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'Playing hard to get' really works; here's why

A team of researchers from the University of Rochester and the Israeli-based Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya examined the effects of playing hard to get, a mating strategy that is likely to instill a certain degree of uncertainty. In a new study they show that making the chase harder increases a potential mate's desirability.

20h

Do COVID-19 apps protect your privacy?

Many mobile apps that track the spread of COVID-19 ask for personal data but don't indicate the information will be secure.

20h

Saturn's Moon Titan Is Drifting Off Into Space, NASA Says

On The Run Many moons, including our own, gradually creep farther and farther out into space. And while these celestial escapes occur at nearly imperceptibly-slow paces, NASA researchers just found out that Saturn's moon Titan is escaping at 100 times the pace they had previously thought — a discovery that could force astronomers to make a sharp adjustment to their understanding of our solar syst

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Boys' poor reading skills might help explain higher education gender gap

Researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Essex in the United Kingdom found boys' poor reading skills in adolescence, combined with the social attitudes about women attending college, can help explain why fewer men than women enroll in higher education or other types of post-high school education.

21h

Deadly superbug could get a vigorous foe in repurposed antibiotic

A new medium that mimics the conditions of the human body opens the door for testing antibiotics against infections other than what they are typically used for.

21h

Kidney problems more prevalent in NYC COVID-19 patients

The first 1,000 COVID-19 patients treated at a NYC medical center had more kidney complications than other patient groups, two peaks in time from symptom onset to intubation.

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Titan is migrating away from Saturn 100 times faster than previously predicted

By Earthly standards, Saturn's moon Titan is a strange place. Larger than the planet Mercury, Titan is swaddled in a thick atmosphere (it is the only moon in the solar system to have one) and covered in rivers and seas of liquid hydrocarbons like methane and ethane. Beneath these is a thick crust of water ice, and beneath that may be a liquid water ocean that could potentially harbor life.

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The US Air Force Is Planning a Human-Versus-AI Showdown in the Skies

A U.S. Air Force F-35A Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter from the 58th Fighter Squadron, 33rd Fighter Wing, Eglin AFB, Fla. escorts a KC-135R Stratotanker from the 336th Air Refueling Squadron, March ARB, Calif., following an aerial refueling mission, May 16, 2013 off the coast of Northwest Florida. The 33rd Fighter Wing is a joint graduate flying and maintenance training wing that trains Air For

21h

Data Suggests the Pandemic Could Be Coming Back With a Vengeance

Florida is preparing to reopen restaurants, bars, gyms, shops, amusement parks and vacation rentals. At the same time, the state has seen a record resurgence in new COVID-19 cases, with new cases exceeding 1,000 for five days straight . "In fact, sadly and quietly, the pandemic is roaring back to life," wrote author Charles Fishman in a series of tweets comparing new COVID-19 statistics from diff

21h

New books present the PhyloCode, an evolution-based system for naming organisms

Move over, Linnaeus: There's a new way of naming organisms.

21h

New books present the PhyloCode, an evolution-based system for naming organisms

Move over, Linnaeus: There's a new way of naming organisms.

21h

Milkweed, only food source for monarch caterpillars, ubiquitously contaminated

New evidence identifies 64 pesticide residues in milkweed, the main food for monarch butterflies in the west. Milkweed samples from all of the locations studied in California's Central Valley were contaminated with pesticides, sometimes at levels harmful to monarchs and other insects.

21h

New tool helps nanorods stand out

Rice University scientists introduce an open-source method to simplify nanoparticle analysis using scanning electron microscope images.

21h

Milkweed, only food source for monarch caterpillars, ubiquitously contaminated

New evidence identifies 64 pesticide residues in milkweed, the main food for monarch butterflies in the west. Milkweed samples from all of the locations studied in California's Central Valley were contaminated with pesticides, sometimes at levels harmful to monarchs and other insects. 32% of the samples contained pesticide levels known to be lethal to monarchs, according to a study released today

21h

Marine energy devices likely pose minimal impacts to marine life, report shows

On World Oceans Day, an international team of marine scientists reports that the potential impact of marine renewable energy to marine life is likely small or undetectable.

21h

You are what you eat is as important for fish as it is for people

There is truth in the saying 'you are what you eat'; even more so if you are a salmon or herring swimming off the British Columbia coast, a recent University of British Columbia study discovered.

21h

Milkweed, only food source for monarch caterpillars, ubiquitously contaminated

New evidence identifies 64 pesticide residues in milkweed, the main food for monarch butterflies in the west. Milkweed samples from all of the locations studied in California's Central Valley were contaminated with pesticides, sometimes at levels harmful to monarchs and other insects.

21h

New tool helps nanorods stand out

Rice University scientists have developed an easy and affordable tool to count and characterize nanoparticles.

21h

Shock waves created in the lab mimic astrophysical particle accelerators powered by exploding stars

When stars explode as supernovas, they produce shock waves in the plasma surrounding them. So powerful are these shock waves, they can act as particle accelerators that blast streams of particles, called cosmic rays, out into the universe at nearly the speed of light. Yet how exactly they do that has remained something of a mystery.

21h

Marine energy devices likely pose minimal impacts to marine life, report shows

Marine scientists from around the world spent the last four years reviewing numerous studies and other data on the possible environmental effects of marine renewable energy (MRE) devices and found that the potential impact to marine life is likely small or undetectable.

21h

Physicists study mirror nuclei for precision theory test

It's not often in nuclear physics that you can clearly get both sides of the story, but a recent experiment allowed researchers to do just that. They compared very similar nuclei to each other to get a clearer view of how the components of nuclei are arranged and found that there's still more to learn about the heart of matter. The research, carried out at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jeffers

21h

Researchers develop ultra-sensitive device for detecting magnetic fields

A team of Brown University physicists has developed a new type of compact, ultra-sensitive magnetometer. The new device could be useful in a variety of applications involving weak magnetic fields, the researchers say.

21h

Researchers shed light on new enzymatic reaction

Researchers have identified key ingredients for producing high-value chemical compounds in an environmentally friendly fashion: repurposed enzymes, curiosity, and a little bit of light.

21h

You are what you eat is as important for fish as it is for people

There is truth in the saying "you are what you eat"; even more so if you are a salmon or herring swimming off the British Columbia coast, a recent UBC study discovered.

21h

Researchers shed light on new enzymatic reaction

Researchers have identified key ingredients for producing high-value chemical compounds in an environmentally friendly fashion: repurposed enzymes, curiosity, and a little bit of light.

21h

You are what you eat is as important for fish as it is for people

There is truth in the saying "you are what you eat"; even more so if you are a salmon or herring swimming off the British Columbia coast, a recent UBC study discovered.

21h

Researchers build better rock models

Once you crush, cut or fracture a rock, there are no do-overs. It's a fact that means geoscientists have to be particularly careful about which rock samples they can sacrifice to physics experiments versus which ones should stay on the shelf.

21h

Engineers put tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses on a single chip

MIT engineers have designed a "brain-on-a-chip," smaller than a piece of confetti, that is made from tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses known as memristors—silicon-based components that mimic the information-transmitting synapses in the human brain.

21h

The battle over Alaska's Pebble Mine is about to get more dramatic

A cluster of spawning sockeye salmon running in the Bristol Bay ecosystem. (Courtesy of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/) This story originally featured on Field & Stream . The battle over Pebble Mine—and the fate of the world's largest salmon run—is expected to hit a major turning point this month. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' final Environmental Impact Statement, a key document in

21h

Health disparities prove to be multidimensional

Hollings Cancer Center researcher Chanita Hughes-Halbert, Ph.D. shows in two recent health disparity studies the work being done by the Transdisciplinary Collaborative Center in Precision Medicine and Minority Men's Health at the Medical University of South Carolina. The two studies conclude that it is important to have effective strategies for chronic disease prevention and management for male mi

21h

The Future of Xbox Isn't Just a Console

With the Xbox Series X on the horizon, Microsoft's head of videogame hardware sees a future where consoles may no longer be front and center.

21h

Here Are a Bunch of Photos of Cops Not Wearing Masks

At a protest in Queens, I asked a police officer why he wasn't wearing a mask. "Corona's over," he replied. As Black Lives Matter protests against police violence and systematic racism erupted across the country, an unfortunate trend has emerged: while police often show up heavily armed and wearing riot gear , they seldom wear medical masks or other face coverings to prevent COVID-19 from spreadi

21h

Physicists entangle 15 trillion hot atoms

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The most urgent threat of deepfakes isn't politics

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European Space Agency is aiming for its own low-cost reusable rocket

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Podastic! The ICU device safely transporting COVID-19 patients

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AI scientist Ben Goertzel explains the Singularity [Dec, 2018]

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Weird Wind Generator No Blades No Moving Parts

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Out with the Old Blood

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How much color do we really see?

Color awareness has long been a puzzle for researchers in neuroscience and psychology, who debate over how much color observers really perceive. A study from Dartmouth in collaboration with Amherst College finds that people are aware of surprisingly limited color in their peripheral vision; much of our sense of a colorful visual world is likely constructed by our brain. The findings are published

22h

Radiocarbon dating pins date for construction of Uyghur complex to the year 777

Dating archaeological objects precisely is difficult, even when using techniques such as radiocarbon dating. Using a recently developed method, based on the presence of sudden spikes in carbon-14 concentration, scientists at the University of Groningen, together with Russian colleagues, have pinned the date for the construction of an eighth-century complex in southern Siberia to a specific year. T

22h

Giving GDP a needed ecological companion

Gross ecosystem product (GEP) summarizes the economic value of nature's contributions to humans.

22h

Replacing GDP with Gross Ecosystem Product reveals value of nature

Replacing Gross Domestic Product (GDP) with a new "ecosystem" measure reveals the enormous value of the natural world, new research shows.

22h

Appetite can be increased by cells in the brain

Tanycytes are glial cells, which communicate with neurons in the brain to inform it of what we have eaten. Researchers from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick have found when tanycytes are selectively stimulated appetite was increased.

22h

Scientists engineer one protein to fight cancer and regenerate neurons

A team led by Stanford bioengineer and department chair Jennifer Cochran has tweaked one ligand in slightly different ways to produce two startlingly different results. One set of alterations caused neuronal cells to regenerate, while different tweaks to the same protein inhibited lung tumor growth.

22h

Sharing of tacit knowledge is most important aspect of mentorship, study finds

In one of the largest ever multidisciplinary investigations into mentorship and mentee performance, the Kellogg School of Management researchers found that the most impactful mentors are those who teach students to think independently and communicate their unique viewpoints effectively. And the most successful protégés are those who pursue their own unique research topics, rather than carrying on

22h

Using multiomics in an agricultural field, scientists discover that organic nitrogen plays a key rol

Researchers from a collaboration led by the RIKEN BioResource Science Center in Japan have analyzed agricultural systems using a multiomics approach, and successfully digitalized the complex interactions between plants, microbes and soil in an agricultural field. Using the new approach, they made the surprising finding that organic nitrogen plays a key role in promoting plant growth.

22h

How to gently caress atoms

It is extremely difficult to study oxygen molecules on the metal oxide surface without altering them. At TU Wien, this has now been achieved with a special trick: a single oxygen atom is attached to the tip of an atomic force microscope and then it is gently guided across the surface. The force between the surface and the oxygen atom is measured, and an image is taken with extremely high resolutio

22h

This Climate Detective Reconstructs What the Ocean Was Like Millions of Years Ago

Yet, the biggest concern, says Smithsonian curator Brian Huber, is how rapidly the ocean has changed in the past few decades

22h

Teargassing Protesters during an Infectious Outbreak Is 'a Recipe for Disaster'

Some scientists call for police to stop using the chemical irritants, which could increase the risk of spreading COVID-19 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

The best cutting devices for your favorite fruit

Slice and dice easier. (amoon ra via Unsplash/) You can always eat more fruit. This is something that can't be said about everything in your fridge or pantry, but it's true of nature's candy. Sure, some varietals make you work for it a little, but that shouldn't be an excuse. With these innovative and convenient fruit-specific slicers and de-corers, you will no longer have any reason to avoid add

22h

Scientists engineer one protein to fight cancer and regenerate neurons

Our lungs, bones, blood vessels and other major organs are made up of cells, and one way our bodies keep us healthy is by using protein messengers known as ligands that bind to receptors on the surfaces of cells to regulate our biological processes. When those messages get garbled, it can make us ill with a host of different diseases.

22h

Using multiomics in an agricultural field, scientists discover that organic nitrogen plays a key rol

Researchers from a collaboration led by the RIKEN BioResource Science Center in Japan have analyzed agricultural systems using a multiomics approach, and successfully digitalized the complex interactions between plants, microbes and soil in an agricultural field. Using the new approach, they made the surprising finding that organic nitrogen plays a key role in promoting plant growth. The study, pu

22h

Four window air conditioners for a cooler, happier indoor space

Make the cool choice. (SHOP SLO via Unsplash/) When high heat and humidity come on strong, a simple open window with a fan in front of it just doesn't cut it. Sometimes, it can even make things worse. Instead of trapping hot air in your home and moving it from point A to point B, put an air conditioner in the nearest window and bask in the unique comfort and relief that only air conditioning can

22h

New technique pinpoints locations of individual molecules in their cellular neighborhoods

Scientists have married two of today's most powerful microscopy techniques to make images that pinpoint, for the first time, the identities and precise locations of individual proteins within the detailed context of bacterial cells. This information is crucial for learning how protein molecules work together to organize cell division and carry out other important tasks, such as enabling microbes t

22h

Scientists engineer one protein to fight cancer and regenerate neurons

Our lungs, bones, blood vessels and other major organs are made up of cells, and one way our bodies keep us healthy is by using protein messengers known as ligands that bind to receptors on the surfaces of cells to regulate our biological processes. When those messages get garbled, it can make us ill with a host of different diseases.

22h

Gently caressing atoms

Oxygen is highly reactive. It accumulates on many surfaces and determines their chemical behavior. At the Vienna University of Technology, scientists study the interaction between oxygen and metal oxide surfaces, which play an important role in many technical applications, from chemical sensors and catalysts to electronics.

22h

Using multiomics in an agricultural field, scientists discover that organic nitrogen plays a key rol

Researchers from a collaboration led by the RIKEN BioResource Science Center in Japan have analyzed agricultural systems using a multiomics approach, and successfully digitalized the complex interactions between plants, microbes and soil in an agricultural field. Using the new approach, they made the surprising finding that organic nitrogen plays a key role in promoting plant growth. The study, pu

22h

New technique pinpoints locations of individual molecules in their cellular neighborhoods

Scientists have married two of today's most powerful microscopy techniques to make images that pinpoint, for the first time, the identities and precise locations of individual proteins within the detailed context of bacterial cells. This information is crucial for learning how protein molecules work together to organize cell division and carry out other important tasks, such as enabling microbes t

22h

Sharing of tacit knowledge is most important aspect of mentorship, study finds

When it comes to education and mentorship, Northwestern University researchers believe that Albert Einstein had the right idea. The most important aspect of teaching, Einstein thought, isn't relaying facts but imparting tacit knowledge that students will build on for the rest of their lives.

22h

Replacing GDP with Gross Ecosystem Product reveals value of nature

Replacing Gross Domestic Product (GDP) with a new "ecosystem" measure reveals the enormous value of the natural world, new research shows.

22h

UK ministers face legal challenge for refusal to order PPE inquiry

Doctors and campaigners seek judicial review of government's efforts to provide PPE for NHS Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Ministers are facing a high court legal challenge after they refused to order an urgent investigation into the shortages of personal protective equipment faced by NHS staff during the coronavirus pandemic. Doctors, lawyers and campaigners for ol

22h

The best inflatable kiddie pools for backyard fun

Splash-tastic, as they say. (Christine Larsen via Unsplash/) When the weather heats up, people—especially kids—will find any way possible to cool down. Water balloons, a neighbor's sprinkler, even just a no-frills blast from a garden hose will do. But the strive to refresh can also be fun, thanks to the right inflatable pool. From simple pools to elaborate activity centers, here are some of the b

22h

When Scientists Find Nothing: The Value of Null Results

Physics Science is an endeavor of trial and error. Can we find a better way to share the "erroneous" trials? 06/03/2020 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer To read more…

22h

Researchers develop ultra-sensitive device for detecting magnetic fields

The new magnetic sensor is inexpensive to make, works on minimal power and is 20 times more sensitive than many traditional sensors.

23h

Physicists study mirror nuclei for precision theory test

A precision measurement of helium and hydrogen mirror isotopes reveals new questions in understanding of nuclear structure. The research, carried out at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, was recently published as an editors' suggested read in Physical Review Letters.

23h

Global oncology pharmacists face restricted access to essential PPE items

Oncology pharmacy practitioners around the globe are fighting to provide cancer patients high quality cancer care with increasingly limited and sometimes restricted personal protective equipment supply as well as impaired access to essential anticancer medication, according to University of California, Irvine-led study.

23h

Elon Musk: Imprisoning People for Selling Weed is Wrong

"This will probably get me into trouble, but I feel I have to say it," Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk wrote in a Saturday tweet. Shareholders held their breath, bracing for another rollercoaster ride — and probably hoping he wasn't about to say something problematic about the Black Lives Matter protests happening across the world. But his followup tweet seemed pretty reasonable. "Selling weed lit

23h

Furloughed due to COVID-19? Become a contact tracer.

Demand for coronavirus contact tracers has made it one of the fastest-growing jobs in the United States. Contact tracers reach out to people who may have been infected with the virus. They answer questions, provide information, and encourage people to stay home. Though contact tracing is not new, states and counties hoping to reopen will need a strong workforce to stave off a COVID-19 resurgence.

23h

Majority of UK cabinet want to cut 2m social distancing

Boris Johnson sympathetic to calls for relaxation of rule to boost the economy

23h

Research team builds better rock models

Once you crush, cut or fracture a rock, there are no do-overs. It's a fact that means geoscientists have to be particularly careful about which rock samples they can sacrifice to physics experiments versus which ones should stay on the shelf. A team of geoscience researchers from The University of Texas at Austin is working to change that with a new method for creating digital replicas of rock sam

23h

Census of viral spike protein antigens reveals candidates for use in a COVID-19 vaccine

A group of researchers has determined how different proteins associated with SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID-19 — generate immune responses when given to rabbits as immunizations.

23h

Researchers shed light on new enzymatic reaction

Researchers have discovered that repurposed enzymes and light are key to producing chemical compounds in an environmentally friendly fashion. By blending bio- and photocatalysis and experimenting with reactionary 'ingredients,' the research team developed a visible-light-induced reaction using the enzyme family ene-reductase (ER). The substrates used in this study, alkenes, can be derived in princ

23h

Police Seize Elon Musk Flamethrower During Traffic Stop

Flame War Remember when Elon Musk released special edition flamethrowers through his Boring Company outfit? Well, the street finds new uses for things — and now police in Massachusetts say they seized one of the Boring Company flamethrowers during a routine traffic stop. SPD officers and members of the C3 North End Unit seize a flamethrower on Sunday morning. pic.twitter.com/oljhW1kh9j — Ryan Wal

23h

Researchers shed light on new enzymatic reaction

Researchers have discovered that repurposed enzymes and light are key to producing chemical compounds in an environmentally friendly fashion. By blending bio- and photocatalysis and experimenting with reactionary 'ingredients,' the research team developed a visible-light-induced reaction using the enzyme family ene-reductase (ER). The substrates used in this study, alkenes, can be derived in princ

23h

Crystalline 'nanobrush' clears way to advanced energy and information tech

Engineers have synthesized a tiny structure with high surface area and discovered how its unique architecture drives ions across interfaces to transport energy or information. Their 'nanobrush' contains bristles made of alternating crystal sheets with vertically aligned interfaces and plentiful pores.

23h

Emerging economies take hit from coronavirus

World Bank warns of mass increase in poverty that will leave lasting scars

23h

Tear gas during COVID-19 is a public health disaster

Protesters in Washington, D.C. faced off with canisters of tear gas at the end of May. (Koshu Kunii/Unsplash/) Grey clouds waft over scattering crowds in the footage from Seattle this past Sunday. The yells and screams of police and protesters alike are punctuated by shots of flare guns. Eventually, the street empties out, but the haze of tear gas continues to swirl under the lights. As more and

23h

Doing more with terahertz: Simplifying near-infrared spectroscopy systems

Researchers from Beihang University, China, and Tokushima University, Japan, have developed a terahertz spectroscopy scheme that offers outstanding resolution using a single laser.

23h

NASA Snaps Closeup Shots of Potential Asteroid Landing Site

Flyby The NASA space probe OSIRIS-REx recently took a low swoop over the surface of Bennu, the asteroid it's been orbiting for the last two years . The spacecraft flew down to a region of Bennu called Osprey, where it came within 820 feet of the surface and took nearly 350 pictures that NASA stitched into a mosaic map, Space.com reports . OSIRIS-REx is expected to dislodge and gather samples from

23h

Drug researcher develops 'fat burning' molecule

Scientists have recently identified a small mitochondrial uncoupler, named BAM15, that decreases the body fat mass of mice without affecting food intake and muscle mass or increasing body temperature.

23h

Tiny, magnetically powered neural stimulator

Neuroengineers have created a tiny surgical implant that can electrically stimulate the brain and nervous system without using a battery or wired power supply.

23h

Shock waves created in the lab mimic supernova particle accelerators

Scientists have found new details about how supernovas boost charged particles to nearly the speed of light.

23h

Integrating nanomaterial with light-absorbing molecule powers hydrogen production from water and sun

Scientists have developed a hybrid material constructed from a metal oxide nanosheet and a light-absorbing molecule for splitting water molecules (H2O) to obtain dihydrogen (H2) under sunlight. Since H2 can be used as carbon-free fuel, this study provides relevant insight towards clean energy generation.

23h

Tiny, magnetically powered neural stimulator

Neuroengineers have created a tiny surgical implant that can electrically stimulate the brain and nervous system without using a battery or wired power supply.

23h

Crystalline 'nanobrush' clears way to advanced energy and information tech

Engineers have synthesized a tiny structure with high surface area and discovered how its unique architecture drives ions across interfaces to transport energy or information. Their 'nanobrush' contains bristles made of alternating crystal sheets with vertically aligned interfaces and plentiful pores.

23h

Shock waves created in the lab mimic supernova particle accelerators

In experiments at the National Ignition Facility, a SLAC-led team found new details about how supernovas boost charged particles to nearly the speed of light.

1d

Drug researcher develops 'fat burning' molecule

Scientists have recently identified a small mitochondrial uncoupler, named BAM15, that decreases the body fat mass of mice without affecting food intake and muscle mass or increasing body temperature.

1d

Physical activity in all of its forms may help maintain muscle mass in midlife

Loss of estrogen has an effect on muscles and leads to a decline in muscle mass. .

1d

Russian company accidentally spills 20,000 tons of oil into Arctic river

The accident occurred in the Siberian city of Norilsk. The company said thawing permafrost caused a fuel tank to collapse. Thawing permafrost poses a major threat to Russia's oil industry, which is the world's third largest. Russian President Vladimir Putin recently declared a state of emergency after an industrial accident spilled more than 20,000 tons of diesel into the Arctic environment. The

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Covid-19 news: Lockdowns prevented 3.1 million deaths in Europe

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

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How the coronavirus pandemic is fuelling online trolls and scams

The pandemic has resulted in a surge in anti-Asian hate speech, a proliferation of covid-19 scams, and in the rapid spread of scientific misinformation

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Japanese pride in end of lockdown can swell too much

Taro Aso's claim of national superiority shows a mindset that obstructs progress

1d

France to extend crisis jobs scheme for up to two years

Labour minister says long extension will be needed to avert mass unemployment

1d

COVID-19: Are we handling this the right way?

COVID-19: Herd Immunity needs to be considered.

1d

Researchers shed light on new enzymatic reaction

Researchers have discovered that repurposed enzymes and light are key to producing chemical compounds in an environmentally friendly fashion. By blending bio- and photocatalysis and experimenting with reactionary 'ingredients,' the CABBI team developed a visible-light-induced reaction using the enzyme family ene-reductase (ER). The substrates used in this study, alkenes, can be derived in principl

1d

Kawasaki-like syndrome linked to COVID-19 in children is a new condition

A study on children suffering from severe inflammatory symptoms shows the condition is new and distinct from Kawasaki disease.

1d

Addressing sexual violence in sport: American Medical Society for Sports Medicine issues position statement

Sexual violence is a serious problem with potentially severe and lasting negative effects on the physical, psychological, and social well-being of victims — including athletes. A new American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) Position Statement on sexual violence in sport was published simultaneously in four leading sports medicine journals, including Current Sports Medicine Reports (CS

1d

Engineers put tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses on a single chip

MIT engineers have designed a 'brain-on-a-chip,' smaller than a piece of confetti, that is made from tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses known as memristors — silicon-based components that mimic the information-transmitting synapses in the human brain.

1d

Case Western Reserve-led research uncovers connections between psoriasis and joint disease

A team led by Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers has made two major discoveries involving psoriasis, a chronic and debilitating skin disease with no known cure.

1d

Integrating nanomaterial with light-absorbing molecule powers hydrogen production from water and sun

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) developed a hybrid material constructed from a metal oxide nanosheet and a light-absorbing molecule for splitting water molecules (H2O) to obtain dihydrogen (H2) under sunlight. Since H2 can be used as carbon-free fuel, this study provides relevant insight towards clean energy generation.

1d

Better detection of a type of ovarian cancer could lead to better treatments

Scientists have found that a specific type of ovarian cancer could possibly benefit from existing platinum-based chemotherapy and new DNA repairing treatments, following better testing.

1d

Monkeys appreciate lifelike animation

Monkeys can overcome their aversion to animated monkeys through a more realistic avatar, according to research recently published in eNeuro.

1d

Oops: Netflix Trademarked "Space Force" Before the US Military

The US Department of Defense only established its branding and trademark licensing office in 2007, decades after the entertainment industry started planting its flags in the world of trademarks. Case in point: in the case the US military's youngest branch, Space Force, Netflix was almost a year ahead in registering a trademark for the same name — for its satirical show starring Steve Carell, acco

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Ocean geoengineering tests violate UN convention: green groups

Experimental geoengineering schemes to protect areas such as Australia's Great Barrier Reef are "distracting technofixes" that violate an international moratorium on the largely untested tech projects, a coalition of nearly 200 environmental groups said Monday.

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Protection of seagrasses is key to building resilience to climate change and disasters

Seagrass meadows can be a powerful nature-based climate solution and help sustain communities hard-hit by stressors such as the COVID-19 pandemic, but these important ecosystems continue to decline. The importance of seagrasses is highlighted in a new report, "Out of the Blue: The Value of Seagrasses to the Environment and to People," released by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) tog

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Jagten på liv i Universet: Endnu en jord-lignende planet fundet

Planeten kredser om en sol-lignende stjerne tusindvis af lysår væk.

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Chemists have induced uniform chirality

Chirality is a fundamental property of many organic molecules and means that chemical compounds can appear in not only one form, but in two mirror-image forms as well. Chemists have now found a way to spontaneously induce chirality in crystalline, liquid-crystalline and liquid substances, without requiring any external influence. The findings could be significant for the development of new active

1d

Temperate insects as vulnerable to climate change as tropical species

In previous research, it has been assumed that insects in temperate regions would cope well with or even benefit from a warmer climate. Not so, according to researchers. The earlier models failed to take into account the fact that insects in temperate habitats are inactive for much of the year.

1d

Chemists have induced uniform chirality

Chirality is a fundamental property of many organic molecules and means that chemical compounds can appear in not only one form, but in two mirror-image forms as well. Chemists have now found a way to spontaneously induce chirality in crystalline, liquid-crystalline and liquid substances, without requiring any external influence. The findings could be significant for the development of new active

1d

Monkeys Don't Trust Bad Avatars

Monkeys' reactions to computer-generated videos suggest they, like humans, suffer from the creepy "uncanny valley" effect. disturbed-monkey_cropped.gif Image credits: Stig Berge via Flickr Creature Monday, June 8, 2020 – 12:00 Joshua Learn, Contributor (Inside Science) — Whether it's an android, computer graphics in a movie, or a live Tupac hologram , animated representations of people can some

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Red tape may have a silver lining for micro businesses: new study

Small business owners who complain about excessive regulation may be overlooking the business benefits it brings, according to a new study from the University of Bath.

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A Solution to the Confederate-Monument Problem

Updated at 9:45 p.m. ET on June 8, 2020. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam announced his intention to remove his state's most prominent statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, which has presided regally over Richmond since 1890. * On the subject of whether to topple a statue of Lee, my opinion is predictable. I grew up partly in the American South, but in a mixed-race Canadian-immigrant family

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The Search for the World's Simplest Animal

O n a sunny pre-pandemic afternoon at the beach near Santa Cruz, California, children shriek as the waves demolish their sand castles, and seagulls squawk over a discarded bag of salt-and-vinegar potato chips. Pelicans, sea lions, and fishermen flock to the end of an old wooden pier, attracted by schools of fish that shelter in the wreckage of a half-submerged tanker, the SS Palo Alto. The pier b

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Images From a Worldwide Protest Movement

Over the weekend, demonstrations took place around the world, with thousands of people outside the United States marching to show solidarity with American protests over the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police. In many places, marchers also voiced their anger about systemic racism and police brutality within their own countries. Gathered below are images from the past 48 hours in Sweden,

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Monkeys appreciate lifelike animation

Monkeys can overcome their aversion to animated monkeys through a more realistic avatar, according to research recently published in eNeuro.

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Monkeys appreciate lifelike animation

Monkeys can overcome their aversion to animated monkeys through a more realistic avatar, according to research recently published in eNeuro.

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Facebook needs 30,000 of its own content moderators, says a new report

Imagine if Facebook stopped moderating its site right now. Anyone could post anything they wanted. Experience seems to suggest that it would quite quickly become a hellish environment overrun with spam, bullying, crime, terrorist beheadings, neo-Nazi texts, and images of child sexual abuse. In that scenario, vast swaths of its user base would probably leave, followed by the lucrative advertisers.

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First global map of rockfalls on the Moon

A research team counted over 136,000 rockfalls on the moon caused by asteroid impacts. Even billions of years old landscapes are still changing.

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Countries must work together on CO2 removal to avoid dangerous climate change

The Paris Agreement lays out national quotas on CO2 emissions but not removal, and that must be urgently addressed, say the authors of a new study.

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Astronomers find elusive target hiding behind dust

Some young, still-forming stars are surrounded by regions of complex organic molecules called "hot corinos." In some pairs of young stars forming together as binary pairs, astronomers found a hot corino around one, but not the other. Guessing that the unseen one might be obscured by dust, researchers studied such a pair with the VLA at radio wavelengths that readily pass through dust, and found

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Ultrathin nanosheets separate harmful ions from water

An international research team has created an ultrathin membrane with high porosity that can filter potentially harmful ions from water.

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Rice team makes tiny, magnetically powered neural stimulator

Rice University neuroengineers have created a tiny surgical implant that can electrically stimulate the brain and nervous system without using a battery or wired power supply.

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Pregnancy complications in assisted reproduction linked to a specific process

An experimental study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania links a specific procedure — embryo culture — that is part of the assisted reproduction process (ART) to placental abnormalities, risk for preeclampsia, and abnormal fetal growth. The team, led by Marisa Bartolemei, PhD, a professor of Cell and Developmental Biology, published their findin

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Red tape may have a silver lining for micro businesses — new study

Small business owners who complain about excessive regulation may be overlooking the business benefits it brings, according to a new study from the University of Bath.

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Study links blood type to lower risk of catching coronavirus

Preliminary data show that people with type O blood were less likely to test positive

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Crystalline 'nanobrush' clears way to advanced energy and information tech

A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory synthesized a tiny structure with high surface area and discovered how its unique architecture drives ions across interfaces to transport energy or information. Their "nanobrush" contains bristles made of alternating crystal sheets with vertically aligned interfaces and plentiful pores.

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'Social distancing' saves frogs: New approach to identify individual frogs noninvasively

Globally, 41% amphibian species are regarded as threatened with extinction. However, when it comes to the case of India, the majority of the species falls in the Data Deficient group, according to the criteria of the International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species.

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'Social distancing' saves frogs: New approach to identify individual frogs noninvasively

Globally, 41% amphibian species are regarded as threatened with extinction. However, when it comes to the case of India, the majority of the species falls in the Data Deficient group, according to the criteria of the International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species.

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The Dangers of Space, Military Rivals and Other New Books to Read

These five recent releases may have been lost in the news cycle

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New study filters to search for non-randomized studies in PubMed and Medline

In collaboration with McMaster University/Canada, IQWiG developed two study filters to search for non-randomized studies (NRS) in PubMed and Medline (OVID).

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New smart parking software cuts congestion, emissions

New smart parking software developed by Cornell University researchers, which matches drivers with parking garage spots based on travel time and other factors, could reduce congestion and emissions while saving drivers the time of circling to look for available spots.

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Crystalline 'nanobrush' clears way to advanced energy and information tech

A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory synthesized a tiny structure with high surface area and discovered how its unique architecture drives ions across interfaces to transport energy or information. Their 'nanobrush' contains bristles made of alternating crystal sheets with vertically aligned interfaces and plentiful pores. 'These are major technical accomplishment

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Indirect effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the kidneys: beware of the genetic background

A current study [1] reports on two COVID-19 patients with acute kidney injury. The virus was detected in throat swabs only, but not in kidney tissue, so it is suspected that inflammatory or immunological reactions are the cause, particularly in people with a certain genetic predisposition.

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Switching from aluminum to zinc alloys could improve sustainability of automotive parts

A new study reveals that switching from aluminum to zinc alloys in the production of automotive parts could greatly enhance their longevity and sustainability. The study, conducted by Cranfield University's Sustainable Manufacturing Systems Centre, compared three different alloys (Aluminium-A380, Magnesium-AZ91D and Zinc-ZA8). Over recent years aluminum alloys have been favoured by the automotive

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Stanford-led study suggests a new approach to reducing spread of mosquito-borne diseases

Stanford researchers working in rural Kenya have identified the most productive breeding habitats for mosquitoes that spread a range of untreatable viruses. Their findings point to more effective health interventions that focus on the purpose of water-holding containers.

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Specific kidney proximal tubular injury caused by SARS-CoV-2

A French study [1] investigated acute Fanconi syndrome as a kidney injury associated with COVID-19. The hallmark of the syndrome is increased excretion or loss of certain substances (such as protein, phosphate or glucose) in urine. This renal dysfunction often precede acute kidney injury and disappears again when the kidneys recover.

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Protection of seagrasses is key to building resilience to climate change and disasters

Seagrass meadows can be a powerful nature-based climate solution and help sustain communities hard-hit by stressors such as the COVID-19 pandemic, but these important ecosystems continue to decline. The importance of seagrasses is highlighted in a new report, "Out of the Blue: The Value of Seagrasses to the Environment and to People", released by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) tog

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Drug researcher develops 'fat burning' molecule

Santos and his colleagues have recently identified a small mitochondrial uncoupler, named BAM15, that decreases the body fat mass of mice without affecting food intake and muscle mass or increasing body temperature

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New algorithm helps select patients for urgent surgery or chemotherapy during pandemic

A new approach to better select breast cancer patients in need of urgent surgery or chemotherapy during the COVID-19 pandemic has been developed by researchers at The Royal Marsden and the Breast Cancer Now Research Centre at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, in collaboration with colleagues in the UK, Germany and US.

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Research team to study food resilience in the face of catastrophic global events

An interdisciplinary team of Penn State professors has received $3 million from Open Philanthropy to study food resilience in the face of catastrophic global events such as an all-out nuclear war, a large asteroid strike or a supervolcano eruption.

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Temperate insects as vulnerable to climate change as tropical species

In previous research, it has been assumed that insects in temperate regions would cope well with or even benefit from a warmer climate. Not so, according to researchers from the Universities of Uppsala and Lund in Sweden and Oviedo, Spain, in a new study. The earlier models failed to take into account the fact that insects in temperate habitats are inactive for much of the year.

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Threats to global food security from emerging fungal crop pathogens

Amongst the world's most challenging problems is the need to feed an ever-growing global population sustainably.

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This Quasar Warps Itself Into a Ring by Distorting Spacetime

Circling Back While they were waiting out the pandemic lockdown, a team of astronomers revisited a pivotal discovery from the 1980s and walked away with new tools that could help them uncover the secrets of dark matter. In 1987, scientists directly observed an Einstein ring — a distant celestial object that appears to be a circle because of the way it warps spacetime and light around it — for the

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Temperate insects as vulnerable to climate change as tropical species

In previous research, it has been assumed that insects in temperate regions would cope well with or even benefit from a warmer climate. Not so, according to researchers from the Universities of Uppsala and Lund in Sweden and Oviedo, Spain, in a new study. The earlier models failed to take into account the fact that insects in temperate habitats are inactive for much of the year.

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Threats to global food security from emerging fungal crop pathogens

Amongst the world's most challenging problems is the need to feed an ever-growing global population sustainably.

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Chemists are able to induce uniform chirality

Chirality is a fundamental property of many organic molecules and means that chemical compounds can appear in not only one form, but in two mirror-image forms as well. Chemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg have now found a way to spontaneously induce chirality in crystalline, liquid-crystalline and liquid substances, without requiring any external influence. The findings could be s

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Green cities roadmap touts COVID-19 recovery stimulus

A Roadmap to fast-track flourishing green roofs, walls and facades in Australian cities released today promotes six positive actioned based strategies to help grow green cities.

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NASA calculates soaking rainfall in Tropical Depression Cristobal

When Tropical Storm Cristobal made landfall in southern Louisiana yesterday, May 7, it dropped a lot of rain, and continues to as it weakens and moves inland. NASA's GPM satellite provided a look at the rainfall rates in the now depression.

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Volcanic glass spray can kill mosquitoes

An indoor residual spray made by combining a type of volcanic glass with water showed effective control of mosquitoes that carry malaria, according to a new study. The findings could be useful in reducing disease-carrying mosquito populations—and the risk of malaria—in Africa. Malaria annually kills some 400,000 people in Africa. The use of insecticide-treated bed nets and indoor residual sprays

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Novel eco-friendly electrochemical reaction can synthesize useful semiconductor materials

Organic solar cells have a variety of applications in the field of electronics, especially in the development of novel electronic devices like wearable devices. Often, these batteries are composed of organic semiconductor molecules, which are light and robust. Thus, finding novel strategies for the development of these semiconductor molecules has been the goal of many scientists globally. But usua

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Lack of UK testing data is impeding our understanding of the outbreak

The UK government hasn't reported the daily numbers of how many people outside of hospitals and care homes have been tested for covid-19 in over two weeks

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Grieving and frustrated: Black scientists call out racism in the wake of police killings

Nature, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01705-x An academic strike is planned for this week, alongside marches and demonstrations worldwide.

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Study shows opioid, sedative and antidepressant use pre-surgery leads to worse outcomes

A study led by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers showed that patients who already used opioids, sedatives or antidepressants prior to colorectal surgery experience significantly more complications post-surgery.

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Army researchers enhance communications for multi-agent teaming

Army researchers are collaborating to enhance multi-agent teaming capabilities for the Soldier that will lead to improved situational awareness and communication capabilities on the battlefield.

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Heart injury among hospitalized COVID-19 patients associated with higher risk of death

Study findings may help doctors better triage coronavirus patients in admitted to the hospital.

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Researchers developing quick and simple method of glyphosate detection

Glyphosate is a very widely used herbicide. It is suspected to be carcinogenic, which is why a quick, low-cost method for detecting glyphosate would be highly beneficial. Researchers at Leipzig University and Technische Universität Dresden have spent more than a year working on a solution in a collaborative project with three companies from Saxony.

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Which Experts Should You Listen to during the Pandemic?

It should be a no-brainer: your best bet is to follow those who have actual expertise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nobel laureate Tasuku Honjo to sue Japanese drug firm for 22 billion yen

Dispute stems from patent rights to lucrative cancer treatment

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Photoenzymatic enantioselective intermolecular radical hydroalkylation

Nature, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2406-6

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Twenty-one tips for making the most of your Apple subscriptions

You're already paying for your subscriptions, so you better get everything you can from them. (Daniel Korpai / Unsplash/) The number of Apple subscriptions you can sign up for has grown sharply. Today, monthly fees get you access to music , movies, TV shows, news, and exclusive games directly from Apple. While the prices for these subscriptions are competitive enough, you'll still want to get you

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Controversial essay at German chemistry journal leads to suspensions, mass resignations

Facing a storm of criticism on social media, a chemistry journal in Germany has suspended two editors who handled a controversial essay that it said "highlights the bias displayed in our field and many others" to women and minority researchers. And the 16 members of the journal's international advisory board — which includes Nobel Laureates … Continue reading

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NASA calculates soaking rainfall in Tropical Depression Cristobal

When Tropical Storm Cristobal made landfall in southern Louisiana yesterday, May 7, it dropped a lot of rain, and continues to as it weakens and moves inland. NASA's GPM satellite provided a look at the rainfall rates in the now depression.

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New light for plants

Scientists from ITMO in collaboration with their colleagues from Tomsk Polytechnic University came up with an idea to create light sources from ceramics with the addition of chrome: the light from such lamps offers not just red but also infrared (IR) light, which is expected to have a positive effect on plants' growth. The research was completed as part of a Russian Science Foundation grant, and t

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First global map of rockfalls on the Moon

A research team from ETH Zurich and the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Göttingen counted over 136,000 rockfalls on the moon caused by asteroid impacts. Even billions of years old landscapes are still changing.

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Temperate insects as vulnerable to climate change as tropical species

In previous research, it has been assumed that insects in temperate regions would cope well with or even benefit from a warmer climate. Not so, according to researchers from the Universities of Uppsala and Lund in Sweden and Oviedo, Spain, in a new study. The earlier models failed to take into account the fact that insects in temperate habitats are inactive for much of the year.

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Our Best Reads for World Oceans Day

Most of our planet is covered by water. Here's what going on in that vast part of the planet as global temperatures climb.

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Like humans, these big-brained birds may owe their smarts to long childhoods

Parenting may be linked to the evolution of larger brains and intelligence in corvids

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Which Experts Should You Listen to during the Pandemic?

It should be a no-brainer: your best bet is to follow those who have actual expertise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Radio Corona, June 9: An astronaut returns to a society transformed by coronavirus

This week on Radio Corona, join us for a discussion between reporter Neel Patel and NASA astronaut Jessica Meir, who returned back to Earth in late April after a nearly seven-month mission aboard the ISS. Meir's experience coming back to Earth during the covid-19 pandemic is unique. We will be asking Meir about what it was like to learn about the pandemic from space, what it's been like to come b

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Protected areas worldwide at risk of invasive species

Protected areas across the globe are effectively keeping invasive animals at bay, but the large majority of them are at risk of invasions.

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Preventing pancreatic cancer metastasis by keeping cells 'sheltered in place'

Scientists have shown that pancreatic cancer metastasis — when tumor cells gain the deadly ability to migrate to new parts of the body — can be suppressed by inhibiting a protein called Slug that regulates cell movement. The study also revealed two druggable targets that interact with Slug and hold promise as treatments that may stop the spread of pancreatic cancer.

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Researchers advance fuel cell technology

Researchers have made a key advance in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that could make the highly energy-efficient and low-polluting technology a more viable alternative to gasoline combustion engines for powering cars.

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157 day cycle in unusual cosmic radio bursts

An investigation into one of the current great mysteries of astronomy has come to the fore thanks to a four-year observing campaign.

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Blood pressure medications help even the frailest elderly people live longer

Taking prescription blood pressure medication helped even the frailest elderly patients live longer, according to a large study in Italy. While the improved survival benefit was found in all older people, the healthier older people survived longer than those with multiple medical conditions.

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Why the Victoria Plate in Africa rotates

The East African Rift System is a newly forming plate tectonic boundary at which the African continent is being separated into several plates. According to GPS data, one of those, the Victoria microplate, is moving in a counterclockwise rotation relative to Africa in contrast to the other plates involved. Now, researchers have found evidence that suggests that the configuration of weaker and stron

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German industry records historic 18% tumble in output

April's drop marked depth of coronavirus crisis, hitting car manufacturing hardest

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Shirley Is an Unconventional Biopic About a Horror Master

"A clean house is evidence of mental inferiority," Shirley Jackson (played by Elisabeth Moss) grumbles at her husband as he stumbles around her messy bedroom. By that yardstick, Shirley might be the smartest person alive; her North Bennington abode is so full of dirty dishes and random junk that it feels almost haunted. But that's the mood the director Josephine Decker wants to conjure in Shirley

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Rats Have Not Changed. We Have.

After Chicago's stores and restaurants shut down in March, Rebecca Fyffe, the director of research at a pest-control company, went on one of her usual evening "rat safaris." Her employer, Landmark Pest Management, services many of the city's high-end, Michelin-rated restaurants, which had been forced to close hastily, dumping piles of produce. Beside a dumpster near one such restaurant, Fyffe cam

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Border Force union brands UK quarantine policy 'shambolic'

Immigration services body says members have not had time to prepare for new rules

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People who think they have had Covid-19 'less likely to download contact-tracing app'

Study's findings highlight potential long-term damage of UK's early testing strategy Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage People who think they have had coronavirus are less likely to download a contact-tracing app, even if they have no proof that they ever contracted the virus, according to a study published this week. The finding highlights the potential long-term damag

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Functional polymers to improve thermal stability of bioplastics

One of the key objectives for contemporary chemistry is to improve thermomechanical properties of polymers, in particular, thermostability of bioplastics.

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Bluetooth technology, the best ally to detect COVID-19 cases through smartphone contact tracing

A study carried out by researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) and published in the IEEE Access journal concludes that Bluetooth technology is the best ally to detect possible COVID-19 cases through smartphone contact tracing. The key is the high level of precision, higher than other technologies, such as GPS, cell phone networks and Wi-Fi.

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Cosmic quasars embrace 1970s fashion trend

Researchers have studied more than 300 quasars — spinning black holes that produce beams of plasma. The team has found that the shape of these so-called astrophysical jets changes from parabolic to conical at some distance from the black hole, reminiscent of the iconic flared jeans of the '70s. By effectively measuring these 'cosmic pants,' the researchers aim to interpret the workings of the cen

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Researchers advance fuel cell technology

Researchers have made a key advance in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that could make the highly energy-efficient and low-polluting technology a more viable alternative to gasoline combustion engines for powering cars.

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Astronomers Record Signal Coming From Deep Space Every 157 Days

A team of astronomers have discovered a new "fast radio burst" (FRB) signal, Space.com reports — mysterious flashes of millisecond-wave energy, coming from distance space, that repeat every 157 days. The signal, dubbed FRB 121102, flares up for a 90 day period and then goes silent for another 67 days, as detailed in a paper about the discovery published Sunday in the journal Monthly Notices of th

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Coronavirus: Is R number balanced on knife edge?

There are concerns coronavirus might be starting to spread in parts of England again.

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First Picturephone Requires an Enormous Pocket

Originally published in July 1964 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why Romney Marched

T he clip was short , but surreal: Mitt Romney—his face wrapped in a white mask, his sleeves rolled at the wrists—marches toward the White House alongside protesters chanting about police brutality. A reporter asks him what he's doing there, and the Republican senator from Utah responds: "We need to stand up and say that black lives matter." When the video appeared on Twitter late yesterday after

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Does rioting work? Here are five times it did.

We often hear that riots are not an effective means towards social change, but what do the experts say? Experts are still working on it, but it is agreed that it is at least occasionally effective. We include five cases of when rioting clearly led to desired social change. The United States has a long history of rioting. Some of these events, such as the Boston Tea Party, are well known and celeb

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For university classrooms, are telepresence robots the next best thing to being there?

Telepresence robots help university students learning remotely to feel more a part of the class, new research suggests.

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Ground-breaking research makes childhood vaccines safe in all temperatures

A new system for delivering vaccines to children in low-income nations has taken a vital step forward, thanks to groundbreaking work.

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Pinker flamingos more aggressive

Bright pink flamingos are more aggressive than paler rivals when fighting over food, new research shows.

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Repetitive negative thinking linked to dementia risk

Persistently engaging in negative thinking patterns may raise the risk of Alzheimer's disease, finds a new UCL-led study published in Alzheimer's & Dementia.

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Intestinal health: Dresden research team identifies enzyme essential for stem cell survival

Which pathways govern intestinal epithelial differentiation under constitutive conditions? Epithelial differentiation is largely controlled by the tissue-specific activity of transcription factors. Access to DNA is provided by accessible chromatin (euchromatin), while compacted heterochromatin limits access of transcription factors to DNA. Researchers at the TU Dresden Center for Regenerative Ther

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Astronomers find elusive target hiding behind dust

Some young, still-forming stars are surrounded by regions of complex organic molecules called "hot corinos." In some pairs of young stars forming together as binary pairs, astronomers found a hot corino around one, but not the other. Guessing that the unseen one might be obscured by dust, researchers studied such a pair with the VLA at radio wavelengths that readily pass through dust, and found th

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Scientists analyze spatio-temporal differentiation of spring phenology in China from 1979 to 2018

By simulating the spatial and temporal features of the first bloom date (FBD) of typical vegetation for last four decades in China, Beijing normal university applied co-clustering analysis for high dimensional sparse matrix and revealed the spatio-temporal patterns of FBD in China in different time periods for the first time.

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Forgot where you parked the car? Research suggests memory is a game of all or nothing

An online study, involving more than 400 participants aged 18-35, reveals that memories for specific locations are either totally forgotten or, if they are remembered, it's with as much precision as when they were first learnt.

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Infants have a basic knowledge of the role and limitations of language

Marc Colomer and Núria Sebastián Gallés, members of the Speech Acquisition and Perception (SAP) research group of the Center for Brain and Cognition (CBC) at UPF have investigated whether 14 month-old infants understand that language is a communication tool for transmitting information between speakers of the same language. The study is published in the advanced online edition of the journal Cogni

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Discovery of important molecular mechanism of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

Researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin, in collaboration with colleagues from Milan, Paris and Mexico, have been able to highlight a new molecular mechanism of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: According to their discovery, the protein Rab35 and the mTOR signaling pathway it regulates play a central role in the formation of myelin sheaths in the

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The impact of disclosure laws on prescription patterns from companies that pay them

It's not uncommon for U.S. pharmaceutical companies to pay medical doctors to promote their medications. Questions over possible conflicts of interest have led to introduction of laws that require payment disclosure so that the public can see which pharmaceutical companies are paying which doctors.

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Many factors may contribute to steep, decades-long muskrat population drop

Muskrat populations declined sharply across North America over the last 50 years or so, and wildlife scientists have struggled to understand why. A Pennsylvania research team investigated whether pathogens, parasites, environmental contaminants and disease may be contributing to this decline.

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Acute kidney disease in critically ill COVID-19 patients

A current study [1] is the first to evaluate and characterize the occurrence of COVID-19-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in a larger number of critically ill patients. The study has been published in CKJ. AKI developed in a total of 80% of the patients after admission, and day 14 renal recovery occurred in only 52% of those affected.

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Threats to global food security from emerging fungal crop pathogens

Amongst the world's most challenging problems is the need to feed an ever-growing global population sustainably.

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Rate over time of stroke caused by brain bleeding

This observational study looked at the rate and risk factors of stroke caused by bleeding within the brain (intracerebral hemorrhage) between 1948 and 2016 among 10,000 participants in the Framingham Heart Study. There have been conflicting results in other studies on whether the rate of this often deadly type of stroke is changing.

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Stroke bleeds in the brain not decreasing, Framingham study finds

The incidence of intracerebral hemorrhages has not decreased in senior adults 75 and older during the past three decades, researchers reported in JAMA Neurology . Growth of this age group suggests that the cumulative burden of this form of stroke is likely to increase, authors indicated.

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Countries must work together on CO2 removal to avoid dangerous climate change

The Paris Agreement lays out national quotas on CO2 emissions but not removal, and that must be urgently addressed, say the authors of a new study.

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International Consortium of Scientists Propose New Naming System for Uncultivated Bacteria and Archaea

The long-standing rules for assigning scientific names to bacteria and archaea are overdue for an update, according to a new consensus statement backed by 119 microbiologists from around the globe. The existing naming system only recognizes species that can be grown from cultures in laboratories, a problematic requirement for microbiologists who study bacteria and archaea in the wild. A new articl

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3-D shape of human genome essential for robust inflammatory response

The three-dimensional structure of the human genome is essential for providing a rapid and robust inflammatory response but is surprisingly not vital for reprogramming one cell type into another. The findings can aid efforts to understand why an inflammatory response is impaired or exaggerated and may one day be used to modulate it.

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Study finds path for addressing Alzheimer's blood-brain barrier impairment

In Nature Medicine, MIT researchers pinpoint the molecular pathway by which having the APOE4 gene variant leads to excess amyloid buildup in the blood brain barrier. They demonstrate that medicines affecting the pathway could help.

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Early childhood intervention programs may reap benefits across generations

Youth programs designed to prevent drug use and delinquency and support healthy development can reap lasting benefits not only for participants, but also for their kids, according to a decades-long study.

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University of Cincinnati research points to potential new treatment for pancreatic cancer

As the next step in finding a potential targeted treatment for pancreatic cancer, researchers at the University of Cincinnati are publishing a new study revealing how a combination therapy may improve outcomes for patients with this disease.

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Fågelmatning hjälper honor mer än hanar

En ny studie på talgoxar visar att honor har störst nytta av extra mat vintertid. Om honorna får mat behöver de inte sänka den egna kroppstemperaturen lika mycket som annars och chansen att överleva kalla nätter ökar. Fåglar har en extrem förmåga att reglera sin kroppstemperatur. Kalla vinternätter sänker de kroppstemperaturen flera grader för att spara energi och öka chanserna att överleva. Nack

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Rising markets and inequality grow from the same root

Covid-19 puts workers under immense strain, while asset owners feel much less pain

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The Biggest Psychological Experiment in History Is Running Now

What can the pandemic teach us about how people respond to adversity? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists Claim the Universe Is Actually Flat

Flat Universe Society According to precise new measurements of dark energy, scientists believe that our entire universe is totally flat. By improving the way astronomers measure the impact of dark energy — the force thought to be driving our universe's expansion — a team of University of Portsmouth scientists found that the universe may be spatially flat rather than shaped like a bubble . And in

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Not Winning Friends, Not Influencing People

Many chemists will by now be aware of the brief, but very loud, incident with Angewandte Chemie and a paper by Tomas Hudlicky that appeared there. Well, it didn't appear for long – within hours, the link had disappeared. The article appears to have been an update of parts of his book "The Way of Synthesis", and it didn't take long for people to notice phrases in the piece expressing irritation ab

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Emerging economies forecast to shrink for first time in 60 years

Millions will be thrown into extreme poverty by coronavirus, World Bank warns

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Scientists propose new naming system for uncultivated bacteria and archaea

The long-standing rules for assigning scientific names to bacteria and archaea are overdue for an update, according to a new consensus statement backed by 119 microbiologists from around the globe.

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Countries must work together on carbon dioxide removal to avoid dangerous climate change

The Paris Agreement lays out national quotas on CO2 emissions but not removal, and that must be urgently addressed, say the authors of a new study.

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Scientists propose new naming system for uncultivated bacteria and archaea

The long-standing rules for assigning scientific names to bacteria and archaea are overdue for an update, according to a new consensus statement backed by 119 microbiologists from around the globe.

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COVID-19 heightens water problems around the world

COVID-19 will unquestionably delay achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the latest global attempt to improve the quality of life of billions of people around the world by 2030.

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Novel computer-assisted chemical synthesis method cuts research time and cost

Hokkaido University scientists have succeeded in synthesizing an α,α-difluoroglycine derivative, a type of α-amino acid, based on a reaction path predicted by quantum chemical calculations. This novel method, combining experimental chemistry and computational chemistry, could innovate the development of new chemical reactions.

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Unravelling complex brain networks with automated 3D neural mapping

KAIST researchers developed a new algorithm for brain imaging data analysis that enables the precise and quantitative mapping of complex neural circuits onto a standardized 3D reference atlas.

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A sharper view of flood risk

Extreme weather patterns and regions at risk of flooding could be easier to spot using a new statistical model for large spatial datasets.

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'Social distancing' saves frogs: New approach to identify individual frogs noninvasively

Amphibians possess diverse colour patterns and body markings that can be used to identify individuals, just like fingerprints for humans. This is how Naitik Patel and Dr Abhijit Das came up with one of the very first non-invasive techniques to identify individual frogs using a biometric software. Their protocol, recently published in the open-access journal Herpetozoa, allows for the rapid estimat

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Photodynamic therapy used to treat ovarian cancer

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the most promising methods of treating localized tumors. PDT can be used for treatment in almost all major locations as an independent method or in combination with traditional types of treatment (surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy).

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Males Are the Taller Sex. Estrogen, Not Fights for Mates, May Be Why.

One of the most obvious physical differences between men and women are their average sizes. Men are, on the whole, taller. The standard explanation found in textbooks — sexual selection and male competition — goes all the way back to Charles Darwin: "There can be little doubt that the greater size and strength of man, in comparison with woman, together with his broader shoulders, more developed m

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The economic benefits of climate action | Marcelo Mena

Marcelo Mena, the former environment minister of Chile, is on a mission to create a zero-emission economy in his country by 2050. In a conversation about climate action, he discusses how the COVID-19 pandemic is changing Chile's ambitious plan to tackle climate change — and explains why the green recovery needs to be powered by both political leaders and citizens alike. (This virtual conversation

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We looked for South Africa's 'missing' plastic litter. This is what we found

Every year, the world produces about 300 million tonnes of plastic. Somewhere between 5 million and 12 million tonnes of it finds its way into the oceans, according to a 2015 study by Jenna Jambeck and colleagues. But only a tiny fraction of that is estimated to be floating at sea—around 200,000 to 300,000 tonnes, or less than 5% of the annual input.

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When cancer cells can't make their own fat, they eat more of it

Cancer cells rewire their metabolism to compensate for a halt in fat production by importing more fat molecules from their environment. Th switch in metabolism could be exploited for cancer treatment, researchers say.

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New treatment target verification for myelodysplastic syndrome

A Japanese research group analyzed the pathophysiology of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a blood cancer that presents often in the elderly, and found the presence of transcription factor RUNX3, thereby revealing a cancer growth function for what had been considered be a tumor suppressor. Additional analyses of human MDS cells and model mice found an abnormal gene expression mechanism linked to th

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Physical activity in all of its forms may help maintain muscle mass in midlife

Loss of estrogen has an effect on muscles and leads to a decline in muscle mass. .

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Single-cell yolk-shell capsules with high biological activity and stability

The expansion of the global market for microbes and microbial products have been increasingly demanding the full exploitation of bacteria with high activity and stability. Single-cell yolk-shell nanoencapsulation, a novel technique recently reported by a scientist team based in China and Belgium, can endow living bacteria with a hierarchical ordered porous structure, significantly enhancing biolog

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New study: Chemists at the University of Halle are able to induce uniform chirality

Chirality is a fundamental property of many organic molecules and means that chemical compounds can appear in not only one form, but in two mirror-image forms as well. Chemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg have now found a way to spontaneously induce chirality in crystalline, liquid-crystalline and liquid substances, without requiring any external influence. The findings could be s

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Green cities roadmap touts COVID-19 recovery stimulus

COVID-19 has helped add urgency to a call for industry and government to support a plan to ensure Australian cities become more sustainable by adopting green roofs, walls and facades.

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BAME women account for over half of pregnant women in UK hospitals with COVID-19

More than half of pregnant women recently admitted to a UK hospital with covid-19 infection were from black or other ethnic minority groups, finds a national surveillance study published by The BMJ today.

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Viewing the topology of thermonuclear reaction in nuclear landscape from the network perspective

Nucleosynthesis is a complicated process in astrophysics. By constructing a directed, un-weighted, multilayer nuclear reaction network, which consisted of all nuclides and reactions within the JINA REACLIB database, researchers in Shanghai have investigated important topological features as well as identified the most frequent reaction patterns of the interconnections that occurred amongst the dif

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We're at a fork in the road: do we choose neighbourhoods to live, work and play in?

Living, working and playing in the one neighbourhood has often been touted as the ideal outcome for well-planned cities. Yet this goal has been elusive. For most of us, our daily activities are segregated into one-dimensional precincts.

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Varieties of functionalized aromatics expanded by heteroatom-participated lignin cleavage

Lignin is the aromatic polymer fragment of lignocellulose, which is the richest renewable aromatic carbon source in nature. The depolymerization of lignin and the preparation of a wide variety of aromatic compounds can be achieved through lignin cleavage.

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Sun, sand and uncertainty: the promise and peril of a Pacific tourism bubble

Pacific nations have largely avoided the worst health effects of COVID-19, but its economic impact has been devastating. With the tourism tap turned off, unemployment has soared while GDP has plummeted.

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Mindfulness can cut anxiety for kids with autism

Mindfulness programs can improve decision-making skills and teach kids with autism to focus their attention and react less impulsively through breathing exercises that help to reduce anxiety, researchers report. Mindfulness practice trains people to focus their attention on awareness of the present moment. In neurotypical children, it has been shown to improve decision-making skills and to be eff

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First systematic report on the tug-of-war between DNA damage and repair

A collaborative project between the Center for Genome Integrity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), and the Dundee School of Life Sciences, the EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), and the Wellcome Sanger Institute (UK) have screened almost 163,000 DNA mutations in 2,700 C. elegans roundworms to shed light on DNA damage. The results, published in Nature Comm

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First systematic report on the tug-of-war between DNA damage and repair

A collaborative project between the Center for Genome Integrity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), and the Dundee School of Life Sciences, the EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), and the Wellcome Sanger Institute (UK) have screened almost 163,000 DNA mutations in 2,700 C. elegans roundworms to shed light on DNA damage. The results, published in Nature Comm

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Recycling old genes to get new traits: How social behavior evolves in bees

A team working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) found evidence to support a long-debated mode of evolution, revealing how evolution captures environmental variation to teach old genes new tricks: Sweat bees switch from solitary to social behavior, repurposing ancient sets of genes that originally evolved to regulate the development of other traits.

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Recycling old genes to get new traits: How social behavior evolves in bees

A team working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) found evidence to support a long-debated mode of evolution, revealing how evolution captures environmental variation to teach old genes new tricks: Sweat bees switch from solitary to social behavior, repurposing ancient sets of genes that originally evolved to regulate the development of other traits.

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4 in 10 low-income Americans struggled to buy food

In March, 40% of low-income Americans were already struggling to afford enough food for their households, report researchers. And only 18% of them were able to stock up enough food for two weeks, the findings show, as states started closing schools and issuing stay-home orders. Using data from a national survey of low-income adults in mid-March, Julia Wolfson and Cindy Leung of the University of

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Reform retractions to make them more transparent

Nature, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01694-x The scientific community should agree on the essential information to be provided when pulling a paper from the scientific literature.

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Chinese investment in Australia falls 58%

Tensions over the coronavirus pandemic have strained ties between Canberra and Beijing

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Curbing climate change requires more efficient methods than emissions trading

In her dissertation in the field of international business, Lotta Aho, LL.M.,M.Sc. (Econ.), examines the effectiveness of market mechanisms in climate change mitigation. The thesis addresses the changing power structures between nation states and large multinational corporations, the dominant role of neoclassical economics in determining policies and measures, as well as alternatives to current po

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Repairing nature and 'building back better' in a post-COVID world

,The coronavirus pandemic has provoked a social, environmental and economic crisis unparalleled in the modern era. It is widely recognised, however, that crises represent unique opportunities for change. Rebecca Solnit, who specialises in human responses to crises, describes how in a crisis "what is weak breaks under new pressure, what is strong holds, and what was hidden emerges."

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Checking out iron under pressure

Iron is the most stable and heaviest chemical element produced by nucleosynthesis in stars, making it the most abundant heavy element in the universe and in the interiors of Earth and other rocky planets.

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How cars, pollution and suburbia threaten rattlesnakes

Just like the hordes of mountain bikers, hikers and trail runners that migrate from their comfortable couches to more open spaces in spring, western rattlesnakes are also on the move, emerging from deep winter dens to their summer foraging grounds.

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China will begin constructing its space station in 2021

The Chinese space agency is building a brand new space station, and they're going about it in a suitably impressive way: an ambitious schedule of 11 planned launches crammed into only two years. When it's done, the 66-ton space station will host crews of three astronauts for up to six months at a time, lasting for a planned 10 years before de-orbiting.

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Novel eco-friendly electrochemical reaction can synthesize useful semiconductor materials

In the field of electronics, developing novel strategies for organic semiconductor synthesis are crucial. Derivatives of compounds called "thienoacenes" have been known for their role as organic semiconductors, but conventional methods for the synthesis of thienoacenes require the use of expensive transition metal catalysts. To overcome this limitation, scientists at Okayama University developed a

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Northern California's COVID-19 epidemic resulted from multiple virus strains entering state

Distinct from virus transmission patterns identified elsewhere, analysis of SARS-CoV-2 genomes from a small number of California-based patients suggests the virus arrived in northern California through a complex series of introductions, not only from state to state but also from international travel.

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Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

If renal remission is achieved therapeutically in cases of lupus nephritis (LN), the 10-year survival rate increases significantly. Successful therapy is therefore of great importance. As a recent presentation at the ERA-EDTA Congress showed, this can be achieved by additional administration of belimumab.

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ANCA-associated vasculitis: The ADVOCATE Study

ANCA-associated vasculitis causes inflammation of small blood vessels, which may result in severe injury to the kidneys, lungs and other organs — even death. Immunosuppressive therapies save patients, but in many cases the side effects cannot be ignored. Avacopan, a novel substance, has shown promise in this regard in a Phase III study that was presented at the ERA-EDTA Congress today.

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Empagliflozin — kidney protection regardless of an initial 'eGFR dip'

Data presented today at the ERA-EDTA Congress show that empagliflozin is more likely to induce an initial 'dip' in eGFR in patients belonging to a higher KDIGO risk category and/or on diuretic therapy. However, this did not impact the rate of adverse events or kidney outcomes. For these patients, especially, any intervention is welcome that slows the progression of kidney disease and allows the ne

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Hope for patients with primary hyperoxaluria type 1

Lumasiran is a subcutaneously administered RNAi therapeutic targeting hydroxyacid oxidase 1 (HAO1) – the gene encoding glycolate oxidase (GO) – in development for the treatment of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1). The drug has not yet received approval from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) or other health authorities. The data presented today at the ERA-EDTA Congress have been submitted to re

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Prophylaxis after relapse of ANCA-associated vasculitis

Relapses are not uncommon in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). The disease can cause severe injury to kidneys and other organs, even death. After a relapse, there is an increased risk of further relapses, so there is an urgent need for the most effective relapse prevention strategy. The RITAZAREM study impressively demonstrated that the monoclonal antibody rituximab is superior to conventional the

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For university classrooms, are telepresence robots the next best thing to being there?

Telepresence robots help university students learning remotely to feel more a part of the class, new research suggests.

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Elon Musk in Leaked Email: Starship Now "Top SpaceX Priority"

Priority Number One In an internal email obtained by CNBC , SpaceX CEO Elon Musk told his space company's staff that they should "please consider the top SpaceX priority (apart from anything that could reduce Dragon return risk) to be Starship." Musk called for progress to be accelerated on the project "dramatically and immediately," and even offered up a "dedicated SpaceX aircraft to shuttle peo

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How cars, pollution and suburbia threaten rattlesnakes

Just like the hordes of mountain bikers, hikers and trail runners that migrate from their comfortable couches to more open spaces in spring, western rattlesnakes are also on the move, emerging from deep winter dens to their summer foraging grounds.

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Thicker blood may explain odd COVID-19 blood clots

After noticing unusual blood clotting in many patients diagnosed with COVID-19, doctors believe there may be a connection to the thickness of their blood, known as hyperviscosity, with inflammation and clotting. "It has been a mystery why so many patients with COVID-19 have had atypical blood clots." "It has been a mystery why so many patients with COVID-19 have had atypical blood clots. We reali

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Massive change in commuting trips as well as business travel

Researchers have studied the COVID-19's impact on work and travel patterns in Swedish public agencies.

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Novel computer-assisted chemical synthesis method cuts research time and cost

Hokkaido University scientists have succeeded in synthesizing an α,α-difluoroglycine derivative, a type of α-amino acid, based on a reaction path predicted by quantum chemical calculations. This novel method, combining experimental chemistry and computational chemistry, could innovate the development of new chemical reactions.

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Covid-19 has given businesses a push to change

As we experiment with new ways of working, leaders can encourage diversity and inclusion

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Grindr is deleting its 'ethnicity filter'. But racism is still rife in online dating

Dating and hook-up service Grindr has announced its intention to remove the "ethnicity filter" from its popular app.

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Trouble sleeping? This moon-shaped bedside light might help.

The light is strong enough for reading, but changes brightness and color depending on what you're doing. (Hatch /) Quality of sleep has endured some collateral damage during the COVID-19 pandemic. Even when people stick to their normal schedules, roughly a third of us suffer from bouts of acute, short-term insomnia. And since social distancing has thrown off our routines—and is causing even norma

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To Adapt to Tech, We're Heading Into the Shadows

More and more innovation requires going into darker, more inappropriate, less ethical territory. Here's how to respond.

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Report: European bathing water quality remains high

The quality of bathing waters in Europe remains high according to a study by the EU environment agency that found that minimum water quality standards were met at 95 percent of the sites monitored across the continent last year.

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First systematic report on the tug-of-war between DNA damage and repair

IBS scientists have screened almost 163,000 DNA mutations in 2,700 C. elegans roundworms to shed light on DNA damage. The results, published in Nature Communications, lead to the conclusion that mutation patterns seen in cancer are more complicated than we previously thought.

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Super-cooled metallic ammonia gives clues about electron behavior

Photoelectron spectroscopy maps electrons in alkali metal – liquid ammonia microjets capturing the blue electrolyte-to-bronze colored metal transition.

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Titanium oxide-based hybrid materials promising for detoxifying dyes

Photoactive materials have become extremely popular in a large variety of applications in the fields of photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, water splitting, organic synthesis, photoreduction of carbon dioxide, and others. Elza Sultanova, co-author of the paper, is engaged in researching catalytic properties of photoactive materials based on macrocycles.

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Ultrathin nanosheets separate harmful ions from water

An international research team, led by Monash University and ANSTO (Australia's Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation), has created an ultrathin membrane with high porosity that can filter potentially harmful ions from water.

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Advances in the production of minor ginsenosides using microorganisms and their enzymes

Advances in the Production of Minor Ginsenosides Using Microorganisms and Their Enzymes – BIO Integrationhttps://bio-integration.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/bioi20200007.pdfAnnouncing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the author Almando Geraldi from the Universitas Airlangga, Indonesia considers the advances in the production of minor ginsenosides usi

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Recycling old genes to get new traits — How social behavior evolves in bees

Researchers learned from some unusual sweat bee species on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, how the sophisticated division of labor in highly complex insect societies can arise from humble beginnings.

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Computing Power Can Keep Growing as Moore's Law Winds Down. Here's How

Moore's Law is faltering, but that doesn't mean the end of progress in processing power. R ather than relying on semiconductor physics and silicon-fabrication technology, though, we need to turn to innovations in software, algorithms, and hardware, says a group of leading experts. Despite powering exponential growth in computing power for nearly half a century, the miniaturization of transistors

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MIT startup wraps food in silk for better shelf life

Benedetto Marelli, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at MIT, was a postdoc at Tufts University's Omenetto Lab when he stumbled upon a novel use for silk. Preparing for a lab-wide cooking competition whose one requirement was to incorporate silk into each dish, Marelli accidentally left a silk-dipped strawberry on his bench: "I came back almost one week later, and the straw

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New study provides insights into how retailers have responded to COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the retail sector, a new study by WMG, University of Warwick, and Blue Yonder has examined how retailers have responded to the situation. The study identified the human vulnerabilities across the supply chain and the need for future investment in flexibility, visibility and automation to improve future resilience.

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Virus DNA spread across surfaces in hospital ward over 10 hours

Virus DNA left on a hospital bed rail was found in nearly half of all sites sampled across a ward within 10 hours and persisted for at least five days, according to a new study in the United Kingdom.

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Giving chance a helping hand

New research from ETH Zurich shows that holding events for new students before they enter university is an investment that pays off. Incoming students benefit from the chance to meet, mingle and form friendships at orientation events, which contributes to their long-term academic success.

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Den svenska tilliten har inte påverkats av ökad mångkultur

Nivåerna av tillit mellan människor i landets kommuner är höga och väldigt stabila över tid. En omfattande analys av tillit i relation till mångkultur i Sverige ger väldigt lite stöd till internationella teorier om att ökad mångkultur skulle vara skadligt för tilliten. Detta visar resultaten från de årliga SOM-undersökningarna vid Göteborgs universitet. Inom amerikansk forskning finns etablerade

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Many factors may contribute to steep, decades-long muskrat population drop

Muskrat populations declined sharply across North America over the last 50 years or so, and wildlife scientists have struggled to understand why. A Pennsylvania research team investigated whether pathogens, parasites, environmental contaminants and disease may be contributing to this decline.

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Many factors may contribute to steep, decades-long muskrat population drop

Muskrat populations declined sharply across North America over the last 50 years or so, and wildlife scientists have struggled to understand why. A Pennsylvania research team investigated whether pathogens, parasites, environmental contaminants and disease may be contributing to this decline.

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Researchers reveal molecular basis for assembly of RuBisCO assisted by chaperone Raf1

A team led by Prof. Zhou Congzhao and Prof. Chen Yuxing from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) reported the crystal structures of Raf1 from cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and its complex with RuBisCO large subunit RbcL, and proposed a putative model for the assembly of cyanobacterial RuBisCO coordinated by the chaperone Raf1. The res

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Human hair used to make flexible displays for smart devices

Researchers from the Queensland University of Technology and Griffith University have developed a method for turning small hair strands into carbon nanodots, which are tiny, uniform dots that are one-millionth of a millimeter. To produce the carbon nanodots, they developed a two-step process that involved breaking down the hairs and then burning them at 240 degrees Celsius.

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Researchers advance fuel cell technology

Washington State University researchers have made a key advance in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that could make the highly energy-efficient and low-polluting technology a more viable alternative to gasoline combustion engines for powering cars.

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Researchers reveal molecular basis for assembly of RuBisCO assisted by chaperone Raf1

A team led by Prof. Zhou Congzhao and Prof. Chen Yuxing from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) reported the crystal structures of Raf1 from cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and its complex with RuBisCO large subunit RbcL, and proposed a putative model for the assembly of cyanobacterial RuBisCO coordinated by the chaperone Raf1. The res

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First global map of rockfalls on the moon

A research team from ETH Zurich and the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Göttingen counted over 136,000 rockfalls on the moon caused by asteroid impacts. Even billions of years old landscapes are still changing.

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Researchers use machine learning to aid oil production

Skoltech scientists and their industry colleagues have found a way to use machine learning to accurately predict rock thermal conductivity, a crucial parameter for enhanced oil recovery. The research, supported by Lukoil-Engineering LLC, was published in the Geophysical Journal International.

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New coating material for surgical tools

Spin-off company NChemi Engineering Nanomaterials, created from the Center for the Development of Functional Materials (CDMF) in Brazil, has presented new technology resulting from projects developed by the Universitat Jaume I (UJI) and the CDMF.

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A sharper view of flood risk

By generalizing a classical statistical model and adapting it for use in analyzing the extremes of rainfall in large datasets, researchers, including KAUST's Raphaël Huser, have devised a more efficient and flexible analytical tool that promises to improve the prediction of flood risk and other extreme weather phenomena.

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Reusing chicken litter shows benefits

Chicken is the most consumed protein in the United States. According to the National Chicken Council, the U.S. produced more than 9.2 billion broiler chickens in 2019. US consumers spent more than 95 billion dollars on chicken products.

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Inflammation may link bad sleep and heart disease

New research begins to reveal how disrupted sleep leads to the fatty arterial plaque buildup known as atherosclerosis that can result in deadly heart disease. "We've discovered that fragmented sleep is associated with a unique pathway—chronic circulating inflammation throughout the blood stream—which, in turn, is linked to higher amounts of plaques in coronary arteries," says senior author Matthe

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Reusing chicken litter shows benefits

Chicken is the most consumed protein in the United States. According to the National Chicken Council, the U.S. produced more than 9.2 billion broiler chickens in 2019. US consumers spent more than 95 billion dollars on chicken products.

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Potential biomarker identified to screen quality of donor's stem cells before harvesting

A new study released in STEM CELLS identifies a potential biomarker for prescreening donors for their MSCs' growth capacity and potency.

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Preventing pancreatic cancer metastasis by keeping cells 'sheltered in place'

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that pancreatic cancer metastasis–when tumor cells gain the deadly ability to migrate to new parts of the body–can be suppressed by inhibiting a protein called Slug that regulates cell movement. The study, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, also revealed two druggable targets that interact with Slug and h

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Most deprived children face biggest risk of unemployment

Children growing up in jobless households will be less likely to gain employment in an economic recession, according to a new cross-European study led by UCL and the University of Bath.

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Bangladesh has saved thousands of lives from a devastating cyclone—here's how

The Atlantic and Caribbean hurricane season has just begun, with the world worried about the prospect of providing humanitarian relief in the context of a pandemic and lockdowns. But Bangladesh recently experienced one of the most powerful Bay of Bengal cyclones on record and saved thousands of lives through forecasting, warning, and evacuation.

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Environmental protection and infrastructure investments are necessities, not luxuries

To President Trump and some of his friends, a clean environment seems to be an afterthought. This is a 20th-century mindset that I found typical when I first started to work on environmental issues in 1975 but has become less common with time. In the 1980s, we learned that pollution was not simply unpleasant but could be deadly. That exposure to toxic chemicals could cause cancer. Most Americans u

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The best waffle makers for a golden breakfast

Take home the best. (Mae Mu via Unsplash/) Only the unimaginative think waffles are just for breakfast. True connoisseurs know that they make a perfect meal any time of the day, topped with maple syrup, fruit, ice-cream, fried chicken, whatever. It's tough to find a bad way to eat a waffle. The kind you keep in the freezer are convenient, but if you want waffles that are super fluffy and have del

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The search for microbial dark matter

Nature, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01684-z Researchers are developing technologies to find and grow microbes that biologists have struggled to culture in the lab.

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Glacier mice: these herds of moss-balls roam the ice—and we're uncovering their mysteries

Glaciers are commonly considered to be cold and barren places that are hostile to life. Plants cannot grow directly on these slowly flowing bodies of ice, but life can be found here nonetheless, and perhaps none of it stranger than the glacier mice.

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Ultrathin nanosheets separate ions from water

In a world-first, an international research team, led by Monash University and ANSTO, has created an ultrathin porous membrane to completely separate potentially harmful ions, such as lead and mercury, from water.

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We can no longer ignore the potential of psychedelic drugs to treat depression | Robin Carhart-Harris

At Imperial College we've been comparing psilocybin to conventional antidepressants – and the results are likely to be game-changing The world is experiencing a devastating physical health emergency. But the coronavirus pandemic has also seen a renewed focus on our psychological wellbeing. Loneliness, uncertainty and grief may be intensifying an already acute mental health crisis, and in the US t

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When Health Care Moves Online, Many Patients Are Left Behind

Amid the Covid-19 pandemic, more doctors are turning to telemedicine. That's a problem for tens of millions on the wrong side of the digital divide.

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Method gets LEDs to act more like lasers

A new method could pave the way toward more efficient and versatile LED display and lighting technology. The new approach could allow a wide variety of LED devices—from virtual reality headsets to automotive lighting—to become more sophisticated and sleeker at the same time. "What we showed is a new kind of photonic architecture that not only allows you to extract more photons, but also to direct

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Earlier menopause overlaps with PFAS exposure

Women exposed to PFAS may experience menopause two years earlier than other women, a new study finds. PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) are in a wide variety of nonstick and waterproof products and firefighting foams . These human-made " forever chemicals " can contaminate drinking water —which more than 100 million Americans likely consume. "PFAS are everywhere. Once they enter the body

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Are crowd-control weapons dangerous? Very, says expert

Protests and demonstrations, like those erupting after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was killed when a white police officer in Minneapolis pressed his knee into Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes, are a daily occurrence in our world. But what happens when police use crowd-control weapons, or CCWs, against those exercising their democratic rights?

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Variable star RZ Piscium has a low-mass stellar companion, study finds

Using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), an international team of astronomers has uncovered the presence of a low-mass stellar companion to a young variable star known as RZ Piscium. The newly detected object is about eight times less massive than the sun, and orbits the primary star at a distance of around 23 AU. The finding is reported in a paper published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronom

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Critiqued coronavirus simulation gets thumbs up from code-checking efforts

Nature, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01685-y Influential model judged reproducible — although software engineers called its code 'horrible' and 'a buggy mess'.

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Marine microfibres: less plastic than predicted

Microfibers are fine strands of thread used to make clothing, carpeting and household items like mops. They are found in the air we breathe, the water we drink, and throughout the world's oceans. Natural, rather than synthetic, microfibers, though, make up the majority of those found in the ocean's surface waters—despite the fact that currently two-thirds of all human-produced fibers are synthetic

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Transparent graphene electrodes might lead to new generation of solar cells

A new way of making large sheets of high-quality, atomically thin graphene could lead to ultra-lightweight, flexible solar cells, and to new classes of light-emitting devices and other thin-film electronics.

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Doing more with terahertz: simplifying near-infrared spectroscopy systems

Spectroscopy has roots in early 19th century curiosity about interactions between matter and electromagnetic radiation. Thanks to advances in electronics and materials science, various spectroscopy techniques are now routinely used to study the composition of materials and the nature of their chemical bonds by analyzing how they absorb or reflect electromagnetic waves.

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Cosmic quasars embrace 1970s fashion trend

Researchers from Russia, Germany, Finland and the U.S. have studied more than 300 quasars—spinning black holes that produce beams of plasma. The team has found that the shape of these so-called astrophysical jets changes from parabolic to conical at some distance from the black hole, reminiscent of the iconic flared jeans of the '70s. By effectively measuring these "cosmic pants," the researchers

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Novel probes of the strong force: Precision jet substructure and the Lund jet plane

A hallmark of the strong force at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the dramatic production of collimated jets of particles when quarks and gluons scatter at high energies. Particle physicists have studied jets for decades to learn about the structure of quantum chromodynamics—or QCD, the theory of the strong interaction—across a wide range of energy scales.

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How a fungus turns ants into zombies

Researchers have elucidated the molecular mechanism of the fungus that turns ants into living zombies. The fungus specifically affects the ants' neurobiology, odor perception and biological clock. The Utrecht microbiologist Robin Ohm publishes this, together with American and German colleagues, in G3.

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How a fungus turns ants into zombies

Researchers have elucidated the molecular mechanism of the fungus that turns ants into living zombies. The fungus specifically affects the ants' neurobiology, odor perception and biological clock. The Utrecht microbiologist Robin Ohm publishes this, together with American and German colleagues, in G3.

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How hard-to-recycle plastic is being made as good as new

New recycling technologies currently being tested may allow plastics such as single-use food packaging, fibre-reinforced car parts and mattress foam—polymers which often wind up in landfills or are incinerated—to have more than just a second life: they can become as good as new.

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Using near-infrared light to 3-D print an ear inside the body

A team of researchers with members from several institutions in China, one in the U.S. and one in Belgium, has developed a method for 3-D printing an ear inside of the body. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their method and how well it worked on test mice.

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Astronomers find elusive target hiding behind dust

Astronomers acting on a hunch have likely resolved a mystery about young, still-forming stars and regions rich in organic molecules closely surrounding some of them. They used the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to reveal one such region that previously had eluded detection, and that revelation answered a longstanding que:stion.

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Fix for Mars lander 'mole' may be working

Representatives from NASA's InSight project have reported via Twitter that efforts by the team at the German Aerospace Center (GAC) to push a probe called the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (more affectionately known as "the mole") down into the Martian soil has finally met with some success. The group at GAC has been documenting the work being done to overcome problems with deploying t

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Mulberry plans to cut a quarter of its workforce

Luxury handbag maker hit by fewer overseas visitors and social distancing in stores

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Proteintech announces ISO 13485 Certification for Its HumanKine® Human Cell-expressed Cytokines and Growth Factors

Proteintech Group, Inc, the benchmark in antibodies and proteins, announces completion of its ISO 13485 certification for medical devices.

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Kvanteradaren finder det, den klassiske radar overser

PLUS. Med kvanteprincipper kan man forbedre radarteknologi på flere måder – selv om den vigtigste kvanteegenskab, entanglement, tabes i processen. Forskere beretter om nye fremskridt, men vi hører ikke om alt fra den militære forskning, vurderer det svenske forsvar.

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Dell Will Be the Only Company With an AMD SmartShift Laptop in 2020

When AMD debuted its Ryzen Mobile 4000 hardware, it announced a new feature called SmartShift. Rather than statically partition available TDP between the CPU and GPU, SmartShift allows power to shift dynamically from one to the other depending on workload. Customers have looked forward to the capability debuting on AMD laptops, but information from Frank Azor suggests they'll either be buying a D

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New experiments show complex astrochemistry on thin ice covering dust grains

Astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and the University of Jena have obtained a clearer view of nature's tiny deep-space laboratories: tiny dust grains covered with ice. Instead of regular shapes covered thickly in ice, such grains appear to be fluffy networks of dust, with thin ice layers. In particular, that means the dust grains have considerably larger surfaces, which is whe

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Air conditioner bumps the electric bill by 42%, increasing the risk of energy poverty

A new study published in Economic Modelling by researchers at Ca' Foscari University and CMCC shows that owning and using an air conditioner greatly increases the electricity bills of households, with important implications for the energy poverty of the less well-off.

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Why the Victoria Plate in Africa rotates

The East African Rift System (EARS) is a newly forming plate tectonic boundary at which the African continent is being separated into several plates. This is not a clean break. The system includes several rift arms and one or more smaller so-called microplates. According to GPS data, the Victoria microplate is moving in a counterclockwise rotation relative to Africa in contrast to the other plates

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Newly identified gene reduces pollen number of plants

Producing fewer sperm cells can be advantageous in self-fertilizing plants. An international study led by the University of Zurich identified a gene in the model plant Arabidopsis that reduces the amount of pollen. In addition to supporting the evolutionary theory, these findings could help to optimize plant breeding and domestication in agriculture.

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Ancient asteroid impacts created the ingredients of life on Earth and Mars

A new study published in Scientific Reports reveals that asteroid impact sites in the ocean may possess a crucial link in explaining the formation of the essential molecules for life. The researchers discovered the emergence of amino acids that serve as the building blocks for proteins—demonstrating the role of meteorites in bringing life's molecules to Earth, and potentially Mars.

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Newly identified gene reduces pollen number of plants

Producing fewer sperm cells can be advantageous in self-fertilizing plants. An international study led by the University of Zurich identified a gene in the model plant Arabidopsis that reduces the amount of pollen. In addition to supporting the evolutionary theory, these findings could help to optimize plant breeding and domestication in agriculture.

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Why do you believe what you do? Run some diagnostics on it

Many of the beliefs that play a fundamental role in our worldview are largely the result of the communities in which we've been immersed. Religious parents tend to beget religious children, liberal educational institutions tend to produce liberal graduates, blue states stay mostly blue, and red ones stay mostly red. Of course, some people, through their own sheer intelligence, might be able to se

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The Surgisphere Fiasco

The safety and efficacy of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of COVID-19 has quickly become an important medical question in managing this pandemic, although not by far the most important. There are many drugs under consideration, and some with promising early results. But hydroxychloroquine has garnered the majority of attention for purely political reasons. I most recently wrote about the sc

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Researchers develop 3D-printable material that mimics biological tissues

University of Colorado Denver researchers are the first to 3D print a complex, porous lattice structure using liquid crystal elastomers creating devices that can mimic cartilage and other biological tissues.

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Ocean data need a sea change to help navigate the warming world

Nature, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01668-z Open up, share and network information so that marine stewardship can mitigate climate change, overfishing and pollution.

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Nordliga insekter är lika klimatkänsliga som tropiska

Insekter i norr har antagits kunna klara klimatförändringar bra, men nu visar sig de modellerna vara fel. Man har nämligen missat att ta hänsyn till att nordliga insekter är inaktiva en stor del av under vinterhalvåret. Tidigare forskning har antagit att insekter på nordliga breddgrader skulle klara ett varmare klimat bra, kanske till och med gynnas av det. Men det här är fel, visar forskare från

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Poland to shut 12 coal mines in attempt to contain coronavirus

Number of cases has jumped markedly in Silesia, centre of country's mining industry

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Without public faith in government actions, the UK will never beat Covid-19 | Liam Smeeth

As a scientist, it's clear to me that the collective action vital to success relies on leaders being honest about their strategy Liam Smeeth is dean of the Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine The UK should have been a world leader in tacking Covid-19. It has universal healthcare delivered through a single, joined-up system, a histori

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Ice sheets can melt much faster than we thought

The Agulhas II, the ship used to image the ridges (Courtesy Julian Dowdeswell/) In the past couple of decades, we've had satellites trained on Earth's ice sheets, documenting climate change-induced losses. But those years are a small sample when it comes to understanding the range of behavior these frozen areas can exhibit over the eons of geologic time. That's why glacial geologists are now look

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The Remarkable Stuff Scientists Get Done as They Work From Home

Researchers who usually rely on labs or command centers have been forced to work from laptops and closets—even as they control spacecraft millions of miles away.

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Interesseorganisation om regeringens affaldsudspil: »Noget er helt skævt«

PLUS. Dansk Affaldsforening kritiserer regeringens beregninger for at ramme helt forkert, når det gælder affaldsudspillets pris for borgerne.

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Researchers develop 3-D-printable material that mimics biological tissues

Biological tissues have evolved over millennia to be perfectly optimized for their specific functions. Take cartilage as an example. It's a compliant, elastic tissue that's soft enough to cushion joints, but strong enough to resist compression and withstand the substantial load bearing of our bodies: key for running, jumping, and our daily wear and tear.

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Trä ger högre vindkraftverk

På Björkö utanför Göteborg står ett ovanligt vindkraftverk. Det 30 meter höga tornet är byggt i laminerat trä istället för stål. Att bygga i trä har flera fördelar enligt företaget bakom tekniken. Tornen blir lättare och billigare att bygga jämfört med stål. Genom att bygga i moduler kan vindkraftverken även byggas högre och transporten förenklas. Det finns också miljöfördelar.

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We modelled the future of Leadbeater's possum habitat and found bushfires, not logging, pose the greatest threat

The Federal Court recently ruled that a timber harvesting company couldn't log potential habitat of the critically endangered Leadbeater's possum.

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We modelled the future of Leadbeater's possum habitat and found bushfires, not logging, pose the greatest threat

The Federal Court recently ruled that a timber harvesting company couldn't log potential habitat of the critically endangered Leadbeater's possum.

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Catch-22: technology can help solve fishing's environmental issues – but risks swapping one problem for another

Almost a decade ago, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's Fish Fight campaign galvanised public opinion against the senseless waste of discarding fish. At the time this was the common practice of returning unwanted catches to the sea, dead or alive, because fishermen were legally limited from landing them by the EU's quota system.

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View into plant cells: A membrane protein is targeted to two locations

Metabolic processes are especially complex in plants due to their obligate sessile lifestyle, and scientists are discovering new and surprising connections that occur within plant cells. An important metabolic route that has occupied plant scientists for decades is the so-called oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway by which carbohydrates are converted to reduction power. For this pathway, two membr

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Catch-22: technology can help solve fishing's environmental issues – but risks swapping one problem for another

Almost a decade ago, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's Fish Fight campaign galvanised public opinion against the senseless waste of discarding fish. At the time this was the common practice of returning unwanted catches to the sea, dead or alive, because fishermen were legally limited from landing them by the EU's quota system.

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Lightning-fast algorithms can lighten the load of 3-D hologram generation

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have developed a new way of calculating simple holograms for heads-up displays (HUDs) and near-eye displays (NEDs). The method is up to 56 times faster than conventional algorithms and does not require power-hungry graphics processing units (GPUs), instead running on normal PC computing cores. This opens the way to developing compact, power-efficient

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View into plant cells: A membrane protein is targeted to two locations

Metabolic processes are especially complex in plants due to their obligate sessile lifestyle, and scientists are discovering new and surprising connections that occur within plant cells. An important metabolic route that has occupied plant scientists for decades is the so-called oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway by which carbohydrates are converted to reduction power. For this pathway, two membr

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Magnetic liquid structure elucidated through hybrid reverse Monte Carlo simulation

A research team lead by Ryusuke Futamura of Shinshu University investigated the response of magnetic ionic liquids (MIL) to magnetic fields from the microscopic view points. Magnetic fluids, which can respond to magnetic fields, can be made by dispersing ferromagnetic nanoparticles in a solvent. Some pure liquids that are not mixtures also respond to magnetic feilds. For example, oxygen is a liqui

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A new global crisis is looming in east Asia

China's pride and paranoia are a dangerous mix for the world

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The End of Minimalism

W hen I go home to visit my parents a few times a year, my mom and I have a little dance we do. She asks me to go through some of the stuff in my childhood bedroom and decide what I want to get rid of. I tell her I will, and then I do not. I wouldn't know how to begin sifting through the drawers and storage containers brimming with high-school notebooks and old sweatpants, and my mom offers no gu

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To Save the Climate, Look to the Oceans

They can be a source of clean, renewable energy, sustainable food, and more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Flere aktører, en opgave

I fremtidens sundhedsvæsen er der bl.a. brug for flere praktiserende læger og praktiserende speciallæger, hvis det nære sundhedsvæsen skal styrkes, skriver Christina Frøslev-Friis.

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Who Discovered the First Vaccine?

As the world scrambles to develop an inoculation against Covid-19, it's worth understanding the early, extraordinary history of the technique.

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The Pandemic Is Transforming the Rental Economy

The spread of Covid-19 has made people think twice about what they rent. But this hasn't destroyed the rental marketplace—just changed it.

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The Science Behind Orchestras' Careful Covid Comeback

How readily can playing instruments transmit the virus? As researchers investigate, musical ensembles prepare for the show to go on.

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We can learn from ingenuity of space travel to solve problems on Earth

Endeavours such as space travel show what humanity can do when we pull together to achieve something big – an approach we must emulate if we want to fix the more worldly problems we face

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Zoom Psychiatrists Prep for COVID-19's Endless Ride

An epidemiologist points to new stresses in the U.S. mental health system that may persist from the novel coronavirus pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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To Save the Climate, Look to the Oceans

They can be a source of clean, renewable energy, sustainable food, and more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This Upheaval Is How America Gets Better

This is an extraordinarily tense moment in the United States. Currently on display are police brutality, racism, a president fanning the flames and threatening to use force against peaceful protesters, and a Defense Department leadership initially complicit in using the military for partisan purposes—during a pandemic, no less. Authoritarian states jeer at us, and friends pity us . The head of th

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Missing Roman forts and roads revealed by drought

Researchers say aerial photographs taken during a heatwave identify Roman forts and roads in Wales.

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Discovering Colombia's rare flora and fauna

An expedition of top UK botanists into previously unexplored rainforest in Colombia found rare species.

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Hollandske mink kan have smittet mennesker med corona: 10.000 dyr slås ned

Myndighederne i Holland advarer om sundhedsrisici ved mink efter ti besætninger er ramt af corona og to mennesker er smittet. Den danske fødevarestyrelse ser ikke bevis for, at mennesker kan smittes af mink, hvorfor man ikke ser behov for tests.

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Zoom Psychiatrists Prep for COVID-19's Endless Ride

An epidemiologist points to new stresses in the U.S. mental health system that may persist from the novel coronavirus pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Vi har brug for mere end et klap på skulderen

Lægesekretærerne har gjort en forskel i sundhedsvæsnet de seneste måneder, og det skulle de gerne blive ved med – også efter corona, skriver ledende lægesekretær.

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Zoom Psychiatrists Prep for COVID-19's Endless Ride

An epidemiologist points to new stresses in the U.S. mental health system that may persist from the novel coronavirus pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Live Coronavirus Updates: Bailed-Out Hospitals Laid Off Staff

New Zealand is nearly back to normal, and New York City begins reopening today. Epidemiologists reveal when they expect to hug, shake hands and resume other common activities.

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Sir Isaac Newton Experimented With A Cure For The 1660s Plague

In documents up for auction, we're learning about Newton's experiment. First, hang a toad upside down for three days and collect its vomit. Then grind it all up and apply the mixture topically.

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The First Step Is Figuring Out What Police Are For

It is sadly ironic that the United States, which claims to be devoted to democratic governance through the rule of law, has a long tradition of policing through force. It is important to understand that this tradition is not the product of a conscious and deliberative articulation of what Americans believe the connection between the police and the community ought to look like; rather, the shape o

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Ground-breaking research makes childhood vaccines safe in all temperatures

Vaccines are notoriously difficult to transport to remote or dangerous places, as they spoil when not refrigerated. Formulations are safe between 2°C and 8°C, but at other temperatures the proteins start to unravel, making the vaccines ineffective. As a result, millions of children around the world miss out on life-saving inoculations.

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Stirring biopic of the first woman to win top maths prize

Nature, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01681-2 Maryam Mirzakhani, Fields medallist and Iranian national hero, is celebrated in an elegant documentary.

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Daily briefing: Huge artificial plateau is the oldest Mayan monument ever found

Nature, Published online: 05 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01702-0 The oldest (and largest) Mayan monument ever found, what it would take to prove how the coronavirus passed from bats to people and new evidence for how lack of sleep kills.

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A nursing journal makes two online critiques disappear

A series of back and forth publications about a 12-year-old study of nursing education ended with some unusual editorial decisions. Darrell Spurlock, a professor of nursing at Widener University and director of the university's Leadership Center for Nursing Education Research, co-authored a study of the Health Education Systems, Inc. (HESI) nursing test in 2008. He … Continue reading

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Techtopia #153: Topledere vil have ansvarlig tech

Bestyrelsesformanden for AP Møller Maersk Jim Hagemann Snabe og hans ven investor og tidligere CEO i Milestone Systems Lars Thinggaard har et budskab til andre erhvervsledere: Skab og brug tech ansvarligt.

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Testing funds shortfall imperils Covid-19 fight, health groups warn

Ignoring diagnostics seen as threat to efforts to roll out future treatments and vaccines

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Americans spend billions to look good in lockdown

US retailers benefit from DIY beauty boom following closure of salons, barbers and spas

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New Zealand eliminates transmission of coronavirus

Jacinda Ardern says country has no active cases and will focus on reopening economy

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Engineering and use of proteinoid polymers and nanocapsules containing agrochemicals

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66172-w

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Social environment modulates investment in sex trait versus lifespan: red deer produce bigger antlers when facing more rivalry

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65578-w

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Incidence & Risk Factors of Postoperative Delirium After Spinal Surgery in Older Patients

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66276-3

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Simple ammonium salts acting on sigma-1 receptors yield potential treatments for cancer and depression

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65849-6

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Unique age-related transcriptional signature in the nervous system of the long-lived red sea urchin Mesocentrotus franciscanus

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66052-3

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Design and Fabrication of Low-cost Microfluidic Channel for Biomedical Application

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65995-x

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One-step sorting of single-walled carbon nanotubes using aqueous two-phase extraction in the presence of basic salts

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66264-7

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Dedicated core-on-anvil production of bladelet-like flakes in the Acheulean at Thomas Quarry I – L1 (Casablanca, Morocco)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65903-3

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Estimating the effects of non-pharmaceutical interventions on COVID-19 in Europe

Nature, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2405-7

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The effect of large-scale anti-contagion policies on the COVID-19 pandemic

Nature, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2404-8

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Room temperature organic exciton–polariton condensate in a lattice

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16656-0 Many studies of polariton condensates have been limited to low temperatures. Here the authors demonstrate ambient polariton condensation in lattices using organic traps that profit from the stability of organic excitons and the large Rabi splitting.

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Sequential modification of bacterial chemoreceptors is key for achieving both accurate adaptation and high gain

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16644-4 Bacterial chemoreceptors have multiple methylation sites, but whether the order of methylation matters is unclear. Here, the authors show that sequentially ordered methylation is critical for perfect adaptation and for attenuating the trade-off between accurate adaptation and high response gain.

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NAP1-RELATED PROTEIN1 and 2 negatively regulate H2A.Z abundance in chromatin in Arabidopsis

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16691-x The histone variant H2A.Z is deposited by the SWR1 complex to replace H2A in Arabidopsis, but the mechanism of H2A.Z removal is unclear. Here, the authors show that NRP proteins can regulate gene expression by counteracting SWR1 and prevent excessive accumulation of H2A.Z.

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Self-filtering narrowband high performance organic photodetectors enabled by manipulating localized Frenkel exciton dissociation

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16675-x Narrowband organic photodetectors (OPDs) are attractive for emerging applications. Here, the authors report a simple strategy to produce filter-free narrowband OPDs with outstanding performances by manipulating exciton dissociation with a hierarchical device structure.

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Transcriptional and imaging-genetic association of cortical interneurons, brain function, and schizophrenia risk

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16710-x Interneuron subtypes have distinct properties and spatial distributions. Here, the authors show that the molecular-genetic basis of cortical resting-state brain function is shaped by distributions of interneuron-related transcripts and may capture individual differences in schizophrenia risk.

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Blockade of VEGF-C signaling inhibits lymphatic malformations driven by oncogenic PIK3CA mutation

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16496-y Lymphatic malformation (LM) is a debilitating often incurable vascular disease. Using a mouse model of LM driven by a disease-causative PIK3CA mutation, the authors show that vascular growth is dependent on the upstream lymphangiogenic VEGF-C signalling, permitting effective therapeutic intervention.

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A foundation for complex oxide electronics -low temperature perovskite epitaxy

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16654-2 Designing complex oxides with appreciable low-temperature synthesis remains a challenge. Here, the authors demonstrate an atomic layer deposition process for LaNiO3 to enable epitaxial thin films on LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 substrates deposited at 225 °C, with no annealing required to achieve good electronic properties

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Animal biosynthesis of complex polyketides in a photosynthetic partnership

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16376-5 Complex polyketides are usually produced by microbes, whereas the origin of polyketides found in animals remained unknown. This study shows that sacoglossan animals, such as sea slugs, employ fatty acid synthase-like proteins to produce microbe-like polyketides.

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Hundredvis af forskere vil have Facebook til at stramme skruen overfor Donald Trump

Trumps indlæg om de landsdækkende protester imod politivold tilskynder til vold og spreder misinformation, lyder det fra mere end 200 forskere, der opfordrer Mark Zuckerberg til at overveje strengere Facebook-politikker.

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Sådan nedbringer man årligt 40.000 ton spild fra vingeproduktion

PLUS. LM Wind Power og andre producenter af vindmøllevinger arbejder på at genanvende en del af materialeoverskuddet fra produktionen, bl.a. fra de hjælpematerialer, der bidrager til vingeproduktionen, men som ikke ender i selve vingen.

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Protected areas worldwide at risk of invasive species

Protected areas across the globe are effectively keeping invasive animals at bay, but the large majority of them are at risk of invasions, finds a involving UCL and led by the Chinese Academy of Science, in a study published in Nature Communications.

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Newly identified gene reduces pollen number of plants

Producing less sperm cells can be advantageous in self-fertilizing plants. An international study led by the University of Zurich identified a gene in the model plant Arabidopsis that reduces the number of pollen. In addition to supporting the evolutionary theory, these findings could help to optimize plant breeding and domestication in agriculture.

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Ground-breaking research makes childhood vaccines safe in all temperatures

A new system for delivering vaccines to children in low-income nations has taken a vital step forward, thanks to groundbreaking work at the University of Bath

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Why the Victoria Plate in Africa rotates

The East African Rift System is a newly forming plate tectonic boundary at which the African continent is being separated into several plates. According to GPS data, one of those, the Victoria microplate, is moving in a counterclockwise rotation relative to Africa in contrast to the other plates involved. Now, researchers have found evidence that suggests that the configuration of weaker and stron

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Ancient asteroid impacts created the ingredients of life on Earth and Mars

A new study reveals that asteroid impact sites in the ocean may possess a crucial link in explaining the formation of the essential molecules for life. The study discovered the emergence of amino acids that serve as the building blocks for proteins – demonstrating the role of meteorites in bringing life's molecules to earth, and potentially Mars.

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Blood pressure medications help even the frailest elderly people live longer

Taking prescription blood pressure medication helped even the frailest elderly patients live longer, according to a large study in Italy.While the improved survival benefit was found in all older people, the healthier older people survived longer than those with multiple medical conditions.

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What kind of face mask gives the best protection against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

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Tropical Storm Cristobal to weaken into 'depression' in coming hours

A storm causing heavy rain and coastal flooding in the southern state of Louisiana is expected to weaken into a tropical depression in "the next several hours," the US National Hurricane Center said Monday.

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Protected areas worldwide at risk of invasive species

Protected areas across the globe are effectively keeping invasive animals at bay, but the large majority of them are at risk of invasions, finds a China-UK research team involving UCL.

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Shearing Sheep, and Hewing to Tradition, on an Island in Maine

In a remote area of Maine, the Wakeman family maintains the traditions of island shepherding, the cycles of which have been largely unchanged for centuries.

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A Living Library Filled With Killer Bacteria

Britain's National Collection of Type Cultures, a library of human bacterial pathogens, turned 100 this year.

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Protected areas worldwide at risk of invasive species

Protected areas across the globe are effectively keeping invasive animals at bay, but the large majority of them are at risk of invasions, finds a China-UK research team involving UCL.

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This is the superpower teachers need to flex

Teachers have arguably the most important job on Earth. It's their responsibility to help shape who young people will become by inspiring them and connecting with them as human beings. Trust has to be earned before any meaningful learning can happen. The superpower that poet and children's fiction author Kwame Alexander learned from his mother is the ability to connect emotionally with his audien

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For Experts Who Study Coronaviruses, a Grim Vindication

Scientists who study them had long argued that the next pandemic would arise from the family of pathogens known as coronaviruses. But research funding was funneled toward other threats, stalling coronavirus research and, some experts say, leaving the world unnecessarily vulnerable when SARS-CoV-2 appeared.

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Hong Kong relaxes virus quarantines for big company executives

City eases Covid-19 restrictions on senior employees at likes of Alibaba and Tencent

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The Sexual-Health Supply Chain Is Broken

This article is a collaboration between The Atlantic and the Fuller Project . It took Dimos Sakellaridis about six years to build Kiss condoms into one of Nigeria's top brands, with approximately 91 million sold in 2019. The prophylactics are available in shops, markets, and kiosks across the country, and a combination of irreverent advertising, a growing population of young people, and a greater

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Flertal uden om regeringen vil sætte flere stærekasser op

PLUS. En rundringning, som TV 2 Lorry har foretaget blandt partiernes transportordførere, viser, at der tegner sig et markant politisk flertal for at få flere stærekasser.

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Infographic : Trauma Brain of Processing

submitted by /u/Small-Pocket-Library [link] [comments]

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Curiosity

submitted by /u/Sub2Cuneivlog [link] [comments]

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Dna visar hur influenser såg ut på stenåldern

Vilken sorts utbyte hade stenålderns olika kulturer med varandra? I en ny studie har forskare kombinerat arkeologisk och genetisk information för att förstå varför det finns kulturella influenser från stridsyxekultur i gravar från den gropkeramiska kulturen. Under den senare delen av stenåldern fanns åtminstone tre olika, men delvis samtida, kulturgrupper i Sverige: 1) trattbägarkulturen som var

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UK quarantine regime begins despite airlines' opposition

Prime minister looks to negotiate 'air bridges' with other European countries

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The global AI agenda: Latin America

This report is part of " The global AI agenda ," a thought leadership program by MIT Technology Review Insights examining how organizations are using AI today and planning to do so in the future. Featuring a global survey of 1,004 AI experts conducted in January and February 2020, it explores AI adoption, leading use cases, benefits, and challenges, and seeks to understand how organizations might

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International effort reveals 157 day cycle in unusual cosmic radio bursts

An investigation into one of the current great mysteries of astronomy has come to the fore thanks to a four-year observing campaign conducted at the Jodrell Bank Observatory.

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Climate change has degraded productivity of shelf sea food webs

A shortage of summer nutrients as a result of our changing climate has contributed to a 50% decline in important North East Atlantic plankton over the past 60 years.

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Pinker flamingos more aggressive

Bright pink flamingos are more aggressive than paler rivals when fighting over food, new research shows.

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Zero rates preferable to negative rates for investors' risk-taking

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have determined that zero interest rates are more efficient than negative interest rates in terms of motivating individual investors to borrow money and take risks.

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Pinker flamingos more aggressive

Bright pink flamingos are more aggressive than paler rivals when fighting over food, new research shows.

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Do face masks decrease the risk of COVID-19 transmission?

As wearing masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19 becomes a culture war issue, the evidence for whether they prevent transmission of COVID-19 remains contested. A new systematic review and meta-analysis provides the best evidence yet that social distancing and masks are highly effective at decreasing the risk of contracting coronavirus, while eye protection might also help, but it's not a slam du

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GALLERI: Fra E-færge til legeplads – se vinderne af Danish Design Award

Ved en virtuel prisfest pga. corona kårede Dansk Design Center og brancheforeningen Design Danmark vinderne blandt de 48 finalister i Danish Design Award. Se de prisbelønnede vinderdesign i de 15 meget forskellige kategorier.

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Klimarådet: Olieselskaberne bør også betale dansk CO2-afgift som de andre

Dansk afgift på CO2 i olieindustrien kan skubbe produktionen ud af landet, advarer Equinor.

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Den stora homeopati-skandalen

Homeopati Homeopatiska preparat bygger Samuel Hahnemanns idéer om att "lika botar lika" och så kallad "potentiering" där ett preparats aktiva ämne utsätts för hög utspädning. Utspädningen görs upprepade gånger, ofta tills ingenting återstår mer än det vatten eller den alkohol som används för proceduren. Från Hahnemanns Tyskland i början på 1800-talet spreds homeopati ganska snabbt […] The post a

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We often accuse the right of distorting science. But the left changed the coronavirus narrative overnight | Thomas Chatterton Williams

Progressives blithely accepted throwing millions out of work to fight coronavirus – but now urge street protests to fight racism When I reflect back on the extraordinary year of 2020 – from, I hope, some safer, saner vantage – one of the two defining images in my mind will be the surreal figure of the Grim Reaper stalking the blazing Florida shoreline, scythe in hand, warning the sunbathing masse

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Cheese against COVID-19

Dutch scientists, including two Vitamin K fraudsters, claim this blood clotting factor is the cure for COVID-19. The lead author and The Guardian advise everyone to eat cheese.

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What Covid-19 toilet paper shortages tell us about supply chains

FT Trade Secrets writer Aime Williams goes on a mission to find toilet roll

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Efter tre år og tyve millioner kroner: Hvad har Danmark fået ud af TechPlomacy?

Udenrigsministeriet afviser at udpege konkrete resultater af TechPlomacy-indsatsen, og uafhængige eksperter kan ikke se de klare sejre. Sidstnævnte peger dog på, at effekterne af diplomati ofte er langsigtede.

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JNCCN: Many hospitalized people with advanced cancer struggle with important daily tasks

New research from Mass General Cancer Center, published in the June 2020 issue of JNCCN — Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, found 40.2% of hospitalized patients with advanced, incurable cancer were functionally impaired at the time of admission, meaning they needed assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs) like walking, bathing, getting dressed, or other routine tasks.

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Artificial brains may need sleep too

Neural networks that become unstable after continuous periods of self-learning will return to stability after exposed to sleep like states, according to a study of simulated spiking neural networks, suggesting that even artificial brains need to nap occasionally.

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Zero rates preferable to negative rates for investors' risk-taking -Ben-Gurion U study

In several lab experiments, the researchers demonstrated that a zero-interest rate policy has the strongest impact on individuals' investment decisions driving their decisions to borrow money and the percentage of risky assets in their portfolios. Specifically, dropping the interest rate below zero, a negative interest rate policy, is less effective in terms of increasing leverage and shifting ind

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Impressive result for mental health therapy

As Australia looks for the most efficient assessment and treatment of mental health in the era of COVID-19 lockdowns and disruptions, the outcomes of a national trail, published by Flinders University researchers, has identified the effectiveness of a low intensity Cognitive Behaviour Therapy.

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New research shows how complex chemistry may be relevant to origins of life on Earth

Scientists would like to understand how life began on Earth. One popular model suggests life began when simple RNA molecules capable of copying themselves formed spontaneously in primitive environment. How this happened remains a vexing problem. New research by scientists from Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) at Tokyo Institute of Technology and the University of New South Wales suggests that s

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Engaging in family meals starts with healthy family communication

Engaging in family meals may be a matter of improving communication and support at home. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, connects less family discouragement and better family communication with a higher likelihood to eat evening family meals and family breakfasts together, and not in front of a television.

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Educational video may assist with decision to pursue hospice at the end of life for cancer patients

An educational video about hospice care can provide valuable information for patients with advanced cancer and their caregivers, improve perceptions of this quality form of care at the end of life, and increase its use. These are the findings of a study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS).

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Undisclosed financial conflicts of interest in Canadian clinical guidelines on medications

Failure to disclose organizational financial conflicts of interest by producers of Canadian clinical practice guidelines on medications is widespread, pointing to the need for reform, a new research paper highlights in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191737.

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How slaughterhouses became breeding grounds for coronavirus

High infection rates among employees worldwide put working practices under renewed scrutiny

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Protests in a pandemic present dilemma for scientists

Experts debate whether they should advise to stay at home or risk Covid-19

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Wall Street close to turning positive for the year

European stocks fail to build on gains after German industrial output contracts sharply

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What Einstein's theory means for a cyclist moving at almost light speed

Nature, Published online: 08 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01674-1 Advice from special relativity: avert your eyes as that bicycle whizzes by.

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For Nextdoor, Eliminating Racism Is No Quick Fix [Feb 2017]

submitted by /u/snooshoe [link] [comments]

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The Great Schism of the 21st Century

I see a civilizational bottleneck, a fork in the road, through which every modern human must pass. The decision is being made in a continuous way by everyone in this era. The first path is that of the hypermodernist. The choice to live as a permanent cyborg, interfacing digitally as their primary mode of connection to the world. Social networks, feeds, and bodily dissolution. The majority are plu

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Coronavirus crisis could cause $25tn fossil fuel industry collapse

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

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Dog Owners who've Cloned: what's the best Dog Cloning Organization?

To all Dog Owners who have undergone the cloning process on their (Temporarily?) Passed Canine Compadre. I would like to preemptively clone my Doberman for when the time comes! I am not too concerned about a spitting-image copy (I know his personality and everything will be different since it's not actually my dog) but I'm moreso concerned with the puppy being a Healthy and Stable "offspring" if

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How Rwanda Built A Drone Delivery Service [2019]

submitted by /u/ch33ze [link] [comments]

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Will deep fakes doom democracy?

Imagine a world not long from now in about ten years where you can create a video of an individual doing or saying anything which is indistinguishable from the real thing. What does this do to democracy which is already battling against fake news and misinformation, which will blow up into the stratosphere as a result of deep fakes? submitted by /u/lechwall [link] [comments]

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Hent-AI & DeepCreamPy: The Ultimate Decensoring Combo

submitted by /u/cloud_weather [link] [comments]

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Pandemic takes a chunk out of the great British sandwich

Collapse of Adelie Foods compounds concerns over sharp fall in sales

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Investors expect credit to outperform despite Covid downturn

Survey of asset managers running a combined $20tn finds them optimistic about corporate bonds

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Big drop in UK vacancies stokes fears of mass unemployment

End of furlough schemes could see number of jobless 'rising to five million'

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Not the End of the Chase

The illusion game is still afoot — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Colombia's President Iván Duque on tackling Covid-19

The government's swift response has kept the death toll lower than other Latin American nations

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Whale Protections Need Not Cause Lobstering Losses

Right whales, other whales and turtles get caught in lobster trap lines, but fewer lines can maintain the same lobster catch levels.

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Virus DNA spread across surfaces in hospital ward over 10 hours

Virus DNA left on a hospital bed rail was found in nearly half of all sites sampled across a ward within 10 hours and persisted for at least five days, according to a new study by UCL and Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH). The study, published as a letter in the Journal of Hospital Infection, aimed to safely simulate how SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, may spread across surfaces in a

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Jodrell Bank leads international effort which reveals 157 day cycle in unusual cosmic radio bursts

An investigation into one of the current great mysteries of astronomy has come to the fore thanks to a four-year observing campaign conducted at the Jodrell Bank Observatory.

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Terahertz radiation can disrupt proteins in living cells

Researchers have discovered that terahertz radiation, contradicting conventional belief, can disrupt proteins in living cells without killing the cells.

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PFAS present throughout the Yadkin-Pee Dee river food chain

Researchers have found per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in every step of the Yadkin-Pee Dee River food chain, even though the river does not have a known industrial input of these compounds.

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Terahertz radiation can disrupt proteins in living cells

Researchers have discovered that terahertz radiation, contradicting conventional belief, can disrupt proteins in living cells without killing the cells.

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Artificial neurons show computers could be way more efficient

Computer models of artificial neurons may shed light on what a real neuron does to save energy that a contemporary computer processing unit doesn't, researchers say. When it fires, a neuron consumes significantly more energy than an equivalent computer operation. And yet, a network of coupled neurons can continuously learn, sense, and perform complex tasks at energy levels that are currently unat

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Whale Protections Need Not Cause Lobstering Losses

Right whales, other whales and turtles get caught in lobster trap lines, but fewer lines can maintain the same lobster catch levels. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Coronavirus live news: global cases near 7 million as Saudi infections pass 100,000

Deaths worldwide pass 400,000; Chile deaths jump after new fatalities added; India records nearly 10,000 new cases. Follow the latest updates Global report: China hails coronavirus response as world death toll tops 400,000 Saudi Virus cases top 100,000 After six months of coronavirus, how close are we to defeating it? Australia coronavirus updates – live 1.41am BST Vietnam on Monday reported two

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PFAS present throughout the Yadkin-Pee Dee river food chain

Researchers have found per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in every step of the Yadkin-Pee Dee River food chain, even though the river does not have a known industrial input of these compounds.

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Scientists develop unique polymer coating to tackle harmful fungi

Scientists have developed a new way to control harmful fungi, without the need to use chemical bioactives like fungicides or antifungals.

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Wearable brain scanner technology expanded for whole head imaging

A new type of wearable brain scanner is revealing new possibilities for understanding and diagnosing mental illness after the technology has been expanded to scan the whole brain with millimeter accuracy.

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Researchers help bring biofriendly materials to drug design for neuro disorders

Researchers have found the first indication that carbon quantum dots, a class of nanoparticles, can be utilized to combat neurological disorders.

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Lower cost and durable smart window technology

Researchers have developed an improved method for controlling smart tinting on windows that could make them cheaper, more effective and more durable than current options on the market.

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Memory consolidation during REM sleep

Researchers have found that activity in adult-born neurons (ABNs) in the hippocampus, which is a brain region associated with memory, are responsible for memory consolidation during REM sleep. Identifying the role of specific neurons in memory function deepens our understanding of how memories are formed, retrieved, and consolidated.

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Scientists iron out the physics of wrinkling

Researchers have shown how wrinkles can be increased or reduced by altering the curvature at the edge of a material.

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Women who own handguns at 35X risk of suicide

Men who own handguns are eight times more likely to die of gun suicides than men who don't own handguns, and women who own handguns are 35 times more likely than women who don't, researchers report. Owning a handgun is associated with a dramatically elevated risk of suicide, according to a new study that followed 26 million California residents over a 12-year period. The National Suicide Preventi

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Wearable brain scanner technology expanded for whole head imaging

A new type of wearable brain scanner is revealing new possibilities for understanding and diagnosing mental illness after the technology has been expanded to scan the whole brain with millimeter accuracy.

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Researchers help bring biofriendly materials to drug design for neuro disorders

Researchers have found the first indication that carbon quantum dots, a class of nanoparticles, can be utilized to combat neurological disorders.

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Self-assembling, biomimetic composites possess unusual electrical properties

Sometimes, breaking rules is not a bad thing. Especially when the rules are apparent laws of nature that apply in bulk material, but other forces appear in the nanoscale.

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Early-life education improves memory in old age — Especially for women

Education appears to protect older adults, especially women, against memory loss, according to a new study.

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Self-assembling, biomimetic composites possess unusual electrical properties

Sometimes, breaking rules is not a bad thing. Especially when the rules are apparent laws of nature that apply in bulk material, but other forces appear in the nanoscale.

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New material, modeling methods promise advances in energy storage

The explosion of mobile electronic devices, electric vehicles, drones and other technologies have driven demand for new lightweight materials that can provide the power to operate them.

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High-protein diets help insects to fight against blood parasites

Scientists studying insects have identified a crucial biological mechanism responsible for increasing their survival against blood parasites. The finding, in which a high protein diet is linked to increased survival, could be a key stepping-stone to discovering how diet could help us fight parasitic blood infections.

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Climate change has degraded productivity of shelf sea food webs

Released to coincide with World Oceans Day, new research led by the University of Plymouth has shown that a shortage of summer nutrients — a result of our changing climate — has contributed to a 50% decline in important North East Atlantic plankton over the past 60 years.

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Repetitive negative thinking linked to dementia risk

Persistently engaging in negative thinking patterns may raise the risk of Alzheimer's disease, finds a new UCL-led study published in Alzheimer's & Dementia.

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Pinker flamingos more aggressive

Bright pink flamingos are more aggressive than paler rivals when fighting over food, new research shows.

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'Artificial chemist' combines AI, robotics to conduct autonomous R&D

Researchers have developed a technology called 'Artificial Chemist,' which incorporates artificial intelligence and an automated system for performing chemical reactions to accelerate R&D and manufacturing of commercially desirable materials.

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'Artificial chemist' combines AI, robotics to conduct autonomous R&D

Researchers have developed a technology called 'Artificial Chemist,' which incorporates artificial intelligence and an automated system for performing chemical reactions to accelerate R&D and manufacturing of commercially desirable materials.

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Environmental damage from fog reduction is observable from outer space, find hydrologists

A study led by ecohydrologists at IUPUI is the first to show it's possible to use satellite data to understand how fog reduction from climate change is harming vegetation in ecologically rare regions.

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F.D.A. Says Some Masks Made in China Shouldn't Be Reused

The agency is revising its rules, saying some N95 masks mainly used by health care workers and emergency responders cannot undergo decontamination for further use.

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Childhood trauma affects the timing of motherhood

Women who have experienced childhood trauma become mothers earlier than those with a more stable childhood environment shows a new study. The trauma children experience form living in war zones, natural disasters or perhaps even epidemics can have unexpected effects that resurface later in their lives.

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Deadly bacterial infection in pigs deciphered

New-born piglets often die painfully from infection with an intestinal bacterium. A team of researchers has now discovered how the bacterium causes fatal intestinal bleeding. They have thus made a breakthrough in veterinary research. Promising prospects for vaccinations and medications for use in humans too have now opened up.

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Some infants can identify differences in musical tones at six months

Neuroscientists suggest the capacity to hear the highs and lows, also known as the major and minor notes in music, may come before you take a single lesson; you may actually be born with it. The study examined the capacity of six-month-old infants to discriminate between a major and a minor musical tone sequence with a unique method that uses eye movements and a visual stimulus.

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Study ties stroke-related brain blood vessel abnormality to gut bacteria

Researchers found that the presence of abnormal bundles of brittle blood vessels in the brain or spinal cord, called cavernous angiomas (CA), are linked to the composition of a person's gut bacteria. Also known as cerebral cavernous malformations, these lesions which contain slow moving or stagnant blood, can often cause hemorrhagic strokes, seizures, or headaches.

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Sex differences in participation in large-scale genetic studies may affect results

An international group of researchers have found differences in the characteristics that drive men and women to participate in genome-wide association studies, which analyse genetic variants in different individuals to see if any are associated with a trait or disease. Millions of participants are involved. This means that researchers can see smaller and smaller effects increasing the number of ge

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Pacific islands plead to join Australia-New Zealand travel bubble

Countries have contained Covid-19 but tourism drought is causing severe economic damage

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Tokyo Olympics in doubt without travel deal, says governor

Yuriko Koike also raises possibility of cuts to the opening and closing ceremonies

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One Weird Trick to Make Calculus More Beautiful

The strange power of complex analysis — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Starwatch: how to find the Great Diamond in the sky

The spring asterism known as the Great Diamond is a pattern of four stars from different constellations This week, track down the asterism known as the Great Diamond. Asterisms are patterns of stars that exist alongside the officially defined constellations. In this case, the Great Diamond consists of four stars. Cor Caroli in Canes Venatici, the hunting dogs; Denebola in Leo, the lion; Spica in

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Surgisphere Fallout Hits African Nonprofit's COVID-19 Efforts

The company had helped develop a tool to aid decision-making in distributing limited medical equipment among coronavirus patients, but two high-profile retractions call into question the validity of Surgisphere's work in toto.

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When the Office Is Like a Biohazard Lab

"If people have to stay six feet apart and have to wear masks, why are we bringing them back?"

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Mystiske GPS-signaler 'flytter' skibe tusindvis af kilometer

PLUS. GPS-positioner for skibe ud for både USA's og Kinas kyster bliver manipuleret, så de enten har flyttet sig tusindvis af kilometer eller bliver sendt på land. NGO'en, der har opdaget fejlen, efterlyser nu gode bud på en forklaring.

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Olieselskaber går fri af dansk klima-afgift: Får gratis CO2-kvoter for 372 millioner

Støttepartier presser regeringen for at indføre CO2-afgift, men klimaministeren vil i stedet have EU til at stramme reglerne.

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Coronavirus News: Live Updates

New York City will enter its first phase of restarting businesses on Monday, as protesters rallied for racial justice. Democrats fear farm aid is meant to bolster Trump's campaign.

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America Is Giving Up on the Pandemic

After months of deserted public spaces and empty roads, Americans have returned to the streets. But they have come not for a joyous reopening to celebrate the country's victory over the coronavirus. Instead, tens of thousands of people have ventured out to protest the killing of George Floyd by police. Demonstrators have closely gathered all over the country, and in blocks-long crowds in large ci

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Racism, Not Genetics, Explains Why Black Americans Are Dying of COVID-19

Some scientists and politicians have invoked baseless ideas about unknown genes, ignoring systemic inequality and oppression — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Alabama: Images of the Yellowhammer State

Nearly 5 million people live in Alabama, which takes its nickname from its state bird, the yellowhammer. The terrain of Alabama ranges from mountains in the north, to rolling hills and gentle plains sloping toward Mobile and the Gulf Coast in the southwest. Below are a few glimpses of the landscape of Alabama and some of the wildlife and people calling it home. This photo story is part of Fifty ,

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Racism, Not Genetics, Explains Why Black Americans Are Dying of COVID-19

Some scientists and politicians have invoked baseless ideas about unknown genes, ignoring systemic inequality and oppression — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Small protein, big impact

In meningococci, the RNA-binding protein ProQ plays a major role. Together with RNA molecules, it regulates processes that are important for pathogenic properties of the bacteria.

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Brazil stops releasing Covid-19 death toll and wipes data from official site

Government accused of totalitarianism and censorship after Bolsonaro orders end to publication of numbers Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Brazilian government has been accused of totalitarianism and censorship after it stopped releasing its total numbers of Covid-19 cases and deaths and wiped an official site clean of swaths of data. Health ministry insiders told

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How Britain's chancellor can support the recovery

Rishi Sunak has an opportunity to change the economy for the better

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Great white shark diet surprises scientists

The first-ever detailed study of the diets of great white sharks off the east Australian coast reveals this apex predator spends more time feeding close to the seabed than expected.

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Rain, road flooding as Tropical Storm Cristobal draws closer

Rain pounded the U.S. Gulf Coast on Sunday ahead of the arrival of Tropical Storm Cristobal, which has already spawned a tornado in Florida and threatened more twisters along with high winds and storm surge.

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Great white shark diet surprises scientists

The first-ever detailed study of the diets of great white sharks off the east Australian coast reveals this apex predator spends more time feeding close to the seabed than expected.

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What is the coronavirus R number and is it rising in the UK?

Research suggests the average number of people one person infects may be increasing – but opinions differ as to why Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage With models suggesting that R could have risen above 1 in some parts of the UK, we look at what that means and how concerned we should be: Continue reading…

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Great white shark diet surprises scientists

The first-ever detailed analysis of the diet of great white sharks has shown they spend more time feeding at the seafloor than many would have expected.

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