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Coronavirus second waves emerge in several US states as they reopen

As they reopen, several US states are seeing rises in coronavirus cases and hospitalisations – but this may also be driven by poor health care and lags in contact tracing

59min

New approach to turning on the heat in energy-burning fat cells

Researchers have discovered a new set of signals that cells send and receive to prompt one type of fat cell to convert fat into heat. The signaling pathway, discovered in mice, has potential implications for activating this same type of thermogenic fat in humans.

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LATEST

Baboon model could aide in Alzheimer's disease interventions

Scientists recently published findings indicating the baboon could prove to be a relevant model to test therapeutics and interventions for neurodegenerative diseases, such as early stage Alzheimer's and related dementias.

4min

Surface disturbance can limit mule deer migration

Researchers used 145 migrations from 56 individual deer to examine disturbance effects at various scales. Results consistently showed that mule deer use of migration corridors steeply declined when surface disturbance from roads and well pads surpassed 3%. Mule deer were able to migrate through areas where surface disturbance was lower.

4min

Climate change: Warm springtime's unwelcome legacy

A new study shows that the severe impact of the summer drought that hit Europe in 2018 was partly due to the spring heatwave that preceded it, which triggered early and rapid plant growth, depleting soil moisture.

4min

Red pandas tracked by satellite in conservation 'milestone'

Red pandas in Nepal are being monitored in their last stronghold in the mountainous forests of Nepal.

20min

Remixed mantle suggests early start of plate tectonics

New research on the remixing of Earth's stratified deep interior suggests that global plate tectonic processes, which played a pivotal role in the existence of life on Earth, started to operate at least 3.2 billion years ago.

32min

Plant cell gatekeepers' diversity could be key to better crops

Scientists have shed new light on how the network of gatekeepers that controls the traffic in and out of plant cells works, which they think is key to develop food crops with bigger yields and greater ability to cope with extreme environments.

32min

Protecting bays from ocean acidification

As oceans absorb more human-made carbon dioxide from the air, a process of ocean acidification occurs that can have a negative impact on marine life. But coastal waterways, such as Chesapeake Bay, can also suffer from low oxygen and acidification. New research identifies one way to protect these waterways — the presence of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV).

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New algorithm uses artificial intelligence to help manage type 1 diabetes

Researchers and physicians have designed a method to help people with type 1 diabetes better manage their glucose levels. The method relies upon artificial intelligence and automated monitoring.

1h

Parasites and the microbiome

In a study of ethnically diverse people from Cameroon, the presence of a parasite infection was closely linked to the make-up of the gastrointestinal microbiome, according to a research team.

1h

Novel mechanism triggers a cellular immune response

Researchers present comprehensive evidence that supports a novel trigger for a cell-mediated response and propose a mechanism for its action.

1h

Author Correction: Potential circadian effects on translational failure for neuroprotection

Nature, Published online: 13 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2427-1

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Latin American scientists join the coronavirus vaccine race: 'No one's coming to rescue us'

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01756-0 Researchers fear that breakthroughs from abroad will be too slow or inequitably shared to benefit the global south.

1h

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: Experts call for more awareness of the potential impact of physical distancing on adolescent peer relationships and social development

Authors of an opinion piece, based on a review of evidence and published in The Lancet Child and Adolescent Health journal, are urging policymakers to consider the effects of physical distancing measures introduced to tackle the spread of COVID-19 on young people's social development and wellbeing.

1h

COVID-19 in Geneva, less than 11% have been infected

A study carried out among 2766 people reveals that, at the time of the decline of the Coronavirus pandemic, only 10.8% of the Geneva population had been infected with Covid-19. Moreover, compared to adults between 20 and 50 years of age, children between 5 and 9 years of age are three times less likely to be infected and those over 65 years of age half as likely. These results were published in th

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A New Air Taxi Model Takes Design Cues From a Far-Flying Bird

Beta Technologies' Alia, which debuted Friday, draws inspiration from the ultra-efficient Arctic tern. The craft may one day transport organs for transplants.

1h

Bird feeding helps females more than males

A new study shows that female birds benefit more from extra food in the winter. If females receive additional food, they do not need to reduce their body temperature as much as they would have otherwise, and the chances of surviving cold nights increase.

1h

Why People Of Color Are Disproportionately Hit By COVID-19

Data shows Black and Hispanic populations face higher exposure to coronavirus, plus bigger hurdles for medical treatment and level of care.

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Trusted portable hard drives for taking your data on the go

Portable data storage options. (Jonathan Farber via Unsplash/) There are a number of factors to consider when it comes to external hard drives. How much data are you likely to need to store? Do you ever plan to disconnect it from your home computer or gaming console? Is it likely that the hard drive will end up in rough situations? Thankfully, there are plenty of options for everyone, including t

1h

Mixture and migration brought food production to sub-Saharan Africa

A new interdisciplinary study reports on 20 newly sequenced ancient genomes from sub-Saharan Africa, including the first genomes from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Botswana, and Uganda. The study documents the coexistence, movements, interactions and admixture of diverse human groups during the spread of food production in sub-Saharan Africa.

2h

Discovery of oldest bow and arrow technology in Eurasia

The origins of human innovation have traditionally been sought in the grasslands and coasts of Africa or the temperate environments of Europe. More extreme environments, such as the tropical rainforests of Asia, have been largely overlooked, despite their deep history of human occupation. A new study provides the earliest evidence for bow-and-arrow use, and perhaps the making of clothes, outside o

2h

A vitamin A analog may help treat diabetic retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among the working-age population. A new study reports that visual function in diabetic mice was significantly improved after treatment with a single dose of visual chromophore 9-cis-retinal, a vitamin A analog that can form a visual pigment in the retina cells, thereby producing a light sensitive element of

2h

ET Deals: Dell Vostro 15 3590 Core i7 Laptop Under $700, Amazon Echo Dot for $8.98, $152 Off 27-Inch UltraSharp 4K USB-C Monitor

Dell's Vostro laptops are well equipped to handle the heavy workloads of today's offices, and for a limited time, you can get one of these fine systems with the price cut nearly in half. This particular system comes loaded with a 10th Gen Intel Core i7 processor and it has a 256GB NVMe SSD to quickly boot and load files. Dell Vostro 15 3590 Intel Core i7-10510U 1080p 15.6-Inch Laptop w/ 8GB DDR4

2h

NASA's Mars rover drivers need your help

You may be able to help NASA's Curiosity rover drivers better navigate Mars. Using the online tool AI4Mars to label terrain features in pictures downloaded from the Red Planet, you can train an artificial intelligence algorithm to automatically read the landscape.

2h

Oleh Hornykiewicz, Who Discovered Parkinson's Treatment, Dies at 93

His research into dopamine led to the mainstay treatment still used today to treat millions of people with Parkinson's.

2h

NASA names first woman to head human spaceflight

The NASA official who managed the inaugural private crewed flight into space last month has been promoted to become the first female head of human spaceflight, the agency said Friday, as it prepares to return people to the Moon in 2024.

2h

A Bill in Congress Would Limit Uses of Facial Recognition

Amazon, Microsoft, and IBM say they want federal rules around the technology. Critics of the proposal, sponsored by four Democrats, say it doesn't go far enough.

2h

Temperature spike: Earth ties record high heat May reading

Earth's temperature spiked to tie a record high for May, U.S. meteorologists reported Friday.

2h

Live Coronavirus News

The C.D.C. projects 124,000 to 140,000 deaths in the U.S. by the Fourth of July. Fifty-eight members of the Guatemalan president's staff have tested positive.

2h

UCI researchers uncover cancer cell vulnerabilities; may lead to better cancer therapies

A new University of California, Irvine-led study reveals a protein responsible for genetic changes resulting in a variety of cancers, may also be the key to more effective, targeted cancer therapy.

3h

Royal Marsden trial leads to practice changing milestone for advanced anal cancer

Results from the first ever randomised clinical trial in advanced anal cancer patients, led and supported by The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Cancer Research UK, in collaboration with colleagues in the US, Norway and Australia, has led to a practice changing milestone with a new approach to treatment which is safer and more effective than previously recommended treatments for this group

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What you need to know to protest safely and securely

Black Lives Matters protests have continue from Memorial Day through mid-June. (Patrick Behn/Pixabay/) Wear a mask. Stay hydrated. Use an encrypted messaging app. Sounds simple right? Whether you're out protesting for Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, Tony McDade, or the hundreds of other Black Americans who've died from systemic racism in health care , community policing , and more , key precautions

3h

Could Statins Reduce the Severity of COVID-19?

The cholesterol-lowering drugs quell inflammation and reverse endothelial tissue damage, hints that they might curb the body's excessive immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection.

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Am I immune to COVID-19 if I have antibodies?

There are still a lot of questions about who is and isn't immune to COVID-19

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Researchers Discover People Are Not So Good At Detecting Sick People By Their Coughs

Researchers at the University of Michigan have conducted an experiment to discover how well people could detect people with illnesses from healthy people by the sound of coughs and sneezes.

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Intel's Jim Keller Leaves the Company for 'Personal Reasons'

The Robert N. Boyce Building in Santa Clara, California, is the world headquarters for Intel Corporation. This photo is from Jan. 23, 2019. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation) Jim Keller, the designer behind AMD's Zen and lead chip architect at Intel for the past two years, has left the company abruptly. Intel's statement on the matter says only that Keller departed for "personal reasons,"

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Face masks critical in preventing spread of COVID-19

A study by a team of researchers led by a Texas A&M University professor has found that not wearing a face mask dramatically increases a person's chances of being infected by the COVID-19 virus.

4h

Parasites and the microbiome

In a study of ethnically diverse people from Cameroon, the presence of a parasite infection was closely linked to the make-up of the gastrointestinal microbiome, according to a research team led by Penn scientists.

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CDC warns US 'not out of the woods' on coronavirus

Health body urges people at gatherings such as protests and rallies to wear masks and stay apart

4h

Anti-poverty scheme linked to lower deforestation rates in Indonesia

A poverty alleviation programme has been linked with a 30 per cent reduction in forest loss in villages in Indonesia, which has the world's highest deforestation rate

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New analysis claims the FDA rushed ketamine's approval for depression treatment

A new analysis in The British Journal of Psychiatry claims the FDA approval process for ketamine was rushed. Only one of three clinical trials showed efficacy, while the discontinuation trial produced troubling outcomes. Ketamine's side effects include anxiety, poor appetite, delusions, hallucinations, paranoia, rage, and craving. There was a lot of excitement when the FDA fast-tracked ketamine t

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Traveling with a baby? Here are the supplies you'll need

Items to make traveling with your little ones easier. (Octav Cado via Unsplash/) Traveling with young kids and babies can be a tough and thankless task. Parents often have to deal with long lines, delays, unexpected accidents, and incessant crying. Single dads may not have access to changing stations and other parents may have to do a quick diaper change in the most inconvenient of locations. Occ

4h

NASA Awards Launch Contract for Water-Hunting Lunar Rover

For the first time in years, NASA is gearing up to send humans to the Moon. The agency's Artemis program aims to have boots on the Moon by 2024, but those boots will necessarily be preceded by wheels. VIPER is one of the many robotic missions currently planned to support human exploration of the Moon, and NASA has just awarded a contract to get VIPER to the lunar south pole. In the Apollo era, sc

4h

Opinion: Surgisphere Fiasco Highlights Need for Proper QA

Our handbook on best practices for quality assurance in biomedicine can help funding agencies shore up research integrity–which is especially needed at a time when mistakes can have outsize effects.

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New algorithm uses artificial intelligence to help manage type 1 diabetes

Researchers and physicians at Oregon Health & Science University have designed a method to help people with type 1 diabetes better manage their glucose levels. The method relies upon artificial intelligence and automated monitoring.

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Playards to keep your baby or toddler happy and safe

A place to play. (Amazon /) New parents are always reluctant to let go of their little ones. But let us assure you there will come a time when both you and baby need your space and these playards are the perfect place to let baby have some not-so-free time. Playards give baby a chance to learn the ropes, test out their first steps, play independently and explore without their parents assisting ev

4h

An Obscure Field of Math Might Help Unlock Mysteries of Human Perception

How hyperbolic geometry, once considered mathematical heresy, could help us understand human perception.

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Coronavirus News Roundup, June 6-June 12

Pandemic highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Terrifying Argument Says Economy Will Collapse For Real in August

Pending Catastrophe There's a chance that the worst of the damage caused by the coronavirus pandemic hasn't happened yet. According to a troubling BuzzFeed News op-ed , the real economic and societal collapse could arrive in August. Part of the problem, according to BuzzFeed's argument, is that many of the measures put in place by the U.S. government to mitigate the coronavirus's impact will expi

4h

Swinging chairs for a relaxing afternoon outside

Sit back and relax. (Amazon/) Swinging above the ground is one of those rare feelings that's just about as close to weightlessness as you can get without jumping in the water. From rocking chairs to hammocks, many inventions are designed for the sole purpose of leveling up on the relief that comes from taking a seat. If you have an outdoor space that you're looking to claim or a corner of your li

4h

Regular volunteering maintains the health of older adults

A new study has confirmed that volunteering is good for your health. The researchers found that volunteering two hours a week reduced the risk of death in older adults. The test subjects also reported a greater sense of meaning, more optimism, and got more exercise. A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine has confirmed that volunteering in your golden years is fantast

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Behind the Byline With Ed Yong

In our series "Behind the Byline," we're chatting with Atlantic staffers to learn more about who they are and how they approach their work. Ed Yong is a staff writer who covers science. He writes about everything from hagfish slime to giraffe tackling, but since March, he has focused all his reportorial energy on the pandemic. This interview has been lightly edited and condensed. Nesima Aberra: H

5h

Coder-Turned-Kingpin Paul Le Roux Gets His Comeuppance

The programmer who became a flagrant drug lord and weapons trafficker was sentenced in New York City to 25 years in prison.

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Grass-roots groups take on the hard work of correcting coronavirus disparities

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01781-z Noha Aboelata, the head of a community health centre in Oakland, California, tailors testing to suit communities of colour.

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A secluded icy fortress shelters rare whales

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01780-0 Bowhead whale stock has survived by wintering under the Arctic ice.

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Scientists Hunting For Signs of the "Dark Age" Before Stars Formed

Dark Ages For the first several hundred million years after the Bing Bang, the universe was a dark, opaque void . After that, the hydrogen atoms that made up most of the cosmos began to clump together and ionize, eventually forming the first stars that would light up the sky. That "dark age" of the universe remains poorly understood. But a team of Washington University scientists is hunting for a

5h

America Is Already Different Than It Was Two Weeks Ago

A lot has changed these past couple of weeks. As protesters have gathered following the killing of George Floyd at the hands of police in late May, the Black Lives Matter movement has rapidly gained public support . Seizing or at least reading the moment, politicians, companies, and organizations have announced a flurry of new policies and revised positions intended to address structural racism.

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Pandemics and the environment: China's COVID-19 interventions reduced nitrogen dioxide levels

A new Special Collection of Science Advances papers will delve into how pandemics such as COVID-19 affect — and are affected by — global environmental conditions, underscoring the interconnectedness of

5h

Research links personality traits to toilet paper stockpiling

People who feel more threatened by COVID-19 and rank highly on scales of emotionality and conscientiousness were most likely to stockpile toilet paper in March 2020, according to a new study by Theo Toppe of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and colleagues.

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Inhibitory interneurons in hippocampus excite the developing brain

A new study from the George Washington University, however, reports that in some critical structures of the developing brain, the inhibitory neurons cause excitation rather than suppression of brain activity. The findings, published in Science Advances, could have implications for the treatment of neonatal seizures.

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LJI scientists uncover immune cells that may lower airway allergy and asthma risk

In a new Science Immunology study, published on June 12, 2020, scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) offer a clue to why non-allergic people don't have a strong reaction to house dust mites. They've uncovered a previously unknown subset of T cells that may control allergic immune reactions and asthma from ever developing in response to house dust mites–and other possible allergens

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Research links personality traits to toilet paper stockpiling

People who feel more threatened by COVID-19 and rank highly on scales of emotionality and conscientiousness were most likely to stockpile toilet paper in March 2020, according to a new study published June 12, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Lisa Garbe (University of Saint Gallen, Switzerland), Richard Rau (Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitat Munster, Germany), and Theo Toppe (the Max Pl

5h

Mixture and migration brought food production to sub-Saharan Africa

A new interdisciplinary study published in the journal Science Advances reports on 20 newly sequenced ancient genomes from sub-Saharan Africa, including the first genomes from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Botswana, and Uganda. The study documents the coexistence, movements, interactions and admixture of diverse human groups during the spread of food production in sub-Saharan Africa.

5h

Cash me outside: Transfers to the poor linked to eco-benefits

In a new study, researchers recently discovered that Indonesia's national anti-poverty program reduced deforestation by about 30%.

5h

The best parents: Genetically as divergent as possible with similar preferences

The more diverse in genetics, than better. But only in cases of similar preferences. A team of researchers led by IPK Gatersleben has succeeded in providing answers to a long unsolved question in the breeding of plant hybrids.

5h

Discovery of oldest bow and arrow technology in Eurasia

The origins of human innovation have traditionally been sought in the grasslands and coasts of Africa or the temperate environments of Europe. More extreme environments, such as the tropical rainforests of Asia, have been largely overlooked, despite their deep history of human occupation. A new study provides the earliest evidence for bow-and-arrow use, and perhaps the making of clothes, outside o

5h

Sun umbrellas and shades that instantly upgrade your yard

Always have a place in the shade. ( Aldo Terrazas via Unsplash/) When the weather warms up and the sun comes out, your home's outdoor space becomes an instant focal point for relaxation and entertaining. No matter what size your yard, adequate shade from the sun is the key to enjoying yourself on a beautiful day. If you have a grilling and picnic area, a large open lawn, or even a small garden wi

5h

Reusable sandwich bags and wraps for eco-friendly eats

Say goodbye to single-use plastic. (Asnim Asnim via Unsplash/) Moving toward a zero-waste lifestyle requires changing habits. The best eco-friendly products help you make the transition seamlessly, with a minimum of fuss. If the convenience of air-tight zippered bags or plastic-wrapped PB+J is part of your everyday routine, washable silicone or cloth bags and beeswax wraps are a great solution. W

5h

SHAGGY-like kinase 12 regulates flowering through mediating CONSTANS stability in Arabidopsis

Photoperiod is a major environmental cue that determines the floral transition from vegetative to reproductive development in flowering plants. Arabidopsis thaliana responds to photoperiodic signals mainly through a central regulator CONSTANS (CO). Although it has been suggested that phosphorylation of CO contributes to its role in photoperiodic control of flowering, how this is regulated so far

5h

Transfer of orbital angular momentum of light to plasmonic excitations in metamaterials

The emergence of the vortex beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM) has provided intriguing possibilities to induce optical transitions beyond the framework of the electric dipole interaction. The uniqueness stems from the OAM transfer from light to material, as demonstrated in electronic transitions in atomic systems. In this study, we report on the OAM transfer to electrons in solid-state syst

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Negative dominance and dominance-by-dominance epistatic effects reduce grain-yield heterosis in wide crosses in wheat

The genetics underlying heterosis, the difference in performance of crosses compared with midparents, is hypothesized to vary with relatedness between parents. We established a unique germplasm comprising three hybrid wheat sets differing in the degree of divergence between parents and devised a genetic distance measure giving weight to heterotic loci. Heterosis increased steadily with heterotic

5h

An ancient push-pull pollination mechanism in cycads

Most cycads engage in brood-site pollination mutualisms, yet the mechanism by which the Cycadales entice pollination services from diverse insect mutualists remains unknown. Here, we characterize a push-pull pollination mechanism between a New World cycad and its weevil pollinators that mirrors the mechanism between a distantly related Old World cycad and its thrips pollinators. The behavioral co

5h

Three-dimensional superlattice engineering with block copolymer epitaxy

Three-dimensional (3D) structures at the nanometer length scale play a crucial role in modern devices, but their fabrication using traditional top-down approaches is complex and expensive. Analogous to atomic lattices, block copolymers (BCPs) spontaneously form a rich variety of 3D nanostructures and have the potential to substantially simplify 3D nanofabrication. Here, we show that the 3D superl

5h

Ancient genomes reveal complex patterns of population movement, interaction, and replacement in sub-Saharan Africa

Africa hosts the greatest human genetic diversity globally, but legacies of ancient population interactions and dispersals across the continent remain understudied. Here, we report genome-wide data from 20 ancient sub-Saharan African individuals, including the first reported ancient DNA from the DRC, Uganda, and Botswana. These data demonstrate the contraction of diverse, once contiguous hunter-g

5h

Conditional cash transfers to alleviate poverty also reduced deforestation in Indonesia

Solutions to poverty and ecosystem degradation are often framed as conflicting. We ask whether Indonesia's national anti-poverty program, which transfers cash to hundreds of thousands of poor households, reduced deforestation as a side benefit. Although the program has no direct link to conservation, we estimate that it reduced tree cover loss in villages by 30% (95% confidence interval, 10 to 50

5h

The internal origin of the west-east asymmetry of Antarctic climate change

Recent Antarctic surface climate change has been characterized by greater warming trends in West Antarctica than in East Antarctica. Although this asymmetric feature is well recognized, its origin remains poorly understood. Here, by analyzing observation data and multimodel results, we show that a west-east asymmetric internal mode amplified in austral winter originates from the harmony of the at

5h

Multiplexed whole-animal imaging with reversibly switchable optoacoustic proteins

We introduce two photochromic proteins for cell-specific in vivo optoacoustic (OA) imaging with signal unmixing in the temporal domain. We show highly sensitive, multiplexed visualization of T lymphocytes, bacteria, and tumors in the mouse body and brain. We developed machine learning–based software for commercial imaging systems for temporal unmixed OA imaging, enabling its routine use in life s

5h

Marangoni flows drive the alignment of fibrillar cell-laden hydrogels

When a sessile droplet containing a solute in a volatile solvent evaporates, flow in the droplet can transport and assemble solute particles into complex patterns. Transport in evaporating sessile droplets has largely been examined in solvents that undergo complete evaporation. Here, we demonstrate that flow in evaporating aqueous sessile droplets containing type I collagen—a self-assembling poly

5h

Bows and arrows and complex symbolic displays 48,000 years ago in the South Asian tropics

Archaeologists contend that it was our aptitude for symbolic, technological, and social behaviors that was central to Homo sapiens rapidly expanding across the majority of Earth's continents during the Late Pleistocene. This expansion included movement into extreme environments and appears to have resulted in the displacement of numerous archaic human populations across the Old World. Tropical ra

5h

Mapping the 3D orientation of nanocrystals and nanostructures in human bone: Indications of novel structural features

Bone is built from collagen fibrils and biomineral nanoparticles. In humans, they are organized in lamellar twisting patterns on the microscale. It has been a central tenet that the biomineral nanoparticles are co-aligned with the bone nanostructure. Here, we reconstruct the three-dimensional orientation in human lamellar bone of both the nanoscale features and the biomineral crystal lattice from

5h

Self-assembled cGAMP-STING{Delta}TM signaling complex as a bioinspired platform for cGAMP delivery

The stimulator of interferon (IFN) genes (STING) pathway constitutes a highly important part of immune responses against various cancers and infections. Consequently, administration of STING agonists such as cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) has been identified as a promising approach to target these diseases. In cancer cells, STING signaling is frequently impaired by epigenetic silencing of STING; hence, c

5h

Enhancing the regenerative effectiveness of growth factors by local inhibition of interleukin-1 receptor signaling

Although growth factors (GFs) are key molecules for regenerative medicine, their use has been limited by issues associated with suboptimal delivery systems and incomplete understanding of their signaling dynamics. Here, we explored how proinflammatory signals affect GF regenerative potential. Using bone regeneration in mouse, we found that the regenerative capacity of two clinically relevant GFs

5h

Recording brain activities in unshielded Earths field with optically pumped atomic magnetometers

Understanding the relationship between brain activity and specific mental function is important for medical diagnosis of brain symptoms, such as epilepsy. Magnetoencephalography (MEG), which uses an array of high-sensitivity magnetometers to record magnetic field signals generated from neural currents occurring naturally in the brain, is a noninvasive method for locating the brain activities. The

5h

Developmental biology of Helicoforamina reveals holozoan affinity, cryptic diversity, and adaptation to heterogeneous environments in the early Ediacaran Wengan biota (Doushantuo Formation, South China)

The exceptional fossil preservation of the early Ediacaran Weng'an biota provides a unique window on the interval of Earth history in which animal lineages emerged. It preserves a diversity of similarly ornamented encysted developmental stages previously interpreted as different developmental stages of one taxon. Although Helicoforamina wenganica is distinguished from other forms by a helical gro

5h

A highly potent lymphatic system-targeting nanoparticle cyclosporine prevents glomerulonephritis in mouse model of lupus

Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a powerful immunosuppressant, but it is an ineffective stand-alone treatment for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) due to poor target tissue distribution and renal toxicity. We hypothesized that CD71 (transferrin receptor 1)–directed delivery of CsA to the lymphatic system would improve SLE outcomes in a murine model. We synthesized biodegradable, ligand-conjugated nanopa

5h

GABAergic interneurons excite neonatal hippocampus in vivo

GABAergic interneurons are proposed to be critical for early activity and synapse formation by directly exciting, rather than inhibiting, neurons in developing hippocampus and neocortex. However, the role of GABAergic neurons in the generation of neonatal network activity has not been tested in vivo, and recent studies have challenged the excitatory nature of early GABA. By locally manipulating i

5h

Skeletal muscle antagonizes antiviral CD8+ T cell exhaustion

CD8 + T cells become functionally impaired or "exhausted" in chronic infections, accompanied by unwanted body weight reduction and muscle mass loss. Whether muscle regulates T cell exhaustion remains incompletely understood. We report that mouse skeletal muscle increased interleukin (IL)–15 production during LCMV clone 13 chronic infection. Muscle-specific ablation of Il15 enhanced the CD8 + T ce

5h

The science behind sex, gender, and athletic competition is still pretty shaky

Medical physicist Joanna Harper is going the distance in researching when and how trans athletes should qualify for women's sports. (Jon Enoch/) Popular Science 's Play issue is now available to everyone. Read it now, no app or credit card required. Joanna Harper's research started not in a lab, but on the track. Though she didn't have a background in sports science—she held a master's in medical

5h

The best plant parents: Genetically as divergent as possible with similar preferences

A team of researchers led by IPK Gatersleben has succeeded in providing answers to a long unsolved question in the breeding of plant hybrids. Their conclusions: the more diverse in genetics, than better, but only in cases of similar preferences.

5h

5h

Mixture and migration brought food production to sub-Saharan Africa

A new interdisciplinary study published in the journal Science Advances reports on 20 newly sequenced ancient genomes from sub-Saharan Africa, including the first genomes from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Botswana, and Uganda. The study documents the coexistence, movements, interactions and admixture of diverse human groups during the spread of food production in sub-Saharan Africa.

5h

The best plant parents: Genetically as divergent as possible with similar preferences

A team of researchers led by IPK Gatersleben has succeeded in providing answers to a long unsolved question in the breeding of plant hybrids. Their conclusions: the more diverse in genetics, than better, but only in cases of similar preferences.

5h

Cash me outside: Transfers to the poor linked to eco-benefits

In a new study, researchers recently discovered that Indonesia's national anti-poverty program reduced deforestation by about 30%.

5h

Discovery of oldest bow and arrow technology in Eurasia

The origins of human innovation have traditionally been sought in the grasslands and coasts of Africa or the temperate environments of Europe. More extreme environments, such as the tropical rainforests of Asia, have been largely overlooked, despite their deep history of human occupation. A new study provides the earliest evidence for bow-and-arrow use, and perhaps the making of clothes, outside o

5h

Brazilian Amazon deforestation hits new record in May

Deforestation continued to surge in the Brazilian Amazon last month, according to official figures released Friday, showing it was the worst May and worst first five months of the year on record.

5h

Ukraine scientists see signs of hope after huge Chernobyl fires

Ukrainian scientist Oleksandr Borsuk looks bitterly at the charred trunks of old pine trees as the acrid smell of burnt wood hangs in the air.

5h

Protecting bays from ocean acidification

As oceans absorb more man-made carbon dioxide from the air, a process of ocean acidification occurs that can have a negative impact on marine life. But coastal waterways, such as Chesapeake Bay, can also suffer from low oxygen and acidification. New research from the University of Delaware identifies one way to protect these waterways — the presence of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV).

5h

NASA catches development of Tropical Cyclone Nuri in South China Sea

A low-pressure system that developed in the Philippine Sea and tracked over the central Philippines has moved into the South China Sea and become a depression. NASA's Terra satellite provided an image of the newly formed storm.

5h

State-level R&D tax credits spur growth of new businesses: study

Here's some good news for U.S. states trying to spur an economic recovery in the years ahead: The R&D tax credit has a significant effect on entrepreneurship, according to a new study led by an MIT professor.

5h

This Flying Car Looks Like the DeLorean From "Back to the Future"

Doc! Israel startup Urban Aeronautics announced this week that it's partnering with hydrogen fuel cell maker HyPoint to devise a hydrogen-powered flying car. And the sleek, retro design will look familiar to fans of the DeLorean Motor Company — or anyone who's seen the 1985 time travel blockbuster "Back to the Future," featuring one of the company's vehicles. Also, you know, it flies. eVTOL The v

5h

Choose the Perfect Stock Photo Every Time With JumpStory's AI Tools

Stock photography is an essential part of any marketer's toolkit, which is why it's such a shame that the medium is often made into a laughingstock. Ultra-specific images and exaggerated visuals quickly get turned into memes when the context is taken away. That can make using stock images a real minefield — pick the wrong one and you just might see the image go viral for all the wrong reasons . W

5h

Bringing Back Sea Otters Benefits People, Too

These predators compete with fisheries for shellfish along the Pacific coast, but an economic analysis explains the positives of reintroduction

5h

Study shows optical fields can modify electrons in metal

Pittsburgh research coauthored by team from the Department of Physics and Astronomy reveals that optical fields have the ability to modify electronic properties of a solid.

5h

The Books Briefing: Readjusting Our Understanding of History

In the abolitionist Frederick Douglass's 1866 essay "Reconstruction," he dissects how the enterprise of slavery could not be righted without devising a plan that accounted for the danger in giving states too much autonomy. Douglass was keen to the way the institution of slavery could linger if not reckoned with honestly and ended definitively. Many inconsistent or inaccurate perceptions of Americ

5h

'It's really complicated.' United States and others wrestle with putting COVID-19 vaccines to the test

The World Health Organization and Operation Warp Speed try to prove a vaccine's worth in different ways

6h

State-level R&D tax credits spur growth of new businesses

Here's some good news for US states trying to spur an economic recovery in the years ahead: The R&D tax credit has a significant effect on entrepreneurship, according to a new study led by an MIT professor.

6h

Deepfakes Aren't Very Good. Nor Are the Tools to Detect Them

The winning detection algorithm from a Facebook-led challenge could spot about two-thirds of the altered videos, highlighting the need for improvement.

6h

Bird feeding helps females more than males

A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that female birds benefit more from extra food in the winter. If females receive additional food, they do not need to reduce their body temperature as much as they would have otherwise, and the chances of surviving cold nights increase.

6h

Innovative model provides insight into the behavior of the black hole at the center of our galaxy

Like most galaxies, the Milky Way hosts a supermassive black hole at its center. Called Sagittarius A*, the object has captured astronomers' curiosity for decades. And now there is an effort to image it directly.

6h

Bird feeding helps females more than males

A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that female birds benefit more from extra food in the winter. If females receive additional food, they do not need to reduce their body temperature as much as they would have otherwise, and the chances of surviving cold nights increase.

6h

Creating a non-toxic alternative to colored smoke

Colored smoke is increasingly employed as an element of spectacle in a broad spectrum of public events. However, the chemicals used for this purpose give rise to toxic by-products. LMU chemists have now developed a safe alternative.

6h

ATLAS Experiment searches for rare Higgs boson decays into a photon and a Z boson

The Higgs boson was discovered by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 through its decays into pairs of photons, W bosons and Z bosons. Since then, physicists at these experiments have gained great insight into the properties of the Higgs boson through the study of its different production and decay processes. Decays to pairs of tau leptons and bottom quar

6h

Coronapod: The Surgisphere scandal that rocked coronavirus drug research

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01790-y The latest from the hydroxychloroquine saga, as a questionable dataset threatens trust in science and forces major journals to review their processes

6h

Daily briefing: The Universe's coolest lab has created bizarre quantum matter in space

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01786-8 Physicists have made a Bose–Einstein condensate on the International Space Station. Plus: how healthy blood vessels might protect children from serious effects of COVID-19 and the hunt for the microbial 'dark matter' that has never been cultured in the lab.

6h

How a team of Venezuelan expats is fighting COVID-19 at home

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01784-w It started as a small group of friends. Now, hundreds of members around the world are channelling their skills to take on their country's most pressing needs, say Johanna Figueira and Samir Rachid Zaim.

6h

Coronavirus infections still falling across UK

Lockdown relaxation not yet affecting decline in numbers carrying the virus, ONS data show

6h

Renaissance hedge fund loses 20% this year

Secretive firm founded by Jim Simons caught out by market volatility

6h

Covid-19 death rates twice as high in England's most deprived areas

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

6h

Up to 45 percent of SARS-CoV-2 infections may be asymptomatic

Asymptomatic infections may have played a significant role in the early and ongoing spread of COVID-19 and highlight the need for expansive testing and contact tracing to mitigate the pandemic.

6h

Self-swabbing tests for COVID-19 accurate and safe, Stanford study reports

Test samples collected by people who swabbed their own nasal passages yielded results for the COVID-19 virus that were as accurate as samples collected by a health care worker, according to a small study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

6h

Mutation Allows Coronavirus to Infect More Cells, Study Finds. Scientists Urge Caution.

Geneticists said more evidence is needed to determine if a common genetic variation of the virus spreads more easily between people.

6h

First coronavirus R numbers for regions within England released

The south west of England has the highest rate of coronavirus spread in the UK, with an R number estimated to be in the range of 0.8 to 1.1

6h

The Covid-19 Economic Slump Is Closing Down Coal Plants

This year, coal usage has dropped in the US, and renewables now generate more electricity. To some experts, the financial crisis is a clean energy opportunity.

6h

Scientists Claim to Have Recreated Earth's First Life

Playing God A team of scientists believe that they've recreated the biochemical processes that gave rise to the earliest forms of life on Earth. Researchers from the University of Duisburg-Essen recreated the harsh conditions deep within the Earth's crust as it existed some 3.8 billion years ago , which is where they suspect life began. Under those conditions, they say they managed to create and

6h

Deep-sea currents are behind the ocean's thickest piles of microplastics

One square meter of sea floor can contain up to 1.9 million plastic pieces

6h

As rare animals disappear, scientist faces 'ecological grief'

As the wilds around Joanna Lamberts research sites in Africa and North America have vanished, the conservation biologist has struggled to keep hopeful amid the losses.

6h

NASA catches development of Tropical Cyclone Nuri in South China Sea

A low-pressure system that developed in the Philippine Sea and tracked over the central Philippines has moved into the South China Sea and become a depression. NASA's Terra satellite provided an image of the newly formed storm.

6h

Pitt study shows optical fields can modify electrons in metal

The paper, 'Coherent multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy of ultrafast quasiparticle dressing by light,' describes how applying intense optical fields to electrons in metals can change how electrons flow between the ions. The results could introduce new innovations by using light to control the properties of matter.

6h

Case series: Teriflunomide therapy in COVID-19 patients with MS

Co-authors present the cases of five multiple sclerosis patients who developed COVID-19 infection while taking the oral disease-modifying therapy teriflunomide and continued taking the medication. All five patients had favorable outcomes, with their COVID-19 taking a mild course and without experiencing relapse of their MS.

6h

Study links elevated levels of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) with breast cancer risk

Hollings Cancer Center researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and colleagues assessed the connection between dietary advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and breast cancer risk. The study was part of a larger decade-long prostate, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer screening trial (PLCO) designed and sponsored by the National Cancer Institute.

6h

A* model

Like most galaxies, the Milky Way hosts a supermassive black hole at its center. Called Sagittarius A*, the object has captured astronomers' curiosity for decades. And now there is an effort to image it directly.

6h

Don't Conceal Your Age. Instead, Slow Aging at the Cellular Level.

For thousands of years, humans have been coming up with new and inventive ways to conceal the effects of aging . And the reason is simple: nobody likes getting old. Fortunately, scientists today know more about the root causes of aging than ever before. And now innovative companies like Neurohacker Collective are creating incredibly advanced anti-aging supplements like Eternus that puts this scie

6h

There's still time to save about half of Earth's land

Roughly half of Earth's ice-free land remains without significant human influence, according to a new study. The study in Global Change Biology compares four recent global maps of the conversion of natural lands to human land uses to reach its conclusions. The more affected half of Earth's lands includes cities, croplands, and places intensively ranched or mined. "The encouraging takeaway from th

6h

World economy's challenge laid bare by new data

UK GDP shrinks by more than a fifth and eurozone industrial production suffers record fall

6h

MIT Wants to Put AI in Your Pocket With Confetti-Sized Brain Chip

The human brain operates on roughly 20 watts of power (a third of a 60-watt light bulb) in a space the size of, well, a human head. The biggest machine learning algorithms use closer to a nuclear power plant's worth of electricity and racks of chips to learn. That's not to slander machine learning, but nature may have a tip or two to improve the situation. Luckily, there's a branch of computer ch

7h

Hot holes are key in a plasmon-induced reaction of oxygen molecules on silver surfaces

Chemists at RIKEN have discovered why shining light on silver nanoparticles causes oxygen molecules attached to their surfaces to break off. This insight will help researchers design new catalysts that harness light energy.

7h

Three people with inherited diseases successfully treated with CRISPR

Two people with beta thalassaemia and one with sickle cell disease no longer need blood transfusions after their blood stem cells were gene edited and put back in their bodies

7h

Radioactive cloud over Europe had civilian background

A mysterious cloud containing radioactive ruthenium-106, which moved across Europe in autumn 2017, is still bothering Europe's radiation protection entities. Although the activity concentrations were innocuous, they reached up to 100 times the levels of what had been detected over Europe in the aftermath of the Fukushima accident. Since no government had assumed responsibility, a military backgrou

7h

Health profession: Social interdependence in active learning evaluated by Delphi procedure

Physicians must be competent collaborators with team members in order to practice medicine effectively. Health professional students have limited opportunities to work and learn together during the course of their medical education. Not only is it important for students to acquire prodigious knowledge, they must also learn how to collaborate well, and the results of their efforts must be evaluated

7h

People will need face masks if 2-metre rule relaxed, says Sage

Warning from UK government advisers reflects concerns over plans to reopen pubs and cafes Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists have warned ministers that people will need to wear facecoverings and minimise their time together if they sit closer than 2 metres apart, according to the latest tranche of documents released by the UK government's committee of experts

7h

How to handle a pepper spray attack

Pepper spray packs a serious punch. ( Spenser / Unsplash/) If you've ever accidentally touched your eyes after handling slices of jalapeño, you know the deep, searing pain that quickly follows. Now imagine that but 200 times worse. That's what it's like to be pepper-sprayed. Let that sink in for a moment. Pepper spray, along with tear gas , is one of the most common weapons in police departments'

7h

COVID-19 may trigger new diabetes, experts warn

Emerging evidence suggests that COVID-19 may actually trigger the onset of diabetes in healthy people and also cause severe complications of pre-existing diabetes.

7h

Fler arter av talgoxar och lärkor än tidigare känt

Det kan finnas fler olika arter av talgoxar än vad man hittills har trott. I en ny studie har fem huvudgrupper av denna småfågel identifierats, till skillnad från de tre grupper som vetenskapen har räknat med fram till nu. – Talgoxen finns över nästan hela Europa och Asien, och vår studie visar att den har en komplex utvecklingshistoria, där olika grupper isolerats genetiskt från varandra under l

7h

The two-year fight to stop Amazon from selling face recognition to the police

In the summer of 2018, nearly 70 civil rights and research organizations wrote a letter to Jeff Bezos demanding that Amazon stop providing face recognition technology to governments. As part of an increased focus on the role that tech companies were playing in enabling the US government's tracking and deportation of immigrants , it called on Amazon to "stand up for civil rights and civil libertie

7h

For Scientific Institutions, Racial Reconciliation Requires Reparations

Antiracism in science must be about much more than challenging the bigoted graybeards of our past — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Book: Racial inequality is baked into the legal system

Race and class inequalities are embedded in the American criminal legal system, the author of a new book argues. For Matthew Clair , the protests following the death of George Floyd are a stark reminder of the US's turbulent racial history. "In 2012 when I was in graduate school, I attended several protests in Boston following the acquittal of George Zimmerman, who killed Trayvon Martin, a Black

7h

Ambridge needs Alan Bennett | Brief letters

Psychedelic therapy | Statues | Veganism | Boris Johnson | The Archers monologues Robin Carhart-Harris says that the impact of psychedelic therapy is profound, with people experiencing emotional catharsis and physical rejuvenation ( We can no longer ignore the potential of psychedelic drugs to treat depression , 8 June). Yet studies only focus on treating patients with depression. Why are these l

7h

Clues to aging come to light in vivid snapshots of brain cell links

Striking images of some five billion brain cell connections have been created by scientists, mapping a lifetime's changes across the brain in minute detail.

7h

What control the height of mountains? Surprisingly, it is not erosion

Which forces and mechanisms determine the height of mountains? A group of researchers has now found a surprising answer: It is not erosion and weathering of rocks that determine the upper limit of mountain massifs, but rather an equilibrium of forces in the Earth's crust. This finding is fundamentally new and important for the earth sciences.

7h

Volunteerism: Doing good does you good

A new study takes a closer look at the benefits of volunteering to the health and well-being of volunteers, both validating and refuting findings from previous research. The results verify that adults over 50 who volunteer for at least 100 hours a year (about two hours per week) have a substantially reduced risk of mortality and developing physical limitations, higher levels of subsequent physical

7h

Could we run out of sand? Scientists adjust how grains are measured

How we account for sand is important for understanding how reefs, atolls and coastal regions will cope with the effects of climate change. Scientists have discovered models for measuring sand were giving incorrect information and have developed more accurate engineering models.

7h

City Passes Measure to Cancel Rent During Pandemic

Rent Freeze Thanks to a newly-passed resolution, Ithaca, New York could become the first U.S. city to cancel rent during the coronavirus pandemic. The resolution, which still requires state approval, would not only erase rent debt accrued over the last three months but also cancel rent payments for both tenants and small businesses going forward, Fast Company reports . If enacted, it would make I

7h

App tracks messed up body clocks during pandemic

A free app called Social Rhythms could help users understand their own sleep rhythms and shed light on how their biological clock is responding to lockdowns, researchers say. It can also give tips about how to shift their potentially disrupted rhythms to a more appropriate time. Almost overnight, the sleep and wake patterns of nearly four billion people may have changed because of COVID-19-spurre

7h

Mer forskning per försöksdjur ger bättre resultat och mindre lidande

Forskare föreslår ny strategi för utveckling av läkemedel och vaccin för att få ut mer av forskningen och samtidigt minska lidandet för försöksdjuren. Det handlar om att maximera den kunskap som varje försöksdjur bidrar med, snarare än att minimera antalet försöksdjur per experiment. Att utveckla läkemedel och behandlingsmetoder via djurförsök är en omfattande och viktig verksamhet. Förutom etisk

7h

Leaked CDC Documents: Coronavirus Is Spiking in US Again

Leaked documents dated to earlier this week, obtained from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention by Yahoo News , warn that new coronavirus cases are spiking again as Americans relax their social distancing practices. Even Dr. Anthony Fauci, the White House's top infectious disease expert and a national figurehead against the virus, lamented this week that the outbreak has become his

8h

Politics is now a dating deal-breaker, according to new research

According to a new survey from a popular dating website, 84 percent of people currently looking for a relationship through dating apps won't even consider dating someone with opposite political views. Additionally, 67 percent of the dating site's users have admitted to previously ending a relationship due to opposing political views. Licensed marriage therapist Dr. Gary Brown says that there is m

8h

Elastomeric masks provide a more durable, less costly option for health care workers

A cost-effective strategy for health care systems to offset N95 mask shortages due to COVID-19 is to switch to reusable elastomeric respirator masks.

8h

The best SSDs for portable digital storage

Need to store more? (Neal E. Johnson via Unsplash/) There was a time not long ago when almost any solid state drive would cost you an arm and a leg. That's no longer the case. In fact, the standard for fast storage drives are now affordable even in sturdy and compact portable form. These portable drives can allow you to both reduce load times on your favorite games while easily bringing them with

8h

Can space rocks on a distant asteroid explain Earth's water?

Micrometeoroids that delivered stardust to asteroid 4 Vesta also carried water, researchers report. The formation of our solar system was a messy affair. Most of the material that existed before its formation—material formed around other, long-dead stars—was vaporized, then recondensed into new materials. But some grains of that material from before the sun's birth still persist. These "stardust"

8h

Facebook just released a database of 100,000 deepfakes to teach AI how to spot them

Deepfakes⁠ have struck a nerve with the public and researchers alike. There is something uniquely disturbing about these AI-generated images of people appearing to say or do something they didn't. With tools for making deepfakes now widely available and relatively easy to use, many also worry that they will be used to spread dangerous misinformation. Politicians can have other people's words put

8h

Boendeform inte avgörande för nyanländas integration

Integrationsprocessen för nyanlända i Sverige är komplicerad, oavsett om man som asylsökande har ordnat sin bostad själv eller om man bor i en av Migrationsverkets anläggningar. Det menar Lina Sandström, nybliven doktor i sociologi vid Örebro universitet. Lina Sandström har intervjuat asylsökande från Syrien för att ta reda på hur de upplever möjligheterna till integration i Sverige. I arbetet me

8h

Prodigiosin-based solution has selective activity against cancer cells

Together with colleagues from the University of Palermo, KFU employees offer a nano preparation based on biocompatible halloysite nanotubes and bacterial pigment prodigiosin; the latter is known to selectively disrupt cancer cells without damaging the healthy ones.

8h

Radioactive cloud over Europe had civilian background

A mysterious cloud containing radioactive ruthenium-106, which moved across Europe in 2017, is still bothering Europe's radiation protection entities. German researchers now found out that the cloud did not originate from military sources but rather from civilian nuclear activities. The study has been published in Nature Communications.

8h

All that base

Researchers have created a new searchable library of base editors — an especially efficient and precise kind of genetic corrector. Using experimental data from editing more than 38,000 target sites in cells with 11 of the most popular base editors (BEs), they created a machine learning model that accurately predicts base editing outcomes. Called BE-Hive, the library is free and open to the public

8h

Changes in frequency of sex among US adults

This survey study of US adults ages 18 to 44 looked at changes in the reported frequency of sexual activity, the number of sexual partners and factors associated with frequency and numbers of partners.

8h

University of Michigan researchers identify new approach to turning on the heat in energy-burning fat cells

Researchers have discovered a new set of signals that cells send and receive to prompt one type of fat cell to convert fat into heat. The signaling pathway, discovered in mice, has potential implications for activating this same type of thermogenic fat in humans.

8h

Trump's Aides Are Desperately Trying to Soothe His Anxieties

The Trump campaign is busy fighting the battle for hearts and minds this week. Not voters' hearts and minds—at the moment, the president's reelection campaign is losing those left and right, with many recent polls showing his position slipping against the presumptive Democratic candidate, Joe Biden. Instead, the Trump reelection team is busy trying to soothe the president's own troubled mind, and

8h

The US Gov Is Paying a Crypto Startup to Explore a Digital Dollar

Digital Dollar The U.S. federal government just awarded a grant to the blockchain startup Key Retroactivity Network Consensus (KRNC) to study the feasibility of integrating cryptocurrency into the economy. That doesn't mean that the U.S. is going to pivot to a digital blockchain dollar, CoinDesk reports . Rather, the National Science Foundation funded KRNC because it's interested in exploring new

8h

Where have the swans gone?

Nearly 13 kilometers per year: that is the rate at which the wintering area of Bewick's swans has shifted east over the past 50 years. It's a discovery with consequences for the conservation of this migratory species, writes a team of researchers led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) in Global Change Biology.

8h

Where have the swans gone?

Nearly 13 kilometers per year: that is the rate at which the wintering area of Bewick's swans has shifted east over the past 50 years. It's a discovery with consequences for the conservation of this migratory species, writes a team of researchers led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) in Global Change Biology.

8h

Nitrogen in permafrost soils may exert great feedbacks on climate change

What nitrogen is getting up to in permafrost soils may be much more interesting than researchers have long believed—with potentially significant consequences for our management of climate change.

8h

Analysing the effects two decades after a mining spill

A group of experts from the University of Seville has carried out a comparative study of the concentrations—both totals as well as fractions—of the metals found in sediment in the River Guadiamar in 2002 with those present in the same area in 2018. After this study, the researchers state that there has been an important fall in the total concentrations, and evolution of the metal fraction towards

8h

Twisted microfiber's network responses to water vapor

Researchers at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) graduate student Kulisara Budpud, Assoc. Prof. Kosuke Okeyoshi, Dr. Maiko Okajima and, Prof. Tatsuo Kaneko reveal a unique polysaccharide fiber in a twisted structure forming under a drying process which showed spring-like behavior. The spring-like behavior of twisted structures is practically used as a reinforced structure

8h

Image: Barcelona, Spain

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Barcelona—the second largest city in Spain.

8h

New insights on the role of trade unions in struggles for rights

Trade unions are crucial in advancing workers' rights, but it is unhelpful to consider their leaders as representatives of the working class as a whole when analysing labour relations and government policies, a new paper from the University of Warwick Department of Sociology argues.

8h

ESAIL maritime satellite ready for launch

The ESAIL microsatellite for tracking ships worldwide—developed under an ESA Partnership Project—has completed its accommodation on Vega's new dispenser for small satellites and is ready for launch.

8h

The rise of the 'liberaltarian'

Political economists Neil Malhotra and David Broockman have documented a new species of political animal: the liberaltarian.

8h

New machine learning model predicts which base editor performs best to repair thousands of disease-causing mutations

Gene editing technology is getting better and growing faster than ever before. New and improved base editors—an especially efficient and precise kind of genetic corrector—inch the tech closer to treating genetic diseases in humans. But, the base editor boom comes with a new challenge: Like a massive key ring with no guide, scientists can sink huge amounts of time into searching for the best tool t

8h

Researchers identify new approach to turning on the heat in energy-burning fat cells

Researchers have discovered a new set of signals that cells send and receive to prompt one type of fat cell to convert fat into heat. The signaling pathway, discovered in mice, has potential implications for activating this same type of thermogenic fat in humans.

8h

New species of spiders described in honour of Swedish climate activist

Senckenberg arachnologist Peter Jäger has described a new genus of spiders from Madagascar: Thunberga gen. nov. is comprised of five species of huntsman spiders. The name refers to the Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg and her commitment to tackling climate change. Thus, Jäger alerts the public about the threats to Malagasy and global biodiversity. The study was published in the journal "Z

8h

Staph's activation of blood clotting

Acute bacterial endocarditis—infection of the inner lining of the heart—is most often caused by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus ("staph") and has up to a 40% mortality rate.

8h

How drawing can set you free | Shantell Martin

Who are you? To answer this question, artist Shantell Martin followed her pen. In this brilliantly visual talk featuring her signature freestyle line work — drawn across everything from the screens of Times Square to the bodies of New York City Ballet dancers — Martin shares how she found freedom and a new perspective through art. See how drawing can connect your heart to your hand and deepen yo

8h

Developer Blames VR Headset for Degraded Eyesight

Danny Bittman is a software developer who specializes in VR projects, with more than an estimated 10,000 hours logged in headsets over the past few years. He's also convinced that virtual reality headsets are to blame for unusual vision problems he's having. Just had my 1st eye doctor visit in 3 years. Now I'm very worried about my future VR use. I have a new eye convergence problem that acts lik

8h

New machine learning model predicts which base editor performs best to repair thousands of disease-causing mutations

Gene editing technology is getting better and growing faster than ever before. New and improved base editors—an especially efficient and precise kind of genetic corrector—inch the tech closer to treating genetic diseases in humans. But, the base editor boom comes with a new challenge: Like a massive key ring with no guide, scientists can sink huge amounts of time into searching for the best tool t

8h

From tiny shards to tons in the sea, plastic pollution presents a challenge to labs, beaches and society

Love-hate relationships are tricky. They're vexing. They're complicated.

8h

Researchers identify new approach to turning on the heat in energy-burning fat cells

Researchers have discovered a new set of signals that cells send and receive to prompt one type of fat cell to convert fat into heat. The signaling pathway, discovered in mice, has potential implications for activating this same type of thermogenic fat in humans.

8h

New spider species named after Greta

Swedish climate campaigner Greta Thunberg can add to her list of personal accolades, including TIME magazine's Person of the Year, a group of spiders named after her.

8h

Staph's activation of blood clotting

Acute bacterial endocarditis—infection of the inner lining of the heart—is most often caused by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus ("staph") and has up to a 40% mortality rate.

8h

Soot Rule Thrusts EPA into Spotlight on Race

Air pollution disproportionately impacts minority communities and proposed changes would stymie efforts to address the disparity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

University students facing food insecurity due to pandemic

A collaboration of universities in the U.K. and U.S. surveyed students on their levels of food insecurity during April, after universities in both nations ceased campus-based teaching.

8h

Study proposes "Microbial Noah's Ark" pilot project

A new study finds that proposal to create a "microbial Noah's ark" to protect the long-term health of humanity is feasible and should move forward into a pilot project phase, that would include installing infrastructure to store microbes in a site such as Norway or Switzerland and a collaboration for collecting samples all over the world. The Rutgers University's initiative will give an important

8h

Protecting scientific diversity: Building an inclusive scientific community

In the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists are facing great challenges because they have to reorient, interrupt or even cancel research and teaching. A team of international scientists with participation from the University of Göttingen published an international appeal which highlights the precarious situation of many scientists and calls for a collective effort by the entire scientific c

8h

Scientists Discover "Unexpected" Structures Near Earth's Core

Deep Underground A team of researchers say they've used cutting-edge imaging techniques to discover huge, "unexpected" structures near the Earth's core — a startling reminder of how little we know about the interior of the planet where we live. Vedran Lekić, an associate professor of geology at the University of Maryland who worked on the research, said in a statement that the "anomalous structur

8h

High-tech surveillance amplifies police bias and overreach

Video of police in riot gear clashing with unarmed protesters in the wake of the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has filled social media feeds. Meanwhile, police surveillance of protesters has remained largely out of sight.

8h

Printed perovskite LEDs

Microelectronics utilize various functional materials whose properties make them suitable for specific applications. For example, transistors and data storage devices are made of silicon, and most photovoltaic cells used for generating electricity from sunlight are also currently made of this semiconductor material. In contrast, compound semiconductors such as gallium nitride are used to generate

8h

Study proposes "Microbial Noah's Ark" pilot project

A new study finds that proposal to create a "microbial Noah's ark" to protect the long-term health of humanity is feasible and should move forward into a pilot project phase, that would include installing infrastructure to store microbes in a site such as Norway or Switzerland and a collaboration for collecting samples all over the world. The Rutgers University's initiative will give an important

9h

COVID-19 compels new food safety norms in Asia

Food safety practices in Asia-Pacific countries got a boost from COVID-19 concerns as lockdowns and restrictions start easing up in the region, a webinar held on 3 June heard.

9h

Protecting scientific diversity: Building an inclusive scientific community

In the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists are facing great challenges because they have to reorient, interrupt or even cancel research and teaching. A team of international scientists with participation from the University of Göttingen published an international appeal which highlights the precarious situation of many scientists and calls for a collective effort by the entire scientific c

9h

Water bacteria have a green thumb

The sheer endless expanses of the oceans are hostile deserts—at least from the perspective of a bacterium living in water. Tiny as it is, its chances of finding sufficient nutrients in the great mass of water would seem to be vanishingly small. However, as in other deserts, there are life-saving oases in the sea: for example, microorganisms find everything they need to live on the surfaces of aqua

9h

Water bacteria have a green thumb

The sheer endless expanses of the oceans are hostile deserts—at least from the perspective of a bacterium living in water. Tiny as it is, its chances of finding sufficient nutrients in the great mass of water would seem to be vanishingly small. However, as in other deserts, there are life-saving oases in the sea: for example, microorganisms find everything they need to live on the surfaces of aqua

9h

Why Racism, Not Race, Is a Risk Factor for Dying of COVID-19

Public health specialist and physician Camara Phyllis Jones talks about ways that jobs, communities and health care leave Black Americans more exposed and less protected — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Why Racism, Not Race, Is a Risk Factor for Dying of COVID-19

Public health specialist and physician Camara Phyllis Jones talks about ways that jobs, communities and health care leave Black Americans more exposed and less protected — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

I redesigned a school playground for my PhD – and the children got better marks learning outside

The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the education of at least 1.5 billion school students. That's more than 90% of the world's children. Although many schools in the west, along with private schools in the developing world, have continued some school activities online, more than 50% of learners worldwide do not have a household computer. The absence of face-to-face learning and opportunities fo

9h

Reduce food waste to save money

With the COVID-19 pandemic causing disruptions in the food supply chain, it's more important than ever to reduce food waste, says a University of Missouri Extension food safety specialist.

9h

Stem cell advance could demystify the placenta

Researchers have developed a way to guide human stem cells into becoming important precursor cells that give rise to the placenta. Despite past efforts to understand pregnancy—both healthy and high-risk—the human placenta remains something of a mystery. Tissue samples are nearly impossible to obtain until after birth, making it difficult to study the placenta's role in pregnancy complications. Th

9h

India's 50-year drying period and subsequent reversal — Battle between natural and anthropogenic variability

Increase of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere generally tends to increase rainfall over India. Up to the year 2000, however, it appeared that the natural variability had been able to override this effect, resulting in the overall decrease. In addition to anthropogenic climate change, rainfall changes in recent decades are also influenced by natural sea surface temperature oscillation

9h

New biomaterial has potential to repair damaged bone with lower risk of inflammation

Scientists at RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences have developed a new biomaterial that has the potential to accelerate bone regeneration by promoting an immune response that encourages repair and lowers the risk of inflammation.

9h

Where have the swans gone?

Nearly 13 kilometres per year: that is the rate at which the wintering area of Bewick's swans has shifted east over the past 50 years. It's a discovery with consequences for the conservation of this migratory species, writes a team of researchers led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) in Global Change Biology.

9h

Nitrogen in permafrost soils may exert great feedbacks on climate change

A new Sino-German scientific collaboration investigating nitrogen in the soils of China's melting permafrost aims to get to the bottom of why emissions of nitrous oxide — an often overlooked greenhouse gas — are greater than they are supposed to be.

9h

Analysing the effects two decades after a mining spill

There has been an important fall in the total concentrations and evolution of the metal fraction towards their more innocuous forms, so the environmental risk is much reduced. The samples were taken in the same locations and by the same research group twenty years later. Sediments were analysed from six locations on the River Guadiamar and its main tributaries, from the area of the Aznalcóllar min

9h

Bird feeding helps females more than males

A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that female birds benefit more from extra food in the winter. If females receive additional food, they do not need to reduce their body temperature as much as they would have otherwise, and the chances of surviving cold nights increase.

9h

Heart attack in a dish: a 3D model

Researchers in the Medical University of South Carolina Clemson Bioengineering program report in Nature Biomedical Engineering that they have developed human cardiac organoids that model what happens in a heart attack in a microtissue less than 1 millimeter in diameter. This is the first model that accurately recapitulates the complex tissue dysfunction after a heart attack with multiple human cel

9h

Study reveals impacts of climate change on migrating mule deer

When drought reshuffles the green-up of habitats that mule deer migrate across, it dramatically shortens the annual foraging bonanza they rely on.

9h

Study reveals impacts of climate change on migrating mule deer

When drought reshuffles the green-up of habitats that mule deer migrate across, it dramatically shortens the annual foraging bonanza they rely on.

9h

Steering new mobility in the right direction

Advances in transportation technology—e-scooters and bike share, Lyft & Uber, and autonomous vehicles—are beginning to have profound impacts on cities. New mobility is changing not only how we travel, but also urban form and development itself. In the near future, we can expect differences in what public transit looks like, the layout of cities, and the places we spend our time. In turn, these cha

9h

School may be the key to improvement for children in social care

Children in social care have poorer mental health and perform worse in school than other children. But they have trust in the school staff and perform better after individual assessment at school. These are findings in a doctoral thesis from Linköping University.

9h

Coronavirus recovery: why local markets are key to reviving our locked down town centres

During the early weeks of coronavirus in the UK, there was an obsessive focus on supermarkets and how they were handling the pandemic. It was as if traditional retail markets and small shops didn't exist. Many markets and traders, however, continued to provide essential goods and services during the lockdown, sometimes responding quicker and in more creative ways than larger stores.

9h

Could China's strategic pork reserve be a model for the US?

During the height of the coronavirus pandemic, we became accustomed to face-masked shoppers, social distancing and one-way aisles at the grocery store. But most shocking was the scene at the supermarket meat case.

9h

Versatile symbionts: Reed beetles benefit from bacterial helpers through all life stages

Insects that feed only on plants have a number of challenges to overcome. But they also have some active helpers to assist them with the supply of important nutrients. So-called symbiotic microorganisms make essential amino acids, vitamins, and enzymes available and in this way supplement and enrich the limited diet of their host insects. Reed beetles with their semi-aquatic lifestyle also have su

9h

Statistical analyses of plant metabolites allow solid testing of plant defense theories

Do plants attacked by herbivores produce substances that are most effective against attackers in a targeted manner, or are herbivore-induced changes in a plant metabolism random, which could thwart the performance of herbivores?

9h

Scientists call for long-term research on ozone source apportionment

Tropospheric ozone is produced via the photochemical reaction of volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides in the presence of sunlight. Over the past 20 years, serious ozone pollution has been found in the most highly populated and industrialized city clusters in China, such as the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei, Yangtze River Delta, Pearl River Delta, and Sichuan Basin regions.

9h

Could China's strategic pork reserve be a model for the US?

During the height of the coronavirus pandemic, we became accustomed to face-masked shoppers, social distancing and one-way aisles at the grocery store. But most shocking was the scene at the supermarket meat case.

9h

Scientists develop low-cost, high power density vanadium flow battery stack

The development of renewable energy sources such as wind and solar energy is limited by their inherently random and intermittent nature. However, vanadium flow batteries (VFBs) comprise a cost- and energy-efficient, long-life energy storage technology that can store and smoothly output power from renewable energy sources.

9h

Versatile symbionts: Reed beetles benefit from bacterial helpers through all life stages

Insects that feed only on plants have a number of challenges to overcome. But they also have some active helpers to assist them with the supply of important nutrients. So-called symbiotic microorganisms make essential amino acids, vitamins, and enzymes available and in this way supplement and enrich the limited diet of their host insects. Reed beetles with their semi-aquatic lifestyle also have su

9h

Statistical analyses of plant metabolites allow solid testing of plant defense theories

Do plants attacked by herbivores produce substances that are most effective against attackers in a targeted manner, or are herbivore-induced changes in a plant metabolism random, which could thwart the performance of herbivores?

9h

Reindeer were domesticated much earlier than previously thought, new study suggests

A University of Alberta anthropologist has found what might be the earliest evidence for domestication of reindeer in the Eurasian Arctic.

9h

NASA's IBEX charts 11 years of change at the boundary to interstellar space

Far beyond the orbits of the planets are the hazy outlines of the heliosphere, the magnetic bubble in space that we call home. This flexible cosmic bubble stretches and shrinks in response to the sun's gasps and sighs.

9h

Protecting scientific diversity

The COVID-19 pandemic means that scientists face great challenges because they have to reorient, interrupt or even cancel research and teaching. A team of international scientists including the University of Göttingen published an international appeal highlighting the precarious situation of many scientists and calling for a collective effort by the scientific community, especially from its leader

9h

Our sleep during lockdown: Longer and more regular, but worse

A survey conducted at the University of Basel and the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel has investigated how sleep has changed during the Covid-19 lockdown. The 435 individuals surveyed — most of whom were women — reported sleeping longer while sleep quality deteriorated. The results of the study were published in the scientific journal Current Biology.

9h

Genetics could help diagnose diabetes in Indians, study shows

A new way of using genetics to diagnose diabetes could pave the way for better diagnosis and treatment in Indians, new research has concluded.

9h

Water bacteria have a green thumb

Research team from University of Jena discover new natural products that bacteria in water use to regulate the growth of competing organisms.

9h

Versatile symbionts: Reed beetles benefit from bacterial helpers through all life stages

Researchers have investigated the contributions that symbiotic bacteria make to the unusual life cycle and diet of reed beetles.

9h

Addressing the drug problem in health and social care will produce better outcomes

Researchers at the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL) have evaluated the impact of decriminalization policy in different settings. The new study reviews reports, peer-review articles, and critical response papers on the topic.

9h

Modeling the trajectory of COVID-19 cases in settings with weaker health systems

A new modeling study evaluating unfolding COVID-19 epidemics among different income countries reports that, in lower income countries, even if risk is reduced because populations are younger, this benefit is largely negated by limited health system capacity and closer inter-generational contact.

9h

Poll shows social networks strong in response to COVID-19 crisis

In a time of a documented decline of community and social connections, a large number of people who have needed assistance during the COVID-19 pandemic have found that help through community organizations, the government and their family, friends and neighbors, according to a newly released poll from the University of Rhode Island's Social Science Institute for Research, Education, and Policy.

9h

Study: CEOs who invest less in corporate social responsibility undermine their organization's resilience

Organizations led by more greedy CEOs—that is, CEOs that are driven by the pursuit of excessive or extraordinary material wealth—before the global financial crisis of 2008 suffered more severe consequences of that systemic shock. That is one of the main conclusions by a team of organization scientists from Antwerp and Tilburg based on a recent study that will be published in the Journal of Managem

9h

Pandemic Hotspots Continue to Shift Away from Urban Centers

The trajectory of the Covid-19 pandemic is continuing to shift away from major urban clusters in Europe and North America. As cases and hospitalizations subside in the northeastern U.S. and other hard-hit areas, they are climbing in some states, especially in the South and Southwest.

9h

Scientists close in on 12-billion-year-old signal from the end of the universe's 'dark age'

Today, stars fill the night sky. But when the universe was in its infancy, it contained no stars at all. And an international team of scientists is closer than ever to detecting, measuring and studying a signal from this era that has been traveling through the cosmos ever since that starless era ended some 13 billion years ago.

9h

Image: Hubble glimpses a galaxy among many

Looking deep into the universe, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope catches a passing glimpse of the numerous arm-like structures that sweep around this barred spiral galaxy, known as NGC 2608. Appearing as a slightly stretched, smaller version of our Milky Way, the peppered blue and red spiral arms are anchored together by the prominent horizontal central bar of the galaxy.

9h

1.400 meter lang motorvejsbro skal bygges på gitterspær af træ

PLUS. For at få CO2-udledningen fra byggeriet ned skal en kommende motorvejsbro over søen Mjøsa i Norge efter planen bygges med træspær.

9h

Environmental DNA shows promise in estimating sport fish populations

Anglers often lament how hard it can be to land a fish for dinner, but the tougher job usually falls to fisheries managers, who have set sustainable catch limits for the fishes we love to harvest.

9h

These Two Generations of Best Friends Live Like Family

Each installment of The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two women in the U.K. who became best friends when they were pregnant, and with their daughters, who are best friends, too. They "basically became a family unit," as one of the moms put i

9h

New Horizons conducts the first interstellar parallax experiment

For the first time, a spacecraft has sent back pictures of the sky from so far away that some stars appear to be in different positions than we'd see from Earth.

9h

NASA selects Astrobotic to fly water-hunting rover to the moon

NASA has awarded Astrobotic of Pittsburgh $199.5 million to deliver NASA's Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover (VIPER) to the moon's South Pole in late 2023.

9h

Environmental DNA shows promise in estimating sport fish populations

Anglers often lament how hard it can be to land a fish for dinner, but the tougher job usually falls to fisheries managers, who have set sustainable catch limits for the fishes we love to harvest.

9h

Everything we just learned about the Sony PS5 and its games

The PS5 ditches the straight lines for curved edges. (Sony/) Video game console releases don't work like typical gadget announcements—they happen in slow motion. We heard the first details about Sony's new PlayStation 5 more than a year ago, but this week we finally got our first look at the hardware, as well as a bunch of new games for the system. The case is a departure from the PS4's current d

9h

Controlling invasive milfoil with lake-wide herbicide could do more harm than good to native plants

Invasive Eurasian water milfoil is flourishing in Wisconsin's lakes, sometimes outcompeting native plants and creating floating mats that cause problems for people, boats and property values. But new research shows that the benefits of using one type of historical lake-wide herbicide treatment may be outweighed by the costs to native aquatic plants.

9h

Using light to speed up CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing

A team of researchers at Johns Hopkins University has developed a way to speed up the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing process by using light-sensitive nucleotides. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their process and its precision. Darpan Medhi and Maria Jasin with the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have published a Perspective piece in the same journal issue out

9h

Ingredients for life appear in stellar nurseries long before stars are born

https://uanews.arizona.edu/story/ingredients-life-appear-stellar-nurseries-long-stars-are-born

9h

Controlling invasive milfoil with lake-wide herbicide could do more harm than good to native plants

Invasive Eurasian water milfoil is flourishing in Wisconsin's lakes, sometimes outcompeting native plants and creating floating mats that cause problems for people, boats and property values. But new research shows that the benefits of using one type of historical lake-wide herbicide treatment may be outweighed by the costs to native aquatic plants.

9h

Using light to speed up CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing

A team of researchers at Johns Hopkins University has developed a way to speed up the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing process by using light-sensitive nucleotides. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their process and its precision. Darpan Medhi and Maria Jasin with the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have published a Perspective piece in the same journal issue out

9h

School may be the key to improvement for children in social care

Children in social care have poorer mental health and perform worse in school than other children. But they have trust in the school staff and perform better after individual assessment at school. These are findings in a doctoral thesis from Linköping University.

9h

Hibernation in mice: Are humans next?

University of Tsukuba and RIKEN researchers identified cells in the brain that can induce a hibernation-like state in mice or rats, species that do not naturally hibernate. In this state, oxygen consumption, body temperature, heart rate, and respiration were all lowered, and animals spontaneously recovered without any tissue damage. Inducing this state in humans could have several medical benefits

9h

Transient increase in blood pressure promotes some blood vessel growth

Blood vessels are the body's transportation system, carrying oxygen and nutrients to cells and whisking away waste. A research team led by a scientist at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan has discovered a mechanism by which the growth of these vessels' inner liner is stimulated, which may lead to therapeutics that could cut vessels off from tumors or help rebuild vesse

9h

Statistical analyses of plant metabolites allow solid testing of plant defense theories

High-throughput analyses of small substances in Nicotiana attenuata reveal that plants re-organize their metabolism to produce highly-specific defense metabolites after insect attack. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, and at the CNRS Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, France, combined extensive measurements of known and unknown plant metabolites using

9h

Scientists call for long-term research on ozone source apportionment

More long-term research should be carried out to provide references for the development of emission reduction strategies to achieve long-term ozone attainment in China

9h

Silicones may lead to cell death

Silicone molecules from breast implants can initiate processes in human cells that lead to cell death. Researchers from Radboud University have demonstrated this in a new study that will be published on 12 June in Scientific Reports. "However, there are still many questions about what this could mean for the health effects of silicone breast implants. More research is therefore urgently needed," s

9h

Single enzyme responsible for gender-based plumage color differences in canaries

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Portugal and the U.S. has found that a single enzyme is responsible for gender-based plumage color differences in mosaic canaries. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes narrowing their search for the factors involved in gender-based color differences in canaries and what they found. In the same journal is

9h

From bacteria to you: The biological reactions that sustain our rhythms

Every second of every day, countless biochemical reactions take place in our bodies' cells. The organization of this complex system is the result of billions of years of evolution, fine-tuning our functions since the first primordial organisms.

9h

Random Search Wired Into Animals May Help Them Hunt

It's not surprising that the fruit fly larva in the laboratory of Jimena Berni crawls across its large plate of agar in search of food. "A Drosophila larva is either eating or not eating, and if it's not eating, it wants to eat," she said. The surprise is that this larva can search for food at all. Owing to a suite of genetic tricks performed by Berni, it has no functional brain. In fact, the sys

9h

Scientists report heavy ion transfer in charged vdW cluster for the first time

Since the discovery of the double helix form of DNA and the hypothesis of DNA mutation induced by proton transfer more than 50 years ago, it has been recognized that proton transfer is crucial to many chemical and biological processes.

9h

Scientists report heavy ion transfer in charged vdW cluster for the first time

Since the discovery of the double helix form of DNA and the hypothesis of DNA mutation induced by proton transfer more than 50 years ago, it has been recognized that proton transfer is crucial to many chemical and biological processes.

9h

Single enzyme responsible for gender-based plumage color differences in canaries

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Portugal and the U.S. has found that a single enzyme is responsible for gender-based plumage color differences in mosaic canaries. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes narrowing their search for the factors involved in gender-based color differences in canaries and what they found. In the same journal is

9h

From bacteria to you: The biological reactions that sustain our rhythms

Every second of every day, countless biochemical reactions take place in our bodies' cells. The organization of this complex system is the result of billions of years of evolution, fine-tuning our functions since the first primordial organisms.

9h

Young Blood and Old Blood

So let's do a non-coronavirus post for the weekend. Over the years, I've sporadically reported on the (rather contentious) field of aging and its biochemical implications. Many readers will recall the results of the past few years that claim that infusion of young-animal plasma into aged animals seems to have many beneficial effects. Of course, this field is well stocked with controversy. Not eve

9h

Cave divers search depths for the bones of the Ice Age

For thousands of years, the massive pelvis lay undisturbed at the bottom of the watery black pit. Approximately four feet across and weighing an estimated 80 pounds, it had once belonged to a giant ground sloth, an elephant-sized animal that roamed the ancient Americas alongside the saber-tooth cat and the woolly mammoth.

9h

Unexpected mammal provides insight into the lives of ancient hominins

For decades, anthropologists have attempted to solve the mystery of what hominins—early ancestors of humans—ate to survive. The answer to this question can be found etched into the bones and teeth of hominins, but the conclusion is not always obvious.

9h

Q&A: Protecting essential farm workers during COVID-19

State and federal executive orders have deemed seasonal and migrant farmworkers "essential." Yet, few protections have been granted to this population, which may be at higher risk of exposure to coronavirus, according to a policy brief by researchers at the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

9h

Printed perovskite LEDs

A team of researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin has succeeded for the first time in producing light-emitting diodes (LEDs) from a hybrid perovskite semiconductor material using inkjet printing.This opens the door to broad application of these materials in manufacturing many different kinds of electronic components.The scientists achieved the breakth

10h

Together they stay alive longer

Hamburg/Borstel/Leipzig. The tuberculosis pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis can protect itself better when combined and thus stay alive longer in the air. This was the result of a study by the Leibniz Research Alliance INFECTIONS, which was published in the scientific journal "Scientific Reports" on Monday.

10h

Artificial intelligence makes blurry faces look more than 60 times sharper

Researchers have developed an AI tool that can turn blurry faces into eerily convincing computer-generated portraits, in finer detail than ever before. Previous methods can scale an image to eight times its original resolution. But a Duke team has come up with a way to take a handful of pixels and create realistic-looking faces with up to 64 times the resolution, 'imagining' features such as eyela

10h

Desalination device turns brine into useful chemicals

A new device could make converting seawater to freshwater, called desalination, profitable and environmentally benign. The research, published in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering , outlines an efficient method for transforming water with very high concentrations of salt and chemicals, known as brine, into commercially valuable chemicals as part of the desalination process. The approach avo

10h

Corrona Psoriasis Registry shares real-world evidence at AAD Virtual Meeting

The Corrona® Psoriasis Registry, a joint collaboration between the National Psoriasis Foundation, NPF, and Corrona, LLC, the leading sponsor of registries in immune-mediated diseases, announces that studies from the registry will be presented at the American Academy of Dermatology Virtual Meeting Experience (AAD VMX) taking place June 12-14, 2020.

10h

Steering new mobility in the right direction

The latest report from the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC), by Marc Schlossberg and Heather Brinton of the University of Oregon, is a guide for city staff and leadership on adopting local policy and code to respond to the emergence of emerging transportation technologies and encourage their responsible use.

10h

Unlocking PNA's superpowers for self-assembling nanostructures

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a method for self-assembling nanostructures with gamma-modified peptide nucleic acid, a synthetic mimic of DNA. The process has the potential to impact nanomanufacturing and future biomedical technologies like targeted diagnostics and drug delivery.

10h

Minimizing thermal conductivity of crystalline material with optimal nanostructure

Japanese researchers successfully minimized thermal conductivity by designing, fabricating, and evaluating the optimal nanostructure-multilayer materials through materials informatics (MI), which combines machine learning and molecular simulation.

10h

Health profession: Social interdependence in active learning evaluated by Delphi procedure

An instrument was developed and validated for measuring social interdependence in collaborative learning in the health professional education field.

10h

Cytokine implicated in HLH treatment resistance

Research sheds light on cytokine storm syndromes and how ruxolitinib may benefit patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

10h

Fuel walking and cycling with low carbon diets, researchers say

Walking and cycling have many benefits and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but researchers say we need to think about what people eat to fuel their walking and cycling.

10h

Remixed mantle suggests early start of plate tectonics

New Curtin University research on the remixing of Earth's stratified deep interior suggests that global plate tectonic processes, which played a pivotal role in the existence of life on Earth, started to operate at least 3.2 billion years ago.

10h

Hvis danske virksomheder var fodboldklubber, ville Novo Nordisk være de studerendes Real Madrid

PLUS. Alle kender Real Madrid, ligesom alle kender de gamle, hæderkronede virksomheder – og så forstår de at brande sig som klimavenlige og bæredygtige. Derfor optager de pladserne på de ingeniørstuderendes top-10, mener eksperter.

10h

A Council of Citizens Should Regulate Algorithms

To ensure our AI-driven future is just ant equitable, we should borrow from Ancient Athens.

10h

Citizen Isn't Here to Be Your Free-Speech Platform

Plus: The birth of digital maps, the timeline for self-driving cars, and a recalculation of doomsday.

10h

Andrew Martin on the Coming-of-Age Story

Editor's Note: Read "Deep Cut," new fiction from Andrew Martin. "Deep Cut," a new story by Andrew Martin, which is adapted from the author's upcoming story collection, Cool for America (available July 7), will appear in the July/August issue of The Atlantic . To mark the story's publication, Martin and Thomas Gebremedhin, a senior editor at the magazine, discussed the story over email. Their conv

10h

Study reveals impacts of climate change on migrating mule deer

The benefits of migration are likely to decrease for mule deer and other migratory herbivores as drought becomes more common due to ongoing climate change.

10h

Study identifies mechanism affecting X chromosome that could lead to new disease therapies

Learning how to inactivate and reactivate an X chromosome would have important implications for medicine. A notable category of beneficiaries could be people with certain congenital diseases known as X-linked disorders, which are caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome.

10h

Fuel walking and cycling with low carbon diets, researchers say

Walking and cycling have many benefits and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but researchers say we need to think about what people eat to fuel their walking and cycling.

10h

Quantum effect observed in 'large' metal

In the world of materials science, sometimes main discoveries can be found in unexpected places. While working on the resistivity of a type of delafossite—PdCoO2—researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Quantum Materials discovered that the electrons in their sample did not behave entirely as expected. When a magnetic field was applied, the electrons retained signatures of their wave-like nature, which

10h

Precise magnets 3-D printed from special stainless steel

It looks quite inconspicuous to the casual beholder, hardly like groundbreaking innovation: a small metallic chessboard, four millimeters long on either side. At first glance, it shines like polished steel; at second glance, minute differences in color are visible: The tiny chessboard has 16 squares, eight appear slightly darker, the other eight a bit lighter.

10h

Chinese conservationists battle to save pangolins from poachers

Rescued from a farmer's fishpond, a young pangolin's release back into China's wilderness this week was hailed as a small victory in the battle to save the critically endangered animal.

11h

Using GIE to map deforestation in the Amazon rainforest

As deforestation continues to rise in the Amazon rainforest, efforts are ongoing to identify ways to reverse the trend of tree loss in this valuable ecosystem.

11h

Chinese conservationists battle to save pangolins from poachers

Rescued from a farmer's fishpond, a young pangolin's release back into China's wilderness this week was hailed as a small victory in the battle to save the critically endangered animal.

11h

Potential beginning of life simulated in lab

Did life originate underground? Scientists at the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE) have substantiated their theory that life could have begun deep in the Earth's crust. In their experiments, structures that were inanimate developed survival strategies within a short time.

11h

Potential beginning of life simulated in lab

Did life originate underground? Scientists at the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE) have substantiated their theory that life could have begun deep in the Earth's crust. In their experiments, structures that were inanimate developed survival strategies within a short time.

11h

Lives saved or deaths postponed? Calculating the cost of lockdowns

While lockdowns undoubtedly avoided large numbers of deaths from the new coronavirus, the repercussions of the pandemic response are expected to blight economies and health systems long after restrictions are lifted.

11h

The coastal banksia has its roots in ancient Gondwana

If you fondly remember May Gibbs's Gumnut Baby stories about the adventures of Snugglepot and Cuddlepie, you may also remember the villainous Big Bad Banksia Men (perhaps you're still having nightmares about them).

11h

Minimizing thermal conductivity of crystalline material with optimal nanostructure

Professor Junichiro Shiomi et al. from the University of Tokyo aimed to reduce the thermal conductivity of semiconductor materials by reducing the internal nanostructure. The researchers successfully minimized thermal conductivity by designing, fabricating and evaluating the optimal nanostructure-multilayer materials through materials informatics (MI), which combines machine learning and molecular

11h

The coastal banksia has its roots in ancient Gondwana

If you fondly remember May Gibbs's Gumnut Baby stories about the adventures of Snugglepot and Cuddlepie, you may also remember the villainous Big Bad Banksia Men (perhaps you're still having nightmares about them).

11h

Why the calls for defunding police?

It's an idea that sounds radical and impractical to many who hear it: We should defund, dismantle or even abolish the police. But it quickly entered mainstream discussion following the death of George Floyd in the custody of Minneapolis police. A. Naomi Paik is a professor of Asian American studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who studies police and prisons, and co-edited a hi

11h

How cities can add accessible green space in a post-coronavirus world

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced governments to weigh the benefits of keeping green spaces open against the public health concerns that come from their use. During the pandemic, playgrounds have been taped off, parks locked and access to outdoor spaces for recreation cut off.

11h

An El Niño hit this banana prawn fishery hard. Here's what we can learn from their experience

Prawns are a staple of many Australian barbecues, and we're fortunate to have wild-caught prawns from sustainably-managed fisheries that boast best management practice.

11h

Survey reveals COVID-19's impact on small business, nonprofits

A survey of small businesses by Florida State University researchers has found that 15.2 percent of those studied have closed their doors permanently as a result of the COVID-19 shutdown.

11h

Have you got what it takes to become an astronaut in the new era of human spaceflight?

Millions of people watched breathlessly as astronauts for the first time successfully travelled to the International Space Station (ISS) in a privately funded spacecraft, SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon capsule, on May 30. The historic launch, which marks a new chapter in human spaceflight, is likely to lead to renewed interest in spaceflight.

11h

Remixed mantle suggests early start of plate tectonics

New Curtin University research on the remixing of Earth's stratified deep interior suggests that global plate tectonic processes, which played a pivotal role in the existence of life on Earth, started to operate at least 3.2 billion years ago.

11h

Physicists publish worldwide consensus of muon magnetic moment calculation

For decades, scientists studying the muon have been puzzled by a strange pattern in the way muons rotate in magnetic fields, one that left physicists wondering if it can be explained by the Standard Model—the best tool physicists have to understand the universe.

11h

Could these 'salt-loving' edible sea vegetables be the new kale?

Three species of vegetables from the sea could just be the new kale with the added benefit of a salty flavor. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute recently completed a 10-week study to determine the optimal growing conditions for three species of sea vegetables: sea asparagus (Salicornia bigelovii), sea purslane (Sesuvium portulacastrum) and saltwort

11h

Atom swap turns glowy molecules into cancer killers

A project to make better fluorescent tags has turned into a method to kill breast cancer, researchers report. The researchers found that replacing a single oxygen atom with a sulfur atom in a common fluorophore turns it into a photosensitizing molecule. When exposed to light, the molecule generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) that destroyed breast cancer cells in the lab. This method of photody

11h

Once Starship prototypes stop exploding, we could see an orbital launch this year

SpaceX has had a lot of ups and downs lately. On Saturday, May 30, the company made history when their Crew Dragon spacecraft took off from the NASA Kennedy Space Center, carrying two astronauts to space. But just a day before, SpaceX engineers and ground crews watched their fourth Starship prototype (SN4) explode on its testbed during a static fire test, making it the fourth prototype in a row to

11h

Could these 'salt-loving' edible sea vegetables be the new kale?

Three species of vegetables from the sea could just be the new kale with the added benefit of a salty flavor. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute recently completed a 10-week study to determine the optimal growing conditions for three species of sea vegetables: sea asparagus (Salicornia bigelovii), sea purslane (Sesuvium portulacastrum) and saltwort

11h

Effective communication between politicians and constituents vital for political participation, experts say

The way politicians communicate with constituents has never been more important than during the COVID-19 pandemic, say experts.

11h

Research shows that submerged vegetation helps to offset Chesapeake Bay acidification

For many years, the world's oceans have suffered from absorbing human-made carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which has led to the decreasing pH of saltwater, known as ocean acidification, and threatened the health of marine organisms and ecosystems. While this process has been well documented, the acidification process is complicated and poorly understood in coastal waters.

11h

Some youth programs may benefit the next generation, too

Youth programs designed to prevent drug use and delinquency and support healthy development can reap lasting benefits for their future kids, according to a decades-long study. The research focuses on a program called Raising Healthy Children, which researchers in the University of Washington's Social Development Research Group monitored in several Seattle elementary schools in the 1980s. The prog

11h

Dalian Coherent Light Source reveals new dissociation channels in ethane photochemistry

Understanding and exploiting the environment of extraterrestrial bodies is a central objective of planetary science. The gas giants, such as Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, are rich in molecular chemistry and remain the target of prolonged scientific study.

11h

India's 50-year drying period and subsequent reversal—battle between natural and anthropogenic variability

A billion people rely on rainfall from the Indian summer monsoon (ISM). Its variability may produce impacts both locally and globally. Understanding the variability is essential to make effective adaptation planning for future events.

11h

Scientists propose data encoding method for the 6G standard

Researchers around the world are working on methods to transfer data in the terahertz (THz) range, which would make it possible to send and receive information more quickly than today's technology. But it is much more difficult to encode data in the THz range than in the GHz range currently used by 5G technology. A group of scientists from ITMO University has demonstrated the possibility of modify

11h

Unlocking PNA's superpowers for self-assembling nanostructures

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a method for self-assembling nanostructures with gamma-modified peptide nucleic acid (γPNA), a synthetic mimic of DNA. The process has the potential to impact nanomanufacturing as well as future biomedical technologies like targeted diagnostics and drug delivery.

11h

Teknisk opgradering af beredskabsradioer forsinkes med fire år

PLUS. Hverken Rigspolitiet eller justitsministeren vil fortælle, hvorfor indkøbet af et nyt radionetværk til beredskab, politi og brandvæsen udsættes i fire år, hvilket har krævet, at en nødbestemmelse tages i brug, så den eksisterende kontrakt kan forlænges uden udbud.

11h

China and the Pangolin Trade

Pangolin's are adorable and weird animals. They are mammals , with eight (although some references say seven) species in their own order, the Pholidota (all eight species are also in the same family and genus). They have scales, no teeth, and a long tongue, and are native to Africa and Asia. They are also endangered for a very specific reason – their scales are valued as medicine in Traditional C

11h

Adding noise for completely secure communication

How can we protect communications against eavesdropping if we don't trust the devices used in the process? This is one of the main questions in quantum cryptography research. Researchers at the University of Basel and ETH Zurich have succeeded in laying the theoretical groundwork for a communication protocol that guarantees 100% privacy.

11h

Why Do Some People Get Sick All the Time, While Others Stay in Freakishly Good Health?

Researchers are starting to learn how genes, environment and personal choices can make or break our immune health.

11h

The Hunt Is On for Elusive Ghost Particles in Antarctica

Ultrahigh-energy neutrinos could help scientists unravel some of the biggest mysteries in astrophysics—and the best place to find them may be the South Pole.

11h

Your Most Vexing New Coronavirus Questions, Answered

In some ways things are getting harder, not easier, as shelter-in-place orders lift worldwide. On this week's episode, we tackle tough new corona-questions.

11h

Researchers Expose a New Vulnerability in Intel's CPUs

The Software Guard eXtension is supposed to protect encryption keys and other sensitive data. But this isn't the first time it's been defeated.

11h

Astronomers spot repeating radio burst patterns from deep space

The Lovell Telescope in the UK has found 32 bursts from deep space, helping a team of astronomers uncover a pattern in their flashes. (Kristi Mickaliger/) Astronomers have spent six years watching an unknown object a million, billion light years away explode again and again. They still don't know what's expelling the violent bursts of energy, but one team thinks they've figured out at least when

11h

'Yoga With Adriene' Is the YouTube Star of the Pandemic

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET on June 12, 2020. There is a unique quality to this day-by-day pandemic sadness, this quarantine depression that with the protests is edging into despair. I'm not referring to those adults who seemed, in the early, pre-protest days, to be inexplicably thriving. "I've never been so busy!" one friend, a computer consultant, giddily enthused. "With time zones from London to T

11h

Spike Lee Has Made His Most Ambitious Film Yet

"War is about money. Money is about war. Every time I walk out my front door, I see cops patrolling my neighborhood like it's some kind of police state. I can feel just how much I ain't worth." So says Stormin' Norman (played by Chadwick Boseman), the mythic figure at the center of Spike Lee's bombastic war epic Da 5 Bloods (out on Netflix today). Norman says those words in 1970s Vietnam, and thi

11h

Action averted 530 million COVID-19 infections

Emergency health policies in six major countries have "significantly and substantially slowed" the spread of COVID-19 and prevented hundreds of millions of new infections, according to new research. The findings come as leaders worldwide struggle to balance the enormous and highly visible economic costs of emergency health measures against their public health benefits, which are difficult to see.

12h

7 ways American racism is 'alive and well' today

Racism is a deeply American problem and, based on a review of prior research, there are seven factors contributing to racism in the US today, researchers argue in a new paper. "American racism is alive and well," begins the new article, which arrives during a time of heightened attention to racial injustice in the United States. "People often define racism as disliking or mistreating others on th

12h

Is It Safe?

I've been in solo practice for almost 34 years now. I own my own practice and am my own boss. I chose this route because I wanted to be the Captain of my own ship and never have to worry about a job. Moreover, I'm a bit lazy and have problems with authority, so I would have made a terrible employee in […]

12h

'How I got fooled': The story behind the retraction of a study of gamers

In April of this year, Corneel Vandelanotte realized something had gone wrong with a paper he had recently published. First, there was a post about his paper by Nick Brown, a scientific sleuth, questioning the results, ethics, and authors behind the work. That was followed by a comment on PubPeer by Elisabeth Bik, another scientific … Continue reading

12h

The Country Is Reopening. I'm Still on Lockdown

For those of us with vulnerable loved ones, the risks of Covid-19 seem more dangerous than ever—with no end in sight.

12h

The Pandemic Is Propelling a New Wave of Automation

Software programs adopted during the Covid-19 crisis make it easier to complete forms and track requests. It saves work, but could cost jobs.

12h

Spies Can Eavesdrop by Watching a Light Bulb's Vibrations

The so-called lamphone technique allows for real-time listening in on a room that's hundreds of feet away.

12h

'Last of Us Part II' Is Great, but Can't Escape Its Father's Shadow

'The Last of Us' was the quintessential dad game. Its sequel is destined to be the archetype of something else: the daughter game.

12h

Bad Medicine Is Worse Than No Medicine

History shows that advocating for a "cure" without evidence can be deadly—and it's happening again — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

The vanishing-neutron mystery might be cracked by a robot in outer space

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01755-1 A mission to explore the planets also furnishes insights into the small stuff.

12h

A Roman city's splendours emerge while it's still underground

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01737-3 Radar shows the surprisingly complex architecture of Falerii Novi, a now-buried settlement founded in 241 BC.

12h

Reddit Is Finally Facing Its Legacy of Racism

In 2015, the Southern Poverty Law Center called out Reddit as home to "the most violently racist" content on the internet, citing a constellation of antiblack forums, or subreddits, that had adopted the name " the Chimpire " and racked up tens of thousands of members before they were taken down that year. Reddit's content policy prohibits inciting violence, as well as bullying and harassment, but

12h

How the Mayor of New York Lost His City

David Dee Delgado; John Lamparski / Getty; Paul Spella / The Atlantic T he clash between police and protesters that, once and for all, seemed to sever Bill de Blasio from the city that twice elected him mayor occurred on a Brooklyn street corner just over a mile from where he used to live. No one died at the intersection of Flatbush and Saint Marks Avenues on the evening of May 31; there are no m

12h

Indian military tests eye-tracking tech to help pilots control planes

Pilots are testing eye-tracking devices that let them flick through a plane's computer displays without taking their hands off the throttle

12h

Bad Medicine Is Worse Than No Medicine

History shows that advocating for a "cure" without evidence can be deadly—and it's happening again — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Buschauffører smittes oftere med covid-19, men synshaller vil ikke godkende afskærmning

PLUS. Busserne åbnede i denne uge fordørene på Fyn og i Jylland. Når turen kommer til København, frygter tillidsmand arbejdsnedlæggelser, for chaufførerne er utrygge.

12h

'Forever Chemicals' Are Building Up in the Arctic–and Likely Worldwide

An ice-core analysis reveals the chemicals that replaced ozone-depleting substances are leading to an increase of nondegradable compounds in the environment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

'Forever Chemicals' Are Building Up in the Arctic–and Likely Worldwide

An ice-core analysis reveals the chemicals that replaced ozone-depleting substances are leading to an increase of nondegradable compounds in the environment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

The Protesters Are Upholding America's Moral Authority Abroad

In December 1956, Martin Luther King Jr. interrupted himself during a speech on desegregation to discuss an event on the other side of the world: the prodemocracy uprising then being quashed in Hungary. "Our minds leap the mighty Atlantic," he told the National Committee for Rural Schools, because we are "concerned about the Hungarians as they confront the desperate situation that they stand amid

13h

Datatilsynet giver alvorlig kritik for manglende sletning af medarbejder-billeder

Billeder og video af tidligere medarbejdere skal slettes, siger tilsyn i sag om Dansk Miljørådgivning.

13h

The Mainstream Media Won't Tell You This

Photo Illustration by Adam Maida I t is strange to watch the creation of a new culture-war meme in real time. Talking directly to the camera from a fishing trawler, Nigel Farage takes a concerned and somber tone. The pro-Brexit politician says he has uncovered a huge scandal—migrant boats traveling from France to England, escorted into British waters by the French navy. He is worried for those on

13h

What Big Tech Wants Out of the Pandemic

Pablo Delcan L ong before the coronavirus pandemic, the tech industry yearned to prove its indispensability to the world. Its executives liked to describe their companies as "utilities." They came by their self-aggrandizement honestly: The founding fathers of Big Tech really did view their creations as essential, and essentially good. In recent years, however, our infatuation with these creations

13h

Janet Hemingway: working on Covid-19 — and her farm

How the scientist conducts her research while tending 15 acres in remotest Cheshire

13h

Coronavirus Live News and Updates

Citing the virus threat, Russian cities have refused to hold June 24 celebrations of the Soviet Union's victory over the Nazis. President Trump's campaign is requiring rally audiences to agree not to sue if they contract the virus.

13h

Pangolin released into wild under China's new protections

Activists in China have released a pangolin into the wild to celebrate new protections for the armadillo-like animal whose numbers in the country have dropped to near extinction levels.

13h

Coronavirus diaries: back to the lab again

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01782-y John Tregoning ponders a staged reopening of his lab on campus.

13h

Twitter sletter 170.000 konti med forbindelse til kinesisk propaganda

Mere end 170.000 Twitter-kontoer, hvor langt størstedelen ikke havde nogen følgere, blev brugt af den kinesiske regering til at sprede vildledende informationer og er derfor slettet, annoncerer Twitter.

13h

Pangolin released into wild under China's new protections

Activists in China have released a pangolin into the wild to celebrate new protections for the armadillo-like animal whose numbers in the country have dropped to near extinction levels.

13h

Ett pusslande med sällsynta blodgrupper

De flesta känner till blodgrupperna A, B, AB och O samt att man är Rh-positiv eller Rh-negativ. Men totalt finns det 367 blodgrupper, som kan spela roll vid en blodtransfusion. Och siffran förändras ständigt när nya blodgrupper upptäcks.

14h

Utan blod stannar vården

INTERNATIONELLA BLODGIVARDAGEN 14 JUNI Altruism – att ge osjälviskt för att samhället ska fungera genom att dela med sig av sitt blod är en grundbult i vården. I vårt land vill säga. I många andra länder är inte frivillig, obetald bloddonation normen. Genom den internationella blodgivardagen sätts fokus på blodgivarens viktiga roll och på att vägen från ven till ven blir säker.

14h

A teenager's guide to building the world's best pandemic and protest trackers

The coronavirus pandemic and the protests sparked by the May 25 murder of George Floyd have been the defining events of 2020 so far, and in both cases one 17-year-old has played a major role online: Avi Schiffmann, the creator of the web's preeminent covid-19 case tracker and, more recently, a protest tracking site . The trackers have garnered praise for providing concise, instantly updated infor

14h

Book Review: The Woman Who Helped Modernize Forensic Science

In "18 Tiny Deaths," Bruce Goldfarb chronicles the life and struggles of Frances Glessner Lee, a pioneer in expanding the medical examiner system and advancing the field of forensic investigation. Though she never went to college or medical school, at age 51 Lee began a career in forensic science.

14h

Functional annotation of rare structural variation in the human brain

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16736-1 Structural variants (SVs) contribute to the genetic architecture of many brain-related disorders. Here, the authors integrate SV calls from genome sequencing (n = 755) with RNA-seq data (n = 629) from post-mortem dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex to annotate the gene regulatory effects of SVs in the human brain a

14h

TECPR1 promotes aggrephagy by direct recruitment of LC3C autophagosomes to lysosomes

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16689-5 Many neurodegenerative disorders are characterised by the accumulation of protein aggregates in neurons. Here, the authors show that the lysosomal protein TECPR1 selectively recruits mature autophagosomes via an interaction with LC3C to break down protein aggregates in neural stem cells.

14h

3D sedimentary architecture showing the inception of an Ice Age

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16776-7 Northeast Atlantic climate shifted into the Quaternary Ice Age around 2.6 Myr ago. Here, the authors use 3D seismic data from the northern North Sea to document detailed changes in continental-margin sedimentary architecture spanning the transition from a fluvially dominated environment to an icehouse world.

14h

Angiopoietin-2–integrin α5β1 signaling enhances vascular fatty acid transport and prevents ectopic lipid-induced insulin resistance

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16795-4 Fat uptake and storage in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) prevents ectopic fat accumulation and associated metabolic complications, however, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, the authors show that adipose angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) enhances SAT size via increased endothelial fatty acid

14h

Strongly correlated Fermions strongly coupled to light

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16767-8 Atom-photon interaction and their coupling are important to understand correlated and quantum matter. Here the authors show strong coupling between degenerate interacting Fermi gas of 6Li atoms and photons.

14h

Quantification of ongoing APOBEC3A activity in tumor cells by monitoring RNA editing at hotspots

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16802-8 The DNA cytosine deaminases APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B have emerged from cancer genomics studies as drivers of mutation in cancers and tumor heterogeneity. Here the authors present a computational approach to identify the RNA mutations specifically driven by APOBEC3A, and developed an RNA mutation-based assay to quan

14h

A kinase-deficient NTRK2 splice variant predominates in glioma and amplifies several oncogenic signaling pathways

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16786-5 Tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), encoded by the neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase 2 (NTRK2) gene, exhibits intricate splicing patterns and post-translational modifications. Here, the authors perform whole gene and transcript-level analyses and report the TrkB.T1 splice variant enhances PDGF-driven gliom

14h

Transient lensing from a photoemitted electron gas imaged by ultrafast electron microscopy

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16746-z Excited charge carriers, such as photoelectrons, play an important role in fundamental and technological fields. Here the authors employ an ultrafast electron microscope to directly visualize the cyclotron oscillations and oblate-to-prolate shape change of a photoemitted electron gas from a laser-excited copper

14h

What kind of face mask gives the best protection against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

14h

Proceed with caution with the UK reopening

Easing social-distancing rule should wait until the virus rate falls further

14h

Scientists report heavy ion transfer in charged vdW cluster for the first time

Researchers from the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, and Centre de recherche sur les Ions, les MAtériaux et la Photonique (CIMAP) in France reported reporting a new channel involving heavy N+ ion transfer observed in a charged Van der Waals cluster.

14h

New approach to DNA data storage makes system more dynamic, scalable

Researchers have developed a fundamentally new approach to DNA data storage systems, giving users the ability to read or modify data files without destroying them and making the systems easier to scale up for practical use.

14h

Gastroprotective effect of phytoncide extract from Pinus koraiensis pinecone in Helicobacter pylori infection

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66603-8

14h

Artocarpus altilis extracts as a food-borne pathogen and oxidation inhibitors: RSM, COSMO RS, and molecular docking approaches

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66488-7

14h

Graphene oxide integrated silicon photonics for detection of vapour phase volatile organic compounds

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66389-9

14h

Imputation for sequencing variants preselected to a customized low-density chip

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66523-7

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Unexpected presence of 14C in inorganic pigment for an absolute dating of paintings

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65929-7 Unexpected presence of 14 C in inorganic pigment for an absolute dating of paintings

14h

An Incremental Voltage Difference Based Technique for Online State of Health Estimation of Li-ion Batteries

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66424-9

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14h

Verdens insekter dør i massevis – eller gør de?

PLUS. Ny forskning skyder store huller i fortællingen om en global insekt-apokalypse, som trak overskrifter i 2017.

14h

PODCAST: Insekt-apokalypsen, der fløj sin vej. Enhver kan sende en SMS fra dit nummer

Skrækscenariet med stor tilbagegang for insekter, som et tidligere studie fremmalede, holder ikke til en nærmere prøvelse. Danske teleselskaber beskytter ikke deres kunder mod telefonsvindlere. Dansk bølgekraft-koncept installerer demonstrationsanlæg i år.

14h

'Satellit-toget' blinker løs: Her er Musks løsninger til at stoppe genskæret

PLUS. Astronomer, borgere og danske politikere er bekymrede for de tusindvis af lysende satellitter, der breder sig på nattehimlen. Tre løsninger er på vej.

15h

Rumors, death, and a tech overhaul: Inside Amazon's race to hire 175,000 workers during a pandemic

It was a surge unlike any other, even for Amazon. In the first quarter of 2020, the e-commerce giant's net sales increased by 26% over the same period a year earlier. It was panic-buying on a grand scale. Amazon.com search rankings from mid-March awarded top billing to toilet paper, hand sanitizer, and Clorox wipes, but shelter-in-place orders and social distancing meant online shopping was now t

15h

Did a shark clash with large squid and live to tell the tale?

Underwater photographer Deron Verbeck was diving off the coast of Kona, Hawaii when he spotted an oceanic whitetip shark with strange scarring across its head and back. He snapped a photo of the shark with its scarring pattern of circles and dots that didn't look like teeth marks.

15h

Did a shark clash with large squid and live to tell the tale?

Underwater photographer Deron Verbeck was diving off the coast of Kona, Hawaii when he spotted an oceanic whitetip shark with strange scarring across its head and back. He snapped a photo of the shark with its scarring pattern of circles and dots that didn't look like teeth marks.

15h

Lockdowns are no problem for whale sharks in Tanzania

Global lockdowns pose few problems for whale sharks off Tanzania. New research shows that these gigantic fish prefer to stay in the bay they call home.

15h

Lockdowns are no problem for whale sharks in Tanzania

Global lockdowns pose few problems for whale sharks off Tanzania. New research shows that these gigantic fish prefer to stay in the bay they call home.

15h

Pandemic shuts Earth's eyes on the skies

It's as if the Earth has closed its eyes, some scientists say: the coronavirus pandemic has forced astronomers in northern Chile to shut down the world's most powerful telescopes, running the risk of missing out on supernovas and other spectacles in space.

15h

Study warns of poverty surge to over 1 billion due to virus

Global poverty is set to rise above 1 billion people once again as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, which is reducing the income of the world's poorest by $500 million a day, according to new research published Friday.

15h

Sundhedsjurist: Langsommelig styrelse skader patientsikkerheden

En kombination af fejl og langsommelighed betød, at 19 sundhedspersoner, der var til fare for patientsikkerheden, fik mulighed for at genoptage arbejdet. Lange sagsbehandlingsfrister i styrelsen skal ændres, mener ekspert. Styrelsen er uenig.

16h

New global extinction target proposed

With species fast disappearing, the world needs a single target for fighting extinction, say experts.

16h

In light of COVID-19, study looks at tradeoffs between economic value and public health

Banks and bookstores. Gyms and juice bars. Dental offices and department stores. The COVID-19 crisis has shuttered some kinds of businesses, while others have stayed open. But which places represent the best and worst tradeoffs, in terms of the economic benefits and health risks?

16h

Half the Earth relatively intact from global human influence

Roughly half of Earth's ice-free land remains without significant human influence, according to a study from a team of international researchers led by the National Geographic Society and the University of California, Davis.

16h

Lang sagsbehandling i styrelse rammer læger og patienter

Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed gav 'Anal-lægen' og 18 andre sundhedspersoner mulighed for at praktisere, selvom de havde udsat patientsikkerheden for fare. Forkert læsning af loven og ekstrem sagsbehandlingstid er forklaringen, viser gennemgang af sagen. Styrelsen skader både retssikkerhed og patientsikkerhed, vurderer Lægeforeningen. Styrelse beklager.

16h

Matt Hancock faces legal action from daughter of Covid-19 care home victim

Minister accused of 'litany of failures' and misleading public over protecting care homes Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Matt Hancock is facing legal action from the daughter of a man who died from Covid-19 in a care home in which the health secretary is accused of a "litany of failures" and misleading the public with his claim to have "thrown a protective ring" aro

17h

17h

UK coronavirus: Matt Hancock not ruling out compulsory cooperation with test and trace system – as it happened

UK death toll rises by 151 to 41,279 ; urgent cancer referrals in England fell by 60% in first month of lockdown NHS unable to trace contacts of 33% of people with coronavirus Who does coronavirus kill in England and Wales? How successful is test and trace? – Analysis Coronavirus – latest updates 7.15pm BST That's it from us today on the UK side. If you would like to continue to follow the Guardi

17h

17h

Covid-19 studies based on flawed Surgisphere data force medical journals to review processes

New England Journal of Medicine and Lancet peer reviewers did not see raw data behind findings before publication Some of the world's leading medical journals are reviewing their processes after they were forced to retract studies based on flawed data. None of the peer reviewers who examined a questionable study on the impact of blood pressure medications on Covid-19 saw the raw data behind the f

17h

Forskere opdager mekanismer bag naturens måske største erektion – som ikke er særlig stor

I planteriget vokser han-pollenets kønsorgan til op mod tusinde gange sin egen længde og lugter…

17h

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18h

'Snot Palaces' Reveal Undersea Creature Secrets

Scientists are studying the delicate mucus houses built by creatures called larvaceans to better understand how they live. Christopher Intagliata reports.

18h

Photos of the Week: Monastery Move, Desert Ride, Backpack Pup

Rhythmic gymnastics on a British seashore, anti-racism protests across the United States, the funeral procession of George Floyd in Houston, a defaced statue of King Leopold II in Brussels, a moment of silence at the Atlanta Motor Speedway, a wildfire in California, idled elephants in Thailand, a sea turtle release in Bali, and much more

19h

Plant cell gatekeepers' diversity could be key to better crops

Scientists have shed new light on how the network of gatekeepers that controls the traffic in and out of plant cells works, which they think is key to develop food crops with bigger yields and greater ability to cope with extreme environments.

19h

COVID-19: Relationship between social media use and prejudice against Chinese Americans

The novel coronavirus pandemic that originated in China has created a backlash in the United States against Asian Americans. Researchers in New Zealand found a strong relationship between the pandemic, social media use and prejudice. Gender appears to play a significant role in predicting whether someone reacts more intellectually or emotionally to perceived threats from a minority population.

19h

Baby, bryllup og fyring: Sådan påvirker livets store begivenheder din lykke

Når først du er blevet gift eller har fået barn, falder din lykkefølelse markant.

19h

Brain cells can harbor and spread HIV virus to the body

Researchers have found that astrocytes, a type of brain cell can harbor HIV and then spread the virus to immune cells that traffic out of the brain and into other organs. HIV moved from the brain via this route even when the virus was suppressed by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), a standard treatment for HIV.

19h

Utah's arches continue to whisper their secrets

Two new studies show what can be learned from a short seismic checkup of natural rock arches and how erosion sculpts some arches — like the iconic Delicate Arch — into shapes that lend added strength.

19h

Ancient crocodiles walked on two legs like dinosaurs

An international research team has been stunned to discover that some species of ancient crocodiles walked on their two hind legs like dinosaurs and measured over three metres in length. University of Queensland palaeontologist Dr Anthony Romilio said the researchers first thought the similar-shaped fossilised footprints were from another ancient animal known as the pterosaurs.

19h

Forced responses: Jun 2020

Open thread on climate solutions. Please try and stay within a mile or two of the overall topic.

19h

»Idiotisk telefonsystem«: Derfor kan enhver stå bag SMS'en fra din mor eller chef

De danske teleselskaber beskytter ikke deres kunder mod falske sms'er og snyde-­opkald. Derfor har telefonsvindlere fortsat frit spil i Danmark.

19h

Fedtvævets hukommelse under lup

Et kommende ph.d.-projekt undersøger, om fedtvæv 'husker' overvægten, selvom en svært overvægtig person taber sig.

19h

Saudi Arabia considers cancelling hajj for first time in modern history

Religious pilgrims were expected to generate $12bn for the kingdom before the pandemic struck

19h

EU to spend billions of euros to secure coronavirus vaccine

Brussels calls for advanced purchased deals with pharmaceutical groups to develop promising drugs

19h

COVID-19: Relationship between social media use and prejudice against Chinese Americans

The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 that originated in China has claimed an estimated 100,000 lives in the United States, while a different sort of pandemic is spreading online against Asian Americans, particularly of Chinese descent. A study published in Frontiers in Communication suggests there is a strong relationship between social media use and prejudice.

19h

An aspirin a day keeps the bowel doctor away

A regular dose of aspirin to reduce the risk of inherited bowel cancer lasts at least 10 years after stopping treatment, research has revealed.

20h

Scientists carry out first space-based measurement of neutron lifetime

Scientists have found a way of measuring neutron lifetime from space for the first time — a discovery that could teach us more about the early universe.

20h

Slow down: Reduced speed limits save lives in busy cities

Traffic accidents are the leading cause of non-natural deaths worldwide. Lower speed limits may help prevent accidents. But speed-reduction policies can be controversial and effects are not well documented. A new study shows that speed reductions in São Paulo, Brazil, dramatically reduced fatal accidents and increased travel times only minimally.

20h

'Snot Palaces' Reveal Undersea Creature Secrets

Scientists are studying the delicate mucus houses built by creatures called larvaceans to better understand how they live. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

'Snot Palaces' Reveal Undersea Creature Secrets

Scientists are studying the delicate mucus houses built by creatures called larvaceans to better understand how they live. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Søer og vandløb overset i CO2-regnskab: Udleder 9 pct. af landets klimagasser

PLUS. CO2 siver fra danske ferskvande og udgør en hidtil udokumenteret del af den danske CO2-udledning, påpeger forskere på baggrund af nye beregninger. Det er endnu uvist, hvor meget af udledningen der fremgår af landets CO2-regnskab.

20h

Kronik: Vådområder bidrager markant til CO2-udledningen

Søer og vandløb modtager vand fra landjorden med et højt kulstofindhold, hvoraf en del frigøres som CO2 til luften. Tre forskere har undersøgt mulighederne for at reducere CO2-udslippet ved at standse dyrkningen af lavbundsjorder, der hyppigt oversvømmes.

20h

21h

Hong Kong's contentious national security law concerns some academics

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01693-y Plans for the new bill follow months of protests, but researchers are divided about how it might affect them.

21h

22h

Allosteric control of hemoglobin S fiber formation by oxygen and its relation to the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The pathology of sickle cell disease is caused by polymerization of the abnormal hemoglobin S upon deoxygenation in the tissues to form fibers in red cells, causing them to deform and occlude the circulation. Drugs that allosterically shift the quaternary equilibrium from the polymerizing T quaternary structure to the nonpolymerizing…

22h

The ventral striatum dissociates information expectation, reward anticipation, and reward receipt [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Do dopaminergic reward structures represent the expected utility of information similarly to a reward? Optimal experimental design models from Bayesian decision theory and statistics have proposed a theoretical framework for quantifying the expected value of information that might result from a query. In particular, this formulation quantifies the value of…

22h

Identifying airborne transmission as the dominant route for the spread of COVID-19 [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Various mitigation measures have been implemented to fight the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, including widely adopted social distancing and mandated face covering. However, assessing the effectiveness of those intervention practices hinges on the understanding of virus transmission, which remains uncertain. Here we show that airborne transmission is highly virulent…

22h

Resolving the adsorption of molecular O2 on the rutile TiO2(110) surface by noncontact atomic force microscopy [Physics]

Interaction of molecular oxygen with semiconducting oxide surfaces plays a key role in many technologies. The topic is difficult to approach both by experiment and in theory, mainly due to multiple stable charge states, adsorption configurations, and reaction channels of adsorbed oxygen species. Here we use a combination of noncontact…

22h

Exaggerated meta-perceptions predict intergroup hostility between American political partisans [Political Sciences]

People's actions toward a competitive outgroup can be motivated not only by their perceptions of the outgroup, but also by how they think the outgroup perceives the ingroup (i.e., meta-perceptions). Here, we examine the prevalence, accuracy, and consequences of meta-perceptions among American political partisans. Using a representative sample (n =…

22h

Denisovan DNA influences immune system of modern day Oceanian populations

More than 120,000 novel human genetic variations that affect large regions of DNA have been discovered, some of which are linked to immune response, disease susceptibility or digestion.

23h

'Matador' guppies trick predators

Trinidadian guppies behave like matadors, focusing a predator's point of attack before dodging away at the last moment, new research shows.

23h

More than 1000 tons of plastic rains into Western US protected lands annually

Watershed researchers estimate more than 1000 tons of microplastics (equal to more than 123 million plastic water bottles) are deposited in national parks and wilderness areas each year. Researchers used high-resolution atmospheric deposition data and identified samples of microplastics and other particulates collected over 14 months in 11 western U.S. national parks and wilderness areas. They ide

23h

Cascade sets the stage for superconductivity in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene

The researchers used scanning tunneling microscopy to observe what happens when they add additional electrons to magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene. They observed a cascade of transitions in the electronic properties, patterns that could help unlock how superconductivity emerge in these materials.

23h

Scientists apply 'twistronics' to light propagation and make a breakthrough discovery

A research team has employed "twistronics" concepts (the science of layering and twisting two-dimensional materials to control their electrical properties) to manipulate the flow of light in extreme ways. The findings hold the promise for leapfrog advances in a variety of light-driven technologies, including nano-imaging devices; high-speed, low-energy optical computers; and biosensors.

23h

Crop pathogens 'remarkably adaptable'

Pathogens that attack agricultural crops show remarkable adaptability to new climates and new plant hosts, new research shows.

23h

Lack of mitochondria causes severe disease in children

Researchers have discovered that excessive degradation of the power plants of our cells plays an important role in the onset of mitochondrial disease in children. These inherited metabolic disorders can have severe consequence such as brain dysfunction and neurological impairment.

23h

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