.

15h

Almost 30,000 invalid UK coronavirus tests had to be redone

Consignment sent back from the US as void last month after issues at a British lab Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Tens of thousands of Britons had to be retested for coronavirus after the government sent their swabs to the US. Nearly 30,000 tests were found to be invalid after being flown out following problems at a UK laboratory last month. Continue reading…

15h

Snake eels burst through the stomach of predators in bid to escape being eaten alive

Creatures' attempts are in vain, and as they are unable to burrow through the fish's ribcage, the eels become trapped in the gut of their captor It's no secret that nature can be brutal and violent, but a new Queensland Museum report on the death of some snake eels reads more like the plot of a horror movie than a scientific paper. Snake eels are a family of eel species that live most of their li

15h

Snäckans supergener visar hur arter bildas

En är liten och skör men med kraftig fot. Den andra är stor och robust med tjockt skal. Ändå tillhör snäckorna samma art och parar sig med varandra. Professor Kerstin Johannesson har ägnat hela sin forskarkarriär åt gåtan på Bohusläns stränder. Lösningen förvånar – och lär oss mycket om evolutionen.

15h

Asian hornet: UK beekeepers on lookout for bee-eater

The bee-eating Asian hornet has already reached the Channel Islands and beekeepers fear it could soon reach the UK mainland.

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Zoom afviser kryptering til gratis-brugere

Den kommende Zoom-version bliver med end-to-end-kryptering, men ikke for gratister. Zooms CEO siger, at dette skyldes, at man ønsker at samarbejde med FBI og lokalpoliti.

15h

Which kind of face mask is the best protection against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

15h

Dödahavsrullarnas dna kartläggs i Uppsala

Tidigare har man trott att Dödahavsrullarna skrevs av en isolerad sekt, men så verkar inte vara fallet. Vid Evolutionsbiologiskt centrum, EBC, i Uppsala har forskare analyserat dna från ett 40-tal småbitar av rullar från bland annat Qumran vid Döda havet. Där har man hittat de flesta skriftrullarna, som är 2000 år gamla och bland annat innehåller texter som senare kommit att ingå i Bibeln och den

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Google sagsøges for fem milliarder dollars for at invadere privatliv i inkognito-tilstand

Google sagsøges for skjult og uautoriseret dataindsamling. Søgegiganten mener, at de tydeligt angiver, at websteder kan indsamle oplysninger i Chromes inkognito-tilstand.

15h

WHO to resume hydroxychloroquine trial after earlier halt over safety concerns

Questions raised over study claiming drug linked to higher rate of mortality and heart problems in Covid-19 patients Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Coronavirus Australia maps and cases: live numbers and statistics The World Health Organization will resume clinical trials of an anti-malaria drug researc

16h

VENUS construction on track for ORNL's newest neutron imaging instrument

Researchers and engineers at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) are making progress on the construction of VENUS, the facility's newest instrument for studying materials in exciting new ways that are currently not possible for open research programs in the United States.

16h

On a caravan, with one of the Sahara's last European explorers

Climbing into the saddle, he adjusts the scarf protecting his head from the sun and, with a tap on the camel's back, the caravan sets off.

16h

Epidemic of wipes and masks plague sewers, storm drains

Mayor Jim Kenney kicked off a recent briefing on Philadelphia's coronavirus response with an unusual request for residents: Be careful what you flush.

16h

Metasurface opens world of polarization

Polarization, the direction in which light vibrates, is invisible to the human eye. Yet, so much of our optical world relies on the control and manipulation of this hidden quality of light.

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JCESR lays foundation for safer, longer-lasting batteries

Electricity storage in batteries is in ever increasing demand for smartphones, laptops, cars and the power grid. Solid-state batteries are among the most promising next-generation technologies because they offer a higher level of safety and potentially longer life.

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High-speed atomic video

A team including researchers from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Tokyo has successfully captured video of single molecules in motion at 1,600 frames per second. This is 100 times faster than previous experiments of this nature. They accomplished this by combining a powerful electron microscope with a highly sensitive camera and advanced image processing. This method could aid man

16h

Larger streams are critical for wild brook trout conservation

The Latin name for brook trout—Salvelinus fontinalis—means "speckled fish of the fountains," but a new study by Penn State researchers suggests, for the first time, that the larger streams and rivers those fountains, or headwaters, flow into may be just as important to the brook trout.

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Larger streams are critical for wild brook trout conservation

The Latin name for brook trout—Salvelinus fontinalis—means "speckled fish of the fountains," but a new study by Penn State researchers suggests, for the first time, that the larger streams and rivers those fountains, or headwaters, flow into may be just as important to the brook trout.

16h

Tillage and cover cropping effects on grain production

Incorporating cover crops with tillage reportedly results in increased cover crop decomposition rates and increased mineralization of nutrients from cover crop biomass. Multiple studies have reported mixed results for corn-soybean grain yields when planted after cover crops.

16h

Hubble makes surprising find in the early universe

New results from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope suggest the formation of the first stars and galaxies in the early Universe took place sooner than previously thought. A European team of astronomers have found no evidence of the first generation of stars, known as Population III stars, as far back as when the Universe was just 500 million years old.

16h

The Costs of Europe's Soon-to-Be-Lost Summer

Summer is peak tourism time in Europe. The weather is nice, schools are out, and millions of people flock to popular destinations such as Athens, Barcelona, and Venice. Not this year though. Even with some countries reopening their economies, the coronavirus has all but ensured that this summer, and the many vacations that people have booked in preparation for it, won't go ahead as planned. Europ

16h

UK government to guarantee £10bn of trade credit insurance

Sector faces huge claims as Covid-19 throws market into turmoil

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UK coronavirus live: push to reopen primary schools in England falls flat

News updates: latest updates on the UK coronavirus situation and response Thousands of primary schools in England snub call to restart classes Follow our latest global coronavirus blog Coronavirus latest: at a glance Coronavirus – latest global updates See all our coronavirus coverage 8.33am BST Related: Coronavirus UK map: the latest deaths and confirmed cases near you 8.19am BST Lisa McNally, p

17h

Hydroxychloroquine Does Not Protect Against COVID-19, Clinical Trial Suggests

No better than a placebo, and in some ways, worse.

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The Covid-19 generation divide between millennials and boomers ignores the real problem | Natasha Lennard

Rather than pitting old people against the young, now is the time to unite against a system that only benefits those who are wealthy Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage During the first weeks of the coronavirus lockdown in the United States and Britain, a flurry of media commentary centred around issues of generational difference in response to the pandemic. "Boomer" par

18h

US to Stockpile Millions of COVID-19 Vaccines Ahead of FDA Approval, Fauci Says

"We hope to have a couple of hundred million doses."

18h

Redan de första djuren hade parasiter

Fossila armfotingar från en 525 miljoner år gammal havsbotten visade sig ha varit angripna av parasiter. Forskarna konstaterar att parasitism förekom redan bland de allra första djuren. Detta framkommer i en ny forskningsartikel av forskare vid Naturhistoriska riksmuseet. Det hittills tidigaste kända tecknet på parasitism upptäcktes när forskare från Naturhistoriska riksmuseet tillsammans med kin

18h

Cell-cultured meat: Earth's savior or just a $600 burger?

Cell-cultured meat raises may issues, including safety, environmental impact, cost, and our current technology's ability to manufacture it. Most importantly, when it finally hits the supermarket, will consumers buy it?

18h

Country diary: the mason bee builds individual rooms for her eggs

Langstone, Hampshire: This industrious little insect collects mud to partition off cells in the garden box I put up for her A few weeks ago, my neighbours had cavity wall insulation installed and the resulting drill holes in their gable-end wall were soon being prospected by red mason bees ( Osmia bicornis ). People often assume that the common name of these gingery, spring-flying solitary bees r

19h

Pentagon v Trump, hydroxychloroquine, Warner Music

US defence secretary Mark Esper breaks with Trump over sending troops to quell protests

19h

Can't concentrate at work? This AI system knows why

Computer scientists have developed a way to measure staff comfort and concentration in flexible working spaces using artificial intelligence.

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Tillage and cover cropping effects on grain production

Soybean yields decreased when planted after cereal rye.

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Vision and balance issues are common in elementary school-age children with a concussion

In a new study, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have performed the most comprehensive characterization of elementary school-age concussions to date, revealing an opportunity to improve outcomes for this age group through more consistent visio-vestibular assessments at the initial health care visit.

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Stakeholders update newborn screening guidelines for critical congenital heart disease

A distinguished panel of medical experts, state and federal health officials, and congenital heart disease parent advocates published recommended updates to the current American Academy of Pediatrics' protocol for detecting critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) in newborn babies using pulse oximetry. The recommendations appear in the June 2020 issue of Pediatrics.

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The secret, sonic lives of narwhals – podcast

Narwhals may be shy and elusive, but they are certainly not quiet. Nicola Davis speaks to geophysicist Dr Evgeny Podolskiy about capturing the vocalisations of narwhals in an arctic fjord, and what this sonic world could tell us about the lives of these mysterious creatures Continue reading…

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Loss of Smell in COVID-19 Can Present with Brain Alterations

MRI scans of a coronavirus patient suggest how SARS-CoV-2 might invade the brain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Eight international cheeses you need to try once

Paneer is a dense (and delicious) cheese eaten in India and other Southeast Asian countries. (Kanwardeep Kaur/Unsplash/) I came to terms with my lactose intolerance two years ago, after an encounter with a grilled cheese sandwich in my college dining hall gave me a night to remember. But one of my biggest regrets in having to quit dairy for life is that I never tried a cheese that wasn't from Fra

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