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Coronavirus breakthrough: dexamethasone is first drug shown to save lives

Nature, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01824-5 In a large trial, a cheap and widely available steroid cut deaths by one-third among patients critically ill with COVID-19.

28min

As many as six billion Earth-like planets in our galaxy, according to new estimates

There may be as many as one Earth-like planet for every five Sun-like stars in the Milky way Galaxy, according to new estimates by University of British Columbia astronomers using data from NASA's Kepler mission.

3h

Eksperter advarer mod dyr naturgasledning til Lolland

PLUS. Milliard-dyr naturgasledning skal holdes op mod elektrificering, som typisk er billigere, siger energi-eksperter.

13h

LATEST

Seafood helped prehistoric people migrate out of Africa, study reveals

A study, led by the University of York, has examined fossil reefs near to the now-submerged Red Sea shorelines that marked prehistoric migratory routes from Africa to Arabia. The findings suggest this coast offered the resources necessary to act as a gateway out of Africa during periods of little rainfall when other food sources were scarce.

7min

Overlooked: The role of bacterial viruses in plant health

We know how important bacteria and fungi are for the health of plants. In marine environments and in our own gut, bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) are important in regulating the microbiome. Yet, their effect on bacteria living around the roots of plants has hardly been studied. 'I cannot believe that they are not important,' says Joana Falcao Salles, Professor of Microbial Community

7min

Multi-institutional study looks at brain MRI findings in COVID-19

A new multi-institutional study published in the journal Radiology identifies patterns in abnormal brain MRI findings in patients with COVID-19.

7min

Hormone systems can still be adapted in adulthood

Behavioural biologists at Münster University have now been able to demonstrate for the first time that male guinea pigs are still able to adapt their hormone systems to changes in their social environment in adulthood. The study has been published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

7min

A coordinated COVID-19 response helped western Washington state "flatten the curve"

Despite having the first confirmed case of coronavirus and the first major COVID-19 outbreak in the United States, the state of Washington implemented a response plan that kept its death rate the lowest among all states that have had major outbreaks. A multidisciplinary consensus panel of 26 experts analyzed western Washington's response and identified six key factors that contributed to "flatteni

7min

Oncotarget: Preoperative geriatric nutritional risk index is a useful prognostic indicator

The cover for issue 24 of Oncotarget features Figure 4, 'Cancer-specific survival curves based on GNRI according to pTNM stage,' by Hirahara, et al.Volume 11 Issue 24 of @Oncotarget reported that this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between preoperative Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index and long-term outcomes in elderly gastric cancer patients.

7min

Could the cure for IBD be inside your mouth?

A new collaborative study reveals that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be the latest condition made worse by poor oral health via a clash between the mouth and gut microbiomes.

11min

How does our brain trigger different sighs? New findings could provide answers

One group of neurons controls various types of sighing, but they receive their instructions from different areas of the brain depending on the reason for the sigh, according to a new study.

11min

Brain research sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of depression

A new study reveals how symptoms indicating depression and anxiety are linked to brain function changes already in healthy individuals.

11min

Study settles the score on whether the modern world is less violent

A study by mathematicians has used new techniques to address the long-running debate over whether battle deaths have been declining globally since the end of the Second World War.

11min

Simulated sea slug gets addicted to drug

Scientists built a computer model of a simple brain network based on that of a sea slug, taught it how to get food, gave it an appetite and the ability to experience reward, added a dash of something called homeostatic plasticity and then exposed it to a very intoxicating drug. To no one's surprise, the creature became addicted.

11min

Depression associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease

A new study provides further evidence of the link between depressive symptoms and an increased risk of heart disease and early death.

11min

World's most complete health analysis of nesting sea turtles conducted in Florida

The most comprehensive health assessment for a green turtle rookery in the world to date is providing critical insights into various aspects of physiology, biology, and herpesvirus epidemiology of this nesting population. Findings are hopeful for this population of green sea turtles in southeastern Florida, offer important data on the profile of health for future comparative investigations, and su

11min

Recovery trial for Covid-19 treatments: what we know so far

The biggest randomised controlled trial of drugs against Covid-19 in the world is already producing results Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Recovery, based at Oxford University, is the biggest randomised controlled trial of drugs against Covid-19 in the world, thanks in no small part to the NHS. Almost all acute hospitals across the whole of the UK – 176 in all – hav

12min

Multicolor super-resolution imaging made easy

Scientists at EPFL have developed robust and easy-to-implement multicolor super-resolution imaging. The approach is based on the simultaneous acquisition of two spectral channels followed by spectral cross-cumulant analysis and unmixing. They exploit fluorophore blinking and spectral crosstalk for the generation of additional color channels with super-resolved images.

27min

Huge forest fires put health at risk

After Australia, Siberia is burning, indicating that the frequency of such events is on the rise, with myriad dire consequences: devastated ecosystems, risk of desertification, CO2 emissions, toxic particles, further climate impacts… An expert in atmospheric processes at EPFL, Athanasios Nenes shares his views about it.

27min

Wastewater treatment boom changes essential nutrient balance in lakes

A vast number of new wastewater treatment plants in developing countries has led to an imbalance between phosphorous and nitrogen in surface waters. The result could be excessive growth of potentially poisonous algae with a preference for nitrogen. A new study calls for better nutrient reduction in order to maintain ecosystem biodiversity in lakes and others surface waterbodies.

27min

Hurricane season combined with COVID-19 pandemic could create perfect storm

When extreme climate conditions interact with stressors to social systems, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, the consequences could be severe unless experts from diverse backgrounds work together to develop comprehensive solutions to combat their negative impacts.

27min

If there is life out there, can we detect it?

Instruments aboard future space missions are capable of detecting amino acids, fatty acids and peptides, and can even identify ongoing biological processes on ocean moons in our solar system. These are the exciting conclusions reached by two studies from an international team led by scientists of the Planetary Sciences research group at Freie Universität Berlin. The two studies were published in t

27min

Scientists grow optical chips in a petri dish

The modern photonics industry is constantly working on making its devices more compact, be it computing systems or sensors and lidars. For this, it is necessary to make lasers, transistors and other elements smaller. A team of scientists led by ITMO researchers proposed a quick and affordable method to create optical chips right in a Petri dish. The research was published in ACS Nano.

27min

How plants' vascular cells turn into holes

Theoretical biologists have solved a unique puzzle in the structure of plants' vascular tissue. Two mutations that had opposite effects appear to lead to the same result. Professor of Computational Developmental Biology Kirsten ten Tusscher has shown that both accelerating or delaying the transport of auxin through the plant's vascular tissue result in the creation of a Swiss-cheese-like pattern o

27min

Need for better approaches to tackle multiple stressors in European lakes and rivers

A newly released Nature paper highlights a continued management need for reduction of nutrient stress in lakes. It also shows that river management requires more complicated approaches to tackle several stressors simultaneously.

27min

A small protein transports electrons between the two photosystems involved in plant photosynthesis

The emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis made it possible for complex multicellular life-forms to evolve on Earth. By utilizing solar energy to turn carbon dioxide into sugars, while also generating molecular oxygen from water, photosynthesis provides the basis for both plant and animal life. These two processes are carried out by distinct, but functionally connected complexes called photosystems

27min

The smallest motor in the world

A research team from Empa and EPFL has developed a molecular motor which consists of only 16 atoms and rotates reliably in one direction. It could allow energy harvesting at the atomic level. The special feature of the motor is that it moves exactly at the boundary between classical motion and quantum tunneling – and has revealed puzzling phenomena to researchers in the quantum realm.

27min

Are You Ready to Eat Meat Grown in a Lab?

In "Billion Dollar Burger," Chase Purdy explores the "edible space race" to grow cell-cultured meat.

27min

Scientists grow optical chips in a petri dish

The modern photonics industry is constantly working on making its devices more compact, be it computing systems or sensors and lidars. For this, it is necessary to make lasers, transistors and other elements smaller. A team of scientists led by ITMO researchers proposed a quick and affordable method to create optical chips right in a Petri dish. The research was published in ACS Nano.

28min

Newly discovered plant gene could boost phosphorus intake

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered an important gene in plants that could help agricultural crops collaborate better with underground fungi — providing them with wider root networks and helping them to absorb phosphorus. The discovery has the potential to increase agricultural efficiency and benefit the environment.

28min

Shhhh, the whales are resting

A Danish-Australian team of researchers recommend new guidelines for noise levels from whale-watching boats after having carried out experiments with humpback whales. They exposed the whales to different levels of boat-engine noises while observing the current guidelines for whale-watching – keeping 100 metres distance, for instance – while monitoring the whales' behavior closely with a drone came

28min

The smallest motor in the world

A research team from Empa and EPFL has developed a molecular motor which consists of only 16 atoms and rotates reliably in one direction. It could allow energy harvesting at the atomic level. The special feature of the motor is that it moves exactly at the boundary between classical motion and quantum tunneling — and has revealed puzzling phenomena to researchers in the quantum realm.

28min

Boosting research without supporting universities is wrong-headed

Nature, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01788-6 Universities are facing a severe financial crisis and some contract staff are hanging by a thread. Senior colleagues need to speak up now.

28min

Keeping two journals has made me a better scientist

Nature, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01826-3 Her habit of keeping two journals has helped Adeline Williams to develop observation and recording skills she might otherwise lack.

28min

Racism — Nature must track diversity of staff and publications

Nature, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01825-4

28min

Therapy at the bench

Nature, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01752-4 Psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda trains teams of grandmothers to provide open-air counselling sessions in Zimbabwe.

28min

FDA Approves First-Ever Prescription Video Game

For the first time, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized doctors to prescribe a video game as a form of medical treatment. An iOS game called EndeavorRX seems to help kids between eight and 12 years old who have ADHD, The Verge reports . And while the actual evidence to support those claims is somewhat shaky, the concept of a prescription video game is still a fascinating world-

29min

How plants' vascular cells turn into holes

Theoretical biologists have solved a unique puzzle in the structure of plants' vascular tissue. Two mutations that had opposite effects appear to lead to the same result. Professor of Computational Developmental Biology Kirsten ten Tusscher has shown that both accelerating or delaying the transport of auxin through the plant's vascular tissue result in the creation of a Swiss-cheese-like pattern o

30min

Need for better approaches to tackle multiple stressors in European lakes and rivers

A newly released Nature paper highlights a continued management need for reduction of nutrient stress in lakes. It also shows that river management requires more complicated approaches to tackle several stressors simultaneously.

30min

A small protein transports electrons between the two photosystems involved in plant photosynthesis

The emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis made it possible for complex multicellular life-forms to evolve on Earth. By utilizing solar energy to turn carbon dioxide into sugars, while also generating molecular oxygen from water, photosynthesis provides the basis for both plant and animal life. These two processes are carried out by distinct, but functionally connected complexes called photosystems

30min

A 'pause button' for light particles

How do you stop something that is faster than anything else, intangible and always in motion by nature? A team led by physicists Dr. Thorsten Peters and Professor Thomas Halfmann is doing the seemingly impossible: stopping light for tiny fractions of a second. They then end the stopover at the push of a button letting the light pulse continue its journey. The researchers are even stopping individu

33min

Scientists uncover new mechanism for balancing protein stability during neuronal development

A research team led by Dr. Chaogu Zheng from the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Hong Kong (HKU), in collaboration with a team led by Professor Martin Chalfie (2008 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry) from the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University, recently discovered an unexpected role of heat shock proteins (HSPs), also known as the molecular chaperones, during neu

33min

Improved heat-resistant wheat varieties are identified

Wheat, in its own right, is one of the most important foods in the world. It is a staple food for more than 2.5 billion people, it provides 20% of the protein consumed worldwide and, according to the FAO, supplies more calories than any other grain. Its long-term productivity, however, is threatened by rising temperatures, among other factors. Stress from heat, an increasing trend due to climate c

33min

Carpet shell clams reveal high levels of pollution in several coastal lagoons in Tunisia

Transitional waters, those situated between land and the sea, such as lagoons and estuaries, are more exposed to human activity and these waters are slowly refreshed, meaning that their ecosystems are more vulnerable to pollution. In order to understand the environmental health of Tunisia's coastal lagoons, a Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology research team at the University of Cordo

33min

New satellite data made available to help tackle public challenges

The public sector can access new satellite images of the UK to help issues such as town planning and flood mapping.

33min

Scientists uncover new mechanism for balancing protein stability during neuronal development

A research team led by Dr. Chaogu Zheng from the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Hong Kong (HKU), in collaboration with a team led by Professor Martin Chalfie (2008 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry) from the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University, recently discovered an unexpected role of heat shock proteins (HSPs), also known as the molecular chaperones, during neu

36min

Improved heat-resistant wheat varieties are identified

Wheat, in its own right, is one of the most important foods in the world. It is a staple food for more than 2.5 billion people, it provides 20% of the protein consumed worldwide and, according to the FAO, supplies more calories than any other grain. Its long-term productivity, however, is threatened by rising temperatures, among other factors. Stress from heat, an increasing trend due to climate c

36min

John Roberts May Not Be the Ally Gun-Rights Advocates Hoped For

Easily overlooked in all the attention paid (rightly) to the historic Supreme Court decision extending antidiscrimination protections to LGBTQ people was a quiet announcement by the justices that they would not hear any of 10 Second Amendment cases they had been considering. By agreeing not to decide any of these cases, the justices sent a clear signal to the gun-rights movement: Stop looking to

39min

It's Not Callout Culture. It's Accountability.

The police killing of George Floyd continues to inspire a bracingly physical uprising, with protesters still taking to the streets and monuments to white oppressors still being torn down. But fierce confrontation, campaigning, and figurehead-toppling has happened online, too. In recent weeks, Twitter has exploded with stories from people of color about pay disparities, discrimination, and offensi

39min

Martian rover motors ahead

European engineers, together with Canada, are working on the technologies needed to find and retrieve samples from Mars, as part of ESA's plans to send material from the Red Planet to Earth.

39min

Study shows how caring responsibilities affect health and restrict ability to work

New research from the University of Southampton has highlighted inequalities faced by men and women over the age of fifty with caring responsibilities. As well as being more likely to be socio-economically disadvantaged, carers in this age group are more likely to experience problems with their mental and physical health than people who do not provide any care.

43min

Virus co-opts immune protein to avoid antiviral defences

By discovering a trick the hepatitis C virus uses to evade the immune system, scientists have identified a new antiviral defence system that could be used to treat many virus infections, according to new research published today in eLife.

43min

Brain research sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of depression

A new study conducted in Turku, Finland, reveals how symptoms indicating depression and anxiety are linked to brain function changes already in healthy individuals.

43min

Endogenous insulin production is preserved in Type 1 diabetes with anti-TNF drug

A study led by a UB researcher found that a drug called golimumab preserved beta-cell function in children and young adults with newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes, according to findings from a Phase 2 study.

43min

TU Darmstadt: Pause button for light particles

Researchers at TU Darmstadt halt individual photons and can release them at the push of a button. The tool could be used for bug-proof communications, for example, or for something that was previously impossible. A recent paper on their work was published in ;Optics Express'.

43min

Simulated sea slug gets addicted to drug

Scientists built a computer model of a simple brain network based on that of a sea slug, taught it how to get food, gave it an appetite and the ability to experience reward, added a dash of something called homeostatic plasticity and then exposed it to a very intoxicating drug. To no one's surprise, the creature became addicted.

43min

Europe Rolls Out Contact Tracing Apps, With Hope and Trepidation

Italy and Germany activated apps this week as tools to avoid a second wave of coronavirus infections, fueling a debate about privacy rights.

51min

Flushing the Toilet May Fling Coronavirus Aerosols All Over

A new study shows how turbulence from a toilet bowl can create a large plume that is potentially infectious to a bathroom's next visitor.

51min

Early Results Show Benefit Of Steroid For Very Sick COVID-19 Patients

A low-cost anti-inflammatory drug appears to reduce the risk of death in patients with COVID-19. The promising result comes from a large study of therapies being conducted in the U.K. (Image credit: John Minchillo/AP)

55min

After a century of speculation, a new liquid phase has been discovered

Researchers at the University of Colorado, Boulder confirm that a new liquid phase has been discovered. This liquid phase was first speculated about over a century ago by physicists Peter Debye and Max Born. Liquid crystals are used in many technologies, including LCD televisions. Your television may soon be getting an upgrade, thanks to new research that confirms a scientific speculation from ov

1h

Hurricane season combined with COVID-19 pandemic could create perfect storm

When extreme climate conditions interact with stressors to social systems, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, the consequences could be severe unless experts from diverse backgrounds work together to develop comprehensive solutions to combat their negative impacts. That's the recommendation of a new article in Nature Climate Change published Monday and co-authored by a University of Central Florida re

1h

IU study finds most people saw a decrease in their sexual behavior early in the pandemic

One in five adults in the United States report they have experienced change — mostly a decrease — in their sexual behavior during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study by Indiana University researchers.

1h

Including patients in hospital discharge communication would improve outcomes of care

Sending discharge letters to UK patients as well as their GPs when they leave hospital could make a substantial difference to patient outcomes, according to a new study by University of Warwick researchers.

1h

Researchers: Homes of North Zealand's elite are most likely to be preserved

Since 1945, the vast majority of historically preserved dwellings in Denmark are architect-designed gems located in North Zealand, according to a study conducted by, among others, a University of Copenhagen researcher. The researchers point out that this contradicts the legal requirement for historical preservation to reflect the population as a whole, not just the elite.

1h

Mangroves at risk of collapse if emissions not reduced by 2050, international scientists predict

An international research team comprising scientists from the University of Hong Kong, the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), Macquarie University and the University of Wollongong (Australia) as well as Rutgers University (USA) has predicted that mangroves will not be able to survive with rising sea-level rates reached by 2050, if emissions are not reduced. The team's fin

1h

Previously undetected brain pulses may help circuits survive disuse, injury

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found previously undetected neuronal pulses in the human brain that activate after an immobilizing illness or injury. MRI scans showed that the brain's main circuits responsible for movement in specific areas of the body disconnected within 48 hours. Also, disuse pulses emerged to maintain neural activity and allow the main motor

1h

Children with developmental disabilities more likely to develop asthma

Children with developmental disabilities or delay are more at risk of developing asthma, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open led by public health researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) as part of the Center for Pediatric Population Health.

1h

Persistent DNA damage in the placenta affects pregnancy outcomes

Scientists at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have shown that a dysfunctional placenta can play a previously unrecognized role during the earliest stages of development in mouse models of Cornelia de Lange syndrome. People with this rare genetic disorder often harbor mutations in cohesins, ring-like proteins that help DNA organize and repair itself.

1h

How does our brain trigger different sighs? New findings could provide answers

One group of neurons controls various types of sighing, but they receive their instructions from different areas of the brain depending on the reason for the sigh, according to a study scheduled to publish June 16, 2020 in the journal Cell Reports.

1h

Repeated coughing seriously degrades face mask efficiency

Face masks are thought to slow the spread of viruses, including the COVID-19 virus, but little is known about how well they work. In Physics of Fluids, researchers use computer models to map expected flow patterns of droplets released when a mask-wearing person coughs repeatedly. Previous work showed droplets can travel 18 feet when an unmasked person coughs. This work used an extended model to co

1h

Determining effective magnetic moment of multicore nanoparticles

Most commercial nanoparticles do not possess a single magnetic core but have small magnetic crystals called crystallites. The important question is how these crystallites behave inside a multicore nanoparticle and how they respond to an applied magnetic field. In the Journal of Applied Physics, researchers compare the effective magnetic moments of different multicore nanoparticle systems and shows

1h

Could the cure for IBD be inside your mouth?

A new collaborative study from the U-M Medical and Dental Schools reveals that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be the latest condition made worse by poor oral health via a clash between the mouth and gut microbiomes.

1h

Asthma among children with developmental disabilities

How common asthma was among children with various developmental disabilities (including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder and vision, hearing or speech delay) was compared to children without disabilities in this survey study.

1h

Characteristics of patients with COVID-19 in Detroit

Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with COVID-19 at a health system in Detroit are described in this case series, which also provides a comparative analysis of hospitalized and ambulatory patient populations.

1h

Flushing toilets create clouds of virus-containing particles

Researchers used a computer simulation to show how a flushing toilet can create a cloud of virus-containing aerosol droplets that is large and widespread and lasts long enough that the droplets could be breathed in by others. With recent studies showing the COVID-19 virus can survive in the human digestive tract and show up in feces of the infected, this raises the possibility the disease could be

1h

Brain network algorithm could improve epilepsy surgery

A better understanding of the brain's evolving networks could improve treatments for epilepsy, say researchers. Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, affecting about three million people in the United States. Medication can often control epileptic seizures, which can lead to serious falls and other injuries, but about one-third of people with epilepsy do not respond to the dr

1h

'Telepresence' can help bring advanced courses to schools that don't offer them

In schools where students want to take an advanced course that the school doesn't offer, the telepresence model, which enables students in one school to use videoconferencing to take a course offered at another school, is an effective alternative that can keep students learning and engaged.

1h

CureVac: the Berliner ensemble

It is dispiriting to see countries squabbling over vaccine companies instead of finding a global solution

1h

Quantum material research facilitates discovery of better materials that benefit our society

A joint research team from the University of Hong Kong (HKU), Institute of Physics at Chinese Academy of Science, Songshan Lake Materials Laboratory, Beihang University in Beijing and Fudan University in Shanghai, has provided a successful example of modern era quantum material research. By means of the state-of-art quantum many-body simulations, performed on the world's fastest supercomputers (Ti

1h

Scientists discover a long-sought-after nitrogen allotrope in black phosphorus structure

Graphene, or a single layer of graphite, has a set of novel properties that have attracted tremendous attention since its discovery. Nitrogen is the next neighbor to carbon in the periodic table of elements, so it is natural to question whether nitrogen can form a 2-D material similar to graphene. It is not easy to imagine such a nitrogen layer because nitrogen has one more electron than carbon, o

1h

Summer favorite bitter gourd genome shows unusual domestication, insight into evolution

The bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is a summer vegetable that graces the tables of many homes and restaurants in Asia. In Okinawa and Kyushu, the southern islands of Japan, the bitter gourds grow easily and have long been said to have many health benefits. The bitter gourds are packed with vitamin C, vitamin A, folate, minerals, carotenes and catechins. It is thought to ward off the feeling of

1h

How aerial technology helped us discover the largest Pictish settlement in Scotland

A much-loved local landmark with an ancient fort at its summit, Tap O'Noth is a gently sloping hill overlooking the lush rolling farmland around the village of Rhynie in Aberdeenshire.

1h

Simulated sea slug gets addicted to drug

Scientists built a computer model of a simple brain network based on that of a sea slug, taught it how to get food, gave it an appetite and the ability to experience reward, added a dash of something called homeostatic plasticity and then exposed it to a very intoxicating drug. To no one's surprise, the creature became addicted.

1h

Our relationship with our stuff is mutual, says researcher

When you exclaim "I love that!" about a favourite possession, do you really mean it?

1h

Summer favorite bitter gourd genome shows unusual domestication, insight into evolution

The bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is a summer vegetable that graces the tables of many homes and restaurants in Asia. In Okinawa and Kyushu, the southern islands of Japan, the bitter gourds grow easily and have long been said to have many health benefits. The bitter gourds are packed with vitamin C, vitamin A, folate, minerals, carotenes and catechins. It is thought to ward off the feeling of

1h

Simulated sea slug gets addicted to drug

Scientists built a computer model of a simple brain network based on that of a sea slug, taught it how to get food, gave it an appetite and the ability to experience reward, added a dash of something called homeostatic plasticity and then exposed it to a very intoxicating drug. To no one's surprise, the creature became addicted.

1h

SpaceX Is Now Taking Requests for Starlink Beta Testers

With over 500 Starlink broadband-beaming satellites already in orbit, SpaceX is looking to move ahead with rolling out its internet service. The Elon Musk-led company is now seeking beta users to test it out, ZDNet reports . The service's website now invites users to apply to become early adopters of the service. "Get updates on Starlink news and service availability in your area," it reads. Once

1h

Europe Rolls Out Contact Tracing Apps, With Hope and Trepidation

Italy and Germany activated apps this week as tools to avoid a second wave of coronavirus infections, fueling a debate about privacy rights.

1h

What superpower conflicts mean for indigenous peoples

International attention returned to the ill-defined Himalayan border between India and China last month as disputes between soldiers stationed there escalated into beatings and fistfights. In recent days, both countries have been working to diplomatically resolve the tension, which has been ongoing with occasional episodes of heightened hostility since a border was first drawn decades ago. This la

1h

Refining projections of Antarctic ice loss and global sea level rise

Antarctica is rapidly shedding ice, a loss that contributes to rising seas. Research demonstrates that human-induced global climate change and warming ocean temperatures are the main culprits behind the ice loss. But the rate of ice loss and how much it may raise global sea levels remain uncertain.

1h

What Buddhism and science can teach each other – and us – about the universe

These are trying times. A global recession sparked by the coronavirus pandemic, and widespread civil unrest, have created a combustible mix of angst—stressors that heighten the risk for long-term health woes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued guidelines to cope with this anxiety. Among them is meditation.

1h

What 'Because of Sex' Really Means

Justice Neil Gorsuch appears to have been serious. In his recent book, A Republic, If You Can Keep It , Gorsuch explained his twin philosophies of judging, "originalism" and "textualism": Rather than guess about unspoken purposes hidden in the hearts of legislators or rework the law to meet the judge's estimation of what an "evolving" or "maturing" society should look like, an originalist and tex

1h

The Table Stays White

The oldest cliché of the food world is a simple one: Food brings people together . It's a warm maxim that could serve as the slogan for a farming cooperative or a brand of prepackaged frozen meals. At the dinner table, the saying implies, a kind of rare democracy exists. After all, everybody needs to eat. Somewhere between the principle and its application, though, comes the uncomfortable realiza

1h

Huge open-access journal deal inked by University of California and Springer Nature

Pact could ultimately make articles in Nature journals immediately free to read

1h

The Russian Disinfo Operation You Never Heard About

The campaign known as Secondary Infektion appears to be a distinct effort from the meddling of the IRA and GRU—and it went undetected for years

1h

Universities Step Up the Fight for Open-Access Research

Today's deal between the University of California and publisher Springer Nature is a big milestone on the path to dismantling paywalls around academic journals.

1h

New mechanism underlying colorectal cancer reveals a crucial role for intestinal microbes

A collaborative study by research groups from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research and Ghent University uncovered a new mechanism causing colorectal cancer. The researchers found that abnormal expression of the protein Zeb2 affects the integrity of the intestinal wall or 'epithelium'.

1h

Springer Nature strikes University of California deal to end paywalls

Open access agreement follows growing clamour from academic institutions

1h

Determining effective magnetic moment of multicore nanoparticles

Magnetic nanoparticles, a class of nanoparticles that can be manipulated by magnetic fields, have a wide range of technical and biomedical applications, including magnetic hyperthermia, targeted drug delivery, new magnetic storage media and nanorobots. Most commercial nanoparticles do not possess a single magnetic core but have a number of small magnetic crystals called crystallites.

1h

Video: What might help rebuild police-community relations?

Sanford School Ph.D. candidate Ajenai Clemmons does research that is part of the headlines. She has spent years interviewing police and minority group residents in East Durham and East London. Her data on the factors helping and harming community relations will be shared with leaders of both cities.

1h

Flushing toilets create clouds of virus-containing particles

Researchers used a computer simulation to show how a flushing toilet can create a cloud of virus-containing aerosol droplets that is large and widespread and lasts long enough that the droplets could be breathed in by others.

1h

Fatal Opioid Overdoses May Be More Common Than Thought

A new model shows opioid deaths may be significantly underreported — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

A new family of nanocars ready for the next nano 'Grand Prix'

Researchers have developed a new family of nanocars ready to compete on a gold surface against the 9 other teams selected for the 2nd Nanocar Race in 2021.

1h

My secret to staying focused under pressure | Russell Wilson

Athletes train their bodies to run faster, jump higher, throw farther — so why don't they train their minds, too? Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson talks about the power of "neutral thinking," which helps him thrive under pressure (both on the field and off) — and shows how you can use this mindset to make the right moves in your own life.

1h

The number of climate deniers in Australia is more than double the global average, new survey finds

Australian news consumers are far more likely to believe climate change is "not at all" serious compared to news users in other countries. That's according to new research that surveyed 2,131 Australians about their news consumption in relation to climate change.

1h

Individuella råd minskar risken för hjärtkärlsjukdom

Det går att minska risken för hjärtkärlsjukdom även på äldre dar. För 70-åringar som ingick i ett program med justerad behandling mot blodtryck och blodfetter samt råd om kost och motion, sjönk risken för hjärtkärlsjukdom till 20 procent under riksgenomsnittet. – Det är mycket glädjande att vi nu för första gången tydligt kan visa att det faktiskt aldrig är för sent att sänka risken för hjärtkärl

1h

Ways to reduce tense relationships between detectives and homicide victims' families suggested in study

Systemic changes may be needed to improve the relationship between police detectives and the families and friends of murder victims, according to a Georgia State University study.

1h

HKU scientists uncover new mechanism for balancing protein stability during neuronal development

A School of Biological Sciences research team at the University of Hong Kong recently discovered an unexpected role of the heat shock proteins (HSPs) during neuronal differentiation. HSPs are mostly known to protect cells from various stresses, e.g. extreme temperatures, toxins, and mechanical damage, and to safeguard tissue development. This new study, however, suggests that the HSPs can also pla

1h

New species extinction target proposed for global nature rescue plan

The 10-year plan for conserving biodiversity adopted as part of the International Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) failed to reach its targets for 2020. A scientist from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) proposes therefore a prominent political target to give discussions of species conservation more vigor. Together with a group of experts from other research institutions, he proposes

1h

Quantum material research facilitates discovery of better materials that benefit our society

By means of the state-of-art quantum many-body simulations, performed on the world's fastest supercomputers, researchers from various institutions including the University of Hong Kong have achieved accurate model calculations for a rare-earth magnet TmMgGaO4 (TMGO). They found that the material, under the correct temperature regime, could realise the the long-sought-after two-dimensional topologi

1h

Scientists discover a long-sought-after nitrogen allotrope in black phosphorus structure

A long-sought-after black phosphous-structured (BP) nitrogen was synthesized by an international team co-led by Dr. Ho-Kwang Mao and Dr. Huiyang Gou from the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR) and Prof. Yansun Yao from the University of Saskatchewan. This finding provides prospects for a new direction of nitrogen-based two-dimensional materials. The results

1h

Support drives fate of protected gold nanoclusters as catalysts

In collaboration with experimentalists from Ghent University, Belgium and Utrecht University, Netherlands, researchers at the Nanoscience Center (NSC) at the University of Jyväskylä, have recently discovered that the choice of a support material for model catalysts, made from gold nanoclusters protected by organic molecules, may have drastic effects on the structure of the catalyst. On certain sup

1h

Amyloid formation on the International Space Station

Amyloids, abnormal fibrillar aggregates of proteins, are associated with various disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of amyloid formation is critical for developing clinical strategies and drugs against these diseases. However, accumulating evidence suggests that amyloid formation processes and the consequent morphology of fibrils can be af

1h

As many as six billion Earth-like planets in our galaxy, according to new estimates

To be considered Earth-like, a planet must be rocky, roughly Earth-sized and orbiting Sun-like (G-type) stars. It also has to orbit in the habitable zones of its star—the range of distances from a star in which a rocky planet could host liquid water, and potentially life, on its surface.

1h

Understanding water-repellent enzymes

The ability of some molecules, such as fatty or oily molecules, to repel water is known as hydrophobicity. The opposite, water attracting, is hydrophilicity. The hydrophobic force that keeps water molecules at bay is one of the most fundamental of chemical interactions, but it is not only about why oil and water do not mix, it lies at the heart of how the proteins, the molecular machinery of our c

1h

This Is How Democracy Dies

In a hushed courtroom, with only litigants, their lawyers, and three other journalists present, a judge convicted the Philippine journalist Maria Ressa for an article she did not write, edit, or supervise, of a crime that hadn't even existed when the story was published. In sentencing Maria and the story's author, Reynaldo Santos Jr., to a jail term of six months to six years, Judge Rainelda Esta

1h

It Didn't Have to Be Like This

W hen President Donald Trump took office in 2017, he pointed to "mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities; rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation," and vowed to end this "American carnage." From now on, he said, "every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs will be made to benefit American workers and American

1h

A question of trust: should bosses be able to spy on workers, even when they work from home?

Anyone familiar with George Orwell's novel 1984 will relate to the menace of Big Brother watching their every keystroke and mouse click. For a growing share of the workforce that dystopian reality arrived while most of us were hunkering down in our "bubbles".

1h

Supergiant atmosphere of Antares revealed by radio telescopes

An international team of astronomers has created the most detailed map yet of the atmosphere of the red supergiant star Antares. The unprecedented sensitivity and resolution of both the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) revealed the size and temperature of Antares' atmosphere from just above the star's su

1h

Tomography studies of coins shed light on the history of Volga Bulgaria

Kazan Federal University, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), and Khalikov Institute of Archeology (Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, Kazan, Russia) are working together to study the physical properties of the coins found on the territory of former Volga Bulgaria.

1h

As many as six billion Earth-like planets in our galaxy, according to new estimates

There may be as many as one Earth-like planet for every five Sun-like stars in the Milky way Galaxy, according to new estimates.

1h

Susceptibility to carcinogens varies due to genetics

A new study looks into how and why certain individuals develop cancer and others do not.

1h

Origins of the beloved guinea pig

New research sheds light on guinea pig domestication and how and why the small, furry animals became distributed around the world.

1h

Working in the sun: Heating of the head may markedly affect safety and performance

Prolonged exposure of the head to strong sunlight significantly impairs cognitively dominated functions and coordination of complex motor tasks shows a new study. This may have important implications for work safety and productivity.

1h

Impurities explain gap in theory of how solids melt

A new study helps to reconcile a Nobel Prize-winning theory with experiments on how solids actually melt. In 1972, physicists J. Michael Kosterlitz and David Thouless published a groundbreaking theory of how phase changes could occur in two-dimensional materials. Experiments soon showed that the theory correctly captured the process of a helium film transitioning from a superfluid to a normal flu

1h

World's most complete health analysis of nesting sea turtles conducted in Florida

While it's only about a 10-kilometer stretch, Juno Beach is home to one of the largest aggregations of nesting green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) in Florida and is one of the highest-density nesting beaches in the state. Although this high-profile turtle population has routinely been monitored for nest counts since 1989, an in-depth health assessment of these turtles has never been conducted.

2h

Researchers uncover mysterious tanaids

Tanaids are one of the most underappreciated animals in the world. These small crustaceans can be found in virtually all marine benthic habitats, from mangroves, rocky shores and coral reefs along the coasts to mud volcanoes, cold seeps and trenches in the deepest oceans. They even inhabit the shell surfaces of sea turtles, live inside gastropod shells like hermit crabs, and reside under the skin

2h

Chip fra MIT forsøger at gøre supercomputere håndholdte

Titusindvis af kunstige synapser kan indgå i en enkelt chip på størrelse med et stykke konfetti.

2h

World's most complete health analysis of nesting sea turtles conducted in Florida

While it's only about a 10-kilometer stretch, Juno Beach is home to one of the largest aggregations of nesting green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) in Florida and is one of the highest-density nesting beaches in the state. Although this high-profile turtle population has routinely been monitored for nest counts since 1989, an in-depth health assessment of these turtles has never been conducted.

2h

Redesigning hand sanitizer and donating 7,000 gallons to fight COVID-19

So many people Seth Marder spoke to didn't see the hand sanitizer crisis brewing. The country was going to run dangerously short if someone did not act urgently.

2h

Researchers uncover mysterious tanaids

Tanaids are one of the most underappreciated animals in the world. These small crustaceans can be found in virtually all marine benthic habitats, from mangroves, rocky shores and coral reefs along the coasts to mud volcanoes, cold seeps and trenches in the deepest oceans. They even inhabit the shell surfaces of sea turtles, live inside gastropod shells like hermit crabs, and reside under the skin

2h

Borrowing from robotics, scientists automate mapping of quantum systems

Scientists at the University of Sydney have adapted techniques from autonomous vehicles and robotics to efficiently assess the performance of quantum devices, an important process to help stabilize the emerging technologies.

2h

Fishing with Elders builds these children's Oji-Cree language, cultural knowledge and writing

In a northern Ontario First Nation community, a council member who also drove the children's school bus volunteered to take three primary teachers and their students to a nearby river. They had heard that the suckers were running. It was May, the time of the sucker moon; time for community members to harvest the fish.

2h

Study settles the score on whether the modern world is less violent

A study, by mathematicians at the University of York, has used new techniques to address the long-running debate over whether battle deaths have been declining globally since the end of the Second World War.

2h

Cholesterol levels dropping in Western nations but rising in Asia

Cholesterol levels are declining sharply in western nations, but rising in low- and middle-income nations – particularly in Asia, according to a study of global cholesterol levels, which involve researchers at the University of Gothenburg.

2h

Support drives fate of protected gold nanoclusters as catalysts

In collaboration with experimentalists from Ghent University, Belgium and Utrecht University, Netherlands, researchers at the Nanoscience Center (NSC) at the University of Jyväskylä, have recently discovered that the choice of a support material for model catalysts, made from gold nanoclusters protected by organic molecules, may have drastic effects on the structure of the catalyst.

2h

Summer favorite bitter gourd genome shows unusual domestication, insight into evolution

The genomic architecture of the Long-read bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) has been elucidated to show nonclassic domestication. This study provides valuable insight into evolution under human influence.

2h

Improved heat-resistant wheat varieties are identified

An international study, including researchers at the University of Cordoba, analyzed 54 genetically improved wheat genotypes from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center in order to determine which respond best to high temperatures

2h

Comforting, monitoring 7,600 COVID patients at home

How do you monitor thousands of patients who have COVID-19 symptoms but are not ill enough to come to the emergency department? How do you catch them before they seriously deteriorate? A new program does exactly that — and makes them feel cared about.

2h

Irregular findings common in knees of young competitive alpine skiers

Bony lesions on the lower part of the thigh bone near the knee are a common but benign finding on MRI in young alpine skiers and should not be confused with more serious conditions, according to a new study from Switzerland.

2h

Fishing with Elders builds these children's Oji-Cree language, cultural knowledge and writing

In a northern Ontario First Nation community, a council member who also drove the children's school bus volunteered to take three primary teachers and their students to a nearby river. They had heard that the suckers were running. It was May, the time of the sucker moon; time for community members to harvest the fish.

2h

With a 'catch-and-release' process, researchers advance graphene electronics

In recent years, atomically flat layered materials have gained significant attention due to their prospects for building high-speed and low-power electronics. Best known among those materials is graphene, a single sheet of carbon atoms. Among the unique qualities of this family of materials is that they can be stacked on top of each other like Lego pieces to create artificial electronic materials.

2h

What do 'Bohemian Rhapsody,' 'Macbeth,' and a list of Facebook friends all have in common?

To an English scholar or avid reader, the Shakespeare Canon represents some of the greatest literary works of the English language. To a network scientist, Shakespeare's 37 plays and the 884,421 words they contain also represent a massively complex communication network. Network scientists, who employ math, physics, and computer science to study vast and interconnected systems, are tasked with usi

2h

Feel the beat: implanted microlasers scan heart from inside

It sounds like science fiction—but lasers beating to the rhythm of a live heart is exactly what researchers at the University of St Andrews have developed to improve the understanding of heart failure and to help develop more effective treatments.

2h

Dancing stars and black holes in a cosmic cloud of gas: New research of the 'common envelope phase'

Most massive stars are born in binaries (and sometimes triples, quadruples, and so on). As stars age, they grow larger in size by a hundred-fold or even thousand-fold expansion. When stars in binaries expand, parts of them approach the other star in the binary, whose gravity can then pull off the outer portions of the expanding star. The result is mass transfer from one star to the other.

2h

Traits associated with increased risk of gun use among high-risk adolescents

Research out today identifies traits among high-risk adolescents associated with increased risk for gun use. Among high-risk adolescents, those with greater callous-unemotional traits were more likely to carry a gun and to use a gun during a crime over a four-year period following an initial arrest, according to a new study.

2h

Shining like a diamond: A new species of diamond frog from northern Madagascar

Despite the active ongoing taxonomic progress on the Madagascar frogs, the amphibian inventory of this hyper-diverse island is still very far from being complete. More new species are constantly being discovered, often within already well-studied areas. So, in one of the relatively well-studied parks in northern Madagascar, a new species of diamond frog, Rhombophryne ellae, was found in 2017.

2h

Turning faces into thermostats: Autonomous HVAC system could provide more comfort with less energy

As lockdown requirements ease, COVID-19 is changing the way we use indoor spaces. That presents challenges for those who manage those spaces, from homes to offices and factories.

2h

Patch that treats melanoma dissolves in 1 minute

A new wearable patch could help provide improved treatment for people with melanoma. Conventional melanoma therapies, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, suffer from the toxicity and side effects of repeated treatments due to the aggressive and recurrent nature of melanoma cells. Less invasive topical chemotherapies have emerged as alternatives, but the painful size of the microneedles and t

2h

FSSCat/Ф-sat-1 ready for launch

The first artificial intelligence to be carried onboard a European Earth observation mission will be launched this week from Europe's spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. The pioneering artificial intelligence technology named ɸ-sat-1, pronounced PhiSat-1, will be the first experiment to improve the efficiency of sending vast quantities of data back to Earth.

2h

Pass the shiraz, please: how Australia's wine industry can adapt to climate change

Many Australians enjoy a glass of homegrown wine, and A$2.78 billion worth is exported each year. But hotter, drier conditions under climate change means there are big changes ahead for our wine producers.

2h

Portable smartphone add-on can measure methanol in alcoholic beverages

A team of researchers and engineers from Particle Technology Laboratory, ETH Zurich and University Hospital Zurich has designed and built a palm-sized device that can measure the amount of methanol in an alcoholic beverage. In their paper published in the journal Nature Food, the researchers describe their device, how it works and how well it performed when tested.

2h

Police use-of-force policies fall short of human rights standards, report finds

Police use-of-force policies in the nation's 20 largest cities fail to meet international human rights standards, according to a new report from the University of Chicago Law School.

2h

Cheap Drug Appears to Cut COVID Deaths By 30 Percent

A drug used to reduce inflammation for a variety of conditions cuts the risk of death for COVID-19 patients on ventilators by a third, the BBC reports — an astonishing margin that could change the course of the world's battle against the pandemic. "This is the only drug so far that has been shown to reduce mortality — and it reduces it significantly," Martin Landray, professor of medicine and epi

2h

Become a Leader With This $25 Project Management Certification Bundle

"Project manager" is where the buck both starts and stops in organizations across the world, and it's a uniquely flexible title that gives you the tools to transition between industries and take a leadership role. The Project Management Certifications Tests + Courses Bundle will help you nab three of the most important certifications in the field for just $25. What Is A Project Manager? Project m

2h

Reopening schools requires major caution

A new analysis stresses the need for caution when when reopening America's schools. The authors advocate for large-scale viral testing in children, contract tracing, and other actions to avoid compounding the COVID-19 crisis. The analysis can serve as a roadmap not only in California but nationwide, according to Dan Cooper, professor of pediatrics at the University of California, Irvine. The reop

2h

How politics have played a big role in the release of prisoners

As governments around the world responded to the COVID-19 pandemic, they released prisoners in large numbers. The scale and scope of these releases are unprecedented, but this phenomenon is not new.

2h

Decade-long study shows why South Africa needs to stop stereotyping young black men

South Africa's Youth Day celebration on the 16th of June, just after my birthday on the 15th, remained a special day in my life as a young black man. But the day also raised questions for me. A lot gets said in the media about the youth of today, especially young black men who (unlike the young lions of 1976) are generally described and depicted as reckless, irresponsible, aggressive and violent.

2h

Researchers perform southern white rhino oocyte collection and embryo creation

In order to prevent the extinction of species such as the northern white rhino, the BioRescue consortium is developing new methods and technologies for conservation. An important part of this work is basic research in cooperation with zoological institutions. This partnership has enabled the BioRescue team to continue working even during the Corona pandemic. On May 26, 2020, the team extracted ooc

2h

Can implicit bias training help cops overcome racism?

Implicit bias can be disastrous when you're pressured into making quick decisions. (Unsplash/) Thirty police officers sat contemplating a deceptively simple question: at the scene of a car crash, why is it that the man dressed in a suit and driving a shiny BMW is usually more believable than the man wearing muddy jeans driving a pickup truck? It was late in 2018 at the New York Police Department,

2h

Amazingly Detailed Map Reveals How the Brain Changes With Aging

If a brain is our Earth, then we, as inhabitants, are individual brain cells. Just as our human relationships and connections can nudge, push, or dramatically shift societal values and consequences, the connections between neurons form intricate networks that dictate the outcome of your mind. Your thoughts, memories, behaviors; your values, world view, mental health—everything that makes you you

2h

Researchers perform southern white rhino oocyte collection and embryo creation

In order to prevent the extinction of species such as the northern white rhino, the BioRescue consortium is developing new methods and technologies for conservation. An important part of this work is basic research in cooperation with zoological institutions. This partnership has enabled the BioRescue team to continue working even during the Corona pandemic. On May 26, 2020, the team extracted ooc

2h

You Can Now Buy Spot the Robot Dog—If You've Got $74,500

Boston Dynamics is finally making its mechanical canine available for businesses and developers. But know that this puppy ain't for everyone.

2h

Dexamethasone Reduces Coronavirus Deaths, Scientists Say

A steroid, dexamethasone, is the first drug proven to reduce coronavirus-related deaths, according to scientists at the University of Oxford in Britain.

2h

All of the performance, none of the fuss: nitrile hydrogenation done right

The need to be mindful consumers is becoming a priority for an ever-growing portion of society. This means that achieving efficient and environmentally sustainable chemical processes is more important than ever before. One way of influencing reaction efficiency is catalysis. However, when choosing a catalyst there is often a need to trade-off different factors including performance and cost. Osaka

2h

Storm hunter turns two

The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor or ASIM, mounted outside the European laboratory of the International Space Station, enters its second year of science operations.

2h

Simba CubeSat to swivel from Earth to sun to help track climate change

Due to launch aboard Friday's Vega rocket, ESA's Simba CubeSat is a tiny mission with a big ambition: to measure one of the fundamental drivers of climate change in a new way. The 30-cm long nanosatellite will turn from Earth to space to the sun and back again, to calculate our planet's overall energy budget.

2h

PICASSO, ESA's CubeSat to sift secrets from sunrise

There is always a sunrise and sunset happening somewhere on our planet. Soon ESA's newest CubeSat—flying aboard Europe's Vega launcher this Friday—will be keeping watch. The miniature PICASSO mission will use the filtering of sunlight by Earth's atmosphere to check the health of our protective ozone layer.

2h

Study finds depression associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease

A new study co-led by Simon Fraser University health sciences professor Scott Lear provides further evidence of the link between depressive symptoms and an increased risk of heart disease and early death.

2h

Susceptibility to carcinogens varies due to genetics

A new study led by Michele Carbone of the University of Hawai'i Cancer Center looks into how and why certain individuals develop cancer and others do not.

2h

Two new, powerful small molecules may be able to kill cancers that other therapies can't

Scientists have identified and developed two potent small molecules that appear to suppress tumor growth in multiple cancers even when other treatments cease to work, possibly due to the development of drug resistance. Called CS1 and CS2, these cancer inhibitor compounds are part of a protein known as "fat mass and obesity-associated protein." This FTO protein plays a critical role in cancer devel

2h

Wearable patch may provide new treatment option for skin cancer

Innovators have created a novel wearable patch to provide an improved treatment experience for people with melanoma. The researchers developed a novel wearable patch with fully miniaturized needles, enabling unobtrusive drug delivery through the skin for the management of skin cancers.

2h

Almost 90% of astronauts have been men. But the future of space may be female

Only 566 people have ever travelled to space. Sixty-five of them, or about 11.5%, were women.

2h

Combining magnetic data storage and logic

Computers normally store and process data in separate modules. But now researchers at ETH Zurich and the Paul Scherrer Institute have developed a method that allows logical operations to be performed directly within a memory element.

2h

Listen: An Extremely Bizarre Plan to Play Basketball

On March 11, the NBA abruptly shut down its season after one of its players tested positive for COVID-19. Now, even though the pandemic isn't behind us, the league has announced a plan to restart the season. Joel Anderson, a Slate staff writer and a co-host of the podcast Hang Up and Listen , joins James Hamblin and Katherine Wells to explain what's going on with the NBA. Listen to the episode he

2h

Study finds 82 percent of avocado oil rancid or mixed with other oils

Consumer demand is rising for all things avocado, including oil made from the fruit. Avocado oil is a great source of vitamins, minerals and the type of fats associated with reducing the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. But according to new research from food science experts at the University of California, Davis, the vast majority of avocado oil sold in the U.S. is of poor quality, mis

2h

We were warned what to expect in the pandemic, shows health-care league table

Nature, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01748-0 Germany and Taiwan top a ranking drawn up pre-crisis by architect of US Affordable Care Act; United States trails behind.

2h

New discovery paves way for next generation malaria vaccine

New findings pave the way for a novel, next generation genetically attenuated parasite (GAP) vaccine against the deadliest form of malaria in humans.

2h

All of the performance, none of the fuss: Nitrile hydrogenation done right

Researchers developed a nano-cobalt phosphide catalyst (nano-Co 2 P) for the hydrogenation of nitriles to primary amines. The catalyst was stable in air and achieved activity up to 500-fold higher than other catalysts. A range of nitriles were hydrogenated at ambient pressure, making nano-Co 2 P the first earth-abundant metal catalyst to be effective under mild conditions. It will have a significa

2h

Amyloid formation in the International Space Station

The collaborative research team of Japan using the International Space Station (ISS) successfully characterized Alzheimer's disease-related amyloid fibril formation under microgravity conditions. Their findings demonstrated that amyloid fibril formation on the ISS is significantly slower than that on the Earth. Moreover, microgravity promoted the formation of distinct morphologies of amyloid fibri

2h

Borrowing from robotics, scientists automate mapping of quantum systems

Riddhi Gupta has taken an algorithm used for autonomous vehicles and adapted it to help characterise and stabilise quantum technology.

2h

Carpet shell clams reveal high levels of pollution in several coastal lagoons in Tunisia

The clams with the greatest levels of heavy metals come from lagoons in which the water temperature is higher, according to a University of Cordoba study

2h

NUS researchers uncover mysterious tanaids

Research Associate Mr Chim Chee Kong and Research Assistant Ms Samantha Tong from the Tropical Marine Science Institute at the National University of Singapore are on a quest to discover more of the still nameless tanaids, specifically in the relatively species-rich but poorly studied tropical Indo-Pacific.

2h

Black hole's heart still beating

The first confirmed heartbeat of a supermassive black hole is still going strong more than ten years after first being observed. X-ray satellite observations spotted the repeated beat after its signal had been blocked by our Sun for a number of years.

2h

A new family of nanocars ready for the next nano Grand Prix

A collaboration of researchers in France and Japan has developed a new family of nanocars ready to compete on a gold surface against the 9 other teams selected for the 2nd Nanocar Race in 2021.

2h

Otago researchers discover the origins of the beloved guinea pig

New University of Otago research sheds light on guinea pig domestication and how and why the small, furry animals became distributed around the world.

2h

Racial discrimination ingrained in jury selection, law school report finds

An eye-opening report from Berkeley Law's Death Penalty Clinic finds that racial discrimination is a consistent aspect of jury selection in California. The exhaustive study investigates the history, legacy, and ongoing practice of excluding people of color—especially African Americans—from state juries through prosecutors' peremptory challenges.

2h

It's never too early to talk with children about race

Infants as young as six months old can recognize differences in skin color. By age two and a half, research has shown, children prefer playmates who are similar in race and gender. And as early as age three, they are forming judgments about people based on racial differences.

2h

Study settles the score on whether the modern world is less violent

While the first half of the twentieth century marked a period of extraordinary violence, the world has become more peaceful in the past 30 years, a new statistical analysis of the global death toll from war suggests.

2h

Researchers study New Zealand's long history of decapitations and paint attacks on public statues

Controversy over public statues is nothing new, with protestors taking to New Zealand's statues with a range of weapons including an axe, a concrete cutter and a hammer over recent decades, a study by researchers from the University of Otago, Wellington, has found.

2h

Researchers discover the origins of the beloved guinea pig

New University of Otago research sheds light on guinea pig domestication and how and why the small, furry animals became distributed around the world.

2h

Could Africa have a sustainable palm industry?

Palm plantations are associated with deforestation and ecological harm, but researchers are pointing to ways things can be done differently in Africa.

2h

Focused approach to policing could reduce gun violence

A new report from the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research at the Bloomberg School of Public Health finds that broad "stop-and-search" practices used for many years by Baltimore police to look for illegally possessed guns have minimal, if any, impact on gun violence. These practices also result in mental and physical harm to those who are unjustifiably searched and serve to undermine c

2h

New technique for polymer manufacturing with reduced solvents aimed at vehicle, packaging production

A team of Purdue University innovators hopes its new technology provides a more business-friendly option to utilize sustainable cellulose nanomaterials for use in vehicles, food packaging and other manufactured items.

2h

Study finds 82 percent of avocado oil rancid or mixed with other oils

Consumer demand is rising for all things avocado, including oil made from the fruit. Avocado oil is a great source of vitamins, minerals and the type of fats associated with reducing the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. But according to new research from food science experts at the University of California, Davis, the vast majority of avocado oil sold in the U.S. is of poor quality, mis

2h

Scientists find clues to solar variability in observations of other stars

One of the fundamental questions for climate scientists is the extent to which solar output may vary in the future. The sun's all-encompassing effect on Earth's atmosphere means that even slight changes in irradiance can have significant implications for global climate.

2h

Low-Cost Drug Reduces Coronavirus Deaths, Scientists Say

A steroid, dexamethasone, is the first drug proven to reduce coronavirus-related deaths, according to scientists at the University of Oxford in Britain.

2h

Scientists propose explanation for baffling form of childhood OCD

Scientists may have found a cause for the sudden onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in some children, they report. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders, or PANDAS, were first proposed in the 1990s. Thought to be triggered by streptococcal infections, they account for an unknown portion of youth OCD cases. But the biology underpinning this disorder has baffled scientists.

2h

A fractional corner anomaly reveals higher-order topology

Topological insulators (TIs) have an insulating interior and support conducting surface states with additional interfacing properties. The exotic metallic states on their surfaces can provide new routes to generate new phases and particles with potential applications in quantum computing and spintronics. Researchers have developed a theoretical framework to help identify and characterize such exot

2h

Highlights from the July 2020 Issue from a New Editor in Chief

Neutrinos, weather forecasts, the trouble with weight-centric medicine, a coronavirus close-up, and more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Professoren med hjertestarteren på rette sted

Fredrik Folke har om nogen bidraget til at bringe behandlingen af hjertestop uden for hospitalernes trygge rammer fremad, ikke mindst ved brug af teknologi. Indsatsen har nu gjort ham til professor.

3h

Academic warns deep sea mining activity could affect CO2 absorption rates in ocean ecosystems

A leading marine scientist from Heriot-Watt University took the opportunity of a lifetime to dive to the bottom of the ocean.

3h

Tomography studies of coins shed light on the history of Volga Bulgaria

Kazan Federal University, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), and Khalikov Institute of Archeology (Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, Kazan, Russia) are working together to study the physical properties of the coins found on the territory of former Volga Bulgaria.

3h

World's most complete health analysis of nesting sea turtles conducted in Florida

The most comprehensive health assessment for a green turtle rookery in the world to date is providing critical insights into various aspects of physiology, biology, and herpesvirus epidemiology of this nesting population. Findings are hopeful for this population of green sea turtles in southeastern Florida, offer important data on the profile of health for future comparative investigations, and su

3h

Exercise offers 'profound' benefits for Friedreich's ataxia, research suggests

Well-timed exercise programs may slow the progression of Friedreich's ataxia, which robs patients of their ability to walk, new research suggests.

3h

Effect of high-deductible insurance use in bipolar disorder

A new study led by the Department of Population Medicine finds that individuals with bipolar disorder who switched to high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) experienced a moderate decrease in nonpsychiatrist mental health outpatient visits, but rates of psychiatrist visits, medication use, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations did not change. The study, 'Effect of High-deductible Insuran

3h

Streamlined and scalable CHANGE-Seq method improves understanding of genome editors

Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have developed an easy to use, sensitive and high-throughput method to define sites of unintended double stranded breaks in DNA caused by genome editors like the CRISPR-Cas9 technique. They called the method Circularization for High-throughput Analysis of Nuclease Genome-wide Effects by Sequencing (CHANGE-seq). The work appears as an advance onli

3h

Fitbit-like devices used to save turtles in Australia

Researchers from Murdoch University are using Fitbit-like technology to monitor the activity of flatback turtles to inform better conservation management practices.

3h

Crop residue decisions affect soil life between planting seasons

After harvest in the fall, farmers take the harvested crops to market or store them on their farm. They don't take the whole plant from the field, though. The leftover parts of the plant, like the stalk and leaves from corn, remain in the field. This debris is called crop residue.

3h

A quantum metrology protocol for locating noncooperative targets in 3-D space

Radar technology, which stands for radio detection and ranging, has been around for several decades and has a wide range of real-world applications. Radar is currently used to detect targets or other objects in many settings. For instance, it is employed during military and aerospace operations to determine the location, range, angle and/or velocity of aircrafts, ships, spacecrafts, missiles or ot

3h

Streamlined and scalable CHANGE-Seq method improves understanding of genome editors

Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have developed an easy to use, sensitive and high-throughput method to define sites of unintended double stranded breaks in DNA caused by genome editors like the CRISPR-Cas9 technique. They called the method Circularization for High-throughput Analysis of Nuclease Genome-wide Effects by Sequencing (CHANGE-seq). The work appears as an advance onli

3h

Appetite for fast fashion goes out of style when people learn about impact of mass-produced clothing, study shows

Learning in groups how to make, mend, and modify clothing reduces the appetite for fast fashion, a new study shows.

3h

Sulfur provides promising 'next-gen' battery alternative

With the increasing demand for affordable and sustainable energy, the ongoing development of batteries with a high energy density is vital. Lithium-sulfur batteries have attracted the attention of academic researchers and industry professionals alike due to their high energy density, low cost, abundance, nontoxicity and sustainability. However, Li-sulfur batteries tend to have poor cycle life and

3h

Fitbit-like devices used to save turtles in Australia

Researchers from Murdoch University are using Fitbit-like technology to monitor the activity of flatback turtles to inform better conservation management practices.

3h

Study projects more intense rain during future hurricanes

Climate models by team of researchers at the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) at Stony Brook University predict that future tropical cyclones, or hurricanes, will feature more intense rain, with more rain produced per hour than previous storms. Published early online in Geophysical Research Letters, the study suggests that while rain intensity is likely to increase the number of s

3h

Crop residue decisions affect soil life between planting seasons

After harvest in the fall, farmers take the harvested crops to market or store them on their farm. They don't take the whole plant from the field, though. The leftover parts of the plant, like the stalk and leaves from corn, remain in the field. This debris is called crop residue.

3h

Ultraviolet laser induces color centers in ytterbium-doped silica glasses

Ytterbium-doped silica fiber (YDF) has important applications in material processing and scientific research. The photodarkening (PD) effect, which originates from the formation of color centers, can decrease the laser output power over 1,000 h by about 10% and will seriously restrict the power stability of the fiber laser. However, the nature of the PD color centers has not been adequately elucid

3h

Novel redshift mechanism of Ce3+ emission in Ce

As the most commonly used color phosphor in w-LEDs, Ce: Y3Al5O12 (Ce: YAG) makes an almost perfect match with blue chips to convert blue light into yellow light and obtain white light. But unfortunately, the deficiency of the red component in the mixed white light makes the light quality too poor to meet the standards of modern lighting. The redshift of Ce3+ emission in Ce: YAG is of high interest

3h

Four in five fund managers believe stocks 'overvalued', survey finds

Market optimism is fragile after rapid recovery from coronavirus-related sell-off

3h

Researchers fabricate functionalized black phosphorus nanosheets for circulating tumor DNA detection

Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) refers to DNA found in the bloodstream that comes from cancerous cells and tumors. CtDNA identification is one of the most meaningful approaches to early cancer diagnosis. However, there are few effective and practical methods for analyzing this emerging class of biomarkers.

3h

A Visual Guide to the SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus

What scientists know about the inner workings of the pathogen that has infected the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Highlights from the July 2020 Issue from a New Editor in Chief

Neutrinos, weather forecasts, the trouble with weight-centric medicine, a coronavirus close-up, and more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Cheap generic steroid significantly cuts Covid-19 mortality rates

Scientists hail breakthrough as dexamethasone found to reduce deaths by one-third in ventilated patients

3h

#ShutDownSTEM strike was a start, but real action on racism is needed

After various scientific institutions pledged support during the strike against racism in science, many Black academics want to see real action

3h

Researchers fabricate functionalized black phosphorus nanosheets for circulating tumor DNA detection

Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) refers to DNA found in the bloodstream that comes from cancerous cells and tumors. CtDNA identification is one of the most meaningful approaches to early cancer diagnosis. However, there are few effective and practical methods for analyzing this emerging class of biomarkers.

3h

Temperature has significant influence on air pollution in wintertime

Coal-fired central heating is widely used in the winter in northeast China, and the consumption of fossil fuels for winter heating could produce a large number of fine particulates, sulfides and nitrogen oxides, which aggravates the air pollution situation in northeast China in winter.

3h

Quantum cryptography keys for secure communication distributed 1,000 kilometers farther than previous attempts

The exchange of a secret key for encrypting and decrypting messages over a distance of 1,120 kilometers is reported in Nature this week. This achievement is made using entanglement-based quantum key distribution, a theoretically secure communication technique. Previous attempts to directly distribute quantum keys between two ground users under real-world conditions have reached distances of only a

3h

French cave reveals secrets of life and death from the ancient past

Grotte de Cussac cave in Dordogne, France, is the site of stunning cave art, containing more than 800 figurative engravings of animals and humans that are between 25,000 and 30,000 years old.

3h

Remains excavated of strategy board game from the Roman Iron Age

This April, researchers from the University Museum of Bergen excavated the remains of a small Early Iron Age grave cairn at Ytre Fosse, Western Norway. The location is spectacular, overlooking Alversund and the "Indre Skipsleia," a part of the old shipping lane, Nordvegen, which gave Norway its name. The whole area is dotted with monumental grave mounds on both sides of Alversund, symbols of an Ir

3h

ExoMars spots unique green glow at the Red Planet

ESA's ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has detected glowing green oxygen in Mars' atmosphere—the first time that this emission has been seen around a planet other than Earth.

3h

Solar Orbiter makes first close approach to the sun

ESA's sun-exploring mission Solar Orbiter has made its first close approach to the star on June 15, getting as close as 77 million kilometers to its surface, about half the distance between the sun and Earth.

3h

Coffee, cocoa and vanilla: an opportunity for more trees with tropical agroforestry

The cultivation of coffee, cocoa and vanilla secures the income of many small-holder farmers and is also a driver of land-use change in many tropical countries. In particular, cultivation in agroforestry systems, in which these crops are combined with trees that provide shade, is often considered to have great potential for ecologically sustainable cultivation. Researchers at the University of Göt

3h

Red Sea plankton communities ebb and flow with the seasons

The communities of tiny picoplankton in oceans reveal a great deal about the health of marine ecosystems and food webs. KAUST researchers have examined how numbers of these organisms vary across the year in both coastal and offshore locations in the Red Sea, while investigating the predators and viruses that control them.

3h

The Two Forms of Mathematical Beauty

A time-honored practice in mathematical circles is to divide the field in two. There's the traditional "applied versus pure" argument, which mirrors the experimental-theoretical divide of other disciplines — the tension between advancing knowledge toward a specific end and doing it for its own sake. Or we can bisect mathematics in the same way that our brain is split, with an algebraic "left hemi

3h

This supernova 'pizza' in a lab mimics the cosmic blast's splendid aftermath

Nestled in the constellation Taurus, a spectacle of swirling cosmic gasses measuring half a dozen lightyears across glows in shades of emerald and auburn. The Crab Nebula was born of a supernova, the explosion of a giant star, and now, a lab machine the size of a double door replicates how the immense blasts paint the astronomical swirls into existence.

3h

Evidence for volcanic craters on Saturn's moon Titan

Volcano-like features seen in polar regions of Saturn's moon Titan by NASA's Cassini spacecraft could be evidence of explosive eruptions that may continue today, according to a new paper by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Charles A. Wood and coauthor Jani Radebaugh of Brigham Young University.

3h

Dark Energy Survey detects thousands of low-surface-brightness galaxies

An international team of astronomers has identified nearly 21,000 low-surface-brightness galaxies (LSBGs) in the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The detection of such a huge sample could be essential to improving our knowledge about how LSBGs form and evolve. The finding is reported in a paper published June 8 on arXiv.org.

3h

Coffee, cocoa and vanilla: an opportunity for more trees with tropical agroforestry

The cultivation of coffee, cocoa and vanilla secures the income of many small-holder farmers and is also a driver of land-use change in many tropical countries. In particular, cultivation in agroforestry systems, in which these crops are combined with trees that provide shade, is often considered to have great potential for ecologically sustainable cultivation. Researchers at the University of Göt

3h

Red Sea plankton communities ebb and flow with the seasons

The communities of tiny picoplankton in oceans reveal a great deal about the health of marine ecosystems and food webs. KAUST researchers have examined how numbers of these organisms vary across the year in both coastal and offshore locations in the Red Sea, while investigating the predators and viruses that control them.

3h

Virus frodas hos fästingar i varma fladdermusgrottor

Infektionssjukdomar som sprids av till exempel mygg, svidknott och fästingar kallas vektorburna sjukdomar och har globalt sett mycket stor betydelse både för djur- och folkhälsa. Till dessa sjukdomar räknas bland annat de allvarliga virussjukdomarna Dengue-feber, West Nile-feber och Rift Valley fever. För att begränsa vektorburna sjukdomar behöver vi öka kunskapen om vilka virus fästingar bär på

3h

Composers Are Ditching Hollywood—to Make Videogame Music

Films were once the most coveted medium, but talented composers now view games on an equal footing.

3h

Ripple20 Bugs Put Hundreds of Millions of IoT Devices at Risk

The so-called Ripple20 vulnerabilities affect equipment found in data centers, power grids, and more.

3h

Treatment plan helps keep young cancer patients home

An Australian program that avoids hospital admission for some young cancer patients with a fever is helping to ease pressure on the UK health system during the COVID-19 crisis. The AUS-rule system, now published in E Clinical Med, guides doctors when deciding whether patients can be treated and supported at home.

3h

All Black Holes Should Sport Light Rings

Theoretical astrophysicists predict that a glowing halo just outside the event horizon should surround all black holes. bh_accretiondisk_sim_stationary_websize.gif A NASA visualization of how a black hole warps light with its presence. Image credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center /Jeremy Schnittman Space Tuesday, June 16, 2020 – 09:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — When the blac

3h

A Visual Guide to the SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus

What scientists know about the inner workings of the pathogen that has infected the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Failure fails as publisher privileges the privileged

Is too much irony even a thing? Let's test the principle. The guest editor of a special issue on failures in public health and related projects has quit the effort because she and her colleagues couldn't convince the journal to include more researchers from developing countries in the initiative. In a blog post about the … Continue reading

3h

These Scientists Hunt for Viruses in Animals Before They Strike Humans

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers were searching for potential human pathogens in wild animals. They've found thousands

3h

Cats wreak havoc on native wildlife, but we've found one adorable species outsmarting them

Feral and pet cats are responsible for a huge part of Australia's shameful mammal extinction record. Small and medium-sized ground-dwelling mammals are most susceptible.

3h

Styrkelse af patientsikkerheden kræver et trygt personale

Styrelsens for Patientsikkerheds tilsyn skal have den rette balance, så det er trygt at være patient og personale. Det kræver plads og accept af det lægelige skøn, skriver Christina Frøslev-Friis

3h

Why is the stock market doing well during COVID-19?

Stock market trends during the COVID-19 pandemic may not have been as illogical as they appeared, according to new preliminary research. As the COVID-19 outbreak spread in March, stock market prices plunged. Then, in a move that seemed irrational to some observers, markets bounced back. Why would stock prices increase even when the number of COVID-19 cases in the country was continuing to rise? I

3h

Cats wreak havoc on native wildlife, but we've found one adorable species outsmarting them

Feral and pet cats are responsible for a huge part of Australia's shameful mammal extinction record. Small and medium-sized ground-dwelling mammals are most susceptible.

3h

Steroid found to help prevent deaths of sickest coronavirus patients

Trial shows dexamethasone responsible for survival of one in eight patients on ventilators Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A cheap steroid has become the first life-saving treatment in the Covid-19 pandemic, described by scientists as a major breakthrough and raising hopes for the survival of thousands of the most seriously ill. Dexamethasone is cheap, available from

3h

Nyt bølgekraftkoncept står fast: »Jeg tror simpelthen ikke på konstruktioner, der ligger i overfladen«

PLUS. Bølgekraft skal ikke ligge i overfladen, men stå solidt på havbunden. Dansk koncept satser på at kunne producere rent vand og el på det globale marked.

4h

Why Do People Avoid Facts That Could Help Them?

Several studies suggest that individuals widely prefer to remain ignorant about information that would benefit them when it's painful—and sometimes when it's pleasurable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

The 2008 recession cut voter turnout. This fall, too?

Hundreds of thousands of Americans hit by the 2008 recession avoided participating in subsequent elections, a new study finds. The same phenomenon could happen this November as the United States experiences historic levels of unemployment , says study author Ben McCartney, an assistant professor of finance at Purdue University. With so much financial distress on their plate, voting could be the l

4h

Otillräckligt renat avloppsvatten hot mot hälsan

Avloppsvattnet måste renas från antibiotikaresistenta bakterier, menar Faisal Ahmad Khan som nu lägger fram sin avhandling vid Örebro universitet. Hans forskargrupp var först i Sverige med att hitta bakterier, som är resistenta även mot nya sorters antibiotika, i vattendrag och sjöar. – Det räcker inte att begränsa förskrivningen av antibiotika för att stoppa antibiotikaresistensen. Reningen av a

4h

China pressed on Mekong dams after record low water levels

China was pressed Tuesday to show more transparency over its dam operations on the Mekong River, months after downstream water levels hit record lows and threatened millions of livelihoods.

4h

Rising sea levels may have helped dinosaurs dominate the planet

A vast floodplain was drowned by rising seas 227 million years ago and this could have created the ecological conditions for dinosaurs to become more common

4h

Global total of confirmed coronavirus cases has passed 8 million

The global total of confirmed covid-19 cases has passed 8 million, but we are still only in the beginning stages of the pandemic

4h

How Did We Get Here?

America recently passed the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first captive Africans brought to what would become the United States. September 2019 was chosen as an imperfect but significant date to mark the start of American slavery and the systems of inequality perpetuated by the nation's original sin. For 163 years, The Atlantic has discussed, argued, and analyzed America, its lofty idea

4h

Eight ways to cut down on your monthly subscriptions

How much are infinite skips anyway? ( Omid Armin / Unsplash/) It's amazing how quickly a few subscriptions can add up. $16 for Netflix here, $10 for Spotify there, $10 more for that new platform everyone's talking about, and before you know it, you've racked up $100 or more in monthly costs. If that portion of your budget has gone a little out of control, it may be time to take a strategic look a

4h

The Stats on Police Killings

During the current national attention being paid to police practice and inequities of police killing of African Americans it is important to put the data that we have into as much context as possible, in order to understand the phenomenon and make sure that our efforts to improve the situation are properly targeted. Unfortunately, the data are complex, which makes it easy to see what one wants to

4h

The Best Smart Plugs (2020): Plugs, Power Strips, and More

An internet-connected plug can give any basic appliance a brain. Here are our favorites, from Wyze to TP-Link Kasa, and a few we don't like.

4h

The Auto Industry Is Wrecked—Let's Rebuild It With Electric

It's the perfect time for a transportation revolution: the Green-Car New Deal.

4h

Why Do People Avoid Facts That Could Help Them?

Several studies suggest that individuals widely prefer to remain ignorant about information that would benefit them when it's painful—and sometimes when it's pleasurable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Germany launches coronavirus app to immediate criticism

Data protection commissioner says privacy changes are needed urgently

4h

Sanofi to build vaccine plant and research centre in France

Group's €610m investment comes as race to develop treatments becomes increasingly political

4h

The Pandemic Broke End-of-Life Care

(Jim Goldberg / Magnum) When the coronavirus came to Boston, doctors at Brigham and Women's Hospital noticed how silent certain floors became. Any patients who could be discharged were discharged. Anyone who could stay away stayed away. "The hospital had this eerie quiet," says Jane deLima Thomas, the director of palliative care at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Bu

4h

En eller mange tråde i debatterne?

Når vi spørger læserne på ing om deres holdning til indholdet på sitet, bliver debatten ofte fremhævet som et indholdselement, der vægter lige så meget som det journalistiske indhold. Mange læsere kommer primært for at følge, hvad fagfolk skriver i brugerdebatten om de aktuelle teknologiske nyhed…

4h

Lægestafetten: Sundhedsvæsenet har vist sig fra sin bedste side under coronaepidemien

Kardiolog Ulrik Dixen har under coronaepidemien været spændt hårdt for, men glæder sig til at kigge nærmere på alle de nye ting, lægerne har lært i perioden. Hvis han ikke skulle være læge, skulle han være journalist eller kommentere cykelløb med Jørgen Leth.

5h

Using Poetry to Combat Loneliness and Social Isolation

The Hope Storytelling Project uses introspective writing and open group discussions to address feelings of loneliness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Using Poetry to Combat Loneliness and Social Isolation

The Hope Storytelling Project uses introspective writing and open group discussions to address feelings of loneliness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Australian fossil reveals new plant species

Antoine Champreux, a Ph.D. student in the Global Ecology Lab at Flinders University, has cataloged the discovery of the new fern-like plant species as part of an international effort to examine the Australian fossil in greater detail.

5h

5h

African Countries Scramble to Ramp up Testing for COVID-19

Nations in the continent, which have had to import testing supplies and bid against richer countries, are trying to develop their own tests — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

African Countries Scramble to Ramp up Testing for COVID-19

Nations in the continent, which have had to import testing supplies and bid against richer countries, are trying to develop their own tests — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The cosmic web that connects galaxies together may be spinning

Galaxies across the universe are connected by bridge-like filaments of matter that are the largest structures in the cosmos, and they seem to be spinning

5h

Don't Believe the China Hype

The coronavirus pandemic seems to cement the notion that China is replacing the United States as the world's premier economic superpower. Should we have expected anything else? After all, as the conventional wisdom goes, the Chinese make everything; Americans just pack the stuff into Amazon boxes. Beijing plays the long game; we can't think beyond the next election or quarterly earnings report. C

5h

Despise Bolton, but Read His Book Anyway

Former National Security Adviser John Bolton—or, as he once insisted on calling himself on Twitter, #JohnBolton —has a book coming out. According to his publisher , the memoir will be the "most comprehensive and substantial account of the Trump Administration," a chronicle of a "President addicted to chaos, who embraced our enemies and spurned our friends, and was deeply suspicious of his own gov

5h

Working in the sun — heating of the head may markedly affect safety and performance

Prolonged exposure of the head to strong sunlight significantly impairs cognitively dominated functions and coordination of complex motor tasks shows a new study from the Heat-Shield project coordinated by researchers from Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at University of Copenhagen. This may have important implications for work safety and productivity.

6h

Australian fossil reveals new plant species

Fresh examination of an Australian fossil — believed to be among the earliest plants on Earth — has revealed evidence of a new plant species that existed in Australia more than 359 Million years ago.

6h

Live Coronavirus Updates

Retail sales rebounded in May after a record drop in April. The number of U.S. inmates known to be infected has doubled during the past month, to more than 68,000. The virus flares in Beijing.

6h

På Frihedsmuseet går gæsterne under jorden

Udstillingslokalerne er henlagt til kælderen i det nye museum som en hilsen til den modstandsbevægelse, det skildrer. Men arkitektens idé gjorde byggeprocessen langstrakt, dyr og besværlig.

6h

We Can Protect the Economy From Pandemics. Why Didn't We?

A virologist helped crack an impossible problem: how to insure against the economic fallout from devastating viral outbreaks. The plan was ingenious. Yet we're still in this mess.

6h

Why America's Institutions Are Failing

T he pandemic and the police protests, the twin crises of this horrendous year, might initially seem to have nothing to do with each other. In some ways, they are totally opposite cataclysms. The COVID-19 outbreak, which demanded a swift and efficient response, revealed a discombobulated country painfully slow to deploy its arsenal of health interventions. The killing of George Floyd—like the att

6h

Crocodiles' ancient ancestors may have walked on two legs

Researchers identified a series of 9-inch-long prints as belonging to an extinct ancestor of the modern crocodile. The animal appeared to walk on two feet. (Anthony Romilio, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia/) More than 100 million years ago, an ancestor of today's alligators and crocodiles wandered through present-day South Korea on its hind limbs, scientists announced June 11 in

6h

Europe pushes ahead with 'dune buggy' Mars rover

Airbus-UK wins a contract to advance the design of a robot for the Red Planet with four big wheels.

6h

Police Use of High-Tech Surveillance Amplifies Bias and Overreach

Recent history and research warn that technology cannot address the deeper issues of race, power, and privacy that lie at the heart of modern-day policing. But as protesters nationwide call for changes to address structural racism, law enforcement may be tempted to invest even further in flawed technology.

6h

Rörelsemätare ska visa hur covid-19 påverkar vardagen för äldre

De som lyckas komma upp ur sängen, är det också de som blir snabbast friska från covid-19? Forskare i Malmö ska försöka ringa in fysisk aktivitet bland covid-19-sjuka med vård och omsorg i hemmet. Små platta rörelsemätare – snubblometrar – ligger redo att användas för den som vill delta i studien. Nu sätts Malmö stads covid-19-team under lupp av Lunds universitet i en snabbinkallad forskarstudie.

6h

Hunting in savanna-like landscapes may have poured jet fuel on brain evolution

Compared to the vast emptiness of open water, land is rife with obstacles and occlusions. By providing prey with spaces to hide and predators with cover for sneak attacks, the habitats possible on land may have helped give rise to planning strategies — rather than those based on habit — for many of those animals.

7h

Emmanuel Macron in search of renewed reformist zeal

France is handling the deconfinement better than the medical emergency

7h

Heterostructures formed through abraded van der Waals materials

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16717-4 Low-cost, mass-scalable production routes which preserve the quality of the single crystals are required to up-scale van der Waals materials. Here, the authors demonstrate an approach to realise a variety of functional heterostructures based on van der Waals nanocrystal films produced through the mechanical abra

7h

Spatial planning with long visual range benefits escape from visual predators in complex naturalistic environments

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16102-1 Habitat complexity influences the sensory ecology of predator-prey interactions. Here, the authors show that habitat complexity also affects the use of different decision-making paradigms, namely habit- and plan-based action selection. Simulations across habitat types show that only savanna-like terrestrial habi

7h

Central circuit mechanisms of itch

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16859-5 Itch is an important somatosensation, but the central mechanisms underlying it are not fully understood. Here, Chen and Sun review recent studies on the spinal and supraspinal circuits involved in itch processing.

7h

Hepatic HuR modulates lipid homeostasis in response to high-fat diet

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16918-x Human antigen R (HuR) is a RNA binding protein involved in the regulation of many cellular functions. Here the authors show that, hepatocyte specific deletion of HuR exacerbates high-fat diet-induced NAFLD in mice by regulating transcripts involved in lipid transport and ATP synthesis.

7h

Single-cell lineage tracing by integrating CRISPR-Cas9 mutations with transcriptomic data

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16821-5 Lineage tracing studies combining CRISPR-Cas9 editing and scRNA-seq face several challenges and cannot integrate lineages from multiple individuals. Here the authors show that integration of mutation and expression leads to accurate lineage tree inference and enables the learning of a species-invariant lineage t

7h

Recurrent horizontal transfer identifies mitochondrial positive selection in a transmissible cancer

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16765-w The competitive dynamics of mitochondrial haplotypes juxtaposed within the same cell are poorly studied. Here the authors show, in the context of a transmissible cancer, that one haplotype has recurrently entered cancer cells by horizontal transfer and appears to have a 'selfish' selective advantage.

7h

Surface regulation enables high stability of single-crystal lithium-ion cathodes at high voltage

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16824-2 Performance improvement of cathode materials represents one of the most critical technological challenges for lithium-ion batteries. Here the authors show a close correlation between surface chemistry and phase distribution from homogeneity to heterogeneity, and its impact on the cyclic performance.

7h

Imaging the kinetics of anisotropic dissolution of bimetallic core–shell nanocubes using graphene liquid cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16645-3 Rational design of multicomponent nanocrystals requires atomic-level understanding of reaction kinetics. Here, the authors apply single-particle liquid-cell electron microscopy imaging coupled with atomistic simulations to understand pathways and rates of bimetallic core-shell nanocubes undergoing oxidative diss

7h

Countries from Germany to Vietnam got test and trace right, so why didn't England? | David McCoy

The government was shown how to contain coronavirus – but chose to prioritise centralised control and private interests Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Most people agree that England's handling of the Covid-19 crisis has been slow and disorganised; a fact made worse by the government's willingness to squander public trust by massaging data and spinning the facts to s

7h

Single-Cell Proteomics Reveals Immune Responses to COVID-19: Proteomic and Genomic Findings from the Seattle Consortium

James R. Heath, President of the Institute for Systems Biology, and Stacey Willard from IsoPlexis will discuss how functional phenotyping individual immune cells using IsoPlexis technology edges researchers closer to predicting the risk for severe disease.

7h

Location biases in ecological research on Australian terrestrial reptiles

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66719-x

7h

Minimum Number of Settlers for Survival on Another Planet

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66740-0

7h

Maternal Work and Spontaneous Preterm Birth: A Multicenter Observational Study in Brazil

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66231-2

7h

Germline HOXB13 mutations p.G84E and p.R217C do not confer an increased breast cancer risk

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65665-y

7h

The utilization of seawater for the hydrolysis of macroalgae and subsequent bioethanol fermentation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66610-9

7h

Exogenous melatonin advances the ram breeding season and increases testicular function

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66594-6

7h

A Bio-Based Resin for a Multi-Scale Optical 3D Printing

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66618-1

7h

Tunable resistivity of correlated VO2(A) and VO2(B) via tungsten doping

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66439-2 Tunable resistivity of correlated VO 2 (A) and VO 2 (B) via tungsten doping

7h

Hunting in savanna-like landscapes may have poured jet fuel on brain evolution

Ever wonder how land animals like humans evolved to become smarter than their aquatic ancestors? You can thank the ground you walk on.

7h

Scientists Warn Against Consumer Protection Nominee

Nancy Beck is the Trump administration's nominee to lead the Consumer Product Safety Commission for a seven-year term. Many scientists and public health experts warn she is a dangerous choice. (Image credit: U.S. Senate/Screenshot by NPR)

7h

Racism, Hazing And Other Abuse Taints Medical Training, Students Say

More than 35% of students surveyed experienced mistreatment in a U.S. medical school. "There's a direct link between this abuse and how some … health care disparities play out," a black doctor says. (Image credit: David Ryder/Getty Images)

7h

Hunting in savanna-like landscapes may have poured jet fuel on brain evolution

Ever wonder how land animals like humans evolved to become smarter than their aquatic ancestors? You can thank the ground you walk on.

7h

Transportminister: 94 procent færre fly sparede klimaet for halv mio. ton CO2

PLUS. I to måneder var næsten al passagerflyvning fra Danmark indstillet. Det medførte et fald i emissioner svarende til 3 procent af transportens årlige udledning eller 3,5 års indenrigsflyvning.

7h

What kind of face mask gives the best protection against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

8h

Genetically modified goats can produce cancer drugs in their milk

Genetically modified goats can make the bowel cancer drug cetuximab in their milk, which could cut its high cost and allow more people to use it

8h

Går det att äta sig till ett friskare blod?

För att vi ska må bra behöver kroppens blodflöde fungera och ge syre och näring till kroppens övriga organ. Blodet behöver rensas och goda kolesterolnivåer upprätthållas. Ett friskt blod behöver också en bra produktion av vita blodkroppar, röda blodkroppar och trombocyter, de ämnen som skapar vårt blod. Man kan undra om det vi äter också påverkar vår blodhälsa?

8h

Vad är en blodpropp och varför får somliga det?

Vem som helst kan få en blodpropp och ärftliga faktorer kan spela en roll. Livsstilsfaktorer som stillasittande, rökning och övervikt kan öka risken. Upp till tio procent av befolkningen drabbas under sin livstid av en blodpropp. Men vad är en blodpropp och går de att undvika?

8h

A Bee C: Scientists translate honeybee queen duets

Queens "quack" when ready to hatch – but if two are free at the same time, they fight to the death.

8h

In virus lockdown, Europe's predators regain turf

The hunter-prey drama took place just outside wildlife enthusiast Ennio Ciccotti's window, in the central Italian town of Scanno.

8h

In virus lockdown, Europe's predators regain turf

The hunter-prey drama took place just outside wildlife enthusiast Ennio Ciccotti's window, in the central Italian town of Scanno.

8h

China delays launch to complete GPS-like Beidou network

Citing technical reasons, China has delayed the launch of the final satellite to complete its Beidou Navigation Satellite System constellation that emulates the U.S. Global Positioning System.

8h

Wearable patch may provide new treatment option for skin cancer

Conventional melanoma therapies, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, suffer from the toxicity and side effects of repeated treatments due to the aggressive and recurrent nature of melanoma cells.

8h

Våldet ökar i Afrika – fredsforskare oroade

Antalet människor som dör i organiserat våld i världen fortsätter att minska. Att terrorgruppen Islamiska Staten, IS, i stort sett besegrats i Irak och Syrien har bidragit till de lägsta dödstalen sedan 2011. Men en av de saker som oroar fredsforskarna är att IS har flyttat våldet till Afrika och attackerar nya länder där. – Vi ser att IS fortsätter att dominera trenden. I takt med att gruppen ha

8h

Shining like a diamond: A new species of diamond frog from northern Madagascar

Despite the active ongoing taxonomic progress on Madagascar's frogs, the amphibian inventory of this hyper-diverse island is still very far from being complete. The known diversity of the diamond frog genus Rhombophryne in Madagascar has increased significantly (more than doubled!) over the last 10 years, but still there are several undescribed candidate species awaiting description. New species a

8h

Kunstig intelligens skal tracke affald i Australien

Australien vil bruge kunstig intelligens til at tracke affaldsstrømme, så de kan minimere landets plastikforurening.

8h

8h

Shining like a diamond: A new species of diamond frog from northern Madagascar

Despite the active ongoing taxonomic progress on Madagascar's frogs, the amphibian inventory of this hyper-diverse island is still very far from being complete. The known diversity of the diamond frog genus Rhombophryne in Madagascar has increased significantly (more than doubled!) over the last 10 years, but still there are several undescribed candidate species awaiting description. New species a

8h

8h

A world redrawn: Worry about climate not COVID, says James 'Gaia' Lovelock

James Lovelock—founder of the Gaia theory and, arguably, the field of Earth system science—thinks the world has lost perspective in responding to the new coronavirus, and should focus on a far more formidable foe: global warming.

9h

Den offentlige forvaltning er dårligst på genanvendelse: »Det er jo pinligt«

PLUS. I dag fremlægges aftale om grøn affaldssektor. Men den offentlige forvaltning har flere år i træk været bagefter på genanvendelse af affald.

9h

Fyringer kan undgås – brug tillidsrepræsentanten

I Fagforeningslisten kæmper vi sammen med tillidsrepræsentanter for at få det solide fagforeningsarbejde til at leve på IDAs medlemmernes arbejdspladser. Et arbejde som for os blandt andet betyder samarbejde, fælles udvikling af arbejdspladsen og forebyggelse af konflikter. Men der findes stadig …

9h

Bad advertising for UPGRAID

UPGRAID combines a new formulation of turmeric (curcumin) with 3 other ingredients. It is said to be more bioavailable and to offer unique advantages. The advertising is bad, and can't compensate for a lack of evidence.

9h

How deadly is the coronavirus? Scientists are close to an answer

Nature, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01738-2 Public-health researchers use the infection fatality rate to gauge how to respond to a new disease, but it's tricky to calculate.

9h

Forskere: Vi freder oftest elitens boliger i Nordsjælland

Langt de fleste fredede boliger i Danmark siden 1945 er arkitekttegnede perler beliggende i Nordsjælland,…

9h

The Return of the Platypuses

Rescued from Australia's fires, a small fleet of wild platypuses is launched back into their wetland home and into an uncertain future.

9h

Who's a Bot? Who's Not?

It sometimes seems that automated bots are taking over social media and driving human discourse. But some (real) researchers aren't so sure.

9h

9h

Her er it-problemerne, der plager de danske retssale

Ifølge Domstolsstyrelsens it-direktør er det et problem, hvis fagpersonale ikke føler sig i stand til at leve op til det ansvar som følger med digitaliseringen.

10h

10h

Garden villages locking-in car dependency, says report

A group promoting alternatives to the car said one garden village could be seven miles from a shop.

10h

10h

BP plans for post-coronavirus low-carbon future

The firm expects prices to be lower as plans to cut carbon emissions are sped up in the wake of coronavirus.

10h

Country diary: the tadpoles in this toad soup are dining on me

Buxton, Derbyshire: Some mysterious mechanism – hunger possibly – caused the shoal to wind onwards and entwine a rock It is remarkable how the signal to breed hardwired into the brains of toads brings the creatures to the ponds at Lightwood in such numbers. Yet thereafter one is struck by their almost total invisibility. Since the April frenzy involving perhaps 10,000 adults I have seen one. And

11h

Wuhan Diary: Dispatches from a Quarantined City

Fang Fang's diary of how Covid-19 took hold in Wuhan has a simple, powerful message for both China and the west

11h

Covid-detecting 'smart rings' to be trialled by staff at Las Vegas resort

Small fitness devices slipped on to a finger reported to detect virus days before symptoms appear

12h

Wearable patch may provide new treatment option for skin cancer

Purdue University innovators have created a novel wearable patch to provide an improved treatment experience for people with melanoma. The researchers developed a novel wearable patch with fully miniaturized needles, enabling unobtrusive drug delivery through the skin for the management of skin cancers.

12h

Turning faces into thermostats: Autonomous HVAC system could provide more comfort with less energy

As lockdown requirements ease, COVID-19 is changing the way we use indoor spaces. That presents challenges for those who manage those spaces, from homes to offices and factories.

12h

Shining like a diamond: A new species of diamond frog from northern Madagascar

Despite the active ongoing taxonomic progress on the Madagascar frogs, the amphibian inventory of this hyper-diverse island is still very far from being complete. More new species are constantly being discovered, often within already well-studied areas. So, in one of the relatively well-studied parks in northern Madagascar, a new species of diamond frog, Rhombophryne ellae, was found in 2017. Now,

12h

Antibodies against sugars, internal radiation: Powerful package against cervical cancer

The sugar coating on cancer cells helps them thrive, and a new study indicates patients with cervical cancer who make antibodies to those sugars appear to do better when they also receive internal radiation therapy.

12h

Adding lean beef to a healthy diet does not adversely affect heart health or diabetes risk

Results from a new study show that risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes were similar when participants consumed a healthy US-style eating pattern with and without an additional 5.3 ounces of lean beef. The added beef replaced carbohydrates, primarily refined starches.

12h

Adding lean beef to a healthy diet does not adversely affect heart health or diabetes risk

Results from a new study show that risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes were similar when participants consumed a healthy US-style eating pattern with and without an additional 5.3 ounces of lean beef.

12h

Yale scientists propose explanation for baffling form of childhood OCD

Yale scientists may have found a cause for the sudden onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in some children, they report. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders, or PANDAS, were first proposed in the 1990s. Thought to be triggered by streptococcal infections, they account for an unknown portion of youth OCD cases. But the biology underpinning this disorder has baffled scientists.

12h

Traits associated with increased risk of gun use among high-risk adolescents

Research out today identifies traits among high-risk adolescents associated with increased risk for gun use. Among high-risk adolescents, those with greater callous-unemotional traits were more likely to carry a gun and to use a gun during a crime over a four-year period following an initial arrest, according to a study published online in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

12h

Teens who say their parents are overcontrolling struggle with relationships, educational goals as adults

A new longitudinal study sought to determine the long-term impact on youth of parenting that is psychologically controlling. Although the study did not establish causation, it found that overbearing and overcontrolling tactics by parents when children were 13 years old were associated with difficulties in social relationships and educational attainment by the time the teens reached age 32.

12h

Wildfires cause bird songs to change

A new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances suggests that wildfires change the types of songs sung by birds living in nearby forests.

12h

Printed Coral Could Provide Reef Relief

Three-dimensional printed coral-like structures were able to support the algae that live in real corals, which could help restore reefs and grow algae for bioenergy production.

12h

Covid-19: should we be concerned about air conditioning? – podcast

Following on from several listener questions about the role of air conditioning in spreading or dissipating Covid-19 in buildings and on public transport, Hannah Devlin asks Dr Lena Ciric whether we should be turning our AC systems on or off Continue reading…

12h

Covid-19: should we be concerned about air conditioning?

Following on from several listener questions about the role of air conditioning in spreading or dissipating Covid-19 in buildings and on public transport, Hannah Devlin asks Dr Lena Ciric whether we should be turning our AC systems on or off. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

12h

Wildfires cause bird songs to change

A new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances suggests that wildfires change the types of songs sung by birds living in nearby forests.

12h

UK antibody test access stokes frustration and confusion

Consumers and doctors eager to understand who has immunity face uncertainty over testing and reliability

12h

The two-metre rule and other imperfect Covid-19 risk calculations

A fixation on specific distances encourages a false, binary distinction between safety and danger

12h

A warning from South Korea: the 'fantasy' of returning to normal life

Vigilance and nimbleness over coronavirus outbreaks are critical in restarting economies

12h

Wildfires cause bird songs to change

A new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances suggests that wildfires change the types of songs sung by birds living in nearby forests.

12h

Coronavirus vaccine trial by Imperial College London begins

Professor says early vaccines may not stop virus being contracted but prevent recipients developing severe Covid-19 illness Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Researchers at Imperial College London will this week begin clinical trials of a possible coronavirus vaccine in 300 people. The healthy participants, aged between 18 and 70, will all receive two doses of the vacc

12h

Printed Coral Could Provide Reef Relief

Three-dimensional printed coral-like structures were able to support the algae that live in real corals, which could help restore reefs and grow algae for bioenergy production. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Researchers flush out worrying trend of designer drug use

In a sign that designer drugs are becoming more prevalent in Australia, synthetic cathinones — commonly known as 'bath salts' — have been detected in the nation's wastewater in the largest study of its kind in the country.

13h

Wall Street set to climb on hopes for US stimulus measures

UK study raises expectations for a steroid to lower deaths among sickest Covid-19 patients

13h

US companies near 2019 bond-issuance total with coronavirus binge

Record months in bond markets as companies seek safety and grab cheap debt

13h

Debt investors bet on emerging markets as 'QE' begins to travel

Analysts say local stimulus efforts could help to buttress countries' Covid-19 recoveries

13h

Novel eco-friendly electrochemical reaction can synthesize useful semiconductor materials

In the field of electronics, developing novel strategies for organic semiconductor synthesis are crucial. Derivatives of compounds called 'thienoacenes' have been known for their role as organic semiconductors, but conventional methods for the synthesis of thienoacenes require the use of expensive transition metal catalysts. To overcome this limitation, scientists developed a novel electrochemical

14h

Four must-have tools for any truck owner

Gear to keep on truckin'. (Mark Fuller via Unsplash/) What we keep in our vehicles is a personal choice, certainly. Maybe you keep some cash, a few emergency maps, and a multitool. Maybe you don't even have a window scraper when winter hits. But every truck owner should have these items. They'll get you out of most of your jams, and may even help a friend or stranger out of their tough spot. Long

14h

No single solution helps all students complete MOOCs

In one of the largest educational field experiments ever conducted, researchers found that promising interventions to help students complete online courses were not effective on a massive scale — suggesting that targeted solutions are needed to help students in different circumstances or locations.

14h

Calling for nursing support amid COVID-19 pandemic

In a new editorial, researchers call for rapid policy reform and investment in nurses and nursing in order to leverage the skills of this global workforce.

14h

The Pandemic Has Disrupted Our Sleep in Unexpected Ways, Research Reveals

Sleeping more but still feel crappy? You're not alone.

14h

This ancient crocodile walked on two legs 'like humans'

The Jinju Formation, South Korea,houses nearly 100 well-preserved fossilized footprints. An analysis of the footprints suggests they were left by a 3-meter-long crocodile that walked on human-length hindlegs. The animal, named Batrachopus grandis , is another potential addition to the widely diverse family of the crocodylomorphs. As any schoolchild will tell you, crocodiles have remained unchange

15h

The Atlantic Daily: Fleeing Big Cities Is a Gamble

Associated Press 1. The Supreme Court ruled that a 1964 civil-rights law protects gay and transgender employees from workplace discrimination. Today's ruling hinged on the Court's interpretation of a three-letter word in the Civil Rights Act of 1964— sex . As Todd S. Purdum recounted last year , the word's inclusion in that bill was somewhat of a fluke: A segregationist member of the House propos

15h

Way before stars form, space clouds hold building blocks of life

Complex organic molecules that could serve as building blocks of life may be more ubiquitous than previously thought in the cold clouds of gas and dust that birth stars and planets. These molecules also appear much earlier than conventional wisdom suggested, hundreds of thousands of years before stars actually begin to form, the researchers report. The results in the Astrophysical Journal challen

15h

Hydroxychloroquine: US revokes emergency approval of malaria drug for Covid-19

Food and Drug Administration says drug is unlikely to work against coronavirus and notes heart risks Coronavirus – latest updates US regulators revoked the emergency authorization for malaria drugs championed by Donald Trump for treating Covid-19, amid growing evidence they don't work and could cause serious side effects. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said on Monday the drugs hydroxychlo

16h

Diego, The Magnificent Hero of The Galapagos, Has Finally Returned Home

He was taken from his island nearly a century ago.

16h

What a 1798 book on the dawn of vaccines can teach us

With the ongoing speculation around the development of a viable COVID-19 vaccine, there's no better time to revisit the history of vaccination. One foundational text of modern immunology and vaccination in the Carnegie Mellon University Libraries' Special Collections offers a window into both the history of inoculation and anti-vaccination sentiment. "For one thing, [Edward] Jenner's book gives a

16h

COVID-19 pandemic could decimate outdoor environmental, science education programs

A survey of 1,000 outdoor education programs nationwide finds that nearly two-thirds are in danger of folding because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Such programs connect youth with the world around them and teach about nature, with documented academic, health and social benefits. But most programs are conducted by residential outdoor science schools, nature centers, parks and zoos, not in traditional

16h

Coronavirus live news: global Covid-19 cases pass 8 million as Beijing closes sports halls

China reimposes partial lockdown in capital to tackle new cluster; US authorities revoke emergency use of hydroxychloroquine; 2021 Oscars delayed. Follow the latest updates Beijing lockdown tightens as new coronavirus outbreak spreads US revokes emergency approval of hydroxychloroquine for Covid-19 Only three out of 53 countries say US has handled coronavirus better than China Covid-19 can damage

16h

Powerful floor air conditioners that keep you cool in a heat wave

Keep it cool in any room. (Drew Coffman via Unsplash/) Summertime is here, and for many people that means dusting off an old air conditioner, shoving it into the window, and praying it doesn't fall out. If you're in the market for a new AC, consider a floor unit for keeping the temperature low in your home. They're portable between rooms and generally stronger than window units. And while they ta

16h

Maternal transmission of COVID-19 to baby during pregnancy is uncommon, study finds

Transmission of COVID-19 from mother to baby during pregnancy is uncommon, and the rate of infection is no greater when the baby is born vaginally, breastfed or allowed contact with the mother, according to a new study.

16h

Researchers develop model to predict likelihood of testing positive for COVID-19, disease outcomes

A new risk prediction model for healthcare providers can forecast an individual patient's likelihood of testing positive for COVID-19 as well as their outcomes from the disease.

16h

Combination drug treatments for COVID-19 show promise in cell culture tests

Researchers have established a cell culture that allows them to test antibody-laden plasma, drugs and drug combinations in the laboratory. A screen of 136 safe-in-human antiviral drugs and identified six promising candidates. One combination of two drugs was so effective that researchers hope others can begin clinical trials on the drugs now.

16h

COVID-19 hospitalizations could mean significant out-of-pocket medical costs for many Americans

If past hospitalizations for pneumonia and other respiratory illnesses are any guide, many Americans could face high out-of-pocket medical costs for COVID-19 hospitalizations.

16h

Study examines the prevalence of COVID-19 infections in pregnant women

A new paper reports on the prevalence of infections with the SARS-CoV-2 virus in women admitted to labor and delivery units in several Boston hospitals.

16h

New Study Reveals COVID-19 Causes Serious Neurological Symptoms Shockingly Often

It can even lead to seizures, strokes, and delirium.

17h

Cancer: Drug with new approach on impeding DNA repair shows promise in first clinical trial

Berzosertib, an ATR-targeting drug, improves progression-free survival in combination with chemotherapy in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

17h

Mindfulness combined with hypnotherapy aids highly stressed people, study finds

A new treatment for stress which combines mindfulness and hypnotherapy has shown positive results.

17h

Coffee, cocoa and vanilla: An opportunity for more trees in tropical agricultural landscapes

The cultivation of coffee, cocoa and vanilla secures the income of many small-holder farmers and also drives land-use change. In particular, cultivation in agroforestry, in which these crops are combined with trees that provide shade, is considered to have great potential for ecologically sustainable cultivation. Researchers now show that the land-use history of agroforestry systems plays a crucia

17h

Disrupted circadian rhythms linked to later Parkinson's diagnoses

Older men who have a weak or irregular circadian rhythm guiding their daily cycles of rest and activity are more likely to later develop Parkinson's disease, according to a new study.

17h

Loneliness alters your brain's social network

Social media sites aren't the only things that keep track of your social network — your brain does, too. But loneliness alters how the brain represents relationships.

17h

Surprising growth rates discovered in world's deepest photosynthetic corals

New research has revealed unexpectedly high growth rates for deep water photosynthetic corals. The study alters the assumption that deep corals living on the brink of darkness grow extremely slowly.

17h

Coronavirus Study: 1 in 5 People Worldwide at Risk

Roughly 1.7 billion people have at least one of the underlying health conditions that can worsen cases of the coronavirus, a new analysis shows.

17h

Former eBay Execs Allegedly Made Life Hell for Critics

Surveillance. Harassment. A live cockroach delivery. US attorneys have charged six former eBay workers in association with an outrageous cyberstalking campaign.

17h

The Best Shots From NASA's Photographer of the Year Competition

Enjoy looking at the winners filled with photos taken by the agency

17h

How Space Exploration and the Fight For Equal Rights Clashed Then and Now

Smithsonian curator Margaret Weitekamp reflects on the historic parallel between 2020 and 1969

17h

Drug with new approach on impeding DNA repair shows promise in first clinical trial

Berzosertib, an ATR-targeting drug, improves progression-free survival in combination with chemotherapy in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

17h

The Lancet Global Health: Estimates suggest one in five people worldwide have an underlying health condition that could increase their risk of severe COVID-19 if infected

An estimated 1.7 billion people, 22% of the world population, have at least one underlying health condition that could increase their risk of severe COVID-19 if infected, according to a modelling study that uses data from 188 countries, published in The Lancet Global Health journal.

17h

Do antidepressants create more mental illness than they cure?

Many antidepressants show no better efficacy than placebo or talk therapy in long-term usage. Proselytizing pharmaceutical interventions has been part of a concerted effort since the 1970s. Journalist Robert Whitaker discusses the impact of pathologizing children, moral therapy, and more. Doctors wrote a record number of prescriptions for Zoloft in March, causing the FDA to add this SSRI to its d

17h

Author Correction: A naturally occurring antiviral ribonucleotide encoded by the human genome

Nature, Published online: 16 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2322-9

18h

The Science of Making a Wild Sourdough Starter

The Wild Sourdough Project aims to advance our understanding of yeast and microbes while helping home bakers create delicious bread.

18h

Scientists are working on at least 135 different coronavirus vaccines

The FDA had previously granted emergency approval of two malaria drugs to treat COVID-19. On Monday it revoked that approval. (Pixabay/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including news on federal policies , how to avoid spreading illness while participating in protests , and a state-by-state breakdown of confirmed cases . States around the United States are in various stages of reo

18h

Coffee, cocoa and vanilla: an opportunity for more trees in tropical agricultural landscapes

The cultivation of coffee, cocoa and vanilla secures the income of many small-holder farmers and also drives land-use change. In particular, cultivation in agroforestry, in which these crops are combined with trees that provide shade, is considered to have great potential for ecologically sustainable cultivation. Researchers at the University of Göttingen now show that the land-use history of agro

18h

Smart bathroom scales for your home

Be smarter about your health. (i yunmai via Unsplash/) Being concerned purely with weight is, well, old-fashioned, as a "normal" weight is only one flawed facet of a healthy body. Modern smart scales can paint a more complex picture of your body composition, helping you gain control of your health in a more holistic and productive way. For example, weight gain is a positive thing when trying to b

18h

Super-potent human antibodies protect against COVID-19 in animal tests

Researchers have discovered antibodies in the blood of recovered COVID-19 patients that provide powerful protection against SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes the disease, when tested in animals and human cell cultures.

18h

The top trail-running shoes for people who love being outside

The most important piece of running gear. (Brian Metzler via Unsplash/) In case you are wondering, all running shoes aren't created equal. And trail running shoes aren't necessarily the same as shoes for running on pavement. You need to think about durability, sole traction, breathability and other factors. Fortunately, we can break some of that down for you. Glide on clouds. (Amazon/) The HOKA b

18h

What's a coronavirus superspreader?

As we learn more about how the coronavirus spreads between people, there's more evidence to suggest that most infections are transmitted by a select few individuals we call "superspreaders." Here's what a superspreader is, the role these people play in transmitting the virus, and what we're trying to do about it. What is a superspreader? The word is a generic term for an unusually contagious indi

18h

NOAA Chief Violated Ethics Code in Furor Over Trump Tweet, Agency Says

Neil Jacobs violated the agency's scientific integrity policy with a statement last year backing the president's inaccurate claim that a hurricane was headed for Alabama, a panel found.

18h

Mindfulness combined with hypnotherapy aids highly stressed people, study finds

A new treatment for stress which combines mindfulness and hypnotherapy has shown positive results in a Baylor University pilot study.

19h

Most people accessing USC COVID-19 patient self-assessment tool report mild symptoms

Most people who accessed a USC web-based COVID-19 patient self-assessment tool reported mild symptoms that would not typically require immediate medical attention, according to new research by the Keck School of Medicine of USC.The tool, developed with AltaMed Health Services and Akido Labs, uses answers to six questions to provide an assessment along with customized recommendations regarding eval

19h

Your brain shows if you are lonely or not

Social connection with others is critical to a person's mental and physical well-being. How the brain maps relationships with other people in relation to one's self has long been a mystery. A Dartmouth study finds that the closer you feel to people emotionally, the more similarly you represent them in your brain. In contrast, people who feel social disconnection appear to have a lonelier, neural s

19h

The great white shark has surprising dining habits

A University of Sydney research team found that the great white shark spends an unexpectedly large amount of time feeding close to the sea bed. The group examined the contents in the stomachs of 40 juvenile white sharks and found the remains of a variety of fish species that typically inhabit the sea floor or are buried in the sand. The scientists hope that the information gained from this resear

19h

Coronavirus Precautions Stall Antarctic Field Research

The upcoming summer research season has been suspended amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

19h

Scientists introduce rating system to assess quality of evidence for policy

The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the critical need for robust scientific evidence to support policy decisions, such as around the effectiveness of various social distancing measures and the safety of drug therapies. Yet this need arises at a time of growing misinformation and poorly vetted facts repeated by influential sources. To address this gap, a group of scientists led by Kai Ruggeri, a

19h

Red Sea plankton communities ebb and flow with the seasons

Studies of plankton communities in Red Sea waters provide insights into seasonal variations and dominant control mechanisms.

19h

Calling for nursing support amid COVID-19 pandemic

There are close to 28 million nurses around the world who comprise a global workforce that delivers about 90 percent of primary healthcare, including frontline response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Ensuring their optimal contribution and continued well-being amid the myriad consequences of COVID-19 will increase the potential for measurable and improved health outcomes.

19h

HIV and TB increase death risk from COVID-19, study finds—but not by much

Data from South Africa show old age and diabetes are far more important risk factors

19h

Directly printing 3D tissues within the body

In the TV series Westworld, human body parts are built on robotic frames using 3D printers. While still far from this scenario, 3D printers are being increasingly used in medicine. A team of scientists have developed a technology to print tissues directly in the body.

19h

Has Twitter just had its saddest fortnight ever?

Nature, Published online: 15 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01818-3 A tool that quantifies global happiness on social media recorded an unprecedented dip in mood starting in May.

20h

Birds and other animals may see colours that we cannot even imagine

Experiments with wild hummingbirds suggest that they perceive four so-called non-spectral colours that the cells in our eyes make it impossible for us to see

20h

Accelerating biological systems design for sustainable biomanufacturing

Northwestern University synthetic biologists have developed a new rapid-prototyping system to accelerate the design of biological systems, reducing the time to produce sustainable biomanufacturing products from months to weeks.

20h

A Space Probe Just Took the Closest Pictures of the Sun Ever

The European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter probe just made its first close approach of the Sun, getting within 77 million kilometers (47.8 million miles) of the star's surface — about half the distance between Earth and the Sun. During its approach, it snapped the closest images of the Sun ever captured — which will be released in mid-July, according to a statement . "We have never taken pictures

20h

Taking a landslide's temperature to avert catastrophe

Engineers from Duke University have developed a comprehensive new model of deep-seated landslides and demonstrated that it can accurately recreate the dynamics of historic and current landslides that occur under various conditions.

20h

Accelerating biological systems design for sustainable biomanufacturing

Northwestern University synthetic biologists have developed a new rapid-prototyping system to accelerate the design of biological systems, reducing the time to produce sustainable biomanufacturing products from months to weeks.

20h

New study reveals racial disparities in fear of police brutality

A recently published nationwide study by two University of South Florida professors indicates that blacks are five times more likely and Latinos four times more likely to fear police brutality than whites.

20h

Superresolution imaging reveals spatiotemporal propagation of human replication foci mediated by CTCF-organized chromatin structures [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Mammalian DNA replication is initiated at numerous replication origins, which are clustered into thousands of replication domains (RDs) across the genome. However, it remains unclear whether the replication origins within each RD are activated stochastically or preferentially near certain chromatin features. To understand how DNA replication in single human cells…

20h

Protein complex stoichiometry and expression dynamics of transcription factors modulate stem cell division [Plant Biology]

Stem cells divide and differentiate to form all of the specialized cell types in a multicellular organism. In the Arabidopsis root, stem cells are maintained in an undifferentiated state by a less mitotically active population of cells called the quiescent center (QC). Determining how the QC regulates the surrounding stem…

20h

Ferroelectric nematic liquid crystal, a century in waiting [Commentaries]

In PNAS, the liquid crystal group of the Soft Materials Research Center at the University of Colorado Boulder, led by N. A. Clark, reports on the discovery of a ferroelectric nematic fluid NF, an additional state of matter (Chen et al., ref. 1) (Fig. 1A). Such a phase has been…

20h

Thyroid hormone receptors mediate two distinct mechanisms of long-wavelength vision [Neuroscience]

Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling plays an important role in the regulation of long-wavelength vision in vertebrates. In the retina, thyroid hormone receptor β (thrb) is required for expression of long-wavelength-sensitive opsin (lws) in red cone photoreceptors, while in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), TH regulates expression of a cytochrome P450 enzyme,…

20h

Power-law distribution of degree-degree distance: A better representation of the scale-free property of complex networks [Physics]

Whether real-world complex networks are scale free or not has long been controversial. Recently, in Broido and Clauset [A. D. Broido, A. Clauset, Nat. Commun. 10, 1017 (2019)], it was claimed that the degree distributions of real-world networks are rarely power law under statistical tests. Here, we attempt to address…

20h

Auditory representation of learned sound sequences in motor regions of the macaque brain [Neuroscience]

Human speech production requires the ability to couple motor actions with their auditory consequences. Nonhuman primates might not have speech because they lack this ability. To address this question, we trained macaques to perform an auditory–motor task producing sound sequences via hand presses on a newly designed device ("monkey piano")….

20h

Functional imaging evidence for task-induced deactivation and disconnection of a major default mode network hub in the mouse brain [Neuroscience]

The default mode network (DMN) has been defined in functional brain imaging studies as a set of highly connected brain areas, which are active during wakeful rest and inactivated during task-based stimulation. DMN function is characteristically impaired in major neuropsychiatric diseases, emphasizing its interest for translational research. However, in the…

20h

Plastocyanin is the long-range electron carrier between photosystem II and photosystem I in plants [Plant Biology]

In photosynthetic electron transport, large multiprotein complexes are connected by small diffusible electron carriers, the mobility of which is challenged by macromolecular crowding. For thylakoid membranes of higher plants, a long-standing question has been which of the two mobile electron carriers, plastoquinone or plastocyanin, mediates electron transport from stacked grana…

20h

Molecular motor crossing the frontier of classical to quantum tunneling motion [Physics]

The reliability by which molecular motor proteins convert undirected energy input into directed motion or transport has inspired the design of innumerable artificial molecular motors. We have realized and investigated an artificial molecular motor applying scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), which consists of a single acetylene (C2H2) rotor anchored to a…

20h

EYES ABSENT and TIMELESS integrate photoperiodic and temperature cues to regulate seasonal physiology in Drosophila [Physiology]

Organisms possess photoperiodic timing mechanisms to detect variations in day length and temperature as the seasons progress. The nature of the molecular mechanisms interpreting and signaling these environmental changes to elicit downstream neuroendocrine and physiological responses are just starting to emerge. Here, we demonstrate that, in Drosophila melanogaster, EYES ABSENT…

20h

The 3' processing of antisense RNAs physically links to chromatin-based transcriptional control [Plant Biology]

Noncoding RNA plays essential roles in transcriptional control and chromatin silencing. At Arabidopsis thaliana FLC, antisense transcription quantitatively influences transcriptional output, but the mechanism by which this occurs is still unclear. Proximal polyadenylation of the antisense transcripts by FCA, an RNA-binding protein that physically interacts with RNA 3′ processing factors,…

20h

Probing and manipulating embryogenesis via nanoscale thermometry and temperature control [Developmental Biology]

Understanding the coordination of cell-division timing is one of the outstanding questions in the field of developmental biology. One active control parameter of the cell-cycle duration is temperature, as it can accelerate or decelerate the rate of biochemical reactions. However, controlled experiments at the cellular scale are challenging, due to…

20h

Correction to Supporting Information for Feldon et al., Null effects of boot camps and short-format training for PhD students in life sciences [SI Correction]

SOCIAL SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for "Null effects of boot camps and short-format training for PhD students in life sciences," by David F. Feldon, Soojeong Jeong, James Peugh, Josipa Roksa, Cathy Maahs-Fladung, Alok Shenoy, and Michael Oliva, which was first published August 28, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1705783114 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci….

20h

The Whi2p-Psr1p/Psr2p complex regulates interference competition and expansion of cells with competitive advantage in yeast colonies [Evolution]

Yeast form complex highly organized colonies in which cells undergo spatiotemporal phenotypic differentiation in response to local gradients of nutrients, metabolites, and specific signaling molecules. Colony fitness depends on cell interactions, cooperation, and the division of labor between differentiated cell subpopulations. Here, we describe the regulation and dynamics of the…

20h

Temporal dynamics of sitting behavior at work [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Sitting for prolonged periods of time impairs people's health. Prior research has mainly investigated sitting behavior on an aggregate level, for example, by analyzing total sitting time per day. By contrast, taking a dynamic approach, here we conceptualize sitting behavior as a continuous chain of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions. We…

20h

Impact of {alpha}-synuclein pathology on transplanted hESC-derived dopaminergic neurons in a humanized {alpha}-synuclein rat model of PD [Neuroscience]

Preclinical assessment of the therapeutic potential of dopamine (DA) neuron replacement in Parkinson's disease (PD) has primarily been performed in the 6-hydroxydopamine toxin model. While this is a good model to assess graft function, it does not reflect the pathological features or progressive nature of the disease. In this study,…

20h

Brain networks underlying vulnerability and resilience to drug addiction [Neuroscience]

Regular drug use can lead to addiction, but not everyone who takes drugs makes this transition. How exactly drugs of abuse interact with individual vulnerability is not fully understood, nor is it clear how individuals defy the risks associated with drugs or addiction vulnerability. We used resting-state functional MRI (fMRI)…

20h

Abundant expression of maternal siRNAs is a conserved feature of seed development [Plant Biology]

Small RNAs are abundant in plant reproductive tissues, especially 24-nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Most 24-nt siRNAs are dependent on RNA Pol IV and RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 2 (RDR2) and establish DNA methylation at thousands of genomic loci in a process called RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). In Brassica rapa,…

20h

The AAA+ ATPase Msp1 is a processive protein translocase with robust unfoldase activity [Biochemistry]

Msp1 is a conserved eukaryotic AAA+ ATPase localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is thought to extract mislocalized tail-anchored proteins. Despite recent in vivo and in vitro studies supporting this function, a mechanistic understanding of how Msp1 extracts its substrates is still lacking. Msp1's ATPase activity depends on…

20h

On-demand modulation of 3D-printed elastomers using programmable droplet inclusions [Engineering]

One of the key thrusts in three-dimensional (3D) printing and direct writing is to seamlessly vary composition and functional properties in printed constructs. Most inks used for extrusion-based printing, however, are compositionally static and available approaches for dynamic tuning of ink composition remain few. Here, we present an approach to…

20h

Modes of action of the archaeal Mre11/Rad50 DNA-repair complex revealed by fast-scan atomic force microscopy [Biochemistry]

Mre11 and Rad50 (M/R) proteins are part of an evolutionarily conserved macromolecular apparatus that maintains genomic integrity through repair pathways. Prior structural studies have revealed that this apparatus is extremely dynamic, displaying flexibility in the long coiled-coil regions of Rad50, a member of the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) superfamily…

20h

Protein folding from heterogeneous unfolded state revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

One of the most challenging tasks in biological science is to understand how a protein folds. In theoretical studies, the hypothesis adopting a funnel-like free-energy landscape has been recognized as a prominent scheme for explaining protein folding in views of both internal energy and conformational heterogeneity of a protein. Despite…

20h

Biologically inspired flexible photonic films for efficient passive radiative cooling [Applied Physical Sciences]

Temperature is a fundamental parameter for all forms of lives. Natural evolution has resulted in organisms which have excellent thermoregulation capabilities in extreme climates. Bioinspired materials that mimic biological solution for thermoregulation have proven promising for passive radiative cooling. However, scalable production of artificial photonic radiators with complex structures, outstan

20h

Wounding-induced changes in cellular pressure and localized auxin signalling spatially coordinate restorative divisions in roots [Plant Biology]

Wound healing in plant tissues, consisting of rigid cell wall-encapsulated cells, represents a considerable challenge and occurs through largely unknown mechanisms distinct from those in animals. Owing to their inability to migrate, plant cells rely on targeted cell division and expansion to regenerate wounds. Strict coordination of these wound-induced responses…

20h

Scaling up behavioral science interventions in online education [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Online education is rapidly expanding in response to rising demand for higher and continuing education, but many online students struggle to achieve their educational goals. Several behavioral science interventions have shown promise in raising student persistence and completion rates in a handful of courses, but evidence of their effectiveness across…

20h

The 142Nd/144Nd variations in mantle-derived rocks provide constraints on the stirring rate of the mantle from the Hadean to the present [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Early silicate differentiation events for the terrestrial planets can be traced with the short-lived 146Sm-142Nd system (∼100-My half-life). Resulting early Earth-produced 142Nd/144Nd variations are an excellent tracer of the rate of mantle mixing and thus a potential tracer of plate tectonics through time. Evidence for early silicate differentiation in the…

20h

E2F1 sumoylation as a protective cellular mechanism in oxidative stress response [Biochemistry]

Oxidative stress is a ubiquitous threat to all aerobic organisms and has been implicated in numerous pathological conditions such as cancer. Here we demonstrate a pivotal role for E2F1, a cell cycle regulatory transcription factor, in cell tolerance of oxidative stress. Cells lacking E2F1 are hypersensitive to oxidative stress due…

20h

Changes in firearm mortality following the implementation of state laws regulating firearm access and use [Social Sciences]

Although 39,000 individuals die annually from gunshots in the US, research examining the effects of laws designed to reduce these deaths has sometimes produced inconclusive or contradictory findings. We evaluated the effects on total firearm-related deaths of three classes of gun laws: child access prevention (CAP), right-to-carry (RTC), and stand…

20h

Regulation of spatiotemporal limits of developmental gene expression via enhancer grammar [Developmental Biology]

The regulatory specificity of a gene is determined by the structure of its enhancers, which contain multiple transcription factor binding sites. A unique combination of transcription factor binding sites in an enhancer determines the boundary of target gene expression, and their disruption often leads to developmental defects. Despite extensive characterization…

20h

Structure of the RECK CC domain, an evolutionary anomaly [Evolution]

Five small protein domains, the CC-domains, at the N terminus of the RECK protein, play essential roles in signaling by WNT7A and WNT7B in the context of central nervous system angiogenesis and blood–brain barrier formation and maintenance. We have determined the structure of CC domain 4 (CC4) at 1.65-Å resolution…

20h

The social context of nearest neighbors shapes educational attainment regardless of class origin [Social Sciences]

We study the association between sociospatial neighborhood conditions throughout childhood and educational attainment in adulthood. Using unique longitudinal microdata for a medium-sized Swedish town, we geocode its population at the address level, 1939 to 1967, and link individuals to national registers, 1968 to 2015. Thus, we adopt a long-term perspective…

20h

Profile of Christopher A. Walsh [Profiles]

When Christopher A. Walsh was still a teenager, his parents gave him a choice of either skipping a year of high school or a year of college. Deciding to forgo his high school senior year, Walsh found himself, just a month after turning 17, a freshman at Bucknell University with…

20h

Correction for Frantz et al., Ancient pigs reveal a near-complete genomic turnover following their introduction to Europe [Corrections]

ANTHROPOLOGY Correction for "Ancient pigs reveal a near-complete genomic turnover following their introduction to Europe," by Laurent A. F. Frantz, James Haile, Audrey T. Lin, Amelie Scheu, Christina Geörg, Norbert Benecke, Michelle Alexander, Anna Linderholm, Victoria E. Mullin, Kevin G. Daly, Vincent M. Battista, Max Price, Kurt J. Gron, Panoraia…

20h

Correction for Kel et al., Size-dependent ultrafast structural dynamics inside phospholipid vesicle bilayers measured with 2D IR vibrational echoes [Corrections]

CHEMISTRY Correction for "Size-dependent ultrafast structural dynamics inside phospholipid vesicle bilayers measured with 2D IR vibrational echoes," by Oksana Kel, Amr Tamimi, and Michael D. Fayer, which was first published January 6, 2014; 10.1073/pnas.1323110111 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 918–923). The authors note that Fig. 3 appeared incorrectly. The…

20h

Wild hummingbirds discriminate nonspectral colors [Evolution]

Many animals have the potential to discriminate nonspectral colors. For humans, purple is the clearest example of a nonspectral color. It is perceived when two color cone types in the retina (blue and red) with nonadjacent spectral sensitivity curves are predominantly stimulated. Purple is considered nonspectral because no monochromatic light…

20h

Complex mortuary dynamics in the Upper Paleolithic of the decorated Grotte de Cussac, France [Anthropology]

The Mid-Upper Paleolithic (Gravettian) karstic Grotte de Cussac (France) contains two areas of human remains in the context of abundant (and spectacular) parietal engravings. The first area (loci 1 and 2) includes the skeleton of a young adult male in a bear nest, rearranged by postdecomposition inundation, and the variably…

20h

Identification of a chemical fingerprint linking the undeclared 2017 release of 106Ru to advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing [Chemistry]

The undeclared release and subsequent detection of ruthenium-106 (106Ru) across Europe from late September to early October of 2017 prompted an international effort to ascertain the circumstances of the event. While dispersion modeling, corroborated by ground deposition measurements, has narrowed possible locations of origin, there has been a lack of…

20h

Mechanisms of lipid preservation in archaeological clay ceramics revealed by mass spectrometry imaging [Anthropology]

Traces of lipids, absorbed and preserved for millennia within the inorganic matrix of ceramic vessels, act as molecular fossils and provide manifold information about past people's subsistence, diet, and rituals. It is widely assumed that lipids become preserved after adsorption into nano- to micrometer-sized pores, but to this day the…

20h

Intrinsically stretchable electrode array enabled in vivo electrophysiological mapping of atrial fibrillation at cellular resolution [Engineering]

Electrophysiological mapping of chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) at high throughput and high resolution is critical for understanding its underlying mechanism and guiding definitive treatment such as cardiac ablation, but current electrophysiological tools are limited by either low spatial resolution or electromechanical uncoupling of the beating heart. To overcome this limitation,…

20h

Greater flood risks in response to slowdown of tropical cyclones over the coast of China [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The total amount of rainfall associated with tropical cyclones (TCs) over a given region is proportional to rainfall intensity and the inverse of TC translation speed. Although the contributions of increase in rainfall intensity to larger total rainfall amounts have been extensively examined, observational evidence on impacts of the recently…

20h

How canyons evolve by incision into bedrock: Rainbow Canyon, Death Valley National Park, United States [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Incising rivers may be confined by low-slope, erodible hillslopes or steep, resistant sidewalls. In the latter case, the system forms a canyon. We present a morphodynamic model that includes the essential elements of a canyon incising into a plateau, including 1) abrasion-driven channel incision, 2) migration of a canyon-head knickpoint,…

20h

Vaccination as a social contract [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Most vaccines protect both the vaccinated individual and the society by reducing the transmission of infectious diseases. In order to eliminate infectious diseases, individuals need to consider social welfare beyond mere self-interest—regardless of ethnic, religious, or national group borders. It has therefore been proposed that vaccination poses a social contract…

20h

RNA-dependent sterol aspartylation in fungi [Biochemistry]

Diverting aminoacyl-transfer RNAs (tRNAs) from protein synthesis is a well-known process used by a wide range of bacteria to aminoacylate membrane constituents. By tRNA-dependently adding amino acids to glycerolipids, bacteria change their cell surface properties, which intensifies antimicrobial drug resistance, pathogenicity, and virulence. No equivalent aminoacylated lipids have been uncovered..

20h

Macrophage metabolic reprogramming presents a therapeutic target in lupus nephritis [Immunology and Inflammation]

IgG antibodies cause inflammation and organ damage in autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We investigated the metabolic profile of macrophages isolated from inflamed tissues in immune complex (IC)-associated diseases, including SLE and rheumatoid arthritis, and following IgG Fcγ receptor cross-linking. We found that human and mouse macrophages…

20h

Cascaded nanooptics to probe microsecond atomic-scale phenomena [Physics]

Plasmonic nanostructures can focus light far below the diffraction limit, and the nearly thousandfold field enhancements obtained routinely enable few- and single-molecule detection. However, for processes happening on the molecular scale to be tracked with any relevant time resolution, the emission strengths need to be well beyond what current plasmonic…

20h

Structure-guided engineering of the affinity and specificity of CARs against Tn-glycopeptides [Immunology and Inflammation]

The potency of adoptive T cell therapies targeting the cell surface antigen CD19 has been demonstrated in hematopoietic cancers. It has been difficult to identify appropriate targets in nonhematopoietic tumors, but one class of antigens that have shown promise is aberrant O-glycoprotein epitopes. It has long been known that dysregulated…

20h

Infrared spectroscopy of neutral water clusters at finite temperature: Evidence for a noncyclic pentamer [Chemistry]

Infrared spectroscopic study of neutral water clusters is crucial to understanding of the hydrogen-bonding networks in liquid water and ice. Here we report infrared spectra of size-selected neutral water clusters, (H2O)n (n = 3−6), in the OH stretching vibration region, based on threshold photoionization using a tunable vacuum ultraviolet free-electron…

20h

Lower socioeconomic status and the acceleration of aging: An outcome-wide analysis [Social Sciences]

Aging involves decline in a range of functional abilities and phenotypes, many of which are also associated with socioeconomic status (SES). Here we assessed whether lower SES is a determinant of the rate of decline over 8 y in six domains—physical capability, sensory function, physiological function, cognitive performance, emotional well-being,…

20h

Clonally expanding smooth muscle cells promote atherosclerosis by escaping efferocytosis and activating the complement cascade [Medical Sciences]

Atherosclerosis is the process underlying heart attack and stroke. Despite decades of research, its pathogenesis remains unclear. Dogma suggests that atherosclerotic plaques expand primarily via the accumulation of cholesterol and inflammatory cells. However, recent evidence suggests that a substantial portion of the plaque may arise from a subset of "dedifferentiated"…

20h

An energy landscape approach to locomotor transitions in complex 3D terrain [Engineering]

Effective locomotion in nature happens by transitioning across multiple modes (e.g., walk, run, climb). Despite this, far more mechanistic understanding of terrestrial locomotion has been on how to generate and stabilize around near–steady-state movement in a single mode. We still know little about how locomotor transitions emerge from physical interaction…

20h

Yum, Delicious: Inventors Built an Edible Robot

Choking Hazard A team of particularly inspired scientists finally pulled it off: they built an edible robot . Researchers from Austria's Johannes Kepler University build a robotic elephant trunk capable of bending and gripping objects out of an edible, biodegradable gel, New Scientist reports . While you can't buy yourself an edible robot quite yet, the technology could have a huge impact in area

20h

Coronavirus Live Updates: Most Colleges Won't Require SAT or ACT Scores

Cash-starved states are forced to make massive job cuts. Reopenings for some restaurants and bars are short-lived amid new infections.

20h

Spectacular bird's-eye view? Hummingbirds see diverse colors humans can only imagine

While humans have three color cones in the retina sensitive to red, green and blue light, birds have a fourth color cone that can detect ultraviolet light. A research team trained wild hummingbirds to perform a series of experiments that revealed that the tiny birds also see combination colors like ultraviolet+green and ultraviolet+red.

20h

Taking a landslide's temperature to avert catastrophe

Engineers have developed a comprehensive model of deep-seated landslides and demonstrated that it can accurately recreate the dynamics of historic and current landslides occurring under varying conditions. The model points to the temperature of a thin layer of clay at the base of the landslide as critical to the potential for sudden cataclysmic failure. The approach is currently monitoring a lands

20h

Tips for staying in campgrounds, hotels, and rentals in the time of COVID-19

Planning to hit the road and bunking at a hotel or Airbnb while you travel? You'll want to take certain precautions. (Daniel von Appen/Unsplash/) Elizabeth Marder is an instructor in the Department of Environmental Toxicology at the University of California, Davis. Paloma Beamer is an associate professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Arizona. This story originally featured

20h

Taking a landslide's temperature to avert catastrophe

Duke engineers have developed a comprehensive model of deep-seated landslides and demonstrated that it can accurately recreate the dynamics of historic and current landslides occurring under varying conditions. The model points to the temperature of a thin layer of clay at the base of the landslide as critical to the potential for sudden cataclysmic failure. The approach is currently monitoring a

20h

Accelerating biological systems design for sustainable biomanufacturing

A new cell-free platform rapidly identifies optimal enzyme combinations for sustainable fuels and materials.

20h

Accelerating biological systems design for sustainable biomanufacturing

A new cell-free platform rapidly identifies optimal enzyme combinations for sustainable fuels and materials.

20h

A carbon sink shrinks in the Arctic

Ice melts in the Arctic Ocean were thought to be drawing large amounts of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, acting as a carbon sink and helping to mitigate greenhouse gases. But new research shows that may not be the case in all areas, particularly in the Canada Basin, where the carbon sink is shrinking, inhibiting the ocean's ability to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into the deep

20h

Research delves into causes of nightmares that shadow female survivors of sexual trauma

A new study attempts to shed light on triggers of post-trauma nightmare occurrences — a topic that has received scant study.

20h

Addressing the safety of high folate levels in the older population and implications for fortification in Ireland

A new study challenges claims from some international scientific circles, that having high blood levels of folate (folic acid) increases the risk of poor cognition in older adults, especially in those with low levels of vitamin B12. On the contrary the study found that having higher folate seemed to be associated with better cognitive function in these older adults.

20h

Benchmark for detecting large genetic mutations linked to major diseases

Researchers have developed a way for laboratories to determine how accurately they can detect large mutations. The new method and the benchmark material enable researchers, clinical labs and commercial technology developers to better identify large genome changes they now miss and will help them reduce false detections of genome changes.

20h

Circular reasoning: Spiraling circuits for more efficient AI

Scientists have built new specialized computer hardware that can perform AI tasks more efficiently based on a spiraling 3D architecture. This work may help with the development of energy efficient smart devices.

20h

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