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Cascade sets the stage for superconductivity in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene

The researchers used scanning tunneling microscopy to observe what happens when they add additional electrons to magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene. They observed a cascade of transitions in the electronic properties, patterns that could help unlock how superconductivity emerge in these materials.

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Solving a Parkinson's disease puzzle through protein design

Scientists have developed a computational protein design approach, and used it to obtain the first ever high-resolution structure of an activated dopamine receptor in its natural cell membrane environment. The breakthrough will open up a new dimension in drug discovery for Parkinson's disease and perhaps other disorders.

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The Atlantic Daily: 'It's a Bad Week to Be a Racist Statue'

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Ryan Melgar NASCAR banned Confederate flags . The country band Lady Antebellum rebranded as " Lady A ." In Richmond, Virginia, protesters pulled down a statue of Jefferson Davis. The death of Geo

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Psychedelic DMT Improves Wellbeing in 89% of People

submitted by /u/tahutahut [link] [comments]

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Ultra-thin camera lenses of the future could see the light of day

In the future, camera lenses could be thousands of times thinner and significantly less resource-intensive to manufacture. Researchers now present a new technology for making the artificial materials known as 'metasurfaces', which consist of a multitude of interacting nanoparticles that together can control light. They could have great use in the optical technology of tomorrow.

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US coronavirus outbreak continues to spread south and west

Seven states that were spared initial outbreak see new daily case totals at or near highs

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New efficient ships won't be enough to curb shipping sector's environmental damage

New climate research has stated that urgent action on emissions from existing ships is the key to tackling shipping's impact on climate change.

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The places you go (or don't) can change your personality

The places where we spend time seem to influence our personalities, researchers report. If complying with shelter-in-place orders has made you feel more disorganized or less kind than usual, it may be because that's what happens when you spend more time at home instead of public spaces, according to a new study. "We found that when people spend time in social places, they tend to be more open-min

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PS5 Games Revealed (Trailers): Every Game Sony Just Announced

The company's June E3-like online event was filled with trailers and teasers galore. Here's everything we learned.

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Half the earth relatively intact from global human influence

If we act quickly and decisively, there is a slim window in which we can still conserve roughly half of Earth's land in a relatively intact state, a new study suggests.

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Stiffer roadways could improve truck fuel efficiency

A theoretical study suggests that small changes in roadway paving practices could reduce that efficiency loss, potentially eliminating a half-percent of the total greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector, at little to no cost.

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Novel approach for treating eczema

Researchers have identified a key enzyme that contributes to eczema, which may lead to better treatment to prevent the skin disorder's debilitating effects.

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New genetic defect linked to ALS

Researchers have identified how certain gene mutations cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The pathway identified by the researchers may also be responsible for a certain form of dementia related to ALS. The finding could offer potential new approaches for treating this devastating condition.

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Ancient crocs walked on two legs the size of ours

Some species of ancient crocodiles walked on their two hind legs like dinosaurs, report researchers. They measured over three meters (9.8 feet) in length, the findings indicate. The researchers first thought the similar-shaped fossilized footprints were from another ancient animal known as the pterosaurs, says Anthony Romilio, a paleontologist at the University of Queensland. "The footprints meas

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Delhi accused of under-reporting coronavirus deaths

Doctors claim fatalities exceed official figures as cemeteries overflow

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Twitter's Newest Trick Relies on Tracking More of Your Clicks

The social media company is testing warnings for users who try to share links to articles they haven't read. To do that, it has to know what you've read.

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This Is What the PlayStation 5 Looks Like. Both of Them

We finally saw Sony's new PS5 and the two consoles (plural!) are … curvy.

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Sony Reveals PlayStation 5's Bizarre Final Design

Both Microsoft and Sony plan to launch new consoles at the end of 2020, but Sony's big PlayStation 5 reveal on Thursday was more subdued than it initially intended. With the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and protests against police brutality around the globe, Sony decided a simpler pre-taped stream would be more appropriate. So, that's what we got. The "reveal" focused on the games coming to PS5,

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Island 'drowning' is not inevitable as sea levels rise

An international study suggests islands composed of gravel material can evolve in the face of overtopping waves, with sediment from the beach face being transferred to the island's surface.

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Aspirin reduces long-term colorectal cancer risk in genetically predisposed individuals

Aspirin reduces colorectal cancer risk by half in individuals at high genetic risk. Preventive efficacy is prolonged for 10-20 years after treatment with aspirin.

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An aspirin a day keeps the bowel doctor away

A regular dose of aspirin to reduce the risk of inherited bowel cancer lasts at least 10 years after stopping treatment, research has revealed.

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Only 1 in 3 COVID-19 research authors are women and even fewer are senior authors

Women make up only a third of all authors who have published research on COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic in January this year, and even fewer of them are senior authors on these papers, suggests an analysis in BMJ Global Health.

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Female researchers majorly under-represented in COVID-19 research

New research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found significant gender bias in research authorship relating to COVID-19, which means that women's views are not equally shaping the response to the pandemic.

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Pluto probe offers eye-popping view of neighbouring star Proxima Centauri

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01699-6 NASA's New Horizons mission measures the distances of two stars from the outer reaches of the Solar System.

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Author Correction: Carbon dioxide stimulates lake primary production

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67061-y

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Author Correction: Vitamin D Supplementation in Overweight/obese Asian Indian Women with Prediabetes Reduces Glycemic Measures and Truncal Subcutaneous Fat: A 78 Weeks Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial (PREVENT-WIN Trial)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67064-9 Author Correction: Vitamin D Supplementation in Overweight/obese Asian Indian Women with Prediabetes Reduces Glycemic Measures and Truncal Subcutaneous Fat: A 78 Weeks Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial ( PREVENT-WIN Trial)

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Author Correction: Hyperpolarization of the subthalamic nucleus alleviates hyperkinetic movement disorders

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67067-6

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Author Correction: Revised phylogeny and historical biogeography of the cosmopolitan aquatic plant genus Typha (Typhaceae)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67060-z

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Author Correction: Jdp2-deficient granule cell progenitors in the cerebellum are resistant to ROS-mediated apoptosis through xCT/Slc7a11 activation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66843-8 Author Correction: Jdp2 -deficient granule cell progenitors in the cerebellum are resistant to ROS-mediated apoptosis through xCT/Slc7a11 activation

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Coronavirus Can Set Off a 'Cytokine Storm.' These Drugs May Calm It.

At least a dozen treatments are being evaluated for virus patients whose immune systems go on the attack.

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Fake Meat Is on the Rise, But Will It Ever Replace the Real Thing?

Sales of plant-based meat alternatives have been skyrocketing since March. But their growing presence in grocery stores likely won't get the average American to give up animal products.

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Først IBM, nu Amazon: It-giganter dropper ansigtsgenkendelse i skyggen af George Floyds død

Amazon vil sætte en stopper for politiets brug af firmaets udskældte ansigtsgenkendelsesprogram.

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Half the earth relatively intact from global human influence

If we act quickly and decisively, there is a slim window in which we can still conserve roughly half of Earth's land in a relatively intact state, a UC Davis study suggests.

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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

Multigroup, Adaptively Randomized Trials Are Advantageous for Comparing COVID-19 Interventions.

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How #BlackInTheIvory put a spotlight on racism in academia

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01741-7 After two Black scholars shared their experiences on Twitter, a firestorm followed.

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A buried ancient Roman city uncovered using radar technology

Using ground-penetrating radar, layers of an ordinary field in Italy are pulled back to reveal a lost Roman town. Without disturbing a single artifact, an incredible level of detail is uncovered. The buried town, Falerii Novi, has been quietly awaiting discovery since it was abandoned at the start of medieval age. It doesn't look like much to the naked eye. It's basically an empty field, but if y

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Which businesses should be open?

A new study by MIT researchers uses a variety of data on consumer and business activity to tackle that question, measuring 26 types of businesses by both their usefulness and risk. Vital forms of commerce that are relatively uncrowded fare the best in the study; less significant types of businesses that generate crowds perform worse. The results can help inform the policy decisions of government o

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A creative way to expand the geriatrics workforce

In this new study, researchers outlined the results and outcomes of an undergraduate service-learning course that used music and filmmaking to teach person-centered approaches to dementia.

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Type III interferons: Protective or harmful in COVID-19?

Interferons and other cytokines produced by the immune system are important defenses against viral infections, but as we have seen in COVID-19, they can also contribute to damaging, potentially life-threatening lung inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that one type of interferon, known as type III interferon or interferon lambda (λ), can fight viral infection while limiting this inflammatory da

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Lab Puts Mice in Suspended Animation. Will It Work on Humans?

It could take months if not years to travel to faraway planets. Science fiction has long suggested that for humans to survive such a lengthy and intense journey, their best bet it so be put into a deep sleep state, whether by flash-freezing their vital organs or being put under with a cocktail of drugs. Such a state of suspended animation is still far off. But that could now be starting to change

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No 'patient zero' as Covid-19 came into UK at least 1,300 times

Study prompts further criticism that chances to suppress infection early in outbreak were missed Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage There was no "patient zero" in the UK's Covid-19 epidemic, according to research showing that the infection was introduced on at least 1,300 occasions. The findings, from the Covid-19 Genomics UK consortium, have prompted further criticism

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Nasa finalises deal for design of lunar Gateway crew cabin

Northrop Grumman subsidiary awarded $187m contract for habitation and logistics outpost Nasa has finalised the contract for the design of the Gateway lunar space station's crew cabin. Astronauts will dock at this outpost upon arriving in lunar orbit, before embarking on their descent to the surface of the moon. The $187m (£147m) contract will allow Orbital Science Corporation in Dulles, Virginia,

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Place doesn't trump race as predictor of incarceration

For black Americans—particularly men—growing up in better neighborhoods doesn't diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos, new Cornell research shows.

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Keep moving to prevent major mobility disability

According to research, being physically inactive is the strongest risk factor for disability as we age. A team of researchers created a study to examine the effects of performing light physical activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on older adults. The researchers were interested in studying how participating in these different intensities of activity, and whether a person spreads th

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Stiffer roadways could improve truck fuel efficiency

A theoretical study by MIT researchers suggests that small changes in roadway paving practices could reduce that efficiency loss, potentially eliminating a half-percent of the total greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector, at little to no cost.

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Best Summer Game Sales (2020): Xbox, PlayStation, Switch, PC, and More

The annual videogame conference may have shut down this year, but there are still celebratory deals. Here are our favorites.

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Slow down: Reduced speed limits save lives in busy cities

Traffic accidents are the leading cause of non-natural deaths worldwide. Lower speed limits may help prevent accidents. But speed-reduction policies can be controversial and effects are not well documented.

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From Minneapolis to Facebook Feeds, Police Protests are Roiling our Psyches

Race-charged collective action is sweeping the nation. Here's how your mind might be processing it all.

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Scientists detect unexpected widespread structures near Earth's core

A new study has produced the first analysis of seismic echoes from hundreds of earthquakes at once, revealing widespread structures at the core-mantle boundary. Previous studies were limited to analysis of single earthquakes, providing only a narrow window into the structure deep inside the Earth. This study enables a much wider view than ever before, revealing new, unexpected features and expandi

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US stocks slide nearly 6% on worst day since March

Investors spooked by uptick in virus cases and gloomy prognosis from the Federal Reserve

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NASA Picks Astrobotic to Carry VIPER Ice-Hunting Moon Rover

Astrobotic, a Pittsburgh company, won a $199.5 million contract to transport NASA's VIPER rover to the lunar surface.

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Research reveals function of genetic pathway for reproductive fitness in flowering plants

Small RNAs are key regulators involved in plant growth and development. Two groups of small RNAs are abundant during development of pollen in the anthers—a critical process for reproductive success. A research collaboration has demonstrated the function of a genetic pathway for anther development, with this pathway proven in 2019 work to be present widely in the flowering plants that evolved over

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Regular physical activity can maintain or improve frailty

Frailty is the medical term for becoming weaker or experiencing lower levels of activity or energy. Becoming frail as we age increases our risk for poor health, falls, disability, and other serious concerns. In this study, researchers examined the benefits of assistance that helps older adults follow their prescribed medications and prevent falls, frailty, and loneliness.

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Retinitis pigmentosa research probes role of the enzyme DHDDS in this genetic disease

Researchers who made a knock-in mouse-model of the genetic disorder retinitis pigmentosa 59, or RP59, expected to see retinal degeneration and retinal thinning. As reported in the journal Cells, they surprisingly found none, calling into question the commonly accepted — though never proved — mechanism for RP59.

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Place doesn't trump race as predictor of incarceration

Steven Alvarado is the author of 'The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos,' published June 1 in the journal Socius showing that for black Americans growing up in better neighborhoods doesn't diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos.

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Self-driving cars that recognize free space can better detect objects

It's important that self-driving cars quickly detect other cars or pedestrians sharing the road. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have shown that they can significantly improve detection accuracy by helping the vehicle also recognize what it doesn't see. Empty space, that is.

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UNC-Chapel Hill researchers create new type of COVID-19 antibody test

UNC School of Medicine researchers Aravinda de Silva, PhD, and Prem Lakshmanane, Ph.D., and colleagues developed a COVID-19 test that pinpoints human antibodies specific to a particular part of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. The test can be ramped up to document past and recent COVID-19 infections and possibly used to identify asymptomatic virus infection and the level of immunity in individuals.

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USC survey suggests the importance of clearly communicating coronavirus risk, behaviors

A newly published USC analysis of March survey data sheds light on our understanding of how perceptions of the virus impact behavior, finding individuals who perceive greater risk from COVID-19 were more likely to engage in protective behaviors like handwashing and social distancing.

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Slow down: Reduced speed limits save lives in busy cities

Traffic accidents are the leading cause of non-natural deaths worldwide. Lower speed limits may help prevent accidents. But speed-reduction policies can be controversial and effects are not well documented. A new study from University of Illinois shows that speed reductions in São Paulo, Brazil, dramatically reduced fatal accidents and increased travel times only minimally.

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Research reveals function of genetic pathway for reproductive fitness in flowering plants

Small RNAs are key regulators involved in plant growth and development. Two groups of small RNAs are abundant during development of pollen in the anthers—a critical process for reproductive success. A research collaboration has demonstrated the function of a genetic pathway for anther development, with this pathway proven in 2019 work to be present widely in the flowering plants that evolved over

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Study: News reports of education 'achievement gaps' may perpetuate stereotypes of Black Americans

Scholars have warned that the framing of racial "achievement gaps" in tests scores, grades, and other education outcomes may perpetuate racial stereotypes and encourage people to explain the gaps as the failure of students and their families rather than as resulting from structural racism. A new study finds that TV news reporting about racial achievement gaps led viewers to report exaggerated ster

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Utah's arches continue to whisper their secrets

Two new studies from University of Utah researchers show what can be learned from a short seismic checkup of natural rock arches and how erosion sculpts some arches—like the iconic Delicate Arch—into shapes that lend added strength.

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Is OAN the Leading Edge of Russian Misinformation?

I n what appears to be a signal of intensifying political warfare ahead of the November election, One America News Network, the Trump-supporting cable channel that has been promoting anti-Biden conspiracies for several months , says it has obtained several hours of secret recordings of then–Vice President Biden's conversations with Ukrainian officials. If such recordings exist, they're likely lin

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Recovery of sea otter populations yields more benefits than costs

Researchers have created a new model to evaluate the long-term economic benefits of top predator recovery, using sea otter recovery along the west coast of Canada as a case study.

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Plastic in the deep sea: Virtually unaltered after a quarter of a century

Even in the most remote regions of the oceans plastic debris can be found. Usually it is impossible to determine how long they have been lying on the seabed. Up to now, this has also hampered attempts to estimate how long plastic degradation might take. Scientists have now examined plastic items that have verifiably been at the abyssal seabed for more than 20 years. They could not find any traces

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Scientists carry out first space-based measurement of neutron lifetime

Scientists have found a way of measuring neutron lifetime from space for the first time—a discovery that could teach us more about the early universe.

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Free online tool will enable farmers to deliver environmental benefits

A free web-based support tool will enable farmers to deliver environmental improvements and potentially attract payments for providing 'public money for public goods' under the new agri-environment scheme.

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Tear Gas, Pollution, Wildfire Smoke: A Triple Threat to Your Lungs

By John Upton (Climate Central) | Danielle Venton (KQED) contributed Reporting | KQED Radio/Brian Watt, Morning Edition Teron McGrew stayed home during the past two weeks while others in her hometown of Oakland were protesting systemic racism and police killings of Black people. Like many of her neighbors, McGrew has asthma and, because of her breathing difficulties, she feared being exposed to C

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Meet the Autistic Scientists Redefining Autism Research

Growing ranks of researchers on the spectrum are overcoming barriers–from neurotypical bias to sensory sensitivities–to shape autism science.

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Soil biology research can help create a more sustainable future

Soils are home to more than 25 percent of the earth's total biodiversity, supporting life on land and water, nutrient cycling and retention, food production, pollution remediation and climate regulation. Scientists have found increasing evidence that when soil organisms are put front and center, numerous global sustainability goals can be enhanced. This is because the activity and interactions of

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Tales From the Frontlines of the Coronavirus Pandemic

One veteran ER doctor's crash course in treating COVID-19 patients in New York City.

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How to handle fraudulent reviews on online portals? Study gives tips to managers

A new study sought to determine how consumers respond to potentially fraudulent reviews and how review portals (e.g., Amazon, Expedia, TripAdvisor, Yelp) can leverage this information to design better fraud-management policies and increase consumers' trust. It found that portals that include fraudulent reviews are more likely to boost buyers' trust.

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Discovering how the brain works through computation

Researchers from Columbia Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Graz University of Technology propose a new computational system to expand the understanding of the brain at an intermediate level, between neurons and cognitive phenomena such as language. They have developed a brain architecture based on neuronal assemblies, and they demonstrate its use in the syntactic processing in the

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Disparities in the Treatment of Pain Experienced by Black Patients

Recent events in the United States, namely the murders of two Black Americans George Floyd and Breonna Taylor at the hands of police, have thrust racial policies and violence faced by Black Americans onto the national and global stage. To be clear, the racism faced by the Black community is not new, has been known […]

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Seismic waves reveal giant structures deep beneath Earth's surface

Seismic waves travelling through Earth have revealed a giant structure between Earth's molten core and solid mantle under the Marquesas Islands in the South Pacific

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Migration Numbers Plunge for the Red Knot, a Threatened Shore Bird

Every May, these birds stop in the Delaware Bay on their way to Arctic Canada. But a shortage of food this season puts their flight at risk.

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Research reveals function of genetic pathway for reproductive fitness in flowering plants

A research collaboration has demonstrated the function of a genetic pathway for anther development, with this pathway proven in 2019 work to be present widely in the flowering plants that evolved over 200 million years ago. The research team was led by Blake Meyers, Ph.D., member, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center and professor, Division of Plant Sciences, University of Missouri, and Virginia W

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The Search For Earth's Underground Oceans

The water stored in the inner layers of Earth may be more plentiful — and important — than scientists previously thought.

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Coronavirus: Health Care in Brazil's River Communities

Brazil has reported more than 775,000 cases of the new coronavirus and has attributed more than 39,800 deaths to the disease so far, with daily death tolls continuing to climb in recent days—as many as 1,200 per day. While President Jair Bolsonaro has tried to downplay the threat, local authorities and communities are working hard to slow the spread of the virus, as well as to treat those affecte

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Ramy Meditates on the Pitfalls of Self-Righteousness

This article contains spoilers throughout Season 2 of Ramy. In Season 1 of Ramy, audiences are introduced to Ramy Hassan—the character loosely based on the show's creator, Ramy Youssef—and his Egyptian American family in northern Jersey. With a formidable mix of surrealism and humor, Youssef explores the complexities of being a religious Millennial man, namely through navigating the difficulties

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Sound waves transport droplets for rewritable lab-on-a-chip devices

Engineers have demonstrated a versatile microfluidic lab-on-a-chip that uses sound waves to create tunnels in oil to digitally manipulate and transport droplets. The technology could form the basis of a small-scale, programmable, rewritable biomedical chip that is completely reusable for disparate purposes from on-site diagnostics to laboratory-based research.

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Elite gamers share mental toughness with top athletes, study finds

In one of the first studies to investigate mental toughness and stress and coping in high performing esports athletes, researchers have found similarities to traditional elite athletes.

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The mystery of visual stability

We move our eyes several times per second. These fast eye movements, called saccades, create large image shifts on the retina — making our visual system work hard to maintain a stable perceptual world. Remapping the retinal image compensates for this; however, errors in actual eye movements cause image shifts, even with remapping.

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Scientists carry out first space-based measurement of neutron lifetime

Scientists have found a way of measuring neutron lifetime from space for the first time — a discovery that could teach us more about the early universe.

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Study examines emotional regulation, family history as risk factors for suicidal behavior

In a recent study, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital examined the intersection of two risk factors, parental history of suicidal behavior and emotion regulation, in children 6-9 years of age.

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Putting 'super' in natural killer cells

Using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and deleting a key gene, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have created natural killer cells — a type of immune cell — with measurably stronger activity against a form of leukemia, both in vivo and in vitro.

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This Plan For a Martian City Under a Dome is Breathtaking

Back in 2017, architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group were asked to design a prototype of a Martian city by the Dubai government. What they came up with is a stunning vision of what life on the Red Planet could one day be like, CNN reports . The project is part of the United Arab Emirates' Mars Science City, a space intended for Dubai's Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre. So far, the city is not much

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Sound waves transport droplets for rewritable lab-on-a-chip devices

Engineers have demonstrated a versatile microfluidic lab-on-a-chip that uses sound waves to create tunnels in oil to digitally manipulate and transport droplets. The technology could form the basis of a small-scale, programmable, rewritable biomedical chip that is completely reusable for disparate purposes from on-site diagnostics to laboratory-based research.

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How Do Police Dramas Shape What We Think of Real-Life Officers?

Who we see on police television, and the work we see them do, might make some of us think that real cops aren't much different.

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Neuroscientists discover neural circuits that control hibernation-like behaviors in mice

Neuroscientists have discovered a population of neurons in the hypothalamus that controls hibernation-like behavior, or torpor, in mice, revealing for the first time the neural circuits that regulate this state. By better understanding these processes in mice and other animal models, the authors envision the possibility of one day working toward inducing torpor in humans.

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The brain uses minimum effort to look for key information in text

The human brain avoids taking unnecessary effort. When a person is reading, she strives to gain as much information as possible by dedicating as little of her cognitive capacity as possible to the processing.

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Bedrock type under forests greatly affects tree growth, species, carbon storage

A forest's ability to store carbon depends significantly on the bedrock beneath, according to researchers who studied forest productivity, composition and associated physical characteristics of rocks in the Appalachian ridge and Valley Region of Pennsylvania.

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Researchers mimic nature for fast, colorful 3D printing

Brilliantly colored chameleons, butterflies, opals – and now some 3D-printed materials — reflect color by using nanoscale structures called photonic crystals. A new study demonstrates how a modified 3D-printing process provides a versatile approach to producing multiple colors from a single ink.

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Bizarre Subatomic "Quasiparticle" Reproduces Like a Living Cell

Splitting Off For the first time, scientists have found that a bizarre subatomic "quasiparticle," called a skyrmion, that's capable of reproducing itself in an unusual way. A skyrmion is considered a quasiparticle because it acts like a subatomic particle in many ways, but doesn't have any mass. In an experiment probing how skyrmions are formed that was published in the journal NANO Letters , a t

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Adult stem cell study shows fish oil may help with depression

A study published in Molecular Psychiatry shows that patient-derived adult stem cells can be used to model major depressive disorder and test how a patient may respond to medication and that fish oil, when tested in the model, created an antidepressant response.

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Utah's arches continue to whisper their secrets

Two new studies from University of Utah researchers show what can be learned from a short seismic checkup of natural rock arches and how erosion sculpts some arches — like the iconic Delicate Arch — into shapes that lend added strength.

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A novel mechanism that triggers a cellular immune response

Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine present comprehensive evidence that supports a novel trigger for a cell-mediated response and propose a mechanism for its action.

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Chronic exposure to interferons being tested for COVID-19 therapy may increase the risk of bacterial

Two separate studies in mice suggest that a class of interferons being evaluated in clinical trials as a therapy for COVID-19 may increase susceptibility to bacterial infections, depending on how long patients are exposed to it, and when they receive it.

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The SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain may provide a specific and sensitive target for population

A new analysis of blood sera taken from 63 COVID-19 patients, 71 controls, and various coronavirus-exposed animals provides strong support for the use of the SARS-CoV-2 virus' receptor-binding domain (RBD) as an antigen for reliable tests to detect antibodies to the virus.

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A protein that helps to fight viruses can also block lung damage repair

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have found that a protein which is initially helpful in the body's immune response to a virus, can later interfere with the repair of lung tissue. The work, published in Science, highlights the need for careful consideration regarding the use of this protein to treat viruses, including coronavirus.

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Tiny pump builds polyrotaxanes with precision

Northwestern University researchers have developed the most precise way to build polyrotaxanes by using two artificial molecular pumps to install rings onto each end of a polymer string.

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Animal territorial behavior could play larger role in disease spread than formerly thought

Using a mathematical model, linking animal movement and the spread of disease, a new study finds that territorial behaviors in animals, such as a puma using its scent to mark its domain, may help to decrease the severity of a potential disease outbreak — but not without the cost of increased persistence of the disease within the population.

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Clues to ageing come to light in vivid snapshots of brain cell links

Striking images of some five billion brain cell connections have been created by scientists, mapping a lifetime's changes across the brain in minute detail.

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Where's Airborne Plastic? Everywhere, Scientists Find.

There's "no nook or cranny" on the planet where it doesn't end up, the lead researcher on a new study said.

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Eva Konrad Hawkins, Marine Scientist Who Fled Hungary, Dies at 90

She lived through the Holocaust, Communism and the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. She died of Covid-19.

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Researchers mimic nature for fast, colorful 3D printing

Brilliantly colored chameleons, butterflies, opals – and now some 3D-printed materials — reflect color by using nanoscale structures called photonic crystals. A new study demonstrates how a modified 3D-printing process provides a versatile approach to producing multiple colors from a single ink.

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Newly synthesized fungal compound can switch on a self-destruct button for cancer

Cancers cells use a special technique to propagate; they delete their 'programmed death' gene through mutation, 'forget' to die when their lifetime is over, and continue to grow instead. A research team has developed a method through which a fungal compound capable of rearming the self-destruct gene in certain cancer cells can be artificially produced in marketable quantities, providing a potentia

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Roadkill study identifies animals most at risk in Europe

New method used to predict how many birds and mammals are being killed on European roads, as well as identifying species whose long-term survival is threatened by roads. Roadkill risk is not currently considered when assessing impact of new roads on wildlife, meaning conservation efforts may currently be misplaced.

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Ten rings on one axle

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Robot on a wire

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Autism and muscles

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Thousands of Tons of Microplastics Are Falling from the Sky

New research helps unravel how vast amounts of plastic particles travel—both regionally and globally—on the wind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sea Otters Can Be Money Makers, But Not Everyone Benefits

The return of sea otters to historic habitats can restore ecosystems and bring economic benefits, but hungry otters can also threaten the food security of remote indigenous communities. (Image credit: Ted S. Warren/AP)

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News at a glance

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Discounting lives

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Ten rings on one axle

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Robot on a wire

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Autism and muscles

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Big cat genomics

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Membrane-proximal F-actin restricts local membrane protrusions and directs cell migration

Cell migration is driven by local membrane protrusion through directed polymerization of F-actin at the front. However, F-actin next to the plasma membrane also tethers the membrane and thus resists outgoing protrusions. Here, we developed a fluorescent reporter to monitor changes in the density of membrane-proximal F-actin (MPA) during membrane protrusion and cell migration. Unlike the total F-a

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Structures of cell wall arabinosyltransferases with the anti-tuberculosis drug ethambutol

The arabinosyltransferases EmbA, EmbB, and EmbC are involved in Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall synthesis and are recognized as targets for the anti-tuberculosis drug ethambutol. In this study, we determined cryo–electron microscopy and x-ray crystal structures of mycobacterial EmbA-EmbB and EmbC-EmbC complexes in the presence of their glycosyl donor and acceptor substrates and with ethambut

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Far-field excitation of single graphene plasmon cavities with ultracompressed mode volumes

Acoustic graphene plasmons are highly confined electromagnetic modes carrying large momentum and low loss in the mid-infrared and terahertz spectra. However, until now they have been restricted to micrometer-scale areas, reducing their confinement potential by several orders of magnitude. Using a graphene-based magnetic resonator, we realized single, nanometer-scale acoustic graphene plasmon cavi

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Sequencing seismograms: A panoptic view of scattering in the core-mantle boundary region

Scattering of seismic waves can reveal subsurface structures but usually in a piecemeal way focused on specific target areas. We used a manifold learning algorithm called "the Sequencer" to simultaneously analyze thousands of seismograms of waves diffracting along the core-mantle boundary and obtain a panoptic view of scattering across the Pacific region. In nearly half of the diffracting wavefor

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Chloride-mediated selective electrosynthesis of ethylene and propylene oxides at high current density

Chemicals manufacturing consumes large amounts of energy and is responsible for a substantial portion of global carbon emissions. Electrochemical systems that produce the desired compounds by using renewable electricity offer a route to lower carbon emissions in the chemicals sector. Ethylene oxide is among the world's most abundantly produced commodity chemicals because of its importance in the

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h/e oscillations in interlayer transport of delafossites

Microstructures can be carefully designed to reveal the quantum phase of the wave-like nature of electrons in a metal. Here, we report phase-coherent oscillations of out-of-plane magnetoresistance in the layered delafossites PdCoO 2 and PtCoO 2 . The oscillation period is equivalent to that determined by the magnetic flux quantum, h/e , threading an area defined by the atomic interlayer separatio

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Pervasive ice sheet mass loss reflects competing ocean and atmosphere processes

Quantifying changes in Earth's ice sheets and identifying the climate drivers are central to improving sea level projections. We provide unified estimates of grounded and floating ice mass change from 2003 to 2019 using NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) and ICESat-2 satellite laser altimetry. Our data reveal patterns likely linked to competing climate processes: Ice loss fro

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Cascading social-ecological costs and benefits triggered by a recovering keystone predator

Predator recovery often leads to ecosystem change that can trigger conflicts with more recently established human activities. In the eastern North Pacific, recovering sea otters are transforming coastal systems by reducing populations of benthic invertebrates and releasing kelp forests from grazing pressure. These changes threaten established shellfish fisheries and modify a variety of other ecos

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A precise polyrotaxane synthesizer

Mechanically interlocked molecules are likely candidates for the design and synthesis of artificial molecular machines. Although polyrotaxanes have already found niche applications in exotic materials with specialized mechanical properties, efficient synthetic protocols to produce them with precise numbers of rings encircling their polymer dumbbells are still lacking. We report the assembly line–

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Disordered proteins follow diverse transition paths as they fold and bind to a partner

Transition paths of macromolecular conformational changes such as protein folding are predicted to be heterogeneous. However, experimental characterization of the diversity of transition paths is extremely challenging because it requires measuring more than one distance during individual transitions. In this work, we used fast three-color single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer spectro

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Plastic rain in protected areas of the United States

Eleven billion metric tons of plastic are projected to accumulate in the environment by 2025. Because plastics are persistent, they fragment into pieces that are susceptible to wind entrainment. Using high-resolution spatial and temporal data, we tested whether plastics deposited in wet versus dry conditions have distinct atmospheric life histories. Further, we report on the rates and sources of

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Temporal integration of mitogen history in mother cells controls proliferation of daughter cells

Multicellular organisms use mitogens to regulate cell proliferation, but how fluctuating mitogenic signals are converted into proliferation-quiescence decisions is poorly understood. In this work, we combined live-cell imaging with temporally controlled perturbations to determine the time scale and mechanisms underlying this system in human cells. Contrary to the textbook model that cells sense m

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Very fast CRISPR on demand

CRISPR-Cas systems provide versatile tools for programmable genome editing. Here, we developed a caged RNA strategy that allows Cas9 to bind DNA but not cleave until light-induced activation. This approach, referred to as very fast CRISPR (vfCRISPR), creates double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the submicrometer and second scales. Synchronized cleavage improved kinetic analysis of DNA repair, revealing

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A genetic mechanism for sexual dichromatism in birds

Sexual dichromatism, a difference in coloration between males and females, may be due to sexual selection for ornamentation and mate choice. Here, we show that carotenoid-based dichromatism in mosaic canaries, a hybrid phenotype that arises in offspring of the sexually dichromatic red siskin and monochromatic canaries, is controlled by the gene that encodes the carotenoid-cleaving enzyme β-carote

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A noncompeting pair of human neutralizing antibodies block COVID-19 virus binding to its receptor ACE2

Neutralizing antibodies could potentially be used as antivirals against the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Here, we report isolation of four human-origin monoclonal antibodies from a convalescent patient, all of which display neutralization abilities. The antibodies B38 and H4 block binding between the spike glycoprotein receptor binding domain (RBD) of the virus and the cellular r

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Linking glutamate receptor movements and synapse function

Regulation of neurotransmitter receptor content at synapses is achieved through a dynamic equilibrium between biogenesis and degradation pathways, receptor stabilization at synaptic sites, and receptor trafficking in and out synapses. In the past 20 years, the movements of receptors to and from synapses have emerged as a series of highly regulated processes that mediate postsynaptic plasticity. O

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NIH strengthens policies to alert agency to sexual harassment by grantees

Institutions must report when an investigator's status changes because of harassment findings or allegations

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Simulations reveal interplay between scent marking and disease spread

In a new mathematical model that bridges animal movement and disease spread, territorial behaviors decreased the severity of potential disease outbreaks—but at the cost of increased disease persistence. Lauren White of the University of Maryland's National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, Annapolis, MD, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Recovery of sea otter populations yields more benefits than costs

Since their reintroduction to the Pacific coast in the 1970s, the sea otters' rapid recovery and voracious appetite for tasty shellfish such as urchins, clams and crabs has brought them into conflict with coastal communities and fishers, who rely on the same valuable fisheries for food and income.

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Plastic Rain Is the New Acid Rain

Researchers find that over 1,000 metric tons of microplastic fall on 11 protected areas in the US annually, equivalent to over 120 million plastic water bottles.

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People with diabetes are at greater risk of bone fractures

People living with diabetes are at greater risk of bone fractures, new research led by the University of Sheffield has found.

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Computer algorithms find tumors' molecular weak spots

Approach to identifying the best drug targets gets critical test

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Simulations reveal interplay between scent marking and disease spread

In a new mathematical model that bridges animal movement and disease spread, territorial behaviors decreased the severity of potential disease outbreaks—but at the cost of increased disease persistence. Lauren White of the University of Maryland's National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, Annapolis, MD, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Smallest cavity for light realized by graphene plasmons

Miniaturization has enabled technology like smartphones, health watches, medical probes and nano-satellites, all unthinkable a couple decades ago. Just imagine that in the course of 60 years, the transistor has shrunk from the size of your palm to 14 nanometers in dimension, 1000 times smaller than the diameter of a hair.

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Tiny pump builds polyrotaxanes with precision

Northwestern University researchers have developed the most precise way to build polyrotaxanes, a mechanically locked polymer for slide-ring gels, battery electrode materials and drug-delivery platforms.

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Scientists detect unexpected widespread structures near Earth's core

University of Maryland geophysicists analyzed thousands of recordings of seismic waves, sound waves traveling through the Earth, to identify echoes from the boundary between Earth's molten core and the solid mantle layer above it. The echoes revealed more widespread, heterogenous structures—areas of unusually dense, hot rock—at the core-mantle boundary than previously known.

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Recovery of sea otter populations yields more benefits than costs

Since their reintroduction to the Pacific coast in the 1970s, the sea otters' rapid recovery and voracious appetite for tasty shellfish such as urchins, clams and crabs has brought them into conflict with coastal communities and fishers, who rely on the same valuable fisheries for food and income.

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More than 1000 tons of plastic rains into western US protected lands annually

Utah State University Assistant Professor Janice Brahney and her team used high-resolution atmospheric deposition data and identified samples of microplastics and other particulates collected over 14 months in 11 national parks and wilderness areas. The researchers identified plastic and polymers' composition to identify sources of plastic emitted into the atmosphere and track its movement and fal

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Trump Corrupts Everyone Around Him

By the evening of Monday, June 1, General Mark Milley must have thought that he'd won the fight. That's Milley's job—he's the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff—and throughout the day he'd been battling with fellow Trump-administration officials over how to handle protests in Washington, D.C. The president and some of his aides wanted to invoke the Insurrection Act, an 1807 law that allows the

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The Big Story: What It Means to 'Defund the Police'

Join Atlantic staff writers Annie Lowrey and Adam Harris for a conversation about the current state of policing in America, how the U.S. system compares to other countries, and what changes might be on the horizon.

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Richmond's Confederate Monuments Were Used to Sell a Segregated Neighborhood

On May 29, 1890, roughly 150,000 people gathered for the dedication of the Robert E. Lee monument in Richmond. It was an opportunity to celebrate a man who many believed embodied the virtues of the old South, the "Christian Warrior" who bravely fought to the bitter end for the Confederacy's Lost Cause. The Richmond industrialist and former Confederate staff officer Archer Anderson predicted that

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Astronomers Find Evidence of Supernova Just 600 Light-Years from Earth

Astronomers have found many awe-inspiring objects in the cosmos, but a pair of astronomers 20 years ago found something just plain confusing. They spotted a straight line of ionized gas in the direction of Ursa Major, which was never really explained to everyone's satisfaction. A new analysis of this line involving astronomers from all over the world has revealed it is actually part of a much lar

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Thousands of Tons of Microplastics Are Falling from the Sky

New research helps unravel how vast amounts of plastic particles travel—both regionally and globally—on the wind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Covid-19 news: NHS England reveals extent of disruption to services

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

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Working Scientist podcast: How films and festivals can showcase your science

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01724-8 Pakinam Amer explores how science communication translates to film, comedy clubs, and virtual space clubs.

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New distance measurements bolster challenge to basic model of universe

A cosmic measurement technique independent of all others adds strong evidence pointing to a problem with the current theoretical model describing the composition and evolution of the Universe.

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Can gut microbiome alter drug safety and efficacy?

Researchers have developed an approach for studying how the gut microbiome chemically alters oral medications, unlocking possibilities for improving efficacy, reducing side effects, and creating drugs personalized to an individual's microbiome.

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COVID-19 threatens the entire nervous system

A new review of neurological symptoms of COVID-19 patients in current scientific literature reveals the disease poses a global threat to the entire nervous system. About half of hospitalized patients have neurological manifestations of COVID-19, which include headache, dizziness, decreased alertness, difficulty concentrating, disorders of smell and taste, seizures, strokes, weakness and muscle pai

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Treat early or wait? Experts ponder best way to manage milder forms of spinal muscular atrophy

The advent of therapeutic interventions for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has increased the importance of presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment. When to start treatment in children with less severe disease remains controversial. Now, in a report published in the Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases, German researchers argue for an earlier start of treatment to prevent permanent nerve damage, challen

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Soil biology research can help create a more sustainable future

Soil biodiversity should be incorporated into the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals and other global sustainability targets, researchers said.

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News reports of education 'achievement gaps' may perpetuate stereotypes of Black Americans

A new study finds that TV news reporting about racial achievement gaps led viewers to report exaggerated stereotypes of Black Americans as lacking education and may have increased implicit stereotyping of Black students as less competent than White students.

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New study confirms superiority of open surgery for early-stage cervical cancer

A study led by researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center confirms that minimally invasive surgery for early-stage cervical cancer is linked to higher rates of recurrence and death compared with open surgery.

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Adding noise for completely secure communication

How can we protect communications against 'eavesdropping' if we don't trust the devices used in the process? This is one of the main questions in quantum cryptography research. Researchers at the University of Basel and ETH Zurich have succeeded in laying the theoretical groundwork for a communication protocol that guarantees one hundred percent privacy.

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Shift to online consultations helps patients with chronic pain receive support in lockdown

Academics and practitioners from the Centre for Pain Research at the University of Bath (UK) have been active in ensuring those with debilitating chronic pain conditions continue to receive support throughout lockdown, including by championing virtual consultations.

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Three stages to COVID-19 brain damage identified by top neurologists in Journal of Alzheimer Disease paper

The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease has just published a paper with a comprehensive review of the COVID-19's effect on the nervous system which classifies brain damage caused by COVID-19 into three stages.

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Promising path found for COVID-19 therapeutics

A team of researchers at the University of Georgia has successfully demonstrated that a set of drug-like small molecules can block the activity of a key SARS-CoV-2 protein — providing a promising path for new COVID-19 therapeutics.

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Boeing's Spaceship Cockpit Looks Strikingly Different Than SpaceX's

A decade ago, NASA challenged private vendors to develop concepts for spacecraft that could carry US and international astronauts to and from the International Space Station. In 2014, it awarded those contracts to Space and Boeing. Ten years later, SpaceX already has a successful launch under its belt thanks to its futuristic Crew Dragon vehicle and Falcon 9 rocket. But Boeing has been struggling

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Lab turns fluorescent tags into cancer killers

A Rice University lab's project to make better fluorescent tags has turned into a method to kill tumors. Switching one atom in the tag does the trick.

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Rice engineers offer smart, timely ideas for AI bottlenecks

Rice University researchers have demonstrated methods for both designing data-centric computing hardware and co-designing hardware with machine-learning algorithms that together can improve energy efficiency in artificial intelligence hardware by as much as two orders of magnitude.

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Neuroscientists discover neural circuits that control hibernation-like behaviors in mice

Harvard Medical School neuroscientists have discovered a population of neurons in the hypothalamus that controls hibernation-like behavior, or torpor, in mice, revealing for the first time the neural circuits that regulate this state. By better understanding these processes in mice and other animal models, the authors envision the possibility of one day working toward inducing torpor in humans.

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Refugee children get better health, nutrition via e-vouchers

Electronic food vouchers provided young Rohingya children in Bangladeshi refugee camps with better health and nutrition than direct food assistance, according to new research led by Cornell University, in conjunction with the International Food Policy Research Institute.

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A vitamin A analog may help treat diabetic retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among the working-age population. A new study in The American Journal of Pathology reports that visual function in diabetic mice was significantly improved after treatment with a single dose of visual chromophore 9-cis-retinal, a vitamin A analog that can form a visual pigment in the retina cells, thereby pr

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Researchers model human stem cells to identify degeneration in glaucoma

More than 3 million Americans have glaucoma, a serious eye condition causing vision loss. Using human stem cell models, researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine found they could analyze deficits within cells damaged by glaucoma, with the potential to use this information to develop new strategies to slow the disease process.

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Do you want a cheerleader or a critic? The Voice shows how we really choose our mentors.

We think that we will choose our personal and professional advisors based on reasoned criteria about their expertise, competence and experience. In practice, we go more with our gut than our head, choosing the person who shows enthusiasm for us and our goals. A team of researchers has used the popular singing competition show The Voice to prove it.

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Rice lab turns fluorescent tags into cancer killers

Fluorophores with one oxygen atom replaced by a sulfur atom can be triggered with light to create reactive oxygen species within cancer cells, killing them.

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Fentanyl tops list of drugs found in Baltimore overdose patients

Hospital testing for illicit drug use does not typically include fentanyl, however, a new University of Maryland study found after expanding testing, that fentanyl, a potent synthetic opioid linked to most fatal overdoses in Maryland, tops the list of drugs detected in overdose patients at two Baltimore hospital emergency departments. The researchers suggest the addition of fentanyl to routine dru

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Fra Einstein-teori til virkelighed: Sjældent superatom skabt ombord på rumstation

Normalt er atomer usynlige, men superatomet kan næsten ses med det blotte øje.

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Pretty in pink: India crater lake changes colour overnight

A crater lake in India's western Maharashtra state has turned pink overnight, delighting nature enthusiasts and surprising experts who attributed it to changing salinity levels and the presence of algae in the water.

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Meteorologen: "Midsommar kommer bli varm"

SVT:s meteorolog Pererik Åberg ger en prognos över midsommarvädret i Sverige och förklarar dessutom varför den är så osäker. Men en sak verkar vara säker: det kommer att bli varmt.

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Daily briefing: Coronavirus vaccine — where we are now

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01775-x Catch up on the status of the more than 135 vaccines in development against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, ponder the biology and physics of free will and learn how scientists helped win the battle over evolution in US classrooms.

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Plastic in the deep sea: Virtually unaltered after a quarter of a century

Plastic products are durable. On one hand this is a great advantage, but on the other hand, if the plastic enters the environment, this advantage turns into a problem. According to current knowledge, natural degradation, as with organic matter, does not take place. It can only be estimated, how long plastic debris actually remains in the environment. Corresponding long-term experiments are lacking

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Insouciance and mismanagement of Covid-19 has cost so many lives in the UK | Letters

Readers respond to Prof Neil Ferguson's estimate that a lockdown a week earlier could have saved half the lives lost to coronavirus On Wednesday, Prof Neil Ferguson, a former member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage), said a lockdown one week earlier could have saved half of all lives lost to Covid-19 ( Coronavirus: enforcing UK lockdown one week earlier 'could have saved 20,

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Boris Johnson's wild idea to reopen the zoos | Brief letters

Zoos | Hairdressers | Angela Merkel | Fred Trueman | 'ee' endings | Psychedelic therapy "The reopening of safari parks and zoos will help provide families with more options to spend time outdoors" said a Downing Street official ( English zoos and safari parks to reopen from 15 June , 9 June). Well yes – families who can afford the entry costs and, in the case of safari parks, have a car to get th

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Verden er mere grå og kedelig, end du tror

PLUS. Vi overser i stor stil farvefejl og -mangler i helt almindelige situationer. Måske fylder hjernen selv farver på fra erfaringen.

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Israeli scientists produce energy from plants

Israeli scientists say they have produced hydrogen from plants in a development that they hope could eventually lead to using vegetation to produce electricity.

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Ohio State University soil professor gets World Food Prize

A soil scientist whose research led to improved food production and a better understanding of how atmospheric carbon can be held in the soil to help combat climate change was named this year's recipient of the World Food Prize on Thursday.

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Israeli scientists produce energy from plants

Israeli scientists say they have produced hydrogen from plants in a development that they hope could eventually lead to using vegetation to produce electricity.

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The Curious Comforts of a YouTube Show About Group Therapy

Eight patients sit in a circle in a sunlit room. "You seem to carry so much weight around—the weight of women," Frank, a 50-ish newspaper reporter, tells Pam, a mid-30s comparative-lit professor, as their psychoanalyst looks on approvingly. Pam's feminism, Frank continues, "feels less empowering and more like a burden." But that's too much for Manny, a carpenter. "When you're not a white man," he

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Cost, distance from hospitals present barriers to surgical care

A Rutgers-led study in Colombia can help health care providers across the globe develop plans to improve surgical care access in their regions.

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Health care workers at Rush invited to participate in national PCORnet study of hydroxychloroquine

Rush University Medical Center has opened enrollment for a new clinical trial investigating whether the drug hydroxychloroquine is better than a placebo in preventing COVID-19 infection in healthy people working in health care settings.

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Warburg effect: Sugar-tagging helps drug compounds to target human prostate cancer cells

Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), together with German and Russian colleagues, have developed a lead compound to fight chemotherapy-resistant prostate cancer. The original design comes out as scientists combine biologically active molecules from the chemically modified pigment of sea urchins with glucose molecules to deliver the active drug substance inward the tumor cells. A re

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Opposition to sexual- and gender-minority rights linked to support for Christian dominance

Many Christian and political conservatives in the U.S. support legislation to deny sexual and gender minorities the rights most Americans enjoy: unfettered access to jobs, housing, services and public facilities; the opportunity to marry as they choose; and the right to adopt a child. A new study offers insight into the factors that correlate with support for such laws.

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Thematic package: Corona and sustainability

The COVID-19 pandemic remains an important topic throughout the world. A number of contributions on the IASS website address the pandemic and its consequences from the perspective of sustainability. We would be happy to put you in contact with the respective authors.

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Dopamine signaling allows neural circuits to generate coordinated behaviors

As part of the study, the MIT research team invented a new open-source microscopy platform complete with a parts list and online instructions for other labs to build their own.

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The disease pyramid: Environment, pathogen, individual and microbiome

Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), the Université de Toulouse and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) show how the microbial colonization of the organism influences the interactions between living organisms, the environment and pathogens, using amphibians like frogs as examples. This is basic research for health prophylaxis.

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Dopamine signaling allows neural circuits to generate coordinated behaviors

For a nematode worm, a big lawn of the bacteria that it eats is a great place for it to disperse its eggs so that each hatchling can emerge into a nutritive environment. That's why when a worm speedily roams about a food patch it methodically lays its eggs as it goes. A new study by neuroscientists at MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory investigates this example of action coordination—

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Ancient footprints could be from a crocodile that walked on two legs

Ancient footprints once thought to belong to a pterosaur may in fact have been made by an ancient relative of crocodiles that walked on two feet

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The disease pyramid: Environment, pathogen, individual and microbiome

Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), the Université de Toulouse and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) show how the microbial colonization of the organism influences the interactions between living organisms, the environment and pathogens, using amphibians like frogs as examples. This is basic research for health prophylaxis.

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Dopamine signaling allows neural circuits to generate coordinated behaviors

For a nematode worm, a big lawn of the bacteria that it eats is a great place for it to disperse its eggs so that each hatchling can emerge into a nutritive environment. That's why when a worm speedily roams about a food patch it methodically lays its eggs as it goes. A new study by neuroscientists at MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory investigates this example of action coordination—

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Global air pollution maps now available

A new online platform that allows for the tracking of air pollution worldwide is now available to the public. The maps, which use data from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite, show the averaged nitrogen dioxide concentrations using a 14-day moving average. The maps not only show changes over time on a global scale, but also provide the possibility for users to zoom in to areas of interest, for e

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Novel noncovalent bond blocks repulsive odor of isocyanides

Isocyanides are an important class of organic compounds owing to a wide range of chemical transformations they can undergo. These molecules are employed for the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals, polymers, catalysts, and luminophores. Widespread use of isocyanides in chemistry and chemical industry is, however, hampered by their extremely foul odor, described by some researchers as "mind-boggli

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Presence of devastating pest confirmed on Socotra Island

CABI scientist Dr. Arne Witt has led an international team of researchers who have confirmed for the first time the presence of the date pest red palm weevil on Socotra Island, Yemen, putting the livelihoods of residents at risk.

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Presence of devastating pest confirmed on Socotra Island

CABI scientist Dr. Arne Witt has led an international team of researchers who have confirmed for the first time the presence of the date pest red palm weevil on Socotra Island, Yemen, putting the livelihoods of residents at risk.

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Tropical disease in medieval Europe revises the history of a pathogen related to syphilis

Mass burials are common remnants of the many plague outbreaks that ravaged Medieval Europe. A number of these graveyards are well documented in historical sources, but the locations of most, and the victims they contain, have been lost to the pages of time. In Vilnius, Lithuania, one such cemetery was found in a typical way: Accidental discovery during a routine city construction project.

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Army researchers find new ways to test swarming drones

The US Army has implemented a one-of-a-kind outdoor system to test swarming drones — with a capacity of more than 1,500 times the volume of a typical testing facility.

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Sound waves transport droplets for rewritable lab-on-a-chip devices

Engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a versatile microfluidic lab-on-a-chip that uses sound waves to create tunnels in oil to digitally manipulate and transport droplets. The technology could form the basis of a small-scale, programmable, rewritable biomedical chip that is completely reusable for disparate purposes from on-site diagnostics to laboratory-based research.

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Political 'oil spill': Polarization is growing stronger and getting stickier

Experts have documented that political polarization is intensifying in the United States. However, a Penn State sociologist now suggests that this separation isn't just more intense, but it is also growing broader, coagulating into an ideological slick of opinions.

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COVID-19 triage decisions should 'ignore life-years saved,' writes bioethicist in Medical Care

How do we decide which patients with COVID-19 should get priority for lifesaving ventilators and ICU beds? Writing in the July issue of Medical Care, a prominent bioethicist argues that COVID-19 triage strategies should focus on saving lives, rather than prioritizing life-years saved. Medical Care is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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The disease pyramid: Environment, pathogen, individual and microbiome

Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), the Université de Toulouse and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) show how the microbial colonisation of the organism influences the interactions between living organisms, the environment and pathogens, using amphibians like frogs as examples. This is basic research for health prophylaxis.

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New distance measurements bolster challenge to basic model of universe

A cosmic measurement technique independent of all others adds strong evidence pointing to a problem with the current theoretical model describing the composition and evolution of the Universe.

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Novel noncovalent bond blocks repulsive odor of isocyanides

Researchers at St. Petersburg State University have developed a method for eliminating the overpoweringly unpleasant odor of isocyanides, an important class of organic compounds.

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How Dashcams help and hinder forensics

Dashcams are vital for helping police investigate car incidents, however the way the footage is submitted to police, managed and processed can cause problems. A researcher at WMG, University of Warwick has assessed seven different types of dashcams' SD storage systems to see how they help and hinder digital forensics.

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A breakthrough in developing multi-watt terahertz lasers

Terahertz lasers could soon have their moment. Emitting radiation that sits somewhere between microwaves and infrared light along the electromagnetic spectrum, terahertz lasers have been the focus of intense study due to their ability to penetrate common packaging materials such as plastics, fabrics, and cardboard and be used for identification and detection of various chemicals and biomolecular s

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A 2010 Scientific Paper Predicted That 2020 Would Be a Shitshow

Paging Nostradamus The year 2020 has heralded a seemingly endless onslaught of political, economic, and societal chaos. But surprisingly, one scientist predicted our particularly hellish year a full decade ago. University of Connecticut researcher Peter Turchin published an article in the journal Nature, back in 2010, in which he predicted that social and economic turmoil would come to a boiling

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A new character for Pokemon? Novel endemic dogfish shark species discovered from Japan

Newly discovered creatures can often be as impressive and exciting as the ones from the Japanese movies and shows. Many of those fictional characters, including inhabitants of the famous Pokémon universe, might have their analogues among the real animals native to Japan. Maybe, a new species of the dogfish shark published in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution is also "a real Poké

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The Millennial Mental-Health Crisis

Alec Soth/Magnum If you are having thoughts of suicide, please know that you are not alone. If you are in danger of acting on suicidal thoughts, call 911. For support and resources, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text 741-741 for the Crisis Text Line. T hroughout the summer of 2012, Tylor Morgan would call his sister Lacey at night and beg her to come over and

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Research with industry executives reveals impact of COVID-19 on air transport sector

Cranfield-led research has assessed the initial impact of COVID-19 on air transport and found that it is likely to lead to a smaller, consolidated sector in the future.

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A new character for Pokemon? Novel endemic dogfish shark species discovered from Japan

Newly discovered creatures can often be as impressive and exciting as the ones from the Japanese movies and shows. Many of those fictional characters, including inhabitants of the famous Pokémon universe, might have their analogues among the real animals native to Japan. Maybe, a new species of the dogfish shark published in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution is also "a real Poké

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New insight into the Great Dying

A new study shows for the first time that the collapse of terrestrial ecosystems during Earth's most deadly mass extinction event was directly responsible for disrupting ocean chemistry.

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Lovende resultater af ny behandling for mastocytose

Fase 2 resultater peger på, at tyrosinkinasehæmmeren avapritinib kan være effektivt til at hjælpe patienter med den sjældne, men alvorlige sygdom mastocytose.

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Why children avoid the worst coronavirus complications might lie in their arteries

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01692-z Evidence is mounting that healthy blood vessels protect children from serious effects of COVID-19, such as stroke.

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Living with ADHD: how I learned to make distraction work for me

Even today, 20 years after my childhood diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), I am still keenly aware of how my attention wavers, lapses or holds differently from that of most people. I'm prone to experiencing 'blank' patches in conversation, when I suddenly realise I have no recollection of the past 30 or so seconds of what's been said, as if someone has skipped forward t

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Past stressful experiences do not create resilience to future trauma, new study finds

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, new research finds that past stressors and traumatic events increase vulnerability to mental illnesses, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD).

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Better reading proficiency linked to fewer youth homicides

A good education system has long been linked with providing opportunity for people to get better jobs and escape poverty. However, less is known about the impact of education on youth violence.

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Time-saving high-intensity workouts can benefit people with spinal cord injuries

Research from the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University has found that the practical advantages of high-intensity interval training (HIIT), or short bursts of all-out exercise, could be especially beneficial for people who have experienced spinal cord injuries (SCI).

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Lightning in a (nano)bottle: new supercapacitor opens door to better wearable electronics

Researchers from Skoltech, Aalto University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have designed a high-performance, low-cost, environmentally friendly, and stretchable supercapacitor that can potentially be used in wearable electronics

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Landmark study shows inflammation after meals varies dramatically among healthy adults

Researchers led by King's College London announced today the first published results from PREDICT, the largest ongoing nutritional study of its kind.

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CABI confirms presence of devastating date pest the red palm weevil on Socotra Island

CABI scientist Dr Arne Witt has led an international team of researchers who have confirmed for the first time the presence of the date pest red palm weevil on Socotra Island, Yemen, putting the livelihoods of residents at risk.The researchers say more surveys are needed to determine the exact distribution of the palm pest on Socotra and what impact current invasions are having on date production.

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Scientists propose data encoding method for the 6G standard

A group of scientists from ITMO University have demonstrated the possibility of modifying terahertz pulses in order to use them for data transmission.

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RCSI researchers find potential new way to improve treatment for common bleeding disorder

Scientists have found a potential new way to promote blood clotting that could be used to help develop treatments for Von Willebrand Disease, the most common genetic bleeding disorder.

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Twisted microfiber's network responses to water vapor

Researchers at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST): graduate student Kulisara Budpud, Assoc. Prof. Kosuke Okeyoshi, Dr. Maiko Okajima and, Prof. Tatsuo Kaneko reveal a unique polysaccharide fiber in a twisted structure forming under drying process which showed spring-like behavior. The spring-like behavior of twisted structures is practically used as a reinforced structure i

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Chemotherapy/immunotherapy combo shows promise for first-line treatment of mesothelioma

Inoperable malignant pleural mesothelioma, is a rare and aggressive cancer of the protective lining of the lungs, or pleura, often caused by exposure to asbestos.

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Many children in intensive care may not be getting rehabilitation therapy, study shows

Adult patients in hospital intensive care units (ICUs) are often given rehabilitation therapy and urged to keep mobile from an early point in their hospital stays.

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Spanish archaeologist sentenced for faking Basque finds

'Third-century' artefacts with hieroglyphics and Basque words referred to non-existent gods and to René Descartes A Spanish archaeologist whose staggering discoveries included one of the earliest representations of the crucifixion and proof that the written Basque language was centuries older than previously thought has been found guilty of faking the finds. The saga began in June 2006 when Elise

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The Removal of 'Gone with the Wind' From HBO Max Isn't Censorship

The streaming service's decision to temporarily pull the film from its roster isn't suppression—it's an opportunity to recontextualize.

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Tropical disease in medieval Europe revises the history of a pathogen related to syphilis

Plague was commonplace in medieval times, so finding its victims in a 15th century Lithuanian graveyard was no surprise. However, discovering one woman with a second disease, yaws — a close relative of modern syphilis found today only in tropical settings — was something researchers did not expect. The current study's findings are changing perspectives on the evolutionary history of a disease fa

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Ancient origin for key hormone system: Sea cucumbers

A key set of proteins that help regulate hormones necessary for many essential functions in humans and other vertebrates have ancient origins in much simpler creatures such as sea cucumbers, says a new study.

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Methods to inactivate and safely study SARS-CoV-2

Virologists have identified detailed methods of how to perform research on SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, including procedures that effectively inactivate the virus to enable safe study of infected cells.

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Att bli sedd som en hel människa trots psykossjukdom

Att bli betraktad som en hel människa, både av andra och sig själv, är det som möjliggör en hälsosam livsstil för personer med psykossjukdomar, såsom schizofreni, visar en ny avhandling från Högskolan i Halmstad. Med egen erfarenhet som specialistsjuksköterska inom psykiatrin, har Marjut Blomqvist i sin avhandling undersökt vilka effekter individanpassad levnadsvaneintervention, har fått för pers

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Coronavirus Vaccine Update, June 11

Since I did a monoclonal antibody update in the last post , here's one on the vaccine front, where there is a lot of news – and where there are a lot of issues coming up similar to the ones with the antibodies as well. The last vaccine update post was here . What we're seeing now is the plan for entering large-scale human trials. The Wall Street Journal 's Peter Loftus broke the news of the overa

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Ny metode til at korrigere for udsving i pollenmængder

Statistisk model giver bedre grundlag for at sammenholde pollenallergikeres symptomer og medicinering med mængden af pollen.

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Strength training benefits patients with cirrhosis

Three hours of weekly strength training combined with protein supplements leads to both bigger and stronger muscles in patients with cirrhosis. This is shown by a new study from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital.

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Antihypotensive agent disrupts the immune system in sepsis

Patients who go into shock caused by sepsis (septic shock) are treated with the antihypotensive agent norepinephrine. Researchers from Radboud university medical center published results in today's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine revealing that its use is not without drawbacks: the drug disrupts the immune system and increases susceptibility to infections. This may have

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Research with industry executives reveals impact of COVID-19 on air transport sector

Research has assessed the initial impact of COVID-19 on air transport and found that it is likely to lead to a smaller, consolidated sector in the future.

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Bacteria in Chinese pickles can prevent cavities — Ben-Gurion University study

Prof. Ariel Kushmaro of the BGU Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering and the Chinese research team evaluated 14 different types of Sichuan pickles from southwest China. They extracted 54 different strains of Lactobacilli and found that one, L. plantarum K41, significantly reduced the incidence and severity of cavities. K41 was also highly tolerant of acids and s

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A breakthrough in developing multi-watt terahertz lasers

Researchers from Lehigh University are reporting another terahertz technology breakthrough: they have developed a new phase-locking technique for plasmonic lasers and, through its use, achieved a record-high power output for terahertz lasers. Their laser produced the highest radiative efficiency for any single-wavelength semiconductor quantum cascade laser. These results are explained in a paper,

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Mental disorders in the family affects the treatment of people with bipolar disorder

Patients with bipolar disorder who have multiple family members with severe mental disorders, are more difficult to treat and require more medicine. But if they receive an intensive course of treatment, the effect of this is just as good as for patients who do not have a family history of severe mental disorders.

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Nickel-based catalysts tested at Boca de Jaruco oilfield in Cuba

In this publication, the authors studied transformations of asphaltenes, the compounds determining the viscosity of petroleum. The provided catalyst proved to be effective for in-situ conversion of asphaltenes.

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Camelina sativa oil and fatty fish have positive effects on lipid metabolism

Camelina sativa oil and fatty fish are rich in polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids, but their health benefits seem to differ. A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that Camelina sativa oil reduces the formation of fatty acid derivatives that may be harmful to cardiovascular health. Camelina sativa oil also seems to protect against oxidative stress. Fatty fish, on the other hand,

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Plastic in the deep sea: Virtually unaltered after a quarter of a century

Even in the most remote regions of the oceans plastic debris can be found. Usually it is impossible to determine how long they have been lying on the seabed. Up to now, this has also hampered attempts to estimate how long plastic degradation might take. Scientists have now examined plastic items that have verifiably been at the abyssal seabed for more than 20 years. They could not find any traces

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Freshly printed magnets

During metal processing in the 3D laser printer, temperatures of more than 2,500 degrees Celsius are reached within milliseconds, causing some components of the alloys to evaporate. While widely considered a problem inherent to the process, Empa researchers spotted an opportunity – and are now using the effect to create new alloys with novel properties and embed them in 3D-printed metallic work pi

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New insights into epigenetic modifications

Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Rome, in collaboration with Tim Bestor at Columbia University in New York and John Edwards at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, show for the first time how DNA methylation instructs cells to repress parts of their genome by inducing the assembly of a silencing complex. Their work was published in Proceedings of the National Aca

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Improving the operation and performance of Wi-Fi networks for the 5G/6G ecosystem

An article published in the advanced online edition of the journal Computer Communications shows that the use of machine learning can improve the operation and performance of the Wi-Fi networks of the future, those of the 5G/6G ecosystem.

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Researchers identify 'hot spots' for developing lymphatic vessels

The development of the lymphatic vasculature is crucially dependent on one specific protein — the growth factor VEGF-C. Using the zebrafish model, researchers now gained new insights into how and at which spots the individual protagonists of the VEGF-C signalling pathway need to interact with each other in the embryo. The study has been published in the journal 'Nature Communications'.

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The Atlantic Presents White Noise: Feature Documentary Goes Inside the Racist Right

The AFI Docs Film Festival will present the world premiere of White Noise , The Atlantic 's first feature documentary, which investigates and exposes the rise of the racist right in America. The Atlantic and director Daniel Lombroso gained unprecedented access to the inner workings of the alt-right over several years of filming, tracking the movement across 12 U.S. states, Canada, France, Belgium

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Firefighters Will Attack Blazes Quickly to Avoid Coronavirus

A fast fire response will limit the need for mass evacuations and encampments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fossil tracks left by an ancient crocodile that 'ran like an ostrich'

Scientists are stunned to find that some ancient crocodiles may have moved around on two feet.

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Religious believers prefer dogs over cats — by a lot

A 2019 study in Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion found that religious believers are more likely to own dogs than cats. Researchers found that hardcore evangelicals are less likely to own pets than more the progressive religious. Pet ownership also skews political: Democrats prefer cats while Republicans choose dogs. Bastet was the daughter of the sun. The ancient Egyptian goddess was

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The liver–brain–gut neural arc maintains the Treg cell niche in the gut

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2425-3 The liver–brain–gut neural arc maintains the T reg cell niche in the gut

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Podcast: The quantum space lab

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01761-3 Listen to the latest from the world of science, brought to you by Shamini Bundell and Nick Howe.

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Universe's coolest lab creates bizarre quantum matter in space

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01773-z Physicists have made a Bose–Einstein condensate on the International Space Station — allowing them to probe the mysteries of quantum physics in detail.

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Unbundle the Police

As anti-police protests sweep across the country and the world, many people seeing signs, Instagram posts, and articles proclaiming Defund the Police have the same reaction: Yes! Followed swiftly by: So, how exactly does that work? Fair question. The U.S. is an unusually violent country with more guns than citizens. Entirely defunding, or abolishing, police departments tomorrow would not abolish

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E-health resource improves men's health behaviours with or without fitness facilities

Men who regularly used a free web resource made significantly more health changes than men who did not, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia and Intensions Consulting.

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From bacteria to you: The biological reactions that sustain our rhythms

Methylation and the circadian clock are both conserved mechanisms found in all organisms. Kyoto University researchers found that inhibiting methylation with a specific compound disrupts the circadian clock in most organisms except bacteria. The team transformed specific methylation genes from bacteria into animal cells to rescue said inhibition, opening potentially new treatments for methylation

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A new character for Pokémon? Novel endemic dogfish shark species discovered from Japan

A new endemic deep-water dogfish shark: Squalus shiraii, was discovered in the tropical waters of Southern Japan by an international team of scientists led by Dr. Sarah Viana from South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity. The finding brings the amount of spurdogs shark species inhabiting Japanese waters to six. The discovery is published in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolut

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New insight into the Great Dying

A new study shows for the first time that the collapse of terrestrial ecosystems during Earth's most deadly mass extinction event was directly responsible for disrupting ocean chemistry. The study highlights the importance of understanding the inter-connectedness of ecosystems as our modern environment struggles with the devastating effects of a rapidly warming planet.

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Engineered Human Cells Could Propel Drugs Through the Body

Recently, several research teams have proposed injecting medical patients with nanobots that could transport medicine throughout their bodies. But one group has a simpler idea: engineer cells already present in the bloodstream to carry the drugs instead. Scientists from the University of California, San Diego and the University of Science and Technology Beijing found away to engineer platelets —

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Three ways blockchain could get the world to act against the climate crisis

The world has failed to halt global warming. Four years after the signing of the Paris Agreement, most experts predict global warming will exceed the agreed thresholds, with disastrous consequences. As much as the world faces a climate crisis, it also faces a climate governance crisis: we know what must be done to halt climate change but we do not know yet how to get there.

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Lights in the eyes for better disguise

This hatchetfish hides from predators swimming in the shadowy depths below using a clever disguise. Glowing spots on its belly make it nearly invisible against the sunlit waters above. But the fish's eyes point upward.

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What tech companies know about your kids | Veronica Barassi

The digital platforms you and your family use every day — from online games to education apps and medical portals — may be collecting and selling your children's data, says anthropologist Veronica Barassi. Sharing her eye-opening research, Barassi urges parents to look twice at digital terms and conditions instead of blindly accepting them — and to demand protections that ensure their kids' dat

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Pandemic upends Colombia's controversial drug war plan to resume aerial spraying

Court rules spraying of herbicide glyphosate can't restart until communities consulted

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A post-pandemic world: will populations be on the move? Study shows contagions could be catalysts for mass migration

Could the world soon be on the move again in the wake of COVID-19? Theoretical modelling by the University of Sydney's Centre for Complex Systems has shown that populations typically disperse following major global crises, including contagions.

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Matrix imaging: An innovation for improving ultrasound resolution

In conventional ultrasounds, variations in soft tissue structure distort ultrasound wavefronts. They blur the image and can hence prove detrimental to medical diagnosis. Researchers at the Institut Langevin (CNRS/ESPCI Paris-PSL) have developed a new non-invasive ultrasound method that avoids such aberrations.

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ModGraProDep: Artificial intelligence and probabilistic modelling in clinical oncology

Improving the prediction of survival indicators in patients with breast cancer using tools from artificial intelligence and probabilistic modelling is the aim of ModGraProDep, an innovative system presented in a study led by Ramon Clèries, lecturer at the Department of Clinical Sciences of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the University of Barcelona and member of the Oncology Master

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Substandard hand sanitizers readily available on market, confirm pharmacists

AN INTERNATIONAL team of pharmacy experts has researched the effectiveness of hand sanitisers in the fight against CoViD-19 and warned the public to beware of sub-standard products. They have also provided detailed 'recipes' for the manufacture of effective hand sanitising gels and explained the science behind them.

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The brain uses minimum effort to look for key information in text

The human brain avoids taking unnecessary effort. When a person is reading, she strives to gain as much information as possible by dedicating as little of her cognitive capacity as possible to the processing. This is a finding presented in an article by specialists in computer science and psychology at the University of Helsinki, published in Scientific Reports.

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Can your gut microbes tell you how old you really are?

Harvard longevity researchers in collaboration with Insilico Medicine develop the first AI-powered microbiomic aging clock

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Angling for underwater WiFi

Scuba divers could send sea life shots in real time using an aquatic internet service.

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New discovery of giant bipedal crocodile footprints in the cretaceous of Korea

A new study has announced the surprising discovery of well-preserved footprints belonging to a large bipedal ancestor of modern-day crocodiles. Before this discovery, crocodile ancestors that were more adapted to life on land were believed to be smaller animals that walked on all fours.

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Prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms, fecal viral shedding in patients with COVID-19

How commonly reported gastrointestinal symptoms were in patients with COVID-19 and viral RNA shedding was detected in these patients' stool are examined in this systematic review and meta-analysis.

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Temperature, humidity, latitude analysis to estimate potential spread, seasonality of COVID-19

The association between climate and the spread of COVID-19 is examined in this observational study.

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Ancient crocodiles walked on two legs like dinosaurs

An international research team has been stunned to discover that some species of ancient crocodiles walked on their two hind legs like dinosaurs and measured over three metres in length. University of Queensland palaeontologist Dr Anthony Romilio said the researchers first thought the similar-shaped fossilised footprints were from another ancient animal known as the pterosaurs.

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Comparing survival after minimally invasive hysterectomy or open surgery for early-stage cervical cancer

This study combined the results of 15 observational studies with 9,500 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer to compare the risk of cancer recurrence and death associated with receiving minimally invasive versus open radical hysterectomy.

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Outcomes of COVID-19 in countries with different income levels

Possible outcomes of the COVID-19 pandemic on low- and middle-income countries are described.

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An ion channel senses cell swelling and helps cells to choose a response

Liz Haswell's lab at WashU provides insight into how plants sense and respond (including suicide) to mechanical signals, such as cell swelling, rather than chemicals signals, such as nutrients or growth factors.

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'Matador' guppies trick predators

Trinidadian guppies behave like matadors, focusing a predator's point of attack before dodging away at the last moment, new research shows.

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Scientists rescue mini retinas from eye disease via new gene therapy approach

Scientists have developed a new gene therapy approach that offers tremendous promise for one day treating an eye disease that leads to blindness and affects thousands of people across the globe.

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Denisovan DNA influences immune system of modern day Oceanian populations

More than 120,000 novel human genetic variations that affect large regions of DNA have been discovered, some of which are linked to immune response, disease susceptibility or digestion.

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Palaeontology: Ancient footprints may belong to two-legged crocodile, not giant pterosaur

The discovery of large well-preserved footprints belonging to an ancestor of modern-day crocodiles from the Lower Cretaceous Jinju Formation of South Korea is reported this week in Scientific Reports. The study suggests that footprints found previously, thought to have been made by giant pterosaurs walking on two legs, may have instead been made by ancient crocodile relatives.

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Lights in the eyes for better disguise

This hatchetfish hides from predators swimming in the shadowy depths below using a clever disguise. Glowing spots on its belly make it nearly invisible against the sunlit waters above. But the fish's eyes point upward.

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Exploring the diversity of cell gatekeepers could be the key to better crops

Scientists have shed new light on how the network of gatekeepers that controls the traffic in and out of plant cells works, which researchers believe is key to develop food crops with bigger yields and greater ability to cope with extreme environments.

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Skolan kan förbättra för barn i samhällets vård

Barn i samhällets vård mår sämre än andra barn och presterar sämre i skolan. Men de har förtroende för skolans personal och presterar bättre efter individuell kartläggning i skolan, visar en avhandling från Linköpings universitet. Varje år omhändertas mer än tiotusentals barn och ungdomar av samhället, då de av olika anledningar inte kan bo hemma. År 2018 bodde 39 000 barn och ungdomar i exempelv

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Exploring the diversity of cell gatekeepers could be the key to better crops

Scientists have shed new light on how the network of gatekeepers that controls the traffic in and out of plant cells works, which researchers believe is key to develop food crops with bigger yields and greater ability to cope with extreme environments.

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Housing instability undermines public health response to COVID-19 pandemic

A long-brewing crisis of housing instability in the U.S. threatens to mar the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic by undermining strategies such as social distancing, says a new working paper co-written by an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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Life on welfare isn't what most people think it is

When Americans talk about people receiving public assistance—food stamps, disability, unemployment payments and other government help—they often have stereotypes and inaccurate perceptions of who those people are and what their lives are like.

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Opposition to sexual- and gender-minority rights linked to support for Christian dominance

,Many Christian and political conservatives in the U.S. support legislation to deny sexual and gender minorities the rights most Americans enjoy: unfettered access to jobs, housing, services and public facilities; the opportunity to marry as they choose; and the right to adopt a child.

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Could the answer to groundwater resources come from high in the sky?

Groundwater makes up 30 to 50 percent of California's water supply, but until recently there were few restrictions placed on its retrieval. Then in 2014 California became the last Western state to require regulation of its groundwater. With deadlines starting this year, for the first time water managers in the nation's premier agricultural region—the state's Central Valley—are tasked with estimati

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Populært græsprotein er mindre allergent end soya og græspollen

Forarbejdningsmåde og høsttidspunkt kan have betydning for risikoen for allergiske reaktioner ved at indtage græsprotein, der er populært som klimavenligt alternativ til animalsk protein, viser dansk undersøgelse præsenteret på EAACI.

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Matrix imaging: an innovation for improving ultrasound resolution

In conventional ultrasounds, variations in soft tissue structure distort ultrasound wavefronts. They blur the image and can hence prove detrimental to medical diagnosis. Researchers at the Institut Langevin (CNRS/ESPCI Paris-PSL)1 have developed a new non-invasive ultrasound method that avoids such aberrations.

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City compost programs turn garbage into 'black gold' that boosts food security and social justice

Almost overnight, the COVID-19 pandemic has transformed many Americans' relationships with food. To relieve some of the stress associated with shopping safely for groceries and ensure food security, many people are once again planting "victory gardens." This tradition hearkens back to previous generations who cultivated home gardens during both World Wars.

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Paying for coronavirus will have to be like war debt – spread over generations

The macroeconomic shock to the world economy from the COVID-19 pandemic is arguably unprecedented in modern times. The financial response by governments of the major economies has been substantial.

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After a century of searching, scientists find new liquid phase

Researchers have discovered an elusive phase of matter, first proposed more than 100 years ago and sought after ever since.

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Bad News: Another Deadly Virus Is Spreading in the US

There's another deadly virus brewing in the Northeastern United States. Those words may be hard to hear, but there's some good news as well: you're extremely unlikely to catch it. The eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus can cause a severe brain infection, and it can be transmitted through a mosquito bite, as OneZero reports . As the virus' name suggests, horses are particularly susceptible to

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Adding women to corporate boards improves decisions about medical product safety

Medical supply companies with boards that included at least two women recalled life-threatening products almost a month sooner than those with all-male boards, according to our forthcoming study examining thousands of medical product recalls from 2002 to 2013.

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Going online due to COVID-19 this fall could hurt colleges' future

When the California State University system decided to conduct all of its classes online this coming fall, administrators said it was to avoid the health risks associated with COVID-19. Many other colleges are making similar decisions as they move online.

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Globalization really started 1,000 years ago

Viking ships touched down on the Canadian island of Newfoundland around the year 1000, at what is now the archaeological site known as L'Anse aux Meadows.

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A new glacier website from the Austrian Alps

A new website dedicated to glacier education has launched. OGGM- Edu, as it's known, is geared towards educators and instructors. Fabien Maussion, a glaciologist at the University of Innsbruck, was inspired to create the site after working on the Open Global Glacier Model (the "OGGM" of the website's name), a tool created by the University of Innsbruck and the University of Bremen in Germany. Acco

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First space tourists will face big risks, as private companies gear up for paid suborbital flights

On May 30, 2020, millions of Americans watched the inaugural SpaceX Crew Dragon launch NASA astronauts to the International Space Station. This mission marked two significant events: First, the return of launch to orbit capability for human spaceflight from the United States. Secondly, it successfully demonstrated private sector capability to build and operate a launch vehicle for human spacefligh

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How dashcams help and hinder forensics

Dashcams are vital for helping police investigate car incidents, however the way the footage is submitted to police, managed and processed can cause problems. A researcher at WMG, University of Warwick has assessed seven different types of dashcams' SD storage systems to see how they help and hinder digital forensics.

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Fossil Footprints Help Uncover the Mysteries of Bipedal Crocodiles

Ancient tracks reveal a previously unknown creature from the Age of Dinosaurs—answering one question but raising more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fossil Footprints Help Uncover the Mysteries of Bipedal Crocodiles

Ancient tracks reveal a previously unknown creature from the Age of Dinosaurs—answering one question but raising more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tropical disease in medieval Europe revises the history of a pathogen related to syphilis

Plague was commonplace in medieval times, so finding its victims in a 15th century Lithuanian graveyard was no surprise. However, discovering one woman with a second disease, yaws — a close relative of modern syphilis found today only in tropical settings — was something researchers did not expect. The current study's findings are changing perspectives on the evolutionary history of a disease fa

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Protecting eels protects freshwater biodiversity

An international research team has conducted a field survey on two species of eel native to Japan and other organisms that share the same habitat, revealing for the first time in the world that these eels can act as comprehensive surrogate species for biodiversity conservation in freshwater rivers. It is hoped that conducting activities to restore and protect eel populations will contribute greatl

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Denisovan DNA influences immune system of modern day Oceanian populations

More than 120,000 novel human genetic variations that affect large regions of DNA have been discovered, some of which are linked to immune response, disease susceptibility or digestion. Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute identified these changes affecting multiple bases of DNA, known as structural variations, in a study of the most diverse worldwide populations examined to date. This incl

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'Matador' guppies trick predators

Trinidadian guppies behave like matadors, focusing a predator's point of attack before dodging away at the last moment, new research shows.

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An ion channel senses cell swelling and helps cells to choose a response

After a dry spell, a rainy day can feel rejuvenating. But for plants, a downpour can mean trouble. Faced with water suddenly rushing into its tissues, a plant must control its cells' volume or risk them exploding.

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OpenAI's Text Generator Is Going Commercial

The research institute was created to steer AI away from harmful uses. Now it's competing with tech giants to sell a cloud-computing service to businesses.

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Fossil Footprints Help Uncover the Mysteries of Bipedal Crocodiles

Ancient tracks reveal a previously unknown creature from the Age of Dinosaurs—answering one question but raising more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Denisovan DNA influences immune system of modern day Oceanian populations

More than 120,000 novel human genetic variations that affect large regions of DNA have been discovered, some of which are linked to immune response, disease susceptibility or digestion. Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute identified these changes affecting multiple bases of DNA, known as structural variations, in a study of the most diverse worldwide populations examined to date. This incl

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'Matador' guppies trick predators

Trinidadian guppies behave like matadors, focusing a predator's point of attack before dodging away at the last moment, new research shows.

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An ion channel senses cell swelling and helps cells to choose a response

After a dry spell, a rainy day can feel rejuvenating. But for plants, a downpour can mean trouble. Faced with water suddenly rushing into its tissues, a plant must control its cells' volume or risk them exploding.

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Ancient crocodiles walked on two legs like dinosaurs

An international research team has been stunned to discover that some species of ancient crocodiles walked on their two hind legs like dinosaurs and measured over three meters in length.

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Højt blodsukker ved diabetes påvirker funktionsmåling af hjertet

Funktionsmålinger af hjertet hos patienter med insulinkrævende type 2-diabetes foretages mest sikkert ved fasteblodsukker om morgenen. For pumpefunktionen ændrer sig i takt med blodsukkeret, viser nyt studie ved Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen.

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Politics this week

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Business this week

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KAL's cartoon

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Apple vil bruge ARM-processor i MacBooks: Kan starte chip-revolution

PLUS. ANALYSE: Det kan være startskuddet på en længe ventet chip-revolution, når Apple forventes at bytte Intels x86-chips ud med egenudviklede ARM-chips fra næste år. For selvom ARMs processorer stadig har en lavere ydeevne, er de langt mere energieffektive, fleksible og ikke mindst billigere.

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A plan to turn the atmosphere into one, enormous sensor

It will watch for storms, earthquakes, volcanos—and missile launches

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The nose, it seems, is protected by bacterial guards

They are similar to some of the bugs found in yogurt

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To make STEM more diverse, change general chemistry?

General chemistry—a key introductory-level course series for many STEM degrees—is a major barrier for underrepresented students, according to a new study. Previous studies have shown that students from certain backgrounds are less likely than their peers to complete an undergraduate degree in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics—or STEM. These groups are low-income students, first-gen

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Reaction microscope 'X-rays' individual molecules

For more than 200 years, we have been using X-rays to look inside matter, and progressing to ever smaller structures -from crystals to nanoparticles. Now, physicists have achieved a qualitative leap forward: using a new experimental technique, they have been able to 'X-ray' molecules such as oxygen and view their motion in the microcosm.

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What can maritime shipping learn from brain network science?

Researchers show how network science computational theories used for brain analysis can help us to understand global shipping networks and their impact on the world economy.

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Kissing bugs also find suitable climatic conditions in Europe

Scientists have used ecological niche models to calculate the extent to which habitats outside of the Americas may also be suitable for insect species that spread Chagas disease. The result: climatically suitable conditions can be found in southern Europe for two kissing bug species; along the coasts of Africa and Southeast Asia the conditions are suitable for yet another species.

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England's covid-19 contact tracers failed to reach thousands of people

In its first week of operation, England's coronavirus contact tracing scheme was unable to reach a third of the people who tested positive for the virus

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Intercropping can significantly increase yields in agriculture while reducing the use of fertilisers

Intercropping, or the simultaneous cultivation of multiple crops on a single plot of land, can significantly increase the yield, not only of low input agriculture, but also of intensive agriculture, and reduce the use of fertilizers. Scientists of Wageningen University & Research (WUR) reached this conclusion in collaboration with colleagues from China. They published their results in Nature Plant

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Protecting eels protects freshwater biodiversity

An international research team has conducted a field survey on two species of eel native to Japan, and other organisms that share the same habitat, revealing for the first time in the world that these eels can act as comprehensive surrogate species for biodiversity conservation in freshwater rivers. It is hoped that conducting activities to restore and protect eel populations will contribute great

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Oldest relative of ragworms and earthworms discovered

Scientists have discovered the oldest fossil that can be assigned to the living annelid worms, the group of animals that contains earthworms, leeches and many different forms in the ocean including polychaetes (such as ragworms and lugworms).

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What can maritime shipping learn from brain network science?

Researchers show how network science computational theories used for brain analysis can help us to understand global shipping networks and their impact on the world economy.

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Intercropping can significantly increase yields in agriculture while reducing the use of fertilisers

Intercropping, or the simultaneous cultivation of multiple crops on a single plot of land, can significantly increase the yield, not only of low input agriculture, but also of intensive agriculture, and reduce the use of fertilizers. Scientists of Wageningen University & Research (WUR) reached this conclusion in collaboration with colleagues from China. They published their results in Nature Plant

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Protecting eels protects freshwater biodiversity

An international research team has conducted a field survey on two species of eel native to Japan, and other organisms that share the same habitat, revealing for the first time in the world that these eels can act as comprehensive surrogate species for biodiversity conservation in freshwater rivers. It is hoped that conducting activities to restore and protect eel populations will contribute great

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This wearable robot arm can hold fruit and punch through walls

Unlike exoskeletons or prostheses, supernumerary robotic limbs function independently of the human skeleton. This new example of the technology attaches to the wearer's hips, and can lift 11 pounds. The arm currently isn't autonomous. Before A.I. can control supernumerary limbs, researchers first have to figure out how to make the technology understand and execute what the wearer wants it to do.

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2D nanosheets show promise for stopping cancer cells

The development of a 2D nanosheet 1,000 times smaller than a strand of hair could advance cancer treatment and regenerative medicine, say researchers. The new class of 2D nanosheets called molybdenum disulfide can adsorb near infrared (NIR) light and modify cell behavior. These nanosheets are an emerging class of materials that have shown distinct physical and chemical properties due to their uni

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Using DNA to look for fish species

Researchers from Biomon have used DNA techniques to find 40 different species of fish in the river Dommel. This technique is capable of detecting more species than conventional methods of measuring.

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SpaceX Trying to Figure Out How to Land Starship on the Moon

Wider Stance In an exchange on Twitter this week, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk elaborated on the design tweaks his space company is considering to allow its massive Starship spacecraft to safely land on the Moon. "We're working on new legs," he wrote in a tweet . "Wider stance & able to auto-level. Important for leaning into wind or landing on rocky & pitted surfaces." Moonship Responding to YouTuber Tim

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Using DNA to look for fish species

Researchers from Biomon have used DNA techniques to find 40 different species of fish in the river Dommel. This technique is capable of detecting more species than conventional methods of measuring.

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New distance measurements bolster challenge to basic model of universe

A new set of precision distance measurements made with an international collection of radio telescopes have greatly increased the likelihood that theorists need to revise the "standard model" that describes the fundamental nature of the Universe.

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Compound in the gills of clams may fight common infections

A compound discovered in the gills of wood-eating clams could be the solution to a group of parasites responsible for some of the world's most common infections.

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Astronomers discover how long-lived Peter Pan discs evolve

New research has revealed how long-lived Peter Pan discs form, which could provide new insights into how planets arise.

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New method to study barred spiral galaxies

Analysis of gas motion in 20 nearby spiral galaxies has revealed a clear difference between those with bars and those without bars. This suggests that already available data on gas motion can be used to study bars in spiral galaxies, even in the absence of high-resolution imaging data.

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Researchers synthesize silicon-based quantum dots

NDSU researchers recently developed a new method of creating quantum dots made of silicon. Quantum dots, or nanocrystals, are tiny nanometer-scale pieces of semiconductor that emit light when their electrons are exposed to UV light. The most common application of quantum dots is in QLED displays. Through their use, digital displays have become brighter and much thinner, resulting in improvements t

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New data capture eviction laws in 40 US cities

New data released today on LawAtlas.org describe a patchwork landscape of laws governing eviction in 40 of the largest US cities. Nearly 1 million households are evicted from their homes each year, a number that is likely compounded by the impact of COVID-19.

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New insights into epigenetic modifications

Scientists at EMBL Rome unveil the mechanism behind the most studied epigenetic modification.

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Why Republicans Still Can't Quit Trump

With Donald Trump sagging in the polls against Joe Biden, the internal Republican debate about what a post-Trump GOP might look like is growing louder. And that dialogue is underscoring how hard it may be for Republicans to abandon the confrontational and divisive direction he has set for the party, no matter what happens in November. The debate obviously will be shaped by whether he wins or lose

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10 jokes from philosopher Slavoj Žižek

Slavoj Žižek is a remarkably funny philosopher, who has a joke for every theory and can explain things in a fun way. His tendency to joke has helped endear him to the public, though it does sometimes irk curmudgeons. Not every joke he makes is suitable for republishing here. Join Slavoj Žižek live on Big Think today (June 11) at 1 pm ET! Join the live stream free via YouTube and Facebook , or via

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Clinical updates for diagnostic ultrasound during coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic

An open-access article published ahead-of-print in the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) by radiologists in Singapore recommends a number of applied updates to the workflow of diagnostic ultrasound to prevent nosocomial transmission of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) to frontline US service providers: patient and visitor screening, segregation and monitoring of staff, scan vetting, strict pro

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NIH scientists develop blood test to help improve liver cancer screening

Scientists have developed a new test that can help identify people who are likely to develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer. The approach uses a simple blood test to check for the patient's previous exposure to certain viruses. The findings were published June 10 in Cell. A study of the new approach was led by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)

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New insights into epigenetic modifications

Scientists at EMBL Rome unveil the mechanism behind the most studied epigenetic modification.

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New findings help design highly efficient metal oxide catalyst for ozone removal

Atmospheric ozone (O3) has become one of the major air pollutants. Catalytic decomposition is one efficient and economical technology in O3 removal, where metal oxides can serve as cost-effective catalysts substituting for noble metals.

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Ägget väljer spermie

Kvinnors äggceller avger kemiska signaler för att locka till sig spermier. Ny forskning visar att äggcellen kan välja spermie genom dessa signaler. Olika kvinnors ägg attraherar olika mäns spermier. De föredrar alltså inte alltid partnerns. Människor lägger mycket tid och energi på att välja sin partner. En ny forskningsstudie från Stockholms universitet och Manchester University NHS Foundation T

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Human embryo-like model created from human stem cells

Scientists have developed a new model to study an early stage of human development, using human embryonic stem cells.

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High doses of ketamine can temporarily switch off the brain

Researchers have identified two brain phenomena that may explain some of the side-effects of ketamine. Their measurements of the brain waves of sheep sedated by the drug may explain the out-of-body experience and state of complete oblivion it can cause.

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Building with DNA

Life on Earth developed from inanimate components. Can we recreate this process in the laboratory, and what tools do we need for this? Using DNA origami, the art of folding at a scale of just a few millionths of a millimetre, we are able to reconstruct individual cellular components. They may be capable of taking over important tasks in our bodies in future.

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Building with DNA

Life on Earth developed from inanimate components. Can we recreate this process in the laboratory, and what tools do we need for this? Using DNA origami, the art of folding at a scale of just a few millionths of a millimetre, we are able to reconstruct individual cellular components. They may be capable of taking over important tasks in our bodies in future.

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Extremely brilliant giga-electron-volt gamma rays from a two-stage laser-plasma accelerator

Laser-wakefield accelerators have led to the development of compact, ultrashort X-ray or gamma-ray sources to deliver peak brilliance, similar to conventional synchrotron sources. However, such sources are withheld by low efficiencies and limited to 107-8 photons per shot in the kiloelectron volt (KeV) to megaelectron volt (MeV) range. In a new report now published on Science Advances, Xing-Long Z

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Third of those in NHS test and trace system failing to share details

Scheme not yet at desired 'gold standard', admits head of programme in England

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New Record-Crushing Battery Lasts 1.2 Million Miles in Electric Cars

Electric cars had their biggest year ever in 2019. As of the end of the year, 2.5 percent of the world's total cars were electric. It's a small percentage, but represents significant growth for the electric vehicle industry. Before electric cars become more widespread, they have some technological hurdles left to clear, including the distance drivers can go before having to re-charge the car's ba

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Se Version2s video-interview med Java-ekspert Christian Damsgaard

Konsulent Christian Damsgaard tager pulsen på programmeringssproget Java.

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Elite gamers share mental toughness with top athletes, study finds

In one of the first studies to investigate mental toughness and stress and coping in high performing esports athletes, researchers have found similarities to traditional elite athletes.

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Jämlika löner i biståndsprojektet ökade den biologiska mångfalden

Det blir allt vanligare att anlita lokalbefolkning för att hjälpa till i bevarandeprogram för biologisk mångfald. Forskare har undersökt hur lönesättningen påverkade effektiviteten i ett sådant program i Vietnam. Det är viktigt att följa lokala rättvisenormer i form av jämlika löner, visar studien. Den visar också att kvinnor arbetar hårdare. Det är forskare från Leibniz Center for Agricultural L

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Climate change to make extreme waves more frequent

Over the next 80 years, a warming planet will cause stronger storm winds, triggering larger and more frequent extreme waves, according to new research. Researchers simulated Earth's changing climate under different wind conditions, recreating thousands of simulated storms to evaluate the magnitude and frequency of extreme events. They find that if we don't curb global emissions, there will be an

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No disadvantages to having kids early

When some species are heavily hunted, animal mortality increases and they have fewer offspring in the course of their lives.

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Researchers aim to help cities prioritize interventions for public transit

The New York City Subway—which, under normal circumstances, serves 5.5 million riders daily—resumed service June 8, amid concerns from residents about exposing themselves to the closed, crowded conditions that could be ripe for coronavirus transmission. Researchers at Penn State aim to help minimize the risk of COVID-19 spread by identifying specific subway stations in which intervention resources

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U.S. can reach 90% clean energy by 2035 without higher costs, report says

The United States can deliver 90 percent clean, carbon-free electricity nationwide by 2035, dependably, at no extra cost to consumer bills and without the need for new fossil fuel plants, according to a study released today from the Center for Environmental Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. The study also finds that without robust policy reforms, most of the potential to red

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No disadvantages to having kids early

When some species are heavily hunted, animal mortality increases and they have fewer offspring in the course of their lives.

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The mystery of visual stability

We move our eyes several times per second. These fast eye movements, called saccades, create large image shifts on the retina — making our visual system work hard to maintain a stable perceptual world. Remapping the retinal image compensates for this; however, errors in actual eye movements cause image shifts, even with remapping.

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Experts clarify subtypes of multiple sclerosis to improve care and clinical trials

An international committee has clarified previously published descriptors of courses of MS and disease activity. MS subtypes are consensus definitions rather than pathologically defined phenotypes, and easily misconstrued. The clarification was prompted in part by differences in specified indications for MS therapies recently approved by the FDA and EMA. The goal is to improve care and refine the

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Night owls have more grey matter in their brains than early birds

Being a late-riser suggests you could have more grey matter in your brain, a study from Brunel University London has shown.

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Night owls have more grey matter in their brains than early birds

Being a late-riser suggests you could have more grey matter in your brain, a study from Brunel University London has shown.

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"Som kille är det ofta svårt att säga nej till sex"

– Att män alltid vill ha sex – det är en myt som påverkar både män och kvinnor, säger Lena Gunnarsson, genusforskare vid Örebro universitet. Hon har skrivit en bok om sexuellt samtycke och gråzonen mellan sex och övergrepp. I boken berättar Nils att han ofta har haft sex mot sin vilja bara för att ställa upp. – Människor har ett behov av bekräftelse och vill inte såra eller hota relationen. Jag h

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Advanced nanotechnology to improve success of dental implants

A technological advancement that may prove crucial in the long-term success of dental implants has been developed by University of Queensland researchers.

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Coal-tar-sealant major source of PAH contamination in Great Lakes tributaries

Runoff from pavement with coal-tar-based sealant is the most likely primary source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, found in the majority of streambed sediments of Great Lakes tributaries, according to a study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. PAHs are a group of chemicals found in crude oil and coal and occur as a byproduct of burning. PAHs can have harmful effects

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An experimental new method to study disease, including COVID-19

Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists have developed a new cell screening method for agents that alter biologic functions. This approach uses thousands of artificial proteins called "traptamers" and may help to answer some research questions that are difficult to address with other cell screening methods. The data is published today in the journal Cell Reports.

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Enigt folketing: 4.500 ekstra studiepladser til teknologi, it og grøn omstilling

PLUS. Uddannelser, der kan understøtte den grønne omstilling, skal have førsteprioritet, lyder det fra regeringen og alle Folketingets partier, som i dag har bevilget 210 millioner kroner til flere studiepladser. 165 millioner kroner er øremærket uddannelser med gode jobchancer.

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Try it: Will COVID lead to 'extreme traffic' in your city?

Researchers predict a sweeping switch to single-occupancy vehicle commuting and resulting risk of extreme traffic in large metro areas as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Their paper , which is available as a pre-print on arXiv, looks at transportation modes during and after the pandemic using mathematical analysis and basic laws of traffic to explore scenarios of increased car commuting. "We p

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Where Jaguars Are Killed, New Common Factor Emerges: Chinese Investment

Poaching of the big cats is on the rise, and a new study links their slaughter to corruption as well as investment from Chinese companies.

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New study advocates updating approach to teaching supply chain curriculum

"Nobody worries about the supply chain until something goes wrong," said Joe Walden, the assistant area director in analytics, information and operations management at the University of Kansas.

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Are peaceful protests more effective than violent ones?

As unrest erupts across the world after the killing of a Black man, George Floyd, by a white police officer, even some peaceful protests have descended into chaos, calling into question the efficacy of violence when it comes to spurring social change.

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Extreme waves set to get bigger and more frequent due to climate change

A warming planet will cause stronger storm winds triggering larger and more frequent extreme waves over the next 80 years, with largest increases shown in the Southern Ocean, according to new research.

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New sensor technology could speed up blood tests for COVID patients

Researchers are using laser-light technology to develop handheld biosensors with the potential to deliver fast, real-time blood test results for patients including those suffering from COVID-19 with secondary infections such as pneumonia.

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An experimental new method to study disease, including COVID-19

Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists have developed a new cell screening method for agents that alter biologic functions. This approach uses thousands of artificial proteins called "traptamers" and may help to answer some research questions that are difficult to address with other cell screening methods. The data is published today in the journal Cell Reports.

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A Surprise Discovery Points to the Source of Fast Radio Bursts

On the morning of April 28, a newly built radio telescope was monitoring the quiet skies over British Columbia when it caught the flash that would change everything. One of the telescope's duties was to search for fast radio bursts — millisecond-long blips that, until then, had always come from distant galaxies. No one knew for sure what could create such short explosions of radio waves, making f

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Clean water ponds boost rare wetland plants, study reveals

Digging ponds in the countryside can deliver unprecedented gains for nature, according to a study involving the University of York.

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New findings help design highly efficient metal oxide catalyst for ozone removal

A research team led by Prof. CHEN Yunfa from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences demonstrated the electron generation, compensation and transfer between ZnO and O 3 through tuning crystal defects in ZnO. The findings may help design and synthesize highly efficient metal oxide catalytic materials for air cleaning.

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Coal-tar-sealant major source of PAH contamination in Great Lakes tributaries

Runoff from pavement with coal-tar-based sealant is the most likely primary source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, found in the majority of streambed sediments of Great Lakes tributaries, according to a new study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

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How targeting killer T cells in the lungs could lead to immunity against respiratory viruses

A significant site of damage during COVID-19 infection is the lungs. Understanding how the lungs' immune cells are responding to viral infections could help scientists develop a vaccine.Now, a team of researchers led by Salk Professor Susan Kaech has discovered that the cells responsible for long-term immunity in the lungs can be activated more easily than previously thought. The insight could aid

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People who eat a late dinner may gain weight

Eating a late dinner may contribute to weight gain and high blood sugar, according to a small study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Study finds older physicians and those of asian ancestry are at highest risk of suicide

Health care professionals who die by suicide are more likely to be older and nearing the end of their careers, or be of Asian or Pacific Islander ancestry, or confronting physical, mental health or medical malpractice issues.

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One silver-lining amid the pandemic: College students are sleeping better

A new study shows that since stay-at-home orders took effect, university students are devoting 30 more minutes per weekday and 24 minutes per weekend to sleep, keeping more regular sleep hours and experiencing less 'social jetlag' on Monday mornings.

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Clean water ponds boost rare wetland plants, study reveals

Digging ponds in the countryside can deliver unprecedented gains for nature, according to a study involving the University of York.

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How police departments can identify and oust killer cops

The global condemnation of the death of George Floyd, one of the latest in a constellation of officer-involved deaths of unarmed civilians, has grown into a worldwide social movement for disbanding or defunding police.

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Lang ventetid for patienter med hudsygdomme

I gennemsnit må patienter med hudsygdomme i Danmark vente 15 uger på at blive tilset af en privatpraktiserende hudlæge, viser nye tal fra sundhed.dk. Værst er ventetiden i Region Midtjylland, hvor der i gennemsnit er 24 ugers ventetid. Vi intensiverer indsatsen på hospitalsniveau, siger regionen.

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Nyopdaget gen i planter kan booste fosfor-optag

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har opdaget et vigtigt gen i planter, som kan bane vejen for,…

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COVID-19 recovery is a chance to improve the African food system

The World Food Programme has warned that the COVID-19 pandemic could cause one of the worst food crises since World War II. It predicts a doubling of the number of people going hungry – more than half of them in sub-Saharan Africa. While wealthier people stay inside and practise physical distancing, the economically marginalised populations risk going out in search of food. They take decisions bet

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New research reveals political changes wrought by the 'Black Death'

From 1347 to 1351, Europe was in the grip of a pandemic, later known as the "Black Death," that killed millions, leaving doctors struggling to understand its origins and cities struggling to bury the dead and isolate the sick.

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Disadvantaged pupils could be unfairly penalised by using predicted grades during pandemic, expert warns

This year's system of using predicted grades to award A-level and GCSE results should be closely monitored to ensure it doesn't unfairly penalize disadvantaged pupils, a social mobility expert has warned.

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Drivers v cyclists: it's like an ethnic conflict, which offers clues to managing 'road wars'

Motorists and cyclists are akin to ethnic groups, our research shows. This means we might want to look to multiculturalism in managing relations on the roads.

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Powerful X-ray flare detected from the protostar HOPS 383

Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, astronomers have conducted X-ray observations and near-infrared imaging of a protostar named HOPS 383. The monitoring campaign detected a powerful X-ray flare from the source, which could help astronomers to better understand the earliest stages of star formation. The finding is detailed in a paper acc

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Why it's so critical to continuously monitor and manage plant diseases

Most of us understand the critical importance of monitoring the spread of diseases. And it is as important for plant diseases as it is for humans.

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More than 1,200 tonnes of microplastics are dumped into Aussie farmland every year from wastewater sludge

Every year, treated wastewater sludge called "biosolids" is recycled and spread over agricultural land. My recent research discovered this practice dumps thousands of tonnes of microplastics into farmlands around the world. In Australia, we estimate this amount as at least 1,241 tonnes per year.

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About that spare room: employers requisitioned our homes and our time

Working from home during COVID-19 appeared to cost us little.

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Why it's so critical to continuously monitor and manage plant diseases

Most of us understand the critical importance of monitoring the spread of diseases. And it is as important for plant diseases as it is for humans.

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NIST software aids the analysis of instrumented charpy tests

To help labs characterize the toughness of steel, a new software package allows analysis of instrumented Charpy tests, or Charpy tests augmented with strain gauges, in compliance with standards from ASTM and ISO. The NIST Instrumented Charpy Analysis Software, or NICAS, is available free of charge from NIST as part of the Charpy Machine Verification Program.

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Prolific anesthesiologist in Japan has two papers retracted

A journal has retracted two case reports by a prolific Japanese anesthesiologist who appears to be embroiled in a misconduct investigation. The two case studies, in JA Clinical Reports, were written by Hironobu Ueshima and Hiroshi Otake, of Showa University Hospital in Tokyo. Ueshima has roughly 170 publications to his name, according to Google Scholar, … Continue reading

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Transforming spleen to liver brings new hope for organ regeneration

Scientists from Nanjing University and University of Macau have transformed the spleen into a functioning liver in living mice, which could bring new hope for patients suffering from organ shortage worldwide.

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Obesity patients report health challenges during shelter in place

Shelter-in-place orders to reduce the spread of COVID-19 put unusual strains on people with obesity, making it more difficult for them to eat properly and manage their weight, according to a UT Southwestern study.

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The Cyberwar Needs More Women on the Front Lines

To combat criminals who prey on women and children, we must start educating girls to be the cybersecurity leaders of tomorrow.

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Hollywood Is About to Reopen. It Could Be Better Than Before

When TV and film production restarts, the industry has an opportunity to fix its long-entrenched inequalities and invest in black and brown artists.

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Scientists Unearth Oldest Figurine Discovered Yet in China

Bird statuette, recovered from a refuse heap, more than doubles the age of the earliest known animal sculpture from East Asia. AncientBirdStatue_crop2.jpg Miniature bird sculpture discovered at the site of Lingjing in China Image credits: © Francesco d'Errico and Luc Doyon Culture Thursday, June 11, 2020 – 09:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — An ancient bird statuette recovered

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The Glimmer of a Silver Lining

Traumatic events such as pandemics can spur transformative psychological growth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study shows contagions could be catalysts for mass migration

Could the COVID-19 pandemic spell the end of globalisation and migration?

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Tool developed to calculate household 'plastics footprint'

How much plastic do we really use, and can we live without it? These are among the questions addressed by a tool that calculates the scale and extent of household plastic use, developed by the University of Exeter Business School's plastics research hub.

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Researchers discover skyrmions can split like biological cells

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered that skyrmions— a type of quasiparticle with properties that could lead to the next generation of data storage and transfer— reproduce by splitting in a way very similar to biological cell division.

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Trygga vuxna är viktiga när barn ska berätta om våld i hemmet

Nu finns en mer lättillgänglig version av en tidigare studie om hur barn som utsatts för våld i hemmet kan få hjälp. Behandlingsmetoden som enligt studien fungerar bra heter KIBB (Kognitiv Integrerad Behandling vid Barnmisshandel). – Det är barn som fått komma till tals, och de berättar bland annat om hur det blir för dem när de avslöjar förälders våld mot dem. Där är skola och förskola en viktig

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The Glimmer of a Silver Lining

Traumatic events such as pandemics can spur transformative psychological growth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sun Belt cities comprise nearly half of U.S. population growth

The Sun Belt's large metro areas are growing much faster than those elsewhere in the United States, and they are adding more young and old residents than the rest of the nation, according to a new white paper from Rice University's Kinder Institute for Urban Research.

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How four newborn exoplanets get cooked by their sun

Scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) examined the fate of the young star V1298 Tau and its four orbiting exoplanets. The results show that these recently born planets are roasted by the intense X-ray radiation of their young sun, which leads to the vaporization of the atmospheres of these planets. The innermost planets could be evaporated down to their rocky cores,

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Four experts investigate how the 5G coronavirus conspiracy theory began

In times of crisis, conspiracy theories can spread as fast as a virus.

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Sustainable cover-crop farming practice faces one big limitation: Land to produce seeds

As farmers around the globe look to grow food more sustainably—with less water, fertilizer, pesticides and other environmental impactors—the use of cover crops is becoming more popular. These crops, which are often grasses or legumes, or many other types of plants, are generally grown between the harvest and planting season of the land's main cash crop, to reduce erosion, build soil fertility and

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Black hole model reveals star collapse without bright explosion

A team of scientists, including Chief Investigator Ilya Mandel from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) at Monash University, recently studied what happens to rotating massive stars when they reach the end of their lives.

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Exotic electron-electron interactions found unnecessary for conduction in nickelates

Some metal oxides, such as nickelates, have a tuneable resistivity, which makes them an interesting material for adaptable electronics and cognitive computing. These materials can change their nature from metallic to insulating. How exactly this metal-insulator transition takes place is a topic of great interest in condensed matter physics. However, even the metallic behavior in nickelates seems u

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Which factors control the height of mountains?

Which forces and mechanisms determine the height of mountains? A group of researchers from Münster and Potsdam has now found a surprising answer: It is not erosion and weathering of rocks that determine the upper limit of mountain massifs, but rather an equilibrium of forces in the Earth's crust. This is a fundamentally new and important finding for the earth sciences. The researchers report on it

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Sustainable cover-crop farming practice faces one big limitation: Land to produce seeds

As farmers around the globe look to grow food more sustainably—with less water, fertilizer, pesticides and other environmental impactors—the use of cover crops is becoming more popular. These crops, which are often grasses or legumes, or many other types of plants, are generally grown between the harvest and planting season of the land's main cash crop, to reduce erosion, build soil fertility and

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Kissing bugs also find suitable climatic conditions in Europe

An infection with Chagas disease is only possible in Latin America since the insect species that spread the disease only occurs there. Scientists at Goethe University and the Senckenberg Society for Natural Research have now used ecological niche models to calculate the extent to which habitats outside of the Americas may also be suitable for these insects. The result: Climatically suitable condit

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Kissing bugs also find suitable climatic conditions in Europe

An infection with Chagas disease is only possible in Latin America since the insect species that spread the disease only occurs there. Scientists at Goethe University and the Senckenberg Society for Natural Research have now used ecological niche models to calculate the extent to which habitats outside of the Americas may also be suitable for these insects. The result: Climatically suitable condit

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A compound unlike any other

A compound discovered in the gills of wood-eating clams could be the solution to a group of parasites responsible for some of the world's most common infections.

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Mobiltelefonen skal fange øjenproblemer hos diabetikere

En adaptor monteret på en mobiltelefon gør det muligt at opdage forandringer i øjet på et tidligt stadie. Et internationalt forskerhold har testet metoden og håber, at diabetikere i udviklingslande kan få behandling i tide og undgå synsnedsættelse eller blindhed.

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Google's Drone Delivery Service Now Dropping Library Books to Kids

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Carbon nanotube transistors make the leap from lab to factory floor

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World-first 3D bionic eye could enable superhuman sight, night vision

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DeepMind hopes to teach AI to cooperate by playing Diplomacy

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Amazon to pause police use of its facial recognition tool amid wave of protests

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I think it's fair to say that with the protests,riots and covid 19 the world is changing massively especially in a short amount of time

So my question is what do you guys think the world will look like in a year? submitted by /u/DARKSOULS103 [link] [comments]

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Foreseeable Futures Podcast. Episode 7 – Pandemics and Covid-19

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A 'wave' of layoffs is coming for $100,000/year white-collar jobs

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Ethiopia to Plant 5 Billion Tree Seedlings in 2020

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Nation must prepare for COVID-19 related drug shortages

A new paper published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines the nation's current shortage of vitally needed medications, and how this dangerous situation is being made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors provide recommendations on how clinicians and institutions might address potential scarcities of essential medications during the current public health crisis.

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Four Years Embedded With the Alt-Right

Editor's Note: The Atlantic 's film, White Noise , premieres on June 20 at the AFI Docs documentary film festival. Tickets are available on AFI's website. White nationalists have always been able to find one another in America, but the recent resurgence of the white-nationalist movement—and the extent to which its ideas have seeped into the mainstream alongside Donald Trump's political ascent—is

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Smart nanoteknik kan ge ultratunna kameralinser

Framtidens kameralinser kan bli tusentals gånger tunnare – och betydligt mer resurssmarta att tillverka. Genom elektronritade mönster i ett tunt lager plast på glas fokuseras ljuset precis som i en vanligt lins. Samtidigt är den artificiella ytan böjbar och tusentals gånger tunnare. Forskare vid Chalmers har utvecklat en teknik för att framställa artificiella material till morgondagens optiska te

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What Is Twistronics

It's hard to keep up with all the latest science and technology, even for an enthusiast. Entire new fields are emerging, and it can be challenging for the non-expert to wrap their head around all the new concepts. Here is my attempt to quickly tackle a relatively new idea in physics – twistronics. The term refers to tuning the properties of 2-dimensional materials by stacking them and rotating th

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Is it Safe to Send My Child to Back to Day Care

As parents, we may have to develop a new level of comfort with a certain level of risk.

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Lab-grown cells mimic crucial moment in embryo development

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01757-z Artificial structures developed the rudimentary components of a heart and nervous system.

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Nvidia Ampere Rumors Point to 300W+ TDP, Up to 24GB of VRAM

Rumors about Nvidia's Ampere and the proposed family of consumer GPUs based on it have been circulating for months. The latest leaks claim Nvidia is prepping some significant improvements at the top end, along with higher power consumption. According to Igor's Lab, which also leaked supposed images of the new Ampere GPUs this week, the upcoming top-end cards will be the RTX 3090 (possibly branded

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20 Things You Didn't Know About Longevity

Exploring our age-old fascination with longevity.

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Bizarre Nearby Star Offers Clues to Origins of Mysterious Fast Radio Bursts

The first fast radio burst detected in our galaxy comes from a magnetized star, and could help to explain these cosmic enigmas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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News next steps for the future of U.K. inshore fisheries

The next steps for an ambitious and collaborative project which aims to improve how inshore fisheries are managed in the UK have been published.

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Lockdown easing will only work if trust is restored

As Covid-19 infections fall, the government needs to act to prevent more economic harm

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News next steps for the future of U.K. inshore fisheries

The next steps for an ambitious and collaborative project which aims to improve how inshore fisheries are managed in the UK have been published.

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Local news volume does not increase pro-social behaviors during COVID-19

During this pandemic, there are countless voices urging Americans to engage in the kind of civic behaviors that keep us all safe, like social distancing and frequent hand washing. These voices come at the national, state, and local level. But which ones are actually getting through, making it more likely that Americans will comply with the recommendations?

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New plant gene editing approach improves speed, scalability and heritability

Breeding plants for specific characteristics goes back thousands of years. For most of that time, the process has been slow and tied to the agricultural cycle. Farmers identified plants with desirable traits, harvested seeds and hoped for a reprise of a specific trait in the next generation of seedlings. Gene editing made it possible to accelerate this process—to a point—but reliance on tissue cul

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New plant gene editing approach improves speed, scalability and heritability

Breeding plants for specific characteristics goes back thousands of years. For most of that time, the process has been slow and tied to the agricultural cycle. Farmers identified plants with desirable traits, harvested seeds and hoped for a reprise of a specific trait in the next generation of seedlings. Gene editing made it possible to accelerate this process—to a point—but reliance on tissue cul

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Twitter wants you to read articles before you retweet them

The news: Twitter is testing a new feature on Android phones that prompts people to read articles before they share them. Someone who goes to retweet a link on Twitter without having clicked through to the story it leads to may be shown a pop-up message saying "Want to read this before retweeting?" It's currently available only in English for people using Twitter for Android. What's the point? Tw

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The Structure and Functions of the p53 Pathway: Information Acquisition, Redundancy, and Connectivity

Arnold Levine will discuss his discovery of p53 and the evolution of the field since then, and Jon Chen will discuss the use of single-cell phosphoproteomics in identifying changes in key signaling networks, including p53.

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200 millioner år gammel virus kan have skabt menneskers langtidshukommelse

PLUS. Virussen kan have muteret sig til det arc-protein, der muligvis har været skyld tilblivelsen af langtidshukommelsen.

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Ultra-thin camera lenses of the future could see the light of day

In the future, camera lenses could be thousands of times thinner and significantly less resource-intensive to manufacture. Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, now present a new technology for making artificial materials known as metasurfaces, which consist of a multitude of interacting nanoparticles that, together, can control light. They could have great use in the optical

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Newly synthesized fungal compound can switch on a self-destruct button for cancer

Cancers cells use a special technique to propagate: They delete their "programmed death" gene through mutation, and seemingly "forget" to die when their lifetime is over, and continue to grow instead. A research team from Tokyo University of Science has developed a method through which a fungal compound capable of rearming the self-destruct gene in certain cancer cells can be artificially produced

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Physics principle explains order and disorder of swarms

Current experiments support the controversial hypothesis that a well-known concept in physics—a critical point—is behind the striking behavior of collective animal systems. Physicists from the Cluster of Excellence Centre for the Advanced Study of Collective Behavior at the University of Konstanz showed that light-controlled microswimming particles can be made to organize into collective states su

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Newly synthesized fungal compound can switch on a self-destruct button for cancer

Cancers cells use a special technique to propagate: They delete their "programmed death" gene through mutation, and seemingly "forget" to die when their lifetime is over, and continue to grow instead. A research team from Tokyo University of Science has developed a method through which a fungal compound capable of rearming the self-destruct gene in certain cancer cells can be artificially produced

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Glacial uppslitning har orsakat de svenska stenblocksfälten

Områden med stora kantiga stenblock finns i stora delar av östra Sverige. Vissa av dem kan ha uppkommit genom att berggrunden slitits isär av glaciärer, tror forskare. Det är första gången på närmare 200 år som en ny process för hur inlandsisen format landskapet identifierats. Den nya processen kallas glacial uppslitning ( ripping på engelska) och förklarar uppkomsten av områden med stora kantiga

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New topological materials could have multiple electrical properties

This it is the story of a unique material—made of a single compound, it conducts electrons in different ways on its different surfaces and doesn't conduct at all in its middle. It is also the story of three research groups—two at the Weizmann Institute of Science and one in Germany, and the unique bond that has formed between them.

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Warm springs bring early, rapid plant growth, and severe droughts

A new study shows that the severe impact of the summer drought that hit Europe in 2018 was partly due to the spring heatwave that preceded it, which triggered early and rapid plant growth, depleting soil moisture.

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The King of Comedy Is Okay With Not Being Funny

The heroes of Judd Apatow's movies always have some growing up to do. The director's early television work on comedies such as Freaks and Geeks and Undeclared dealt with the growing pains of adolescence. His filmmaking debut, 2005's The 40-Year-Old Virgin , focused on a grown man (played by Steve Carell) whose life was frozen in place because of his sexual inexperience. Apatow's other stories of

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Quantum 'fifth state of matter' observed in space for first time

Scientists have observed the fifth state of matter in space for the first time, offering unprecedented insight that could help solve some of the quantum universe's most intractable conundrums, research showed Thursday.

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Större variation i riskbeteenden bland tonåringar

Kriminalitet liksom användning av droger och alkohol bland ungdomar följer mer heterogena mönster än vad forskning tidigare visat. Det finns inget tydligt samband mellan att tonåringar börjar dricka och att de senare hamnar i kriminalitet. Däremot kan tidig kriminalitet leda till missbruk av alkohol och droger, visar forskning från Göteborgs universitet. Russell Turner har för sin avhandling i so

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Five Coronavirus Treatments In Development

While only remdesivir has been scientifically shown to help treat COVID-19, it is not a particularly effective drug. More drugs like it and fundamentally different ones are in the pipeline. (Image credit: Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images)

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The Musk of Romance

Like her brother Elon, Tosca Musk is a revolutionary—in the steamy, softcore genre of romance movies.

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What's Confusing About Calling Covid-19 Cases 'Asymptomatic'

There's a difference between people who never develop symptoms and people who just don't have them yet. And that matters when calculating public health risk.

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Religion and Science in a Time of COVID-19: Allies or Adversaries?

Despite what some believe, they can work effectively together — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Religion and Science in a Time of COVID-19: Allies or Adversaries?

Despite what some believe, they can work effectively together — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Lab heads: how have your minority ethnic trainees fared?

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01760-4

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Nytt sätt att hitta riskgener vid hjärntumör

Vår mänskliga arvsmassa är uppbyggd av tre miljarder baspar och rymmer 22.000 gener. För att förstå orsaken bakom sjukdomar som cancer har mycket forskning gjorts på de 1,5–2 procent av arvsmassan som ger upphov till protein. Övrig arvsmassa kallas icke-kodande, men är också mycket viktig. Här finns exempelvis regioner som styr när i utvecklingen ett visst protein ska tillverkas, i vilka vävnader

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Handheld Ultrasound Devices Are Speeding Diagnosis of COVID-19

Doctors can triage and monitor patients faster—and sometimes more accurately—with the aid of the pocket-size machines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Handheld Ultrasound Devices Are Speeding Diagnosis of COVID-19

Doctors can triage and monitor patients faster—and sometimes more accurately—with the aid of the pocket-size machines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brain switch lets us control a kind of suspended animation in mice

Stimulating or inhibiting specific neurons in mice can put them in a hibernation-like state called torpor. The same trick works in rats that don't experience torpor naturally, suggesting it may also be possible in people

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Exotic fifth state of matter made on the International Space Station

An instrument on board the International Space Station contains one of the coldest places in the universe, and researchers have used it to create a cloud of frozen atoms

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Låg risk för komplikationer vid tandimplantat

Även om passformen i ett implantat inte är perfekt är risken för komplikationer ganska låg. Detta framkommer i en ny avhandling av tandläkaren Marco Toia som undersökt nära 600 italienska patienter med tandimplantat. De senaste årens utveckling inom implantat och tandersättningar har gått från manuell planerings- och framställningsprocess till att huvudsakligen utföras digitalt. Implantatsystem k

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Neutrophil 'safety net' causes cancer cells to metastasize and proliferate

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01672-3 Immune cells called neutrophils can support the spread of cancer. How neutrophils aid this process now comes into focus through insights into the function of structures called neutrophil extracellular traps.

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Cascade of electronic transitions in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2339-0 Electron–electron interactions in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene can split usually degenerate electronic bands, giving rise to a cascade of electronic transitions revealed by spectroscopy.

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Neurons that regulate mouse torpor

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2387-5 A specific neuronal population in the medial and lateral preoptic area of the hypothalamus regulates entry into torpor in mice.

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Observation of Bose–Einstein condensates in an Earth-orbiting research lab

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2346-1 A Bose–Einstein condensate prepared in low Earth orbit shows a free-expansion time greater than one second, demonstrating the advantages of a microgravity environment for such studies.

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DNA of neutrophil extracellular traps promotes cancer metastasis via CCDC25

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2394-6 DNA from neutrophil extracellular traps interacts with the transmembrane receptor CCDC25 on cancer cells, activating the ILK-β-parvin pathway to enhance cell motility and promote distant metastases.

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Leveraging excited-state coherence for synthetic control of ultrafast dynamics

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2353-2 Information from quantum coherence observations guides synthetic modifications of an iron-based chromophore, increasing the excited-state dynamics lifetime by a factor of 20, with implications for photo-induced electron-transfer applications.

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Borrow crisis tactics to get COVID-19 supplies to where they are needed

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01750-6 Emergency procedures that keep electricity running and food banks stocked can also keep health workers in protective equipment.

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Topological polaritons and photonic magic angles in twisted α-MoO3 bilayers

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2359-9 The photonic dispersion of phonon polaritons in bilayers of α-phase molybdenum trioxide can undergo tunable topological transitions at magic interlayer twist angles.

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Self-templating assembly of soft microparticles into complex tessellations

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2341-6 A hexagonal self-assembled monolayer of soft microparticles acts as the template for a second layer of the same particles, forcing the formation of patterns with unexpected structural symmetries and complexities.

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Good news: US classrooms are warming to evolution, thanks in part to scientist outreach

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01454-x Advocacy works, but more must be done to protect against misinformation.

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Structure of a nascent membrane protein as it folds on the BAM complex

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2370-1 Cryo-electron microscopy structures of a folding intermediate on the BAM complex of Escherichia coli reveal how interactions between the BamA catalyst and substrate permit stable association during folding, followed by rapid turnover.

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Flipping the switch on the body's thermoregulatory system

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01600-5 A population of excitatory neurons has been found to have a key role in controlling body temperature in rodents. The discovery adds to a body of work that is raising questions about long-standing models of thermoregulation.

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An in vitro model of early anteroposterior organization during human development

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2383-9 Human gastruloids—three-dimensional aggregates derived from human embryonic stem cells—show features of human embryos at around 19–21 days, and provide a model for the study of early human development.

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Transcriptional regulation of strigolactone signalling in Arabidopsis

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2382-x Many of the molecular targets of strigolactones—plant hormones involved in development and in interactions with symbiotic and parasitic organisms—are uncovered, revealing how strigolactones function and an intriguing role for self-regulation of a downstream transcription factor.

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Structure of a D2 dopamine receptor–G-protein complex in a lipid membrane

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2379-5 The structure of the D2 dopamine receptor in complex with its G protein reveals how dopamine receptors are activated and, importantly, how a G-protein-coupled receptor can interact with its G protein in a phospholipid membrane.

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A discrete neuronal circuit induces a hibernation-like state in rodents

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2163-6 In rodents, activation of a population of neurons characterized by the expression of the neuropeptide QRFP induces a hibernation-like state of long-lasting hypothermia and hypometabolism.

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Cascade of phase transitions and Dirac revivals in magic-angle graphene

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2373-y Local electronic compressibility measurements of magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene show that the insulating and superconducting phases of this system are both derived from a high-energy symmetry-broken state.

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Megathrust shear force controls mountain height at convergent plate margins

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2340-7 Simulations using a force balance model match mountain heights observed around the globe, suggesting that mountain elevation is almost completely controlled by tectonic forces rather than erosion.

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Mountain height might be controlled by tectonic force, rather than erosion

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01601-4 What controls the height of mountain ranges? An analysis of the forces acting on mountains near tectonic-plate boundaries suggests that tectonic forces are the main controller, rather than climate-driven erosion.

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A Cambrian crown annelid reconciles phylogenomics and the fossil record

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2384-8 Dannychaeta tucolus, a bristle worm from the early Cambrian period, belongs to crown annelids, and has characters that provide evidence of ecological and morphological diversity in ancient annelids, thus reconciling the fossil record with molecular phylogenetic analyses.

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Quantum matter orbits Earth

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01653-6 Exotic ultracold gases called Bose–Einstein condensates have been created on board the International Space Station. This feat is not only a technological landmark, but could also improve our understanding of fundamental physics.

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Lack of mitochondria causes severe disease in children

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that excessive degradation of the power plants of our cells plays an important role in the onset of mitochondrial disease in children. These inherited metabolic disorders can have severe consequence such as brain dysfunction and neurological impairment. The study is published in EMBO Molecular Medicine.

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Public-Health Experts Are Not Hypocrites

The past two weeks have seen no shortage of enraging events—from the murder of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, by a white police officer to the continued police brutality during the ensuing protests across the country. But some have directed their outrage elsewhere: at public-health experts, whose choice to support the anti-racism demonstrations has been called the latest example of liberal h

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Saudi Arabia Isn't Just Raising Taxes

Iconic images from the 1970s show long lines at gas stations across the United States—a group of Arab nations had imposed an oil embargo on the U.S. for supporting Israel during the 1973 Arab-Israeli War. The price of oil nearly quadrupled, causing gas shortages that hit Americans badly, while leaving countries such as Saudi Arabia so rich that they dismantled their tax bureaucracies. In the foll

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Amazon vil stoppe politiets brug af deres ansigtsgenkendelses-teknologi i et år

Både IBM og Amazon har i ugens løb erklæret sig skeptiske overfor ansigtsgenkendelse, men skepsissen er ikke delt af det danske folketing.

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Live Coronavirus Updates: Schools Face Hurdles

A New York drugmaker is set to begin a clinical trial of a new antibody treatment. A treatment of last resort: A virus patient is recovering from a double lung transplant.

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Alan Turing obituary – archive, 10 June 1954

10 June 1954: Dr Turing was one of the pioneers of the electronic calculating machine in Britain Alan Turing is recognised as a key figure in Britain's codebreaking efforts at Bletchley Park during the second world war, a mathematical genius and even the father of modern computing and artificial intelligence. An inquest will be held to-day on Dr Alan Mathison Turing , reader in the theory of comp

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Regeringen: Små 5G-antenner skal kunne sættes op uden tilladelse

PLUS. Regeringen lægger op til at små 5G-celler skal undtages for byggetilladelser og sættes op uden bygnings-ejerens tilladelse, så teleselskabernes udrulningen af 5G går stærkere. Men EU-Kommissionen spænder foreløbigt ben for de mere lempelige regler.

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Danske alger kan nedbringe methan fra kobøvser markant

PLUS. Et australsk studie viser, at en tropisk rødalge kan nedbringe mængden af methan fra kobøvser med 40-98 procent. Herhjemme har forskere især et godt øje til brunalgers potentiale for reduktion af landbrugets klimabelastning.

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Photonic Readout of Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Counting Detectors

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65971-5

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Detachment of cell sheets from clinically ubiquitous cell culture vessels by ultrasonic vibration

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66375-1

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Enhanced rate capabilities in a glass-ceramic-derived sodium all-solid-state battery

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66410-1

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Vagus nerve stimulation even after injury ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephropathy via reducing macrophage infiltration

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66295-0

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Incidental Findings on Brain MRI in People with HIV Infection

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66443-6

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The kinetics and mechanism of the uranium hydride – water vapour system under ambient conditions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66462-3

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Topical application of endothelin receptor a antagonist attenuates imiquimod-induced psoriasiform skin inflammation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66490-z

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Seasonal variation in net ecosystem CO2 exchange of a Brazilian seasonally dry tropical forest

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66415-w Seasonal variation in net ecosystem CO 2 exchange of a Brazilian seasonally dry tropical forest

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Cascade sets the stage for superconductivity in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene

The researchers used scanning tunneling microscopy to observe what happens when they add additional electrons to magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene. They observed a cascade of transitions in the electronic properties, patterns that could help unlock how superconductivity emerge in these materials.

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Solving a Parkinson's disease puzzle through protein design

EPFL researchers, in collaboration with UTSW and UCSD scientists, have developed a computational protein design approach, and used it to obtain the first ever high-resolution structure of an activated dopamine receptor in its natural cell membrane environment. The breakthrough will open up a new dimension in drug discovery for Parkinson's disease and perhaps other disorders.

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Applying 'magic angle' twistronics to manipulate the flow of light

'Twisted' layers of 2D materials produce photonic topological transition at 'magic' rotation angles. Moire-pattern bilayer graphene principles applied to 2D material photonics for the first time hold promise for leapfrog advances in light-driven technologies including nano-imaging devices, high-speed, low-energy optical computers, and biosensors.

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Viewing dopamine receptors in their native habitat

A new study led by UT Southwestern researchers reveals the structure of the active form of one type of dopamine receptor, known as D2, embedded in a phospholipid membrane.

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