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Nyheder2020juni09

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American Cancer Society updates diet and physical activity guideline for cancer prevention
The American Cancer Society updated guideline for diet and physical activity for cancer prevention increases recommended levels of physical activity and have an increased emphasis on reducing the consumption of processed and red meat, sugar-sweetened beverages, processed foods, and alcohol.
5h
Live Coronavirus Updates: Disease's Peak Is Still Far Off in Some Places
Seven million people have been infected worldwide, and new cases hit a high globally on Sunday, according to the W.H.O. Central banks are seeking new tools to offset the downturn.
7h
IBM stopper al udvikling af ansigtsgenkendelse
IBM stopper for al udvikling inden for ansigtsgenkendelsesteknologier, og tager stærk afstand fra dem i nyt brev skrevet til kongressen i USA.
8h

LATEST

Undersized airways may explain why nonsmokers get COPD
A mismatch between airway and lung size may explain why some nonsmokers get COPD and some heavy smokers do not, according to a new study from Columbia University Irving Medical Center.
4min
Study shows cannabis temporarily relieves PTSD symptoms
People suffering from post-traumatic distress disorder report that cannabis reduces the severity of their symptoms by more than half, at least in the short term, according to a recent study led by WSU psychology professor Carrie Cutler.
4min
Mexican immigrant obesity rates climb with deportation fears
Mexican immigrants, especially those who are undocumented and fear deportation, have limited access to healthy foods and are at increased risk for obesity because of stress, anxiety and depression, according to a Rutgers study.
4min
Boris Johnson's patience wears thin over tracing app
Downing Street steps up pressure to switch to technology developed by Google and Apple
4min
Where Do Memories Lives ?
submitted by /u/Small-Pocket-Library [link] [comments]
6min
Unreliable data: how a tiny US company influenced Covid-19 policy globally
In May a single study published in one of the world's leading medical journals led to trials of a possible coronavirus treatment being halted around the world. Weeks later the study was retracted and the company behind the data used is facing serious scrutiny. Melissa Davey tells us how it all unravelled You can read Melissa Davey's feature on how unreliable data in Covid-19 research was question
10min
Is it safe for coronavirus 'shielders' in the UK to go outside now?
The easing of lockdown restrictions in the UK has prompted growing concern from those taking extra precautions because they are particularly vulnerable to covid-19
10min
IBM gives up on face-recognition business – will other firms follow?
IBM has said that it will withdraw certain face-recognition systems from the market, a move that acknowledges the well-documented racial biases in this kind of technology
10min
Volcanic activity and changes in Earth's mantle were key to rise of atmospheric oxygen
Evidence from rocks billions of years old suggest that volcanoes played a key role in the rise of oxygen in the atmosphere of the early Earth.
25min
Study by NUI Galway researchers into DNA biology could impact future anti-cancer therapies
A study by the Centre for Chromosome Biology at NUI Galway, Ireland, in partnership with the University of Zurich, has uncovered new insights into how the replication of DNA occurs which can be applied to help develop novel cancer treatments.
25min
Network effects govern the evolution of maritime trade [Economic Sciences]
Maritime transport accounts for over 80% of the world trade volume and is the backbone of the global economy. Global supply chains create a complex network of trade flows. The structure of this network impacts not only the socioeconomic development of the concerned regions but also their ecosystems. The movements…
31min
An aphid RNA transcript migrates systemically within plants and is a virulence factor [Agricultural Sciences]
Aphids are sap-feeding insects that colonize a broad range of plant species and often cause feeding damage and transmit plant pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, and viroids. These insects feed from the plant vascular tissue, predominantly the phloem. However, it remains largely unknown how aphids, and other sap-feeding insects, establish intimate…
31min
Targeted mutation of secretogranin-2 disrupts sexual behavior and reproduction in zebrafish [Agricultural Sciences]
The luteinizing hormone surge is essential for fertility as it triggers ovulation in females and sperm release in males. We previously reported that secretoneurin-a, a neuropeptide derived from the processing of secretogranin-2a (Scg2a), stimulates luteinizing hormone release, suggesting a role in reproduction. Here we provide evidence that mutation of the…
31min
Loss of function of the Pad-1 aminotransferase gene, which is involved in auxin homeostasis, induces parthenocarpy in Solanaceae plants [Agricultural Sciences]
Fruit development normally occurs after pollination and fertilization; however, in parthenocarpic plants, the ovary grows into the fruit without pollination and/or fertilization. Parthenocarpy has been recognized as a highly attractive agronomic trait because it could stabilize fruit yield under unfavorable environmental conditions. Although natural parthenocarpic varieties are useful for breeding
31min
Fire mosaics and habitat choice in nomadic foragers [Anthropology]
In the mid-1950s Western Desert of Australia, Aboriginal populations were in decline as families left for ration depots, cattle stations, and mission settlements. In the context of reduced population density, an ideal free-distribution model predicts landscape use should contract to the most productive habitats, and people should avoid areas that…
31min
Ancient genomes from present-day France unveil 7,000 years of its demographic history [Anthropology]
Genomic studies conducted on ancient individuals across Europe have revealed how migrations have contributed to its present genetic landscape, but the territory of present-day France has yet to be connected to the broader European picture. We generated a large dataset comprising the complete mitochondrial genomes, Y-chromosome markers, and genotypes of…
31min
Transition between solid and liquid state of yield-stress fluids under purely extensional deformations [Applied Physical Sciences]
We report experimental microfluidic measurements and theoretical modeling of elastoviscoplastic materials under steady, planar elongation. Employing a theory that allows the solid state to deform, we predict the yielding and flow dynamics of such complex materials in pure extensional flows. We find a significant deviation of the ratio of the…
31min
Load-induced dynamical transitions at graphene interfaces [Applied Physical Sciences]
The structural superlubricity (SSL), a state of near-zero friction between two contacted solid surfaces, has been attracting rapidly increasing research interest since it was realized in microscale graphite in 2012. An obvious question concerns the implications of SSL for micro- and nanoscale devices such as actuators. The simplest actuators are…
31min
Glycosaminoglycans accelerate biomimetic collagen mineralization in a tissue-based in vitro model [Biochemistry]
Mammalian teeth are attached to the jawbone through an exquisitely controlled mineralization process: unmineralized collagen fibers of the periodontal ligament anchor directly into the outer layer of adjoining mineralized tissues (cementum and bone). The sharp interface between mineralized and nonmineralized collagenous tissues makes this an excellent model to study the…
31min
Algal neurotoxin biosynthesis repurposes the terpene cyclase structural fold into an N-prenyltransferase [Biochemistry]
Prenylation is a common biological reaction in all domains of life wherein prenyl diphosphate donors transfer prenyl groups onto small molecules as well as large proteins. The enzymes that catalyze these reactions are structurally distinct from ubiquitous terpene cyclases that, instead, assemble terpenes via intramolecular rearrangements of a single substrate….
31min
The 6-4 photoproduct is the trigger of UV-induced replication blockage and ATR activation [Biochemistry]
The most prevalent human carcinogen is sunlight-associated ultraviolet (UV), a physiologic dose of which generates thousands of DNA lesions per cell, mostly of two types: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PPs). It has not been possible, in living cells, to precisely characterize the respective contributions of these two…
31min
Untangling the sequence of events during the S2 -> S3 transition in photosystem II and implications for the water oxidation mechanism [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
In oxygenic photosynthesis, light-driven oxidation of water to molecular oxygen is carried out by the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II (PS II). Recently, we reported the room-temperature structures of PS II in the four (semi)stable S-states, S1, S2, S3, and S0, showing that a water molecule is inserted during…
31min
Membrane-tethered mucin-like polypeptides sterically inhibit binding and slow fusion kinetics of influenza A virus [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The mechanism(s) by which cell-tethered mucins modulate infection by influenza A viruses (IAVs) remain an open question. Mucins form both a protective barrier that can block virus binding and recruit IAVs to bind cells via the sialic acids of cell-tethered mucins. To elucidate the molecular role of mucins in flu…
31min
Cell response to substrate rigidity is regulated by active and passive cytoskeletal stress [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Morphogenesis, tumor formation, and wound healing are regulated by tissue rigidity. Focal adhesion behavior is locally regulated by stiffness; however, how cells globally adapt, detect, and respond to rigidity remains unknown. Here, we studied the interplay between the rheological properties of the cytoskeleton and matrix rigidity. We seeded fibroblasts onto…
31min
High-affinity oligoclonal TCRs define effective adoptive T cell therapy targeting mutant KRAS-G12D [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Complete cancer regression occurs in a subset of patients following adoptive T cell therapy (ACT) of ex vivo expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). However, the low success rate presents a great challenge to broader clinical application. To provide insight into TIL-based immunotherapy, we studied a successful case of ACT where regression…
31min
A methyl-TROSY approach for NMR studies of high-molecular-weight DNA with application to the nucleosome core particle [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The development of methyl-transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (methyl-TROSY)–based NMR methods, in concert with robust strategies for incorporation of methyl-group probes of structure and dynamics into the protein of interest, has facilitated quantitative studies of high-molecular-weight protein complexes. Here we develop a one-pot in vitro reaction for producing NMR quantities of methyl-
31min
Collective effects of XMAP215, EB1, CLASP2, and MCAK lead to robust microtubule treadmilling [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Microtubule network remodeling is essential for fundamental cellular processes including cell division, differentiation, and motility. Microtubules are active biological polymers whose ends stochastically and independently switch between phases of growth and shrinkage. Microtubule treadmilling, in which the microtubule plus end grows while the minus end shrinks, is observed in cells;…
31min
Molecular taxonomy of human ocular outflow tissues defined by single-cell transcriptomics [Cell Biology]
The conventional outflow pathway is a complex tissue responsible for maintaining intraocular pressure (IOP) homeostasis. The coordinated effort of multiple cells with differing responsibilities ensures healthy outflow function and IOP maintenance. Dysfunction of one or more resident cell types results in ocular hypertension and risk for glaucoma, a leading cause…
31min
Atom-by-atom electrodeposition of single isolated cobalt oxide molecules and clusters for studying the oxygen evolution reaction [Chemistry]
We report an electrodeposition protocol for preparing isolated cobalt oxide single molecules (Co1Ox) and clusters (ConOy) on a carbon fiber nanoelectrode. The as-prepared deposits are able to produce well-defined steady-state voltammograms for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline media, where the equivalent radius (rd) is estimated by the limiting…
31min
Semisynthesis of an evasin from tick saliva reveals a critical role of tyrosine sulfation for chemokine binding and inhibition [Chemistry]
Blood-feeding arthropods produce antiinflammatory salivary proteins called evasins that function through inhibition of chemokine-receptor signaling in the host. Herein, we show that the evasin ACA-01 from the Amblyomma cajennense tick can be posttranslationally sulfated at two tyrosine residues, albeit as a mixture of sulfated variants. Homogenously sulfated variants of the…
31min
Ultrasensitive detection of malignant melanoma using PET molecular imaging probes [Chemistry]
Malignant melanoma has one of the highest mortality rates of any cancer because of its aggressive nature and high metastatic potential. Clinical staging of the disease at the time of diagnosis is very important for the prognosis and outcome of melanoma treatment. In this study, we designed and synthesized the…
31min
Putative regulators for the continuum of erythroid differentiation revealed by single-cell transcriptome of human BM and UCB cells [Developmental Biology]
Fine-resolution differentiation trajectories of adult human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) involved in the generation of red cells is critical for understanding dynamic developmental changes that accompany human erythropoiesis. Using single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) of primary human terminal erythroid cells (CD34−CD235a+) isolated directly from adult bone marrow (BM) and umbilical cord…
31min
Subpolar marginal seas fuel the North Pacific through the intermediate water at the termination of the global ocean circulation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The mechanism by which nutrients in the deep ocean are uplifted to maintain nutrient-rich surface waters in the subarctic Pacific has not been properly described. The iron (Fe) supply processes that control biological production in the nutrient-rich waters are also still under debate. Here, we report the processes that determine…
31min
Past and future decline of tropical pelagic biodiversity [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
A major research question concerning global pelagic biodiversity remains unanswered: when did the apparent tropical biodiversity depression (i.e., bimodality of latitudinal diversity gradient [LDG]) begin? The bimodal LDG may be a consequence of recent ocean warming or of deep-time evolutionary speciation and extinction processes. Using rich fossil datasets of planktonic…
31min
Migratory behavior and winter geography drive differential range shifts of eastern birds in response to recent climate change [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Over the past half century, migratory birds in North America have shown divergent population trends relative to resident species, with the former declining rapidly and the latter increasing. The role that climate change has played in these observed trends is not well understood, despite significant warming over this period. We…
31min
Earth and field observations underpin metapopulation dynamics in complex landscapes: Near-term study on carabids [Ecology]
Understanding risks to biodiversity requires predictions of the spatial distribution of species adapting to changing ecosystems and, to that end, Earth observations integrating field surveys prove essential as they provide key numbers for assessing landscape-wide biodiversity scenarios. Here, we develop, and apply to a relevant case study, a method suited…
31min
Imperfect transparency and camouflage in glass frogs [Ecology]
Camouflage patterns prevent detection and/or recognition by matching the background, disrupting edges, or mimicking particular background features. In variable habitats, however, a single pattern cannot match all available sites all of the time, and efficacy may therefore be reduced. Active color change provides an alternative where coloration can be altered…
31min
Complete encapsulation of sulfur through interfacial energy control of sulfur solutions for high-performance Li-S batteries [Engineering]
Complete encapsulation of high-content sulfur in porous carbon is crucial for high performance Li−S batteries. To this end, unlike conventional approaches to control the pore of carbon hosts, we demonstrate controlling the interfacial energy of the solution in the process of penetrating the sulfur-dissolved solution. We unveil, experimentally and theoretically,…
31min
Caring for the future can turn tragedy into comedy for long-term collective action under risk of collapse [Environmental Sciences]
We will need collective action to avoid catastrophic climate change, and this will require valuing the long term as well as the short term. Shortsightedness and uncertainty have hindered progress in resolving this collective action problem and have been recognized as important barriers to cooperation among humans. Here, we propose…
31min
Tuning environmental timescales to evolve and maintain generalists [Evolution]
Natural environments can present diverse challenges, but some genotypes remain fit across many environments. Such "generalists" can be hard to evolve, outcompeted by specialists fitter in any particular environment. Here, inspired by the search for broadly neutralizing antibodies during B cell affinity maturation, we demonstrate that environmental changes on an…
31min
Competition and hybridization drive interspecific territoriality in birds [Evolution]
Costly interactions between species that arise as a by-product of ancestral similarities in communication signals are expected to persist only under specific evolutionary circumstances. Territorial aggression between species, for instance, is widely assumed to persist only when extrinsic barriers prevent niche divergence or selection in sympatry is too weak to…
32min
Forward genetic analysis using OCT screening identifies Sfxn3 mutations leading to progressive outer retinal degeneration in mice [Genetics]
Retinal disease and loss of vision can result from any disruption of the complex pathways controlling retinal development and homeostasis. Forward genetics provides an excellent tool to find, in an unbiased manner, genes that are essential to these processes. Using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis in mice in combination with a screening protocol…
32min
FcRn, but not Fc{gamma}Rs, drives maternal-fetal transplacental transport of human IgG antibodies [Immunology and Inflammation]
The IgG Fc domain has the capacity to interact with diverse types of receptors, including the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), which confer pleiotropic biological activities. Whereas FcRn regulates IgG epithelial transport and recycling, Fc effector activities, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis, are mediated…
32min
Inflammation-related plasma and CSF biomarkers for multiple sclerosis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Effective biomarkers for multiple sclerosis diagnosis, assessment of prognosis, and treatment responses, in particular those measurable in blood, are largely lacking. We have investigated a broad set of protein biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma using a highly sensitive proteomic immunoassay. Cases from two independent cohorts were compared with…
32min
Cytomegalovirus inhibition of extrinsic apoptosis determines fitness and resistance to cytotoxic CD8 T cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
Viral immune evasion is currently understood to focus on deflecting CD8 T cell recognition of infected cells by disrupting antigen presentation pathways. We evaluated viral interference with the ultimate step in cytotoxic T cell function, the death of infected cells. The viral inhibitor of caspase-8 activation (vICA) conserved in human…
32min
CD5 signalosome coordinates antagonist TCR signals to control the generation of Treg cells induced by foreign antigens [Immunology and Inflammation]
CD5 is characterized as an inhibitory coreceptor with an important regulatory role during T cell development. The molecular mechanism by which CD5 operates has been puzzling and its function in mature T cells suggests promoting rather than repressing effects on immune responses. Here, we combined quantitative mass spectrometry and genetic…
32min
Selective AhR knockout in langerin-expressing cells abates Langerhans cells and polarizes Th2/Tr1 in epicutaneous protein sensitization [Immunology and Inflammation]
The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) represents an environmental sensor regulating immune responses. In the skin, AhR is expressed in several cell types, including keratinocytes, epidermal Langerhans cells (LC), and dermal dendritic cells (DC). The mechanisms how AhR activates or inhibits cutaneous immune responses remain controversial, owing to differences in the…
32min
Low-frequency ultrasound-mediated cytokine transfection enhances T cell recruitment at local and distant tumor sites [Medical Sciences]
Robust cytotoxic T cell infiltration has proven to be difficult to achieve in solid tumors. We set out to develop a flexible protocol to efficiently transfect tumor and stromal cells to produce immune-activating cytokines, and thus enhance T cell infiltration while debulking tumor mass. By combining ultrasound with tumor-targeted microbubbles,…
32min
Enzyme-mediated depletion of serum l-Met abrogates prostate cancer growth via multiple mechanisms without evidence of systemic toxicity [Medical Sciences]
Extensive studies in prostate cancer and other malignancies have revealed that l-methionine (l-Met) and its metabolites play a critical role in tumorigenesis. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that systemic restriction of serum l-Met, either via partial dietary restriction or with bacterial l-Met–degrading enzymes exerts potent antitumor effects. However, administration…
32min
Metformin selectively inhibits metastatic colorectal cancer with the KRAS mutation by intracellular accumulation through silencing MATE1 [Medical Sciences]
Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients have poor overall survival despite using irinotecan- or oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy combined with anti-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) drugs, especially those with the oncogene mutation of KRAS. Metformin has been reported as a potentially novel antitumor agent in many experiments, but its therapeutic activity is discrepant…
32min
USP37 promotes deubiquitination of HIF2{alpha} in kidney cancer [Medical Sciences]
Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by loss of tumor suppressor Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) function, which leads to accumulation of hypoxia inducible factor α (including HIF1α and HIF2α). HIF2α was previously reported to be one of the major oncogenic drivers in ccRCC, however, its therapeutic targets remain…
32min
Adenine DNA methylation, 3D genome organization, and gene expression in the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis [Microbiology]
Trichomonas vaginalis is a common sexually transmitted parasite that colonizes the human urogenital tract causing infections that range from asymptomatic to highly inflammatory. Recent works have highlighted the importance of histone modifications in the regulation of transcription and parasite pathogenesis. However, the nature of DNA methylation in the parasite remains…
32min
Epstein-Barr virus co-opts TFIIH component XPB to specifically activate essential viral lytic promoters [Microbiology]
Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with epithelial and lymphoid malignancies, establishes latent infection in memory B cells, and intermittently produces infectious virions through lytic replication. Released virions play a key role in latent reservoir maintenance and transmission. Lytic EBV transcription differs from cellular transcription in requiring a virus-encoded preinitiation complex…
32min
Plasmodium vivax spleen-dependent genes encode antigens associated with cytoadhesion and clinical protection [Microbiology]
Plasmodium vivax, the most widely distributed human malaria parasite, causes severe clinical syndromes despite low peripheral blood parasitemia. This conundrum is further complicated as cytoadherence in the microvasculature is still a matter of investigations. Previous reports in Plasmodium knowlesi, another parasite species shown to infect humans, demonstrated that variant genes…
32min
Modulation of hippocampal brain networks produces changes in episodic simulation and divergent thinking [Neuroscience]
Prior functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies indicate that a core network of brain regions, including the hippocampus, is jointly recruited during episodic memory, episodic simulation, and divergent creative thinking. Because fMRI data are correlational, it is unknown whether activity increases in the hippocampus, and the core network more broadly,…
32min
Context-dependent and dynamic functional influence of corticothalamic pathways to first- and higher-order visual thalamus [Neuroscience]
Layer 6 (L6) is the sole purveyor of corticothalamic (CT) feedback to first-order thalamus and also sends projections to higher-order thalamus, yet how it engages the full corticothalamic circuit to contribute to sensory processing in an awake animal remains unknown. We sought to elucidate the functional impact of L6CT projections…
32min
Multiple areas of the cerebral cortex influence the stomach [Neuroscience]
The central nervous system both influences and is influenced by the gastrointestinal system. Most research on this gut–brain connection has focused on how ascending signals from the gut and its microbiome alter brain function. Less attention has focused on how descending signals from the central nervous system alter gut function….
32min
Turning the body into a clock: Accurate timing is facilitated by simple stereotyped interactions with the environment [Neuroscience]
How animals adapt their behavior according to regular time intervals between events is not well understood, especially when intervals last several seconds. One possibility is that animals use disembodied internal neuronal representations of time to decide when to initiate a given action at the end of an interval. However, animals…
32min
Altered photoreceptor metabolism in mouse causes late stage age-related macular degeneration-like pathologies [Neuroscience]
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. While the histopathology of the different disease stages is well characterized, the cause underlying the progression, from the early drusen stage to the advanced macular degeneration stage that leads to blindness, remains unknown. Here, we show that…
32min
In vivo mapping of a GPCR interactome using knockin mice [Pharmacology]
With over 30% of current medications targeting this family of proteins, G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain invaluable therapeutic targets. However, due to their unique physicochemical properties, their low abundance, and the lack of highly specific antibodies, GPCRs are still challenging to study in vivo. To overcome these limitations, we combined here…
32min
DCyFIR: a high-throughput CRISPR platform for multiplexed G protein-coupled receptor profiling and ligand discovery [Pharmacology]
More than 800 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest class of membrane receptors in humans. While there is ample biological understanding and many approved drugs for prototypic GPCRs, most GPCRs still lack well-defined biological ligands and drugs. Here, we report our efforts to tap the potential of understudied GPCRs…
32min
Hydrodynamic and frictional modulation of deformations in switchable colloidal crystallites [Physics]
Displacive transformations in colloidal crystals may offer a pathway for increasing the diversity of accessible configurations without the need to engineer particle shape or interaction complexity. To date, binary crystals composed of spherically symmetric particles at specific size ratios have been formed that exhibit floppiness and facile routes for transformation…
32min
Quantum critical phenomena in a compressible displacive ferroelectric [Physics]
The dielectric and magnetic polarizations of quantum paraelectrics and paramagnetic materials have in many cases been found to initially increase with increasing thermal disorder and hence, exhibit peaks as a function of temperature. A quantitative description of these examples of "order-by-disorder" phenomena has remained elusive in nearly ferromagnetic metals and…
32min
Superdiffusive transport of energy in one-dimensional metals [Physics]
Metals in one spatial dimension are described at the lowest energy scales by the Luttinger liquid theory. It is well understood that this free theory, and even interacting integrable models, can support ballistic transport of conserved quantities including energy. In contrast, realistic one-dimensional metals, even without disorder, contain integrability-breaking interactions…
32min
Protein phosphatase 2A promotes stomatal development by stabilizing SPEECHLESS in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]
Stomatal guard cells control gas exchange that allows plant photosynthesis but limits water loss from plants to the environment. In Arabidopsis, stomatal development is mainly controlled by a signaling pathway comprising peptide ligands, membrane receptors, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, and a set of transcription factors. The initiation of…
32min
Prosocial polio vaccination in Israel [Population Biology]
Regions with insufficient vaccination have hindered worldwide poliomyelitis eradication, as they are vulnerable to sporadic outbreaks through reintroduction of the disease. Despite Israel's having been declared polio-free in 1988, a routine sewage surveillance program detected polio in 2013. To curtail transmission, the Israel Ministry of Health launched a vaccine campaign…
32min
Neural representations of perceptual color experience in the human ventral visual pathway [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Color is a perceptual construct that arises from neural processing in hierarchically organized cortical visual areas. Previous research, however, often failed to distinguish between neural responses driven by stimulus chromaticity versus perceptual color experience. An unsolved question is whether the neural responses at each stage of cortical processing represent a…
32min
Spatial frequency tuning of motor responses reveals differential contribution of dorsal and ventral systems to action comprehension [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Understanding object-directed actions performed by others is central to everyday life. This ability is thought to rely on the interaction between the dorsal action observation network (AON) and a ventral object recognition pathway. On this view, the AON would encode action kinematics, and the ventral pathway, the most likely intention…
32min
Other people's gaze encoded as implied motion in the human brain [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Keeping track of other people's gaze is an essential task in social cognition and key for successfully reading other people's intentions and beliefs (theory of mind). Recent behavioral evidence suggests that we construct an implicit model of other people's gaze, which may incorporate physically incoherent attributes such as a construct…
32min
As diversity increases, people paradoxically perceive social groups as more similar [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
With globalization and immigration, societal contexts differ in sheer variety of resident social groups. Social diversity challenges individuals to think in new ways about new kinds of people and where their groups all stand, relative to each other. However, psychological science does not yet specify how human minds represent social…
32min
A linear threshold model for optimal stopping behavior [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
In many real-life decisions, options are distributed in space and time, making it necessary to search sequentially through them, often without a chance to return to a rejected option. The optimal strategy in these tasks is to choose the first option that is above a threshold that depends on the…
32min
Orbital-use fees could more than quadruple the value of the space industry [Sustainability Science]
The space industry's rapid recent growth represents the latest tragedy of the commons. Satellites launched into orbit contribute to—and risk damage from—a growing buildup of space debris and other satellites. Collision risk from this orbital congestion is costly to satellite operators. Technological and managerial solutions—such as active debris removal or…
32min
Redox controls metabolic robustness in the gas-fermenting acetogen Clostridium autoethanogenum [Systems Biology]
Living biological systems display a fascinating ability to self-organize their metabolism. This ability ultimately determines the metabolic robustness that is fundamental to controlling cellular behavior. However, fluctuations in metabolism can affect cellular homeostasis through transient oscillations. For example, yeast cultures exhibit rhythmic oscillatory behavior in high cell-density continuo
32min
Correction for Gomez et al., Influence of spatially segregated IP3-producing pathways on spike generation and transmitter release in Purkinje cell axons [Corrections]
NEUROSCIENCE Correction for "Influence of spatially segregated IP3-producing pathways on spike generation and transmitter release in Purkinje cell axons," by Laura C. Gomez, Shin-ya Kawaguchi, Thibault Collin, Abdelali Jalil, Maria del Pilar Gomez, Enrico Nasi, Alain Marty, and Isabel Llano, which was first published May 1, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2000148117 (Proc. Natl….
32min
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
Evolution of maritime shipping routes Comparison of prediction quality of link openings of the common neighbors model (Top) vs. port-gravity model (Bottom). Maritime shipping represents more than 80% of the cargo shipped worldwide and plays a central role in global supply chains. Shipping vessels emit significant levels of greenhouse gases,…
32min
Median-joining network analysis of SARS-CoV-2 genomes is neither phylogenetic nor evolutionary [Social Sciences]
Tracking the spread of pandemics and the evolution of the underlying pathogens are effective tools for managing deadly outbreaks. Forster et al. (1) use a median-joining (MJ) network (MJN) and its Steinerization process to investigate the evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease 2019…
32min
Evolving COVID-19 conundrum and its impact [Social Sciences]
Forster et al. (1) performed a phylogenetic network analysis with 160 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) genomes from a public database and proposed a network of ancestral nodes and derived types, suggesting virus adaptability to specific geographical regions. The median-joining network approach employed in Forster et al. (1)…
32min
Sampling bias and incorrect rooting make phylogenetic network tracing of SARS-COV-2 infections unreliable [Social Sciences]
There is obvious interest in gaining insights into the epidemiology and evolution of the virus that has recently emerged in humans as the cause of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The recent paper by Forster et al. (1) analyzed 160 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) full genomes available…
32min
Reply to Sanchez-Pacheco et al., Chookaȷorn, and Mavian et al.: Explaining phylogenetic network analysis of SARS-CoV-2 genomes [Social Sciences]
We calculated a phylogenetic analysis network of the 160 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) complete genomes submitted to the international Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza Data (GISAID) database by early March 2020, to produce a snapshot of the beginning of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic (1). Phylogenetic network analysis…
32min
Get rid of the bad first: Therapeutic plasma exchange with convalescent plasma for severe COVID-19 [Biological Sciences]
We read the article by Duan et al. (1) with great interest and are deeply impressed by the promising results for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients worldwide. The authors transfused convalescent plasma (CP) into 10 patients on average 15.7 d after symptom onset. However, only 3 of 10 patients'…
32min
Convalescent plasma for patients with COVID-19 [Biological Sciences]
The ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) (1), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has posed a huge threat to global public health, while no specific treatment is recommended for therapy (2). In Duan et al.'s study (3), they observed a large clinical improvement in…
32min
Reply to Kesici et al. and Zeng et al.: Blocking the virus and reducing the inflammatory damage in COVID-19 [Biological Sciences]
We appreciate the constructive comments from Kesici et al. (1) and Zeng et al. (2), which mainly focus on the key points about the optimal procedure of convalescent plasma (CP) transfusion in severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) therapy and about how to improve the effectiveness. First of all, this study…
32min
QnAs with Gloria M. Coruzzi [QnAs]
For plants, nitrogen is a key nutrient responsible for growth and development. Farms throughout the world rely on fertilizers rich in the element to increase production. However, fertilizer use carries a high environmental impact, and reducing fertilizer use remains a challenging goal, especially as the global population grows. Uncovering the…
32min
The transient ȷoys of others—neural ensembles encode social approach in bonded voles [Neuroscience]
Social bonds are an essential part of the human experience. We bond with our parents, our children, our romantic partners, and our friends; these bonds not only shape our emotional well-being but have profound consequences for our health and longevity (1). Perhaps because these bonds are so profoundly important, we…
32min
Time to activin on pathogenic T cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by neuronal and axonal damage resulting in a decline in motor and sensory functions (1). Although the ultimate cause of the disease has yet to be defined, the immune system and, in particular, pathogenic T cells…
32min
Decarbonizing construction through carbonation [Chemistry]
It is probably safe to assume that most of us are aware of the magnitude of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions on an annual basis, on the order of billions of metric tons (gigatons), and that an appreciable percentage of that CO2 can be attributed to industrial emitters (1) such as…
32min
A colloquium on the status and challenges in science for decarbonizing our energy landscape [Introductions]
An Arthur M. Sackler Colloquium titled "Status and Challenges in Science for Decarbonizing our Energy Landscape" was held at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center in Irvine, California in October 2018. The papers that follow in this issue of PNAS (1–7) stem from that activity, which addressed a topic of…
32min
Energy storage emerging: A perspective from the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research [Colloquium Paper]
Energy storage is an integral part of modern society. A contemporary example is the lithium (Li)-ion battery, which enabled the launch of the personal electronics revolution in 1991 and the first commercial electric vehicles in 2010. Most recently, Li-ion batteries have expanded into the electricity grid to firm variable renewable…
32min
Magnetotransport studies of Fe vacancy-ordered Fe4+{delta}Se5 nanowires [Applied Physical Sciences]
We studied the electrical transport of Fe4+δSe5 single-crystal nanowires exhibiting √5 × √5 Fe-vacancy order and mixed valence of Fe. Fe4+δSe5 compound has been identified as the parent phase of FeSe superconductor. A first-order metal-insulator (MI) transition of transition temperature TMI ∼ 28 K is observed at zero magnetic fields…
32min
Renewable electricity storage using electrolysis [Colloquium Paper]
Electrolysis converts electrical energy into chemical energy by storing electrons in the form of stable chemical bonds. The chemical energy can be used as a fuel or converted back to electricity when needed. Water electrolysis to hydrogen and oxygen is a well-established technology, whereas fundamental advances in CO2 electrolysis are…
32min
A stable dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell mediated by a NiO overlayer for water oxidation [Colloquium Paper]
In the development of photoelectrochemical cells for water splitting or CO2 reduction, a major challenge is O2 evolution at photoelectrodes that, in behavior, mimic photosystem II. At an appropriate semiconductor electrode, a water oxidation catalyst must be integrated with a visible light absorber in a stable half-cell configuration. Here, we…
32min
Toward electrochemical synthesis of cement—An electrolyzer-based process for decarbonating CaCO3 while producing useful gas streams [Colloquium Paper]
Cement production is currently the largest single industrial emitter of CO2, accounting for ∼8% (2.8 Gtons/y) of global CO2 emissions. Deep decarbonization of cement manufacturing will require remediation of both the CO2 emissions due to the decomposition of CaCO3 to CaO and that due to combustion of fossil fuels (primarily…
32min
Selective reduction of CO to acetaldehyde with CuAg electrocatalysts [Colloquium Paper]
Electrochemical CO reduction can serve as a sequential step in the transformation of CO2 into multicarbon fuels and chemicals. In this study, we provide insights on how to steer selectivity for CO reduction almost exclusively toward a single multicarbon oxygenate by carefully controlling the catalyst composition and its surrounding reaction…
32min
Opinion: The unintended consequences of antiflaring policies—and measures for mitigation [Environmental Sciences]
Oil reservoirs contain significant quantities of methane, which can leak out when the oil is extracted. At oil wells around the world, more than 140 billion cubic meters (bcm) of this methane is burned off ("flared") every year, transforming it into carbon dioxide, which contributes to global warming. Just as…
32min
Gender imbalance in medical imaging datasets produces biased classifiers for computer-aided diagnosis [Medical Sciences]
Artificial intelligence (AI) systems for computer-aided diagnosis and image-based screening are being adopted worldwide by medical institutions. In such a context, generating fair and unbiased classifiers becomes of paramount importance. The research community of medical image computing is making great efforts in developing more accurate algorithms to assist medical doctors…
32min
The multi-faceted mechano-bactericidal mechanism of nanostructured surfaces [Microbiology]
The mechano-bactericidal activity of nanostructured surfaces has become the focus of intensive research toward the development of a new generation of antibacterial surfaces, particularly in the current era of emerging antibiotic resistance. This work demonstrates the effects of an incremental increase of nanopillar height on nanostructure-induced bacterial cell death. We…
32min
Nutrient dose-responsive transcriptome changes driven by Michaelis-Menten kinetics underlie plant growth rates [Plant Biology]
An increase in nutrient dose leads to proportional increases in crop biomass and agricultural yield. However, the molecular underpinnings of this nutrient dose–response are largely unknown. To investigate, we assayed changes in the Arabidopsis root transcriptome to different doses of nitrogen (N)—a key plant nutrient—as a function of time. By…
32min
Lessons from Hurricane Katrina for predicting the indirect health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic [Social Sciences]
Beyond their immediate effects on mortality, disasters have widespread, indirect impacts on mental and physical well-being by exposing survivors to stress and potential trauma. Identifying the disaster-related stressors that predict health adversity will help officials prepare for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Using data from a prospective study of…
32min
Technoeconomic and life-cycle analysis of single-step catalytic conversion of wet ethanol into fungible fuel blendstocks [Colloquium Paper]
Technoeconomic and life-cycle analyses are presented for catalytic conversion of ethanol to fungible hydrocarbon fuel blendstocks, informed by advances in catalyst and process development. Whereas prior work toward this end focused on 3-step processes featuring dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation, the consolidated alcohol dehydration and oligomerization (CADO) approach described here r
32min
Addressing the challenge of carbon-free energy [Colloquium Paper]
This century will witness a major transformation in how energy is acquired, stored, and utilized globally. The impetus for this change comes from the deep impacts that both developed and developing societies have had on our planet's environment during the past century, and the projections going forward of what will…
32min
Armor on butterfly wings protects against heavy rain
An analysis of high-speed raindrops hitting biological surfaces such as feathers, plant leaves and insect wings reveals how these highly water-repelling veneers reduce the water's impact.
34min
Water vapor in the atmosphere may be prime renewable energy source
A new study finds that water vapor in the atmosphere may serve as a potential renewable energy source in the future.
34min
Presence of airborne dust could signify increased habitability of distant planets
Scientists have expanded our understanding of potentially habitable planets orbiting distant stars by including a critical climate component — the presence of airborne dust.
34min
Enorm Saturn-måne glider overraskende hurtigt væk fra planeten
Også vores måne glider væk fra Jorden – det går bare langsommere.
34min
How magnetic fields and 3-D printers will create the pills of tomorrow
Doctors could soon be administering an entire course of treatment for life-threatening conditions with a 3-D printed capsule controlled by magnetic fields thanks to advances made by University of Sussex researchers.
35min
AI sentencing tools need to be closely scrutinised, says new study
In a paper published by the Behavioral Sciences & Law journal, experts from the University of Surrey take a critical look at the growing use of algorithmic risk assessment tools, which act as a form of expert scientific evidence in a growing number of criminal cases.
35min
Renewable fuel from carbon dioxide with the aid of solar energy
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, are attempting to convert carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, to fuel using energy from sunlight. Recent results have shown that it is possible to use their technique to selectively produce methane, carbon monoxide or formic acid from carbon dioxide and water. The study has been published in ACS Nano.
35min
How magnetic fields and 3-D printers will create the pills of tomorrow
Doctors could soon be administering an entire course of treatment for life-threatening conditions with a 3-D printed capsule controlled by magnetic fields thanks to advances made by University of Sussex researchers.
35min
Infected insects may warn of impending citrus disease a year in advance
Citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing of HLB), transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid, is currently the biggest threat to the citrus industry and is threat to many parts of the world, including Asia, Africa, South America, and the Unites States. In Florida alone, citrus greening disease has accounted for losses of several billions of U.S. dollars.
38min
Study on shorebirds suggests that when conserving species, not all land is equal
Princeton University researchers may have solved a long-standing mystery in conservation that could influence how natural lands are designated for the preservation of endangered species.
38min
Infected insects may warn of impending citrus disease a year in advance
Citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing of HLB), transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid, is currently the biggest threat to the citrus industry and is threat to many parts of the world, including Asia, Africa, South America, and the Unites States. In Florida alone, citrus greening disease has accounted for losses of several billions of U.S. dollars.
41min
Study on shorebirds suggests that when conserving species, not all land is equal
Princeton University researchers may have solved a long-standing mystery in conservation that could influence how natural lands are designated for the preservation of endangered species.
41min
An alternative route for studying the intrinsic properties of solid-state materials
The physical and chemical properties of intermetallic compounds are governed by the real structure of synthesized materials and are strongly influenced by the structural imperfections, e.g. strain, dislocations, and presence of admixture phases. This leads to inconsistent reports for known and extensively studied materials.
41min
China removes pangolin from traditional medicine list
China has removed pangolin parts from its official list of traditional medicines, state media reported Tuesday, days after increasing legal protections on the endangered animal.
41min
China removes pangolin from traditional medicine list
China has removed pangolin parts from its official list of traditional medicines, state media reported Tuesday, days after increasing legal protections on the endangered animal.
44min
First Arab mission to Mars designed to inspire youth
The first Arab space mission to Mars, armed with probes to study the Red Planet's atmosphere, is designed to inspire the region's youth and pave the way for scientific breakthroughs, officials said Tuesday.
47min
Tower extension test a success for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope
To test the James Webb Space Telescope's readiness for its journey in space, technicians successfully commanded it to deploy and extend a critical part of the observatory known as the Deployable Tower Assembly.
47min
How magnetic fields and 3D printers will create the pills of tomorrow
Doctors could soon be administering an entire course of treatment for life-threatening conditions with a 3D printed capsule controlled by magnetic fields thanks to advances made by University of Sussex researchers.
48min
Biomedical sciences researchers provide methods to inactivate and safely study SARS-CoV-2
Detailed methods on how to perform research on SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, including procedures that effectively inactivate the virus to enable safe study of infected cells have been identified by virologists in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.
48min
Birmingham scientists 're-train' immune system to prevent attack of healthy cells
The body's immune system can be re-wired to prevent it from recognising its own proteins which, when attacked by the body, can cause autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, a significant new study by UK scientists has found.
48min
Study on shorebirds suggests that when conserving species, not all land is equal
Princeton researchers may have solved the long-standing puzzle of why migratory shorebirds around the world are plummeting several times faster than coastal ecosystems are being developed. They discovered that shorebirds overwhelmingly rely on tidal zones closest to dry land, which are most often lost to development. The findings suggest that protecting species requires a detailed understanding of
48min
Majority of first-wave COVID-19 clinical trials have significant design shortcomings, study finds
Most of the registered clinical trials of potential treatments for COVID-19 underway as of late March were designed in ways that will greatly limit their value in understanding potential treatments, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
48min
BU researcher: Screening for drug use can be reasonable, but not evidence-based
In the June 9 issue of JAMA, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that clinicians screen for unhealthy drug use (that is, any use of drugs that are illegal or medications not used for medical purposes) for all adult patients, but admits that there is still little evidence weighing the benefits and risks of this practice.
48min
Infected insects may warn of impending citrus disease a year in advance
Despite the first appearance of citrus greening disease in Florida in 2005, the bacterium wasn't found in Texas until 2011, when scientists detected it in the psyllids. The disease was not detected in citrus years until 2012, suggesting that psyllids may actually be used for early detection of the HLB pathogen in newly invaded areas.
48min
AI sentencing tools need to be closely scrutinised, says new study
Judges should closely vet the AI tools they use to help them predict whether a defendant is likely to re offend, urges a new study.
48min
Lab makes 4D printing more practical
Soft robots and biomedical implants that reconfigure themselves upon demand are closer to reality with a method developed at Rice University to print shapeshifting materials.
48min
Lab makes 4-D printing more practical
Soft robots and biomedical implants that reconfigure themselves upon demand are closer to reality with a new way to print shapeshifting materials.
53min
New research paves the way for simulating catalysts under reaction conditions
Computational catalysis, a field that simulates and accelerates the discovery of catalysts for chemicals production, has largely been limited to simulations of idealized catalyst structures that do not necessarily represent structures under realistic reaction conditions.
53min
New material allows for unprecedented imaging deeper in tissues
A team from the Department of Chemistry has established an approach for the creation of a metal-organic framework material that provides new perspectives for the sensitization of near-infrared luminescent lanthanide ions, including unprecedented possibilities of imaging deeper in tissues for more comprehensive studies of biological systems with light.
53min
Isolation can cut your life short
Social isolation can lead to shorter lifespan, researchers report. Their new paper explores the wide-ranging, negative consequences that social isolation has on our psychological well-being and physical health, including decreased lifespan. Through examining a broad range of studies, a full picture emerged of the severe impact that loneliness can have: having strong interpersonal relationships is
54min
Black Investors Call On VCs to Fix Hiring and Funding
Mentoring and networking advice aren't enough to solve the industry's dismal diversity numbers, say business leaders: Firms need to "Make the hire. Send the wire."
56min
NASA tracks Tropical Depression Cristobal moving toward Great Lakes
Once a tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico, now a tropical depression in the Mississippi Valley, NASA's Aqua satellite is tracking Cristobal as it continues to generate large amounts of rainfall while it heads toward the Great Lakes region.
59min
Pitt researchers' new material allows for unprecedented imaging deeper in tissues
A team from the Department of Chemistry has established an approach for the creation of a metal-organic framework material that provides new perspectives for biological imaging.
1h
Computer modelling predicts where vaccines are needed most
Researchers have developed a model that can estimate regional disease burden and the impact of vaccination, even in the absence of robust surveillance data, a study in eLife reveals.
1h
Fecal transplants show promise as treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
A new study from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University suggests that fecal transplants could be used as a treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The randomized controlled trial published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology found that fecal transplants in patients with NAFLD result in a reduction in how easily pathogens and other unwanted molecules pass t
1h
Alzheimer research: Noise-inducing neurons shut down memories
Neurons that are responsible for new experiences interfere with the signals of neurons that contain memories and thereby disturb the recall of memories – at least in mice. The research group of Martin Fuhrmann of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) reports this phenomenon in the scientific journal 'Nature Neuroscience'. The results of this study potentially shed new light on me
1h
EULAR advocates deployment of health care professionals — study confirms effectiveness
Inflammatory-rheumatic disorders are a widespread ailment, affecting at least 1.5 million people in Germany alone. Because of the shortage of rheumatologists, however, only half of the patients are adequately treated (1,2). A study in Germany has shown for the first time that the care of patients with inflammatory-rheumatic diseases by 'rheumatological assistants' (RFA*) is just as effective as tr
1h
NASA tracks Tropical Depression Cristobal moving toward Great Lakes
Once a tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico, now a tropical depression in the Mississippi Valley, NASA's Aqua satellite is tracking Cristobal as it continues to generate large amounts of rainfall while it heads toward the Great Lakes region.
1h
After COVID-19, green investment must deliver jobs to get political traction
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01682-1 Analysis of past recoveries shows a low-carbon reboot matters more for climate than does the brief emissions crash.
1h
Systemic racism: science must listen, learn and change
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01678-x Nature commits to working to end anti-Black practices in research.
1h
Beware the illusion of certainty: it can be weaponized
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01680-3 What happens when facts face personal, political and commercial pressures? A book on the workings of science explores.
1h
Pulling back layers of history, culture and identity
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01697-8 Aboriginal archaeologist Chris Wilson retraces the steps of the Ngarrindjeri people in South Australia.
1h
Animals and coronavirus, help for African labs and a short flu season
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01679-w The latest science news, in brief.
1h
Scientists identify ancient origin for key hormone system
A key set of proteins that help regulate hormones necessary for many essential functions in humans and other vertebrates have ancient origins in much simpler creatures such as sea cucumbers, says a new study published today in eLife.
1h
Scientists identify ancient origin for key hormone system
A key set of proteins that help regulate hormones necessary for many essential functions in humans and other vertebrates have ancient origins in much simpler creatures such as sea cucumbers, says a new study published today in eLife.
1h
Armor on butterfly wings protects against heavy rain
An analysis of high-speed raindrops hitting biological surfaces such as feathers, plant leaves and insect wings reveals how these highly water-repelling veneers reduce the water's impact.
1h
Study identifies network of genes that directs trachea and esophagus development
A new study reporting how a network of genes directs the development of the trachea and esophagus in mice has been published today in eLife.
1h
Armor on butterfly wings protects against heavy rain
An analysis of high-speed raindrops hitting biological surfaces such as feathers, plant leaves and insect wings reveals how these highly water-repelling veneers reduce the water's impact.
1h
Study identifies network of genes that directs trachea and esophagus development
A new study reporting how a network of genes directs the development of the trachea and esophagus in mice has been published today in eLife.
1h
COVID-19: How Does It Affect You?
A look at what happens in the lungs — ground zero for COVID-19.
1h
This Madlad Wants to Build a Particle Collider on the Moon
Outsourcing Building particle accelerators and setting up the conditions for high-energy experiments is notoriously tricky, but one physicist has an unusual solution: outsource the whole process to the Moon. Nikolai Zaitsev, a high energy physics Ph.D. who now owns the financial consulting firm Innovaest, argues that the Moon has many of the ideal conditions for particle physics research, Live Sc
1h
BMI og deltagelse i sport har betydning for gennemførelse af løbetest
Dansk undersøgelse peger på hvilke børn med astma, hvor det kan være relevant at overveje at erstatte løbetest med en anden diagnostisk metode.
1h
Water vapor in the atmosphere may be prime renewable energy source
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that water vapor in the atmosphere may serve as a potential renewable energy source in the future.
1h
Improved MRI scans could aid in development of arthritis treatments
An algorithm which analyses MRI images and automatically detects small changes in knee joints over time could be used in the development of new treatments for arthritis.
1h
Use of cystatin C for precise assessment of kidney function and cardiovascular risk
In many situations, it is essential that the physician knows a patient's kidney function as precisely as possible. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is calculated in order to assess kidney function. Various equations and methods exist in that regard, each of which has its advantages and disadvantages. As a paper published today in NDT [1] has now shown, there are clear scientific findings on ho
1h
Botox is an effective treatment for some common sports injuries, new research suggests
While botulinum toxin is commonly known as a cosmetic treatment for facial lines and wrinkles, a growing body of evidence suggests that 'Botox' can also be an effective treatment for certain sports injuries and chronic pain conditions, according to a review in the June issue of Current Sports Medicine Reports, official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). The journal is publi
1h
Predicting unpredictable reactions
New research from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering, in collaboration with the Laboratory of Catalysis and Catalytic Processes (Department of Energy) at Politecnico di Milano in Milan, Italy, advances the field of computational catalysis by paving the way for the simulation of realistic catalysts under reaction conditions. The work was published in ACS Catalysis.
1h
Study tracks decades of life cycle changes in nonwoody plants
For 25 years, Carol Augspurger visited a patch of ancient woods near Urbana, Illinois to look at the same 25 one-square-meter plots of earth she first demarcated for study in 1993. Her 600,000+ observations revealed that herbaceous plants are shifting their schedules in response to climate change, with distinct patterns for early- and late-spring-emerging plants.
1h
Predictors of 5-year mortality in young dialysis patients
The analysis published in NDT [1] evaluated for the first time the association of a large number of demographic, HD treatment and laboratory variables with mortality in patients on chronic hemodialysis treatment since childhood. The variety of retained risk factors identified by the analysis highlights the importance of multimodal intervention strategies in addition to adequate HD treatment.
1h
NAFLD in pregnancy increases risks for mother and baby
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in pregnancy has nearly tripled over the past ten years. It increases risks for both mother and baby, including hypertensive complications of pregnancy, bleeding after delivery, and preterm birth, report investigators in the Journal of Hepatology, published by Elsevier. They recommend that NAFLD should be considered a high-risk condition in pregnancy and t
1h
Put sustainable development at heart of UK recovery, PM told
Business, charity and trade body leaders urge Johnson to tackle inequality and climate crisis Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The bosses of Unilever, HSBC and Royal Bank of Scotland are among 150 business, charity and trade body leaders urging Boris Johnson to put UN sustainable development goals (SDGs) at the centre of the UK's Covid-19 recovery plans. In a letter a
1h
Mastocytose forekommer hyppigt ved insektstikallergi
Den potentielt alvorlige sygdom mastocytose overses nemt blandt patienter med f.eks. hvepseallergi, fremgår af et oversigtsforedrag, som overlæge Sigurd Broesby-Olsen har holdt på EAACIs e-kongres.
1h
Hydrogen Balloons Could Elevate Telegraph Wires above Rivers
Originally published in November 1845 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Poor nutrition education puts female athletes at risk
Lack of proper nutrition education may affect female athletes' performance and long-term health, according to a new review. Two decades of research among female athletes over the age of 13 shows that a lack of nutrition knowledge about what they need to eat to stay healthy and compete may contribute to poor performance, low energy and nutrient intake, and potential health risks, the review shows.
1h
After Tesla Defied Lockdown, Workers Started Catching Coronavirus
Last month, Tesla decided to reopen its factory in California a week before it struck an agreement with the local county's health department, in defiance of the lockdown. A short time later, several employees were instructed to stay at home after testing positive for the coronavirus, The Washington Post reports . Last month, as the pandemic raged, CEO Elon Musk had what amounted to a complete onl
1h
Heat and humidity battle sunshine for influence over the spread of COVID-19, research
An international team of researchers led by McMaster University has found that while higher heat and humidity can slow the spread of COVID-19, longer hours of sunlight are associated with a higher incidence of the disease, in a sign that sunny days can tempt more people out even if this means a higher risk of infection.
1h
The Quantum App Store Is Coming
Quantum computing is still the province of specialized programmers—but that is likely to change very quickly — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Economists are hunting for alternative indicators of recovery
US data suggest that being allowed to go out and spend is less important than feeling confident to do so
1h
No 10 must regain public's trust to avoid second wave, scientists warn
Repairing damage 'central' to ensuring people follow UK self-isolation rules, say Sage experts Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Ministers need to rebuild public trust in their handling of the coronavirus outbreak and compensate people for lost earnings when asked to self-isolate to prevent a resurgence of the epidemic, leading scientists have warned. Prof Susan Michie
1h
Grieving and Frustrated: Black Scientists Call Out Racism in the Wake of Police Killings
An academic strike is planned for this week, alongside marches and demonstrations worldwide — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Digital services are making isolation easier – unless you have a disability
While many people have been able to muddle through the lockdown, albeit with more stress or boredom than they're used to, people with disabilities have been more profoundly affected than other groups. People with disabilities are often not considered by developers of websites and other online services. This can make life very difficult for someone who's visually impaired, stuck at home without as
2h
Armor on butterfly wings protects against heavy rain
An analysis of high-speed raindrops hitting biological surfaces such as feathers, plant leaves and insect wings reveals how these highly water-repelling veneers reduce the water's impact.
2h
Study identifies network of genes that directs trachea and oesophagus development
A new study reporting how a network of genes directs the development of the trachea and oesophagus in mice has been published today in eLife.
2h
New nanodevice could use solar energy to produce hydrogen
Amsterdam, June 9, 2020 – Solar energy is considered by some to be the ultimate solution to address the current energy crisis and global warming and the environmental crises brought about by excessive consumption of fossil fuels. However, this clean and inexhaustible energy source is difficult to capture and store. In a novel study, scientists propose using solar energy to produce hydrogen by spli
2h
Novel DNA analysis will help to identify food origin and counterfeit food in the future
Estonian scientists are developing a DNA-based method of analysis that enables them to identify food components and specify the origin of a foodstuff.
2h
Study: National calorie menu labeling law will add years of healthy living, save billions
The national law requiring calorie labeling on menus at large chain restaurants is estimated to prevent tens of thousands of new heart disease and type 2 diabetes cases–and save thousands of lives–in just five years, according to a new study that estimates the law's impact.
2h
Health services should learn long-term lessons of earlier coronavirus outbreaks
Patients recovering from COVID-19 could suffer significant long-term effects, according to research into the experiences of people hospitalised by previous coronavirus outbreaks.
2h
The 'Useless' Perspective That Transformed Mathematics
When representation theory emerged in the late 19th century, many mathematicians questioned its worth. In 1897, the English mathematician William Burnside wrote that he doubted that this unorthodox perspective would yield any new results at all. "Basically what saying is that representation theory is useless," said Geordie Williamson of the University of Sydney in a 2015 lecture . More than a cen
2h
Climate change brings fires, floods and moths to Siberia
Best known as a vast, cold tundra, Russia's sprawling Siberia region is being transformed by climate change that has brought with it warmer temperatures, forest fires and growing swarms of hungry moth larvae.
2h
Lab-grown mini-lungs could reveal why covid-19 kills
Inside the biosafety level 4 lab at the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL) in Boston, researchers wear three sets of gloves and breathe air piped into moon suits through snaking tubes. Before them, under a plastic shield, are human lung-sac cells grown from organoids, blobs of cells that mimic organs. Now it's time to infect them with the coronavirus. What happens next cou
2h
IBM says it is no longer working on face recognition because it's used for racial profiling
The news: IBM has said the company will stop developing or selling facial recognition software due to concerns the technology is used to promote racism. In a letter to Congress , IBM's CEO Arvind Krishna said the tech giant opposes any technology used "for mass surveillance, racial profiling, violations of basic human rights and freedoms." He called for a "national dialogue" on whether and how it
2h
Tydlig kommunikation under operationen ger ökad patientsäkerhet
Tydlig kommunikation är avgörande för att samordna arbetet i en operationssal och förebygga fel under pågående operation. En undersökning av lagarbetet i svenska operationssalar visar att fler sociala aspekter i kommunikationen kan främja patientsäkerheten, enligt forskning från Göteborgs universitet. I en studie av kommunikationen inom ett operationsteam under pågående arbete har sociala mekanis
2h
How flags unite (and divide) us | Michael Green
Flags are one of the simplest yet most powerful pieces of design ever conceived. They can make us swell with pride, burn with hatred — and even inspire people to die or kill in their name, says vexillologist Michael Green. Take a brief walk through history as Green explores the symbolic fervor behind flags that unify and divide, inviting us to imagine a future where we can come together under one
2h
From space, Russian cosmonauts fight chess grandmaster to a draw
Two Russian cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station played chess against an Earth-bound grandmaster on Tuesday, in a celebration of the first such game half a century ago.
2h
Lægemiddelallergier er sjældne og komplekse at udrede
Stor interesse på EAACIs e-kongres for at blive opdateret på dansk viden om udredning af perioperative lægemiddelreaktioner.
2h
Engineers put tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses on a single chip
Engineers have designed a 'brain-on-a-chip,' smaller than a piece of confetti, that is made from tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses known as memristors — silicon-based components that mimic the information-transmitting synapses in the human brain.
2h
High-salt diet impacts health of gut microbiome
Particularly in females with untreated hypertension, reducing salt intake to what's considered a healthier level appears to be good for both their gut microbiome and their blood pressure, scientists report.
2h
Scientists identify ancient origin for key hormone system
A key set of proteins that help regulate hormones necessary for many essential functions in humans and other vertebrates have ancient origins in much simpler creatures such as sea cucumbers, says a new study published today in eLife.
2h
Antihistamines and similar drugs could slow down Huntington's disease
Scientists have described a potential new therapeutic strategy for slowing down early-stage Huntington's disease in a new study published today in eLife.
2h
Invasive rushes spreading in upland farm fields
Scientists have used a series of Google Earth images to plot the spread of rushes in farm fields in the West Pennine Moor SSSI — an area of the Lancashire uplands between Bolton, Bury and Darwen. Using more than 200 images from Google Earth taken across a 13-year period between 2005 and 2018, the researchers found that rushes have spread across the surveyed area by between 82 per cent and 174 per
2h
Renewable fuel from carbon dioxide with the aid of solar energy
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, are attempting to convert carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, to fuel using energy from sunlight. Recent results have shown that it is possible to use their technique to selectively produce methane, carbon monoxide or formic acid from carbon dioxide and water. The study has been published in ACS Nano.
2h
COVID-19 loneliness linked to elevated psychiatric symptoms in older adults
A new study has linked COVID-19-based loneliness in older adults with elevated psychiatric symptoms of anxiety, depression, and trauma symptoms that immediately follow exposure to trauma. Notably, the researchers found that the effect of loneliness on psychiatric symptoms was most pronounced among participants who felt subjectively older than their chronological age. On the other hand, participant
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Phenothiazine derivatives may find use in photodynamic therapy
A group on organic compounds under Professor Ivan Stoikov's guidance has been working on phenothiazine derivatives at Kazan Federal University since 2016.Probably the most well-known derivative among the general public is methylene blue – a dye with antiseptic properties.
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Down to the bone: Understanding how bone-dissolving cells are generated
Bone-dissolving cells called osteoclasts are derived from a type of immune cells called macrophages. They are necessary for the maintenance and renewal of bones. But the intracellular mechanisms through which macrophages convert to osteoclasts are not fully understood. Recently, scientists at the Tokyo University of Science uncovered the role of a protein called Cpeb4 in this process. Their findin
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Happiness might protect you from gastrointestinal distress
Serotonin, a chemical known for its role in producing feelings of well-being and happiness in the brain, can reduce the ability of some intestinal pathogens to cause deadly infections, new research by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. The findings, publishing online today in Cell Host & Microbe, could offer a new way to fight infections for which few truly effective treatments currently exist.
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Strahl lab decodes another piece of the histone code puzzle
Published in the journal Cell Reports, this research reinforces the notion that the multiple chemical modifications placed on histones by a single enzyme ensures multiple and distinct functions — an idea that was postulated by Strahl and his former mentor, David Allis, Ph.D., and was called the Histone Code hypothesis.
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Biohybrid model uses organic lungs, synthetic muscles to re-create respiration mechanics
Discussed in APL Bioengineering, researchers created a high-fidelity respiratory simulator that accurately represents the interplay between the abdomen, diaphragm, lungs and pleural space, the fluid-filled membrane surrounding the thorax and lungs. The model, using swine lungs, soft robotic materials and artificial muscles, allows precise tuning of pressure in each part of the system, so specific
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Lung development may explain why some non-smokers get COPD and some heavy smokers do not
According to a new study, people with small airways relative to the size of their lungs may have a lower breathing capacity and, consequently, an increased risk for COPD — even if they don't smoke or have any other risk factors. The study, funded in part by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, will publish in the June 9 issue of JAMA.
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Presence of airborne dust could signify increased habitability of distant planets
Scientists have expanded our understanding of potentially habitable planets orbiting distant stars by including a critical climate component — the presence of airborne dust.
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USPSTF recommendation on screening for unhealthy drug use
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for unhealthy drug use in adults 18 or older by asking questions about such use when services for diagnosis, treatment, and care can be offered or referred. Unhealthy drug use includes using illegal drugs or using a prescription drug in ways that are not recommended by a doctor.
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Serious complication of Crohn's disease may be preventable in young people
For children and young adults with Crohn's disease, steroid-sparing therapies may help reduce the risk of developing a severe and common complication of the inflammatory bowel condition, a new study suggests.
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Paper-based device provides low-power, long-term method for analyzing sweat
Researchers at North Carolina State University have constructed a paper-based device as a model of wearables that can collect, transport and analyze sweat in next-generation wearable technology. Using a process known as capillary action, akin to water transport in plants, the device uses evaporation to wick fluid that mimics the features of human sweat to a sensor for up to 10 days or longer. They
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Targeting SARS-CoV-2 enzyme with inhibitors
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread, many researchers are studying epidemiological models to predict its propagation. However, a mathematician and expert in complex systems decided to focus on finding targets within SARS-CoV-2 for new drugs to attack. In the journal Chaos, he discusses the dramatic increase in the sensitivity of the main protease of SARS-CoV-2 to small disturbances, which
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Eye scanner detects molecular aging in humans
People often say that eyes are windows to the soul. Now it appears they may also be windows to human aging.
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Predicting cancer behavior requires better understanding of tumor cells
Our ability to predict who will get cancer, how patients will respond to treatment, or if patients will relapse is still quite limited, despite advances in the detection of genetic mutations and the establishment of risk factors; recently researchers were inspired to find new ways of looking at the problem. They report that using cellular mechanophenotyping, along with traditional methods such as
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Survival of coronavirus in different cities, on different surfaces
One of the many questions researchers have about the COVID-19 virus is how long it remains alive after someone infected coughs or sneezes. In Physics of Fluids, researchers examine the drying time of respiratory droplets from COVID-19-infected subjects on various surfaces in six cities around the world. Using a model well established in the field of interface science, the drying time calculations
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Robot Journalist Accused of Racism
Algorithmic Bias Shortly after Microsoft announced it was laying off scores of journalists across its news divisions and replacing them with news-skimming artificial intelligence , it's already in hot water after a clear example of racial algorithmic bias. The algorithm doesn't do any original reporting. Instead, it finds articles on the internet and populates MSN with them. Recently, it confused
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Hope for pangolins as protection boosted in China
China has removed pangolins from its official list of traditional Chinese medicine treatments, reports say.
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France's wolf population rises further to 580 adults
France's wild wolf population rose again last year, with officials counting 580 adults at winter's end compared with an average of 530 a year ago, France's OFB biodiversity agency said Tuesday.
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Ultra-sensitive device for detecting magnetic fields
The new magnetic sensor is inexpensive to make, works on minimal power and is 20 times more sensitive than many traditional sensors.
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Siberian oil spill contaminates Arctic lake
An oil spill that sparked a state of emergency has contaminated a freshwater lake in the Russian Arctic, an official said Tuesday, after authorities claimed to have contained the pollution.
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France's wolf population rises further to 580 adults
France's wild wolf population rose again last year, with officials counting 580 adults at winter's end compared with an average of 530 a year ago, France's OFB biodiversity agency said Tuesday.
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Amazon risks combusting with twin fire, virus crises
As tens of thousands of fires consumed the Amazon last year, it seemed the world's biggest rainforest could not be in greater peril.
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Lots of Coronavirus Antibody News
There's a lot of interesting antibody news to catch up on, from the early science to clinical trials. A previous post on this subject is here , with links to earlier background explanations, if you would like to catch up on the area. Here , for example, is a report from a large multi-center team in China characterizing two monoclonal antibodies against the coronavirus, both of which were derived
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Examining a snapshot of exploding oxygen
For more than 100 years, we have been using X-rays to look inside matter and progressing to ever smaller structures—from crystals to nanoparticles. Now, within the framework of a larger international collaboration on the X-ray laser European XFEL in Schenefeld near Hamburg, physicists at Goethe University have achieved a qualitative leap forward. Using a new experimental technique, they have been
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Presence of airborne dust could signify increased habitability of distant planets
Scientists have expanded our understanding of potentially habitable planets orbiting distant stars by including a critical climate component—the presence of airborne dust.
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Biohybrid model uses organic lungs, synthetic muscles to re-create respiration mechanics
Benchtop tools for studying the respiratory system misrepresent the interdependence between the diaphragm, abdomen and lungs. Meanwhile, computational models often hide the mechanisms in a black box computation, without a clear picture of what transpires in the process.
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Team decodes another piece of the histone code puzzle
Inside our cells, DNA is tightly packed and spooled around proteins called histones. Packaging DNA in this way allows large amounts of genetic material to exist inside the cell in a final form called chromatin. Tiny enzymes modify the histones to make sure the genes that are part of the DNA can be accessed and precisely regulated. The result of this is proper gene expression and the production of
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Paper-based device provides low-power, long-term method for analyzing sweat
Human sweat contains several biomolecules the research community is exploring for noninvasive medical testing. Analyzing sweat for research, however, is often expensive, and devices typically are reliable for only a limited amount of time.
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Targeting SARS-CoV-2 enzyme with inhibitors
As the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 continues to spread around the world, many researchers are studying epidemiological models to predict its propagation.
2h
Biohybrid model uses organic lungs, synthetic muscles to re-create respiration mechanics
Benchtop tools for studying the respiratory system misrepresent the interdependence between the diaphragm, abdomen and lungs. Meanwhile, computational models often hide the mechanisms in a black box computation, without a clear picture of what transpires in the process.
2h
Team decodes another piece of the histone code puzzle
Inside our cells, DNA is tightly packed and spooled around proteins called histones. Packaging DNA in this way allows large amounts of genetic material to exist inside the cell in a final form called chromatin. Tiny enzymes modify the histones to make sure the genes that are part of the DNA can be accessed and precisely regulated. The result of this is proper gene expression and the production of
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Survival of coronavirus in different cities, on different surfaces
One of the many questions researchers have about COVID-19 is how long the coronavirus causing the disease remains alive after someone infected with it coughs or sneezes. Once the droplets carrying the virus evaporate, the residual virus dies quickly, so the survival and transmission of COVID-19 are directly impacted by how long the droplets remain intact.
2h
Targeting SARS-CoV-2 enzyme with inhibitors
As the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 continues to spread around the world, many researchers are studying epidemiological models to predict its propagation.
2h
Survival of coronavirus in different cities, on different surfaces
One of the many questions researchers have about COVID-19 is how long the coronavirus causing the disease remains alive after someone infected with it coughs or sneezes. Once the droplets carrying the virus evaporate, the residual virus dies quickly, so the survival and transmission of COVID-19 are directly impacted by how long the droplets remain intact.
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Green Infrastructure Can Be Cheaper, More Effective than Dams
A new report advocates for governments to increase funding for projects like floodplain restoration — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Study reveals birth defects caused by flame retardant
A new study from the University of Georgia has shown that exposure to a now-banned flame retardant can alter the genetic code in sperm, leading to major health defects in children of exposed parents.
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Parasitic fungi keep harmful blue-green algae in check
When a lake is covered with green scums during a warm summer, cyanobacteria — often called blue-green algae — are usually involved. Mass development of cyanobacteria is bad for water quality. But cyanobacteria can become sick, when for instance infected by fungal parasites. Researchers found out that these infections do not only kill cyanobacteria, they also make them easier to consume for their
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Researchers have found a molecular explanation to a longstanding enigma in viral oncology
The oncogenic herpesvirus (HHV8 or KSHV) causes a cancer known as Kaposi's Sarcoma. An international team of scientists led by the University of Helsinki has discovered key factors that control the genome maintenance and replication of a virus responsible for lymphatic vascular cancer.
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Orthotics breakthrough helps children with Cerebral Palsy walk and play
Children with Cerebral Palsy have more energy to play and be physically active for longer thanks to specially designed orthotics.Researchers have confirmed that adapting splints in combination with the footwear used by disabled children to help them walk can decrease the energy they use by as much as 33%.
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Snapshot of exploding oxygen
For more than 200 years, we have been using X-rays to look inside matter, and progressing to ever smaller structures -from crystals to nanoparticles. Now, within the framework of a larger international collaboration on the X-ray laser European XFEL in Schenefeld near Hamburg, physicists at Goethe University have achieved a qualitative leap forward: using a new experimental technique, they have bee
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An alternative route for studying the intrinsic properties of solid-state materials
To understand the origin of conflicting reports on TaGeIr, scientists from MPI CPfS and Northwestern University investigated the deviation of the crystal structure from the ideal MgAgAs model, possibility of off-stoichiometry (presence of homogeneity range), impact of the synthesis route on the real structure, as well as metallographic features of TaGeIr.
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Engineers put tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses on a single chip
Engineers have designed a 'brain-on-a-chip,' smaller than a piece of confetti, that is made from tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses known as memristors — silicon-based components that mimic the information-transmitting synapses in the human brain.
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Forgot where you parked the car? Research suggests memory is a game of all or nothing
An online study, involving more than 400 participants aged 18-35, reveals that memories for specific locations are either totally forgotten or, if they are remembered, it's with as much precision as when they were first learnt.
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Ancient asteroid impacts created the ingredients of life on Earth and Mars
A new study reveals that asteroid impact sites in the ocean may possess a crucial link in explaining the formation of the essential molecules for life. The study discovered the emergence of amino acids that serve as the building blocks for proteins – demonstrating the role of meteorites in bringing life's molecules to earth, and potentially Mars.
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Re-trafficking proteins to fight Salmonella infections
When humans get infected by pathogenic bacteria, the body's immune system tries to eliminate the intruders. One way of doing this is by launching an inflammatory response—a cascade of events that includes the expression of protective proteins, the activation of immune cells, and a process of controlled cell death when infected cells can't be saved.
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How to dissolve your ego—and why you should
Many of us are held back by the idea of ourselves that our egos have built and will do anything to maintain. Oftentimes this manifests as a fear of failure, an inability to start on new projects, or the evasion of responsibility. Here we have five suggestions on how to keep your ego in check. Even for those who aren't self-absorbed, egos can get in the way more often than we'd like. Having a sens
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Spontaneous formation of nanoscale hollow structures could boost battery storage
An unexpected property of nanometer-scale antimony crystals—the spontaneous formation of hollow structures—could help give the next generation of lithium ion batteries higher energy density without reducing battery lifetime. The reversibly hollowing structures could allow lithium ion batteries to hold more energy and therefore provide more power between charges.
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The state of China's climate in 2019: Warmer and wetter, but less loss
The National Climate Center (NCC) of China has just completed a report in which it provides an authoritative assessment of China's climate in 2019 based on the NCC's operational system. More specifically, it gives a summary of China's climate along with all major weather and climate events throughout the year.
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Re-trafficking proteins to fight Salmonella infections
When humans get infected by pathogenic bacteria, the body's immune system tries to eliminate the intruders. One way of doing this is by launching an inflammatory response—a cascade of events that includes the expression of protective proteins, the activation of immune cells, and a process of controlled cell death when infected cells can't be saved.
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New research network examines conditions for greater food security
As a result of climate change, cereal crops will undoubtedly be exposed to longer and more frequent periods of drought. How well they survive this depends on their interaction with water, nutrients, bacteria, and fungi in the soil. The new research network "RhizoTraits", coordinated by the University of Bayreuth, is now seeking to get to the bottom of the varying resilience of cereal varieties. Th
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How effective are language learning apps?
Now more than ever, people who want to learn a new language turn to their mobile devices for help as language learning applications have become increasingly available. While these apps allow users to study a new language from anywhere at any time, how effective are they?
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California's climate refugia: Mapping the stable places
Some landscapes can hold their own against climate change better than others.A studyfrom the University of California, Davis, maps these places, called "climate refugia," where existing vegetation is most likely to buffer the impacts of climate change through the end of the century.
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California's climate refugia: Mapping the stable places
Some landscapes can hold their own against climate change better than others.A studyfrom the University of California, Davis, maps these places, called "climate refugia," where existing vegetation is most likely to buffer the impacts of climate change through the end of the century.
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Developing better fabrication techniques for pH-responsive microcapsules
Researchers have developed a new method to create microcapsules, which are tiny droplets surrounded by a solid shell. The technique can be used to make microcapsules that respond to changes in pH, which are useful for applications such as anti-corrosion coatings.
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Patterns in permafrost soils could help climate change models
The Arctic covers about 20% of the planet. But almost everything hydrologists know about the carbon-rich soils blanketing its permafrost comes from very few measurements taken just feet from Alaska's Dalton Highway.
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The neurobiology of social distance
Never before have we experienced social isolation on a massive scale as we have during the evolving COVID-19 pandemic. A new paper published in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences explores the wide-ranging, negative consequences that social isolation has on our psychological well-being and physical health, including decreased life span. The paper was co-authored by Associate Professor Danilo
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Study proves that magma chambers can be totally molten
The paper shows that basaltic magma chambers may develop as large bodies of crystal-free melts in the Earth's crust. This study challenges a recently-emerged paradigm that magma chambers are huge masses of crystal-rich mush – in other words, crystals with just a very small amount of melt.
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New pathway to attack tumor cells identified
A study led by the Institut de Neurociències (INc-UAB) describes a new strategy to tackle cancer, based on inducing a potent stress in tumor causing cell destruction by autophagy. The mechanism has been revealed using the new antitumor drug ABTL0812, currently in clinical trial. Results has been validated using samples from oncologic patients and published in Autophagy.
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Coronavirus recession threatens to worsen racial inequalities in youth unemployment, researchers warn
Young BAME people are likely to be hit hardest by the coronavirus recession, researchers at the University of Sheffield have warned.
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UK pesticide standards could be slashed in new trade deals, threatening public health and the environment
UK consumers are likely to be exposed to larger amounts of more toxic chemicals in their food if trade negotiators from the US have their way, warns a new report out today.
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Study tracks decades of life cycle changes in nonwoody plants
For 25 years, Carol Augspurger visited a patch of ancient woods near Urbana to look at the same 25 one-square-meter plots of earth she first demarcated for study in 1993. She surveyed the plots once a week in spring and summer, tracking the major life events of each of the herbaceous plants that grew there. In fall, she visited every other week. In winter, once a month.
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High-sugar diet dampens release of dopamine, triggering overeating
Everyone knows it: An entire box of Girl Scout cookies counts as one serving, right?
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Seven factors contributing to American racism
"American racism is alive and well," begins a new journal article led by Steven O. Roberts, a Stanford psychologist, that arrives during a time of heightened attention to racial injustice in the United States.
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Close-up view reveals binary proto-stars in the process of assemblage
High-resolution observations of a young star forming system clearly unveil a pair of proto-stars at their earliest stages of evolution deeply embedded within the source IRAS 16293-2422 in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. The team led by the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics used the ALMA interferometer not only to pin down the source configuration, but also to measure the gas and ste
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Advancing Neurodegenerative Disease Research
Download this eBook to learn how researchers expose molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease with biophysical tools!
3h
Study tracks decades of life cycle changes in nonwoody plants
For 25 years, Carol Augspurger visited a patch of ancient woods near Urbana to look at the same 25 one-square-meter plots of earth she first demarcated for study in 1993. She surveyed the plots once a week in spring and summer, tracking the major life events of each of the herbaceous plants that grew there. In fall, she visited every other week. In winter, once a month.
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High-sugar diet dampens release of dopamine, triggering overeating
Everyone knows it: An entire box of Girl Scout cookies counts as one serving, right?
3h
Older staff most likely to benefit from work from home
Almost half of workforce over 55 can operate remotely but also more likely to lose jobs
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Protein and Enzyme Tools: Advances and Applications
Download this eBook to learn new techniques for studying cells!
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Nope, you don't see the world objectively
People cannot see the world objectively, researchers say. With a novel series of experiments using sophisticated computer graphics and laser-cut "coins," the researchers found that it's almost impossible for people to separate an object's true identity from their own perspective on it. In this case, people looked at round objects that were tilted away from them; even when people were certain that
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Førende virksomheder: Corona kradser i lakken
PLUS. Vi har spurgt de bedste placerede ingeniørvirksomheder i årets Profilanalyse, hvordan coronakrisen har påvirket dem. Og selvom krisen kan mærkes over hele linjen, er der både nye muligheder, langsigtede nye arbejdsmetoder og et fortsat fokus på klimaet at spotte hos virksomhederne øverst på image…
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Does sarcoponic obesity link to metabolic syndrome? An issue that needs clarification
A systematic review and meta-analysis with the main scope to provide benchmark data on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (Mets) among individuals with Sarcopenic Obesity (SO), as well as to detect the potential association between the presence of SO and the higher risk of Mets.
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An unusual cobalt compound
A research team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and Carleton University in Ottawa has manufactured a novel, highly versatile cobalt compound. The molecules of the compound are stable, extremely compact and have a low molecular weight so that they can be evaporated for the production of thin films. Accordingly, they are of interest for applications such as battery or accumulator production. Beca
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Female athletes at risk for nutritional deficiencies
Two decades of research among female athletes over the age of 13 years shows that a lack of nutrition knowledge about what they need to eat to stay healthy and compete may contribute to poor performance, low energy and nutrient intake, and potential health risks, according to a Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School study.
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Immune cell discovery could improve the fight against hepatitis B
For the first time, researchers at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research (WIMR) have identified and described a new and unique subset of human cells that are involved in the immune response against hepatitis B (HBV) infection. The discovery could help develop new treatments for HBV and inform future vaccine design.
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Holders of negative opinions towards GM food likely to be against other novel food tech
Scientists at NTU Singapore and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health have found that people who hold negative opinions of genetically-modified (GM) food are likely to feel the same about nano-enabled food — food with nano-additives to enhance flavor, nutrition or prolong shelf life. The 'spillover effect' they observed from GM food to nano-enabled food could possibly extend to other nov
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Magnesium ductility improvement elucidated thru first principles and molecular dynamics simulation
The mechanism of how stacking faults and basal slips occur was elucidated through molecular dynamics simulations. With this understanding magnesium alloys can be better designed for strength. Other hexagonal close-packed structures can also be better understood.
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Cryoablation comparable to surgery for treating early-stage kidney cancer
A minimally invasive procedure that destroys cancer cells by freezing them is as effective as surgery for treating early-stage kidney cancer, offering similar 10-year survival rates with a lower rate of complications, according to a new study.
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Spontaneous formation of nanoscale hollow structures could boost battery storage
An unexpected property of nanometer-scale antimony crystals — the spontaneous formation of hollow structures — could help give the next generation of lithium ion batteries higher energy density without reducing battery lifetime. The reversibly hollowing structures could allow lithium ion batteries to hold more energy and therefore provide more power between charges.
3h
The state of China's climate in 2019: Warmer and wetter, but less loss
The National Climate Center (NCC) of China has just completed a report in which it provides an authoritative assessment of China's climate in 2019 based on the NCC's operational system.
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Tesla Supplier: New Battery Will Last a Shocking 1.2 Million Miles
Million Mile Tesla's Chinese battery supplier, Contemporary Amperex Technology Co., claims it's created a power pack that lasts for 2 million kilometers (1.24 million miles), Bloomberg reports . If true, it would represent a massive leap in the longevity of an electric car battery. It could even mean that a single battery could outlast the original vehicle it was installed in. Tesla didn't respon
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Hur mycket dna krävs för att identifiera Olof Palmes mördare?
Det är många som idag spekulerar i vad för slags bevis som åklagare Krister Petersson kommer att presentera på morgondagens presskonferens. Ett hett tips är att Palmegruppen har lyckats säkra dna från mördaren. SVT ställer fem frågor till Marie Allen som är professor i rättsmedicin vid Uppsala universitet.
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New nanodevice could use solar energy to produce hydrogen
Scientists describe the design of a PSI-GNP-PSII conjugate that could be used as a platform for developing a light-driven, water-splitting nanodevice for generating hydrogen, in Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging
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Parasitic fungi keep harmful blue-green algae in check
When a lake is covered with green scum during a warm summer, cyanobacteria—often called blue-green algae—are usually involved. Mass development of such cyanobacteria is bad for water quality because they can deprive the water of oxygen and produce toxins. But cyanobacteria can become sick, when for instance infected by fungal parasites. Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology
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Minneapolis Had This Coming
Photographs by Wing Young Huie Back in the late 1990s, the photographer and Minnesota native Wing Young Huie started an ambitious project to document life along Lake Street , a six-mile corridor that stretches across south Minneapolis, west from the Mississippi River to Lake Bde Maka Ska. For four years, Huie captured Lake Street at its most beautiful and mundane—families at worship and at play;
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A new mechanism improves the efficiency of antibacterial surfaces
Resistance to antibiotics has become a serious public health problem. Hospital infections, prostheses or surgical implants that become infected and do not respond to treatment are a real challenge to the research community, which has been seeking alternatives for effectively eliminating these bacteria for years. In 2012 the researchers from the Department of Chemical Engineering of the Universitat
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Scientific fieldwork 'caught in the middle' of US-Mexico border tensions
Imagine you're a scientist, setting out camera traps to snap pictures of wildlife in a remote area of southern Arizona. You set out with your gear early in the morning, but it took longer than expected to find all the locations with your GPS. Now, on your hike back, it's really starting to heat up.
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Allt bättre badvatten i Sverige
Ett EU-bad är ett offentligt strandbad inom unionen vars vattenkvalitet undersöks med standardiserade metoder. Man mäter bland annat bakteriehalten i vattnet. Kvaliteten på vattnet bedöms på en skala i fyra steg. Inför årets säsong har 378 av landets 438 EU-bad fått högsta betyg och endast ett bad har underkänts. Den totala andelen bad med godkänt vatten är 94 procent i år.
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Behind the Scenes With the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Master of Jellyfish
Aquarist Mac Bubel takes you into the rarely seen "jelly lab" to explore how she raises these sensitive, hypnotic creatures.
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Koldioxid blir bränsle med fejkad fotosyntes
Forskare vid Linköpings universitet vill omvandla växthusgasen koldioxid till bränsle genom att använda energi från solljus. De har nu kunnat visa att det med deras teknik är möjligt att selektivt producera metan, kolmonoxid eller myrsyra av koldioxid och vatten. Metangas till exempel används som bränsle i fordon anpassade för gasbränsle. Växter omvandlar koldioxid och vatten till syre och energi
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The state of magma in crustal reservoirs
Research conducted by a Ph.D. student at the Wits School of Geosciences reveals that basaltic magma chambers may develop as large bodies of crystal-free melts in the Earth's crust. This study challenges a recently-emerged paradigm that magma chambers are huge masses of crystal-rich mush—in other words, crystals with just a very small amount of melt.
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Human presence weakens social relationships of giraffes
The effects of human presence on the social relationships of wild animals have rarely been studied. Even if the animals are not hunted or killed, increasing contact with humans could have profound indirect impacts. This is because proximity to humans could disturb the animals' ability to perform at tasks that are important for survival—such as feeding together or rearing young.
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Human presence weakens social relationships of giraffes
The effects of human presence on the social relationships of wild animals have rarely been studied. Even if the animals are not hunted or killed, increasing contact with humans could have profound indirect impacts. This is because proximity to humans could disturb the animals' ability to perform at tasks that are important for survival—such as feeding together or rearing young.
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Trump's latest executive order could let agencies shirk environmental responsibility
Oil and gas pipelines could be among the projects fast-tracked without consideration of how they might impact the environment (jotoya/Pexels/) The Trump Administration continued to erode the nation's environmental protections last week, issuing an executive order that could lead to major infrastructure projects being approved with little consideration of their impacts. In the order, President Tru
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Essential components of dietary restriction revealed
Studies by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI), have provided a new understanding into the roles two essential amino acids play in metabolic health, which may help scientists in the fight against obesity.
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Machine learning predicts nanoparticles' structure and dynamics
Researchers at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland have demonstrated that new distance-based machine learning methods are capable of predicting structures and atomic dynamics of nanoparticles reliably. The new methods are significantly faster than traditional simulation methods used for nanoparticle research and will facilitate more efficient explorations of particle-particle reactions and part
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Feeding habits differ by age and sex in Asian black bears: Data may help wildlife experts better manage bears' habitats
A ten-year study shows that Asian black bears' diets vary greatly depending on sex, stage of life, and resource availability, providing important information on foraging strategy according to age-sex classes. Researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan published their findings on April 15 in Mammal Study.
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Re-trafficking proteins to fight Salmonella infections
New study demonstrates how monitoring all cellular proteins over time and space can improve our understanding of host-pathogen interactions.
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A new mechanism improves the efficiency of antibacterial surfaces
Universitat Rovira i Virgili researchers have developed a nanometric-scale theoretical model to create structures that kill bacteria by using elastic forces. The results of this study pave the way to creating new antibacterial materials.
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Ways to disrupt protein synthesis in Staphylococcus aureus found
It is well known that many strains of Staphylococcus are resistant to antibiotics, and research groups around the world seek new targets in the bacteria to decrease their infectious potential.
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Chemotherapy and cancer gang up to cause a neurological side effect, study says
Chemotherapy has been the lone suspect in a neurological ailment, but cancer also appears to be to blame. The havoc they wreak together is much more than additive.
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The relationship between delicate suture structure and damping performance of biomaterials
High-performance advanced composite materials integrating high stiffness, strength and excellent damping performance are in urgent demand in aerospace, energy, high-speed transportation and other fields. However, it is difficult for traditional damping materials to excel in both damping performance and those static mechanical properties. In contrast, the biological materials in nature achieve the
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Nature's 'slow lanes' offer hope for species feeling heat of climate change, other pressures
Pockets of landscape less prone than adjacent areas to disturbances like fire and drought may hold the key for scientists, conservationists and land managers seeking to preserve vulnerable species in a changing climate.
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Scientists 3D Printed Ears Inside Living Mice Using Light
Tissue engineering just got wilder and weirder. Using nothing but light and bioink, scientists were able to directly print a human ear-like structure under the skin of mice. The team used a healthy ear as a template and 3D printed a mirror image of that ear—tissue layer by tissue layer—directly onto the back of a mouse. All without a single surgical cut. If you're thinking that's super creepy, ye
3h
Bispebjerg Hospitals Akutmodtagelse får ny ledende overlæge
Jens Rasmussen er ny ledende overlæge for Akutmodtagelsen ved Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital. Han vil bidrage til, at hospitalet bliver den mest attraktive arbejdsplads for akutpersonale, siger han.
3h
Mysterious iron X-ray lines grow stranger with high precision measurements
Two prominent X-ray emission lines of highly charged iron have puzzled astrophysicists for decades because their measured and calculated brightness ratios always disagree. This hinders good determinations of plasma temperatures and densities. New, careful high-precision measurements, together with top-level calculations, now exclude all hitherto proposed explanations for this discrepancy, and thus
3h
Rewiring plant reproduction for higher seed yields
Exploiting quirks in plant reproduction could boost yields in two staple crops, sorghum and cowpea, for crop farming communities in sub-Saharan Africa (SA).
3h
Rewiring plant reproduction for higher seed yields
Exploiting quirks in plant reproduction could boost yields in two staple crops, sorghum and cowpea, for crop farming communities in sub-Saharan Africa (SA).
3h
Teen reading skills may explain college gender gap
Teen boys' poor reading skills and social attitudes about women attending college can help explain why fewer young men enroll in college and other post-high-school education, researchers report. "Reading scores are important for both boys and girls, and we know that girls, on average, score better on reading tests," says study coauthor David Geary, a professor of psychological sciences at the Uni
3h
Sunlight cracking rocks on Bennu
Asteroids don't just sit there doing nothing as they orbit the Sun. They get bombarded by meteoroids, blasted by space radiation, and now, for the first time, scientists are seeing evidence that even a little sunshine can wear them down.
3h
Dna-tekniken som löser dubbelmordet i Linköping
Dubbelmordet i Linköping 2004 kan nu vara på väg att klaras upp tack vare kombination av ny dna-teknik och en djupdykning i kyrkböcker från 1700- och 1800-talen. Spela videon för att se hur den nya tekniken fungerar i brottsutredningar.
4h
Controlling the zeolite pore interior for chemo-selective alkyne/olefin separations
Organic chemists aim to separate alkenes such as ethylene and propene from alkynes before converting them into polymers. The technique has several drawbacks including hydrogenation of alkynes to produce unwanted alkanes, which has spurred an interest in other methods of separation. Zeolites, also known as molecular sieves, are crystalline solids made of silicon, aluminium and oxygen to retain cati
4h
Study examines impact of high school teacher and student views of freshmen's social, emotional needs
When high school freshmen's teachers give them lower scores on communication skills, the students receive four times as many disciplinary referrals as some of their peers, a new study found.
4h
Alternating flows and a high-latitude eastward jet explain Saturn's polar hexagon, researchers report
A pair of researchers at Harvard University has developed a computer simulation that may explain Saturn's mysterious polar hexagon. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Rakesh Yadav and Jeremy Bloxham describe the factors that went into developing their simulation and what it showed.
4h
Research reveals insights into bioprinted skeletal muscle tissue models
SUTD collaborates with NTU to provide in-depth analysis of 3D in vitro biomimetic skeletal muscle tissue models, highlighting the great potential of bioprinting technology.
4h
Researchers put a price tag on alcohol use
Alcohol use disorders are associated with high social welfare and health care costs — but what causes them? A new Finnish study looks at the magnitude and reasons behind the economic burden alcohol use disorders have on society.
4h
Human presence weakens social relationships of giraffes
Living close to human settlements disturbs the social networks of giraffes. They have weaker bonds with other giraffes and fewer interactions with other members of the species, an international study led by the University of Zurich on the social structure of over 500 female giraffes in Tanzania has shown.
4h
To understand COVID-19, researchers review aging, immune response to viral infections
As clinicians learn about a new disease in real-time, researchers are also investigating what lessons from other respiratory infections could apply to COVID-19.
4h
New hints of volcanism under the heart of northern Europe
Scientists have discovered new evidence for active volcanism next door to some of the most densely populated areas of Europe. The study 'crowd-sourced' GPS monitoring data from antennae across western Europe to track subtle movements in the Earth's surface, thought to be caused by a rising subsurface mantle plume. The work is published in Geophysical Journal International.
4h
Racial, gender disparities observed in heart transplant recipients with COVID-19 infection
Researchers suggest focusing on disparities to help identify which patients with a heart transplant may be at higher risk for a worse course of COVID-19 infection.
4h
New antivirals for influenza and Zika
Leuven researchers have deployed synthetic amyloids to trigger protein misfolding as a strategy to combat the influenza A and Zika virus.
4h
Hver anden pakke legetøjsslim indeholder for meget bor
PLUS. Ud af 27 typer legetøjsslim er 15 sundhedsskadelige og 13 direkte ulovlige i Danmark, viser en ny undersøgelse. Produkter købt uden for EU er værst, men også seks danske typer slim er skadelige.
4h
Method found for making photons repel each other in an ultracold atomic gas
A team of researchers from MIT, Harvard University and the University of Belgrade has found a way to make photons repel each other inside a cloud of ultracold atomic gas. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the group describes experiments they conducted that involved coupling pairs of photons to atomic states and what they learned from them.
4h
Women still an afterthought in research
COVID-19 impacts men more seriously than women, critical information that resulted from research examining how the virus progresses differently based on sex.
4h
Machine learning predicts nanoparticle structure and dynamics
Researchers at the Nanoscience Center and at the Faculty of Information Technology at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland have demonstrated that new distance-based machine learning methods developed at the University of Jyväskylä are capable of predicting structures and atomic dynamics of nanoparticles reliably. The new methods are significantly faster than traditional simulation methods used f
4h
Unusual cobalt compound developed for thin film production
A research team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and Carleton University in Ottawa has manufactured a novel, highly versatile cobalt compound. The molecules of the compound are stable, extremely compact and have a low molecular weight so that they can be evaporated for the production of thin films. Accordingly, they are of interest for applications such as battery or accumulator production. Beca
4h
For the first time, researchers focus plasmons into nanojet
Researchers of Tomsk Polytechnic University with Russian and Danish teams have been able to experimentally confirm a plasmonic nanojet effect previously forecast in practice. Using a simple method, they focused surface plasmon waves into a jet and captured it with a microscope. In the future, the effect of plasmon compression can make optical electronics competitive and boost the creation of an op
4h
Invasive rushes spreading in upland farm fields
A new study involving University of Liverpool ecologists shows invasive native species of rushes are spreading across UK upland farms and have the potential to threaten wildlife and the livelihoods of farmers.
4h
Research study improves solar radiation forecasting models by 30%
Researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad de Jaen (UJA) have published a study reporting an optimal blending of solar radiation forecasting models with which they are able to reduce error in short-term forecasts (6 hours) by 25% and 30%.
4h
At the heart of the Milky Way, stars draw closer, threatening planets in their orbit
At the center of our galaxy resides the galactic bulge, a densely packed region of stars, dust and gas. Within this massive structure, which spans thousands of light-years, there are an estimated 10 billion stars, most of which are old red giant stars. Because of this density, astronomers have often wondered if a galactic bulge is a likely place to find stars with habitable planets orbiting them.
4h
Invasive rushes spreading in upland farm fields
A new study involving University of Liverpool ecologists shows invasive native species of rushes are spreading across UK upland farms and have the potential to threaten wildlife and the livelihoods of farmers.
4h
Parking in a pandemic
The coronavirus pandemic has brought the tourism and travel industry to a near-standstill, with nationwide lockdowns significantly impacting the aviation and maritime industry worldwide. Satellite images, captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, show parked aircraft and anchored vessels in times of COVID-19.
4h
Ischemic stroke rates decrease during COVID-19 pandemic
Research reveals fewer people have been admitted to stroke centers in Michigan and northwest Ohio since the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic, and significantly fewer patients received a mechanical thrombectomy for their ischemic stroke.
4h
How effective are language learning apps?
Researchers from Michigan State University recently conducted a study focusing on Babbel, a popular subscription-based language learning app and e-learning platform, to see if it really worked at teaching a new language.
4h
Oregon timber harvests don't appear to affect rare salamander, study finds
The Oregon slender salamander only exists on the western slopes of the Cascades, where it lives most of the year underground or burrowed in woody debris on the forest floor.
4h
Developing better fabrication techniques for pH-responsive microcapsules
Researchers have developed a new method to create microcapsules, which are tiny droplets surrounded by a solid shell. The technique can be used to make microcapsules that respond to changes in pH, which are useful for applications such as anti-corrosion coatings.
4h
Nature's 'slow lanes' offer hope for species feeling heat of climate change
Pockets of landscape less prone than adjacent areas to disturbances like fire and drought may hold the key for scientists, conservationists and land managers seeking to preserve vulnerable species in a changing climate.
4h
Patterns in permafrost soils could help climate change models
A team of scientists spent the past four summers measuring permafrost soils across a 5,000 square-mile swath of Alaska's North Slope. While working to buildup a much-needed soil dataset, their measurements revealed an important pattern: The hydrologic properties of different permafrost soil types are very consistent, and can be predicted based on the surrounding landscape.
4h
California's climate refugia: Mapping the stable places
Some landscapes can hold their own against climate change better than others. A study from the University of California, Davis, maps these places, called 'climate refugia,' where existing vegetation is most likely to buffer the impacts of climate change through the end of the century.
4h
The mental health of fathers of babies born very prematurely
Following the journey of 100 fathers of babies born before 30 weeks' gestation, the study found that almost one in five fathers experienced high depressive symptoms, and approximately half of all fathers experienced moderate anxiety symptoms that persisted throughout the first year of their baby's life.
4h
What do electric vehicle drivers think of the charging network they use?
A new study provides the best insight yet into the attitudes of electric vehicle (EV) drivers about the existing network of charging stations. The findings in some cases contradict conventional wisdom about driver preferences.
4h
Skonsam övervakning ska rädda solparakiten
Forskare vid Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet har tillsammans med ursprungsbefolkning i Guyana utvecklat ett nytt genetiskt övervakningsverktyg som ska hjälpa bevarandet av solparakiten – en papegoja som lever i Amazonas regnskog. Papegojor är bland de mest hotade grupperna av fåglar idag och de förblir hotade på grund av förlorade livsmiljöer och handeln med levande fåglar. Solparakiten är i dag et
4h
Video: Boiling. We research. You benefit.
Did you know that in microgravity you can better study the boiling process?
4h
Police violence and the 'bystander effect' explained
Since George Floyd died after police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for almost nine minutes on May 25, demonstrators across the country have gathered to protest police actions against African Americans. While most of the protests were calm, in several cities police officers have used force against demonstrators and journalists under the justification of crowd control. The sight of officer
4h
The Protests Prove the Need to Regulate Surveillance Tech
US policymakers too often argue that regulation is about geopolitical competition. But algorithms have perpetuated harm and inequality at home.
4h
Disjunct distribution across the equator
Podonychus gyobu sp. nov., a second species of the genus Podonychus Jäch & Kodada, 1997, hitherto known only to inhabit Indonesia, is reported to have been found in Kyushu, Japan. The endophallic structures and the larva of P. gyobu sp. nov. are described.
4h
How to Set a Price on Carbon Pollution
A smart combination of math and policy choices can determine a practical tax that will cut CO2 emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Are viruses alive? Perhaps we're asking the wrong question
Viruses are an inescapable part of life, especially in a global viral pandemic. Yet ask a roomful of scientists if viruses are alive and you'll get a very mixed response.
5h
Kidneys deteriorate with age, regardless of health
Why we age remains an unanswered question. But recently, researchers at UiT, along with colleagues in Berlin and Reykjavik, have discovered that kidneys age, regardless if people are sick or not.
5h
Are viruses alive? Perhaps we're asking the wrong question
Viruses are an inescapable part of life, especially in a global viral pandemic. Yet ask a roomful of scientists if viruses are alive and you'll get a very mixed response.
5h
A cell process discovered in fish has important implications for medical research and aquaculture
Autophagy is the process by which cells degrade and recycle their own components. It helps maintain homeostasis which is crucial to proper cell functioning. Among the different subtypes of autophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) has been the subject of particular attention in recent years due to the discovery that several human pathologies could be associated to CMA defects. This form of aut
5h
Coronavirus: Satellite traffic images may suggest virus hit Wuhan earlier
A surge in hospital traffic may indicate the virus hit China earlier than reported, a study suggests.
5h
New Zealand cuts research to keep Antarctica virus free
New Zealand said Tuesday it will reduce its scientific projects in Antarctica to keep the virtually uninhabited continent free from COVID-19.
5h
2019 fossil fuel subsidies nearly $500 bn: OECD/IEA
Climate crisis notwithstanding, governments subsidised fossil fuels in 2019 to the tune of nearly half-a-trillion dollars, two intergovernmental agencies have jointly reported.
5h
Fishers are one of the poorest professions in Indonesia, yet they are one of the happiest
Indonesia's status as a maritime country seemingly does not guarantee that its fishers live prosperously. My recent study, analysing data from the 2017 National Socioeconomic Survey (SUSENAS), shows fishers are one of the poorest professions in Indonesia.
5h
A cell process discovered in fish has important implications for medical research and aquaculture
Autophagy is the process by which cells degrade and recycle their own components. It helps maintain homeostasis which is crucial to proper cell functioning. Among the different subtypes of autophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) has been the subject of particular attention in recent years due to the discovery that several human pathologies could be associated to CMA defects. This form of aut
5h
How very hungry caterpillars grow and grow and don't get sick
What if I told you that right in your backyard there lives a creature that eats five times its weight every day and grows a thousandfold in weeks. Instinctively, you'd probably want to stay away from the gluttonous beast! However, it wouldn't be interested in you at all—in fact, it's a vegan. Feel safer now?
5h
Why Feeling Close to the Finish Line Makes You Push Harder
Behavioral scientist Oleg Urminksy explains why you work harder when you get close to achieving a goal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Unfavourable attitudes toward genetically modified food predict negative feelings about other food technologies
Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health (HSPH) have found that people who hold negative opinions of genetically-modified (GM) food are likely to feel the same about nano-enabled food—food with nano-additives to enhance flavour, nutrition or prolong shelf life.
5h
How very hungry caterpillars grow and grow and don't get sick
What if I told you that right in your backyard there lives a creature that eats five times its weight every day and grows a thousandfold in weeks. Instinctively, you'd probably want to stay away from the gluttonous beast! However, it wouldn't be interested in you at all—in fact, it's a vegan. Feel safer now?
5h
AGA does not recommend the use of probiotics for most digestive conditions
After a detailed review of available literature, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) has released new clinical guidelines finding that for most digestive conditions there is not enough evidence to support the use of probiotics. This is the first clinical guideline to focus on probiotics across multiple GI diseases while also considering the effect of each single-strain or multi-stra
5h
New method to identify genes that can drive development of brain tumors
Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a method for identifying functional mutations and their effect on genes relevant to the development of glioblastoma. The results show that a specific, evolutionarily conserved, mutation in the vicinity of SEMA3C disrupts the binding of certain proteins whose task is to bind genes and regulate their activity.
5h
Researchers design novel antibiofouling biomimetic diamond film
Biofouling is a worldwide problem that leads to severe deterioration after a substrate comes into contact with seawater. Traditional polymers and other antifouling coatings suffer from poor mechanical and chemical stability, which diminishes the antibacterial and antibiofouling performance upon progression of usage time.
5h
Researchers developing quick and simple method of glyphosate detection
Glyphosate is a widely used herbicide. It is suspected to be carcinogenic, and a quick, low-cost method for detecting glyphosate would be highly beneficial. Researchers at Leipzig University and Technische Universität Dresden have spent more than a year working on a solution in a collaborative project with three companies from Saxony.
5h
How has COVID-19 affected the gig economy?
The arrival of the novel coronavirus and subsequent shutdowns of economies across the globe have caused hardships not seen in generations. But for business professors, it's also a once-in-a-generation research opportunity.
5h
High snow levels indicate very weak Nordic power prices this summer
Electricity prices in the Nordic countries are likely to be unusually low this summer amid high inflows to hydropower plants, caused by a combination of a very snow-rich winter and late snowmelt.
5h
New multispectral curved compound eye camera developed with ultra-large field of view
Multispectral imaging technology has found wide applications in remote sensing, as it has a relatively high spectral resolution. But the existing technologies have many shortcomings such as low system integration, high complexity, small field of view (FOV), and are not suitable for real-time spectral imaging applications from the atmosphere or from orbit. How to solve this bottleneck? Nature is th
5h
Researchers design novel antibiofouling biomimetic diamond film
Biofouling is a worldwide problem that leads to severe deterioration after a substrate comes into contact with seawater. Traditional polymers and other antifouling coatings suffer from poor mechanical and chemical stability, which diminishes the antibacterial and antibiofouling performance upon progression of usage time.
5h
Abundance and composition of periphyton show noticeable seasonality under different warming scenario
Periphyton plays an important functional role in lake nutrient cycles and food webs, especially at low and intermediate nutrient levels. Knowledge of how periphyton responds to key drivers such as climate change and nutrient enrichment is, therefore, crucial.
5h
Large earthquakes shape landscape at high elevation
The mountain landscape is a result of battle between tectonic uplift, river incision and bedrock landsliding. The erosion of landslide dominates the process of removing sediment from the watersheds; therefore, where it happens is important for the landscape evolution.
5h
6th millennium BC structure discovered in Saudi Arabia
In contrast to the prehistoric remains of the Near East, the megalithic monuments of Arabia remain largely unknown. These monumental structures, made of dry stone walls, still hold many secrets in terms of their construction, function and chronology.
5h
Researchers developing quick and simple method of glyphosate detection
Glyphosate is a widely used herbicide. It is suspected to be carcinogenic, and a quick, low-cost method for detecting glyphosate would be highly beneficial. Researchers at Leipzig University and Technische Universität Dresden have spent more than a year working on a solution in a collaborative project with three companies from Saxony.
5h
Sustainable iron catalysis enables controllable alkene borylation
National University of Singapore chemists have unlocked a way to achieve site-selective borylation of alkenes using earth-abundant iron-based catalysts to facilitate synthesis of high-value chemicals.
5h
New nanomaterial developed to split water molecules, obtain dihydrogen under sunlight
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed a hybrid material constructed from a metal oxide nanosheet and a light-absorbing molecule for splitting water molecules to obtain dihydrogen (H2) under sunlight. Since H2 can be used as carbon-free fuel, this study provides relevant insight toward clean energy generation.
5h
China rejects Harvard study suggesting Covid-19 was circulating last summer
Scientists used satellite images and online search data to indicate early arrival of virus in Wuhan
5h
Planet's satellites aim for still sharper view of Earth
Some locations on Earth, such as the UK, will be pictured at high resolution up to 12 times a day.
5h
Just How Historic Is the Latest Covid-19 Science Meltdown?
Don't blame last week's journal retractions on the scary pace of the pandemic. "Once-in-a-lifetime" scandals like this seem to happen all the time.
5h
5 Raspberry Pi Alternatives: Rock64, PocketBeagle, Banana Pi, Odroid
If you're working on a project that a Pi can't tackle, here are five single-board computers that power any DIY demand.
5h
How to level-up the picture quality of your cheap TV
Don't throw your TV just yet—tweaking a few settings can give it new life. ( Daniel von Appen / Unsplash/) A truly good TV can make your movies and favorite shows look amazing, but not everyone has $1,500 to plop down on a high-end panel. That doesn't mean you're stuck with mediocrity, though—if you aren't happy with your TV's picture, there may be a few things you can do to kick things up a notc
5h
Why Feeling Close to the Finish Line Makes You Push Harder
Behavioral scientist Oleg Urminksy explains why you work harder when you get close to achieving a goal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Yet Another Week of Trump Failing to Be an Actual Authoritarian
Last week began with one of the ugliest—and potentially most dangerous—spectacles of Donald Trump's presidency: the nation's leader, having declared himself "your president of law and order," striding across a park violently cleared of peaceful protesters by police firing chemical irritants. Within a week, however, the Trump administration's response to the nationwide protests over the killing of
5h
Perhaps More Than Ever – Truth Matters
The following quote from a recent address to graduating student resonated with me: "What's become clear is that social media can also be a tool to spread conflict, divisions, and falsehoods, to bully people and promote hate," he said. "Too often, it shuts us off from each other instead of bringing us together, partly because it gives us the ability to select our own realities, independent of fact
5h
5G-opgradering gav ugelange problemer på TDC's mobilnetværk
PLUS. I flere uger har TDC-kunder oplevet periodiske udfald og dårlig lyd ved opkald på 3G og 4G i Vestjylland. Det sker på grund af en konfigurationsfejl i forbindelse med at TDC's mobilmaster skal opgraderes til 5G.
6h
UK records lowest excess deaths since late March
ONS data show mortality levels are still 20% higher than the five-year average
6h
Segregerad skola påverkar framtida relationer
En skolas elevsammansättning påverkar elevernas framtid på flera sätt. Det kommer Debbie Lau fram till i en ny doktorsavhandling vid Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet. När andelen skolkamrater från samma ursprungsregion ökar, ökar även sannolikheten att de väljar framtida partner från samma region. Även sannolikheten att framtida kolleger kommer från samma land ökar, visar hennes statisti
6h
Spåren från forntida klimatkriser
Hur klarade våra förfäder extrema klimathändelser? Klimatarkeologer söker svar – bland annat i spåren av en köldchock för 1500 år sedan. I nästan hundra år har arkeologer varit skeptiska till att förklara omvälvningar av samhället med klimathändelser. Men nu har klimatarkeologin inte bara kommit in från kylan, den har rent av blivit het. Vår oro för de nutida klimatförändringarna har bidragit. Ar
6h
How can I pass assets to my children?
Join the FT's live discussion at 12 noon UK time on Wednesday June 10
6h
High plant diversity has a positive effect on soil properties and soil fauna in rubber plantations
Plant diversity affects soil properties, which in turn affects plant productivity. Soil quality (SQ) includes the assessment of soil properties and its processes related to the ability of soil to function effectively as a component of a healthy ecosystem. However, almost no studies have reported on the relationship between plant diversity and SQ under different seasons in the rubber plantations in
6h
When fathers go missing, female songbirds take up the slack
A new study of a migratory songbird shows that when fathers abandon late-season nests during flight-feather molt, the nestlings suffer no ill effects; deserted females effectively double their maternal efforts and completely compensate for the loss of male care.
6h
Liquid metals break down organic fuels into ultra-thin graphitic sheets
For the first time, researchers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia, have demonstrated the synthesis of ultra-thin graphitic materials at room temperature using organic fuels. These fuels can be as simple as basic alcohols such as ethanol. Graphitic materials, such as graphene, are ultra-thin sheets of carbon compounds are promising for battery storage, solar cells, touc
6h
When fathers go missing, female songbirds take up the slack
A new study of a migratory songbird shows that when fathers abandon late-season nests during flight-feather molt, the nestlings suffer no ill effects; deserted females effectively double their maternal efforts and completely compensate for the loss of male care.
6h
Oregon timber harvests don't appear to affect rare salamander, study finds
A seven-year field experiment on 88 tree stands across Oregon's western Cascade Range found no discernable difference in the abundance and occupancy rates of rare Oregon slender salamanders on recently harvested tree stands—clear-cuts—compared to stands late in the harvest rotation—older than 50 years.
6h
Radiocarbon dating pins date for construction of Uyghur complex to the year 777
Dating archeological objects precisely is difficult, even when using techniques such as radiocarbon dating. Using a recently developed method based on the presence of sudden spikes in carbon-14 concentration, scientists at the University of Groningen, together with Russian colleagues, have pinned the date for the construction of an eighth-century complex in southern Siberia to a specific year. Thi
6h
Use of glass ceramics in greenhouse lamps facilitate plants' growth
Bright pink lights are used for providing sufficient lighting to house plants. Similar lamps are also used by farmers in greenhouses. Still, specialists in photophysiology argue that such lamps do not provide all the light that plants need. Scientists from ITMO in collaboration with their colleagues from Tomsk Polytechnic University have developed light sources from ceramics with the addition of c
6h
Coronavirus and the cashless economy: a tipping point?
For those of us who have braved a high street of late, the familiar 'Contactless Only', 'Card Only' or 'No Cash Accepted' signs are typical on the doors of many businesses. According to a recent statement by Lothar Wieler, the head of Germany's Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for infectious diseases, virus transmission through banknotes "has no particular significance." The porous nature of the majori
6h
Three in four people hold negative view of Indigenous people: study
Most Australians tested for unconscious bias hold a negative view of Indigenous Australians which can lead to widespread racism, new analysis from The Australian National University (ANU) shows.
6h
Oregon timber harvests don't appear to affect rare salamander, study finds
A seven-year field experiment on 88 tree stands across Oregon's western Cascade Range found no discernable difference in the abundance and occupancy rates of rare Oregon slender salamanders on recently harvested tree stands—clear-cuts—compared to stands late in the harvest rotation—older than 50 years.
6h
Disjunct distribution across the equator—a new riffle beetle from Kyushu, Japan
Podonychus gyobu sp. nov., a second species of the genus Podonychus Jäch & Kodada, 1997, hitherto known only to inhabit Indonesia, is reported to have been found in Kyushu, Japan. The endophallic structures and the larva of P. gyobu sp. nov. are described.
6h
Moving out early improves squirrels' odds of surviving winter, new study shows
North American red squirrels that strike out earlier to find territory of their own could stand a better chance of surviving the winter months, according to a new study involving biologists at the University of Alberta.
6h
Disjunct distribution across the equator—a new riffle beetle from Kyushu, Japan
Podonychus gyobu sp. nov., a second species of the genus Podonychus Jäch & Kodada, 1997, hitherto known only to inhabit Indonesia, is reported to have been found in Kyushu, Japan. The endophallic structures and the larva of P. gyobu sp. nov. are described.
6h
Moving out early improves squirrels' odds of surviving winter, new study shows
North American red squirrels that strike out earlier to find territory of their own could stand a better chance of surviving the winter months, according to a new study involving biologists at the University of Alberta.
6h
Birds use social networks to pick opponents
Knowing when to fight and when to flee is a big part of many animal societies, including our own.
6h
Senator vil have kontroversiel ansigtsgenkendelse bandlyst fra amerikanske demonstrationer
De mange demonstrationer mod politivold og racisme i USA betyder, at politiet tager forskellige overvågningsmetoder i brug. Senatoren fra Massachusetts beder nu om, at ansigtsgenkendelsessoftware fra Clearview AI ikke bliver brugt.
6h
National survey shows different bacteria on cell phones and shoes
The largest study of its kind in the US shows thousands of different types of bacteria living on cell phones and shoes, including groups that have barely been studied by scientists.
6h
The Films That Understand Why People Riot
Giancarlo Esposito stars in Do the Right Thing . (Everett Collection) At the end of Spike Lee's 1989 seminal film, Do the Right Thing , the protagonist Mookie (played by Lee) returns to Sal's Pizzeria the morning after the police murder of Radio Raheem (Bill Nunn) sets off a riot in the area. Mookie approaches the burned-down pizza parlor, his former place of employment, where his ex-boss, Sal (D
6h
The Black Women Who Paved the Way for This Moment
In cities across the United States, black activists are denouncing state-sanctioned violence and demanding radical changes to American policing. Black women leaders occupy a central role in these movements. Utilizing public spaces—such as city parks and streets—they are advocating for equality and justice and giving voice to historical truths many Americans find uncomfortable. From the activist T
6h
The Man Who Sacked Rome
Rodrigo Corral T he sack of Rome by Alaric and his Goths has exerted an outsize influence on the Western imagination. It was a devastating event, and sent psychological aftershocks across the empire. On the night of August 24, in the year 410, thousands of Goths made their way into the city through the Porta Salaria, not far from where the American embassy sits today. Rome's walls were stout, and
6h
Birds use social networks to pick opponents
Knowing when to fight and when to flee is a big part of many animal societies, including our own.
6h
New hints of volcanism under the heart of northern Europe
Scientists have discovered new evidence for active volcanism next door to some of the most densely populated areas of Europe. The study 'crowd-sourced' GPS monitoring data from antennae across western Europe to track subtle movements in the Earth's surface, thought to be caused by a rising subsurface mantle plume. The work is published in Geophysical Journal International.
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Bees? Please. These plants are putting ants to work
In a world first, ECU researchers have discovered a plant that has successfully evolved to use ants—as well as native bees—as pollinating agents by overcoming their antimicrobial defenses.
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Bees? Please. These plants are putting ants to work
In a world first, ECU researchers have discovered a plant that has successfully evolved to use ants—as well as native bees—as pollinating agents by overcoming their antimicrobial defenses.
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Media stereotypes confound kids' science ambitions
White lab coats and dangerous experiments all epitomize the "mad scientist" from many a Hollywood blockbuster but, even beyond the silver screen, the stereotype lives on, and according to new research, it could mar the next generation of potential scientists.
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Beware of 'Theories of Everything'
Nature is under no obligation to conform to our mathematical ideas—even the most brilliant ones — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Sekvensering avslöjar gener som triggar tumören
Mutationer i ickekodande arvsmassa kan påverka gener som i sin tur har betydelse för utveckling av glioblastom – en malign hjärntumör med mycket negativ prognos. Cancerforskare vid Uppsala universitet har utvecklat en metod för att identifiera sådana funktionella mutationer. Det mänskliga genomet (den samlade arvsmassan) rymmer närmare 22 000 gener. Många studier har utforskat de knappa två proce
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Lockdowns may have prevented more than 3 million deaths in Europe
The news: Lockdowns in Europe helped stop 3.1 million deaths up to the start of May, researchers have estimated. Strictly limiting people's movements and enforcing social distancing cut the average number of people that contagious individuals infected by 81%. The measures pushed the epidemic's reproduction number, R, down from 3.8 to below 1 in all 11 European countries they studied, including Ge
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IoT Security Is a Mess. Privacy 'Nutrition' Labels Could Help
Just like foods that display health information the package, researchers are exploring a tool that details how connected devices manage data.
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These Bacteria Ate Their Way Through a Really Tricky Maze
Microbes are well known for working together in stressful environments. Scientists wanted to see how they would fare at a labyrinthine brain teaser.
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National survey shows different bacteria on cell phones and shoes
The largest study of its kind in the U.S. shows thousands of different types of bacteria living on cell phones and shoes, including groups that have barely been studied by scientists.
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National survey shows different bacteria on cell phones and shoes
The largest study of its kind in the U.S. shows thousands of different types of bacteria living on cell phones and shoes, including groups that have barely been studied by scientists.
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Beware of 'Theories of Everything'
Nature is under no obligation to conform to our mathematical ideas—even the most brilliant ones — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Clinical benefit of remdesivir in rhesus macaques infected with SARS-CoV-2
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2423-5
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Lab life — rebuild it better after coronavirus lockdowns ease
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01708-8
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Alexa, do science! Voice-activated assistants hit the lab bench
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01683-0 Research-optimized tools can take notes, dictate instructions and answer questions, allowing researchers to work hands-free.
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Pakistan and India: don't let squabbling impede locust control
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01709-7
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Women join Italy's all-male coronavirus task force
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01707-9
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Government scraps plan to fully reopen English primary schools before summer
Teachers' unions welcome move after arguing that return of all pupils would be unsafe
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Robot built for Japan's aging workforce finds coronavirus role
submitted by /u/LIS1050010 [link] [comments]
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COVID-19: Could AI and supercomputers unlock the pathogen puzzle?
submitted by /u/Sorin61 [link] [comments]
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Emerging AI and ML trends that will transform the whole business world.
submitted by /u/sameer-25 [link] [comments]
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Self driving cars and DUIs
Not sure if this is the right place for this. With self driving cars, most likely becoming the future of driving, people will have them drive themselves home after a night out. Now my questions is if you were to get pulled over in a self-driving car would it still be a DUI? submitted by /u/mweston31 [link] [comments]
7h
New technologies could threaten Amazon's empire
submitted by /u/snooshoe [link] [comments]
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Britain goes coal free as fossil fuels edged out
submitted by /u/Sorin61 [link] [comments]
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IBM will no longer offer, develop, or research facial recognition technology
submitted by /u/quantizedself [link] [comments]
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Printing at atomic scales
submitted by /u/Apollo_XXI [link] [comments]
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Computing Power Can Keep Growing as Moore's Law Winds Down. Here's How.
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
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Direct Proof of Dark Matter May Lurk at Low-Energy Frontiers
Mysterious effects in a new generation of dark matter detectors could herald a revolutionary discovery — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ledelse under corona: Som at blive kaldt til syn uden mulighed for at runde mekanikeren først
Når hverdagen under coronakrisen har været uforudsigelig og slutdatoen er uklar, så kan man som afdeling vælte. Men det skete ikke, og jeg kender forklaringen, skriver oversygeplejerske.
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Direct Proof of Dark Matter May Lurk at Low-Energy Frontiers
Mysterious effects in a new generation of dark matter detectors could herald a revolutionary discovery — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Housebuilding slowdown to last at least a year, warns UK builder
Bellway reopened four in five construction sites but capacity remains reduced following lockdown
7h
Take the Confederate Names Off Our Army Bases
As I have watched Confederate monuments being removed by state and local governments, and sometimes by the forceful will of the American people, the fact that 10 U.S. Army installations are named for Confederate officers has weighed on me. That number includes the Army's largest base, one very special to many in uniform: Fort Bragg, in North Carolina. The highway sign for Bragg proclaims it Home
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Experts Say Tear Gas Is Dangerous, Especially During the Pandemic
The widespread use of tear gas amid a respiratory pandemic has experts worried that it may accelerate the spread of the virus and worsen Covid-19 infections. Law enforcement agencies have used the chemical agent in especially dangerous ways in response to nationwide protests against police brutality.
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Testing Nursing Home Workers Can Help Stop Coronavirus. But Who Should Pay?
A patchwork of state and U.S. recommendations has hampered efforts to devise a uniform policy, leading to disputes over whether insurers or employers should cover testing costs.
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Criminology researcher to lose sixth paper
A criminologist whose work has been under scrutiny for a year is set to have a sixth paper retracted, Retraction Watch has learned. Last July, Justin Pickett, of the University of Albany at the State University of New York, posted a 27-page explanation of why he was asking for one of his papers to be … Continue reading
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Efter russisk olieudslip: Vil tjekke alle installationer på permafrost
Nu skal alle 'farlige installationer' på smeltende permafrost undersøges, efter at et sibirisk anlæg har lækket 20.000 ton olie, da en sætningsskade fik en tank til at kollapse.
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India is ill-equipped to live with the virus
The economy is reopening even as new cases continue to increase
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Hong Kong still most expensive city for expats: Mercer
Hong Kong retains its place atop the rankings for a third straight year as the world's most expensive city for expats, according to the latest Mercer annual report Tuesday.
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France unveils €15bn aid package to 'save' its aerospace industry
Finance minister Bruno Le Maire warns 100,000 jobs at risk as coronavirus pandemic decimates sector
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Cancervärldens bortglömda sjukdom
Cancer i urinblåsan är lika vanligt som malignt melanom. Men de senaste tre decennierna har dödligheten varit oförändrat hög och behandlingen är densamma sedan 70-talet. Genom ett unikt samarbete vill man nu ta ny vetenskap om sjukdomen vidare till ­klinik.
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Type 2-diabetes tredoblet på 20 år
Flere danskere får type 2-diabetes, men færre dør af det. Samtidig er dødeligheden større blandt type 1-patienter. Det er hovedkonklusionerne i et nyt studie fra Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen.
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Cell type specific adhesion to surfaces functionalised by amine plasma polymers
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65889-y
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A novel study on the inhibitory effect of marine macroalgal extracts on hyphal growth and biofilm formation of candidemia isolates
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66000-1
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First data on the organization of the nervous system in juveniles of Novocrania anomala (Brachiopoda, Craniiformea)
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66014-9
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Discovery of new boron-rich chalcogenides: orthorhombic B6X (X=S, Se)
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66316-y Discovery of new boron-rich chalcogenides: orthorhombic B 6 X (X=S, Se)
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Tonic NMDA receptor signalling shapes endosomal organisation in mammalian cells
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66071-0
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Self-reported snoring is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66208-1
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Combining Physiological and Neuroimaging Measures to Predict Affect Processing Induced by Affectively Valent Image Stimuli
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66109-3
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Tuberculosis: Discovery of an ancestral lineage in the African Great Lakes region
Two exceptional strains of tuberculosis, isolated from East African patients with multi-resistant forms of the disease have been discovered. Genome analyses show that this lineage originated from an ancestral phylum which predates the branching point shared by all other lineages of common tuberculosis strains known to date. This discovery reinforces the hypothesis of an East African origin for the
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Mysterious Australian Night Parrots may not see in the dead of night
Australia's most elusive bird, the Night Parrot, may not be much better at seeing in the dark than other parrots active during the day.An international study, co-led by Flinders University's Dr Vera Weisbecker, has revealed the critically endangered parrot's visual system is not as well-adapted to life in the dark as would be expected for a nocturnal bird, raising concerns it might be adversely im
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Child education 'risks being forgotten' as England prioritises economy
Commissioner says pubs and shops will reopen while most children cannot go to school Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Ministers have been warned that children's education is being forgotten while theme parks, pubs and shops are being allowed to reopen, after the government admitted most pupils will not return to the classroom until September at the earliest. Anne Long
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ADP binding by the Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito D7 salivary protein enhances blood feeding on mammals
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16665-z D7 proteins are highly abundant in the salivary glands of several blood feeding insects. Here, the authors study the ligand binding specificity and physiological roles of the mosquito D7 proteins CxD7L1 and CxD7L2, showing that CxD7L1 acquired ADP-binding properties to enhance blood feeding in mammals.
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The genetic basis of sex determination in grapes
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16700-z Grapevine is one of a few ancestrally dioecious crops that are reverted to hermaphroditism during domestication. Here, the authors identify candidate genes related to male- and female-sterility in grapes and describe the genetic process that led to hermaphroditism during domestication.
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Nucleoid remodeling during environmental adaptation is regulated by HU-dependent DNA bundling
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16724-5 HU is among the most conserved and abundant nucleoid-associated proteins in eubacteria. Here the authors investigate the role of histone-like proteins (HU) in the 3D organization of the bacteria DNA and show via soft X-ray tomography the process of nucleoid remodeling.
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CYCLIN-B1/2 and -D1 act in opposition to coordinate cortical progenitor self-renewal and lineage commitment
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16597-8 Sequential generation of layer-specific cortical neurons requires radial glial cells (RGCs) to balance self-renewal and commitment. Here the authors show that RGCs and lineage committed progenitors are defined by distinct cell cycle phases and CYCLIN-B1/2 cooperates with CDK1 to activate Notch and maintain RGCs.
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Structural basis for oligoclonal T cell recognition of a shared p53 cancer neoantigen
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16755-y Developing broadly applicable neoantigen-directed adoptive cell therapies (ACTs) is challenging because each cancer patient has an unique neoantigen repertoire. Here, the authors present the crystal structures of tumor-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) that recognize a shared neoepitope arising from the R175H dri
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Publisher Correction: Optoplasmonic characterisation of reversible disulfide interactions at single thiol sites in the attomolar regime
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16611-z
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Towards fully integrated photonic displacement sensors
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16739-y Integrated devices are useful for applications like sample stabilization, microscopy, adaptive optics, and acceleration sensors. Here the authors demonstrate a fully integrated chip-scale light-based displacement sensor using Huygens dipole scattering of light.
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Ribosome engineering reveals the importance of 5S rRNA autonomy for ribosome assembly
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16694-8 Ribosomes of all organisms have retained 5S rRNA as an autonomous rRNA species. Here the authors engineer a bacterial strain with ribosomes that do not have free 5S rRNA, and carry structural analyses that suggest the evolutionary preservation of 5S rRNA as an independent molecule is based on its role in the dyn
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Quantum computing: A key ally for meeting business objectives
In the business world, the opportunities for applying quantum technology relate to optimization: solving difficult business problems, reconfiguring complex processes, and understanding correlations between seemingly disparate data sets. The main purpose of quantum computing is to carry out computationally costly operations in a very short period of time, while at the same time accelerating busine
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NNIT-system fejler ved grænsen: Visum-kontroller må foretages manuelt
En fejl i grænsekontrollens system for fingeraftryksscannere har medført, at grænsevagter i mange tilfælde må tage besværlige og tidskrævende metoder i brug.
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As EPA Steps Back, States Face Wave Of Requests For Environmental Leniency
The EPA does not require companies to notify federal regulators if the pandemic interferes with pollution monitoring or reporting. That leaves states alone on the front lines of pollution control. (Image credit: DKAR Images/Tetra images /Getty Images)
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Court Ruling On Popular Weedkiller Dicamba Upends Midwestern Agriculture
A federal court ordered farmers to stop spraying one of the country's most widely used herbicides. But the Environmental Protection Agency says farmers can use chemicals that they've already bought.
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Mysterious Australian Night Parrots may not see in the dead of night
Australia's most elusive bird, the Night Parrot, may not be much better at seeing in the dark than other parrots active during the day.
8h
Mysterious Australian Night Parrots may not see in the dead of night
Australia's most elusive bird, the Night Parrot, may not be much better at seeing in the dark than other parrots active during the day.
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Ny dansk antistoftest viser med stor nøjagtighed, om man har været smittet med Covid-19
Forskere har udviklet to nye, nøjagtige antistoftest for Covid-19. Den ene er ideel til at følge…
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Miljøstyrelsen erkender: Giftigt algeboom kan skyldes gødningsudslip
PLUS. En ny undersøgelse skubber til myndighedernes syn på gødningsudslippet på Fredericia Havn. Men sammenhængen er endnu ikke entydig, mener Miljøstyrelsen.
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Coronavirus may have been in Wuhan in August, study suggests
Research finds rise in hospital car park usage and web searches for 'diarrhoea' and 'cough' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Coronavirus may have been present and spreading in Wuhan as early as August last year, according to a study that analysed satellite imagery of car parks outside major hospitals and search engine data. The study , by researchers from Harvard Medi
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The Coronavirus Is Already Reshaping Urban Life
Editor's Note: This article is part of " Uncharted ," a series about the world we're leaving behind, and the one being remade by the pandemic. Vilnius isn't the same city it was before the coronavirus. The Lithuanian capital has transformed into an open-air café , where hundreds of restaurants and bars can set up shop in its plazas, squares, and streets and serve customers from a safe distance. I
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Cowi-rapport: Regeringens energiøer giver dyrere havmøllestrøm
PLUS. Regeringens energiøer koster flere milliarder mere for samme antal GW end traditionelle havvindmølleparker, viser en ny rapport fra Cowi.
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Part of China's Great Wall not built for war: study
The northern segment of the Great Wall of China was built not to block invading armies but rather to monitor civilian movement, an Israeli archaeologist said Tuesday.
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Daily briefing: The gargantuan task of getting labs back up and running
Nature, Published online: 05 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01710-0 Scientists return to work and an uncertain future. Plus: the month's most spectacular science images and a call for a sea change in ocean data.
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Ignore the conspiracy theories: scientists know Covid-19 wasn't created in a lab | Peter Daszak
Instead of following false claims, we should be focusing our efforts on the regions where the next pandemic is likely to emerge • Peter Daszak is president of EcoHealth Alliance, a non-profit dedicated to analysing and preventing pandemics In a recent interview with the Telegraph , the former head of MI6 Sir Richard Dearlove cited an "important" scientific report that suggested that the novel cor
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With an Internet of Animals, Scientists Aim to Track and Save Wildlife
Using tiny sensors and equipment aboard the space station, a project called ICARUS seeks to revolutionize animal tracking.
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Scientists warn against 'greenwashing' of global coastal developments
The world's waterfront cities should not be deluged with apparently green developments because they still carry the potential to cause damage to the marine and coastal environment, scientists have warned.
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What kind of face mask gives the best protection against coronavirus?
Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply
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Scientists warn against 'greenwashing' of global coastal developments
The world's waterfront cities should not be deluged with apparently green developments because they still carry the potential to cause damage to the marine and coastal environment, scientists have warned.
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Boys' poor reading skills might help explain higher education gender gap
Researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Essex in the United Kingdom found boys' poor reading skills in adolescence, combined with the social attitudes about women attending college, can help explain why fewer men than women enroll in higher education or other types of post-high school education.
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Entire Roman city revealed without any digging
For the first time, archeologists have succeeded in mapping a complete Roman city, Falerii Novi in Italy, using advanced ground penetrating radar (GPR), allowing them to reveal astonishing details while it remains deep underground. The technology could revolutionize our understanding of ancient settlements.
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23 years of water quality data from crop-livestock systems
Long-term research is important to understand how land management impacts runoff and erosion, which pose serious threats to soil and water quality worldwide. To better understand these processes in agricultural landscapes of the southern Great Plains of the United States, eight 1.6 -ha watersheds were established and instrumented in 1976 at the USDA-ARS Grazinglands Research Laboratory in El Reno,
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Deadly superbug could get a vigorous foe in repurposed antibiotic
USC researchers have discovered that an old antibiotic may be a powerful new tool against a deadly superbug, thanks to an innovative screening method that better mimics conditions inside the human body.
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Deadly superbug could get a vigorous foe in repurposed antibiotic
USC researchers have discovered that an old antibiotic may be a powerful new tool against a deadly superbug, thanks to an innovative screening method that better mimics conditions inside the human body.
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Scientists lament 'Humpty Dumpty' effect on world's spectacular, rare wildlife
Some of the world's largest, most spectacular and unheralded mammals are silently slipping away, species like Tibetan wild yaks and Patagonia's huemul, Bhutan's takin and Vietnam's saola. Even Africa's three species of zebras and wildebeest have suffered massive reductions over the last several decades.
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Scientists lament 'Humpty Dumpty' effect on world's spectacular, rare wildlife
Some of the world's largest, most spectacular and unheralded mammals are silently slipping away, species like Tibetan wild yaks and Patagonia's huemul, Bhutan's takin and Vietnam's saola. Even Africa's three species of zebras and wildebeest have suffered massive reductions over the last several decades.
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Analyse: Derfor skal vi hellere bygge for mange end for få havmøller
PLUS. Det kan blive svært at følge med det fremtidige behov for grøn strøm, fordi vejen mod regeringens nye energiøer er belagt med forhindringer. Og så bliver det vanskeligt at få skubbet de gamle kulfyrede værker ud.
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Should We Avoid Dairy Out of Fear of Cancer?
A doctor is adamant about avoiding dairy because IGF-1 allows cancer cells to multiply. I think he's relying on speculation and an over-abundance of caution.
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Mysterious Radio Burst Coming From Deep Space Repeats in a Cycle Every 157 Days
We thought it was random… but astronomers just found a pattern.
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Homes to be heated by warm water from flooded mines
Can abandoned British coal mines help tackle the climate crisis?
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Five key questions about energy after Covid-19
The pandemic has seen CO2 emissions fall – but will these changes be permanent?
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Climate Basics: CO2 explained
CO2 is at the heart of our changing climate. Here's why.
10h
Can You Boil an Egg Too Long?
You've had six-minute eggs, maybe slow-cooked eggs. Now try an egg cooked forever.
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Ancient DNA Rewrites Dead Sea Scroll History
By sequencing DNA from the dust of dead sea scrolls, scientists were able to glean new clues about the ancient manuscripts. Christopher Intagliata reports.
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Artificial intelligence enhances brain tumour diagnosis
A new machine learning approach classifies a common type of brain tumour into low or high grades with almost 98% accuracy, researchers report in the journal IEEE Access. Scientists in India and Japan, including from Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), developed the method to help clinicians choose the most effective treatment strategy for individual patients
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Scientists warn against 'greenwashing' of global coastal developments
An international team of scientists has said the artificial structures and reclaimed land that are now commonplace in coastal urban areas all over the world are often poor surrogates for the natural environment they replace.
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23 years of water quality data from crop-livestock systems
Researchers summarize runoff water quantity and quality data from native tallgrass prairie and crop-livestock systems in Oklahoma between 1977 and 1999.
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Scientists lament 'Humpty Dumpty' effect on world's spectacular, rare wildlife
A new study reveals how runaway human population growth collapses the role of wildlife in the world's ecosystems.
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Study finds another reason to wash hands: Flame retardants
Harmful flame retardants may be lurking on your hands and cell phone, according to a peer-reviewed study published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.
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Covid-19: the psychology of physical distancing
As the world begins to unlock, many of us will be seeing friends and family again – albeit with guidelines on how close you can get to one another. But why is it more difficult to stay physically apart from friends and family than a stranger in a supermarket queue? Nicola Davis speaks to Prof John Drury about the psychology of physical distancing and why we like to be near those we feel emotionall
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Elliott takes on Blackstone in Travelport battle royale
History shows private equity groups tend to win these kind of fights
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Why coronavirus has fuelled black America's sense of injustice
African-Americans have been especially vulnerable during the pandemic, laying bare disparities in health and employment
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Fed faces tricky balancing act in recession response
Central bank's first forecasts in six months could unnerve investors expecting dovish policy
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Coronavirus numbers — what we have learnt from the pandemic
Scientists understand much more about Covid-19 than they did but big gaps in knowledge persist
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Second space age is creating fresh investment opportunities
New frontiers are being opened up by a wave of innovation in space technology
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Covid-19: the psychology of physical distancing – podcast
As the world begins to unlock, many of us will be seeing friends and family again – albeit with guidelines on how close you can get to one another. But why is it more difficult to stay physically apart from friends and family than a stranger in a supermarket queue? Nicola Davis speaks to Prof John Drury about the psychology of physical distancing and why we like to be near those we feel emotional
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'It is about our survival': UAE's Mars mission prepares for launch
Arab world's first interplanetary mission will see probe orbit planet for a Martian year to study its climate The Arab world's first interplanetary mission, due to launch in 40 days' time and reach the orbit of Mars in February next year, is about the survival and future of the entire Middle East, the leaders of the United Arab Emirates project have declared. The mission is also the latest sign t
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Ancient DNA Rewrites Dead Sea Scroll History
By sequencing DNA from the dust of dead sea scrolls, scientists were able to glean new clues about the ancient manuscripts. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ancient DNA Rewrites Dead Sea Scroll History
By sequencing DNA from the dust of dead sea scrolls, scientists were able to glean new clues about the ancient manuscripts. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Aarhus Universitet nedlægger Ingeniørhøjskolen og opretter fire nye institutter
PLUS. Fremover skal universitetets civilingeniør- og diplomingeniøruddannelser organiseres efter fagligheden. Det skal give en tydeligere profil og tiltrække flere ingeniørstuderende, lyder det fra dekan Eskild Holm Nielsen
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Global stocks extend gains on growing hopes of economic recovery
Asia-Pacific shares follow Wall Street higher as traders eye more central bank support
14h
Exhausted frontline doctors fear second coronavirus wave
Pandemic leaves UK medics ill-equipped to cope with a resurgence in cases
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Shipping lines face formidable foe
The industry has navigated the crisis with some skill, but pressure to cut prices is growing
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Data firms pitch profiling tools at UK councils
Databases used for targeting consumers being used to spot those struggling in pandemic
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New approach to reducing spread of mosquito-borne diseases
Researchers working in rural Kenya have identified the most productive breeding habitats for mosquitoes that spread a range of untreatable viruses. Their findings point to more effective health interventions that focus on the purpose of water-holding containers.
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Many factors may contribute to steep, decades-long muskrat population drop
Muskrat populations declined sharply across North America over the last 50 years or so, and wildlife scientists have struggled to understand why. A research team investigated whether pathogens, parasites, environmental contaminants and disease may be contributing to this decline.
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The Atlantic Daily: The Protests Meet the Pandemic
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . MEL D. COLE / GETTY / THE ATLANTIC The town square has come roaring back to life. The anti-racism movement, set off by the death of George Floyd, is enormous in scale . This past Saturday, more t
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Forerunner to the Great Wall of China mapped in detail for first time
A medieval forerunner to the Great Wall of China runs across what is now Mongolia, but unlike the more famous wall it may not have been built to stop armies
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56 per cent of pregnant women with covid-19 are from BAME backgrounds
A study of 427 pregnant women admitted to 194 UK obstetric units has found that 56 per cent of these women were from black, Asian or minority ethnic backgrounds
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Rockfall map suggests moon's surface still changes
Researchers have analyzed an archive of more than two million images of the lunar surface and have created the first global map of rockfalls on the moon. Even billions-year-old landscapes are still changing, the research finds. On the moon, time and again boulders and blocks of rock travel downslope, leaving behind impressive tracks, a phenomenon that has been observed since the first unpiloted f
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Hannah Gadsby has a message for anti-vaxxers
In her new Netflix special, "Douglas," comedian Hannah Gadsby targets anti-vaxxers. Diagnosed with autism four years ago, Gadsby discusses the dangers of believing vaccinations cause autism. Some high-profile anti-vax activists use their platform in order to sell supplements and books. Hannah Gadsby couldn't understand why people kept telling her she might have autism. She believed the developmen
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Astronaut Kathy Sullivan Becomes First Woman to Reach Challenger Deep
The astronaut Kathy Sullivan, 68, is now also the first woman to reach the Challenger Deep, about seven miles below the ocean's surface.
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Psilocybin mushrooms may subdue brain's ego center
During psilocybin use, the area of the brain believed responsible for setting attention and switching tasks is turned down, research finds. The study compares brain scans of people who've taken psilocybin, the hallucinogenic chemical found in certain mushrooms, and people who've taken a placebo. The scans after psilocybin use showed that the claustrum was less active. "Our findings move us one st
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Playing hard to get may make you seem hotter
"Playing hard to get" may increase your desirability, according to a new study. "Playing hard to get makes it seem as if you are more in demand—we call that having higher mate value," says coauthor Harry Reis, a professor of psychology at the University Rochester. "We all want to date people with higher mate value. We're trying to make the best deal we can." "People who are too easy to attract ma
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Discovering the prehistoric monuments of Arabia
In contrast to the prehistoric remains of the Near East, the megalithic monuments of Arabia remain largely unknown. These monumental structures, made of dry stone walls, still hold many secrets in terms of their construction, function and chronology. An international collaboration of scientists from France, Saudi Arabia and Italy have discovered a 35-metre long monumental platform with a triangula
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UAE Mars mission: Hope project a 'real step forward for exploration'
The UAE's Hope project is hailed as a "real step forward" for space exploration in the Arab world.
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Britain goes coal free as renewables edge out fossil fuels
On Wednesday, Britain will mark two months without burning any coal to generate power.
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Who's to blame? These three scientists are at the heart of the Surgisphere COVID-19 scandal
Author partnership on coronavirus papers is "completely bizarre" and should have been a red flag, former journal editor says
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China welcomes back street hawkers to boost employment
Damage caused by coronavirus prompts rethink about role played by vendors
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Crosspost – welcome to r/AppliedPsychology!
submitted by /u/TomClinPsy [link] [comments]
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Publisher Correction: Patterns and trends of Northern Hemisphere snow mass from 1980 to 2018
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2416-4
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Bildjournalister – en hotad yrkeskår
Samtidigt som bildanvändandet i svenska tidningar ökar blir antalet bildjournalister allt färre. Förändringarna på den svenska tidningsmarknaden slår hårt mot fotograferna som yrkeskår, enligt forskning vid Mittuniversitetet. − Bildjournalisters yrkesideal är att komma nära människor och med sina bilder beskriva deras liv, och i många fall lidanden, för oss läsare. Deras arbete handlar om att åka
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Covid-19: När det omöjliga blir möjligt
Forskare har studerat hur covid-19 pandemin har påverkat arbets- och resmönster hos medarbetare i svenska myndigheter. Resultaten indikerar att den långsiktiga påverkan på samarbetsformer och möten är större än pandemins påverkan på pendlingsvanor. Covid-19 krisen har bidragit till en revolutionerande förändring i både våra privata och professionella liv. Isolering och resebegränsningar har resul
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The most versatile PlayStation 4 controllers for all gamers
Playstation 4 controller alternatives. (Ales Nesetril via Unsplash/) Like an athlete with a preferred pair of sneakers or a favorite bat, a heart-and-soul gamer has the one controller they wouldn't think of going into battle without. Whether it's due to responsive buttons, comfortable grip, or just an inspiring design, these are the controllers we reach for when it's game on. If you're looking fo
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A heritable profile of six miRNAs in autistic patients and mouse models
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65847-8
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Author Correction: Downstream Products are Potent Inhibitors of the Heparan Sulfate 2-O-Sulfotransferase
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66543-3
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Author Correction: Memristive synapses connect brain and silicon spiking neurons
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66548-y
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Dish drying solutions for small kitchens
Make it less of a pain to entertain. (Amazon/) Limited kitchen counter space next to the sink is a common problem, but if you wash at least some of your dishes by hand, drying them thoroughly with a towel and putting them away each time you have a meal isn't always possible. A dish rack that maximizes the space you have will give you an incentive to keep your home neat and tidy, and could even pr
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The ACLU's call to defund the police | Anthony D. Romero
"We need to defund the budgets of police departments. It's the only way we're going to take power back," says Anthony D. Romero, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Calling for allies to get involved in the efforts to dismantle systemic racism, Romero explains why police reform isn't enough anymore — and shows why it's time to take money from militarized law enforceme
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The US needs a radical revolution of values | Dr. Bernice King
To cultivate a society grounded in equity and love, we must uproot systems of oppression and violence towards Black communities, says Dr. Bernice Albertine King, community builder and daughter of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In a time of mourning and protest, King calls for a revolution of values, allies that engage and a world where anger is channeled into social and economic change. "Freedom is ne
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How to channel your presence and energy into ending injustice | Rashad Robinson
The presence and visibility of a movement can often lead us to believe that progress is inevitable. But building power and changing the system requires more than conversations and retweets, says Rashad Robinson, the president of Color Of Change. To create material change in the racist systems that enable and perpetuate violence against Black communities, Robinson shares how we can translate the en
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Why We're Still Waiting on a Vaccine for HIV and Other Deadly Viruses
More than 100 coronavirus vaccines are in the works. But vaccines remain elusive for many diseases we've been fighting for decades.
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New Zealand has eliminated COVID-19. Here's how they're keeping it that way.
Park equipment closed down in New Zealand to help stop the spread of COVID-19. (Unsplash/) States around the country—and countries around the world—are working on reopening social and economic activity while still grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic . But that doesn't mean we're ready to revert back to life as usual. Epidemiologists are still unsure of when the world will return to normal. Here
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The bill has come due for the US's history of racism | Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff
The bill has come due for the unpaid debts the United States owes its Black residents, says Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff, CEO of the Center for Policing Equity (CPE). But we're not going to get to where we need to go just by reforming law enforcement. In addition to the work that CPE is known for — working with police departments to use their own data to improve relationships with the communities they
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Scientists Quantum Entangled a Record-Breaking 15 Trillion Atoms
Atom Soup A team of physicists just managed to entangle a record-breaking 15 trillion atoms. The unusual feat is a first for quantum science, Live Science reports , especially because the scientists decided to heat it up into a chaotic, energized soup. With this mass entanglement in hand, the Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology scientists hope to improve technologies ranging from brain
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Opioid prescriptions after childbirth linked to increased risk of overdose, persistent use
Women who are prescribed opioids after childbirth have an increased risk of persistent opioid use or other serious opioid-related events, including overdose, in their first year postpartum, according to a new study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers. This is true regardless of whether the woman had a vaginal delivery or a cesarean section.
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Galactic flash points to long-sought source for enigmatic radio bursts
CHIME telescope catches burst generated by magnetized neutron star in the Milky Way
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Two Genetic Regions Linked with Severe COVID-19
In a genome-wide association study, variants in both the ABO blood group locus and a cluster of genes on human chromosome 3 are more common among COVID-19 patients with respiratory failure than in the general population.
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Scientists identify targets for COVID-19 vaccine using cancer immunotherapy tools
Cancer researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have harnessed tools used for the development of cancer immunotherapies and adapted them to identify regions of the SARS-CoV-2 virus to target with a vaccine, employing the same approach used to elicit an immune response against cancer cells to stimulate an immune response against the virus. Using this strategy, the researchers belie
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