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Research sheds new light on intelligent life existing across the galaxy

Is there anyone out there? This is an age-old question that researchers have now shed new light on with a study that calculates there could be more than 30 intelligent civilizations throughout our Galaxy. This is an enormous advance over previous estimates which spanned from zero to billions.

10h

Spectacular bird's-eye view? Hummingbirds see diverse colors humans can only imagine

To find food, dazzle mates, escape predators and navigate diverse terrain, birds rely on their excellent color vision.

32min

LATEST

Researchers show Canada Basin's diminished capacity to absorb carbon dioxide

New research by University of Delaware doctoral student Zhangxian Ouyang and oceanographer Wei-Jun Cai, and an international team of researchers, demonstrates that rapid warming and sea-ice loss have induced major changes in the western Arctic Ocean.

2min

While stargazing on Mars, Curiosity rover spots Earth and Venus

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover occasionally stops to stargaze. Recently, it captured a shot of Earth and Venus in the Red Planet's night sky.

8min

Researchers unlock clues to a dramatic chapter of Earth's geological history

Imagine Earth completely covered in ice. While it's hard to picture all of today's oceans and land masses obscured with glaciers, such an ice-covered version of the planet was not so far-fetched millions of years ago.

8min

Accelerating biological systems design for sustainable biomanufacturing

A new cell-free platform developed by Professor Michael Jewett rapidly identifies optimal enzyme combinations for sustainable fuels and materials.

14min

Genetic rescue of SHANK3 is potential therapy in rare forms of autism spectrum disorder

A mouse study by Craig Powell, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues suggests that early genetic rescue may be a potential therapy in autism spectrum disorder, or ASD. Powell looked at one gene called SHANK3, whose alteration is seen in about 0.5 percent of ASD patients.

14min

A carbon sink shrinks in the arctic

Ice melts in the Arctic Ocean were thought to be drawing large amounts of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, acting as a carbon sink and helping to mitigate greenhouse gases. But new research from the University of Delaware shows that may not be the case in all areas, particularly in the Canada Basin, where the carbon sink is shrinking, inhibiting the ocean's ability to absorb carbon dioxide fr

14min

Scientists discover three-dimensional structure in smaller water droplet

A research team led by Prof. JIANG Ling and Prof. YANG Xueming from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Prof. LI Jun from Tsinghua University, has now revealed that the noncyclic 3D structure of water clusters begins to exist with pentamers at low finite temperatures.

14min

Wounded plants: How they coordinate their healing

When we cut our fingers, blood rushes out of the wound to close it. However, the vegetable, we just wanted to slice and dice, would have reacted utterly different to this injury. Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) investigated how plant cells heal wounds. In their results, published in PNAS on June 15, the researchers discovered that the hormone Auxin and p

14min

29min

Hummingbird Vision Hints at Compound Colors Outside the Normal Spectrum

Hummingbirds can distinguish blends of color that we see as ordinary hues. hummingbird-rainbow.gif Image credits: Ramona Edwards/ Shutterstock Creature Monday, June 15, 2020 – 15:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Hummingbirds can see colors humans can only imagine, an ability that now sheds light on an extra dimension of animal vision, a new study finds. Compared to many other

32min

Immune properties in ancient DNA found in isolated villages might benefit humanity today

Could remnants of DNA from a now extinct human subspecies known as the Denisovans help boost the immune functions of modern humans? An international study represents the first characterizations of genes in the DNA of healthy individuals from geographically and genetically distinct populations in Indonesia.

32min

Human portraits reveals shift in culture, cognition

Human cognition and cultural norms have changed the composition of human portraits, according to a new analysis of European paintings from the 15th to the 20th century.

32min

Higher parental stress linked to low screen-time enforcement, research finds

When parents are under stress, household rules about screen time often get abandoned, new research finds.

32min

Neurons can shift how they process information about motion

New research indicates some neurons can shift to process information about movement depending on the brain's current frame of reference. The findings may have implications for developing future prosthetics and for understanding some brain disorders.

32min

Wounded plants: How they coordinate their healing

When we cut our fingers, blood rushes out of the wound to close it. However, the vegetable we just wanted to slice and dice, would have reacted completely differently to this injury. Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) investigated how plant cells heal wounds. In their results, published in PNAS on June 15, the researchers discovered that the hormone auxin a

32min

No single solution helps all students complete MOOCs

In one of the largest educational field experiments ever conducted, a team co-led by a Cornell researcher found that promising interventions to help students complete online courses were not effective on a massive scale—suggesting that targeted solutions are needed to help students in different circumstances or locations.

32min

Scientists discover three-dimensional structure in smaller water droplet

Water and its interactions with other substances are essential to human life. However, understanding the structure of liquid water and its hydrogen-bonding networks has been a challenge.

32min

Three types of laws could reduce gun deaths by more than 10%

Laws preventing children from accessing firearms account for nearly half the drop

33min

Wounded plants: How they coordinate their healing

When we cut our fingers, blood rushes out of the wound to close it. However, the vegetable we just wanted to slice and dice, would have reacted completely differently to this injury. Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) investigated how plant cells heal wounds. In their results, published in PNAS on June 15, the researchers discovered that the hormone auxin a

35min

Spectacular bird's-eye view? Hummingbirds see diverse colors humans can only imagine

To find food, dazzle mates, escape predators and navigate diverse terrain, birds rely on their excellent color vision.

35min

First report of systemic delivery of micro-dystrophin gene therapy in children with DMD

Researchers from Nationwide Children's Hospital have published in JAMA Neurology results from the first four patients treated in the first clinical trial of systemic delivery of micro-dystrophin gene therapy in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) — and initial findings suggest that the therapy can provide functional improvement that is greater than that observed under the standard of

36min

New study reveals racial disparities in fear of police brutality

Nationwide survey shows minorities are five times more likely than white people to worry about police brutality.

36min

Multilevel interventions improve HPV vaccination rates of series initiation and completion

New research from Boston Medical Center shows that providing education and training to pediatric and family medicine providers about the importance of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, in tandem with healthcare systems changes including starting an HPV vaccination series before the age of 11, improves the overall rate of HPV vaccinations among adolescent patients. HPV vaccinations can help redu

36min

Astronaut: Killer Asteroid Plan Must Be Better Than COVID Response

Teachable Moments If the world were to respond to an impending asteroid impact the way it did the coronavirus pandemic, then we would all be utterly hosed. That's according to scientist and retired NASA astronaut Thomas Jones, who told Space.com that the uncoordinated and delayed attempts to contain COVID-19 ought to serve as teachable moments — lessons in failure — that should help world leaders

37min

Carbon emission from permafrost soils underestimated by 14%

Picture 500 million cars stacked in rows. That's how much carbon—about 1,000 petagrams, or one billion metric tons—is locked away in Arctic permafrost.

38min

New analysis of human portraits reveals shift in culture, cognition

Throughout history, portraits featuring the human profile have evolved to reflect changing cultural norms. A new study led by Helena Miton, a Santa Fe Institute Omidyar Fellow, and co-authored by Dan Sperber of Central European University and Mikołaj Hernik, of UiT the Artic University of Norway, shows that human cognition plays a critical role in the evolution of human portraiture.

38min

A Screen of 'Old Smoke' Hangs Around in the Atmosphere

How this thin layer of aerosol particles might impact global climate remains to be seen — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

41min

COVID-19 pandemic could decimate outdoor environmental, science education programs

The COVID-19 pandemic threatens the survival of organizations nationwide that provide critical outdoor environmental and science education to K-12 students, with an alarming 63% of such groups uncertain about their ability to ever reopen their doors, according to a study released this week by the Lawrence Hall of Science at the University of California, Berkeley.

44min

The Guardian view on natural history: children need to know

With or without a new GCSE, pupils must be taught to think about life on Earth The lockdown edition of the BBC's Springwatch ended on Friday, with a series of clips sent in by viewers to illustrate their wildlife enthusiasms. But the latest stage in a campaign to extend the reach of natural history beyond television schedules has only just begun. The idea for a new GCSE in the subject came from t

44min

Clues to a dramatic chapter of Earth's geological history

How could the planet be covered entirely in ice — a state known as 'Snowball Earth'– and still give rise to multicellular life? The transition to such icy periods may not have been as abrupt as previously thought, new research shows.

46min

Molecules that reduce 'bad' gut bacteria reverse narrowing of arteries in animal study

Scientists have developed molecules that can remodel the bacterial population of intestines to a healthier state. They also have shown — through experiments in mice — that this approach reduces cholesterol levels and strongly inhibits the thickened-artery condition known as atherosclerosis.

46min

First room-temp 'magnon switch' with industrially useful properties

Scientists have demonstrated a practical technique for controlling magnons, which could lead to computer chip switches that would use less energy and radiate less heat. The approach brings two important firsts: It can be built on silicon and operates efficiently at room temperature, meaning it might be more readily employed by computer manufacturers.

46min

Excitons form superfluid in certain 2D combos

Mixing and matching computational models of 2D materials led scientists to the realization that excitons can be manipulated in new and useful ways.

46min

Tuberculosis vaccine strengthens immune system

A tuberculosis vaccine developed 100 years ago also makes vaccinated persons less susceptible to other infections. While this effect has been recognized for a long time, it is not known what causes it.

46min

Brothers in arms: The brain and its blood vessels

The brain and its surrounding blood vessels exist in a close relationship. Researchers have discovered how cells of the blood vessels sense the metabolic condition of the brain and alter vascular function in response. The result could be important for patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's because the onset of these age-related diseases coincides with vascular defects and br

46min

Atomic physics: Radiation pressure with recoil

Light exerts a certain amount of pressure onto a body: sun sails could thus power space probes in the future. However, when light particles (photons) hit an individual molecule and knock out an electron, the molecule flies toward the light source. Atomic physicists have now observed this for the first time, confirming a 90 year-old theory.

46min

Electrically charged dust storms drive Martian chlorine cycle

The group that previously studied Martian dust storms now shifts focus to the electrochemical processes resulting from dust storms that may power the movement of chlorine, which is ongoing on Mars today.

46min

The many lifetimes of plastics

Many of us have seen informational posters at parks or aquariums specifying how long plastics bags, bottles, and other products last in the environment. They're a good reminder to not litter, but where does the information on the lifetime expectancy of plastic goods come from, and how reliable is it?

46min

Researchers uncover drivers of healthy gut maintenance

Researchers have found two genes that regulate the differentiation of stem cells in the small intestine, offering valuable insight into how the body develops and maintains a healthy gut.

46min

The many lifetimes of plastics

Many of us have seen informational posters at parks or aquariums specifying how long plastics bags, bottles, and other products last in the environment. They're a good reminder to not litter, but where does the information on the lifetime expectancy of plastic goods come from, and how reliable is it?

52min

Researchers create first room-temp 'magnon switch' with industrially useful properties

Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have demonstrated a potentially new way to make switches inside a computer's processing chips, enabling them to use less energy and radiate less heat.

52min

NASA follows Tropical Storm Nuri's path

An animation of four days of imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed the progression and landfall of Tropical Storm Nuri.

52min

Four must-haves for training a puppy

Good doggo! (Jamie Street via Unsplash/) Simply buying a pup from a good lineage will not mean you have the perfect pup or hunting buddy. You have to put in the time. Fortunately, you don't necessarily need much to get you from bouncy puppy to sleek hunter. The best for your best friend. (Amazon/) These natural dog treats are a perfect choice for training your pup in the field. At three calories

57min

Boris Johnson misses his own deadline for two-metre rule review

Promise to conclude new inquiry 'in the coming weeks' angers Tory MPs

58min

New fossil discovery shows 50 million-year-old Canada-Australia connection

The discovery of a tiny insect fossil is unearthing big questions about the global movement of animals and the connection to changes in climate and shifting continents across deep time. The fossil, estimated to be 50 million years old, was found in rocks near the city of Kamloops, British Columbia, but today its relatives live exclusively in Australia.

58min

Cell wall research reveals possibility of simple and sustainable method to protect crops

While crop diseases have devastating consequences on agriculture, causing losses of up to 30% in some crops, plants constantly evolve to maintain robust immune systems that allow them to perceive pathogens and develop defenses. One key player in this system is the plant cell wall, a complex structure that surrounds all plant cells. The plant cell wall is a dynamic structure modified by interaction

58min

Cell wall research reveals possibility of simple and sustainable method to protect crops

While crop diseases have devastating consequences on agriculture, causing losses of up to 30% in some crops, plants constantly evolve to maintain robust immune systems that allow them to perceive pathogens and develop defenses. One key player in this system is the plant cell wall, a complex structure that surrounds all plant cells. The plant cell wall is a dynamic structure modified by interaction

1h

Team develops benchmark for detecting large genetic mutations linked to major diseases

Many serious diseases, including autism, schizophrenia and numerous cardiac disorders, are believed to result from mutation of an individual's DNA. But some large mutations, which still make up only a small fraction of the total human genome, have been surprisingly challenging to detect.

1h

The best kettlebells for intense home workouts

Weights to carry around with you. (Alora Griffiths via Unsplash/) The history of the kettlebell stretches all the way back to 18th-century Russia, where large round metal balls called girya were used to counterbalance crops to determine their weight. They were later adopted by circus strongmen as a means of proving their merit before eventually being adopted into weight lifting training, as well

1h

Scientists Detect Green Glow on Mars

Scientists have identified a green glow in the atmosphere of Mars caused by sunlight releasing oxygen atoms from carbon dioxide — the first time such a glow has been observed on a planet other than Earth. As oxygen is abundant in Earth's atmosphere, a similar one can be observed from the International Space Station . It's the same effect that gives auroras their green hue. "One of the brightest e

1h

Team develops benchmark for detecting large genetic mutations linked to major diseases

Many serious diseases, including autism, schizophrenia and numerous cardiac disorders, are believed to result from mutation of an individual's DNA. But some large mutations, which still make up only a small fraction of the total human genome, have been surprisingly challenging to detect.

1h

New fossil discovery shows 50 million-year-old Canada-Australia connection

The discovery of a tiny insect fossil in Western Canada is unearthing big questions about the global movement of animals across deep time. The fossil, estimated to be 50 million years old, is the latest in a pattern of discoveries that are leading experts to contemplate a Canada-Australia connection not previously considered.

1h

Carbon emission from permafrost soils underestimated by 14%

Picture 500 million cars stacked in rows. That's how much carbon — about 1,000 petagrams, or one billion metric tons – -is locked away in Arctic permafrost.

1h

FDA Withdraws Emergency Use Authorization For Hydroxychloroquine

Emergency use authorization makes it easier for doctors to use a drug in a manner not specifically approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA granted these drugs this status in March. (Image credit: David J. Phillip/AP)

1h

Covid's online cosmetic effect

SoftBank's circular funding, cyberstalking with cockroaches, virtual drum kits

1h

FDA Revokes Emergency Coronavirus Use of Malaria Drugs

The agency said that a review of some studies showed that the drugs' potential benefits in treating Covid-19 did not outweigh the risks.

1h

Covid-19 can damage lungs of victims beyond recognition, expert says

Organs of some who die after over a month in hospital sustain 'complete disruption', peers told Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid-19 can leave the lungs of people who died from the disease completely unrecognisable, a professor of cardiovascular science has told parliament. It created such massive damage in those who spent more than a month in hospital that it re

1h

Disrupted circadian rhythms linked to later Parkinson's diagnoses

Older men who have a weak or irregular circadian rhythm guiding their daily cycles of rest and activity are more likely to later develop Parkinson's disease, according to a new study by scientists at the UC San Francisco Weill Institute for Neurosciences who analyzed 11 years of data for nearly 3,000 independently living older men.

1h

Barriers exist to using risk stratification tools to evaluate pulmonary embolism in the ED

Common barriers exist to the use of risk stratification tools in the evaluation of pulmonary embolism in the emergency department and provide insight into where to focus efforts for future implementation endeavors. That is the conclusion of a study to be published in the June 2020 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM), a journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM).

1h

Three new studies identify neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2

A trio of papers describes several newly discovered human antibodies that target the SARS-CoV-2 virus, isolated from survivors of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV infection.

1h

Ushering an antibody cocktail, designed to reduce antibody resistance, to trial as COVID-19 therapy

Following two studies that screened thousands of human antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 to identify highly potent pairs, in which the antibodies bind non-overlapping regions of the viral target, a resultant antibody cocktail is being tested in human trials.

1h

Super-potent human antibodies protect against COVID-19 in animal tests

A team led by Scripps Research has discovered antibodies in the blood of recovered COVID-19 patients that provide powerful protection against SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes the disease, when tested in animals and human cell cultures.

1h

A continental-scale prediction on the functional diversity of stream microbes

Climate mediates continental scale patterns of stream microbial functional diversity.

1h

Elasticity key to plants and animals' ability to sting

A new study explains for the very first time the principles behind the design of stings, needles, and spikes in animals and plants. The principles can be directly used in the development of new tools and medical equipment.

1h

From clickbait to transparency: Reimagining the online world

Behavioral science perspectives on an alternative Internet.

1h

Intelligence is impacted if born small for gestational age

People born small for gestational age (SGA) have a lower IQ throughout development, however the differences in IQ to those born appropriate for gestational age (AGA) reduce by adulthood. The effects of SGA on IQ are nearly as large as being born into lower socio-economic status or receiving poor parenting in infancy.

1h

More and safer heart transplants could become possible with new heart box

A donated heart can now be transported and preserved for longer than what has previously been possible. The new method, which consists of a specially designed heart box, was used for a transplant for the first time as early as the summer of 2017. Now it has been evaluated in a first clinical study.

1h

Multi-ethnic study suggests vitamin K may offer protective health benefits in older age

A new, multi-ethnic study found adults aged 54-76 with low circulating vitamin K levels were more likely to die within 13 years compared to those with adequate levels, suggesting vitamin K may offer protective health benefits as we age.

1h

The latest guidance on how to prevent cancer

These are all part of a cancer-preventing diet (Wendy Wei/Pexels/) Cancer is second only to heart disease in the number of people it kills annually in the US. For Hispanic and Asian Americans, and those under 80, it's the leading cause of death. Millions of dollars, both public and private, get spent every year in a search for new cancer treatments, but since the 1980s there's also been a focus o

1h

An AI can generate photographs of people's faces from line drawings

An algorithm that can turn line sketches of people's faces into realistic photographs could rapidly generate images of suspects in criminal investigations

1h

Covid-19 news: New coronavirus outbreak linked to market in Beijing

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

1h

New fossil discovery shows 50 million-year-old Canada-Australia connection

The discovery of a tiny insect fossil in Western Canada is unearthing big questions about the global movement of animals across deep time. The fossil, estimated to be 50 million years old, is the latest in a pattern of discoveries that are leading experts to contemplate a Canada-Australia connection not previously considered.

1h

COVID-19 will affect the food and financial security of many for years to come

The complex food shopping patterns that financially insecure families employ have been upended by COVID-19. While the maximum benefit for SNAP increased, this policy change alone will not address many of the barriers low-income families are facing in acquiring food during the pandemic. To facilitate advocacy and policy change around this food insecurity crisis, researchers developed a web mapping

1h

Rochester researchers unlock clues to a dramatic chapter of Earth's geological history

How could the planet be covered entirely in ice–a state known as 'Snowball Earth'–and still give rise to multicellular life? The transition to such icy periods may not have been as abrupt as previously thought, new research from the University of Rochester shows.

1h

Molecules that reduce 'bad' gut bacteria reverse narrowing of arteries in animal study

Scientists at Scripps Research have developed molecules that can remodel the bacterial population of intestines to a healthier state. They also have shown–through experiments in mice–that this approach reduces cholesterol levels and strongly inhibits the thickened-artery condition known as atherosclerosis.

1h

Interviews clarify tension between homicide detectives, bereaved

New research documents the often tense relationship between homicide detectives and the friends and families of murder victims. Criminologists Mark Reed and Dean Dabney collected data from homicide detectives in a single metropolitan unit by accompanying them during an eight-hour shift, recording notes, and conducting on-site interviews. They interviewed the victims' families and friends in focus

1h

Man Survives Coronavirus, Gets $1.1 Million Hospital Bill

Michael Flor, a COVID-19 survivor who holds the unfortunate record for the longest hospital stay linked to the pandemic, just got nailed with the bill. And in a horrifying indictment of the for-profit U.S. healthcare system, the hospital charged more than $1 million for his treatment. The 181-page itemized bill — that's longer than Joseph Conrad's "Heart of Darkness" — comes to a total of $1,122,

1h

US ends emergency use of hydroxychloroquine for virus

FDA withdraws approval for drug taken by Donald Trump as trials fail to show clinical benefit

1h

Improved gut microbiota with cholesterol-lowering medication

There is a clear link between improved gut microbiota and one of our most common cholesterol-lowering drug groups: statins.

1h

Tuberculosis spread from animals to humans may be greater than previously thought

The number of human tuberculosis (TB) cases that are due to transmission from animals, as opposed to human-to-human transmission, may be much higher than previously estimated, according to an international team of researchers. The results could have implications for epidemiological studies and public health interventions.

1h

Vegetarians tend to be slimmer and less extroverted than meat eaters, study finds

The less animal products someone consumes, the lower his body mass index on average and the less he tends to be extroverted. A connection with depressive moods as other studies had found could not be confirmed.

1h

AI reduces 'communication gap' for nonverbal people by as much as half

Researchers have used artificial intelligence to reduce the 'communication gap' for nonverbal people with motor disabilities who rely on computers to converse with others.

1h

3D X-ray reveals secrets from inside bones

Researchers have uncovered a previously unknown substructure in bone tissue using a new X-ray technique to produce 3D images of the internal structure of bones. The discovery potentially questions fundamentally a number of the models of bone tissue and the mechanical properties of bones that, among other things, is used to describe the process of bone formation.

1h

Diluting blood plasma rejuvenates tissue, reverses aging in mice

A new study reveals that replacing half of the blood plasma with a mixture of saline and albumin reverses signs of aging and rejuvenates muscle, brain and liver tissue in old mice. The research team is currently finalizing clinical trials to determine if a modified plasma exchange in humans could be used to treat age-associated diseases and improve the overall health of older people.

1h

Role of lipid rafts in virus infiltration

New research sheds light on how and why the cell membrane forms and grows lipid rafts triggered by ligand-receptor activity. The work could lead to new strategies and innovative approaches to prevent or fight the action of the virus through the integration of biomedical and engineering knowledge.

1h

BU study: Alcohol taxes have never been lower

Inflation has reduced American alcohol tax rates by 70% since 1933, according to a new study from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

1h

Study examines the prevalence of COVID-19 infections in pregnant women

A team led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital has now provided a report on the prevalence of infections with the SARS-CoV-2 virus in women admitted to such units in several Boston hospitals.

1h

As food insecurity continues to plague New Yorkers, impact on children is worrisome

One in four households with children have reported a child experiencing hunger as a result of the COVID-19 health crisis, according to the latest CUNY SPH COVID-19 tracking survey. Many New Yorkers continued to report difficulties in getting the food they needed, but of particular concern is the impact on households with children under the age of 18.

1h

Cell wall research reveals possibility of simple and sustainable method to protect crops

Antonio Molina and his research group at Centro de Biotecnología y Genómica de Plantas in Spain aimed to understand the role of the cell wall in the regulation of plant resistance responses to pathogens. To do that, they selected a collection of mutants with alterations on their cell walls composition/structure and analyzed their resistance to different pathogens.

1h

MIT, NIST create first room-temp 'magnon switch' with industrially useful properties

NIST and MIT scientists have demonstrated a practical technique for controlling magnons, which could lead to computer chip switches that would use less energy and radiate less heat. The approach brings two important firsts: It can be built on silicon and operates efficiently at room temperature, meaning it might be more readily employed by computer manufacturers.

1h

Carbon emission from permafrost soils underestimated by 14%

Picture 500 million cars stacked in rows. That's how much carbon — about 1,000 petagrams, or one billion metric tons – -is locked away in Arctic permafrost.

1h

COVID-19 hospitalizations could mean significant out-of-pocket medical costs for many Americans

If past hospitalizations for pneumonia and other respiratory illnesses are any guide, many Americans could face high out-of-pocket medical costs for COVID-19 hospitalizations.

1h

FDA just gave a thumbs down to Trump's favorite COVID-19 drugs

Agency withdraws emergency authorization for hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine

2h

F.D.A. Revokes Emergency Approval of Malaria Drugs Promoted by Trump

The agency said that a review of some studies showed that the drugs' potential benefits in treating Covid-19 did not outweigh the risks.

2h

English shops reopen amid debate over lockdown easing

'Non-essential' stores welcome their first customers in 3 months

2h

COVID-19 pandemic could decimate outdoor environmental, science education programs

A survey of 1,000 outdoor education programs nationwide finds that nearly two-thirds are in danger of folding because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Such programs connect youth with the world around them and teach about nature, with documented academic, health and social benefits. But most programs are conducted by residential outdoor science schools, nature centers, parks and zoos, not in traditional

2h

Higher parental stress linked to low screen-time enforcement, research finds

When parents are under stress, household rules about screen time often get abandoned, new University of Guelph research finds.

2h

Researchers uncover drivers of healthy gut maintenance

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have found two genes that regulate the differentiation of stem cells in the small intestine, offering valuable insight into how the body develops and maintains a healthy gut.

2h

NIST develops benchmark for detecting large genetic mutations linked to major diseases

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a way for laboratories to determine how accurately they can detect large mutations. The new method and the benchmark material enable researchers, clinical labs and commercial technology developers to better identify large genome changes they now miss and will help them reduce false detections of genome changes.

2h

NASA follows Tropical Storm Nuri's path

An animation of four days of imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed the progression and landfall of Tropical Storm Nuri.

2h

Neurons can shift how they process information about motion

New research from the University of Rochester indicates some neurons can shift to process information about movement depending on the brain's current frame of reference. The findings may have implications for developing future prosthetics and for understanding some brain disorders.

2h

The many lifetimes of plastics

Many of us have seen informational posters at parks or aquariums specifying how long plastics bags, bottles, and other products last in the environment. They're a good reminder to not litter, but where does the information on the lifetime expectancy of plastic goods come from, and how reliable is it?

2h

Loneliness alters your brain's social network

Social media sites aren't the only things that keep track of your social network — your brain does, too. But loneliness alters how the brain represents relationships, according to new research published in JNeurosci.

2h

Vårdpersonal: Bättre arbetsmiljö hellre än applåder

Vårdpersonalens tuffa situation har fått en hel del uppmärksamhet under pandemin. Nu har Erika Wall, sociolog vid Mittuniversitetet, publicerat en första forskningsanalys om hur de själva upplever sin situation. I fokus för delstudien står vårdpersonalens budskap till beslutsfattare – vad hade kunnat göras bättre hittills och vad kan förbättras framöver?

2h

Nogle er bagud, før de starter i skole: Sådan kan du give dit barn en bedre forståelse for tal

Sanglege, perleplader og brætspil er opskriften på en god matematik-start.

2h

Mars: Green glow detected on the Red Planet

A joint European-Russian satellite observes a light in Mars' atmosphere that's generated by oxygen.

2h

Surprising growth rates discovered in world's deepest photosynthetic corals

New research published in the journal Coral Reefs revealed unexpectedly high growth rates for deep water photosynthetic corals. The study, led by Samuel Kahng, affiliate graduate faculty in the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), alters the assumption that deep corals living on the brink of darkness grow extremely slowly.

2h

Surprising growth rates discovered in world's deepest photosynthetic corals

New research published in the journal Coral Reefs revealed unexpectedly high growth rates for deep water photosynthetic corals. The study, led by Samuel Kahng, affiliate graduate faculty in the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), alters the assumption that deep corals living on the brink of darkness grow extremely slowly.

2h

Why pulsars shine bright: A half-century-old mystery solved

When Jocelyn Bell first observed the emissions of a pulsar in 1967, the rhythmic pulses of radio waves so confounded astronomers that they considered whether the light could be signals sent by an alien civilization.

2h

New Algorithm Is a Lot Like the "Enhance!" Feature In "CSI"

Enhance! Researchers at Duke University have developed an algorithm that can upsample a detailed computer-generated portrait of a human face from a heavily pixelated version. It's strikingly similar to the much-memed "Enhance!" tool from TV crime dramas like "CSI," which can seemingly pull information out of thin air. The researchers' AI, dubbed PULSE (Self-Supervised Photo Upsampling via Latent

2h

The benefits of a good apology and how to make one

No one likes to admit they were wrong, but we still have social norms that suggest we all do it from time to time. A well done apology can show respect, build trust, save relationships, and maintain your self-esteem. Saying "I'm sorry you feel that way" does not count. Let's be real, apologizing can be difficult. Nobody likes to admit that they were in the wrong, mistaken, or that they offended s

2h

Using Jenga to explain lithium-ion batteries

Tower block games such as Jenga can be used to explain to schoolchildren how lithium-ion batteries work, meeting an educational need to better understand a power source that has become vital to everyday life.

2h

The High Cost of Panic-Moving

It took only a couple of weeks after the first coronavirus lockdowns in the United States for news reports to bear out what people in the hardest-hit cities immediately saw with their own eyes: When the going got tough, many residents—and especially the wealthy— got out . The outflux was most pronounced in New York City, where an estimated 5 percent of the population vacated the premises for some

2h

Survey: In Vermont, pandemic's impact falling disproportionately on lower income groups

High percentages of Vermonters agree with the social distancing measures put in place by the state in response to the coronavirus pandemic and have complied with them, according to a new survey. But their attitudes and actions, while protecting their health, have come at a significant economic cost, especially for low income Vermonters, one of several ways in which poorer Vermonters have been disp

2h

New analysis of human portraits reveals shift in culture, cognition

Human cognition and cultural norms have changed the composition of human portraits, according to a new analysis of European paintings from the 15th to the 20th century.

2h

Use of unproven COVID-19 therapies by African American patients poses risks

Nearly one out of every 10 African Americans has a genetic variant that puts them inherently at an increased risk for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Writing in the journal Heart Rhythm, the official publication of the Heart Rhythm Society and the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society, published by Elsevier, investigators observe that along with socioeconomic and cultural factors, th

2h

We can make robots from gelatine and other edible ingredients

Soft, edible and biodegradable robots made from gelatine could be used to deliver drugs to animals or make safer children's toys

2h

China's quantum satellite helps send secure messages over 1200km

Quantum communication using entangled particles is essentially unhackable, and now it has been extended to the longest distance ever, about 1200 kilometres

2h

Dengue Fever Is on the Rise — a Ticking Time Bomb in Many Places Around the World

The spread of dengue taps into a perfect storm of climate change and economic strife.

2h

A journal took three days to accept a COVID-19 paper. It's taken two months and counting to retract it.

A Springer Nature journal has issued an editor's note — which seems an awful lot like an Expression of Concern — for a widely circulated but quickly contested paper about how the novel coronavirus might infect white blood cells, akin to HIV. However, readers could be forgiven for missing that fact. Indeed, the journal itself appears … Continue reading

2h

Daily briefing: Pluto probe photographs neighbouring star

Nature, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01821-8 NASA's New Horizon spacecraft offers an eye-popping view of Proxima Centauri. Plus: GitHub's plans to replace coding terms that reference slavery, and how botanical bias might be making hay fever worse.

2h

How teachers are adapting to COVID-19 disruptions is subject of new study

The COVID-19 pandemic has shone a spotlight on many of society's unsung heroes—among them teachers, who took their duties online this past spring and kept teaching, even as schools shuttered and "homeschooling" became the new norm.

2h

Excitons form superfluid in certain 2-D combos

Mixing and matching computational models of 2-D materials led scientists at Rice University to the realization that excitons—quasiparticles that exist when electrons and holes briefly bind—can be manipulated in new and useful ways.

2h

Radiation pressure with recoil: Experimental proof for a 90 year-old theory

Light exerts a certain amount of pressure onto a body: sun sails could thus power space probes in the future. However, when light particles (photons) hit an individual molecule and knock out an electron, the molecule flies toward the light source. Atomic physicists at Goethe University have now observed this for the first time, confirming a 90 year-old theory.

2h

Artificial synapse that works with living cells created

Researchers have created a device that can integrate and interact with neuron-like cells. This could be an early step toward an artificial synapse for use in brain-computer interfaces.

2h

Trump's West Point Stumbles Aren't the Problem

Everyone's feeling a little frayed these days, but even by those standards, President Donald Trump seemed a little off on Saturday, as he delivered the commencement speech at West Point. The speech was supposed to be a triumphant moment for Trump—he'd insisted on calling cadets back to the United States Military Academy, after they were sent home amid the coronavirus pandemic—but instead it raise

2h

How material defects influence the melting process

A new study helps to reconcile a Nobel Prize-winning theory with experiments on how solids actually melt.

2h

Electrically charged dust storms drive Martian chlorine cycle

How's the weather on Mars? Tough on rovers, but very good for generating and moving highly reactive chlorine compounds. New research from Washington University in St. Louis planetary scientists shows that Martian dust storms, like the one that eventually shut down the Opportunity rover, drive the cycle of chlorine from surface to atmosphere and may shed light on the potential for finding life on M

2h

Research reveals how material defects influence melting process

In 1972, physicists J. Michael Kosterlitz and David Thouless published a groundbreaking theory of how phase changes could occur in two-dimensional materials. Experiments soon showed that the theory correctly captured the process of a helium film transitioning from a superfluid to a normal fluid, helping to usher in a new era of research on ultra-thin materials, not to mention earning Kosterlitz, a

2h

New research investigates the role of lipid rafts in virus infiltration

A cell's membrane acts as a natural shield, a fence around the cell that protects and contains it. It mediates processes that let nutrients through and let waste out, and it acts as a physical barrier to the entry of toxic substances and pathogens, like the viruses SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2, the one that causes COVID-19.

2h

Black and female principal candidates more likely to experience delayed and denied promotions

Black and female assistant principals are systematically delayed and denied promotion to principal, compared to their White or male counterparts, despite having equivalent qualifications and more experience on average, according to a new study. The findings were published in June in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed, open access journal of the American Educational Research Association.

2h

When board members get involved, corporate tax burden goes down

New research finds that corporate tax-planning practices improve when a company's board takes an interest in tax-planning practices—and better planning results in both less tax uncertainty and a lower tax burden.

2h

Extra police powers during COVID-19 could affect relationship with public for good

How the police use extra powers they have received during Covid-19 will have a long-lasting effect on their relationship with the public, argues a university researcher who is also a senior police officer.

2h

A method to anaerobically disinfect soil to increase phosphorus using diluted ethanol

Scientists in Japan and the Netherlands have independently developed anaerobic soil disinfestation, also known as biological soil disinfestation or reductive soil disinfestation, to kill off pathogenic bacteria, parasitic nematodes and even weeds in soils without using pesticides. By covering the soil with plastic to cut off access to oxygen, unwanted organisms suffocate and do not need to be chem

2h

New research investigates the role of lipid rafts in virus infiltration

A cell's membrane acts as a natural shield, a fence around the cell that protects and contains it. It mediates processes that let nutrients through and let waste out, and it acts as a physical barrier to the entry of toxic substances and pathogens, like the viruses SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2, the one that causes COVID-19.

2h

A method to anaerobically disinfect soil to increase phosphorus using diluted ethanol

Scientists in Japan and the Netherlands have independently developed anaerobic soil disinfestation, also known as biological soil disinfestation or reductive soil disinfestation, to kill off pathogenic bacteria, parasitic nematodes and even weeds in soils without using pesticides. By covering the soil with plastic to cut off access to oxygen, unwanted organisms suffocate and do not need to be chem

2h

Melting a crystal topologically

The introduction of topology, a branch of mathematics focusing on the properties of 'knots,' into physics has inspired revolutionary concepts such as topological phases of matter and topological phase transitions, which resulted in the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2016.

2h

A phase battery for quantum technologies

Batteries belongs to everyday life. A classical battery, the Volta's pile, converts chemical energy into a voltage, which can power electronic circuits. In many quantum technologies, circuits or devices are based on superconducting materials. In such materials, currents may flow without the need of an applied voltage; therefore, there is no need for a classical battery in such a system. These curr

2h

Elasticity key to plants and animals' ability to sting

A new study explains for the very first time the principles behind the design of stings, needles, and spikes in animals and plants. The principles can be directly used in the development of new tools and medical equipment.

2h

New technical approach can enhance diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension

The management and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension heavily relies on whether the pathology is localized in pulmonary arteries or veins. In particular, at early stages, it is challenging to distinguish pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) from the rare subtype of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) because clinical presentations of PAH and PVOD can be similar. A new study in The American J

2h

New findings from groundbreaking study shows extended delay in onset of type 1 diabetes

Data presented today at the ADA 80th Scientific Sessions by Emily Sims, M.D. details the Phase 2 Teplizumab Prevention Study Clinical Trial findings that showed a two-week course of teplizumab delayed the onset of clinical T1D by three years.

2h

Immune properties in ancient DNA found in isolated villages might benefit humanity today

Could remnants of DNA from a now extinct human subspecies known as the Denisovans help boost the immune functions of modern humans? An international study co-led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, and published in the scientific journal PLOS Genetics, represents the first characterizations of genes in the DNA of healthy individuals from geographi

2h

Addressing the safety of high folate levels in the older population and implications for fortification in Ireland

A new study from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College challenges claims from some international scientific circles, that having high blood levels of folate (folic acid) increases the risk of poor cognition in older adults, especially in those with low levels of vitamin B12. On the contrary the study found that having higher folate seemed to be associated with better co

2h

Romosozumab in osteoporosis: Considerable added benefit for women after menopause

Treatment leads to fewer vertebral fractures and to fewer other typical fractures in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis at high risk of fracture.

2h

Brothers in arms: The brain and its blood vessels

The brain and its surrounding blood vessels exist in a close relationship. Researchers from the MPI of Immunobiology and Epigenetics have discovered how cells of the blood vessels sense the metabolic condition of the brain and alter vascular function in response. The result could be important for patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's because the onset of these age-related d

2h

What Might Go Wrong

With all of my posts here about vaccines and antibodies, it's only fair that I spend some time talking about the potential toxicology problems with both of those. I remain optimistic about both categories, but it's for sure that not all the candidates being advanced are going to make it through. So what sorts of things go wrong? Well, efficacy, for one: some of them just don't work so well agains

3h

Where Is the Metaverse to Help Us Through the Pandemic Era?

blue glowing futuristic city (Credit: Viaframe/Getty Images) The COVID-19 pandemic has given us all the first clear picture of what working from home is really like. Many fear that this could be the new normal and there is no doubt that future pandemics are likely . As we adjust to interacting virtually with coworkers, friends, and family, we're beginning to discover just how important in-person

3h

The first intuitive programming language for quantum computers

Several technical advances have been achieved recently in the pursuit of powerful quantum computers. Now, Computer scientists have made an important breakthrough in the field of programming languages: their quantum language is the first of its kind that is as elegant, simple and safe as classical computer languages.

3h

Artificial synapse that works with living cells created

Researchers have created a device that can integrate and interact with neuron-like cells. This could be an early step toward an artificial synapse for use in brain-computer interfaces.

3h

Muscles support a strong immune system

In the fight against cancer or chronic infections, the immune system must be active over long periods of time. However, in the long run, the immune defense system often becomes exhausted. Scientists have now found initial evidence in mice that skeletal muscles help to keep the immune system functional in chronic diseases.

3h

Significant parental hesitancy about routine childhood and influenza vaccines

A national study measuring parental attitudes toward vaccinations found 6.1% were hesitant about routine childhood immunizations while nearly 26% were hesitant about the influenza vaccine.

3h

Norway halts coronavirus app over privacy concerns

The news: Norway is halting its coronavirus contact tracing app, Smittestopp, after criticism from the Norwegian Data Protection Authority, which said that the country's low rate of infections meant that the app's privacy invasions were no longer justified. As a result, the app will cease collecting new data, all data collected so far is being deleted, and work on it is effectively paused indefin

3h

Volcanoes may have shaped oxygen's evolution on Earth

Volcanic gases and the planet's mantle may have held back oxygen's rise on Earth, researchers say. Oxygen first accumulated in the Earth's atmosphere about 2.4 billion years ago, during the Great Oxidation Event. A long-standing puzzle has been that geologic clues suggest early bacteria were photosynthesizing and pumping out oxygen hundreds of millions of years before then. Where was it all going

3h

Anxious people tend to really love their cats

The more neurotic and anxious cat owners are, the more trust and affection they have for their cat, researchers say. The COVID-19 pandemic may have many people feeling anxious . But if you happen to own a cat, they may be benefiting from your anxiety. "Our study finds that anxiousness may be a positive trait to have because it is associated with trust and affection for a cat," coauthor Mikel Delg

3h

Excitons form superfluid in certain 2D combos

Mixing and matching computational models of 2D materials led scientists at Rice University to the realization that excitons can be manipulated in new and useful ways.

3h

Atomic physics: Radiation pressure with recoil

Light exerts a certain amount of pressure onto a body: sun sails could thus power space probes in the future. However, when light particles (photons) hit an individual molecule and knock out an electron, the molecule flies toward the light source. Atomic physicists at Goethe University have now observed this for the first time, confirming a 90 year-old theory.

3h

Ethnic minorities' employment prospects lag behind white majority

The employment prospects of some ethnic minorities in the UK have improved since the 1970s but still lag behind the white majority because of 'persistent racism', a major new study says.

3h

Research delves into causes of nightmares that shadow female survivors of sexual trauma

A new study from psychologists at the University of Kansas attempts to shed light on triggers of post-trauma nightmare occurrences — a topic that has received scant study.

3h

Researchers develop model to predict likelihood of testing positive for COVID-19, disease outcomes

Cleveland Clinic researchers have developed the world's first risk prediction model for healthcare providers to forecast an individual patient's likelihood of testing positive for COVID-19 as well as their outcomes from the disease.According a new study published in CHEST, the risk prediction model (called a nomogram) shows the relevance of age, race, gender, socioeconomic status, vaccination hist

3h

Combination drug treatments for COVID-19 show promise in cell culture tests

A team of Norwegian and Estonian researchers have established a cell culture that allows them to test antibody-laden plasma, drugs and drug combinations in the laboratory. A screen of 136 safe-in-human antiviral drugs and identified six promising candidates. One combination of two drugs was so effective that researchers hope others can begin clinical trials on the drugs now.

3h

Electrically charged dust storms drive Martian chlorine cycle

The group that previously studied Martian dust storms in this paper shifts focus to the electrochemical processes resulting from dust storms that may power the movement of chlorine, which is ongoing on Mars today. The research was published May 28 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

3h

Surprising growth rates discovered in world's deepest photosynthetic corals

New research published in the journal Coral Reefs revealed unexpectedly high growth rates for deep water photosynthetic corals. The study, led by Samuel Kahng, affiliate graduate faculty in the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), alters the assumption that deep corals living on the brink of darkness grow extremely slowly.

3h

Did you solve it? Domino dancing

The solution to today's puzzle Earlier today, I set this puzzle: Is it possible to cover an 8×8 chessboard with 32 dominos (which are each a 1×2 block) in such a way that any line parallel to a side of the chessboard always passes through the interior of at least one of the dominoes? Continue reading…

3h

Eight survival knife skills you might need in an emergency

Knives are invaluable tools in the outdoors, so it's important you know all the ways to use them. (Markus Spiske/Unsplash/) This story was originally featured on Outdoor Life . Anyone who spends time in the woods owns a survival or everyday carry knife (if you don't, you should). But it's likely you are not using the blade on your hip to its full potential. Knives can do more than cut, and when y

3h

Using Jenga to explain lithium-ion batteries

Tower block games such as Jenga can be used to explain to schoolchildren how lithium-ion batteries work, meeting an educational need to better understand a power source that has become vital to everyday life.

3h

Electronic health information exchange improves public health disease reporting

Disease tracking is an important area of focus for health departments in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. A new study from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University shows that using electronic health information exchanges (HIE) to prepopulate forms for notifiable disease reports increases reporting and completeness of information.

3h

Tuberculosis spread from animals to humans may be greater than previously thought

The number of human tuberculosis (TB) cases that are due to transmission from animals, as opposed to human-to-human transmission, may be much higher than previously estimated, according to an international team of researchers. The results could have implications for epidemiological studies and public health interventions.

3h

Improved gut microbiota with cholesterol-lowering medication

There is a clear link between improved gut microbiota and one of our most common cholesterol-lowering drug groups: statins. This is evident from a European study involving researchers from the University of Gothenburg.

3h

Why pulsars shine bright: A half-century-old mystery solved

Pulsars act like stellar lighthouses, shooting beams of radio waves from their magnetic poles. The cause of those beams has remained a mystery for more than 50 years. Now, a team of researchers suspects that they've finally identified the mechanism responsible: Newborn particles interact with the stars' powerful electromagnetic fields, generating intense radio emissions, the team's simulations sug

3h

Listen: Can We Sing?

On the latest episode of Social Distance , staff writer James Hamblin and executive producer Katherine Wells answer questions from listeners. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published. What follows is an edited and condensed transcript of their conversation. James Hamblin:

3h

When board members get involved, corporate tax burden goes down

New research finds that corporate tax-planning practices improve when a company's board takes an interest — and better planning results in both less tax uncertainty and a lower tax burden.

3h

Research reveals how material defects influence melting process

A new study helps to reconcile a Nobel Prize-winning theory with experiments on how solids actually melt.

3h

A raft that won't save you

New interdisciplinary research published in the Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids sheds light on how and why the cell membrane forms and grows lipid rafts triggered by ligand-receptor activity. The work could lead to new strategies and innovative approaches to prevent or fight the action of the virus through the integration of biomedical and engineering knowledge.

3h

COVID-19 associated with dramatic decline in ED use by pediatric asthma patients

The number of patients visiting the emergency department (ED) for asthma treatment dropped by 76% in the first month of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The proportion of ED visits that led to a patient being hospitalized also decreased over this period, suggesting the decrease in overall visits was not solely due to pati

3h

Black and female principal candidates more likely to experience delayed and denied promotions

Black and female assistant principals are systematically delayed and denied promotion to principal, compared to their White or male counterparts, despite having equivalent qualifications and more experience on average, according to a new study. The findings were published in June in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed, open access journal of the American Educational Research Association.

3h

Tuberculosis vaccine strengthens immune system

A tuberculosis vaccine developed 100 years ago also makes vaccinated persons less susceptible to other infections. While this effect has been recognized for a long time, it is not known what causes it. Together with colleagues from Australia and Denmark, researchers from Radboud university medical center the universities of Nijmegen and Bonn have now presented a possible answer to this question.

3h

'Air Towel' Ends Public Health Menace

Originally published in July 1914 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Opinion: Look to Cholera Vaccine Campaigns for COVID-19 Guidance

Accounting for a limited stockpile of cholera vaccine can provide insight into the most effective way to distribute future COVID-19 vaccines.

3h

10 lessons from the COVID-19 frontline for a more gender-equal world

Evidence shows that disease outbreak affects women and men differently, that pandemics exacerbate inequalities for girls and women, who are also often the hardest hit, and that women play an outsize role responding to crises, including as frontline healthcare and social workers, caregivers at home, and as mobilizers in their communities. That's why the world must put a gender lens on the response

4h

From clickbait to transparency: Reimagining the online world

Polarization, conspiracy theories, fake news: What people see on the Internet is largely determined by the opaque algorithms of just a few corporations. That's a worrying development for democratic societies. But online environments could be designed in ways that promote autonomy and transparency, thereby fostering the positive potential of the Internet. A team of researchers from the Max Planck I

4h

Diluting blood plasma rejuvenates tissue, reverses aging in mice

A new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers reveals that replacing half of the blood plasma with a mixture of saline and albumin reverses signs of aging and rejuvenates muscle, brain and liver tissue in old mice. The research team is currently finalizing clinical trials to determine if a modified plasma exchange in humans could be used to treat age-associated diseases and improv

4h

Superlens squeezes light into nanospace

Russian and Danish researchers have made a first-ever experimental observation of a plasmon nanojet. This physical phenomenon enables nanoscale focusing of light and, theoretically, allows engineers to bypass one of the fundamental limitations of the ordinary converging lens. Tight compression of light waves is necessary to use them as signal carriers in compact devices that would work much faster

4h

Extra police powers during COVID-19 could affect relationship with public for good

Serving police officer and Huddersfield PhD researcher Dan Jones warns against police forces adopting an authoritarian or militarised approach, following new study

4h

A continental-scale prediction on the functional diversity of stream microbes

Climate mediates continental scale patterns of stream microbial functional diversity.

4h

New indication of a link between Alzheimer's and diabetes

Pathological protein clumps are characteristic of a series of diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and type 2 diabetes. Scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, and Maastricht University have now used cryo-electron microscopy to obtain a sharp image for the first time of how individual molecules are arranged in protein strings, which cons

4h

A phase battery for quantum technologies

The work has been published today in the prestigious journal Nature Nanotechnology and has been led by the groups of Francesco Giazotto (NEST-CNR Institute, Pisa) and Sebastian Bergeret (CFM, CSIC-UPV/EHU, DIPC, Donostia / San Sebastian), with the collaboration of Salerno University.

4h

Melting a crystal topologically

Physicists at EPFL have successfully melted a very thin crystal of magnetic quasi-particles controllably, as turning ice into water. Novel phases of matter have been discovered and a new model system for fundamental physics studies has been established.

4h

Elasticity key to plants and animals' ability to sting

A new study explains for the very first time the principles behind the design of stings, needles, and spikes in animals and plants. The principles can be directly used in the development of new tools and medical equipment.

4h

From clickbait to transparency: Reimagining the online world

Behavioral science perspectives on an alternative Internet.

4h

Stanford researchers develop artificial synapse that works with living cells

Researchers have created a device that can integrate and interact with neuron-like cells. This could be an early step toward an artificial synapse for use in brain-computer interfaces.

4h

Unpacking the two layers of bacterial gene regulation during plant infection

A new study has revealed new insights into how pathogenic bacteria regulate gene expression during plant infection as well as the strategies employed by plants to protect themselves from bacterial invaders.

4h

Following a variety of healthy eating patterns associated with lower heart disease risk

Greater adherence to a variety of healthy eating patterns was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

4h

Perceived harm of e-cigarettes vs cigarettes after outbreak of vaping-associated lung injury

This survey study looked at perceptions of the harms of electronic cigarettes compared to regular cigarettes among current smokers in England before and after the US outbreak of vaping-associated lung injury in 2019.

4h

Treating relapsing multiple sclerosis with hookworm infection

This randomized clinical trial assessed the effect of treating patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis with a therapeutic hookworm infection compared with placebo. Some studies have suggested that gut worms induce immune responses that can protect against multiple sclerosis.

4h

Comparing life expectancy between insured adults with or without HIV

Researchers estimated the difference in overall life expectancy and years free from major chronic illnesses between individuals with HIV infection with access to care and similar uninfected adults from the same health care system from 2000 to 2016.

4h

Examining the association between healthy eating patterns and risk of cardiovascular disease

Whether several recommended healthy eating patterns that combine various nutrients and foods are associated with long-term risk of cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, was the focus of this observational study that used data from three large study groups with up to 32 years of follow-up.

4h

N95, KN95, and surgical mask filtration efficiency after sterilization

This is a quality improvement study that examines the effects of sterilization with hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide on the filtration efficiency of N95, KN95 and surgical face masks.

4h

Disrupted circadian rhythms linked to later Parkinson's diagnoses

Older men who have a weak or irregular circadian rhythm guiding their daily cycles of rest and activity are more likely to later develop Parkinson's disease, according to a new study by scientists at the UC San Francisco Weill Institute for Neurosciences who analyzed 11 years of data for nearly 3,000 independently living older men.

4h

UHN AI scientist develops platform to track changes in genetic structure of COVID-19 virus

The COVID-19 Genotyping Tool (CGT) offers an online, user-friendly platform where researchers can compare the genome sequence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in their hospital against the global picture.

4h

Entanglement-based secure quantum cryptography over 1,120 kilometres

Nature, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2401-y An efficient entanglement-based quantum key distribution is sent from the Micius satellite to two ground observatories 1,120 kilometres apart to establish secure quantum cryptography for the exchange of quantum keys.

4h

How STRANGE are your study animals?

Nature, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01751-5 A new framework for animal-behaviour research will help to avoid sampling bias — ten years on from the call to widen the pool of human participants in psychology studies beyond the WEIRD.

4h

Podcast: Enigmatic neutron stars may soon give up their secrets

Nature, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01424-3 After decades of speculation, researchers are closing in on what lies beneath the surface of a neutron star.

4h

In South Africa, COVID-19 Breath Test Trial Set for June

If proven successful, the five-minute test could be a good temporary indicator before a confirmatory PCR test.

4h

A continental-scale prediction on the functional diversity of stream microbes

A recent research find indicates that climate change increases the functional diversity of microbes living in streams. Consequently, climate change may, in certain cases, be beneficial to ecosystems.

4h

Modeling neuronal cultures on 'brain-on-a-chip' devices

For the past several years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and engineers have made significant progress in development of a three-dimensional "brain-on-a-chip" device capable of recording neural activity of human brain cell cultures grown outside the body.

4h

COVID Could Be Making People So Lonely That They're Getting Sick

As we enter another week of pandemic lockdown, scientists are working to understand the toll extended isolation takes on our minds and bodies. The medical effects of loneliness are difficult to measure — especially because loneliness is a subjective experience that varies wildly from person to person. But semantics aside, a clear trend is emerging, CNET reports , and it's not great. Extended lone

4h

3 secrets of resilient people | Lucy Hone

Everyone experiences loss, but how do you cope with the tough moments that follow? Resilience researcher Lucy Hone shares three hard-won strategies for developing the capacity to brave adversity, overcome struggle and face whatever may come head-on with fortitude and grace.

4h

New tool to measure aerosol optical hygroscopicity

Researchers at Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science recently developed a humidified cavity-enhanced albedometer (H-CEA) which could simultaneously measure relative-humidity-dependent aerosol light extinction, scattering, absorption, and single scattering albedo.

4h

A continental-scale prediction on the functional diversity of stream microbes

A recent research find indicates that climate change increases the functional diversity of microbes living in streams. Consequently, climate change may, in certain cases, be beneficial to ecosystems.

4h

Modeling neuronal cultures on 'brain-on-a-chip' devices

For the past several years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and engineers have made significant progress in development of a three-dimensional "brain-on-a-chip" device capable of recording neural activity of human brain cell cultures grown outside the body.

4h

Scientists find key factors impacting sideswiping tropical cyclone precipitation

Sideswiping tropical cyclones (STCs) are tropical cyclones (TCs) that cause precipitation over land without making landfall. STC precipitation (STP) can constitute a severe meteorological disaster leading to devastating impacts on the environment and society. STCs make a significant contribution to the total inland precipitation associated with TCs, and therefore could produce extreme rainfall eve

4h

What has caused more extreme summer heat events over northeast Asia?

Widespread hot extremes have been seen throughout the world in recent years, causing heat-related mortality and harming crops and livestock. In summer 2018, a record-breaking heat wave swept across large areas of Northeast Asia. The China Meteorological Administration issued high-temperature warnings for 33 consecutive days. In Japan, at least 71,266 required hospitalization for heat stroke.

4h

Study demonstrates feasibility of hologram technology in liver tumor ablation

Data from one of the first clinical uses of augmented reality guidance with electromagnetically tracked tools shows that the technology may help doctors quickly, safely, and accurately deliver targeted liver cancer treatments, according to new research.

4h

House-call model tapping interventional radiology improves outcomes and access to care

Interventional radiologists participating in a collaborative house call model in rural Indiana helped reduce emergency department use by 77% and hospital readmissions by 50 percent for nearly 1,000 elderly homebound patients with chronic illnesses, according to a new research.

4h

Novel treatment for mesothelioma shows promise for patients

A novel treatment for advanced mesothelioma is safe and effective and may improve the quality of life for patients who have few treatment options, according to new research. Transarterial chemoperfusion treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) comes with minimal side effects and shows promise for extending the lives of patients who have limited or no remaining treatment options.

4h

Nytt framsteg för säkert kvantkrypto från rymden

Kvantfysiken tillåter kryptering med en metod som är fullständigt avlyssningssäker. Om någon skulle försöka avlyssna ett sådant meddelande kommer mottagaren att märka det, och byta sin kryptering för att kunna vara säker igen. Begränsningen är att det inte går att sända fotoner i optiska fiberkablar på ett sätt som bevarar kvantinformationen mer än ett par hundra kilometer. Nu har forskarna klarat

4h

Research reveals insights into bioprinted skeletal muscle tissue models

Researchers have provided an in-depth analysis of 3D in vitro biomimetic skeletal muscle tissue models, highlighting the great potential of bioprinting technology.

4h

New 3-D X-ray technique reveals secrets from inside bones

An international research team has used new X-ray techniques to describe how the architecture of healthy human bones is built up. The team has uncovered a hitherto unknown structure in healthy bones.

4h

Researchers discover what's behind nature's perhaps largest erection, which is not that big

In the plant kingdom, the sexual organ of a male pollen grain grows up to a thousand times its own length as it sniffs its way forth to a female egg cell to deliver its two sperm cells. Now researchers at the University of Copenhagen have advanced the understanding of what makes pollen 'penises,' called pollen tubes, grow. The newfound knowledge may prove valuable to understanding human nerve cell

4h

China Reports Progress in Ultra-Secure Satellite Transmission

Researchers enlisted quantum physics to send a "secret key" for encrypting and decrypting messages between two stations 700 miles apart.

4h

Researchers discover what's behind nature's perhaps largest erection, which is not that big

In the plant kingdom, the sexual organ of a male pollen grain grows up to a thousand times its own length as it sniffs its way forth to a female egg cell to deliver its two sperm cells. Now researchers at the University of Copenhagen have advanced the understanding of what makes pollen 'penises,' called pollen tubes, grow. The newfound knowledge may prove valuable to understanding human nerve cell

4h

Unpacking the two layers of bacterial gene regulation during plant infection

A study in Nature Plants has revealed new insights into how pathogenic bacteria regulate gene expression during plant infection, as well as the strategies employed by plants to protect themselves from bacterial invaders.

4h

China Takes Another Step Towards Uncrackable Quantum Communication

Uncrackable quantum communication is a step closer after Chinese researchers demonstrated a practical way to share security keys over 1,120 kilometers using entangled photons sent and received by satellites. In 2017, a team lead by China's Jian-Wei Pan broke new ground when they showed they could transmit pairs of entangled photons—particles tied together by the strange laws of quantum mechanics—

4h

Scientists review the metallogenesis and challenges of porphyry copper systems above subduction zone

Porphyry copper ± molybdenum ± gold deposits (PCDs) are the most economically important magmatic-hydrothermal metallogenic system above subduction zones, which have supplied nearly 3/4 of the world's copper, 1/2 of the molybdenum and 1/5 of the gold, as well as large amounts of silver, zinc, tin and tungsten, with however their metallogenesis remaining controversial. Now researchers in Guangzhou h

4h

Maternal transmission of COVID-19 to baby during pregnancy is uncommon, study finds

Transmission of COVID-19 from mother to baby during pregnancy is uncommon, and the rate of infection is no greater when the baby is born vaginally, breastfed or allowed contact with the mother, according to a new study.

4h

The first intuitive programming language for quantum computers

Several technical advances have been achieved recently in the pursuit of powerful quantum computers. Now, Computer scientists from ETH Zurich have made an important breakthrough in the field of programming languages: their quantum language is the first of its kind that is as elegant, simple and safe as classical computer languages.

4h

Unpacking the two layers of bacterial gene regulation during plant infection

A study in Nature Plants has revealed new insights into how pathogenic bacteria regulate gene expression during plant infection, as well as the strategies employed by plants to protect themselves from bacterial invaders.

4h

Scientists unravel the evolution and relationships for all European butterflies

For the first time, a complete time-calibrated phylogeny for a large group of invertebrates is published for an entire continent. Scientists provide a diagrammatic hypothesis of the relationships and evolutionary history for all 496 extant European species of butterflies. Their work provides an important tool for evolutionary and ecological research, meant for the use of insect and ecosystem conse

4h

Insight into the black hole at the center of our galaxy

Like most galaxies, the Milky Way hosts a supermassive black hole at its center. Called Sagittarius A*, the object has captured astronomers' curiosity for decades. And now there is an effort to image it directly.

4h

How to Donate Blood

What you need to know about donating in a time of crisis.

4h

The Inventor of Ibuprofen Tested the Drug on His Own Hangover

Stewart Adams' headache subsided—and his over-the-counter pain reliever became one of the world's most popular medications

4h

The Space Station Is Getting a New Toilet

Astronauts on board the International Space Station will be about to sigh a big sigh of relief: the space station is getting a brand spanking new toilet, as Space.com reports . The new system called the Universal Waste Management System (UWMS) is meant to be the (smelly) testing grounds for zero gravity toilets to be used during long space flight, such as a journey to Mars. It's also meant to sta

4h

Why Gravity Is Not Like the Other Forces

Physicists have traced three of the four forces of nature — the electromagnetic force and the strong and weak nuclear forces — to their origins in quantum particles. But the fourth fundamental force, gravity, is different. Our current framework for understanding gravity, devised a century ago by Albert Einstein, tells us that apples fall from trees and planets orbit stars because they move along

4h

Intelligence is impacted if born small for gestational age

People born small for gestational age (SGA) have a lower IQ throughout development, however the differences in IQ to those born appropriate for gestational age (AGA) reduce by adulthood. The effects of SGA on IQ are nearly as large as being born into lower socio-economic status or receiving poor parenting in infancy.

5h

Multi-ethnic study suggests vitamin K may offer protective health benefits in older age

A new, multi-ethnic study from researchers at Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center found adults aged 54-76 with low circulating vitamin K levels were more likely to die within 13 years compared to those with adequate levels, suggesting vitamin K may offer protective health benefits as we age.

5h

3D X-ray reveals secrets from inside bones

An international team of researchers from Aarhus University, the European Synchotron (ESRF), Chalmers University and the Paul Scherrer Institute have uncovered a previously unknown substructure in bone tissue using a new X-ray technique to produce 3D images of the internal structure of bones. The discovery potentially questions fundamentally a number of the models of bone tissue and the mechanical

5h

Cancer and chemo team up to make neuropathy worse

Contrary to common medical guidance, chemotherapy does not appear to be the only culprit in neuropathy, a neurological side effect of cancer treatment, according to a new study in rats. Cancer itself contributes heavily, too, and the stresses on neurons appear far worse than the sum of the two causes. "There was some distress caused by cancer alone and some distress from chemo alone, but when you

5h

How to protect kids from tick and mosquito bug bites

Parents are twice as likely to be concerned about ticks as they are about mosquitoes transmitting disease, a new national poll on bug bites finds. But as children spend more time outside, families may not always know the best way to protect them from both kinds of bloodsuckers. Among parents who use insect repellent, just one in three use ones containing N,N-Diethyl-meta-Toluamide (DEET)—which is

5h

Artificial intelligence estimates peoples' ages

Wrinkles, furrows, spots: a person's aging process is accompanied by tell-tale signs on their face. Researchers have developed an algorithm that interprets these features very reliably.

5h

Exposure to air pollution impairs cellular energy metabolism

Exposure to air particulate matter impairs the metabolism of olfactory mucosal cells, according to a recent study. The results can contribute to a better understanding of how air pollutants may harm brain health, as the olfactory mucosa can act as a key pathway to the brain.

5h

Da samfundssindet greb industrien

PLUS. Danske industrivirksomheder har lynhurtigt omstillet produktionen til alt fra håndsprit til respiratorer. Indsatsen i krisen har været stor, men næste gang skal der være bedre styr på data.

5h

AI reduces 'communication gap' for nonverbal people by as much as half

Researchers have used artificial intelligence to reduce the 'communication gap' for nonverbal people with motor disabilities who rely on computers to converse with others.

5h

Low physical function increase the risk for bone loss in older hip fracture patients

Low physical function and low muscle mass after hip fracture increased the risk for accelerated bone deterioration in older hip fracture patients.

5h

More and safer heart transplants could become possible with new heart box

A donated heart can now be transported and preserved for longer than what has previously been possible. The new method, which consists of a specially designed heart box, was used for a transplant for the first time as early as the summer of 2017. Now it has been evaluated in a first clinical study, and the results are published in Nature Communications.

5h

Researchers discover what's behind nature's perhaps largest erection — which is not that big

In the plant kingdom, the sexual organ of a male pollen grain grows up to a thousand times its own length as it sniffs its way forth to a female egg cell to deliver its two sperm cells. Now researchers at the University of Copenhagen have advanced the understanding of what makes pollen 'penises', called pollen tubes, grow. The newfound knowledge may prove valuable to understanding human nerve cell

5h

Vegetarians are slimmer and less extroverted than meat eaters

The less animal products someone consumes, the lower his body mass index on average and the less he tends to be extroverted. This is the result of a large-scale study by scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences. A connection with depressive moods as other studies had found could not be confirmed.

5h

GLP-1-based treatment of diabetes does not cause pancreatitis

The commonly used treatment for type 2 diabetes and obesity, GLP-1, does not cause pancreatitis. The treatment is known to increase two markers of pancreatitis, but now, a new study shows a harmless, physiological explanation. The finding from the University of Copenhagen can contribute to the safety of diabetes treatment on a global scale.

5h

A blood sample can be used to assess the severity and prognosis of FTLD in the future

Biomarkers to support the diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and to assess the severity and expected prognosis of the disease are needed. Neurofilament light chain (NfL) measured from a blood sample strongly correlates with the duration of the disease in FTLD patients and the rate of brain atrophy, according to a new study published by the University of Eastern Finland.

5h

Summer observation campaigns to study pollution in the Asian tropopause layer

Scientists find the aerosols in the boundary layer are mostly pollution out of human activities, and the aerosols in the upper troposphere may also contain natural aerosols, like mineral dust and volcanic sulfate aerosols,

5h

A salt solution toward better bioelectronics

A water-stable dopant enhances and stabilizes the performance of electron-transporting organic electrochemical transistors.

5h

Dating Apps Exposed 845GB of Explicit Photos, Chats, and More

3somes, Gay Daddy Bear, and Herpes Dating are among the nine services that leaked the data of hundreds of thousands of users.

5h

New Research: There Could Be 36 Alien Civilizations in Our Galaxy

According to a new study in The Astrophysical Journal , there could be dozens of intelligent alien civilizations hiding in our galaxy, all capable of communicating. "There should be at least a few dozen active civilizations in our Galaxy under the assumption that it takes 5 billion years for intelligent life to form on other planets, as on Earth," Christopher Conselice, Professor of Astrophysics

5h

Myter om særlig høj intelligens afholder piger fra at blive ingeniør

PLUS. Ny analyse fra Engineer the Future viser, at flere piger end drenge tager en naturfaglig studentereksamen på det almene gymnasium. Til gengæld fravælger pigerne naturvidenskab og ingeniørfaget som karrierevej.

5h

Hemp and maple work together to power these high-end headphones

The Hemp Headphones use the familiar Grado design. (Grado/) Brooklyn-based headphone maker Grado is no stranger to replacing plastic or metal with wood in its high-end products. The company's high-end Reference Series headphones employ mahogany ear cups that have earned a reputation for warm, responsive sound. For its latest limited-edition headphones, Grado has opted for hemp . And while it offe

5h

Indians turn to ayurveda to ward off coronavirus

Faced with a rising death toll and limited treatment options, alternative medicine offers solace to many

5h

Salt solution produces better organic electrochemical transistors

Doping is commonly used to improve performance in semiconducting devices but has not previously been successful for electron transporting or n-type, organic electronic materials. Now, an approach developed by KAUST uses a dopant, an additive that boosts the electronic performance and water stability of an n-type semiconducting polymer, to produce the first water-stable n-doped, organic electrochem

5h

Anaerobically disinfect soil to increase phosphorus using diluted ethanol

Anaerobic disinfection of soil is an effective method to kill unwanted bacteria, parasites and weeds without using chemical pesticides. Scientists in Japan were able to show that it also increases the availability of useable phosphorus.

5h

Exposure to air pollution impairs cellular energy metabolism

Exposure to air particulate matter impairs the metabolism of olfactory mucosal cells, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. The results can contribute to a better understanding of how air pollutants may harm brain health, as the olfactory mucosa can act as a key pathway to the brain.

5h

Salt solution produces better organic electrochemical transistors

Doping is commonly used to improve performance in semiconducting devices but has not previously been successful for electron transporting or n-type, organic electronic materials. Now, an approach developed by KAUST uses a dopant, an additive that boosts the electronic performance and water stability of an n-type semiconducting polymer, to produce the first water-stable n-doped, organic electrochem

5h

It-fejl hos politiet gav forkerte tidsangivelser på beviser i hundredvis af sager

I foråret kom det frem, at dansk politi har haft problemer med at trække data ud af Apple-enheder. Software-fejl har givet forkerte tidsangivelser på bevismateriale, og nu viser det sig, at det har stået på i tre år

5h

Begger's test for Schrödingerean predator-prey system

Why is it that nobody remembers the name of [the famous mathematician] Johann Gambolputty…

5h

New light shed on intelligent life existing across the galaxy

Is there anyone out there? This is an age-old question that researchers have now shed new light on with a study that calculates there could be more than 30 intelligent civilizations throughout our Galaxy. This is an enormous advance over previous estimates which spanned from zero to billions.

5h

Candidates who use humor on Twitter may find the joke is on them

Political candidates' use of humor on social media could sometimes backfire on them with potential supporters, new research suggests. People were more likely to view messages using humor as inappropriate for a political candidate they didn't know, the study found. That led participants to rate a candidate using humor as less credible than one who didn't — and less likely to get their vote.

5h

Diabetic mice improve with retrievable millimeter-thick cell-laden hydrogel fiber

Researchers from The University of Tokyo developed a novel fiber-shaped hydrogel transplant for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. They showed that pancreatic cells encapsulated in 1.0-mm-thick hydrogel fibers normalized blood glucose levels in diabetic mice while being protected from foreign body reactions. These findings help facilitate cell-based therapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

5h

Researchers flush out worrying trend of designer drug use

In a sign that designer drugs are becoming more prevalent in Australia, synthetic cathinones — commonly known as 'bath salts' — have been detected in the nation's wastewater in the largest study of its kind in the country.

5h

The benefits of slowness

Wrinkles, furrows, spots: a person's aging process is accompanied by tell-tale signs on their face. Researchers from the Institute for Neural Computation at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have developed an algorithm that interprets these features very reliably. It makes it possible to estimate the age and ethnicity of people so accurately that it catapulted RUB researchers to the top of the league

5h

A clique away from more efficient networks

An old branch of mathematics finds a fertile new field of application.

5h

Embrace Your Inner Artist With This Best-Selling Online Drawing Class

When it comes to being a truly great visual artist or illustrator, the unfortunate fact is that most people believe that they have to be born with a certain set of skills. This myth causes countless potential artists to give up on their passion before they've even started. But the truth is that regardless of whether you're trying to launch a full-fledged career in illustration or simply want to l

6h

Study finds albatrosses fine-tuned to wind conditions

A new study of albatrosses has found that wind plays a bigger role in their decision to take flight than previously thought, and due to their differences in body size, males and females differ in their response to wind.

6h

A quantum memory that operates at telecom wavelengths

To create large quantum networks, researchers will first need to develop efficient quantum repeaters. A key component of these repeaters are quantum memories, which are the quantum-mechanical equivalents of more conventional computer memories, such as random-access memories (RAM).

6h

Key workers are lowest paid with poorer job qualities, study finds

A study led by Dr. Matt Barnes, Senior Lecturer from the Department of Sociology, suggests that key worker jobs including check-out operators, care workers, food operatives and security guards receive lower pay and experience lower job quality than the average worker.

6h

Study finds albatrosses fine-tuned to wind conditions

A new study of albatrosses has found that wind plays a bigger role in their decision to take flight than previously thought, and due to their differences in body size, males and females differ in their response to wind.

6h

Reputation-based social payoff system improves community involvement

Simulations have revealed how a "payoff transfer system," rewarding individuals who cooperate the most with their local communities, can improve social benefits.

6h

A possible explanation for why West Antarctica is warming faster than East Antarctica

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in South Korea has found a possible reason for West Antarctica warming faster than East Antarctica. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of surface and air temperature trends in the region over the past several decades in which they applied math models to the problem, and what they found

6h

Probing dark matter with the Higgs boson

Visible matter—everything from pollen to stars and galaxies—accounts for roughly 15% of the total mass of the universe. The remaining 85% is made of something entirely different from things we can touch and see: dark matter. Despite overwhelming evidence from the observation of gravitational effects, the nature of dark matter and its composition remain unknown.

6h

After coronavirus: how seasonal migration and empty centres might change our cities

The changes to urban space brought by the coronavirus have many people asking what the post-pandemic city might look like.

6h

Study finds warming peat may boost greenhouse gases

Warming temperatures in cold-climate peatlands may over time trigger decomposition of old, deeply buried peat and increase emissions of climate-harming methane and carbon dioxide into the air, according to a study led by a former University of Oregon doctoral student.

6h

Rare moss clinging to life on B.C. cliff should be protected, says expert

A rare moss struggling to survive on a single square metre of rock in British Columbia should be protected as an endangered species, says a University of Alberta expert who has studied the tiny plant.

6h

What is a derecho? An atmospheric scientist explains these rare but dangerous storm systems

Thunderstorms are common across North America, especially in warm weather months. About 10% of them become severe, meaning they produce hail 1 inch or greater in diameter, winds gusting in excess of 50 knots (57.5 miles per hour), or a tornado.

6h

Scientists find key factors impacting sideswiping tropical cyclone precipitation

Scientists find that the distribution of sideswiping tropical cyclones precipitation(STP) includes extreme STP events that appear not only over the island and coastal areas, but also over inland areas

6h

Discovery of graphene switch

Researchers at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) successfully developed the special in-situ transmission electron microscope technique to measure the current-voltage curve of graphene nanoribbon (GNR) with observing the edge structure and found that the electrical conductance of narrow GNRs with a zigzag edge structure abruptly increased above the critical bias voltage, in

6h

Muscles support a strong immune system

In the fight against cancer or chronic infections, the immune system must be active over long periods of time. However, in the long run, the immune defence system often becomes exhausted. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now found initial evidence in mice that skeletal muscles help to keep the immune system functional in chronic diseases.

6h

What has caused more extreme summer heat events over northeast Asia?

A new study found that anomalous anticyclone over Northeast Asia was responsible for nearly half of the magnitude in extreme heat events of 2018.

6h

Magnetic guidance improves stem cells' ability to treat occupational lung disease

Results of a study released in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM) may point the way to a cure for a serious lung disease called silicosis that affects millions of workers worldwide.

6h

Keeping governments accountable: The COVID-10 assessment scorecard

Many actors in the response to COVID-19 are holding out for a vaccine to be developed. But in the meantime, tried and tested public-health measures for controlling outbreaks can be implemented. A scorecard can be used to assess governments' responses to the outbreak.

6h

Rare moss clinging to life on B.C. cliff should be protected, says expert

A rare moss struggling to survive on a single square metre of rock in British Columbia should be protected as an endangered species, says a University of Alberta expert who has studied the tiny plant.

6h

Masks prevented 66K COVID-19 infections in 1 month in NYC

Not wearing a face mask dramatically increases a person's chances of getting COVID-19, researchers report. The team examined the chances of COVID-19 infection and how the virus is easily passed from person to person. Comparing trends and mitigation procedures in China, Italy, and New York City, the researchers found that using a face mask reduced the number of infections by more than 78,000 in It

6h

Overlæge på Næstved Sygehus udnævnt til professor i lungemedicin

Overlæge Uffe Bødtger er ny professor og kommer til at have fokus på bl.a lungekræft og lungehindekræft.

6h

Predicting the future response to our current cascading crises

If the past hundred days or so have taught us anything it should be humility about our ability to predict the future. Here, in New York City, we have seen the horror of a pandemic that locked many of us in our homes while critical workers risked their health to keep the rest of us alive in hospitals and comfortable at home. We have seen a Black man in Minnesota brutally murdered in public by a pol

6h

What the archaeological record reveals about epidemics throughout history – and the human response to them

The previous pandemics to which people often compare COVID-19—the influenza pandemic of 1918, the Black Death bubonic plague (1342-1353), the Justinian plague (541-542) – don't seem that long ago to archaeologists. We're used to thinking about people who lived many centuries or even millennia ago. Evidence found directly on skeletons shows that infectious diseases have been with us since our begin

6h

What the Cluck? KFC Announces New Video Game Console

The buzz around upcoming game consoles from Sony and Microsoft has been building steadily, and KFC — yes, that KFC — has evidently decided this is the time to shake up the company's recipe for success. KFC has declared that it will launch a game console on November 12, 2020, with a declaration on Twitter. Behold the KFConsole: The future of gaming is here. Introducing the KFConsole. #PowerYourHun

6h

Seventy-Five Scientific Research Projects You Can Contribute to Online

From astrophysicists to entomologists, many researchers need the help of citizen scientists to sift through immense data collections

6h

Could tiny 'distracting' rods save COVID-19 patients?

White blood cells called neutrophils may be central to the immune system overreaction that can kill COVID-19 patients. New research finds that rod-shaped particles can take them out of circulation. The top cause of death for COVID-19 patients echoes the way the 1918 influenza pandemic killed: their lungs fill with fluid and they essentially drown. This is called acute respiratory distress syndrom

6h

DSAM trækker sig fra samarbejde med Sundhedsstyrelsen

DSAM trækker sig fra en arbejdsgruppe i Sundhedsstyrelsen, der arbejder med håndtering af fedme i kommunerne.

6h

There is no perfect diet that works for every metabolism or body type

Everyone's metabolism responds differently to the same foods, even among identical twins, which suggests personalised eating plans are more effective than a single diet

6h

Tyskeres tørst på billig dansk diesel kan øge vores CO2-udledning

PLUS. Mens Danmark afviser at indføre CO2-afgifter, kommer det tyske modstykke til at koste 250.000 ton CO2 på det danske CO2-regnskab på grund af grænsehandel, mener Skatteministeriet.

6h

New lithium-rich Cepheid discovered in the Milky Way

Italian astronomers have reported the discovery of a new lithium-rich galactic Cepheid star, identified by high-resolution spectroscopic observations. The newfound object, designated V363 Cas, is the fifth lithium-rich classical Cepheid in our Milky Way galaxy. The study detailing the finding was published June 5 on arXiv.org.

6h

Stomachache? Your Gut Bacteria Might Be to Blame

How your diet, microbes and more contribute to your gut's health.

6h

Don't count your fish before they hatch: experts react to plans to release 2 million fish into the Murray Darling

The New South Wales government plans to release two million native fish into rivers of the Murray-Darling Basin, in the largest breeding program of its kind in the state. But as the river system recovers from a string of mass fish deaths, caution is needed.

6h

Don't count your fish before they hatch: experts react to plans to release 2 million fish into the Murray Darling

The New South Wales government plans to release two million native fish into rivers of the Murray-Darling Basin, in the largest breeding program of its kind in the state. But as the river system recovers from a string of mass fish deaths, caution is needed.

6h

Democratic Republic of the Congo gears up to fight 11th Ebola outbreak

The Democratic Republic of the Congo is using vaccinations, contact tracing and mobile handwashing stations to combat its latest Ebola outbreak, the 11th since the virus was first discovered in 1976

6h

Rethinking our built and open spaces after a pandemic

Keep six feet away from others. Avoid crowds. Stay home.

6h

Candidates who use humor on Twitter may find the joke is on them

Political candidates' use of humor on social media could sometimes backfire on them with potential supporters, new research suggests.

7h

48,000-year-old arrowheads reveal early human innovation in the Sri Lankan rainforest

Archaeological excavations deep within the rainforests of Sri Lanka have unearthed the earliest evidence for hunting with bows and arrows outside Africa.

7h

Evolving our support for early sharing

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16788-3 Nature Communications encouraged rapid dissemination of results with the launch of Under Consideration in 2017. Today we take one more step by offering an integrated preprint deposition service to our authors as part of the submission process.

7h

7h

The search for nature in times of crisis and beyond

As a fellow hiker took a picture of the extremely faint Manhattan skyline stretched out beyond an inlet of the Long Island Sound, I thought about how financially privileged we were to be there. I had paid $27 for a round-trip ticket to the Marshland Conservancy in Rye, Westchester County. This was way back on a crisp Sunday in February 2020, before New Yorkers realized that the coronavirus was a t

7h

Measuring the spin of a black hole

A black hole, at least in our current understanding, is characterized by having "no hair," that is, it is so simple that it can be completely described by just three parameters, its mass, its spin and its electric charge. Even though it may have formed out of a complex mix of matter and energy, all other details are lost when the black hole forms. Its powerful gravitational field creates a surroun

7h

Ethnic minorities' employment prospects lag behind white majority because of 'persistent racism'

Research led by the University of Bristol has revealed that despite progress, most ethnic minority groups studied are still more likely to be in manual work or unemployed or sick than their white counterparts. The researchers analysed national census data on more than 70,000 people in England and Wales.

7h

Precision genome editing enters the modern era

CRISPR has sparked a renaissance in genome editing. Now, next-generation CRISPR technologies let scientists modify the genome more efficiently and precisely than before. Such tools could one day serve as therapeutics, but many challenges remain.

7h

How young embryos conduct quality control

The first few days of embryonic development are a critical point for determining the failure or success of a pregnancy. Because relatively few cells make up the embryo during this period, the health of each cell is vital to the health of the overall embryo. But often, these young cells have chromosomal aneuploidies—meaning, there are too many or too few chromosome copies in the cell. Aneuploid cel

7h

Candidates who use humor on Twitter may find the joke is on them

Political candidates' use of humor on social media could sometimes backfire on them with potential supporters, new research suggests. People were more likely to view messages using humor as inappropriate for a political candidate they didn't know, the study found. That led participants to rate a candidate using humor as less credible than one who didn't — and less likely to get their vote.

7h

Precision genome editing enters the modern era

CRISPR has sparked a renaissance in genome editing. Now, next-generation CRISPR technologies let scientists modify the genome more efficiently and precisely than before. Such tools could one day serve as therapeutics, but many challenges remain.

7h

Choosing your mother tongue, rather than it choosing you

Young Ukrainian adults are prompting us to rethink what we mean when we talk about people having a 'mother tongue', as many are working to shift the primary language they use from Russian to Ukrainian amid the ongoing Ukrainian–Russian War.

7h

Newly observed phenomenon could lead to new quantum devices

An exotic physical phenomenon known as a Kohn anomaly has been found for the first time in an unexpected type of material by researchers at MIT and elsewhere. They say the finding could provide new insights into certain fundamental processes that help determine why metals and other materials display the complex electronic properties that underlie much of today's technology.

7h

How young embryos conduct quality control

The first few days of embryonic development are a critical point for determining the failure or success of a pregnancy. Because relatively few cells make up the embryo during this period, the health of each cell is vital to the health of the overall embryo. But often, these young cells have chromosomal aneuploidies—meaning, there are too many or too few chromosome copies in the cell. Aneuploid cel

7h

Tiny sand grains trigger massive glacial surges

About 10 percent of the Earth's land mass is covered in glaciers, most of which slip slowly across the land over years, carving fjords and trailing rivers in their wake. But about 1 percent of glaciers can suddenly surge, spilling over the land at 10 to 100 times their normal speed.

7h

Brazil drives increase in worldwide forest loss

Primary forest destruction contributed carbon dioxide emissions equivalent to 400 million cars last year, as tree cover loss increased by 2.8 percent compared with 2018.

7h

A very Swedish sort of failure

A flawed policy on Covid-19 was driven by the country's exceptionalism

7h

Quantum trick from nature provides 'roadmap' to better solar tech

A new process gets molecules to tell scientists how they should be modified to better absorb and convert solar energy. The method uses a molecular property known as quantum coherence in which different aspects of a molecule are synchronous, like when your car's turn signal blinks in unison with that of the car in front of you. Scientists believe that quantum coherence may play a role in natural p

7h

New species extinction target proposed for global nature rescue plan

The upcoming future strategy for conserving biodiversity must include a prominent target to lower extinction rates, according to group including UCL scientists.

7h

The AI Pop Star Learning to Sing Like a Human

Computer-generated singing needs plenty of tweaking to make it sound acceptable. Now, Microsoft's computer scientists are teaching an AI to sing like a person.

7h

Refugees face poverty, food insecurity

At the start of Refugee Week, a timely study reminds us of the experiences and 'cultural acclimatisation' of recent arrivals.

7h

'A pandemic within a pandemic': COVID-19, protests shine a spotlight on inequity

Amid worldwide protests over systemic racism, a Richmond-area congresswoman, Virginia's chief diversity, equity and inclusion officer, and the director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center hosted a virtual town hall Wednesday to discuss the disproportionate ways that minority communities have been affected by the novel coronavirus.

7h

Cutting-edge computing paves way to future of NMR spectroscopy

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy helps chemists and other scientists identify and explore atomic structures. However, NMR is limited by the availability of catalogs of reference data to compare and identify structures.

7h

New species extinction target proposed for global nature rescue plan

The upcoming future strategy for conserving biodiversity must include a prominent target to lower extinction rates, according to group including UCL scientists.

7h

Observatories around the solar system team up to study sun's influence

At the heart of understanding our space environment is the knowledge that conditions throughout space—from the sun to the atmospheres of planets to the radiation environment in deep space—are connected.

7h

Interactions between human‐modified habitat change and climate change shape tropical butterfly biodiversity in Yunnan

Butterflies are considered bioindicators of environmental change. In a study published in Insect Science, researchers from Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) found that butterfly diversity in tropical rainforests and savannas is threatened by human‐modified habitat loss and global climate change.

7h

Collecting missing demographic data is the first step to fighting racism in healthcare

To create targeted programs to treat specific health issues, healthcare practitioners need proper demographic information about the population they are seeking to target. (Unsplash/) Without a doubt, racism is a public health issue. As such, tackling it requires support at every government level. Enacting change in this way also requires collecting and evaluating data. But failing to collect that

7h

Current-voltage curve of graphene nanoribbons measured, with implications for graphene switches

Researchers at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) have successfully measured the current-voltage curve of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) that were suspended between two electrodes. Measurements were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results revealed that, in contrast to the findings of previous reports, the electrical conductance of GNRs with a zigzag

7h

How some countries are reviving coronavirus-affected tourism in Africa

In the Gambia, teams of young tourism guides in their first holiday season are doing something very different from what they learned in training. They have been redeployed to act as coronavirus guides for their local communities, raising awareness and explaining to their fellow Gambians how to prevent the spread of infection.

7h

Interactions between human‐modified habitat change and climate change shape tropical butterfly biodiversity in Yunnan

Butterflies are considered bioindicators of environmental change. In a study published in Insect Science, researchers from Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) found that butterfly diversity in tropical rainforests and savannas is threatened by human‐modified habitat loss and global climate change.

7h

Scientists say most likely number of contactable alien civilisations is 36

New calculations come up with estimate for worlds capable of communicating with others They may not be little green men. They may not arrive in a vast spaceship. But according to new calculations there could be more than 30 intelligent civilisations in our galaxy today capable of communicating with others. Experts say the work not only offers insights into the chances of life beyond Earth but cou

7h

COVID-19 Lockdown and the Flu

There is pretty clear evidence now that the lockdown worked in "flattening the curve" and reducing cases, hospitalizations, and deaths from COVID-19. By one estimate the lockdown has already prevented about 60 million cases in the US alone, and about 250,000 additional deaths, perhaps more. This doesn't even take into consideration what would have happened if the pandemic was allowed to overwhelm

7h

When Doctors and Patients Talk About Death Over Zoom

During the Covid-19 pandemic, palliative care specialists are discovering that technology can add a lot to these difficult discussions.

7h

Switch in Mouse Brain Induces a Deep Slumber Similar to Hibernation

If such a snooze button exists in humans, it could protect against strokes, heart attacks and trauma — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Switch in Mouse Brain Induces a Deep Slumber Similar to Hibernation

If such a snooze button exists in humans, it could protect against strokes, heart attacks and trauma — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Switch in Mouse Brain Induces a Deep Slumber Similar to Hibernation

If such a snooze button exists in humans, it could protect against strokes, heart attacks and trauma — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

World to hit 8 million confirmed coronavirus cases in next 24 hours

The global total of confirmed covid-19 cases is expected to pass 8 million in the next 24 hours, but we are still only in the beginning stages of the pandemic

7h

Scientists Create Exotic 'Fifth State of Matter' on Space Station

We're all familiar with the classic states of matter — solid, liquid, and gas. Science is also getting quite familiar with plasma, which is now considered a fourth state. There may also be a fifth state of matter, and research aboard the International Space Station (ISS) has brought us one step closer to understanding so-called Bose-Einstein condensates . With most materials, you can cycle throug

7h

The Path to Autocracy

O ver the past decade , Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orbán and his Fidesz Party have transformed a democracy into something close to an autocracy. Shortly after his first reelection in 2014, Orbán gave a speech outlining his political project. Citing globalization's economic and social failures, Orbán defended the course he had set by noting that those nations best prepared for the future were

7h

Coronavirus could infect human brain and replicate, US study shows

Johns Hopkins University research adds to concern about poorly understood neurological symptoms

8h

Watch yourself: the self-surveillance strategy to keep supermarket shoppers honest

Retailers have tried many overt tactics to limit theft, such as signs that display images of CCTV cameras, threats to prosecute offenders, bag checks, checkout weighing plates and electronic security gates.

8h

Disclosure of climate-related financial risks not enough to drive action

A new Griffith University study cautions over-reliance on a financial disclosure framework for driving climate action.

8h

Pollution in Asian tropopause layer comes from human activities and natural sources, study finds

The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL) is a thin layer of aerosol with a thickness of about 3-4 km, which appears regularly at the height of the tropopause layer during the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) period over the Tibetan Plateau. How is it formed? Where are aerosols from? There questions have been debated since the discovery of ATAL in 2011.

8h

At-home language skills development requires strong motivation, study shows

The coronavirus pandemic was an unwelcome surprise to thousands of Erasmus students. However, high levels of foreign language proficiency and intercultural competence can also be acquired at home. A recent study shows that self-motivation, strategy and reflection are the driving forces for honing such skills.

8h

Coronavirus Outbreak in Beijing, China's Capital, Alarms Officials

Disease experts said limited bursts of infections were likely to become part of the "new normal" for China.

8h

One-minute simultaneous analysis of pungency components in kimchi

The World Institute of Kimchi (WiKim) has announced its development of a rapid analysis method for quantifying capsaicin (CAP) and dihydrocapsaicin (DHC), which are major pungency components in kimchi, within one minute.

8h

Making coal from food waste, garden cuttings – and even human sewage

Food waste, garden cuttings, manure, and even human sewage can be turned into solid biocoal for energy generation, and, if scaled up, could help match the industrial demand for carbon with the need to get rid of organic waste and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

8h

One-minute simultaneous analysis of pungency components in kimchi

The World Institute of Kimchi (WiKim) has announced its development of a rapid analysis method for quantifying capsaicin (CAP) and dihydrocapsaicin (DHC), which are major pungency components in kimchi, within one minute.

8h

Dear Therapist: My Boyfriend Won't Let Me Have Male Friends

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My boyfriend and I have been together for two years now, in a long-distance relationship (we live two and a half hours apart). We are both happy and serious about our relationship. He has been in a few relatio

8h

Berlin to buy stake in Covid-19 vaccine player CureVac

Investment of €300m to secure German drug company and potential treatment from foreign interest

8h

Married Britons report higher anxiety levels during lockdown

Survey finds people married or in civil partnerships feeling more anxious than single people Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Married people and those in civil partnerships have reported the highest rise in anxiety levels during lockdown, according to a study by the Office of National Statistics. Figures from the ONS, based on a survey of 6,430 adults in England, Scot

8h

As Cities Reopen, Expect to Wait in Lots of Lines

Capacity limits and social distancing requirements prompt businesses to count how many people are inside—and force some to wait outside.

8h

An Army of Volunteers Is Taking On Vaccine Disinformation Online

Anti-vaccine messages on social media have tripled since the pandemic began. One public health group wants to teach pro-vaccine Americans to fight fire with fire.

8h

A Crucial Step Toward Preventing Wildlife-Related Pandemics

We need to reform the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Biggest Ever Yellowstone Eruption Revealed

The ancient supervolcano under the national park was much more explosive in its early history and could be slowing down, a new study suggests — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Racism Is Terrible. Blackness Is Not.

A lot of kind statements about black people are coming from the pens and minds of white people now. That's a good thing. But sometimes, it is frankly hard to tell the difference between expressions of solidarity and gestures of absolution ( See, I'm not a racist, I said you matter! ) Among the most difficult to swallow are social-media posts and notes that I and others have received expressing so

8h

Taming nuclear fusion is hard, but there are new reasons for optimism

Technological advances, greater investment and growing political interest in addressing climate change mean the dream of harnessing nuclear fusion for energy may finally become a reality

8h

Neutronens gåta kan lösas i rymden

Mätningar i rymden skulle kunna lösa gåtan – det hoppas i alla fall forskare som har analyserat mätningar gjorda med den amerikanska rymdfarkosten Messenger vid Venus och Merkurius för mer än tio år sedan. Bundna i en atomkärna kan neutroner vara stabila i miljarder år. Fria neutroner sönderfaller däremot efter ungefär en kvart. Det märkliga är att medellivslängden för denna högst vardagliga parti

8h

Biggest Ever Yellowstone Eruption Revealed

The ancient supervolcano under the national park was much more explosive in its early history and could be slowing down, a new study suggests — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Buskis – hatad och älskad underhållning

Folkligt, festligt och fullsatt. Men också hånat, bespottat och använt som nedsättande begrepp. Mikael Strömberg, forskare i teatervetenskap menar att buskis kan ses som en hyllning till landsbygdens original. Det är när buskisen tappar den lokala eller regionala förankringen och exempelvis visas på TV som de övertydliga karaktärerna blir symboler för en specifik region och nidbilder. Trots att b

9h

Bakterier i korallreven skyddar deras ekosystem

En inventering av korallrev jorden runt visar att de bakteriesamhällen som lever på reven är mycket olika – och antagligen deltar i omsättningen av näringsämnen. Forskare från SLU har också förfinat analysen av miljöprover med stora mängder genfragment. Ökad kunskap om korallrevens mikroorganismer kan leda till bättre skydd av korallreven. Korallreven hör till jordens artrikaste och mest produkti

9h

Live Coronavirus Updates: Leaders Threaten New Lockdowns

Beijing officials are scrambling to track cases linked to a sprawling food market. In New York and Texas, frustration is growing as people flout restrictions.

9h

There is no I in data: Former grad student has paper retracted after mentor objects

Just because you work in a lab doesn't mean you get to call the data you produce your own. Ask Constantin Heil. In the mid-2010s, Heil was a PhD student at La Sapienza University in Rome, where he conducted studies with his mentor, Giuseppe Giannini. That research led to Heil's dissertation, a paper titled "One … Continue reading

9h

Hjælpepakker hjalp os undgå titusindvis af fyringer

Statens udbetalinger af lønkompensation til virksomheder med hjemsendte medarbejdere har modvirket…

9h

Studie: Størstedelen af de første 200 kliniske covid-forsøg var for dårligt designet

PLUS. Johns Hopkins Universitet i USA har set på designet i de første 200 kliniske covid-19-forsøg og konkluderer, at de fleste havde store mangler. Dansk læge er ærgerlig.

9h

Amid a Pandemic, Transit Authorities Turn to Technology

To address uneven ridership and other issues during the Covid-19 pandemic, some cities — including Los Angeles, Lincoln, Nebraska, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Berlin, and Palma de Mallorca, Spain — are turning to on-demand programs called microtransit. But experts say there are tradeoffs.

9h

Research sheds new light on intelligent life existing across the galaxy

Is there anyone out there? This is an age-old question that researchers have now shed new light on with a study that calculates there could be more than 30 intelligent civilizations throughout our Galaxy. This is an enormous advance over previous estimates which spanned from zero to billions.

10h

A Neural Network Approach to Quantify Blood Flow from Retinal OCT Intensity Time-Series Measurements

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66158-8

10h

Formation and suppression of hydrogen blisters in tunnelling oxide passivating contact for crystalline silicon solar cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66801-4

10h

Cardiac transcriptional and metabolic changes following thoracotomy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66721-3

10h

10h

Mir34a constrains pancreatic carcinogenesis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66561-1

10h

Density functional theory studies on cytosine analogues for inducing double-proton transfer with guanine

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66530-8

10h

Design and Computational Modeling of Fabric Soft Pneumatic Actuators for Wearable Assistive Devices

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65003-2

10h

Development of a new 'ultrametric' method for assessing spawning progression in female teleost serial spawners

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66601-w

10h

Who is at risk of heart rhythm disorders?

Use the right tool for the job. Today experts outline the best way to identify people most likely to develop common and devastating heart rhythm disorders. The advice is published in EP Europace, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and presented on EHRA Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the ESC.

10h

3D-printede implantater holder bedre sammen på tarmen

PLUS. Forskere fra Syddansk Universitet og Aarhus Universitet har udviklet et 3D-printet implantat, der kan øge styrken på sammensyninger på tarmen med op til 20 procent.

10h

How COVID-19 will destroy and rebirth education

When considering what the future of learning post-COVID-19 will look like, you have to start with a strong foundation. Daniel Kinzer, educator and founder of Pacific Blue Studios, looks at it like a seed that has to be grown. Informed by the culture and geology of Hawaii, Kinzer explains the concept of kipuka: a patch of land, untouched by flowing lava, that provides the DNA to restore life to th

10h

Svenska företags digitala marknadsföring synas i nytt projekt

Hur digitaliserad är svenska företags marknadsföring? Det ska ekonomiforskare vid Lunds universitet ta reda på. Du som själv har inblick i ditt företags digitala marknadsföring bjuds även in att delta i undersökningen. I dag är det digital reklam som dominerar över mer konventionell reklam i svensk radio, tv, tidningar och på skyltar. Men digitaliseringen är inte gratis eller fri från risker, men

10h

A constricted opening in Kir channels does not impede potassium conduction

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16842-0 The transition between conducting and non-conducting states of K+ channels has been explained by conformational changes at the intracellular entrance to the conduction pathway. Here authors demonstrate that control over K+ currents in Kir channels is not explained by the canonical pore-gating model, as conductio

10h

Social training reconfigures prediction errors to shape Self-Other boundaries

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16856-8 The human brain can simulate other people's mental processes with Self-specific and Other-specific neural circuits, but it is not known how these circuits emerge. Here, the authors show that these circuits adapt to social experience, to determine whether a computation is attributed to Self or Other.

10h

Early stratification of radiotherapy response by activatable inflammation magnetic resonance imaging

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16771-y Non-invasive approaches to stratify early responses to therapy are of great value to improve cancer patient management. Here the authors design a hybrid nanovesicle-based activatable inflammation magnetic resonance method for the early prediction of response to radiotherapy.

10h

Tug-of-war between actomyosin-driven antagonistic forces determines the positioning symmetry in cell-sized confinement

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16677-9 Symmetric or asymmetric positioning of intracellular structures such as the nucleus and mitotic spindle steers various biological processes. Here authors use an in vitro model and show that a tug-of-war between centripetal actomyosin waves and percolation of bulk actomyosin network direct the positioning.

10h

An Erg-driven transcriptional program controls B cell lymphopoiesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16828-y B cell development is tightly regulated in a stepwise manner to ensure proper generation of repertoire diversity via somatic gene rearrangements. Here, the authors show that a transcription factor, Erg, functions at the earliest stage to critically control two downstream factors, Ebf1 and Pax5, for modulating th

10h

The influence of the brittle-ductile transition zone on aftershock and foreshock occurrence

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16811-7 Earth surface continues to slip after large earthquakes at a slow velocity for a period of a year or more. In this study, the authors show how such slow slip before and after large earthquakes relates to the interaction of the brittle zone of the fault with the ductile zone at greater depth.

10h

Rhythmic light flicker rescues hippocampal low gamma and protects ischemic neurons by enhancing presynaptic plasticity

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16826-0 Brain ischemia has been associated with deficits in neural oscillations. Here in an animal model, the authors show that modulation of low-gamma oscillations using a light flicker can restore low gamma oscillations and protect ischemic neurons.

10h

A library of ab initio Raman spectra for automated identification of 2D materials

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16529-6 The authors develop a first-principles workflow for calculating Raman spectra of 733 monolayers from the computational 2D materials database. After benchmarking results against experimental data for 15 monolayers, an automatic procedure for identifying a material from its Raman spectrum is proposed.

10h

Oumuamua: Neither Comet nor Asteroid, but a Cosmic Iceberg

A new study suggests the interloper may have arisen in an interstellar cloud, where stars are sometimes born.

10h

In a Crisis, We Can Learn From Trauma Therapy

Emotional resilience can be deliberately cultivated. But it takes work.

10h

Grund til bekymring: Hospitalsansatte markant mere smittet med COVID-19

Læger bliver i højere grad smittet med COVID-19 end resten af befolkningen. Der er et stort behov for yderligere at få afdækket, hvor risikoen for smitte er størst, mener Lægeforeningen.

10h

What Zebra Mussels Can Tell Us About Errors In Coronavirus Tests

The standard test for infection with the coronavirus looks for a genetic fingerprint. Laboratory errors, including contamination, can lead to false results, a problem seen with environmental testing. (Image credit: Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

10h

J.B. Handley's unthinking person's guide to the COVID-19 pandemic

J.B. Handley was the founder of the antivaccine group Generation Rescue. Unfortunately, in the era of COVID-19 he's started peddling pseudoscience related to the pandemic. Some things never change.

10h

Interaktionsdesign skapar bättre analysverktyg för biologer

Biologer analyserar ofta komplexa data, till exempel arvmassan hos olika växter, så kallad genomik. Men för att optimera analysverktygen behövs programmeringskunskaper. Datavetaren Chanaka Mannapperuma har i sin forskning skapat intuitiva, lättanvända verktyg som inte kräver specialiserad bioinformatikkunskap. När Chanaka Mannapperuma började arbeta på Umeå Plant Science Center , UPSC, 2010 som p

10h

Obesity is a major risk factor for dying of Covid-19. We need to take it more seriously | Kermit Jones

Health officials need to emphasize the relation between obesity and Covid-19, and we need to treat it like other chronic diseases By now, most people understand that the elderly are especially vulnerable to Covid-19. But studies of Covid-19 patients in France , Italy , China and the United States have also identified chronic conditions that place even younger patients at risk. Near the top of the

10h

What kind of face mask gives the best protection against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

11h

Zoom erkender: Slettede aktivisters kontoer efter anmodning fra Kinas regering

Zoom erkender at have slettet flere videomødebegivenheder og aktivisters kontoer, efter at den kinesiske regeringen hævdede, at begivenhederne var ulovlige.

11h

MiR: Løsningen på selvkørende robotter er AI, AI og mere AI

PLUS. Selvkørende robotter skal gøre os trygge, og derfor har MiR sat blinklys på deres. Omvendt har robotter brug for at forstå, hvad vi vil, og dertil skal de bruge kunstig intelligens, siger MiR's grundlægger.

11h

A War Against Climate Science, Waged by Washington's Rank and File

Efforts to block research on climate change don't just come from the Trump political appointees on top. Lower managers in government are taking their cues, and running with them.

11h

Norsk sundhedsmyndighed sletter alle data fra Smittestopp-appen efter forbud

Folkehelseinstituttet sletter alle data fra appen Smittestopp og stopper indtil videre indsamlingen af data.

12h

12h

Scientists unravel the evolution and relationships for all European butterflies in a first

For the first time, a complete time-calibrated phylogeny for a large group of invertebrates is published for an entire continent.

12h

Scientists unravel the evolution and relationships for all European butterflies in a first

For the first time, a complete time-calibrated phylogeny for a large group of invertebrates is published for an entire continent.

12h

12h

Trombocyter – blodets doldisar

– Trombocyterna har en underskattad roll i vårt blod, inte minst när vi drabbas av en infektion. De förtjänar mer uppmärksamhet, säger Oonagh Shannon, biomedicinare och forskare inom infektionsmedicin vid Lunds universitet.

12h

Högtryck på blodigt allvar – kärlforskare vill intensifiera jakten på orsakerna

Högt blodtryck skadar våra blodkärl. Det skadar också vårt hjärta, vår hjärna och våra njurar. Ett högt blodtryck ökar också risken att drabbas av hjärtinfarkt och stroke. Exakt varför högt blodtryck är farligt vet man dock inte.

12h

Tillämpad kinesiologi

Teknik inom amerikansk kiropraktik Under 1960-talet utvecklades en gren inom amerikansk kiropraktik som kallas tillämpad kinesiologi ("applied kinesiology"). Tekniken är pseudovetenskaplig och saknar evidens, men hävdar att man kan diagnostisera en patient genom att testa en persons muskelstyrka. Ett sådant muskeltest sker genom att utövaren manuellt känner efter hur starkt en person kan spänna e

13h

Half of Beijing districts report new coronavirus cases

Life in the Chinese capital had returned to normal before mass testing revealed outbreak

13h

Can you solve it? Domino dancing

A riddle about rectangles UPDATE: To read solution click here It's a sin! Yes, I used a picture of the Pet Shop Boys to entrap you into reading my puzzle column. What did you do to deserve it? Today's poser (no, not him) concerns the playful positioning of domino-shaped tiles on a chessboard. Continue reading…

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13h

Study finds significant parental hesitancy about routine childhood and influenza vaccines

A national study measuring parental attitudes toward vaccinations found 6.1% were hesitant about routine childhood immunizations while nearly 26% were hesitant about the influenza vaccine.

14h

Even 'low-risk' drinking can be harmful

It's not just heavy drinking that's a problem — even consuming alcohol within weekly low-risk drinking guidelines can result in hospitalization and death, according to a new study published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

14h

Palsmyrarna försvinner i allt snabbare takt

Klimatet i Subarktis förändras till följd av den globala uppvärmningen. Enligt en ny studie från Göteborgs universitet leder uppvärmningen till att permafrosten i stora våtmarksområden, så kallade palsmyrar, tinar. Följderna blir att utsläppen av växthusgasen metan ökar och att livsmiljöer för växter, djur och människor förändras. Subarktiskt klimat, som råder mellan polarklimat och tempererat kl

14h

Travhästar utan hästskor är snabbare

Att träna och tävla hästar utan skor har blivit mer och mer vanligt inom flera olika hästsportdiscipliner. Inom travsporten har det länge funnits en uppfattning att prestationsförmågan kan påverkas positivt om hästarna inte har skor, men också att barfotakörning kan öka risken för galopp. Forskning från Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet visar att det faktiskt går snabbare om travhästarna körs barfota

14h

14h

One minute simultaneous analysis of pungency components in kimchi

The World Institute of Kimchi (WiKim) announced its development of a rapid analysis method for quantifying capsaicin (CAP) and dihydrocapsaicin (DHC), which are major pungency components in kimchi, within 1 min.

15h

Novel treatment for mesothelioma shows promise for patients

novel treatment for advanced mesothelioma is safe and effective and may improve the quality of life for patients who have few treatment options, according to a research abstract presented during a virtual session of the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting on June 14.

15h

House-call model tapping interventional radiology improves outcomes and access to care

Interventional radiologists participating in a collaborative house call model in rural Indiana helped reduce emergency department use by 77% and hospital readmissions by 50 percent for nearly 1,000 elderly homebound patients with chronic illnesses, according to a research abstract presented during a virtual session of the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting on June

15h

Minimally-invasive treatment for 'frozen shoulder' improves patients' pain and function

A new nonsurgical treatment decreases errant blood flow in the shoulder to quickly reduce pain and improve function in patients with adhesive capsulitis, also known as 'frozen shoulder,' according to a research abstract presented during a virtual session of the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting on June 13.

15h

Study demonstrates feasibility of hologram technology in liver tumor ablation

Data from one of the first clinical uses of augmented reality guidance with electromagnetically tracked tools shows that the technology may help doctors quickly, safely, and accurately deliver targeted liver cancer treatments, according to a research abstract presented during a virtual session of the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting on June 14.

15h

Scientists unravel the evolution and relationships for all European butterflies in a first

For the first time, a complete time-calibrated phylogeny for a large group of invertebrates is published for an entire continent. In a research paper in the open-access, peer-reviewed academic journal ZooKeys, a German-Swedish team of scientists provide a diagrammatic hypothesis of the relationships and evolutionary history for all 496 extant European species of butterflies. Their work provides an

15h

73% of LGBTQ youth bullied for reasons beyond their sexual identity

73% of SGM adolescents surveyed reported experiences of bias-based bullying for reasons beyond their sexual or gender identities, such as being bullied because of their body weight (57%), race/ethnicity (30%) and religion (27%). Each type of bullying was positively related to health risk, including depression, sleep problems, stress, and unhealthy weight control behaviors.

15h

Parents twice as likely to be concerned about ticks than of mosquitoes

When it comes to bug bites, parents are twice as likely to be concerned about ticks as they are about mosquitoes transmitting disease, a new national poll finds.

15h

The Bronx fends for itself as pandemic hits hard

New York's poorest borough suffers highest death rate from coronavirus and is a flashpoint for racial injustice protests

15h

Coronavirus stalks Burundi's political elite after president's death

Pierre Nkurunziza thought to be first head of state killed by Covid-19, diplomats say

15h

Spectre of care home deaths hangs over government

Of all of the UK's mis-steps in tackling coronavirus, the epidemic among the elderly is the worst

15h

Dieseltog kører videre to år ekstra på sjællandsk pendlerstrækning

PLUS. Politikerne har lyttet til Banedanmarks appel og besluttet at droppe såkaldt immunisering af Roskilde-Holbæk-strækningen, hvilket ellers ville gøre det muligt at indsætte eltog flere år tidligere.

16h

Udviklere vælger for nemme løsninger: Ydelse kan øges 60.000 gange ved at omskrive kode

Miniaturisering af halvlederkomponenter har skabt stadigt stigende kraftigere processorer, som har gjort det muligt for udviklere at prioritere hurtig skrivning af kode – i stedet for at gøre selve koden hurtig. Forskere mener ikke, at det kan fortsætte.

16h

Stocks sink after jump in China and US coronavirus cases

Equities hit by fears new outbreaks in world's top two economies could prompt second wave

16h

How Covid-19 is attracting investors to US health ventures

From drugmaking to virtual doctors, start-ups are luring a rush of investors

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The Pandemic Claims New Victims: Prestigious Medical Journals

Two major study retractions in one month have left researchers wondering if the peer review process is broken.

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The Mystery of Hidden Forces Behind Earth's Highest Mountains Could Finally Be Solved

You may not notice, but our planet's mountains are still growing.

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Advanced MRI scans may improve treatment of tremor, Parkinson's disease

Recently developed MRI techniques used to more precisely target a small area in the brain linked to Parkinson's disease and essential tremor may lead to better outcomes without surgery and with less risk of negative effects, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers suggests.

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Coronavirus live news: Beijing enters 'extraordinary period' as it races to contain new Covid-19 outbreak

WHO warns UK not to lift lockdown; Iran deaths top 100 for first time in two months; cases worldwide near 7.9m. Follow the latest updates WHO cautions against further lifting of lockdown in England Demand for flu vaccine soars as countries plan for second Covid-19 wave Republicans insist Trump Tulsa rally won't spread coronavirus Beijing has entered an 'extraordinary period' says city spokesperso

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DNA data storage takes a leap forward with 'DORIS'

A new approach to DNA data storage systems gives users the ability to read or modify data files without destroying them, researchers say. The work makes the systems easier to scale up for practical use. "Most of the existing DNA data storage systems rely on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to access stored files, which is very efficient at copying information but presents some significant challeng

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Solar Orbiter: Europe's Sun mission makes first close pass

The UK-built Solar Orbiter will track by our star on Monday at a distance of just over 77 million km.

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Maternal depression: seeking help sooner is better for mums and kids

The children of mothers with long-term depression have been found to be at higher risk of behavioural problems and poor development.

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Events Like Trump Rally Are 'Perfect Storm' for Viral Spread, Experts Say

Social gatherings and campaign rallies like those planned by President Trump could spread infections this summer. People should wear masks and continue social distancing, public health researchers say.

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Macron lifts most coronavirus restrictions

French president vows to focus on rebuilding economy during final two years of mandate

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Essential travel accessories for your next trip

Make traveling easier. (Tim Gouw via Unsplash/) Traveling comes with its own unique form of exhaustion, between the cramped seats, long layovers, overstuffed suitcases, and time changes. With so many external factors outside of a traveler's control, considering the little details can make a big difference in ensuring some semblance of comfort and convenience during the travel process. We picked a

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Demand for flu vaccine soars as countries plan for second Covid-19 wave

Manufacturers warn they will struggle to meet demand as governments seek to ease pressure on health services Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Fears of a second wave of coronavirus have sparked a global scramble for influenza shots from countries that hope to vaccinate great swathes of the population to reduce pressure on their health services. Health officials in the

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White House says jobless benefits 'disincentive' for work

Trump administration will stop issuing $600 cheques in July even as coronavirus cases rise in some states

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Article: Learning How to Learn (With 20 Study References)

submitted by /u/21cent [link] [comments]

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A theory of everything

submitted by /u/qiling [link] [comments]

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The Brain Uses a Minimum Effort Approach To Read Text

submitted by /u/newsharker [link] [comments]

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This High Tech Real Estate Investing Platform Is Opening Doors for Average Investors

For a long time there were two different sets of rules when it came to investing . Regular everyday people only got to invest in publicly traded assets like stocks and bonds, while rich people and institutional investors got to add real diversity to their portfolios with things like private real estate, which offered more stability and greater returns. Luckily, things are different now. Advanceme

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Urban foxes self-evolve, exhibiting Darwin's domestication syndrome

A study from the University of Glasgow finds urban foxes evolved differently compared to rural foxes. The skulls of the urban foxes are adapted to scavenging for food rather than hunting it. The evolutionary changes correspond to Charles Darwin's "domestication syndrome." How much can living in the city change you? If you were an urban fox, you could be evolving yourself to a whole new stage and

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Animals That Can Do Math Understand More Language Than We Think

It is often thought that humans are different from other animals in some fundamental way that makes us unique, or even more advanced than other species . These claims of human superiority are sometimes used to justify the ways we treat other animals , in the home, the lab, or the factory farm. So, what is it that makes us so different from other animals? Many philosophers, both past and present ,

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What Happens in Your Brain When You Make Memories?

Scientists are using new tech to decode how our brains remember.

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Why the Confederate Flag Flew During World War II

In July 1944, one month after the Allies stormed the beaches of Normandy, the 79th Infantry Division drove Nazi troops out of the French town La Haye-du-Puits. A young officer from Chattanooga, Tennessee, reached into his rucksack and pulled out a flag that his grandfather had carried during the Civil War. He fashioned a makeshift flagpole and hoisted it up, so that the battle-worn Confederate fl

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Living near oil or gas wells may up preterm birth risk

Living in close proximity to oil and gas wells may increase the risk of preterm birth, according to new research on births in California's primary oil-producing region. The study could inform discussions about the state's implementation of setbacks from oil and gas extraction facilities. Researchers examined 225,000 births from mothers who lived within about six miles of oil and gas wells in the

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Try this app to avoid ticks this summer

A new app could help you avoid ticks and the risk of contracting Lyme disease. "We don't want people to be afraid. We just want them to take a few precautions so they can still enjoy being outside," says Jean Tsao, an associate professor in the fisheries and wildlife department at Michigan State University who researches ticks and tick-borne illness and helped develop The Tick App . More than 300

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Delaware: Images of the First State

Fewer than 1 million people live in Delaware, the second-smallest state in America by area. The region is primarily coastal: The state's entire eastern border is formed by the Delaware River and Delaware Bay. Below are a few glimpses of the landscape of Delaware and some of the wildlife and people calling it home. This photo story is part of Fifty , a collection of images from each of the United

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Keeping Schools Closed Next Fall Could Worsen Science's Diversity Problem

But a number of new initiatives might mitigate the damage — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Siblings of infants who have died suddenly and unexpectedly at 10-fold risk of same death

The siblings of infants who have died suddenly and unexpectedly run 10 times the risk of dying in the same way, indicates a long term analysis of monitoring data.

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Get a Lifetime of Rosetta Stone, Online Privacy, and Book Summaries in this 3-App Bundle

Social distancing and staying at home means we've got lots of time to fill, and there's only so many reality shows you can stream before you start feeling the need to actually do something productive with your time. The Social Distancing Lifetime Subscription Bundle gives you three-lifetime subscriptions to help you scratch that itch to be productive, by checking off books from your reading list,

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Scientists report flaws in WHO-funded study on 2-metre distancing

Mistakes mean findings should not be used as evidence for relaxing rule, say professors Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Senior scientists have reported flaws in an influential World Health Organization-commissioned study into the risks of coronavirus infection and say it should not be used as evidence for relaxing the UK's 2-metre physical distancing rule. Critics of

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The history and mystery of America's long-lost pickle sandwich

In this Depression-era stalwart, soft, chewy white bread (homemade or store-bought) is an ideal canvas for butter and pickles. (Jennifer May/) Have you ever stopped to ask yourself why bread-and-butter pickles are called bread-and-butter pickles? "I thought they were called that because they're sweeter and less vinegary," a friend tells me. "You know, smooth as butter." I had never questioned the

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Circular reasoning: Spiraling circuits for more efficient AI

Scientists at the Institute of Industrial Science at The University of Tokyo built new specialized computer hardware that can perform AI tasks more efficiently based on a spiraling 3D architecture. This work may help with the development of energy efficient smart devices.

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Sent i seng, tidligt op: Danske fugle powernapper sig gennem sommeren

For fugle er sommeren travl og stressende, og derfor sover de mindre end om vinteren.

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Tænkeboks: Alice og Bob sender vektorer til hinanden

Nu kan du dykke ned i ugens tænkeboks.

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An Ode to Insomnia

Daniel Savage Y ou have to get up. That's the first thing. Don't just lie there and let it have its way with you. The sea of anxiety loves a horizontal human; it pours over your toes and surges up you like a tide. Is your partner lying next to you, dense with sleep, offensively unconscious? That's not helping either. So verticalize yourself. Leave the bed. Leave its maddening mammal warmth. Out y

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How To Stop Instagram From Tracking Everything You Do

Though the Facebook-owned app doesn't give users complete control, there are ways to limit the data it collects and the types of ads you see.

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Best Sex Toys & Tech for Every Body: Vibrators, Wand Massagers, Etc

Stuck inside? Here are our favorite gender-inclusive adult devices to give you (and your partners) a helping hand.

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The Drug That Could One Day Help People — and Dogs — Live Longer

Scientists are trying to find ways to extend the human lifespan. Turns out our furry friends are the perfect test subjects.

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Readers Respond to the February 2020 Issue

Letters to the editor from the February 2020 issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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As Social Distancing Wanes, Cuomo Warns of Another Lockdown

Sports bettors are shifting to stocks. Brazil's daily death toll is now the highest globally, and Peru is one of the world's hot spots.

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Astronomers Track a Fast Radio Burst to Its Source—a Magnetar

The origin of these explosions of radio waves has long been an astrophysics mystery. Now one has been traced to an ultra-dense spinning, magnetized stellar core.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Leger fugle?

En læser har set dyrebørn lege, men ikke fugle. Leger fugle ikke? Det svarer professor i biologi fra Lund på.

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Kathy Sullivan On Reaching Challenger Deep, Making History Again

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks to Kathy Sullivan, an American geologist, who has made history by reaching the deepest point on the surface of the Earth.

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